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Sample records for burst can detection

  1. HOW ELSE CAN WE DETECT FAST RADIO BURSTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyutikov, Maxim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); Lorimer, Duncan R., E-mail: lyutikov@purdue.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    We discuss possible electromagnetic signals accompanying Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) that are expected in the scenario where FRBs originate in neutron star magnetospheres. For models involving Crab-like giant pulses, no appreciable contemporaneous emission is expected at other wavelengths. However, magnetar giant flares, driven by the reconfiguration of the magnetosphere, can produce both contemporaneous bursts at other wavelengths as well as afterglow-like emission. We conclude that the best chances are: (i) prompt short GRB-like emission, (ii) a contemporaneous optical flash that can reach naked eye peak luminosity (but only for a few milliseconds), and (iii) a high-energy afterglow emission. Case (i) could be tested by coordinated radio and high-energy experiments. Case (ii) could be seen in a coordinated radio-optical surveys, e.g., by the Palomar Transient Factory in a 60 s frame as a transient object of m = 15–20 mag with an expected optical detection rate of about 0.1 hr{sup −1}, an order of magnitude higher than in radio. Shallow, but large-area sky surveys such as ASAS-SN and EVRYSCOPE could also detect prompt optical flashes from the more powerful Lorimer-burst clones. The best constraints on the optical to radio power for this kind of emission could be provided by future observations with facilities like Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Case (iii) might be seen in relatively rare cases that the relativistically ejected magnetic blob is moving along the line of sight.

  2. Detecting pipe bursts by monitoring water demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Van der Roer, M.; Sperber, V.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm which compares measured and predicted water demands to detect pipe bursts was developed and tested on three data sets of water demand and reported pipe bursts of three years. The algorithm proved to be able to detect bursts where the water loss exceeds 30% of the average water demand in

  3. Heuristic burst detection method using flow and pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Roer, Van de M.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst

  4. Detecting Pipe Bursts Using Heuristic and CUSUM Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Jung, D.; Vreeburg, J.; Van de Roer, M.; Lansey, K.; Rierveld, L.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst

  5. Detecting Pipe Bursts Using Heuristic and CUSUM Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, M.; Jung, D; Vreeburg, J.; van de Roer, M.; Lansey, K.; Rietveld, L.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst detection method, which continuously compares forecasted and measured values of the water demand. The forecasts of the water demand were generated by an adaptive water demand forecasting model. To test th...

  6. What can NuSTAR do for X-ray bursts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Tomsick, J.; Chakrabarty, D.

    Unstable thermonuclear burning on the surface of accreting neutron stars is commonly observed as type I X-ray bursts. The flux released during some strong bursts can temporarily exceed the Eddington limit, driving the neutron star photosphere to such large radii that heavy-element ashes of nuclear...... nuclear ashes, and identify the corresponding heavy elements. A positive identification of such edges would probe the nuclear burning processes, and provide a measure of the expansion wind velocity as well as the gravitational redshift from the neutron star. Moreover, we expect that the high sensitivity...... burning are ejected in the burst expansion wind. We have investigated the possibility of observing with NuSTAR some X-ray bursters selected for their high burst rate and trend to exhibit so-called superexpansion bursts. Our main ambition is to detect the photoionization edges associated with the ejected...

  7. What can NuSTAR do for X-ray bursts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Tomsick, John; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2012-01-01

    Unstable thermonuclear burning on the surface of accreting neutron stars is commonly observed as type I X-ray bursts. The flux released during some strong bursts can temporarily exceed the Eddington limit, driving the neutron star photosphere to such large radii that heavy-element ashes of nuclear...... nuclear ashes, and identify the corresponding heavy elements. A positive identification of such edges would probe the nuclear burning processes, and provide a measure of the expans ion wind velocity as well as the gravitational redshift from the neutron star. Moreover, we exp ect that the high sensitivity...... burning are ejected in the burst expansion wind. We have investigated the possibility of observing with NuSTAR some X-ray bursters selected for their high burst rate and trend to exhibit so-called superexpansion bursts. Our main ambition is to detect the photoionization edges associated with the ejected...

  8. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.J.; Baring, M.G.; Granot, J.; Watts, A.L.; Bhat, P.N.; Collazzi, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gorgone, N.; Göğüş, E.; Gruber, D.; Grunblatt, S.; Huppenkothen, D.; Kaneko, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; Lin, L.; Mcenery, J.; van Putten, T.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550-5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a

  9. ESA's Integral detects closest cosmic gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    5 August 2004 A gamma-ray burst detected by ESA's Integral gamma-ray observatory on 3 December 2003 has been thoroughly studied for months by an armada of space and ground-based observatories. Astronomers have now concluded that this event, called GRB 031203, is the closest cosmic gamma-ray burst on record, but also the faintest. This also suggests that an entire population of sub-energetic gamma-ray bursts has so far gone unnoticed... Gamma ray burst model hi-res Size hi-res: 22 KB Credits: CXC/M. Weiss Artist impression of a low-energy gamma-ray burst This illustration describes a model for a gamma-ray burst, like the one detected by Integral on 3 December 2003 (GRB 031203). A jet of high-energy particles from a rapidly rotating black hole interacts with surrounding matter. Observations with Integral on 3 December 2003 and data on its afterglow, collected afterwards with XMM-Newton, Chandra and the Very Large Array telescope, show that GRB 031203 radiated only a fraction of the energy of normal gamma-ray bursts. Like supernovae, gamma-ray bursts are thought to be produced by the collapse of the core of a massive star. However, while the process leading to supernovae is relatively well understood, astronomers still do not know what happens when a core collapses to form a black hole. The discovery of 'under-energetic' gamma-ray bursts, like GRB 031203, should provide valuable clues as to links between supernovae, black holes and gamma-ray bursts. Lo-res JPG (22 Kb) Hi-res TIFF (5800 Kb) Cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are flashes of gamma rays that can last from less than a second to a few minutes and occur at random positions in the sky. A large fraction of them is thought to result when a black hole is created from a dying star in a distant galaxy. Astronomers believe that a hot disc surrounding the black hole, made of gas and matter falling onto it, somehow emits an energetic beam parallel to the axis of rotation. According to the simplest picture, all GRBs

  10. The first interferometric detections of fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleb, M.; Flynn, C.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Bateman, T.; Bhandari, S.; Campbell-Wilson, D.; Farah, W.; Green, A. J.; Hunstead, R. W.; Jameson, A.; Jankowski, F.; Keane, E. F.; Parthasarathy, A.; Ravi, V.; Rosado, P. A.; van Straten, W.; Venkatraman Krishnan, V.

    2017-07-01

    We present the first interferometric detections of fast radio bursts (FRBs), an enigmatic new class of astrophysical transient. In a 180-d survey of the Southern sky, we discovered three FRBs at 843 MHz with the UTMOST array, as a part of commissioning science during a major ongoing upgrade. The wide field of view of UTMOST (≈9 deg2) is well suited to FRB searches. The primary beam is covered by 352 partially overlapping fan-beams, each of which is searched for FRBs in real time with pulse widths in the range 0.655-42 ms, and dispersion measures ≤2000 pc cm-3. Detections of FRBs with the UTMOST array place a lower limit on their distances of ≈104 km (limit of the telescope near-field) supporting the case for an astronomical origin. Repeating FRBs at UTMOST or an FRB detected simultaneously with the Parkes radio telescope and UTMOST would allow a few arcsec localization, thereby providing an excellent means of identifying FRB host galaxies, if present. Up to 100 h of followup for each FRB has been carried out with the UTMOST, with no repeating bursts seen. From the detected position, we present 3σ error ellipses of 15 arcsec × 8.4° on the sky for the point of origin for the FRBs. We estimate an all-sky FRB rate at 843 MHz above a fluence F_lim of 11 Jy ms of ˜78 events sky-1 d-1 at the 95 per cent confidence level. The measured rate of FRBs at 843 MHz is two times higher than we had expected, scaling from the FRB rate at the Parkes radio telescope, assuming that FRBs have a flat spectral index and a uniform distribution in Euclidean space. We examine how this can be explained by FRBs having a steeper spectral index and/or a flatter logN-logF distribution than expected for a Euclidean Universe.

  11. Adaptive Kalman Filter Based on Adjustable Sampling Interval in Burst Detection for Water Distribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo Yong Choi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid detection of bursts and leaks in water distribution systems (WDSs can reduce the social and economic costs incurred through direct loss of water into the ground, additional energy demand for water supply, and service interruptions. Many real-time burst detection models have been developed in accordance with the use of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA systems and the establishment of district meter areas (DMAs. Nonetheless, no consideration has been given to how frequently a flow meter measures and transmits data for predicting breaks and leaks in pipes. This paper analyzes the effect of sampling interval when an adaptive Kalman filter is used for detecting bursts in a WDS. A new sampling algorithm is presented that adjusts the sampling interval depending on the normalized residuals of flow after filtering. The proposed algorithm is applied to a virtual sinusoidal flow curve and real DMA flow data obtained from Jeongeup city in South Korea. The simulation results prove that the self-adjusting algorithm for determining the sampling interval is efficient and maintains reasonable accuracy in burst detection. The proposed sampling method has a significant potential for water utilities to build and operate real-time DMA monitoring systems combined with smart customer metering systems.

  12. Early burst detection for memory-efficient image retrieval : – Extended version –

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Miaojing; Avrithis, Yannis; Jégou, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Recent works show that image comparison based on local descriptors is corrupted by visual bursts, which tend to dominate the image similarity. The existing strategies, like power-law normalization, improve the results by discounting the contribution of visual bursts to the image similarity. In this paper, we propose to explicitly detect the visual bursts in an image at an early stage. We compare several detection strategies jointly taking into account feature similarity and geometrical quanti...

  13. Fermi-GBM detection of a thermonuclear burst from 4U 1608-52

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenke, P.; Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; van der Horst, A.J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection with Fermi-GBM (daily CTIME data, 12-25 keV band) of an X-ray burst from a location consistent with the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and thermonuclear burster 4U 1608-52. The burst peak occurred on May 2, 2012 at 06:47:54 UTC. The Fermi-GBM location of the burst is

  14. Detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 000630: Implications for dark bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, J.U.; Jensen, B.L.; Gorosabel, J.

    2001-01-01

    We present the discovery of the optical transient of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 000630. The optical transient was detected with the Nordic Optical Telescope 21.1 hours after the burst. At the time of discovery the magnitude of the transient was R = 23.04 +/- 0.08. The transient display...

  15. Detection of tremor bursts by a running second order moment function and analysis using interburst histograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Journee, Henricus Louis; Postma, Alida Annechien; Sun, Mingui; Staal, Michiel J.

    Introduction: Conventional linear signal processing techniques are not always suitable for the detection of tremor bursts in clinical practice due to inevitable noise from electromyographic (EMG) bursts. This study introduces (1) a non-linear analysis technique based on a running second order moment

  16. Detecting radio afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with FAST

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhi-Bin Zhang Si-Wei Kong Yong-Feng Huang Di Li Long-Biao Li

    2015-01-01

    Using the generic hydrodynamic model of gamma-ray burst (GRB) after- glows, we calculate the radio afterglow light curves of low luminosity, high luminosity, failed and standard GRBs in different observational bands of FAST's energy window...

  17. Bursting thalamic responses in awake monkey contribute to visual detection and are modulated by corticofugal feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania eOrtuno

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lateral geniculate nucleus is the gateway for visual information en route to the visual cortex. Neural activity is characterized by the existence of 2 firing modes: burst and tonic. Originally associated with sleep, bursts have now been postulated to be a part of the normal visual response, structured to increase the probability of cortical activation, able to act as a wake-up call to the cortex. We investigated a potential role for burst in the detection of novel stimuli by recording neuronal activity in the LGN of behaving monkeys during a visual detection task. Our results show that bursts are often the neuron’s first response, and are more numerous in the response to attended target stimuli than to unattended distractor stimuli. Bursts are indicators of the task novelty, as repetition decreased bursting. Because the primary visual cortex is the major modulatory input to the LGN, we compared the results obtained in control conditions with those observed when cortical activity was reduced by TMS. This cortical deactivation reduced visual response related bursting by 90%. These results highlight a novel role for the thalamus, able to code higher order image attributes as important as novelty early in the thalamo-cortical conversation.

  18. The Konus-Wind Catalog of Gamma-Ray Bursts with Known Redshifts. I. Bursts Detected in the Triggered Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, A.; Frederiks, D.; Golenetskii, S.; Lysenko, A.; Oleynik, P.; Pal'shin, V.; Svinkin, D.; Ulanov, M.; Cline, T.; Hurley, K.; Aptekar, R.

    2017-12-01

    In this catalog, we present the results of a systematic study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with reliable redshift estimates detected in the triggered mode of the Konus-Wind (KW) experiment during the period from 1997 February to 2016 June. The sample consists of 150 GRBs (including 12 short/hard bursts) and represents the largest set of cosmological GRBs studied to date over a broad energy band. From the temporal and spectral analyses of the sample, we provide the burst durations, the spectral lags, the results of spectral fits with two model functions, the total energy fluences, and the peak energy fluxes. Based on the GRB redshifts, which span the range 0.1≤slant z≤slant 5, we estimate the rest-frame, isotropic-equivalent energy, and peak luminosity. For 32 GRBs with reasonably constrained jet breaks, we provide the collimation-corrected values of the energetics. We consider the behavior of the rest-frame GRB parameters in the hardness-duration and hardness-intensity planes, and confirm the “Amati” and “Yonetoku” relations for Type II GRBs. The correction for the jet collimation does not improve these correlations for the KW sample. We discuss the influence of instrumental selection effects on the GRB parameter distributions and estimate the KW GRB detection horizon, which extends to z˜ 16.6, stressing the importance of GRBs as probes of the early universe. Accounting for the instrumental bias, we estimate the KW GRB luminosity evolution, luminosity and isotropic-energy functions, and the evolution of the GRB formation rate, which are in general agreement with those obtained in previous studies.

  19. Astronomers Detect Powerful Bursting Radio Source Discovery Points to New Class of Astronomical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    transients has been very exciting for our students,” Hyman added. Participating in this research program has inspired at least two of Hyman?s students — Jennifer Neureuther and Mariana Lazarova — to pursue graduate studies in astronomy. This project was supported at Sweet Briar College by funding from Research Corporation and the Jeffress Foundation. Basic research in radio astronomy at NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research. Further Research Hyman and his NRL colleagues plan to continue monitoring the Galactic center and search for the source again with the VLA and other X-ray and radio telescopes. They are also developing (with Dr. Kent Wood of NRL) a model that attempts to account for the radio bursts as a new type of outburst from a class of sources known as “magnetars.” NRL is also contributing to an effort to build the world’s largest and most sensitive low-frequency telescope, called the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), which may revolutionize future searches for other radio transient sources. Current plans call for the LWA, which is being developed by the University of New Mexico-led Southwest Consortium, to be sited in New Mexico, not far from the VLA. “One of the key advantages of observing at long radio wavelengths,” explained NRL astronomer, Dr. Namir Kassim, “is that the field-of-view is so large that a single observation can efficiently detect transient phenomena over a large region.” “When completed, the LWA may uncover hundreds of previously unknown radio transients, some of which may be examples of Jupiter-like planets orbiting other stars,” Kassim added. Jupiter is the most famous example of a nearby radio transient. About Sweet Briar College Sweet Briar College is consistently ranked among the nation’s top liberal arts colleges.ÿ Founded in 1901 as an independent undergraduate college for women, Sweet Briar continues its commitment to the education of women, offering a full range of liberal arts majors, including subjects

  20. Periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges can survive anesthesia and result in asymmetric drug-induced burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced burst suppression (DIBS is bihemispheric and bisymmetric in adults and older children. However, asymmetric DIBS may occur if a pathological process is affecting one hemisphere only or both hemispheres disproportionately. The usual suspect is a destructive lesion; an irritative or epileptogenic lesion is usually not invoked to explain DIBS asymmetry. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with new-onset seizures who was found to have a hemorrhagic cavernoma and periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs in the right temporal region. After levetiracetam and before anesthetic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs were administered, the electroencephalogram (EEG showed continuous PLEDs over the right hemisphere with maximum voltage in the posterior temporal region. Focal electrographic seizures also occurred occasionally in the same location. Propofol resulted in bihemispheric, but not in bisymmetric, DIBS. Remnants or fragments of PLEDs that survived anesthesia increased the amplitude and complexity of the bursts in the right hemisphere leading to asymmetric DIBS. Phenytoin, lacosamide, ketamine, midazolam, and topiramate were administered at various times in the course of EEG monitoring, resulting in suppression of seizures but not of PLEDs. Ketamine and midazolam reduced the rate, amplitude, and complexity of PLEDs but only after producing substantial attenuation of all burst components. When all anesthetics were discontinued, the EEG reverted to the original preanesthesia pattern with continuous non-fragmented PLEDs. The fact that PLEDs can survive anesthesia and affect DIBS symmetry is a testament to the robustness of the neurodynamic processes underlying PLEDs.

  1. Intermediate-duration burst from AX J1754.2-2754 detected by INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Beeck, Sarah; Brandt, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The JEM-X instrument on-board INTEGRAL has detected a 15-minute long burst from the source AX J1754.2-2754 during an observation of the Galactic Center (PI J. Wilms) on March 12, 2017. This finding has been achieved in the framework of the INTEGRAL monitoring of long X-ray bursts (Chenevez et al...... the inferred black-body temperature and radius, in the first part of the burst. This is characteristic of a strong photospheric radius expansion phase. The highest flux is reached during the rise of the 3-25 keV light curve at an unabsorbed bolometric value of 7.3 (+/-0.2)×10-8 erg/cm2/s. The source...... is not detected outside the burst interval, with a 3-σ upper limit of 4 mCrab in the JEM-X range, and the burst is only marginally detected by the IBIS/ISGRI instrument in the 20-40 keV energy band. Previous observations regularly taken since February 13, when the region became visible by INTEGRAL, do not reveal...

  2. A Crazy Question: Can Apparently Brighter Gamma-ray Bursts Be Farther Away?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mészáros

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cosmological relationships between observed and emitted quantities are determined for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs. The relationship shows that apparently fainter bursts need not, in general, lie at larger redshifts.This is possible when the luminosities (or emitted energies in a sample of bursts increase faster than the dimming of the observed values with redshift. Four different samples of long bursts suggest that this is what really happens.

  3. SROSS C-2 Detections of Gamma Ray Bursts and the SGR 1627-41

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The GRB monitor (GRBM) on board the Indian SROSS C-2 satellite has detected 53 classical gamma ray bursts since its launch in May, 1994 till its re-entry in July, 2001. For a subset of 26 events, locations were obtained from simultaneous observations by other gamma-ray detectors in space. The sky distribution of these ...

  4. Multi-feature classifiers for burst detection in single EEG channels from preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, X.; Porée, F.; Kuchenbuch, M.; Chavez, M.; Beuchée, Alain; Carrault, G.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. The study of electroencephalographic (EEG) bursts in preterm infants provides valuable information about maturation or prognostication after perinatal asphyxia. Over the last two decades, a number of works proposed algorithms to automatically detect EEG bursts in preterm infants, but they were designed for populations under 35 weeks of post menstrual age (PMA). However, as the brain activity evolves rapidly during postnatal life, these solutions might be under-performing with increasing PMA. In this work we focused on preterm infants reaching term ages (PMA  ⩾36 weeks) using multi-feature classification on a single EEG channel. Approach. Five EEG burst detectors relying on different machine learning approaches were compared: logistic regression (LR), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), k-nearest neighbors (kNN), support vector machines (SVM) and thresholding (Th). Classifiers were trained by visually labeled EEG recordings from 14 very preterm infants (born after 28 weeks of gestation) with 36-41 weeks PMA. Main results. The most performing classifiers reached about 95% accuracy (kNN, SVM and LR) whereas Th obtained 84%. Compared to human-automatic agreements, LR provided the highest scores (Cohen’s kappa  =  0.71) using only three EEG features. Applying this classifier in an unlabeled database of 21 infants  ⩾36 weeks PMA, we found that long EEG bursts and short inter-burst periods are characteristic of infants with the highest PMA and weights. Significance. In view of these results, LR-based burst detection could be a suitable tool to study maturation in monitoring or portable devices using a single EEG channel.

  5. On the Prospects of Gamma-Ray Burst Detection in the TeV Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurm, Indrek; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2017-09-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet running into an external medium is expected to generate luminous GeV-TeV emission lasting from minutes to several hours. The high-energy emission results from inverse Compton upscattering of prompt and afterglow photons by shock-heated thermal plasma. At its peak the high-energy radiation carries a significant fraction of the power dissipated at the forward shock. We discuss in detail the expected TeV luminosity, using a robust “minimal” emission model. Then, using the statistical properties of the GRB population (luminosity function, redshift distribution, afterglow energy), we simulate the expected detection rates of GRBs by current and upcoming atmospheric Cherenkov instruments. We find that GRBs exploding into a low-density interstellar medium must produce TeV emission that would have already been detected by the currently operating Cherenkov telescopes. The absence of detections is consistent with explosions into a dense wind of the GRB progenitor. If, as suggested by the recent analysis of Fermi LAT data, the typical environment of long GRBs is a Wolf-Rayet progenitor wind with the density parameter A˜ {10}11 g cm-1, then 10%-20% of the bursts that trigger the space-borne detectors should also be detectable by the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) under favorable observing conditions. Since absorption by the extragalactic background light limits the detectability above 0.1 TeV for all but the most nearby bursts (z≲ 1), the reduced energy threshold of CTA is the key improvement over current instruments, which should increase the number of detectable bursts by at least a factor of 3 compared with currently operating facilities.

  6. Robust Meter Network for Water Distribution Pipe Burst Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghwi Jung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A meter network is a set of meters installed throughout a water distribution system to measure system variables, such as the pipe flow rate and pressure. In the current hyper-connected world, meter networks are being exposed to meter failure conditions, such as malfunction of the meter’s physical system and communication system failure. Therefore, a meter network’s robustness should be secured for reliable provision of informative meter data. This paper introduces a multi-objective optimal meter placement model that maximizes the detection probability, minimizes false alarms, and maximizes the robustness of a meter network given a predefined number of meters. A meter network’s robustness is defined as its ability to consistently provide quality data in the event of meter failure. Based on a single-meter failure simulation, a robustness indicator for the meter network is introduced and maximized as the third objective of the proposed model. The proposed model was applied to the Austin network to determine the independent placement of pipe flow and pressure meters with three or five available meters. The results showed that the proposed model is a useful tool for determining meter locations to secure high detectability and robustness.

  7. Possible gamma-ray burst radio detections by the Square Kilometre Array. New perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Alan Cosimo; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The next generation interferometric radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the most sensitive and largest radio telescope ever constructed, could greatly contribute to the detection, survey and characterization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). By the SKA, it will be possible to perform the follow up of GRBs even for several months. This approach would be extremely useful to extend the Spectrum Energetic Distribution (SED) from the gamma to the to radio band and would increase the number of radio detectable GRBs. In principle, the SKA could help to understand the physics of GRBs by setting constraints on theoretical models. This goal could be achieved by taking into account multiple observations at different wavelengths in order to obtain a deeper insight of the sources. Here, we present an estimation of GRB radio detections, showing that the GRBs can really be observed by the SKA. The approach that we present consists in determining blind detection rates derived by a very large sample consisting of merging several GRB catalogues observed by current missions as Swift, Fermi, Agile and INTEGRAL and by previous missions as BeppoSAX, CGRO, GRANAT, HETE-2, Ulysses and Wind. The final catalogue counts 7516 distinct sources. We compute the fraction of GRBs that could be observed by the SKA at high and low frequencies, above its observable sky. Considering the planned SKA sensitivity and through an extrapolation based on previous works and observations, we deduce the minimum fluence in the range 15-150 keV. This is the energy interval where a GRB should emit to be detectable in the radio band by the SKA. Results seem consistent with observational capabilities.

  8. CAN BLACK HOLE NEUTRINO-COOLED DISKS POWER SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tong; Gu, Wei-Min [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Lin, Yi-Qing [School of Opto-electronic and Communication Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen, Fujian 361024 (China); Hou, Shu-Jin, E-mail: tongliu@xmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)

    2015-06-10

    Stellar-mass black holes (BHs) surrounded by neutrino-dominated accretion flows (NDAFs) are plausible sources of power for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) via neutrino emission and their annihilation. The progenitors of short-duration GRBs (SGRBs) are generally considered to be compact binary mergers. According to the simulation results, the disk mass of the NDAF is limited after merger events. We can estimate such disk masses using the current SGRB observational data and fireball model. The results show that the disk mass of a certain SGRB mainly depends on its output energy, jet opening angle, and central BH characteristics. Even for the extreme BH parameters, some SGRBs require massive disks, which approach or exceed the limits in simulations. We suggest that there may exist alternative MHD processes or mechanisms that increase the neutrino emission to produce SGRBs with reasonable BH parameters and disk masses.

  9. Optimised control and pipe burst detection by water demand forecasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.

    2014-01-01

    Water demand forecasting The total water demand in an area is the sum of the water demands of all individual domestic and industrial consumers in that area. These consumers behave in repetitive daily, weekly and annual patterns, and the same repetitive patterns can be observed in the drinking water

  10. Use of adaptive network burst detection methods for multielectrode array data and the generation of artificial spike patterns for method evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, G. D. C.; Morrisroe, E.; Petrou, S.; Halgamuge, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Multielectrode arrays are an informative extracellular recording technology that enables the analysis of cultured neuronal networks and network bursts (NBs) are a dominant feature observed in these recordings. This paper focuses on the validation of NB detection methods on different network activity patterns and developing a detection method that performs robustly across a wide variety of activity patterns. Approach. A firing rate based approach was used to generate artificial spike timestamps where NBs were introduced as episodes where the probability of spiking increases. Variations in firing and bursting characteristics were also included. In addition, an improved methodology of detecting NBs is proposed, based on time-binned average firing rates and time overlaps of single channel bursts. The robustness of the proposed method was compared against three existing algorithms using simulated, publicly available and newly acquired data. Main results. A range of activity patterns were generated by changing simulation variables that correspond to NB duration (40-2200 ms), intervals (0.3-16 s), firing rates (0.1-1 spikes s-1), local burst percentage (0%-90%), number of channels in local bursts (20-40) as well as the number of tonic and frequently-bursting channels. By extracting simulation parameters directly from real data, we generated synthetic data that closely resemble activity of mouse and rat cortical cultures at native and chemically perturbed states. In 50 simulated data sets with randomly selected parameter values, the improved NB detection method performed better (ascertained by the f-measure) than three existing methods (p < 0.005). The improved method was also able to detect clustered, long-tailed and short-frequent NBs on real data. Significance. This work presents an objective method of assessing the applicability of NB detection methods for different neuronal activity patterns. Furthermore, it proposes an improved NB detection method that can

  11. Increased burst size in multiply infected cells can alter basic virus dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings Kara W

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of viral infections have been studied extensively in a variety of settings, both experimentally and with mathematical models. The majority of mathematical models assumes that only one virus can infect a given cell at a time. It is, however, clear that especially in the context of high viral load, cells can become infected with multiple copies of a virus, a process called coinfection. This has been best demonstrated experimentally for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, although it is thought to be equally relevant for a number of other viral infections. In a previously explored mathematical model, the viral output from an infected cell does not depend on the number of viruses that reside in the cell, i.e. viral replication is limited by cellular rather than viral factors. In this case, basic virus dynamics properties are not altered by coinfection. Results Here, we explore the alternative assumption that multiply infected cells are characterized by an increased burst size and find that this can fundamentally alter model predictions. Under this scenario, establishment of infection may not be solely determined by the basic reproductive ratio of the virus, but can depend on the initial virus load. Upon infection, the virus population need not follow straight exponential growth. Instead, the exponential rate of growth can increase over time as virus load becomes larger. Moreover, the model suggests that the ability of anti-viral drugs to suppress the virus population can depend on the virus load upon initiation of therapy. This is because more coinfected cells, which produce more virus, are present at higher virus loads. Hence, the degree of drug resistance is not only determined by the viral genotype, but also by the prevalence of coinfected cells. Conclusions Our work shows how an increased burst size in multiply infected cells can alter basic infection dynamics. This forms the basis for future experimental testing

  12. Damage detection and locating using tone burst and continuous excitation modulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Zhi; Xiao, Li; Qu, Wenzhong

    2014-03-01

    Among structural health monitoring techniques, nonlinear ultrasonic spectroscopy methods are found to be effective diagnostic approach to detecting nonlinear damage such as fatigue crack, due to their sensitivity to incipient structural changes. In this paper, a nonlinear ultrasonic modulation method was developed to detect and locate a fatigue crack on an aluminum plate. The method is different with nonlinear wave modulation method which recognizes the modulation of low-frequency vibration and high-frequency ultrasonic wave; it recognizes the modulation of tone burst and high-frequency ultrasonic wave. In the experiment, a Hanning window modulated sinusoidal tone burst and a continuous sinusoidal excitation were simultaneously imposed on the PZT array which was bonded on the surface of an aluminum plate. The modulations of tone burst and continuous sinusoidal excitation was observed in different actuator-sensor paths, indicating the presence and location of fatigue crack. The results of experiments show that the proposed method is capable of detecting and locating the fatigue crack successfully.

  13. INTEGRAL detects an X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 with no detectable persistent emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chenevez, J.; Brandt, S.; Kuulkers, E.; Beckmann, V.; Bird, T.; Domingo, A.; Ebisawa, K.; Jonker, P.; Kretschmar, P.; Markwardt, C.; Oosterbroek, T.; Paizis, A.; Risquez, D.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; Shaw, S.; Wijnands, R.

    2009-01-01

    A new season of observations for the INTEGRAL Galactic Bulge monitoring (see ATel #438) has started on 2009 Feb. 21st. During the latest observation between 2009 Feb 25 13:21 and 17:02 (UT) a type I X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 (1A 1743-288, aka GX .2-0.2) was detected by JEM-X at UT 14:50:51

  14. INTEGRAL detects an X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 with no detectable persistent emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Brandt, Søren Kristian; Kuulkers, Erik

    2009-01-01

    A new season of observations for the INTEGRAL Galactic Bulge monitoring (see ATel #438) has started on 2009 Feb. 21st. During the latest observation between 2009 Feb 25 13:21 and 17:02 (UT) a type I X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 (1A 1743-288, aka GX .2-0.2) was detected by JEM-X at UT 14:50:5...

  15. Use of water-Cherenkov detectors to detect Gamma Ray Bursts at the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, D. [APC, CNRS et Universite Paris 7 (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Alvarez, C. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Asorey, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Barros, H. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Bertou, X. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina)], E-mail: bertou@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Burgoa, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Gomez Berisso, M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Martinez, O. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Miranda Loza, P. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Murrieta, T.; Perez, G. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Rivera, H. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Rovero, A. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (Argentina); Saavedra, O. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale and INFN, Torino (Italy); Salazar, H. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Tello, J.C. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Ticona Peralda, R.; Velarde, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Villasenor, L. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad de Michoacan (Mexico)

    2008-09-21

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) project aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique in ground-based water-Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on detector calibration and operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 4 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst.

  16. EMG burst presence probability: a joint time-frequency representation of muscle activity and its application to onset detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Rymer, William Zev

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this study was to quantify muscle activity in the time-frequency domain, therefore providing an alternative tool to measure muscle activity. This paper presents a novel method to measure muscle activity by utilizing EMG burst presence probability (EBPP) in the time-frequency domain. The EMG signal is grouped into several Mel-scale subbands, and the logarithmic power sequence is extracted from each subband. Each log-power sequence can be regarded as a dynamic process that transits between the states of EMG burst and non-burst. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was employed to elaborate this dynamic process since HMM is intrinsically advantageous in modeling the temporal correlation of EMG burst/non-burst presence. The EBPP was eventually yielded by HMM based on the criterion of maximum likelihood. Our approach achieved comparable performance with the Bonato method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Search for gravitational waves associated with γ-ray bursts detected by the interplanetary network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calderón Bustillo, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Dal Canton, T; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, J; Hall, E D; Hamilton, W; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Horrom, T; Hoske, D; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G

    2014-07-04

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 γ-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10(-2)M⊙c(2) at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  18. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected by the Interplanetary Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Blackbum, L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 223 gamma ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the InterPlanetary Network (IPN) in 2005-2010 during LIGO's fifth and sixth science runs and Virgo's first, second, and third science runs. The IPN satellites provide accurate times of the bursts and sky localizations that vary significantly from degree scale to hundreds of square degrees. We search for both a well-modeled binary coalescence signal, the favored progenitor model for short GRBs, and for generic, unmodeled gravitational wave bursts. Both searches use the event time and sky localization to improve the gravitational wave search sensitivity as compared to corresponding all-time, all-sky searches. We find no evidence of a gravitational wave signal associated with any of the IPN GRBs in the sample, nor do we find evidence for a population of weak gravitational wave signals associated with the GRBs. For all IPN-detected GRBs, for which a sufficient duration of quality gravitational wave data are available, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source in accordance with an optimistic assumption of gravitational wave emission energy of 10(exp-2) solar mass c(exp 2) at 150 Hz, and find a median of 13 Mpc. For the 27 short-hard GRBs we place 90% confidence exclusion distances to two source models: a binary neutron star coalescence, with a median distance of 12 Mpc, or the coalescence of a neutron star and black hole, with a median distance of 22 Mpc. Finally, we combine this search with previously published results to provide a population statement for GRB searches in first-generation LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors and a resulting examination of prospects for the advanced gravitational wave detectors.

  19. Detection of signature consistent with cosmological time dilation in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J. P.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Scargle, J. D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bonnel, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    If gamma ray bursts are at cosmological distances-as suggested by their isotropic distribution on the sky and by their number-intensity relation-then the burst profiles will be stretched in time, by an amount proportional to the redshift, 1 + Z. We have tested data from the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory's (CGRO's) Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) for such time dilation. Out of 590 bursts observed by BATSE, 131 bursts were analyzed; bursts with durations shorter than 1.5 s were excluded. We used three tests to compare the timescales of bright and dim bursts, the latter, on average, being more distant than the former. Our measures of timescale are constructed to avoid selection effects arising from intensity differences by rescaling all bursts to fiducial levels of peak intensity and noise bias. (1) We found that the total rescaled count above background for the dim burst ensemble is approximately twice that for the brightest bursts-translating into longer durations for the dim bursts. (2) Wavelet-transform decompositions of the burst profiles confirmed that this dilation operates over a broad range of timescales. (3) Structure on the shortest timescales was examined using a procedure which aligns the highest peaks of profiles from which the noise has been optimally removed using a wavelet threshold technique. In all three tests, the dim bursts are stretched by a factor of approximately 2 relative to the bright ones, over seven octaves of timescale. We calibrated the measurements by dilating synthetic bursts that approximate the temporal characteristics of bright BATSE bursts. Results are consistent with bursts at BATSE's peak-flux completeness limit being at cosmological distances corresponding to Z approximately equal to 1, and thus with independent cosmological interpretations of the BATSE number-intensity relation. Alternative explanations of our results, arising from the nature of physical processes in bursts, are still possible.

  20. INTEGRAL/JEM-X detection of a type-I X-ray burst from MAXI J1421-613

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozzo, E.; Bazzano, A.; Kuulkers, Erik

    2014-01-01

    . The onset of the burst occurred on 2014 January 10 at 19:05 UTC, and the total event as observed by JEM-X lasted for about 20 s (3-25 keV). The average spectrum of the burst could be roughly described by using a black-body model with temperature kT~1 keV. The corresponding flux was 1.7E-9 erg/cm^2/s...... (translating into a luminosity of 1.3E37 erg/s at 8 kpc; 3-10 keV). We estimated a persistent flux outside the burst of 7E-10 erg/cm^2/s (3-25 keV). This detection reveals that MAXI J1421-613 is a newly discovered X-ray bursting transient source, thus hosting an accreting neutron star....

  1. Prospects for Gamma-Ray Burst detection by the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bissaldi E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Large Area Telescope (LAT on the Fermi satellite is expected to publish a catalogue with more than 100 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs detected above 100 MeV thanks to a new detection algorithm and a new event reconstruction. This work aims at revising the prospects for GRB alerts with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA based on the new LAT results. We start considering the simulation of the observations with the full CTA of two extremely bright events, the long GRB 130427A and the short GRB 090510, then we investigate how these GRBs would be observed by a particular configuration of the array with the telescopes pointing to different directions in what is called the “coupled divergent mode”.

  2. Ultra-fast flash observatory for detecting the early photons from gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, H.; Jeong, S.; Ahn, K.-B.

    ) for the fast measurement of the UV-optical photons from GRBs, and a gamma-ray monitor for energy measurement. The triggering is done by the UFFO burst Alert & Trigger telescope (UBAT) using the hard X-ray from GRBs and the UV/optical Trigger Assistant Telescope (UTAT) using the UV/optical photons from GRBs...... a coded-mask aperture for position detection and their X-ray photons are readout by LYSO crystals and Multi-Anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) with the effective active area size of 191.1 cm2. With this design, we expect UBAT to trigger ∼44 GRBs/yr and expect SMT to detect ∼10 GRBs/yr. © 2011 IEEE....

  3. Detection prospects for GeV neutrinos from collisionally heated gamma-ray bursts with IceCube/DeepCore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, I; Beloborodov, A M; Hurley, K; Márka, S

    2013-06-14

    Jet reheating via nuclear collisions has recently been proposed as the main mechanism for gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission. In addition to producing the observed gamma rays, collisional heating must generate 10-100 GeV neutrinos, implying a close relation between the neutrino and gamma-ray luminosities. We exploit this theoretical relation to make predictions for possible GRB detections by IceCube + DeepCore. To estimate the expected neutrino signal, we use the largest sample of bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment in 1991-2000. GRB neutrinos could have been detected if IceCube + DeepCore operated at that time. Detection of 10-100 GeV neutrinos would have significant implications, shedding light on the composition of GRB jets and their Lorentz factors. This could be an important target in designing future upgrades of the IceCube + DeepCore observatory.

  4. Employee Engagement for Sustainable Organizations: Keyword Analysis Using Social Network Analysis and Burst Detection Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woocheol Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The issue of sustainability is a vital long-term goal for organizations and as such has formed the basis of much academic research over the last two decades. Organizational sustainability is defined as the ability for an organization to accomplish a range of economic, environmental, and human performance objectives. As one of the most studied topics in organizational science, employee engagement at work is seen as a critical component to achieving sustainable organizational success. In order to better understand the employee engagement discourse, this study examined the keywords that appear in the titles and abstract of the employee engagement research domain using the burst detection and social network analysis techniques. A total of 1406 employee engagement relevant articles that were published from 1990 to 2015 were included and investigated in the study. The results revealed the fading, emerging, and central themes within the employee engagement domain.

  5. Embedded Detection and Correction of SEU Bursts in SRAM Memories Used as Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Secondo, R.; Danzeca, S.; Losito, R.; Peronnard, P.; Masi, A.; Brugger, M.; Dusseau, L.

    2016-01-01

    SRAM memories are widely used as particle fluence detectors in high radiation environments, such as in the Radiation Monitoring System (RadMon) currently in operation in the CERN accelerator complex. Multiple Cell Upsets (MCUs), arising from micro-latchup events, are characterized by a large number of SEUs, ultimately affecting the measurement of particle fluxes and resulting in corrupted data and accuracy losses. A study of the generation of this type of SEU bursts was performed on an 8 Mbit 90-nm SRAM memory. Experimental tests were carried out with a focused beam of protons on target as well as in a mixed field environment dominated by high energy hadrons. A solution approach using an on-line detection and correction algorithm embedded on an FPGA was investigated and evaluated for use on a RadMon device.

  6. Is there cosmological time dilation in gamma-ray bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Norris et al. report that the temporal structure of faint gamma-ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  7. Detection of GRB 060927 at z = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A.E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Starling, R.L.C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M.I.; Ashley, M.C.B.; Barthelmy, S.D.; Bersier, D.F.; Cerón, J.M.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gehrels, N.; Gögüs, E.; Gorosabel, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Güver, T.; Hjorth, J.; Horns, D.; Huang, K.Y.; Jakobsson, P.; Jensen, B.L.; Kiziloglu, Ü.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H.A.; Ledoux, C.; Levan, A.J.; Marsh, T.; McKay, T.; Melandri, A.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Mundell, C.G.; O'Brien, P.T.; Özel, M.; Phillips, A.; Quimby, R.; Rowell, G.; Rujopakarn, W.; Rykoff, E.S.; Schaefer, B.E.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N.R.; Thöne, C.C.; Urata, Y.; Vestrand, W.T.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Watson, D.; Wheeler, J.C.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wren, J.; Yost, S.A.; Yuan, F.; Zhai, M.; Zheng, W.K.

    2007-01-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture ground-based telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB.

  8. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  9. A Burst to See

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    , able to record the event with unprecedented temporal resolution.. "These very early detections (just seconds after the beginning of the burst) showed the object to be so bright that it would have been visible just with the unaided eye," says Stefano Covino, from the REM team. "It was astonishing to see how rapidly the source varied during the observations," adds Sergey Karpov, of the TORTORA team. Astronomers use the so-called magnitude scale, an inverse scale where fainter objects have larger magnitudes. In dark sites, the most acute of human eyes can distinguish sources as faint as magnitude 6. GRB 080319B was slightly brighter than this limit, although for just less than a minute. The 8.2-metre ESO Very Large Telescope also reacted to the gamma-ray burst, thanks to a special procedure known as the rapid-response mode (see ESO 17/07), which allows automatic observations with no human intervention. The high-resolution spectrograph UVES could collect exquisite data starting only 10 minutes after the burst, following requests by Fabrizio Fiore and his team. Another team then used also UVES to determine the distance of the burst. "Despite its stunning brightness, the burst exploded in a galaxy 7.5 billion light years away," says Paul Vreeswijk, who led the second team. "It was therefore not only apparently bright, but also intrinsically very luminous. Indeed, it reached the brightest optical luminosity ever recorded for any astronomical object. For comparison, should the burst have exploded in our Galaxy, it would have lit up the night sky for several minutes as if it were daytime."

  10. Burst Oscillation Studies with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2017-08-01

    Type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes observed from the surfaces of accreting neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries. Oscillations have been observed during the rise and/or decay of some of these X-ray bursts. Those seen during the rise can be well explained by a spreading hot spot model, but large amplitude oscillations in the decay phase remain mysterious because of the absence of a clear-cut source of asymmetry. Here we present the results of our computations of the light curves and amplitudes of oscillations in X-ray burst models that realistically account for both flame spreading and subsequent cooling. For the cooling phase of the burst we use two simple phenomenological models. The first considers asymmetric cooling that can achieve high amplitudes in the tail. The second considers a sustained temperature pattern on the stellar surface that is produced by r-modes propagating in the surface fluid ocean of the star. We will present some simulated burst light curves/spectra using these models and NICER response files, and will show the capabilities of NICER to detect and study burst oscillations. NICER will enable us to study burst oscillations in the energy band below ~3 keV, where there has been no previous measurements of these phenomena.

  11. Vertebral body spread in thoracolumbar burst fractures can predict posterior construct failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Iure, Federico; Lofrese, Giorgio; De Bonis, Pasquale; Cultrera, Francesco; Cappuccio, Michele; Battisti, Sofia

    2017-10-23

    The load sharing classification (LSC) laid foundations for a scoring system able to indicate which thoracolumbar fractures, after short-segment posterior-only fixations, would need longer instrumentations or additional anterior supports. We analyzed surgically treated thoracolumbar fractures, quantifying the vertebral body's fragment displacement with the aim of identifying a new parameter that could predict the posterior-only construct failure. This is a retrospective cohort study from a single institution. One hundred twenty-one consecutive patients were surgically treated for thoracolumbar burst fractures. Grade of kyphosis correction (GKC) expressed radiological outcome; Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale were considered. One hundred twenty-one consecutive patients who underwent posterior fixation for unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures were retrospectively evaluated clinically and radiologically. Supplementary anterior fixations were performed in 34 cases with posterior instrumentation failure, determined on clinic-radiological evidence or symptomatic loss of kyphosis correction. Segmental kyphosis angle and GKC were calculated according to the Cobb method. The displacement of fracture fragments was obtained from the mean of the adjacent end plate areas subtracted from the area enclosed by the maximum contour of vertebral fragmentation. The "spread" was derived from the ratio between this subtraction and the mean of the adjacent end plate areas. Analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney, and receiver operating characteristic were performed for statistical analysis. The authors report no conflict of interest concerning the materials or methods used in the present study or the findings specified in this paper. No funds or grants have been received for the present study. The spread revealed to be a helpful quantitative measurement of vertebral body fragment displacement, easily reproducible with the current computed tomography (CT) imaging technologies

  12. Spatial variation in automated burst suppression detection in pharmacologically induced coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jingzhi; Jonnalagadda, Durga; Moura, Valdery; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Westover, M Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression is actively studied as a control signal to guide anesthetic dosing in patients undergoing medically induced coma. The ability to automatically identify periods of EEG suppression and compactly summarize the depth of coma using the burst suppression probability (BSP) is crucial to effective and safe monitoring and control of medical coma. Current literature however does not explicitly account for the potential variation in burst suppression parameters across different scalp locations. In this study we analyzed standard 19-channel EEG recordings from 8 patients with refractory status epilepticus who underwent pharmacologically induced burst suppression as medical treatment for refractory seizures. We found that although burst suppression is generally considered a global phenomenon, BSP obtained using a previously validated algorithm varies systematically across different channels. A global representation of information from individual channels is proposed that takes into account the burst suppression characteristics recorded at multiple electrodes. BSP computed from this representative burst suppression pattern may be more resilient to noise and a better representation of the brain state of patients. Multichannel data integration may enhance the reliability of estimates of the depth of medical coma.

  13. DETECTABILITY OF PLANCK-SCALE-INDUCED BLURRING WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbring, Eric [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2015-03-20

    Microscopic fluctuations inherent to the fuzziness of spacetime at the Planck scale might accumulate in wavefronts propagating a cosmological distance and lead to noticeable blurring in an image of a pointlike source. Distant quasars viewed in the optical and ultraviolet with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) may show this weakly, and if real suggests a stronger effect should be seen for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in X-rays and γ-rays. Those telescopes, however, operate far from their diffraction limits. A description of how Planck-scale-induced blurring could be sensed at high energy, including with cosmic rays, while still agreeing with the HST results is discussed. It predicts dilated apparent source size and inflated uncertainties in positional centroids, effectively a threshold angular accuracy restricting knowledge of source location on the sky. These outcomes are found to be consistent with an analysis of the 10 highest-redshift GRB detections reported for the Fermi satellite. Confusion with photon cascade and scattering phenomena is also possible; prospects for a definitive multiwavelength measurement are considered.

  14. Employee Engagement for Sustainable Organizations: Keyword Analysis Using Social Network Analysis and Burst Detection Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Woocheol; Khan, Gohar; Wood, Jacob; Mahmood, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    .... In order to better understand the employee engagement discourse, this study examined the keywords that appear in the titles and abstract of the employee engagement research domain using the burst...

  15. Bounds on spectral dispersion from Fermi-detected gamma ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroff, Robert J; Connolly, Ryan; Holmes, Justin; Kostinski, Alexander B

    2012-06-08

    Data from four Fermi-detected gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are used to set limits on spectral dispersion of electromagnetic radiation across the Universe. The analysis focuses on photons recorded above 1 GeV for Fermi-detected GRB 080916C, GRB 090510A, GRB 090902B, and GRB 090926A because these high-energy photons yield the tightest bounds on light dispersion. It is shown that significant photon bunches in GRB 090510A, possibly classic GRB pulses, are remarkably brief, an order of magnitude shorter in duration than any previously claimed temporal feature in this energy range. Although conceivably a>3σ fluctuation, when taken at face value, these pulses lead to an order of magnitude tightening of prior limits on photon dispersion. Bound of Δc/c<6.94×10(-21) is thus obtained. Given generic dispersion relations where the time delay is proportional to the photon energy to the first or second power, the most stringent limits on the dispersion strengths were k1<1.61×10(-5)  sec Gpc(-1) GeV(-1) and k2<3.57×10(-7)  sec Gpc(-1) GeV(-2), respectively. Such limits constrain dispersive effects created, for example, by the spacetime foam of quantum gravity. In the context of quantum gravity, our bounds set M1c(2) greater than 525 times the Planck mass, suggesting that spacetime is smooth at energies near and slightly above the Planck mass.

  16. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts detected in the RELEC experiment onboard the Vernov satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Iyudin, A. F.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Minaev, P. Yu.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Pozanenko, A. S.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Chernenko, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    The RELEC scientific instrumentation onboard the Vernov spacecraft launched on July 8, 2014, included the DRGE gamma-ray and electron spectrometer. This instrument incorporates a set of scintillation phoswich detectors, including four identical X-ray and gamma-ray detectors in the energy range from 10 keV to 3 MeV with a total area of 500 cm2 directed toward the nadir, and an electron spectrometer containing three mutually orthogonal detector units with a geometry factor of 2 cm2 sr, which is also sensitive to X-rays and gamma-rays. The goal of the space experiment with the DRGE instrument was to investigate phenomena with fast temporal variability, in particular, terrestrial gammaray flashes (TGFs) and magnetospheric electron precipitations. However, the detectors of the DRGE instrument could record cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and allowed one not only to perform a detailed analysis of the gamma-ray variability but also to compare the time profiles with the measurements made by other instruments of the RELEC scientific instrumentation (the detectors of optical and ultraviolet flashes, the radio-frequency and low-frequency analyzers of electromagnetic field parameters). We present the results of our observations of cosmicGRB 141011A and GRB 141104A, compare the parameters obtained in the GBM/Fermi and KONUS-Wind experiments, and estimate the redshifts and E iso for the sources of these GRBs. The detectability of GRBs and good agreement between the independent estimates of their parameters obtained in various experiments are important factors of the successful operation of similar detectors onboard the Lomonosov spacecraft.

  17. An Ordinary Short Gamma-Ray Burst with Extraordinary Implications: Fermi -GBM Detection of GRB 170817A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, A.; Roberts, O. J.; Connaughton, V. [Science and Technology Institute, Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Veres, P.; Briggs, M. S.; Hamburg, R.; Preece, R. D.; Poolakkil, S. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Burns, E.; Racusin, J.; Canton, T. Dal [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kocevski, D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Hui, C. M.; Littenberg, T. [Astrophysics Office, ST12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Christensen, N.; Broida, J. [Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, MN 55057 (United States); Siellez, K. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Blackburn, L., E-mail: Adam.M.Goldstein@nasa.gov [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); and others

    2017-10-20

    On 2017 August 17 at 12:41:06 UTC the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detected and triggered on the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 170817A. Approximately 1.7 s prior to this GRB, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory triggered on a binary compact merger candidate associated with the GRB. This is the first unambiguous coincident observation of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation from a single astrophysical source and marks the start of gravitational-wave multi-messenger astronomy. We report the GBM observations and analysis of this ordinary short GRB, which extraordinarily confirms that at least some short GRBs are produced by binary compact mergers.

  18. Swift/BAT detection of a burst from SGR J1745-29

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennea, J.A.; Burrows, D.N.; Cummings, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Degenaar, N.; Reynolds, M.T.; Miller, J.M.; Wijnands, R.

    2013-01-01

    At 11:17:26 UT on June 7th, 2013 Swift/BAT triggered on a burst from the region near Sgr A*, which contains the currently active magnetar SGR J1745-29 (Kennea et al. 2013; Mori et al. 2013). The initial onboard data showed a short duration single soft peak < 0.32s in duration (Barthelmy et al., GCN

  19. Detection of an optical transient following the 13 March 2000 short/hard gamma-ray burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Ceron, J.M.C.; Gorosabel, J.

    2002-01-01

    We imaged the error box of a gamma-ray burst of the short (0.5 s), hard type (GRB 000313), with the BOOTES-1 experiment in southern Spain, starting 4 min after the gamma-ray event, in the I-band. A bright optical transient (OT 000313) with I = 9.4 +/- 0.1 was found in the BOOTES-1 image, close...... to the error box (3sigma) provided by BATSE. Late time VRI K'-band deep observations failed to reveal an underlying host galaxy. If the OT 000313 is related to the short, hard GRB 000313, this would be the first optical counterpart ever found for this kind of events (all counterparts to date have been found...... for bursts of the long, soft type). The fact that only prompt optical emission has been detected (but no afterglow emission at all, as supported by theoretical models) might explain why no optical counterparts have ever been found for short, hard GRBs. This fact suggests that most short bursts might occur...

  20. Off-axis emission of short γ-ray bursts and the detectability of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave-detected binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzati, Davide; Deich, Alex; Morsony, Brian J.; Workman, Jared C.

    2017-10-01

    We present calculations of the wide angle emission of short-duration gamma-ray bursts from compact binary merger progenitors. Such events are expected to be localized by their gravitational wave emission, fairly irrespective of the orientation of the angular momentum vector of the system, along which the gamma-ray burst outflow is expected to propagate. We show that both the prompt and afterglow emission are dim and challenging to detect for observers lying outside the cone within which the relativistic outflow is propagating. If the jet initially propagates through a baryon contaminated region surrounding the merger site, however, a hot cocoon forms around it. The cocoon subsequently expands quasi-isotropically producing its own prompt emission and external shock powered afterglow. We show that the cocoon prompt emission is detectable by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We also show that the cocoon afterglow peaks a few hours to a few days after the burst and is detectable for up to a few weeks at all wavelengths. The timing and brightness of the transient are however uncertain due to their dependence on unknown quantities such as the density of the ambient medium surrounding the merger site, the cocoon energy and the cocoon Lorentz factor. For a significant fraction of the gravitationally detected neutron-star-binary mergers, the cocoon afterglow could possibly be the only identifiable electromagnetic counterpart, at least at radio and X-ray frequencies.

  1. Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment on Giant Radio Pulses of Crab Pulsar toward Fast Radio Burst Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takefuji, K.; Terasawa, T.; Kondo, T.; Mikami, R.; Takeuchi, H.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kita, H.; Sekido, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment on giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar in the radio 1.4-1.7 GHz range to demonstrate a VLBI technique for searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs). We carried out the experiment on 2014 July 26 using the Kashima 34 m and Usuda 64 m radio telescopes of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) with a baseline of about 200 km. During the approximately 1 hr observation, we could detect 35 GPs by high-time-resolution VLBI. Moreover, we determined the dispersion measure (DM) to be 56.7585 ± 0.0025 on the basis of the mean DM of the 35 GPs detected by VLBI. We confirmed that the sensitivity of a detection of GPs using our technique is superior to that of a single-dish mode detection using the same telescope.

  2. A Rule of Thumb for the Detectability of Gravitational-Wave Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    We derive a simple relationship between the energy emitted in gravitational waves for a narrowband source and the distance to which that emission can be detected by a single detector. We consider linearly polarized, elliptically polarized, and unpolarized gravitational waves, and emission patterns appropriate for each of these cases. We ignore cosmological effects.

  3. High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kiuchi, Kenta [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2017-10-10

    We investigate current and future prospects for coincident detection of high-energy neutrinos and gravitational waves (GWs). Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are believed to originate from mergers of compact star binaries involving neutron stars. We estimate high-energy neutrino fluences from prompt emission, extended emission (EE), X-ray flares, and plateau emission, and we show that neutrino signals associated with the EE are the most promising. Assuming that the cosmic-ray loading factor is ∼10 and the Lorentz factor distribution is lognormal, we calculate the probability of neutrino detection from EE by current and future neutrino detectors, and we find that the quasi-simultaneous detection of high-energy neutrinos, gamma-rays, and GWs is possible with future instruments or even with current instruments for nearby SGRBs having EE. We also discuss stacking analyses that will also be useful with future experiments such as IceCube-Gen2.

  4. High-energy Neutrino Emission from Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Coincident Detection with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2017-10-01

    We investigate current and future prospects for coincident detection of high-energy neutrinos and gravitational waves (GWs). Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are believed to originate from mergers of compact star binaries involving neutron stars. We estimate high-energy neutrino fluences from prompt emission, extended emission (EE), X-ray flares, and plateau emission, and we show that neutrino signals associated with the EE are the most promising. Assuming that the cosmic-ray loading factor is ˜10 and the Lorentz factor distribution is lognormal, we calculate the probability of neutrino detection from EE by current and future neutrino detectors, and we find that the quasi-simultaneous detection of high-energy neutrinos, gamma-rays, and GWs is possible with future instruments or even with current instruments for nearby SGRBs having EE. We also discuss stacking analyses that will also be useful with future experiments such as IceCube-Gen2.

  5. Dynamic encoding of natural luminance sequences by LGN bursts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Lesica

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN of the thalamus, visual stimulation produces two distinct types of responses known as tonic and burst. Due to the dynamics of the T-type Ca(2+ channels involved in burst generation, the type of response evoked by a particular stimulus depends on the resting membrane potential, which is controlled by a network of modulatory connections from other brain areas. In this study, we use simulated responses to natural scene movies to describe how modulatory and stimulus-driven changes in LGN membrane potential interact to determine the luminance sequences that trigger burst responses. We find that at low resting potentials, when the T channels are de-inactivated and bursts are relatively frequent, an excitatory stimulus transient alone is sufficient to evoke a burst. However, to evoke a burst at high resting potentials, when the T channels are inactivated and bursts are relatively rare, prolonged inhibitory stimulation followed by an excitatory transient is required. We also observe evidence of these effects in vivo, where analysis of experimental recordings demonstrates that the luminance sequences that trigger bursts can vary dramatically with the overall burst percentage of the response. To characterize the functional consequences of the effects of resting potential on burst generation, we simulate LGN responses to different luminance sequences at a range of resting potentials with and without a mechanism for generating bursts. Using analysis based on signal detection theory, we show that bursts enhance detection of specific luminance sequences, ranging from the onset of excitatory sequences at low resting potentials to the offset of inhibitory sequences at high resting potentials. These results suggest a dynamic role for burst responses during visual processing that may change according to behavioral state.

  6. Detection of GRB 060927 at zeta = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Sterling, R. L. C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M. I.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture groundbased telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hours after the trigger shows a continuum break at lambda approx. equals 8070 A, produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at zeta = 5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 A which we interpret as Si II lambda 1260 at zeta = 5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Ly(alpha) profile with a column density with log(N(sub HI)/sq cm) = 22.50 +/- 0.15. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: i) GRB afterglows originating from zeta greater than or approx. equal to 6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid near-infrared monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; ii) The presence of large H I column densities in some GRBs host galaxies at zeta > 5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; iii) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at zeta > 5 and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe.

  7. Can undersea voltage measurements detect tsunamis?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manoj, C.; Kuvshinov, A.; Neetu, S.; Harinarayana, T.

    the question whether the method could also be useful to detect tsunami. A barotropic shallow water model along with a three-dimensional electromagnetic induction code was used to predict the electric fields induced by the Indian Ocean Tsunami occurred...

  8. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude....... We then develop a non-parametric test statistic that allows for the identification of drift bursts from noisy high-frequency data. We apply this methodology to a comprehensive set of tick data and show that drift bursts form an integral part of the price dynamics across equities, fixed income......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  9. A relativistic type Ibc supernova without a detected gamma-ray burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, A M; Chakraborti, S; Pignata, G; Chevalier, R A; Chandra, P; Ray, A; Wieringa, M H; Copete, A; Chaplin, V; Connaughton, V; Barthelmy, S D; Bietenholz, M F; Chugai, N; Stritzinger, M D; Hamuy, M; Fransson, C; Fox, O; Levesque, E M; Grindlay, J E; Challis, P; Foley, R J; Kirshner, R P; Milne, P A; Torres, M A P

    2010-01-28

    Long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) mark the explosive death of some massive stars and are a rare sub-class of type Ibc supernovae. They are distinguished by the production of an energetic and collimated relativistic outflow powered by a central engine (an accreting black hole or neutron star). Observationally, this outflow is manifested in the pulse of gamma-rays and a long-lived radio afterglow. Until now, central-engine-driven supernovae have been discovered exclusively through their gamma-ray emission, yet it is expected that a larger population goes undetected because of limited satellite sensitivity or beaming of the collimated emission away from our line of sight. In this framework, the recovery of undetected GRBs may be possible through radio searches for type Ibc supernovae with relativistic outflows. Here we report the discovery of luminous radio emission from the seemingly ordinary type Ibc SN 2009bb, which requires a substantial relativistic outflow powered by a central engine. A comparison with our radio survey of type Ibc supernovae reveals that the fraction harbouring central engines is low, about one per cent, measured independently from, but consistent with, the inferred rate of nearby GRBs. Independently, a second mildly relativistic supernova has been reported.

  10. Design of a confocal microfluidic particle sorter using fluorescent photon burst detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, B.H.; Schots, A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2004-01-01

    An instrumental system is described for detecting and sorting single fluorescent particles such as microspheres, bacteria, viruses, or even smaller macromolecules in a flowing liquid. The system consists of microfluidic chips (biochips), computer controlled high voltage power supplies, and a

  11. Gamma Ray burst detection and localization capabilities of the IBIS/INTEGRAL telescope Compton mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkowski, R.; Denis, M. [CBK, Warsaw (Poland); Laurent, Ph.; Goldoni, P. [SAp CEA, Gif sur Yvette (France); APC, UMR, Paris (France); Bulik, T. [CAMK, Warsaw (Poland); Rau, A. [MPE, Garching (Germany)

    2005-07-15

    We present the capabilities of the IBIS/INTEGRAL Compton mode for the detection and localization of GRBs. Based on the example of GRB 030406 we demonstrate that the IBIS Compton mode is able to detect a GRB and (if it is strong enough) localize it with an accuracy of a few degrees. Energetic spectra extraction is also possible in the range from a few hundred keV to a few MeV.

  12. A repeating fast radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  13. Multirhythmic bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Robert J.

    1998-03-01

    A complex modeled bursting neuron [C. C. Canavier, J. W. Clark, and J. H. Byrne, J. Neurophysiol. 66, 2107-2124 (1991)] has been shown to possess seven coexisting limit cycle solutions at a given parameter set [Canavier et al., J. Neurophysiol 69, 2252-2259 (1993); 72, 872-882 (1994)]. These solutions are unique in that the limit cycles are concentric in the space of the slow variables. We examine the origin of these solutions using a minimal 4-variable bursting cell model. Poincaré maps are constructed using a saddle-node bifurcation of a fast subsystem such as our Poincaré section. This bifurcation defines a threshold between the active and silent phases of the burst cycle in the space of the slow variables. The maps identify parameter spaces with single limit cycles, multiple limit cycles, and two types of chaotic bursting. To investigate the dynamical features which underlie the unique shape of the maps, the maps are further decomposed into two submaps which describe the solution trajectories during the active and silent phases of a single burst. From these findings we postulate several necessary criteria for a bursting model to possess multiple stable concentric limit cycles. These criteria are demonstrated in a generalized 3-variable model. Finally, using a less direct numerical procedure, similar return maps are calculated for the original complex model [C. C. Canavier, J. W. Clark, and J. H. Byrne, J. Neurophysiol. 66, 2107-2124 (1991)], with the resulting mappings appearing qualitatively similar to those of our 4-variable model. These multistable concentric bursting solutions cannot occur in a bursting model with one slow variable. This type of multistability arises when a bursting system has two or more slow variables and is viewed as an essentially second-order system which receives discrete perturbations in a state-dependent manner.

  14. Mimicking within Euclidean space a cosmological time dilation of gamma-ray burst durations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    If gamma-ray burst sources are cosmological in origin, then the time dilation at large z can correlate a burst's duration with its peak flux. Detection of this effect is thought by many to be strong evidence for a cosmological burst origin. In this Letter I show that an apparent time distortion--either a dilation or contraction--is generally expected for an ensemble of bursts that is spatially limited within Euclidean space. The appearance of this effect is correlated with the falling away of the log N-log P curve from a -3/2 slope line. An example of this effect is provided by the relativistic bulk motion model, which produces a strong time dilation when spatially limited in Euclidean space. As a consequence, envidence that weak bursts have longer durations than strong bursts is not evidence of a cosmological burst origin.

  15. Network based statistical analysis detects changes induced by continuous theta-burst stimulation on brain activity at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropasqua, Chiara; Bozzali, Marco; Ponzo, Viviana; Giulietti, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    We combined continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) and resting state (RS)-fMRI approaches to investigate changes in functional connectivity (FC) induced by right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)-cTBS at rest in a group of healthy subjects. Seed-based fMRI analysis revealed a specific pattern of correlation between the right prefrontal cortex and several brain regions: based on these results, we defined a 29-node network to assess changes in each network connection before and after, respectively, DLPFC-cTBS and sham sessions. A decrease of correlation between the right prefrontal cortex and right parietal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 40, respectively) was detected after cTBS, while no significant result was found when analyzing sham-session data. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates within-subject changes in FC induced by cTBS applied on prefrontal area. The possibility to induce selective changes in a specific region without interfering with functionally correlated area could have several implications for the study of functional properties of the brain, and for the emerging therapeutic strategies based on transcranial stimulation.

  16. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time.

  17. Probing Intrinsic Properties of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xilong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2017-11-01

    Progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts are thought to be neutron stars coalescing with their companion black hole or neutron star, which are one of the main gravitational wave sources. We have devised a Bayesian framework for combining gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave information that allows us to probe short gamma-ray burst luminosities. We show that combined short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave observations not only improve progenitor distance and inclination angle estimates, they also allow the isotropic luminosities of short gamma-ray bursts to be determined without the need for host galaxy or light-curve information. We characterize our approach by simulating 1000 joint short gamma-ray burst and gravitational wave detections by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. We show that ˜90 % of the simulations have uncertainties on short gamma-ray burst isotropic luminosity estimates that are within a factor of two of the ideal scenario, where the distance is known exactly. Therefore, isotropic luminosities can be confidently determined for short gamma-ray bursts observed jointly with gravitational waves detected by Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Planned enhancements to Advanced LIGO will extend its range and likely produce several joint detections of short gamma-ray bursts and gravitational waves. Third-generation gravitational wave detectors will allow for isotropic luminosity estimates for the majority of the short gamma-ray burst population within a redshift of z ˜1 .

  18. A Burst-Mode Photon-Counting Receiver with Automatic Channel Estimation and Bit Rate Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-24

    forward error correction (FEC) based on a product code of an inner LDPC code and an outer BCH code. The FEC supports multiple code rates to achieve...Solomon have a relatively small footprint and high throughput. However, newer soft-decision codes based on low-density parity check codes ( LDPCs ) can...at higher BER than the payload. Figure 5. Frame structure The payload is a 216-1 pseudo-random bit stream (PRBS) encoded using an LDPC +BCH

  19. FAST TCP over optical burst switched networks: Modeling and stability analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Shihada, Basem

    2013-04-01

    FAST TCP is important for promoting data-intensive applications since it can cleverly react to both packet loss and delay for detecting network congestion. This paper provides a continuous time model and extensive stability analysis of FAST TCP congestion-control mechanism in bufferless Optical Burst Switched Networks (OBS). The paper first shows that random burst contentions are essential to stabilize the network, but cause throughput degradation in FAST TCP flows when a burst with all the packets from a single round is dropped. Second, it shows that FAST TCP is vulnerable to burst delay and fails to detect network congestion due to the little variation of round-trip time, thus unstable. Finally it shows that introducing extra delays by implementing burst retransmission stabilizes FAST TCP over OBS. The paper proves that FAST TCP is not stable over barebone OBS. However, it is locally, exponentially, and asymptotically stable over OBS with burst retransmission.

  20. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  1. Burst Searches for Compact Binary Coalescences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    Compact Binary coalescences (CBC) are the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GW) for the first detection with advanced GW detectors. Being the most efficient GW emitters among anticipated GW sources, they are also well understood theoretically in the framework of General Relativity. In the talk I'll discuss different flavors of CBC sources and two types of search methods employed in the GW data analysis: template and excess power. While template methods are the most optimal for CBC sources, I will concentrate on the excess power methods, which are typical for searches of generic GW transients (bursts). How to use burst searches for CBC sources? Why would we do this? What can we learn about CBC sources from a burst search? - these and other questions will be discussed in the talk. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1205512.

  2. EXIST's Gamma-Ray Burst Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D. L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Fishman, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Garson, A., III; Krawczynski, H.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Skinner, G.

    2008-02-01

    We use semianalytic techniques to evaluate the burst sensitivity of designs for the EXIST hard X-ray survey mission. Applying these techniques to the mission design proposed for the Beyond Einstein program, we find that with its very large field of view and faint gamma-ray burst detection threshold, EXIST will detect and localize approximately two bursts per day, a large fraction of which may be at high redshift. We estimate that EXIST's maximum sensitivity will be ~4 times greater than that of Swift's Burst Alert Telescope. Bursts will be localized to better than 40'' at threshold, with a burst position as good as a few arcseconds for strong bursts. EXIST's combination of three different detector systems will provide spectra from 3 keV to more than 10 MeV. Thus, EXIST will enable a major leap in the understanding of bursts, their evolution, environment, and utility as cosmological probes.

  3. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders; Marie, Rodolphe

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the optothermal actuation of individual capillary burst valves in an all-polymer microfluidic device. The capillary burst valves are realised in a planar design by introducing a fluidic constriction in a microfluidic channel of constant depth. We show that a capillary burst valve can be burst by raising the temperature due to the temperature dependence of the fluid surface tension. We address individual valves by using a local heating platform based on a thin film of near infrared absorber dye embedded in the lid used to seal the microfluidic device [L. H. Thamdrup et al., Nano Lett. 10, 826-832 (2010)]. An individual valve is burst by focusing the laser in its vicinity. We demonstrate the capture of single polystyrene 7 μm beads in the constriction triggered by the bursting of the valve.

  4. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Emre eKapucu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates interspike interval thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  5. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Fikret E; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI) histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates ISI thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average (CMA) and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA) data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  6. Can we say: There is a invasive species early detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, Annex 6 calls for a U.S.-Canada, basin-wide aquatic invasive species early detection network by 2015. The objective of our research is to explore survey design strategies that can improve detection efficiency, and to develop performance me...

  7. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    OpenAIRE

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H-F

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in July, 2008. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network (IPN), to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1 degree, underestimat...

  8. Early Detection of Viral Hepatitis Can Save Lives - PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-12

    Early detection of viral hepatitis can help prevent liver damage, cirrhosis, and even liver cancer.  Created: 5/12/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/12/2010.

  9. Classifying LISA gravitational wave burst signals using Bayesian evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feroz, Farhan; Graff, Philip; Hobson, Michael P; Lasenby, Anthony [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Gair, Jonathan R, E-mail: jgair@ast.cam.ac.u [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-07

    We consider the problem of characterization of burst sources detected by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) using the multi-modal nested sampling algorithm, MultiNest. We use MultiNest as a tool to search for modelled bursts from cosmic string cusps, and compute the Bayesian evidence associated with the cosmic string model. As an alternative burst model, we consider sine-Gaussian burst signals, and show how the evidence ratio can be used to choose between these two alternatives. We present results from an application of MultiNest to the last round of the Mock LISA Data Challenge, in which we were able to successfully detect and characterize all three of the cosmic string burst sources present in the release data set. We also present results of independent trials and show that MultiNest can detect cosmic string signals with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as low as approx7 and sine-Gaussian signals with SNR as low as approx8. In both cases, we show that the threshold at which the sources become detectable coincides with the SNR at which the evidence ratio begins to favour the correct model over the alternative.

  10. GRB 091208B: FIRST DETECTION OF THE OPTICAL POLARIZATION IN EARLY FORWARD SHOCK EMISSION OF A GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, T.; Chiyonobu, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ikejiri, Y.; Itoh, R.; Komatsu, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Nagae, O.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Tanaka, H.; Yamanaka, M. [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Toma, K. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kawabata, K. S.; Mizuno, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Uemura, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Inoue, T.; Yamashita, T. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Fuchinobe, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan); Nakaya, H., E-mail: uehara@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2012-06-10

    We report that the optical polarization in the afterglow of GRB 091208B is measured at t = 149-706 s after the burst trigger, and the polarization degree is P = 10.4( {+-} 2.5%. The optical light curve at this time shows a power-law decay with index -0.75 {+-} 0.02, which is interpreted as the forward shock synchrotron emission, and thus this is the first detection of the early-time optical polarization in the forward shock (rather than that in the reverse shock reported by Steele et al.). This detection disfavors the afterglow model in which the magnetic fields in the emission region are random on the plasma skin depth scales, such as those amplified by the plasma instabilities, e.g., Weibel instability. We suggest that the fields are amplified by the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, which would be tested by future observations of the temporal changes of the polarization degrees and angles for other bursts.

  11. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    . "It was a bit of luck that the survey included some observations of the sky surrounding the clouds," Narkevic said. It was from those "flanking" observations that the mysterious radio burst appeared in the data. The burst of radio waves was strong by astronomical standards, but lasted less than five milliseconds. The signal was spread out, with higher frequencies arriving at the telescope before the lower frequencies. This effect, called dispersion, is caused by the signal passing through ionized gas in interstellar and intergalactic space. The amount of this dispersion, the astronomers said, indicates that the signal likely originated about three billion light-years from Earth. No previously-detected cosmic radio burst has the same set of characteristics. "This burst represents an entirely new astronomical phenomenon," Bailes said. The astronomers estimate on the basis of their results that hundreds of similar events should occur over the sky each day. "Few radio surveys have the necessary sensitivity to such short-duration bursts, which makes them notoriously difficult to detect with current instruments," added Crawford. The next generation of radio telescopes currently under development should be able to detect many of these bursts across the sky. Although the nature of the mysterious new object is unclear, the astronomers have some ideas of what may cause such a burst. One idea is that it may be part of the energy released when a pair of superdense neutron stars collide and merge. Such an event is thought by some scientists to be the cause of one type of gamma-ray burst, but the only radio emission seen so far from these has been from the long-lived "afterglow" that follows the original burst. Another, more exotic, candidate is a burst of energy from an evaporating black hole. Black holes, concentrations of mass so dense that not even light can escape their powerful gravity, can lose mass and energy through a process proposed by famed British physicist Stephen

  12. The Double Firing Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    this nearly head-on alignment to occur is only about once a decade," added his colleague Cristiano Guidorzi. GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite towards the constellation of Boötes, the "Herdsman". A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky, including ESO's Very Large Telescope, which was the first to provide the distance of the object, 7.5 billion light-years. The visible light from the burst was detected by a handful of wide-field cameras worldwide that are mounted on telescopes constantly monitoring a large fraction of the sky. One of these was the TORTORA camera mounted on the 0.6-m REM telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (ESO 26/07). TORTORA's rapid imaging provides the most detailed look yet at the visible light associated with the initial blast of a gamma-ray burst. "We've been waiting a long time for this one," says TORTORA senior scientist Grigory Beskin of Russia's Special Astrophysical Observatory. The data collected simultaneously by TORTORA and the Swift satellite allowed astronomers to explain the properties of this burst.

  13. Do alien particles exist, and can they be detected?

    CERN Document Server

    Gasperini, M

    2016-01-01

    We may call "alien particles" those particles belonging to the matter/field content of a $d$-dimensional brane other than the $3$-brane (or stack of branes) sweeping the space-time in which we live. They can appear in our space-time at the regions of intersection between our and their brane. They can be identified (or not) as alien matter depending on their properties, on the physical laws governing their evolution in the "homeland" brane, and on the details of our detection techniques.

  14. Do alien particles exist, and can they be detected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, M.

    2016-07-01

    We may call “alien particles” those particles belonging to the matter/field content of a d-dimensional brane other than the 3-brane (or stack of branes) sweeping the spacetime in which we live. They can appear in our spacetime at the regions of intersection between our and their brane. They can be identified (or not) as alien matter depending on their properties, on the physical laws governing their evolution in the “homeland” brane, and on the details of our detection techniques.

  15. On the connection of gamma-ray bursts and X-ray flashes in the BATSE and RHESSI databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řípa, J.; Mészáros, A.

    2016-12-01

    Classification of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) into groups has been intensively studied by various statistical tests in previous years. It has been suggested that there was a distinct group of GRBs, beyond the long and short ones, with intermediate durations. However, such a group is not securely confirmed yet. Strangely, concerning the spectral hardness, the observations from the Swift and RHESSI satellites give different results. For the Swift/BAT database it is found that the intermediate-duration bursts might well be related to so-called X-ray flashes (XRFs). On the other hand, for the RHESSI dataset the intermediate-duration bursts seem to be spectrally too hard to be given by XRFs. The connection of the intermediate-duration bursts and XRFs for the BATSE database is not clear as well. The purpose of this article is to check the relation between XRFs and GRBs for the BATSE and RHESSI databases, respectively. We use an empirical definition of XRFs introduced by other authors earlier. For the RHESSI database we also use a transformation between the detected counts and the fluences based on the simulated detector response function. The purpose is to compare the hardnesses of GRBs with the definition of XRFs. There is a 1.3-4.2 % fraction of XRFs in the whole BATSE database. The vast majority of the BATSE short bursts are not XRFs because only 0.7-5.7 % of the short bursts can be given by XRFs. However, there is a large uncertainty in the fraction of XRFs among the intermediate-duration bursts. The fraction of 1-85 % of the BATSE intermediate-duration bursts can be related to XRFs. For the long bursts this fraction is between 1.0 % and 3.4 %. The uncertainties in these fractions are large, however it can be claimed that all BATSE intermediate-duration bursts cannot be given by XRFs. At least 79 % of RHESSI short bursts, at least 53 % of RHESSI intermediate-duration bursts, and at least 45 % of RHESSI long bursts should not be given by XRFs. A simulation of XRFs

  16. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  17. Occurrence and Detection of Thermoanaerobacterium and Thermoanaerobacter in Canned Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dotzauer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the reason for loss of vacuum in canned food, obligately anaerobic, spore forming thermophilic organisms were isolated from shelf-stable canned food containing vegetables, noodles and potatoes as main ingredients. Thermophilic bacteria from 44 canned food samples that had been stored under anaerobic conditions at 37 °C for at least 7 days were isolated. In addition, organic fertilizer used for the cultivation of some of the foods’ ingredients was examined and anaerobic, thermophilic bacteria could also be isolated from this source. Identification of bacterial strains was carried out by partial and complete 16S-rRNA-gene sequencing. Some of the obtained gene sequences showed a high level of similarity to existing 16S-rRNA gene sequences towards strains of the genera Thermoanaerobacter, Thermoanaerobium and Thermoanaerobacterium respectively, which have not yet been reported to be of importance as food spoilers. In the course of identification of these thermophilic bacteria we developed genera specific PCR-based approaches for detecting isolates belonging to the genera Thermoanaeroacterium and Thermoanaerobacter. Direct capturing of free DNA from contaminated samples using oligonucleotides coupled with paramagentic beads allowed the reduction of the detection time to six hours with a lower limit of 104 cells/mL.

  18. Early Hearing Detection and Intervention: Can Your Baby Hear?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-06-15

    This podcast discusses how important it is that every child receives a hearing screening as soon as possible after birth. It also gives specific ways that parents and health providers can find out if a child has a possible hearing loss and where to get further information. (Created 6/5/2007 by the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, NCBDDD).  Created: 6/15/2007 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 6/25/2007.

  19. Readout of the UFFO Slewing Mirror Telescope to detect UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, J. E.; Lim, H.; Nam, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    The Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) was proposed for rapid response to prompt UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The SMT is a key component of the Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO)-pathfinder, which will be launched aboard the Lomonosov spacecraft at the end of 2013. The SMT utilizes...... a motorized mirror that slews rapidly forward to its target within a second after triggering by an X-ray coded mask camera, which makes unnecessary a reorientation of the entire spacecraft. Subsequent measurement of the UV/optical is accomplished by a 10 cm aperture Ritchey-Chrètien telescope and the focal...... plane detector of Intensified Charge-Coupled Device (ICCD). The ICCD is sensitive to UV/optical photons of 200–650 nm in wavelength by using a UV-enhanced S20 photocathode and amplifies photoelectrons at a gain of 104–106 in double Micro-Channel Plates. These photons are read out by a Kodak KAI-0340...

  20. DO THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR AND SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE SEE THE SAME SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Eric; Briggs, Michael S. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Connaughton, Valerie [Universities Space Research Association, Science and Technology Institute, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Zhang, Bin-Bin [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Lien, Amy [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Goldstein, Adam [NASA Postdoctoral Program, Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Pelassa, Veronique [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 97, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Troja, Eleonora, E-mail: eb0016@uah.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field of view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field of view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and GBM are detecting significantly different populations of SGRBs. Both instruments can detect untriggered SGRBs using ground searches seeded with time and position. The detection of SGRBs below the on-board triggering sensitivities of Swift BAT and Fermi GBM increases the possibility of detecting and localizing the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) events seen by the new generation of GW detectors.

  1. A high-sensitivity optical device for the early monitoring of plant pathogen attack via the in vivo detection of ROS bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhang eZeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biotic stressors, especially pathogenic microorganisms, are rather difficult to detect. In plants, one of the earliest cellular responses following pathogen infection is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In this study, a novel optical device for the early monitoring of Pseudomonas attack was developed; this device measures the ROS level via oxidation-sensitive 2’, 7’-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA-mediated fluorescence, which could provide early monitoring of attacks by a range of plant pathogen; ROS bursts were detected in vivo in Arabidopsis thaliana with higher sensitivity and accuracy than those of a commercial luminescence spectrophotometer. Additionally, the DCF fluorescence truly reflected early changes in the ROS level, as indicated by an evaluation of the H2O2 content and the tight association between the ROS and Pseudomonas concentration. Moreover, compared with traditional methods for detecting plant pathogen attacks based on physiological and biochemical measurements, our proposed technique also offers significant advantages, such as low cost, simplicity, convenient operation and quick turnaround. These results therefore suggest that the proposed optical device could be useful for the rapid monitoring of attacks by plant pathogen and yield results considerably earlier than the appearance of visual changes in plant morphology or growth.

  2. Burst Oscillation Probes of Neutron Stars and Nuclear Burning with LOFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2012-01-01

    X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts--burst oscillations--have provided a new probe of neutron star spins as well as of the dependent nuclear burning processes. The frequency drift and amplitude evolution of the oscillations observed during bursts can in principle place constraints on the physics of thermonuclear flame spreading and the dynamics of the burning atmosphere. I use simulations appropriate to LOFT to explore the precision with which the time dependence of the oscillation frequency can be inferred. This can test, for example, different models for the frequency drift, such as up-lift versus geostrophic drift. I also explore the precision with which asymptotic frequencies can be constrained in order to estimate the capability for LOFT to detect the Doppler shifts induced by orbital motion of the neutron star from a sample of bursts at different orbital phases.

  3. Coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition in a parabolic bursting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lin; Zhang, Jia; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Xiuhui

    2013-03-01

    The transition from tonic spiking to bursting is an important dynamic process that carry physiologically relevant information. In this work, coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition is investigated in a parabolic bursting model with specific discussion on their cooperation effects. Fast/slow analysis shows that weak coupling may help to induce the bursting by changing the geometric property of the fast subsystem so that the original unstable periodical solution are stabilized. It turned out that noise can play the similar stabilization role and induce bursting at appropriate moderate intensity. However, their cooperation may either strengthen or weaken the overall effect depending on the choice of noise level.

  4. Light Dawns on Dark Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most energetic events in the Universe, but some appear curiously faint in visible light. The biggest study to date of these so-called dark gamma-ray bursts, using the GROND instrument on the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla in Chile, has found that these gigantic explosions don't require exotic explanations. Their faintness is now fully explained by a combination of causes, the most important of which is the presence of dust between the Earth and the explosion. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), fleeting events that last from less than a second to several minutes, are detected by orbiting observatories that can pick up their high energy radiation. Thirteen years ago, however, astronomers discovered a longer-lasting stream of less energetic radiation coming from these violent outbursts, which can last for weeks or even years after the initial explosion. Astronomers call this the burst's afterglow. While all gamma-ray bursts [1] have afterglows that give off X-rays, only about half of them were found to give off visible light, with the rest remaining mysteriously dark. Some astronomers suspected that these dark afterglows could be examples of a whole new class of gamma-ray bursts, while others thought that they might all be at very great distances. Previous studies had suggested that obscuring dust between the burst and us might also explain why they were so dim. "Studying afterglows is vital to further our understanding of the objects that become gamma-ray bursts and what they tell us about star formation in the early Universe," says the study's lead author Jochen Greiner from the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching bei München, Germany. NASA launched the Swift satellite at the end of 2004. From its orbit above the Earth's atmosphere it can detect gamma-ray bursts and immediately relay their positions to other observatories so that the afterglows could be studied. In the new study, astronomers combined Swift

  5. Correlative Analysis of GRBs detected by Swift, Konus and HETE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, Hans A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Donaghy, T.; Lamb, D. Q.; Pal'shin, V.; Golenetskii, S.; Ricker, G. R.

    2005-01-01

    Swift has now detected a large enough sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to allow correlation studies of burst parameters. Such studies of earlier data sets have yielded important results leading to further understanding of burst parameters and classifications. This work focuses on seventeen Swift bursts that have also been detected either by Konus-Wind or HETE-II, providing high energy spectra and fits to E(sub peak). Eight of these bursts have spectroscopic redshifts and for others we can estimate redshifts using the variability/luminosity relationship. We can also compare E(sub peak) with E(sub iso), and for those bursts for which a jet break was observed in the afterglow we can derive E(sub g) and test the relationship between E(peak) and E(sub gamma). For all bursts we can derive durations and hardness ratios from the prompt emission.

  6. The Broad-Lined Type Ic SN 2012ap and the Nature of Relativistic Supernovae Lacking a Gamma-Ray Burst Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Parrent, J. T.; Soderberg, A. M.; Fesen, R. A.; Mazzali, P.; Maeda, K.; Sanders, N. E.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of SN2012ap, a broad-lined Type Ic supernova in the galaxy NGC 1729 that produced a relativistic and rapidly decelerating outflow without a gamma-ray burst signature. Photometry and spectroscopy follow the flux evolution from -13 to +272 days past the B-band maximum of -17.4 +/- 0.5 mag. The spectra are dominated by Fe II, O I, and Ca II absorption lines at ejecta velocities of v approx. 20,000 km s(exp. -1) that change slowly over time. Other spectral absorption lines are consistent with contributions from photospheric He I, and hydrogen may also be present at higher velocities (v approx. greater than 27,000 km s(exp. -1)). We use these observations to estimate explosion properties and derive a total ejecta mass of 2.7 Solar mass, a kinetic energy of 1.0×1052 erg, and a (56)Ni mass of 0.1-0.2 Solar mass. Nebular spectra (t > 200 d) exhibit an asymmetric double-peaked [O I] lambda lambda 6300, 6364 emission profile that we associate with absorption in the supernova interior, although toroidal ejecta geometry is an alternative explanation. SN2012ap joins SN2009bb as another exceptional supernova that shows evidence for a central engine (e.g., black-hole accretion or magnetar) capable of launching a non-negligible portion of ejecta to relativistic velocities without a coincident gamma-ray burst detection. Defining attributes of their progenitor systems may be related to notable properties including above-average environmental metallicities of Z approx. greater than Solar Z, moderate to high levels of host-galaxy extinction (E(B -V ) > 0.4 mag), detection of high-velocity helium at early epochs, and a high relative flux ratio of [Ca II]/[O I] > 1 at nebular epochs. These events support the notion that jet activity at various energy scales may be present in a wide range of supernovae.

  7. THE BROAD-LINED Type Ic SN 2012ap AND THE NATURE OF RELATIVISTIC SUPERNOVAE LACKING A GAMMA-RAY BURST DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Parrent, J. T.; Soderberg, A. M.; Sanders, N. E.; Kamble, A.; Chakraborti, S.; Drout, M. R.; Kirshner, R. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fesen, R. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Mazzali, P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Maeda, K. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Cenko, S. B. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Silverman, J. M. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Filippenko, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Pickering, T. E. [Southern African Large Telescope, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Kawabata, K. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hattori, T. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hsiao, E. Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Stritzinger, M. D., E-mail: dmilisav@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); and others

    2015-01-20

    We present ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of SN 2012ap, a broad-lined Type Ic supernova in the galaxy NGC 1729 that produced a relativistic and rapidly decelerating outflow without a gamma-ray burst signature. Photometry and spectroscopy follow the flux evolution from –13 to +272 days past the B-band maximum of –17.4 ± 0.5 mag. The spectra are dominated by Fe II, O I, and Ca II absorption lines at ejecta velocities of v ≈ 20,000 km s{sup –1} that change slowly over time. Other spectral absorption lines are consistent with contributions from photospheric He I, and hydrogen may also be present at higher velocities (v ≳ 27,000 km s{sup –1}). We use these observations to estimate explosion properties and derive a total ejecta mass of ∼2.7 M {sub ☉}, a kinetic energy of ∼1.0 × 10{sup 52} erg, and a {sup 56}Ni mass of 0.1-0.2 M {sub ☉}. Nebular spectra (t > 200 days) exhibit an asymmetric double-peaked [O I] λλ6300, 6364 emission profile that we associate with absorption in the supernova interior, although toroidal ejecta geometry is an alternative explanation. SN 2012ap joins SN 2009bb as another exceptional supernova that shows evidence for a central engine (e.g., black hole accretion or magnetar) capable of launching a non-negligible portion of ejecta to relativistic velocities without a coincident gamma-ray burst detection. Defining attributes of their progenitor systems may be related to notable observed properties including environmental metallicities of Z ≳ Z {sub ☉}, moderate to high levels of host galaxy extinction (E(B – V) > 0.4 mag), detection of high-velocity helium at early epochs, and a high relative flux ratio of [Ca II]/[O I] >1 at nebular epochs. These events support the notion that jet activity at various energy scales may be present in a wide range of supernovae.

  8. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, NL-1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  9. The Fermi-GBM X-Ray Burst Monitor: Thermonuclear Bursts from 4U 0614+09

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; van der Horst, A.J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Chakrabarty, D.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P.N.; Briggs, M.S.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi

  10. INTEGRAL Results on Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kevin C.

    2008-03-01

    Prompt, precise localizations of gamma-ray bursts imaged by IBIS are being disseminated at a rate of about 10 per year (49 to date). The INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS) produces automated alerts within 10's of seconds, giving positions which are accurate to several arcminutes for events as weak as 5.7 x 10-8 erg cm-2. IBIS is also a very sensitive detector of soft gamma repeaters (SGRs). It has detected well over 200 bursts from SGR1806-20, down to a fluence of 7×10-9 erg cm-2. An unexpected discovery is that the quiescent X-ray emission of this source and SGR 1900+14 is considerably harder than previous measurements indicated, and extends to 200 keV, a property which SGRs share with the AXP's. In addition, the SPI anti-coincidence shield (ACS) system is an extremely useful component of the interplanetary network. With its isotropic response, it detects about 66 confirmed bursts/year ( 450 to date) down to a threshold of 4.8×10-8 erg cm-2, many of which can be localized by triangulation. Most of these events are not detected by Swift or IBIS due to their limited fields of view. The triangulation results are currently being used to search for coincident neutrino emission, for gravitational radiation simultaneous with GRBs, and for coincidences between Type Ic supernovae and bursts, among other things. The SPI ACS has recently played a key role in localizing and identifying two events which are believed to be extragalactic giant magnetar flares (EMFs), from M81 and M31. LIGO was operating at the time of one of these events, and their observations support the EMF hypothesis. SPI is also being used as a Compton-scatter polarimeter for GRBs. Kalemci et al. (2007) and McGlynn et al. (2007) studied its response to GRB041219a, and obtained polarizations of 98% +/- 33%, and 63% (+31%,-30%) respectively.

  11. How Intrusion Detection Can Improve Software Decoy Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monteiro, Valter

    2003-01-01

    This research concerns information security and computer-network defense. It addresses how to handle the information of log files and intrusion-detection systems to recognize when a system is under attack...

  12. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M.S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R.M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H-F.; Bhat, P.N.; Burgess, J.M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M.M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B..B.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the

  13. [Anisometropia can only be detected by a monocular vision examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Læborg, Nina Johanna Schmidt; Hjorth, Malene; Baggesen, Kirsten Lau

    2014-07-07

    In recent years the Eye Department at Aalborg University Hospital has had many referrals of older children with severe amblyopia due to anisometropia. Anisometropia is not visible, thus a monocular vision examination is needed in order to detect it. Early detection increases the possibilities for a better post treatment visual acuity. Recent studies indicate positive treatment response also in older children, and some older individuals respond dramatically. Currently it is not possible to predict who will respond, and therefore treatment should be offered despite the age of the child if the child and parents are motivated for it.

  14. Gravitational waves and neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, Christopher Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are not only strong sources of gammaray emission, but also of neutrinos and gravitational waves (GWs). Observat.ions of these particles can provide a good deal of insight into the progenitor and engine behind these outbursts. But to do so, these particles must be detected . Here we review the different phases of GW and neutrino emission from a range of GRB progenitors, outlining the features and detectability of these phases. Unfortunately, except for a few cases, the detection of non-photon emission is very difficult. But the potential gain from any detection make understanding these sources critically important.

  15. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  16. Statistical properties of SGR 1806-20 bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göğüş, E.; Woods, P.M.; Kouveliotou, C.; van Paradijs, J.; Briggs, M.S.; Duncan, R.C.; Thompson, C.

    2000-01-01

    We present statistics of SGR 1806-20 bursts, combining 290 events detected with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array, 111 events detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment, and 134 events detected with the International Cometary Explorer. We find that the fluence

  17. Adaptive Optical Burst Switching

    OpenAIRE

    Bonald, Thomas; Indre, Raluca-Maria; Oueslati, Sara

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We propose a modified version of Optical Burst Switching (OBS) that adapts the size of switched data units to the network load. Specifically, we propose a two-way reservation OBS scheme in which every active source-destination pair attempts to reserve a lightpath and for every successful reservation, transmits an optical burst whose size is proportional to the number of active data flows. We refer to this technique as Adaptive Optical Burst Switching. We prove that the...

  18. Burst Oscillations: Watching Neutron Stars Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2010-01-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the first detection of rotationally modulated emission from X-ray bursting neutron stars, "burst oscillations," This phenomenon enables us to see neutron stars spin, as the X-ray burst flux asymmetrically lights up the surface. It has enabled a new way to probe the neutron star spin frequency distribution, as well as to elucidate the multidimensional nature of nuclear burning on neutron stars. I will review our current observational understanding of the phenomenon, with an eye toward highlighting some of the interesting remaining puzzles, of which there is no shortage.

  19. Spirometry filters can be used to detect exhaled respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alicia B; Mourad, Bassel; Tovey, Euan; Buddle, Lachlan; Peters, Matthew; Morgan, Lucy; Oliver, Brian G

    2016-09-26

    Respiratory viruses are very common in the community and contribute to the burden of illness for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, including acute exacerbations. Traditional sampling methods are invasive and problematic to repeat. Accordingly, we explored whether respiratory viruses could be isolated from disposable spirometry filters and whether detection of viruses in this context represented presence in the upper or lower respiratory tract. Discovery (n  =  53) and validation (n  =  49) cohorts were recruited from a hospital outpatient department during two different time periods. Spirometry mouthpiece filters were collected from all participants. Respiratory secretions were sampled from the upper and lower respiratory tract by nasal washing (NW), sputum, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). All samples were examined using RT-PCR to identify a panel of respiratory viruses (rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza virus 1, 2 & 3, and human metapneumovirus). Rhinovirus was quantified using qPCR. Paired filter-NW samples (n  =  29), filter-sputum samples (n  =  24), filter-BAL samples (n  =  39) and filter-NW-BAL samples (n  =  10) provided a range of comparisons. At least one virus was detected in any sample in 85% of participants in the discovery cohort versus 45% in the validation cohort. Overall, 72% of viruses identified in the paired comparator method matched those detected in spirometry filters. There was a high correlation between viruses identified in spirometry filters compared with viruses identified in both the upper and lower respiratory tract using traditional sampling methods. Our results suggest that examination of spirometry filters may be a novel and inexpensive sampling method for the presence of respiratory viruses in exhaled breath.

  20. Genetic spatial autocorrelation can readily detect sex-biased dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Sam C; Peakall, Rod

    2012-05-01

    Sex-biased dispersal is expected to generate differences in the fine-scale genetic structure of males and females. Therefore, spatial analyses of multilocus genotypes may offer a powerful approach for detecting sex-biased dispersal in natural populations. However, the effects of sex-biased dispersal on fine-scale genetic structure have not been explored. We used simulations and multilocus spatial autocorrelation analysis to investigate how sex-biased dispersal influences fine-scale genetic structure. We evaluated three statistical tests for detecting sex-biased dispersal: bootstrap confidence intervals about autocorrelation r values and recently developed heterogeneity tests at the distance class and whole correlogram levels. Even modest sex bias in dispersal resulted in significantly different fine-scale spatial autocorrelation patterns between the sexes. This was particularly evident when dispersal was strongly restricted in the less-dispersing sex (mean distance autocorrelation analyses to test for sex-biased dispersal are: (i) maximize sample size, not locus number; (ii) concentrate sampling within the scale of positive structure; (iii) evaluate several distance class sizes; (iv) use appropriate methods when combining data from multiple populations; (v) compare the appropriate groups of individuals. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Can nanotechnology improve cancer diagnosis through miRNA detection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiammengo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression, and alterations in their expression levels correlate with the onset and progression of cancer. Although miRNAs have been proposed as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, their application in routine clinical praxis is yet to come. Current quantification strategies have limitation, and there is a great interest in developing innovative ones. Since a few years, nanotechnology-based approaches for miRNA quantification are emerging at fast pace but there is urgent need to go beyond the proof-of-concept stage. Nanotechnology will have a strong impact on cancer diagnosis through miRNA detection only if it is demonstrated that the newly developed approaches are indeed working on 'real-world' samples under standardized conditions.

  2. MRI can accurately detect meniscal ramp lesions of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Justin W; Herbst, Elmar; Burnham, Jeremy M; Soni, Ashish; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Popchak, Adam; Fu, Freddie H; Musahl, Volker

    2017-12-01

    Posterior horn meniscal tears are commonly found in conjunction with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Some believe tears in the posterior meniscocapsular zone, coined ramp lesions, are important to knee stability. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pre-operative MRI evaluation was able to accurately and reproducibly identify ramp lesions. Three blinded reviewers assessed MRIs twice for the presence of ramp lesions in patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for MRI were calculated based on arthroscopic diagnosis of a ramp lesion. Intra-class correlation coefficient was calculated to assess intra- and interobserver reliability of the MRI assessment between the three examiners. Significance was set at p ramp lesions, while the other 77 had other meniscal pathology. Sensitivity of detecting a ramp lesion on MRI ranged from 53.9 to 84.6%, while specificity was 92.3-98.7%. Negative predictive value was 91.1-97.4%, while positive predictive value was 50.0-90.0%. Inter-rater reliability between three reviewers was moderate at 0.56. The observers had excellent intra-rater reliability ranging from 0.75 to 0.81. This study demonstrates high sensitivity and excellent specificity in detecting meniscal ramp lesions on MRI. Ramp lesions are likely more common and may have greater clinical implications than previously appreciated; the outcomes of untreated lesions must be investigated. Pre-operative identification of ramp lesions may aid clinicians in surgical planning and patient education to improve outcomes by addressing pathology which may have otherwise been missed. III.

  3. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    polarisation properties of the afterglow of GRB 030329 as it developed after the explosion. Hypernovae, the source of GRBs, are indeed so far away that they can only be seen as unresolved points of light. To probe their spatial structure, astronomers have thus to rely on a trick: polarimetry (see ESO PR 23/03). Polarimetry works as follows: light is composed of electromagnetic waves which oscillate in certain directions (planes). Reflection or scattering of light favours certain orientations of the electric and magnetic fields over others. This is why polarising sunglasses can filter out the glint of sunlight reflecting off a pond. The radiation in a gamma-ray burst is generated in an ordered magnetic field, as so-called synchrotron radiation [3]. If the hypernova is spherically symmetric, all orientations of the electromagnetic waves will be present equally and will average out, so there will be no net polarisation. If, however, the gas is not ejected symmetrically, but into a jet, a slight net polarisation will be imprinted on the light. This net polarisation will change with time since the opening angle of the jet widens with time, and we see a different fraction of the emission cone. Studying the polarisation properties of the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst thus allows to gain knowledge about the underlying spatial structures and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the region where the radiation is generated. " And doing this over a long period of time, as the afterglow fades and evolves, provides us with a unique diagnostic tool for gamma-ray burst studies ", says Jochen Greiner . Although previous single measurements of the polarisation of GRB's optical afterglow exist, no detailed study has ever been done of the evolution of polarisation with time. This is indeed a very demanding task, only possible with an extremely stable instrument on the largest telescope... and a sufficient bright optical afterglow. As soon as GRB 030329 was detected, the team of

  4. Part 1: The detection of criticality accidents in the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. Part 2: The Burst Slug Detection; 1. partie: la detection des accidents de criticite au Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. 2. partie.: la detection des ruptures de gaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debrie, G.; Lavie, J.; Planque, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In all installations where fissionable materials are handled in quantities virtually greater than the critical mass, there exists permanent risk of accidental nuclear excursion entailing a serious irradiation hazard to the personnel, in spite of all the precautions that might be taken. Immediate detection followed by rapid evacuation greatly limits the risks of irradiation due to the fission products or to the sustained nuclear reaction. The necessity for a suitable equipment for the detection of accidents of criticality is imposed by the fact that the physical phenomena accompanying a nuclear, excursion are insufficient to follow the alarm, and may lead to confusion. Taking into account the accidents which have occurred and the role expected from a detector, we choose a dose integration device for the detecting probe proper, and a system based on the coincidence of several information to trigger the alarm. At the demand of the Commission des Masses Critiques, the minimal physical and electronic features required to obtain a very reliable system with minimal risk of false alarm has been established. These features are described in some detail. The equipment constructed at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique on the basis of these recommendations has been tested systematically under actual conditions of nuclear excursions at the Health Physics Research Reactor of the National Laboratory at Oak Ridge. These tests have served to determine two types of detection probes which will be described: a photomultiplier and a semiconductor probe. Finally the authors present an example of a complete unit for the detection of criticality accidents in an installation for the processing of fissile material. B - The evolution of the installations for burst slug detection (BSD) in french reactors. The main part of the effort in the field of the Burst Slug Detection has been orientated on the large gas-cooled reactors where the problem of bursts slugs is associated with the

  5. Bipolar Transistors Can Detect Charge in Electrostatic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, L.

    2012-01-01

    A simple charge indicator with bipolar transistors is described that can be used in various electrostatic experiments. Its behaviour enables us to elucidate links between 'static electricity' and electric currents. In addition it allows us to relate the sign of static charges to the sign of the terminals of an ordinary battery. (Contains 7 figures…

  6. Nonlinear ultrasound can detect accumulated damage in human bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, M; Mitton, D; Talmant, M; Johnson, P; Laugier, P

    2008-01-01

    Bone micro-damage is commonly accepted as a relevant parameter for fracture risk assessment, but there is no available technique for its non-invasive characterization. The objective of this work is to study the potential of nonlinear ultrasound for damage detection in human bone. Ultrasound is particularly desirable due to its non-invasive and non-ionizing characteristics. We show results illustrating the correlation of progressive fatigue of human bone samples to their nonlinear dynamical response. In our experiments, damage was induced in 30 samples of diaphyseal human femur using fatigue cycling. At intervals in the cycling, the nonlinear response of the samples was assessed applying Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS). The nonlinear parameter alpha, which in other materials correlates with the quantity of damage, dramatically increased with the number of mechanical testing cycles. We find a large spread in alpha in the pristine samples and infer that the spread is due to damage differences in the sample population. As damage accumulates during cycling, we find that alpha is much more sensitive to damage than other quantities measured, including the slope and hysteresis of the load/displacement curve, and the dynamic wavespeed. To our knowledge, this study represents the first application of the concept of nonlinear dynamic elasticity to human bone. The results are promising, suggesting the value of further work on this topic. Ultimately, the approach may have merit for in vivo bone damage characterization.

  7. King penguins can detect two odours associated with conspecifics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Gregory B; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies on olfaction in penguins have focused on their use of odours while foraging. It has been proposed for some seabirds that an olfactory landscape shaped by odours coming from feeding areas exists. Islands and colonies, however, may also contribute to the olfactory landscape and may act as an orienting map. To test sensitivities to a colony scent we studied whether King penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) could detect the smell of sand, feathers or feces by holding presentations beneath their beaks while they naturally slept on the beach. Penguins had a significantly greater response to the feathers and feces presentations than to sand. Although only a first step in exploring a broader role of olfaction in this species, our results raise the possibility of olfaction being used by King penguins in three potential ways: (1) locating the colony from the water or the shore, (2) finding the rendezvous zone within the colony where a chick or partner may be found, or (3) recognizing individuals by scent, as in Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus demersus). © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Great cormorants ( Phalacrocorax carbo) can detect auditory cues while diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kirstin Anderson; Maxwell, Alyssa; Siebert, Ursula; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-06-01

    In-air hearing in birds has been thoroughly investigated. Sound provides birds with auditory information for species and individual recognition from their complex vocalizations, as well as cues while foraging and for avoiding predators. Some 10% of existing species of birds obtain their food under the water surface. Whether some of these birds make use of acoustic cues while underwater is unknown. An interesting species in this respect is the great cormorant ( Phalacrocorax carbo), being one of the most effective marine predators and relying on the aquatic environment for food year round. Here, its underwater hearing abilities were investigated using psychophysics, where the bird learned to detect the presence or absence of a tone while submerged. The greatest sensitivity was found at 2 kHz, with an underwater hearing threshold of 71 dB re 1 μPa rms. The great cormorant is better at hearing underwater than expected, and the hearing thresholds are comparable to seals and toothed whales in the frequency band 1-4 kHz. This opens up the possibility of cormorants and other aquatic birds having special adaptations for underwater hearing and making use of underwater acoustic cues from, e.g., conspecifics, their surroundings, as well as prey and predators.

  9. Observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows with the AEOS Burst Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Heather Anne

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are variable bursts of gamma-ray radiation, that lasts from milliseconds to hundreds of seconds. These bursts of gamma rays are detected in other wavelengths (optical, IR, radio, X-ray), because the afterglow lasts much longer, and this enables us to learn more about GRBs. The AEOS Burst Camera (ABC) is a 6'x6' field of view camera designed to observe the optical afterglows of GRBs, and is mounted on the 3.67m Advanced Electro- Optical System (AEOS) telescope, located at 10,000ft on Haleakala, Hawaii. There are 45 hours of Target of Opportunity (ToO) time to observe GRBs detected by Swift and other GRB satellites. Observations are started within minutes after a suitable GRB is detected, and continue for an hour or two. During this project, 21 GRBs were observed, and of those, 10 had detected afterglows, and 4 had interesting limits. About half of the bursts fit the fireball model, and half did not, which is similar to what ROTSE has found. Roughly half of the ABC bursts fall in the dark category, with b ox Akerlof Sr, Swan (2007) found, that roughly 70% of all GRBs brighter than 22nd mag at 1000s should be detectable.

  10. ASKAP Joins the Hunt for Mysterious Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    A new telescope, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), has joined the search for energetic and elusive fast radio bursts. And in just a few days of looking, its already had success!Elusive TransientsThe Parkes radio telescope, which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date, has a very narrow field of view. [CSIRO]Fast radio bursts are mysterious millisecond-duration radio pulses that were first discovered around a decade ago. Since that time particularly in recent years weve made some progress toward the goal of localizing them. Were now fairly convinced that fast radio bursts come from outside of the galaxy, and yet theyre enormously bright orders of magnitude more luminous than any pulse seen from the Milky Way.Better identification of where these mysterious bursts come from would help us to determine what they are. But so far, weve discovered only around 30 such bursts, despite the fact that theyre estimated to occur at a rate of 3,000 events per day across the whole sky.Why are they so hard to find? Due to their short duration, effective detection would require instantaneous coverage of a very large fraction of the sky. The Parkes radio telescope which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date has a field of view spanning less than a square degree,significantly limiting our ability to rapidly survey for these transients.FRB 170107s band-averaged pulse (top) and dynamic spectrum (bottom). [Bannister et al. 2017]A New Array in TownA new player is now on the scene, however, and its already had huge success. ASKAP is a wide-field radio telescope made up of an array of 12-meter antennas. Using phased-array-feed technology, ASKAP is able to instantaneously observe an effective area of 160 square degrees an enormous field compared to Parkes 0.6 square degrees! This capability significantly increases our chances of being able to detect fast radio bursts.In a new study led by Keith Bannister

  11. Gamma-ray bursts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe...

  12. QKD-Based Secured Burst Integrity Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2016-03-01

    The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. It is quite evident that people prefer optical communication when it comes to large amount of data involving its transmission. The concept of switching in networks has matured enormously with several researches, architecture to implement and methods starting with Optical circuit switching to Optical Burst Switching. Optical burst switching is regarded as viable solution for switching bursts over networks but has several security vulnerabilities. However, this work exploited the security issues associated with Optical Burst Switching with respect to integrity of burst. This proposed Quantum Key based Secure Hash Algorithm (QKBSHA-512) with enhanced compression function design provides better avalanche effect over the conventional integrity algorithms.

  13. Polarized Emission from Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiho Kobayashi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available I review how polarization signals have been discussed in the research field of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs. I mainly discuss two subjects in which polarimetry enables us to study the nature of relativistic jets. (1 Jet breaks: Gamma-ray bursts are produced in ultra-relativistic jets. Due to the relativistic beaming effect, the emission can be modeled in a spherical model at early times. However, as the jet gradually slows down, we begin to see the edge of the jet together with polarized signals at some point. (2 Optical flash: later time afterglow is known to be insensitive to the properties of the original ejecta from the GRB central engine. However, a short-lived, reverse shock emission would enable us to study the nature of of GRB jets. I also briefly discuss the recent detection of optical circular polarization in GRB afterglow.

  14. Correction of the recording artifacts and detection of the functional deviations in ECG by means of syndrome decoding with an automatic burst error correction of the cyclic codes using periodograms for determination of code component spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenie D. Adamoviс

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims This paper describes a novel approach to the analysis of electrocardiographic data based on the consideration of the repetitive P, Q, R, S, T sequences as cyclic codes. In Part I we introduce a principle similar to the syndrome decoding using the control numbers, which allows correcting the noise combinations. Materials and methods We propose to apply the burst-error-correcting algorithms for automatic detection of the ECG artifacts and the functional abnormalities, including those compared to the reference model. Our approach is compared to the symbolic dynamics methods in cardiology practice. During the automated search of the code components (i.e. point values and spectral ranges one-to-one corresponding to P, Q, R, S, T considered in Part II, the authors apply the Lomb-Scargle periodogram method with the phase control which allows to determine the code components not only from the main harmonics, but also using the sidebands, avoiding the phase errors. Results The results of the method testing on rats with the heart failure using a simplified telemetric recording from the implantable chips are given in Part III. A complete independence of the results of the determination of the code points (fingerprints from the variables for which the calculation is performed is shown. We also prove the robustness of the above approach with respect to the most types of the non-adaptive filtration. Conclusion The above method can be useful not only for experimental medicine, but also for veterinary and clinical diagnostic practice. This method is adequately reproducable both on animals and human ECG, except for some constant values.

  15. Correction of the recording artifacts and detection of the functional deviations in ECG by means of syndrome decoding with an automatic burst error correction of the cyclic codes using periodograms for determination of code component spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenie D. Adamoviс

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims This paper describes a novel approach to the analysis of electrocardiographic data based on the consideration of the repetitive P, Q, R, S, T sequences as cyclic codes. In Part I we introduce a principle similar to the syndrome decoding using the control numbers, which allows correcting the noise combinations. Materials and methods We propose to apply the burst-error-correcting algorithms for automatic detection of the ECG artifacts and the functional abnormalities, including those compared to the reference model. Our approach is compared to the symbolic dynamics methods. During the automated search of the code components (i.e. point values and spectral ranges one-to-one corresponding to P, Q, R, S, T considered in Part II, the authors apply the Lomb-Scargle periodogram method with the phase control which allows to determine the code components not only from the main harmonics, but also using the sidebands, avoiding the phase errors. Results The results of the method testing on rats with the heart failure using a simplified telemetric recording from the implantable chips are given in Part III. A complete independence of the results of the determination of the code points (fingerprints from the variables for which the calculation is performed is shown. We also prove the robustness of the above approach with respect to the most types of the non-adaptive filtration. Conclusion The above method can be useful not only for experimental medicine, but also for veterinary and clinical diagnostic practice. This method is adequately reproduced both on animals and human ECG, except for some constant values.

  16. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  17. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H.-F.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M. M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  18. POPULATION SYNTHESIS AND GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. FREYER

    2000-12-11

    Population synthesis studies of binaries are always limited by a myriad of uncertainties from the poorly understood effects of binary mass transfer and common envelope evolution to the many uncertainties that still remain in stellar evolution. But the importance of these uncertainties depends both upon the objects being studied and the questions asked about these objects. Here I review the most critical uncertainties in the population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors. With a better understanding of these uncertainties, binary population synthesis can become a powerful tool in understanding, and constraining, gamma-ray burst models. In turn, as gamma-ray bursts become more important as cosmological probes, binary population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors becomes an important tool in cosmology.

  19. Gamma Ray Bursts Observations and Theoretical Conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Alagoz, E; Carrillo, C; Golup, G T; Grimes, M; Herrera, Mora C; Gallo, Palomino J L; López, Vega A; Wicht, J

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short bursts of very high energy photons which were discovered in the late 1960s. Ever since their discovery, scientists have wondered about their origin. Nowadays it is known that they originate outside the Milky Way because of their high red shift rst measured in the afterglows thanks to the Beppo-SAX satellite and ground-based observations. However, theoreticians still do not agree about the mechanism that generates the bursts, and different competing models are animatedly debated. Current GRB experiments include the Swift satellite and the Pierre Auger Observatory that could detect GRBs with an increase of the background. A forthcoming dedicated experiment is GLAST, a satellite observatory for detecting gamma rays with energies up to 300 GeV, whose launch is scheduled for early 2008.

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  1. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.

    1995-01-01

    of the observations of the time histories and spectral evolution of the detected events provided by the different instruments in different energy ranges. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts (histories. They have harder energy spectra than the long (> 2 s) events. Evidence of the existence...... of four differently behaving componenents in gamma-ray burst spectra is discussed. Statistical properties of the gamma-ray burst sources based on the 5 years of observations with (∼ 10−6 erg/cm2) sensitivity as well as the results of high sensitivity (∼ 10−8 erg/cm2) search for Gamma-Ray Bursts within...

  2. Correlative Analysis of GRBs Detected by Swift and Suzaku- WAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, H.A.; Sakamoto, T.; Yamaoka, K.; Sugita, S.; Ohno, M.; Sato, G.; Hara, R.; Ohmori, N.; Tanaka, H.; Yamauchi, M.; hide

    2009-01-01

    It is now well known that a complete understanding of the energetics of the prompt phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) requires full knowledge of the spectrum, extending at least as high as the peak energy (Epeak) of the vF(v) spectrum. Since most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have Epeak above the energy range (15-150 keV) of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, a full understanding of the prompt emission from Swift GRBs requires spectral fits over as broad an energy range as possible. This can be completed for bursts which are simultaneously detected by Swift BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-Sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range from 50-5000 keV. Between the launch of Suzaku in July 2005 and the end of 2008, there were 44 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which triggered both Swift and WAM and an additional 41 bursts which triggered Swift and were detected by WAM, but did not trigger. A joint BAT-WAM team has cross-calibrated the two instruments using GRBs, and we are now able to perform joint fits on these bursts to determine spectral parameters including Epeak. The results of broad spectral fits allows us to understand the distribution of Epeak for Swift bursts and to calibrate Epeak estimators when Epeak is within the BAT energy range. For those bursts with spectroscopic redshifts, we can calculate the isotropic energy and study various correlations between Epeak and other global burst parameters. Here we present the results of joint Swift/BAT-Suzaku/WAM spectral fits for 77 of the bursts jointly detected by the two instruments. We show that the distribution of spectral fit parameters is consistent with distributions from earlier missions and confirm that Swift bursts are consistent with earlier reported relationships between Epeak and isotropic energy. We show through time-resolved spectroscopy that individual burst pulses are also consistent with this relationship.

  3. Type III Radio Burst Duration and SEP Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-duration (>15 min), low-frequency (SEP events of solar cycle 23. The Type III durations are distributed symmetrically at 1 MHz yielding a mean value of approximately 33 min (median = 32 min) for the large SEP events. When the SEP events with ground level enhancement (GLE,) are considered, the distribution is essentially unchanged (mean = 32 min, median = 30 min). To test the importance of type III bursts in indicating SEP events, we considered a set of six type III bursts from the same active region (AR 10588) whose durations fit the "long duration" criterion. We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type II radio bursts associated with the type III bursts. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type II burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type II burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 rein) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event, consistent with the statistical study of Cliver and Ling (2009, ApJ ).

  4. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trap...

  5. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  6. WATCH observations of gamma ray bursts during 1990–1992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1994-01-01

    The first WATCH/GRANAT Gamma‐Ray Burst Catalogue comprises 70 events which have been detected by WATCH during the period December 1989–September 1992. 32 GRBs could be localized within a 3σ error radii of 1°. We have found a weak (2.2σ) clustering of these 32 bursts towards the Galactic Center...

  7. The width of the gamma-ray burst luminosity function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulmer, A.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity function through the distribution of GRB peak count rates, Cpeak, as detected by Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) (1993). In the context of Galactic corona spatial distribution models, we attempt to place constaints on the

  8. A GMPLS/OBS network architecture enabling QoS-aware end-to-end burst transport

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso, Pedro; Perelló Muntan, Jordi; Spadaro, Salvatore; Careglio, Davide; Solé Pareta, Josep; Klinkowski, Miroslaw

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)-enabled Optical Burst Switched (OBS) network architecture featuring end-to-end QoS-aware burst transport services. This is achieved by setting up burst Label Switched Paths (LSPs) properly dimensioned to match specific burst drop probability requirements. These burst LSPs are used for specific guaranteed QoS levels, whereas the remaining network capacity can be left for best-effort burst support. Aiming to ensure...

  9. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  10. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lekshmi Resmi

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) were serendipitously discovered in late 1960s by the Vela military satel- lites. In the following years, dedicated scanning instru- ments on-board high energy missions like BeppoSAX1,. CGRO2, HETE3, Swift4 and Fermi5 have increased the number of GRB detections to several ...

  11. Gamma-ray bursts observed by the watch experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    After two years in orbit the WATCH instruments on the GRANAT space observatory have localized seven gamma burst sources with better than 1° accuracy. In several cases, follow‐up observations with Schmidt telescopes have been made within a few days. Some of the bursts have also been detected by th...... by the distant space probes PVO and ULYSSES and there are, therefore, good prospects for obtaining much improved positions using the burst arrival times. The existence of the almost concurrent Schmidt plates could then become particularly interesting.......After two years in orbit the WATCH instruments on the GRANAT space observatory have localized seven gamma burst sources with better than 1° accuracy. In several cases, follow‐up observations with Schmidt telescopes have been made within a few days. Some of the bursts have also been detected...

  12. BATSE Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Valerie

    2002-01-01

    With the observation of low-energy radiation coming from the site of gamma-ray bursts in the hours to weeks after the initial gamma ray burst, it appears that astronomers have discovered a cosmological imprint made by the burster on its surroundings. This paper discusses the phenomenon of postburst emission in Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) gamma-ray bursts at energies usually associated with prompt emission. After summing up the background-subtracted signals from hundreds of bursts, it is found that tails out to hundreds of seconds after the trigger could be a common feature of events of a duration greater than 2 seconds, and perhaps of the shorter bursts at a lower and shorter-lived level. The tail component may be softer and seems independent of the duration (within the long-GRB sample) and brightness of the prompt burst emission. Some individual bursts have visible tails at gamma-ray energies, and the spectrum in a few cases differs from that of the prompt emission. For one of these bursts, GRB 991216, afterglow at lower energies was detected, which raised the possibility of seeing afterglow observations over large energy ranges using the next generation of GRB detectors in addition to sensitive space- or ground-based telescopes.

  13. A Fast Radio Burst Every Second?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    How frequently do fast radio busts occur in the observable universe? Two researchers have now developed a new estimate.Extragalactic SignalsIn 2007, scientists looking through archival pulsar data discovered a transient radio pulse a flash that lasted only a few milliseconds. Since then, weve found another 22 such fast radio bursts (FRBs), yet we still dont know what causes these energetic signals.Artists illustration of the Very Large Array pinpointing the location of FRB 121102. [Bill Saxton/NRAO/AUI/NSF/Hubble Legacy Archive/ESA/NASA]Recently, some clues have finally come from FRB 121102, the only FRB ever observed to repeat. The multiple pulses detected from this source over the last five years have allowed us to confirm its extragalactic origin and pinpoint an origin for this FRB: a small, low-mass, metal-poor dwarf galaxy located about three billion light-years away.Is FRB 121102 typical? How frequently do such bursts occur, and how frequently can we hope to be able to detect them in the future? And what might these rates tell us about their origins? Two scientists from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Anastasia Fialkov and Abraham Loeb, have now taken a phenomenological approach to answering these questions.Influencing FactorsFialkov and Loeb arguethat there are three main factors that influence the rate of observable FRBs in the universe:The spectral shape of the individual FRBsFRB 121102 had a Gaussian-like spectral profile, which means it peaks in a narrow range of frequencies and may not be detectable outside of that band. If this is typical for FRBs, then signals of distant FRBs may become redshifted to outside of the frequency band that we observe, making them undetectable.FRB detection rates in the 1.253.5GHz band predicted by the authors models (red and blue solid and dashed lines), as a function of the flux limit for detection (top) and as a function of the FRB hosts redshift (bottom). Grey circles mark our detections of FRBs thus

  14. An Accurate and Efficient Algorithm for Detection of Radio Bursts with an Unknown Dispersion Measure, for Single-dish Telescopes and Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackay, Barak; Ofek, Eran O.

    2017-01-01

    Astronomical radio signals are subjected to phase dispersion while traveling through the interstellar medium. To optimally detect a short-duration signal within a frequency band, we have to precisely compensate for the unknown pulse dispersion, which is a computationally demanding task. We present the “fast dispersion measure transform” algorithm for optimal detection of such signals. Our algorithm has a low theoretical complexity of 2{N}f{N}t+{N}t{N}{{Δ }}{{log}}2({N}f), where Nf, Nt, and NΔ are the numbers of frequency bins, time bins, and dispersion measure bins, respectively. Unlike previously suggested fast algorithms, our algorithm conserves the sensitivity of brute-force dedispersion. Our tests indicate that this algorithm, running on a standard desktop computer and implemented in a high-level programming language, is already faster than the state-of-the-art dedispersion codes running on graphical processing units (GPUs). We also present a variant of the algorithm that can be efficiently implemented on GPUs. The latter algorithm’s computation and data-transport requirements are similar to those of a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform, indicating that incoherent dedispersion can now be considered a nonissue while planning future surveys. We further present a fast algorithm for sensitive detection of pulses shorter than the dispersive smearing limits of incoherent dedispersion. In typical cases, this algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than enumerating dispersion measures and coherently dedispersing by convolution. We analyze the computational complexity of pulsed signal searches by radio interferometers. We conclude that, using our suggested algorithms, maximally sensitive blind searches for dispersed pulses are feasible using existing facilities. We provide an implementation of these algorithms in Python and MATLAB.

  15. Spitzer ToO observations of a short gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kevin; Bloom, Joshua; Butler, Nathaniel; Falco, Emilio; Foley, Ryan; Granot, Jonathan; Kocevski, Daniel; Lee, William; Li, Weidong; Mahoney, William; Pahre, Michael; Panaitescu, Alin; Perley, Daniel; Prochaska, Jason; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Smith, Ian; Squires, Gordon

    2008-03-01

    An understanding of the origin of the short gamma-ray bursts remains an elusive and exciting pursuit. A great leap forward has been made over the past three years with the first rapid localizations and afterglow detections of such events, but follow-up has yet to reveal a detailed understanding of the progenitors and the nature of the afterglow light. We propose an ambitious multiwavelength approach to the problem, leveraging Spitzer with Chandra as well as numerous ground-based telescopes. By measuring the broad-band spectrum of the afterglow and any concurrent 'mini-supernova ' over a wide range of wavelengths at several epochs, we can distinguish between models proposed to explain this type of burst. We will constrain the energetics of the explosion and the short GRB bursting rate (an important number for gravitational wave observatories), and measure with unprecedented detail the stellar content of a short burst host galaxy. Given the high impact nature of these observations and the rarity of short bursts, we are requesting multiepoch Target of Opportunity observations on a single event in Cycle 5. The wavelengths observed by Spitzer, when used in coordination with these other instruments, can make a crucial contribution to understanding the nature of short duration GRBs, particularly by removing the degeneracies among the models due to dust extinction. This is a resubmission of our AO-4 ToO proposal, which has not been called yet. However, even if that observation is carried out, we are requesting an AO-5 observation, because so little is known about the short bursts that each new detection adds a very significant amount of information. Harvey Tananbaum has agreed to grant us Chandra ToO time through November 2008 (the end of Chandra AO-9) if Spitzer observations are carried out. Following that, we will submit a Chandra AO-10 proposal for ToO time; if warranted, we will request Chandra Director's Discretionary Time to support our Spitzer observations.

  16. Application of burst vibrothermography to characterize planar vertical cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendioroz, Arantza; Celorrio, Ricardo; Cifuentes, Ángel; Zatón, Lander; Salazar, Agustín.

    2016-05-01

    We present a method to characterize vertical cracks in a fast way using burst vibrothermography. In this technique the sample is excited by ultrasounds and, at the defect, rubbing of the contacting surfaces produces heat that can be detected as a temperature rise at the surface using an infrared camera. In this work, first we present the solution of the direct problem, i.e., the calculation of the surface temperature distribution produced by a vertical heat source representing a crack excited by an ultrasound burst, and we choose the information that will be used to characterize the crack, namely, one thermogram and one timing-graph. Next we address the inverse problem, consisting of finding the heat source distribution that is responsible for the observed surface temperature. This inverse problem is ill-posed, and a naïve inversion process is unstable. We propose to use three penalty terms, based on zero order Tikhonov and Total Variation functionals and the Lasso method, to stabilize the inversion. By inverting synthetic data, we analyze the performance of the algorithm as a function of the depth of the heat source and we study the effect of the burst duration and noise level in the data on the quality of the reconstructions. Finally, we invert experimental data taken in samples containing calibrated heat sources. The results show that it is possible to characterize vertical cracks down to depths of 6 mm in AISI 304 stainless steel.

  17. A novel contention solution strategy based on priority for optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ai-Hong; Cui, Fang-Fang

    2010-11-01

    A fundamental issue in optical burst switching (OBS) networks is to solve the burst contention for the core node. In this paper, a novel priority-based contention solution strategy for OBS networks is proposed. When the contention occurs, the burst priority is considered firstly, and then the burst segmentation method is used for the low priority bursts in this strategy. Ensuring the integrity of high priority bursts, part of the segmented bursts can be transmitted to the destination node via combining wavelength conversion and optical buffer method. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme not only ensures the integrity of high priority bursts, but also reduces the packet loss rate of the low priority bursts maximally, so that it can support good quality of service (QoS) for the network.

  18. Fanning the Flames: X-ray Burst Probes of Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2015-04-01

    Type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions observed in many accreting neutron stars (NSs) that result from rapid unstable burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto the surface of the star. During an X-ray burst the X-ray flux rapidly rises by a factor of 10-20 in a couple of seconds and then decays on a longer timescale as the surface of the star cools. Oscillations have been detected during the rise and/or decay of some of these X-ray bursts that have frequencies within a few Hz of the stellar spin frequency and must be due to nonuniform emission from the stellar surface. Here I discuss the results of simulations of the rise and decay of a typical X-ray burst light curve and the evolution of their fractional oscillation amplitudes. We generate light curves using a physical model for a spreading hot spot, taking into account the effect of the Coriolis force (latitude-dependent flame spreading speed), as well as relativistic effects. I will explain how the combination of the light curve and fractional amplitude evolution can constrain the properties of the flame spreading, such as ignition latitude, which would be important for measuring NSs masses and radii using X-ray burst oscillations. I discuss the prospects for future X-ray missions such as ESA's LOFT in this area.

  19. Coexistence of tonic firing and bursting in cortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Flavio; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2006-09-01

    Sustained neuronal activity can be broadly classified as either tonic firing or bursting. These two major patterns of neuronal oscillations are state dependent and may coexist. The dynamics and intracellular mechanisms of transitions between tonic firing and bursting in cortical networks remain poorly understood. Here we describe a detailed two-compartment conductance-based cortical neuron model which exhibits bistability with hysteresis between tonic firing and bursting for elevated extracellular potassium concentration. The study explains the ionic and dynamical mechanisms of burst generation and reveals the conditions underlying coexistence of two different oscillatory modes as a function of neuronal excitability.

  20. Energy sources in gamma-ray burst models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of energy sources in models of gamma-ray bursts is examined. Special emphasis is placed on the thermonuclear flash model which has been the most developed model to date. Although there is no generally accepted model, if the site for the gamma-ray burst is on a strongly magnetized neutron star, the thermonuclear model can qualitatively explain the energetics of some, but probably not all burst events. The critical issues that may differentiate between the possible sources of energy for gamma-ray bursts are listed and briefly discussed.

  1. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Transcriptional Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    Gene transcription or Gene Expression (GE) is the process which transforms the information encoded in DNA into a functional RNA message. It is known that GE can occur in bursts or pulses. Transcription is irregular, with strong periods of activity, interspersed by long periods of inactivity. If we consider the average behavior over millions of cells, this process appears to be continuous. But at the individual cell level, there is considerable variability, and for most genes, very little activity at any one time. Some have claimed that GE bursting can account for the high variability in gene expression occurring between cells in isogenic populations. This variability has a big impact on cell behavior and thus on phenotypic conditions and disease. In view of these facts, the development of a thermodynamic framework to study gene expression and transcriptional regulation to integrate the vast amount of molecular biophysical GE data is appealing. Application of such thermodynamic formalism is useful to observe various dissipative phenomena in GE regulatory dynamics. In this chapter we will examine at some detail the complex phenomena of transcriptional bursts (specially of a certain class of anomalous bursts) in the context of a non-equilibrium thermodynamics formalism and will make some initial comments on the relevance of some irreversible processes that may be connected to anomalous transcriptional bursts.

  2. CONTENTION RESOLUTION IN OPTICAL BURST SWITCHES USING FIBER DELAY LINE BUFFERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIVANGI DUBEY

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical burst switching (OBS is a circuit switching paradigm that provides very high throughput with reasonable delay. In OBS, the data burst size is not uniform and can be of any length. As the size of the data burst cannot be estimated in advance, several burst assembly techniques have been proposed. In this work, an estimation of data burst is done in advance which enable us to store the data burst. In this process, buffering of the data burst reduces average latency as well as it helps to improve the burst loss probability (BLP. Finally, the investigation indicates that the deflection routing along-with buffering of contending bursts provide an effective solution by decreasing the loss probability nearly 100 times.

  3. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2-250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550-5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806-20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  4. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin, E-mail: demetk@sabanciuniv.edu [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Orhanlı Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey)

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2–250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550−5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806−20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ( RXTE ) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  5. CME-Associated Radio Bursts from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are closely associated with various types of radio bursts from the Sun. All radio bursts are due to nonthermal electrons, which are accelerated during the eruption of CMEs. Radio bursts at frequencies below about 15 MHz are of particular interest because they are associated with energetic CMEs that contribute to severe space weather. The low-frequency bursts need to be observed primarily from space because of the ionospheric cutoff. The main CME-related radio bursts are associated are: type III bursts due to accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines, type II bursts due to electrons accelerated in shocks, and type IV bursts due to electrons trapped in post-eruption arcades behind CMEs. This paper presents a summary of results obtained during solar cycle 23 primarily using the white-light coronagraphic observations from the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the WAVES experiment on board Wind. Particular emphasis will be placed on what we can learn about particle acceleration in the coronal and interplanetary medium by analyzing the CMEs and the associated radio bursts.

  6. Dispersion Measure Variation of Repeating Fast Radio Burst Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing

    2017-09-01

    The repeating fast radio burst (FRB) 121102 was recently localized in a dwarf galaxy at a cosmological distance. The dispersion measure (DM) derived for each burst from FRB 121102 so far has not shown significant evolution, even though an apparent increase was recently seen with newly detected VLA bursts. It is expected that more repeating FRB sources may be detected in the future. In this work, we investigate a list of possible astrophysical processes that might cause DM variation of a particular FRB source. The processes include (1) cosmological scale effects such as Hubble expansion and large-scale structure fluctuations; (2) FRB local effects such as gas density fluctuation, expansion of a supernova remnant (SNR), a pulsar wind nebula, and an H ii region; and (3) the propagation effect due to plasma lensing. We find that the DM variations contributed by the large-scale structure are extremely small, and any observable DM variation is likely caused by the plasma local to the FRB source. In addition to mechanisms that decrease DM over time, we suggest that an FRB source in an expanding SNR around a nearly neutral ambient medium during the deceleration (Sedov-Taylor and snowplow) phases or in a growing H ii region can increase DM. Some effects (e.g., an FRB source moving in an H ii region or plasma lensing) can produce either positive or negative DM variations. Future observations of DM variations of FRB 121102 and other repeating FRB sources can provide important clues regarding the physical origin of these sources.

  7. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: D.Kopac@ljmu.ac.uk [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  8. Mechanism behind Erosive Bursts In Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, R.; Mendoza, M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-09-01

    Erosion and deposition during flow through porous media can lead to large erosive bursts that manifest as jumps in permeability and pressure loss. Here we reveal that the cause of these bursts is the reopening of clogged pores when the pressure difference between two opposite sites of the pore surpasses a certain threshold. We perform numerical simulations of flow through porous media and compare our predictions to experimental results, recovering with excellent agreement shape and power-law distribution of pressure loss jumps, and the behavior of the permeability jumps as a function of particle concentration. Furthermore, we find that erosive bursts only occur for pressure gradient thresholds within the range of two critical values, independent of how the flow is driven. Our findings provide a better understanding of sudden sand production in oil wells and breakthrough in filtration.

  9. Aliasing of the Schumann resonance background signal by sprite-associated Q-bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Anirban; Williams, Earle; Boldi, Robert; Sátori, Gabriella; Nagy, Tamás; Bór, József; Montanyà, Joan; Ortega, Pascal

    2017-12-01

    spectral aliasing can occur even when 12-min spectral integrations are considered. The statistical result shows that for a 12-min spectrum, events above 16 CSD are capable of producing significant frequency aliasing of the modal frequencies, although the intensity aliasing might have a negligible effect unless the events are exceptionally large (∼200 CSD). The spectral CSD methodology may be used to extract the time of arrival of the Q-burst transients. This methodology may be combined with a hyperbolic ranging, thus becoming an effective tool to detect TLEs globally with a modest number of networked observational stations.

  10. Path correlation considered prioritized burst segmentation for quality of service support in optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Rui; Changyue, Jiana; He, Tingting; Yu, Jianwei; Lei, Bo; Mao, Tengyue

    2013-04-01

    Burst segmentation (BS) is a high-efficiency contention resolution scheme in bufferless optical burst switching (OBS) networks. A prioritized BS scheme for quality of service (QoS) support is developed. Unlike the existing work on the BS scheme, the proposed BS model considers path-correlated factors, such as path length, the adjoining paths carrying traffic on a given path, and the multipriority traffic coming from all paths. Byte loss probability for high-priority and low-priority bursts under the time-based assembly approach and the length-based assembly approach to estimate the performance of the proposed BS scheme by comparing the cumulative distribution function of a burst length in an OBS ingress node (source) with that in an egress node (destination) is introduced. A preemptive BS policy for different priority bursts is proposed to support the QoS of the OBS network. Finally, a simulation is given to validate the proposed analytical model in an existing OBS network with two priority bursts. It is shown that the proposed BS scheme can realize the service differentiation for multipriority traffic under the consideration of network topology-dependent parameters.

  11. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    CERN Document Server

    Elgart, Vlad; Fenley, Andrew T; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distributio...

  12. From Enigma to Tool: Gamma-Ray Burst Reveals Secrets of Host Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Five years ago, astronomers knew almost nothing about Gamma Ray Bursts. Now, a team of observers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope has used a gamma-ray burst as a powerful tool to unveil the nature of the galaxy in which it occurred, more than 7 billion light-years away. VLA Images of GRB980703 Host Galaxy "We believe that gamma-ray bursts may become one of the best available tools for studying the history of star formation in the universe," said Edo Berger, a graduate student at Caltech. Berger worked with Caltech astronomy professor Shri Kulkarni and Dale Frail, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, to study a gamma-ray burst first seen on July 3, 1998. The astronomers presented their results at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Pasadena, CA. "For the first time, we've seen the host galaxy of a gamma-ray burst with a radio telescope," Berger said. "Previously, gamma-ray-burst host galaxies have been seen with optical telescopes, but detecting this galaxy with a radio telescope has given us new clues about the nature of the galaxy itself -- clues we couldn't have gotten any other way," he added. For example, based on optical-telescope studies, astronomers estimated that new stars are forming in the host galaxy at the rate of about the mass equivalent of 20 suns per year. However, data from the radio observations show that the actual star-formation rate is 25 times greater -- the mass equivalent of 500 suns per year. "With the VLA, we are seeing the entire region of star formation in this galaxy, including the areas so dusty that visible light can't get out," said Frail. Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions since the Big Bang. First discovered in 1967 by a satellite launched to monitor compliance with the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty, gamma-ray bursts remained one of astronomy's premier mysteries for 30 years. For three decades

  13. A novel implementation of TCP Vegas for optical burst switched networks

    KAUST Repository

    Shihada, Basem

    2010-07-01

    TCP performance over bufferless Optical Burst Switched (OBS) networks could be significantly degraded due to the misinterpretation of network congestion status (referred to as false congestion detection). It has been reported that burst retransmission in the OBS domain can improve the TCP throughput by hiding burst loss events from the upper TCP layer, which can effectively reduce the congestion window fluctuation at the expense of introducing additional delay. However, the additional delay may cause performance degradation for delay-based TCP implementations that are sensitive to packet round trip time in estimating the network congestion status. In this paper, a novel implementation of TCP Vegas that adopts a threshold-based mechanism is proposed for identifying the network congestion status in OBS networks. Analytical models are developed to evaluate the throughput of conventional TCP Vegas and threshold-based Vegas over OBS networks with burst retransmission. Simulation is conducted to validate the analytical model and to compare threshold-based Vegas with a number of legacy TCP implementations, such as TCP Sack and TCP Reno. The analytical model can be used to obtain a proper threshold value that results in an optimal steady state TCP throughput.

  14. Introduction to Optical Burst Switching

    OpenAIRE

    KERNÁCS János; Szilágyi, Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    Optical Burst Switching (OBS) isconsidered a popular switching paradigm for therealization of all-optical networks due to the balance itoffers between the coarse-grained Optical CircuitSwitching (OSC) and fine-grained Optical PacketSwitching (OPS). Given that the data are switched allopticallyat the burst level, Optical Burst Switchingcombines the transparency of Optical CircuitSwitching with the benefits of statistical multiplexingin Optical Packet Switching.

  15. On the nature of gamma-ray burst time dilations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery that faint gamma-ray bursts are stretched in time relative to bright ones has been interpreted as support for cosmological distances: faint bursts have their durations redshifted relative to bright ones. It was pointed out, however, that the relative time stretching can also be produced by an intrinsic correlation bewteen duration and luminosity of gamma-ray bursts in a nearby, bounded distribution. While both models can explain the average amount of time stretching, we find a difference between them in the way the duration distribution of faint bursts deviates from that of bright ones, assuming the luminosity function of gamma-ray bursts is independent of distance. This allows us to distinguish between these two broad classes of model on the basis of the duration distributions of gamma-ray bursts, leading perhaps to an unambiguous determination of the distance scale of gamma-ray bursts. We apply our proposed test to the second Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) catalog and conclude, with some caution, that the data favor a cosmological interpretation of the time dilation.

  16. Gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  17. Noise-induced precursors of tonic-to-bursting transitions in hypothalamic neurons and in a conductance-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hans A.; Schwabedal, Justus; Dewald, Mathias; Finke, Christian; Postnova, Svetlana; Huber, Martin T.; Wollweber, Bastian; Schneider, Horst; Hirsch, Martin C.; Voigt, Karlheinz; Feudel, Ulrike; Moss, Frank

    2011-12-01

    The dynamics of neurons is characterized by a variety of different spiking patterns in response to external stimuli. One of the most important transitions in neuronal response patterns is the transition from tonic firing to burst discharges, i.e., when the neuronal activity changes from single spikes to the grouping of spikes. An increased number of interspike-interval sequences of specific temporal correlations was detected in anticipation of temperature induced tonic-to-bursting transitions in both, experimental impulse recordings from hypothalamic brain slices and numerical simulations of a stochastic model. Analysis of the modelling data elucidates that the appearance of such patterns can be related to particular system dynamics in the vicinity of the period-doubling bifurcation. It leads to a nonlinear response on de- and hyperpolarizing perturbations introduced by noise. This explains why such particular patterns can be found as reliable precursors of the neurons' transition to burst discharges.

  18. Cosmic Forensics Confirms Gamma-Ray Burst And Supernova Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    between the supernova and the gamma ray burst. The supra-nova model involves a two-step process: the first step is the collapse of the core of an extremely massive star accompanied by the ejection of the outer layers of the star. The collapsed core forms a rapidly rotating black hole surrounded by a swirling disk of matter. In the second step this black hole-disk system produces a jet of high-energy particles. Shock waves within the jet produce the burst of X-rays and gamma rays that is observed to last only a few minutes. Interaction of the jet with the ejected supernova shell produces the X-ray afterglow, which can last for days or even months. The reason for the delay between the formation of the black hole and the production of the jet is not understood. Earlier observations with Japan's ASCA, the Italian-Netherlands Beppo-SAX, and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton satellites, as well as Chandra had given some indication of the presence of elements expected in a shell ejected by a supernova. However, the number of X-rays detected in those observations was small, and the possibility remained that the reported lines were an instrumental effect or statistical fluctuation. Since Chandra was able to observe X-ray lines from GRB 020813 for almost an entire day, the number of X-rays detected was five times larger than for previous observations. This enabled the team to make a definitive identification of the silicon and sulfur lines. Chandra observed GRB 020813 for about 77,000 seconds, approximately 21 hours after the initial burst. Other members of the research team included Herman Marshall, George Ricker, Roland Vanderspek, Peter Ford, Geoffrey Crew (MIT), and Donald Lamb (University of Chicago). The High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer was built by MIT. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program, and TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center

  19. A Leptonic-Hadronic Model for the Afterglow of Gamma-Ray Burst 090510

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-20

    rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. A LEPTONIC– HADRONIC MODEL FOR THE AFTERGLOW OF GAMMA-RAY BURST 090510 Soebur Razzaque1 Space Science Division...combined leptonic– hadronic model of synchrotron radiation from an adiabatic blast wave. High-energy, !100 MeV, emission in our model is dominated by...escape the blast wave at early time, and their detection can provide evidence of a hadronic emission component dominating at high energies. Key words

  20. A vantage from space can detect earlier drought onset: an approach using relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Alireza; AghaKouchak, Amir; Teixeira, Joao

    2015-02-25

    Each year, droughts cause significant economic and agricultural losses across the world. The early warning and onset detection of drought is of particular importance for effective agriculture and water resource management. Previous studies show that the Standard Precipitation Index (SPI), a measure of precipitation deficit, detects drought onset earlier than other indicators. Here we show that satellite-based near surface air relative humidity data can further improve drought onset detection and early warning. This paper introduces the Standardized Relative Humidity Index (SRHI) based on the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations. The results indicate that the SRHI typically detects the drought onset earlier than the SPI. While the AIRS mission was not originally designed for drought monitoring, we show that its relative humidity data offers a new and unique avenue for drought monitoring and early warning. We conclude that the early warning aspects of SRHI may have merit for integration into current drought monitoring systems.

  1. Recent progress in the detection of bursts in the canning in French reactors; Progres recents de la detection des ruptures de gaines dans les reacteurs francais G1, EL2, G3, EL3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goupil, J.; Grenon, M.; Raffailhac, J.; Roguin, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    electrostatic collecting method. A scintillator and an electronic system provide a specific signal of the fission products which is then marked on a recorder. In a case where the activity threshold is exceeded, the cell involved is isolated from the prospection system and taker, over by a 'follow-up' detector which follows the evolution of the crack. A year of working on the pile G{sub 1}, which is cooled by air at atmospheric pressure, has made it possible to obtain results on the operation of the canning-burst detection appliance, which has led us to perfect the original device by installing an 'evolution-meter' of the type described above for G{sub 3}. The reactor EL{sub 3}, cooled by heavy water, uses a detection system based on the measurement by GM counters of the activity of the fission gases carried by diluted helium into the heavy water, then extracted by hydro-cyclones. The selectivity of the system gives it a low sensitivity to parasite activities, and an excellent performance. (author) [French] Dans les piles refroidies par gaz carbonique sous pression, du type G{sub 3}, la radioactivite principale du gaz est celle de l'azote 16 creee par reaction {sup 16}O(n, p) {sup 16}N des neutrons rapides sur l'oxygene. Cette activite, de vie courte et de forte energie {beta}, masque l'activite des gaz de fission s'echappant par une fissure de gaine dans le gaz carbonique et oblige a utiliser une methode de separation materielle des produits de fission solides avant la detection proprement dite. Cette detection est faite par une chaine electronique speciale dont l'entree est un scintillateur associe a un photomultiplicateur. Un systeme de mesure d'evolution de fissure avec compensation des variations de puissance permet de suivre la vitesse d'evolution d'une fissure. Cet appareil, baptise evolumetre, est destine a ramener a une methode de zero la mesure de l'activite du gaz de refroidissement des canaux, il permet

  2. Modeling inter-signal arrival times for accurate detection of CAN bus signal injection attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael Roy [ORNL; Bridges, Robert A [ORNL; Combs, Frank L [ORNL; Starr, Michael S [ORNL; Prowell, Stacy J [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Modern vehicles rely on hundreds of on-board electronic control units (ECUs) communicating over in-vehicle networks. As external interfaces to the car control networks (such as the on-board diagnostic (OBD) port, auxiliary media ports, etc.) become common, and vehicle-to-vehicle / vehicle-to-infrastructure technology is in the near future, the attack surface for vehicles grows, exposing control networks to potentially life-critical attacks. This paper addresses the need for securing the CAN bus by detecting anomalous traffic patterns via unusual refresh rates of certain commands. While previous works have identified signal frequency as an important feature for CAN bus intrusion detection, this paper provides the first such algorithm with experiments on five attack scenarios. Our data-driven anomaly detection algorithm requires only five seconds of training time (on normal data) and achieves true positive / false discovery rates of 0.9998/0.00298, respectively (micro-averaged across the five experimental tests).

  3. NEW BURST ASSEMBLY AND SCHEDULING TECHNIQUE FOR OPTICAL BURST SWITCHING NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Kavitha, V.; V.Palanisamy

    2013-01-01

    The Optical Burst Switching is a new switching technology that efficiently utilizes the bandwidth in the optical layer. The key areas to be concentrated in Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks are the burst assembly and burst scheduling i.e., assignment of wavelengths to the incoming bursts. This study presents a New Burst Assembly and Scheduling (NBAS) technique in a simultaneous multipath transmission for burst loss recovery in OBS networks. A Redundant Burst Segmentation (RBS) is used fo...

  4. Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within θ(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if θ(j)≲30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB.

  5. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  6. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are transient extragalactic events appearing randomly in the sky as localized flashes of electromagnetic radiation, consisting predominantly of photons with energy in the range of ~0.1–1 MeV. These sporadic bursts, occurring at the rate of ~600 per year, are isotropically distributed in the sky, ...

  7. Monitoring burst (M-burst) — A novel framework of failure localization in all-optical mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.

    2011-10-10

    Achieving instantaneous and precise failure localization in all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks has been an attractive feature of network fault management systems, and is particularly important when failure-dependent protection is employed. The paper introduces a novel framework of real-time failure localization in all-optical WDM mesh networks, called monitoring-burst (m-burst), which aims to initiate a graceful compromise between consumed monitoring resources and monitoring delay. Different from any previously reported solution, the proposed m-burst framework has a single monitoring node (MN) which launches optical bursts along a set of pre-defined close-loop routes, called monitoring cycles (m-cycles), to probe the links along the m-cycles. Bursts along different m-cycles are kept non-overlapping through any link of the network. By identifying the lost bursts due to single link failure events only, the MN can unambiguously localize the failed link in at least 3-connected networks. We will justify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed m-burst framework in the scenario of interest. To avoid possible collision among optical bursts launched by the MN, we define the problem of collision-free scheduling and formulate it into an integer linear program (ILP) in order to minimize the monitoring delay. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework and the proposed solution.

  8. Gamma-Ray Burst at the Extreme: "The Naked-Eye Burst" GRB 080319B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, P. R.; Vestrand, W. T.; Panaitescu, A. D.; Wren, J. A.; Davis, H. R.; White, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    On 2008 March 19, the northern sky was the stage of a spectacular optical transient that for a few seconds remained visible to the naked eye. The transient was associated with GRB 080319B, a gamma-ray burst (GRB) at a luminosity distance of about 6 Gpc (standard cosmology), making it the most luminous optical object ever recorded by humankind. We present comprehensive sky monitoring and multicolor optical follow-up observations of GRB 080319B collected by the RAPTOR telescope network covering the development of the explosion and the afterglow before, during, and after the burst. The extremely bright prompt optical emission revealed features that are normally not detectable. The optical and gamma-ray variability during the explosion are correlated, but the optical flux is much greater than can be reconciled with single-emission mechanism and a flat gamma-ray spectrum. This extreme optical behavior is best understood as synchrotron self-Compton model (SSC). After a gradual onset of the gamma-ray emission, there is an abrupt rise of the prompt optical flux, suggesting that variable self-absorption dominates the early optical light curve. Our simultaneous multicolor optical light curves following the flash show spectral evolution consistent with a rapidly decaying red component due to large-angle emission and the emergence of a blue forward-shock component from interaction with the surrounding environment. While providing little support for the reverse shock that dominates the early afterglow, these observations strengthen the case for the universal role of the SSC mechanism in generating GRBs.

  9. Manifestation of peripherial coding in the effect of increasing loudness and enhanced discrimination of the intensity of tone bursts before and after tone burst noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimskaya-Korsavkova, L. K.

    2017-07-01

    To find the possible reasons for the midlevel elevation of the Weber fraction in intensity discrimination of a tone burst, a comparison was performed for the complementary distributions of spike activity of an ensemble of space nerves, such as the distribution of time instants when spikes occur, the distribution of interspike intervals, and the autocorrelation function. The distribution properties were detected in a poststimulus histogram, an interspike interval histogram, and an autocorrelation histogram—all obtained from the reaction of an ensemble of model space nerves in response to an auditory noise burst-useful tone burst complex. Two configurations were used: in the first, the peak amplitude of the tone burst was varied and the noise amplitude was fixed; in the other, the tone burst amplitude was fixed and the noise amplitude was varied. Noise could precede or follow the tone burst. The noise and tone burst durations, as well as the interval between them, was 4 kHz and corresponded to the characteristic frequencies of the model space nerves. The profiles of all the mentioned histograms had two maxima. The values and the positions of the maxima in the poststimulus histogram corresponded to the amplitudes and mutual time position of the noise and the tone burst. The maximum that occurred in response to the tone burst action could be a basis for the formation of the loudness of the latter (explicit loudness). However, the positions of the maxima in the other two histograms did not depend on the positions of tone bursts and noise in the combinations. The first maximum fell in short intervals and united intervals corresponding to the noise and tone burst durations. The second maximum fell in intervals corresponding to a tone burst delay with respect to noise, and its value was proportional to the noise amplitude or tone burst amplitude that was smaller in the complex. An increase in tone burst or noise amplitudes was caused by nonlinear variations in the two

  10. Bursts de raios gama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  11. Puzzling thermonuclear burst behaviour from the transient low-mass X-ray binary IGR J17473-2721

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Altamirano, Diego; Galloway, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the thermonuclear bursting behaviour of IGR J17473−2721, an X-ray transient that in 2008 underwent a 6-month long outburst, starting (unusually) with an X-ray burst. We detected a total of 57 thermonuclear bursts throughout the outburst with AGILE, Swift, Rossi X-ray Timing Explore...

  12. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  13. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Balamurugan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS. This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  14. INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations of the weak gamma-ray burst GRB 030227

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mereghetti, S.; Gotz, D.; Tiengo, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present International Gamma-Ray Astrophysical Laboratory ( INTEGRAL) and XMM-Newton observations of the prompt gamma-ray emission and the X-ray afterglow of GRB 030227, the first gamma-ray burst for which the quick localization obtained with the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System has led to the disco......We present International Gamma-Ray Astrophysical Laboratory ( INTEGRAL) and XMM-Newton observations of the prompt gamma-ray emission and the X-ray afterglow of GRB 030227, the first gamma-ray burst for which the quick localization obtained with the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System has led...... to the discovery of X-ray and optical afterglows. GRB 030227 had a duration of about 20 s and a peak flux of similar to1.1 photons cm(-2) s(-1) in the 20-200 keV energy range. The time-averaged spectrum can be fitted by a single power law with photon index similar to2, and we find some evidence for a hard......-to-soft spectral evolution. The X-ray afterglow has been detected starting only 8 hr after the prompt emission, with a 0.2-10 keV flux decreasing as t(-1) from 1.3 x 10(-12) to 5 x 10(-13) ergs cm(-2) s(-1). The afterglow spectrum is well described by a power law with photon index modified by a 1.94 +/- 0...

  15. The Chase to Capture Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in the universe, thought to be the birth cries of black holes. It has taken 40 years of international cooperation and competition to begin to unravel the mystery of their origin. The most recent chapter in this field is being written by the SWIFT mission, a fast-response satellite with 3 power telescopes. An international team from countries all over the world participates in the chase to capture the fading light of bursts detected by SWIFT. This talk will discuss the challenges and excitement of building this space observatory. New results will be presented on our growing understanding of exploding stars and fiery mergers of orbiting stars.

  16. Content Aware Burst Assembly - Supporting Telesurgery and Telemedicine in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Orosco

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The emerging Telemedicine and Telesurgery technologies allow patients to share medical experts remotely through communication networks. However, network bandwidth, network latency and jitter (variation of latency, are the obstacles to the widespread use of this technology remotely. Optical Burst Switching (OBS networks greatly expand network bandwidth in existing network infrastructure by utilizing multiple DWDM channels within a single fiber, enabling high bandwidth applications. However, the burst assembly process in OBS networks introduces latency and jitter, making it unsuitable for high bandwidth, latency sensitive applications such as telesurgery and telemedicine. In this paper, we propose a content aware burst assembly scheme which dynamically adjusts the burst assembly parameters based on the content being assembled. The proposed content aware burst assembly minimizes the latency and jitter within a video frame, as well as across the left-view and right-view frames for 3D vision generation. Simulation results have shown that the proposed scheme can effectively reduce the latency and jitter experienced by video streams, making OBS a promising candidate for supporting telesurgery and telemedicine applications.

  17. Bioassays for the detection of chemicals that can form bioactivation-dependent reactive free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J.T.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Wezel, A. van; Vermeulen, N.P.E. (Free Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Div. of Molecular Toxicology National Inst. for Coastal and Marine Management, Den Haag (Netherlands))

    1999-06-01

    In vitro bioassays were developed for the detection of chemicals that can be bioactivated to reactive free radical species in microsomal fractions. Two methods were deployed, a down-scaled spectrophotometric method for the detection of chemicals that can cause lipid peroxidation using the measurement of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and a fluorometric method for the detection of chemicals that can undergo redox cycling to generate superoxide radicals based on the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The response of these systems to prototypical and environmentally relevant chemicals, including tetrachloromethane and paraquat, was examined. The detection limit of the lipid peroxidation bioassay, based on the formation of TBARS, was about 1 [micro]M for tetrachloromethane; that of the bioassay for redox cyclers, based on the production of hydrogen peroxide, was about 2 [micro]M for paraquat and about 100-fold lower for the potent redox cycler 2,3,5,6-tetramethylbenzoquinone (TMBQ). Several binary mixtures of chemicals were tested for potential nonadditive effects in both in vitro systems. Some antagonistic effects among halogenated methanes were observed in the lipid peroxidation assay. In the hydrogen peroxide production assay, greater than additive effects were seen between small concentrations of paraquat and TMBQ. A number of surface water concentrates from several locations in The Netherlands, with various levels of chemical contamination, exhibited a weak response in the hydrogen peroxide production assay. Acetone was found to interfere with the response of the bioassay to redox cyclers and, therefore, the water concentrates (originally in acetone) were transferred to ethanol prior to testing. A good correlation was observed between the response of the water concentrates in the hydrogen peroxide production assay and their acute toxicity in Daphnia magna. No correlation was observed between this bioassay response and toxicity in the Microtox

  18. Oil Droplet Clouds Suspended in the Sea: Can They Be Remotely Detected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Otremba

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Oil floating on the sea surface can be detected by both passive and active methods using the ultraviolet-to-microwave spectrum, whereas oil immersed below the sea surface can signal its presence only in visible light. This paper presents an optical model representing a selected case of the sea polluted by an oil suspension for a selected concentration (10 ppm located in a layer of exemplary thickness (5 m separated from the sea surface by an unpolluted layer (thickness 1 m. The impact of wavelength and state of the sea surface on reflectance changes is presented based on the results of Monte Carlo ray tracing. A two-wavelength index of reflectance is proposed to detect oil suspended in the water column (645–469 nm.

  19. Gravitational wave bursts from Primordial Black Hole hyperbolic encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bellido, Juan; Nesseris, Savvas

    2017-12-01

    We propose that Gravitational Wave (GW) bursts with millisecond durations can be explained by the GW emission from the hyperbolic encounters of Primordial Black Holes in dense clusters. These bursts are single events, with the bulk of the released energy happening during the closest approach, and emitted in frequencies within the AdvLIGO sensitivity range. We provide expressions for the shape of the GW emission in terms of the peak frequency and amplitude, and estimate the rates of these events for a variety of mass and velocity configurations. We study the regions of parameter space that will allow detection by both AdvLIGO and, in the future, LISA. We find for realistic configurations, with total mass M ∼ 60M⊙, relative velocities v ∼ 0 . 01 c, and impact parameters b ∼ 10-3 AU, for AdvLIGO an expected event rate is O(10) events/yr/Gpc3 with millisecond durations. For LISA, the typical duration is in the range of minutes to hours and the event-rate is O(103) events/yr/Gpc3 for both 103M⊙ IMBH and 106M⊙ SMBH encounters. We also study the distribution functions of eccentricities, peak frequencies and characteristic timescales that can be expected for a population of scattering PBH with a log-normal distribution in masses, different relative velocities and a flat prior on the impact parameter.

  20. Understanding the Generation of Network Bursts by Adaptive Oscillatory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguy Fardet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical studies have revealed that isolated populations of oscillatory neurons can spontaneously synchronize and generate periodic bursts involving the whole network. Such a behavior has notably been observed for cultured neurons in rodent's cortex or hippocampus. We show here that a sufficient condition for this network bursting is the presence of an excitatory population of oscillatory neurons which displays spike-driven adaptation. We provide an analytic model to analyze network bursts generated by coupled adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that, for strong synaptic coupling, intrinsically tonic spiking neurons evolve to reach a synchronized intermittent bursting state. The presence of inhibitory neurons or plastic synapses can then modulate this dynamics in many ways but is not necessary for its appearance. Thanks to a simple self-consistent equation, our model gives an intuitive and semi-quantitative tool to understand the bursting behavior. Furthermore, it suggests that after-hyperpolarization currents are sufficient to explain bursting termination. Through a thorough mapping between the theoretical parameters and ion-channel properties, we discuss the biological mechanisms that could be involved and the relevance of the explored parameter-space. Such an insight enables us to propose experimentally-testable predictions regarding how blocking fast, medium or slow after-hyperpolarization channels would affect the firing rate and burst duration, as well as the interburst interval.

  1. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta

    2010-05-25

    mainly based on the brightest bursts detected by GBM inside the LAT field-of-view. The determination of a consistent sample for upper-limit calculations can be established by selecting those bursts which have a strong signal in the GBM BGO detectors. The structure of this thesis can be summarized as follows: The first chapter introduces the basic concepts and scientific background of GRB physics. Afterwards, instrumental details about the Fermi instruments LAT and GBM, as well as LAT performance and capabilities for GRB science are presented in chapter 2. Chapter 3 focuses on the detector-level calibration of the GBM instrument, and in particular on the analysis methods and results, which crucially support the development of a consistent GBM instrument response. The main GBM scientific results collected during the first year of operation are then presented in chapter 4. Particular emphasis is given to the description of joint GBM-LAT and GBM-Swift observations and analysis results. The last chapter presents the selection methodology and detailed spectral analysis of a sample of well-defined BGO-bright bursts detected by GBM during its first year. Using these results, correlations among spectral parameters are finally discussed. (orig.)

  2. [The effect of anesthetic concentration on burst-suppression of the EEG in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Jia, Xiaofeng; Ding, Haiyan

    2012-04-01

    The term "burst-suppression" is used to describe the electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern characterized by theta or delta waves, at times intermixed with faster waves, and intervening periods of relative quiescence. Burst-suppression pattern can reflect the seriously suppressed brain activity under deep anesthesia. To investigate the relationship between burst-suppression features and anesthetic concentration, we adopted four straightforward indexes, i. e., burst-suppression ratio (BSR), burst frequency, burst amplitude and suppression amplitude, and used them to analyze the EEG recordings in ten isoflurane-anesthetized rats. It was found that all the four burst-suppression indexes changed along with anesthetic concentration, that BSR and burst amplitude increased with higher concentration of isoflurane while burst frequency and suppression amplitude decreased, and that BSR was the most sensitive and consistent measurement to indicate isoflurane concentration so it constituted a valuable tool for timely evaluation of burst-suppression feature under deep anesthesia. The result also showed that the composition of carrier gas (i. e. pure oxygen vs. mixed oxygen) did not influence the effect of anesthesia significantly; and the four indexes of burst-suppression features could keep relatively stable within 60 min under the isoflurane concentration of 2%. The present study provides quantitative information of burst-suppression features under different anesthetic depth and may help to develop a clinically satisfied system that could quantify the characteristics of EEG and rigorously evaluate the cerebral state of patients.

  3. Burst segmentation for void-filling scheduling and its performance evaluation in optical burst switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei; Wang, Sheng; Li, Lemin

    2004-12-27

    As a promising solution for the next generation optical Internet, optical burst switching still has much to be improved, especially the design of core routers. This paper mainly focuses on channel scheduling algorithms of core routers and proposes a new practical scheduling algorithm. In the new algorithm, burst segmentation, one of the contention resolution schemes that are another major concern in core router design, is introduced. The proposed algorithm is analyzed theoretically and evaluated by computer simulations. The results show that the new algorithm, compared with existing traditional scheduling algorithms, can lower the packet loss probability and enhance the link utilization and network performance.

  4. Bursts and shocks in a continuum shell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Bohr, Tomas; Jensen, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    We study a burst event, i.e., the evolution of an initial condition having support only in a finite interval of k-space, in the continuum shell model due to Parisi. We show that the continuum equation without forcing or dissipation can be explicitly written in characteristic form and that the right...... and left moving parts can be solved exactly. When this is supplemented by the approximate shock condition it is possible to find the symptotic form of the burst....

  5. A rapid qualitative assay for detection of Clostridium perfringens in canned food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Gayatri Ashwinkumar

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (MTCC 1349) is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore forming, and rod-shaped bacterium. This bacterium produces a variety of toxins under strict anaerobic environment. C. perfringens can grow at temperatures ranging between 20°C and 50°C. It is the major causetive agent for gas gangrene, cellulitis, septicemia, necrotic enteritis and food poisoning, which are common toxin induced conditions noted in human and animals. C. perfringens can produce produce four major types of toxins that are used for the classification of strains, classified under type A-E. Across the globe many countries, including the United States, are affected by C. perfringens food poisonings where it is ranked as one of the most common causes of food borne infections. To date, no direct one step assay for the detection of C. perfringens has been developed and only few methods are known for accurate detection of C. perfringens. Long detection and incubation time is the major consideration of these reporter assays. The prensent study proposes a rapid and reliable colorimetric assay for the detection of C. perfringens. In principale, this assay detects the para nitrophenyl (yellow colour end product) liberated due to the hydrolysis of paranitrophenyl phosphetidyl choline (PNPC) through phospholipase C (lecithinase). Constitutive secretion of phospholipase C is a charactristic feature of C. perfringens. This assay detects the presence of the extracellular lecithinse through the PNPC impragnated impregnated probe. The probe is impregnated with peranitrophenyl phosphotidyl choline ester, which is colourless substrate used by lecithinase. The designed assay is specific towards PNPC and detectes very small quantites of lecithinase under conditions used. The reaction is substrate specific, no cross reaction was observed upon incubation with other substrates. In addition, this assay gave negative results with other clostridium strains, no cross reactions were observed with other

  6. Monitoring low density populations: a perspective on what level of population decline we can truly detect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurz, P. W. W.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of mammal species is an important part in detecting changes in their status. Efforts are based on a variety of direct and indirect methods and many low density populations are monitored through field signs. We present data on the endangered European red squirrel from Kidland Forest in the UK. We used cone transects to both record changes in seed availability and to monitor population trends. We examined the difficulty of accurately detecting population change when populations are low and field signs are patchily distributed. Current efforts would be sufficient to detect significant population declines of 50-75% in years with a modest squirrel population but not when they fall below one squirrel for every 20 ha of forest. The findings emphasise that monitoring aims have to be clearly defined with an awareness and understanding of what level of change the adopted methodological approach can reliably detect. We propose that mammal monitoring schemes need to be based on a pilot scheme to determine effect size and planned accordingly.

  7. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star approaching EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. +k Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts - modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. +k Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  8. Understanding Neutron Stars using Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star = EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts = modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  9. GRO: Black hole models for gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaham, Jacob

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of creating gamma ray bursts (GRB's) from accretion flows on to black holes is investigated. The mechanism of initial energy release in the form of a burst is not understood yet. The typical time scales involved in this energy release and the initial distribution of photons as a function of energy are studied. As a first step the problem is formulated in the Minkowski spacetime for a homogeneous and isotropic burst. For an arbitrary initial distribution of photons, the equations of relativistic kinetic theory are formulated for nonequilibrium plasmas which can take into account various particle creation and annihilation processes and various scattering processes.

  10. Are There Multiple Populations of Fast Radio Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswamy, Divya; Li, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2018-02-01

    The repeating FRB 121102 (the “repeater”) shows repetitive bursting activities and was localized in a host galaxy at z = 0.193. On the other hand, despite dozens of hours of telescope time spent on follow-up observations, no other fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been observed to repeat. Yet, it has been speculated that the repeater is the prototype of FRBs, and that other FRBs should show similar repeating patterns. Using the published data, we compare the repeater with other FRBs in the observed time interval (Δt)–flux ratio (S i /S i+1) plane. We find that whereas other FRBs occupy the upper (large S i /S i+1) and right (large Δt) regions of the plane due to the non-detections of other bursts, some of the repeater bursts fall into the lower left region of the plot (short interval and small flux ratio) excluded by the non-detection data of other FRBs. The trend also exists even if one only selects those bursts detectable by the Parkes radio telescope. If other FRBs were similar to the repeater, our simulations suggest that the probability that none of them have been detected to repeat with the current searches would be ∼(10‑4–10‑3). We suggest that the repeater is not representative of the entire FRB population, and that there is strong evidence of more than one population of FRBs.

  11. The Fermi-GBM Three-year X-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, P. A.; Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Beklen, E.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M. H.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky gamma-ray monitor well known in the gamma-ray burst (GRB) community. Although GBM excels in detecting the hard, bright extragalactic GRBs, its sensitivity above 8 keV and its all-sky view make it an excellent instrument for the detection of rare, short-lived Galactic transients. In 2010 March, we initiated a systematic search for transients using GBM data. We conclude this phase of the search by presenting a three-year catalog of 1084 X-ray bursts. Using spectral analysis, location, and spatial distributions we classified the 1084 events into 752 thermonuclear X-ray bursts, 267 transient events from accretion flares and X-ray pulses, and 65 untriggered gamma-ray bursts. All thermonuclear bursts have peak blackbody temperatures broadly consistent with photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts. We find an average rate of 1.4 PRE bursts per day, integrated over all Galactic bursters within about 10 kpc. These include 33 and 10 bursts from the ultra-compact X-ray binaries 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549, respectively. We discuss these recurrence times and estimate the total mass ejected by PRE bursts in our Galaxy.

  12. ESTIMATION OF BURSTS LENGTH AND DESIGN OF A FIBER DELAY LINE BASED OBS ROUTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RICHA AWASTHI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The demand for higher bandwidth is increasing day by day and this ever growing demand cannot be catered to with current electronic technology. Thus new communication technology like optical communication needs to be used. In the similar context OBS (optical burst switching is considered as next generation data transfer technology. In OBS information is transmitted in forms of optical bursts of variable lengths. However, contention among the bursts is a major problem in OBS system, and for contention resolution defection routing is mostly preferred. However, deflection routing increases delay. In this paper, it is shown that the arrival of very large bursts is rare event, and for moderate burst length the buffering of contending burst can provide very effective solution. However, in case of arrival of large bursts deflection can be used.

  13. Analog Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) information can be more effective than binary marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Corbin A; Drew, Trafton; Wolfe, Jeremy M

    2017-02-01

    In socially important visual search tasks, such as baggage screening and diagnostic radiology, experts miss more targets than is desirable. Computer-aided detection (CAD) programs have been developed specifically to improve performance in these professional search tasks. For example, in breast cancer screening, many CAD systems are capable of detecting approximately 90% of breast cancer, with approximately 0.5 false-positive detections per image. Nevertheless, benefits of CAD in clinical settings tend to be small (Birdwell, 2009) or even absent (Meziane et al., 2011; Philpotts, 2009). The marks made by a CAD system can be "binary," giving the same signal to any location where the signal is above some threshold. Alternatively, a CAD system presents an analog signal that reflects strength of the signal at a location. In the experiments reported, we compare analog and binary CAD presentations using nonexpert observers and artificial stimuli defined by two noisy signals: a visible color signal and an "invisible" signal that informed our simulated CAD system. We found that analog CAD generally yielded better overall performance than binary CAD. The analog benefit is similar at high and low target prevalence. Our data suggest that the form of the CAD signal can directly influence performance. Analog CAD may allow the computer to be more helpful to the searcher.

  14. Can GPS be used to detect deleterious progression in training volume among runners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Cederholm, Jens Peter; Buist, Ida

    2013-01-01

    measurements in open landscape, forest, and urban area of volume was GPS devices were found for training volume. Based on this, GPS has a potential to detect errors in training volume, which may be associated with development of RRI. Based......There is a need to ascertain if an association exists between excessive progression in weekly volume and development of running-related injuries (RRI). The purpose of this study was to investigate if GPS can be used to detect deleterious progression in weekly training volume among 60 novice runners...... included in a 10-week prospective study. All participants used GPS to quantify training volume while running. In case of injury, participants attended a clinical examination. The 13 runners who sustained injuries during follow-up had a significantly higher weekly progression in total training volume...

  15. How Can We Better Detect Unauthorized GMOs in Food and Feed Chains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiture, Marie-Alice; Herman, Philippe; De Loose, Marc; Debode, Frédéric; Roosens, Nancy H

    2017-06-01

    Current GMO detection systems have limited abilities to detect unauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Here, we propose a new workflow, based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, to overcome this problem. In providing information about DNA sequences, this high-throughput workflow can distinguish authorized and unauthorized GMOs by strengthening the tools commonly used by enforcement laboratories with the help of NGS technology. In addition, thanks to its massive sequencing capacity, this workflow could be used to monitor GMOs present in the food and feed chain. In view of its potential implementation by enforcement laboratories, we discuss this innovative approach, its current limitations, and its sustainability of use over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. How modular structure can simplify tasks on networks: parameterizing graph optimization by fast local community detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui-Xuan, Binh-Minh; Jones, Nick S

    2014-10-08

    By considering the task of finding the shortest walk through a Network, we find an algorithm for which the run time is not as O(2 n ), with n being the number of nodes, but instead scales with the number of nodes in a coarsened network. This coarsened network has a number of nodes related to the number of dense regions in the original graph. Since we exploit a form of local community detection as a preprocessing, this work gives support to the project of developing heuristic algorithms for detecting dense regions in networks: preprocessing of this kind can accelerate optimization tasks on networks. Our work also suggests a class of empirical conjectures for how structural features of efficient networked systems might scale with system size.

  17. Can a central blood volume deficit be detected by systolic pressure variation during spontaneous breathing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael; Hayes, Chris; Steen Rasmussen, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether during spontaneous breathing arterial pressure variations (APV) can detect a volume deficit is not established. We hypothesized that amplification of intra-thoracic pressure oscillations by breathing through resistors would enhance APV to allow identification of a reduced...... resistors. A brachial arterial catheter was used to measure blood pressure and thus systolic pressure variation (SPV), pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation . Pulse contour analysis determined stroke volume (SV) and CO and we evaluated whether APV could detect a 10 % decrease in CO. RESULTS...... (from 21 (±15)% to 30 (±13)%). Yet during head-up tilt, a SPV ≥ 37 % predicted a decrease in CO ≥ 10 % with a sensitivity and specificity of 78 % and 100 %, respectively. CONCLUSION: In spontaneously breathing healthy volunteers combined inspiratory and expiratory resistors enhance SPV during head...

  18. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  19. GRANAT/WATCH catalogue of cosmic gamma-ray bursts: December 1989 to September 1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazonov, S.Y.; Sunyaev, R.A.; Terekhov, O.V.

    1998-01-01

    or by their detection with other GRB experiments. For each burst its time history and information on its intensity in the two energy ranges 8-20 keV and 30-60 keV are presented, Most events show hardening of the energy spectrum near the burst peak. In part of the bursts an X-ray precursor or a tail is seen at 8-20 ke...

  20. Gravitational wave bursts from Primordial Black Hole hyperbolic encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan

    2017-01-01

    We propose that Gravitational Wave (GW) bursts with millisecond durations can be explained by the GW emission from the hyperbolic encounters of Primordial Black Holes in dense clusters. These bursts are single events, with the bulk of the released energy happening during the closest approach, and emitted in frequencies within the AdvLIGO sensitivity range. We provide expressions for the shape of the GW emission in terms of the peak frequency and amplitude, and estimate the rates of these events for a variety of mass and velocity configurations. We study the regions of parameter space that will allow detection by both AdvLIGO and, in the future, LISA. We find for realistic configurations, with total mass M∼60 M⊙, relative velocities v∼0.01c, and impact parameters b∼10−3 AU, for AdvLIGO an expected event rate is O(10) events/yr/Gpc^3 with millisecond durations. For LISA, the typical duration is in the range of minutes to hours and the event-rate is O(10^3) events/yr/Gpc^3 for both 10^3 M⊙ IMBH and 1...

  1. Can LIGO Directly Detect the Scalar Field Dark Energy of 5D Gravity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2017-06-01

    The observed acceleration of the present universe is commonly attributed to the existence of dark energy as a dominant component throughout the universe. A direct detection of dark energy has become one of the most important issues in the modern astrophysics and cosmology. Two widely accepted candidates of the dark energy are the cosmological constant Λ and the quintessence. Unlike the cosmological constant, the quintessence is a scalar field Φ that varies throughout spacetime, and has been modelled in various ways such as the four-dimensional (4D) Brans-Dicke scalar-tensor theory of gravitation and the five-dimensional (5D) Kaluza-Klein scalar-vector-tensor theory of gravitation. The scalar field of 5D gravity was shown to be capable of polarizing the space or vacuum and thus can extend the optical length of the path of a laser beam that passes through the polarized space or vacuum. Recently, the author, in terms of his 5D fully covariant Kaluza-Klein scalar-vector-tensor theory of gravitation, has quantitatively related the dielectric constant of the polarized vacuum (and thus the optical length of the path in the polarized vacuum) to the charge-mass ratio of a charged object. This study further demonstrates that the vacuum polarization by the scalar field dark energy of 5D gravity, when the object is highly charged, can be significant enough for the extremely accurate LIGO, which has recently detected first ever the gravitational waves from the binary black hole merger, to directly detect. It is shown that a some-thousand-kilogram sphere electrically charged to tens of kilovolts can polarize the vacuum by its scalar field dark energy and thus extend the optical path length of a laser beam that travels through one LIGO arm with some hundred reflections by approximately 10-18 m, which is one-order higher than that to be detected by the LIGO detectors. Therefore, being added a highly charged sphere into the experimental setup, LIGO may directly discover the

  2. Testing the E(sub peak)-E(sub iso) Relation for GRBs Detected by Swift and Suzaku-WAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, H. A.; Yamaoka, K.; Sugita, S.; Ohno, M.; Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Hara, R.; Onda, K.; Sato, G.; hide

    2009-01-01

    One of the most prominent, yet controversial associations derived from the ensemble of prompt-phase observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the apparent correlation in the source frame between the peak energy (E(sub peak)) of the nuF(nu) spectrum and the isotropic radiated energy, E(sub iso). Since most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have E(sub peak) above the energy range (15-150 keV) of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, determining accurate E(sub peak) values for large numbers of Swift bursts has been difficult. However, by combining data from Swift/BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-Sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range from 50-5000 keV, for bursts which are simultaneously detected ; one can accurately fit E(sub peak) and E(sub iso) and test the relationship between them for the Swift sample. Between the launch of Suzaku in July 2005 and the end of March 2009, there were 45 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which triggered both Swift/BAT and WAM and an additional 47 bursts which triggered Swift and were detected by WAM, but did not trigger. A BAT-WAM team has cross-calibrated the two instruments using GRBs, and we are now able to perform joint fits on these bursts to determine spectral parameters. For those bursts with spectroscopic redshifts.. we can also calculate the isotropic energy. Here we present the results of joint Swift/BAT-Suzaku/WAM spectral fits for 86 of the bursts detected by the two instruments. We show that the distribution of spectral fit parameters is consistent with distributions from earlier missions and confirm that Swift, bursts are consistent with earlier reported relationships between Epeak and isotropic energy. We show through time-resolved spectroscopy that individual burst pulses are also consistent with this relationship.

  3. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  4. Can upwelling signals be detected in intertidal fishes of different trophic levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulgar, J; Poblete, E; Alvarez, M; Morales, J P; Aranda, B; Aldana, M; Pulgar, V M

    2013-11-01

    For intertidal fishes belonging to three species, the herbivore Scartichthys viridis (Blenniidae), the omnivore Girella laevifrons (Kyphosidae) and the carnivore Graus nigra (Kyphosidae), mass and body size relationships were higher in individuals from an upwelling zone compared with those from a non-upwelling zone. RNA:DNA were higher in the herbivores and omnivores from the upwelling zone. Higher biomass and RNA:DNA in the upwelling intertidal fishes may be a consequence of an increased exposure to higher nutrient availability, suggesting that increased physiological conditioning in vertebrates from upwelling areas can be detected and measured using intertidal fishes of different trophic levels. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. You can hide but you have to run: direct detection with vector mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Eramo, Francesco [Department of Physics, University of California Santa Cruz,1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics,1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kavanagh, Bradley J. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Hautes Energies, CNRS, UMR 7589,4 Place Jussieu, F-75252, Paris (France); Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CNRS, CEA,Orme des Merisiers batiment 774, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Panci, Paolo [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie,98 bis Boulevard Arago, Paris 75014 (France)

    2016-08-18

    We study direct detection in simplified models of Dark Matter (DM) in which interactions with Standard Model (SM) fermions are mediated by a heavy vector boson. We consider fully general, gauge-invariant couplings between the SM, the mediator and both scalar and fermion DM. We account for the evolution of the couplings between the energy scale of the mediator mass and the nuclear energy scale. This running arises from virtual effects of SM particles and its inclusion is not optional. We compare bounds on the mediator mass from direct detection experiments with and without accounting for the running. In some cases the inclusion of these effects changes the bounds by several orders of magnitude, as a consequence of operator mixing which generates new interactions at low energy. We also highlight the importance of these effects when translating LHC limits on the mediator mass into bounds on the direct detection cross section. For an axial-vector mediator, the running can alter the derived bounds on the spin-dependent DM-nucleon cross section by a factor of two or more. Finally, we provide tools to facilitate the inclusion of these effects in future studies: general approximate expressions for the low energy couplings and a public code runDM to evolve the couplings between arbitrary energy scales.

  6. Infrared Imaging and Characterization of Exoplanets: Can we Detect Earth-Twins on a Budget?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, William

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade considerable progress has been made developing techniques that can be used to detect and characterize Earth twins in the mid- infrared (7-20 microns). The principal technique is called nulling interferometry, and it was invented by Bracewell in the late 1970's. The nulling technique is an interferometric equivalent of an optical coronagraph. At the present time most of the technological hurdles have been overcome for a space mission to be able to begin Phase A early in the next decade, and it is possible to detect and characterize Earth-twins on a mid- sized strategic mission budget ($600-800 million). I will review progress on this exciting method of planet detection in the context of recent work on the Exoplanet Community Forum and the US Decadal Survey (Astro2010), including biomarkers, technological progress, mission concepts, the theory of these instruments, and a.comparison of the discovery space of this technique with others also under consideration.

  7. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  8. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone.

  9. A simple model of burst nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronov, Alexandr; Bufkin, Kevin; Shaw, Dan W; Johnson, Brad L; Patrick, David L

    2015-08-28

    We introduce a comprehensive quantitative treatment for burst nucleation (BN)-a kinetic pathway toward self-assembly or crystallization defined by an extended post-supersaturation induction period, followed by a burst of nucleation, and finally the growth of existing stable assemblages absent the formation of new ones-based on a hybrid mean field rate equation model incorporating thermodynamic treatment of the saturated solvent from classical nucleation theory. A key element is the inclusion of a concentration-dependent critical nucleus size, determined self-consistently along with the subcritical cluster population density. The model is applied to an example experimental study of crystallization in tetracene films prepared by organic vapor-liquid-solid deposition, where good agreement is observed with several aspects of the experiment using a single, physically well-defined adjustable parameter. The model predicts many important features of the experiment, and can be generalized to describe other self-organizing systems exhibiting BN kinetics.

  10. A review of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin J

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, an enigma for more than 25 years, are now coming into focus. They involve extraordinary power outputs, and highly relativistic dynamics. The 'trigger' involves stellar-mass compact objects. The most plausible progenitors, ranging from neutron star binary mergers to collapsars (sometimes called 'hypernovae') eventually lead to the formation of a black hole with a torus of hot neutron-density material around it, the extractable energy being up to 10 sup 5 sup 4 ergs. Magnetic fields may exceed 10 sup 1 sup 5 G and particles may be accelerated up to > or approx. 10 sup 2 sup 0 eV. Details of the afterglow may be easier to understand than the initial trigger. Bursts at very high redshift can be astronomically-important as probes of the distant universe.

  11. Numerical simulations of trailing vortex bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Philip S.

    1987-01-01

    Solutions of the steady-state Navier-Stokes equations for the axisymmetric bursting of a laminar trailing vortex are computed with Newton's method and the pseudo-arc length continuation method for wide ranges of vortex strength and Reynolds number. The results indicate that a trailing vortex can undergo a transition from a state in which the core slowly diffuses to a state marked by large amplitude, spatial oscillations of core radius and core axial velocity. At the transition point the core grows rapidly in size. This event is interpreted as vortex bursting. The results also suggest that when the maximum core swirl velocity is sufficiently large the centerline axial flow downstream of transition will be reversed.

  12. Machine Learning Search for Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows in Optical Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topinka, M.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to the advances in robotic telescopes, time domain astronomy leads to a large number of transient events detected in images every night. Data mining and machine learning tools used for object classification are presented. The goal is to automatically classify transient events for both further follow-up by a larger telescope and for statistical studies of transient events. Special attention is given to the identification of gamma-ray burst afterglows. Machine learning techniques are used to identify GROND gamma-ray burst afterglow among the astrophysical objects present in the SDSS archival images based on the g'-r', r'-i' and i'-z' color indices. The performance of the support vector machine, random forest and neural network algorithms is compared. A joint meta-classifier, built on top of the individual classifiers, can identify GRB afterglows with the overall accuracy of ≳ 90%.

  13. Decameter Type III-Like Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Rucker, H. O.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Abranin, E. P.; Lecacheux, A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Stanislavskyy, A. A.

    2007-12-01

    Starting from 1960s Type III-like bursts (Type III bursts with high drift rates) in a wide frequency range from 300 to 950MHz have been observed. These new bursts observed at certain frequency being compared to the usual Type III bursts at the same frequency show similar behaviour but feature frequency drift 2-6 times higher than the normal bursts. In this paper we report the first observations of Type III-like bursts in decameter range, carried out during summer campaigns 2002 - 2004 at UTR-2 radio telescope. The circular polarization of the bursts was measured by the radio telescope URAN-2 in 2004. The observed bursts are analyzed and compared with usual Type III bursts in the decameter range. From the analysis of over 1100 Type III-like bursts, their main parameters have been found. Characteristic feature of the observed bursts is similar to Type III-like bursts at other frequencies, i.e. measured drift rates (5-10 MHz/s) of this bursts are few times larger than that for usual Type III bursts, and their durations (1-2 s) are few times smaller than that for usual Type III bursts in this frequency band.

  14. Photoacoustic Doppler measurement of flow using tone burst excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinfeld, Adi; Gilead, Sharon; Eyal, Avishay

    2010-03-01

    In this paper a novel technique for flow measurement which is based on the photoacoustic (PA) Doppler effect is described. A significant feature of the proposed approach is that it can be implemented using tone burst optical excitation thus enabling simultaneous measurement of both velocity and position. The technique, which is based on external modulation and heterodyne detection, was experimentally demonstrated by measurement of the flow of a suspension of carbon particles in a silicon tube and successfully determined the particles mean velocity up to values of 130 mm/sec, which is about 10 times higher than previously reported PA Doppler set-ups. In the theoretical part a rigorous derivation of the PA response of a flowing medium is described and some important simplifying approximations are highlighted.

  15. Rock burst governance of working face under igneous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhenxing; Yu, Yue

    2017-01-01

    As a typical failure phenomenon, rock burst occurs in many mines. It can not only cause the working face to cease production, but also cause serious damage to production equipment, and even result in casualties. To explore how to govern rock burst of working face under igneous rock, the 10416 working face in some mine is taken as engineering background. The supports damaged extensively and rock burst took place when the working face advanced. This paper establishes the mechanical model and conducts theoretical analysis and calculation to predict the fracture and migration mechanism and energy release of the thick hard igneous rock above the working face, and to obtain the advancing distance of the working face when the igneous rock fractures and critical value of the energy when rock burst occurs. Based on the specific conditions of the mine, this paper put forward three kinds of governance measures, which are borehole pressure relief, coal seam water injection and blasting pressure relief.

  16. Transient optical emission from the error box of the gamma-ray burst of 28 February 1997

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Paradijs, J.; Groot, P.J.; Galama, T.

    1997-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century(1), the origin of gamma-ray bursts-brief, energetic bursts of high-energy photons-has remained unknown. The detection of a counterpart at another wavelength has long been thought to be a key to understanding the nature of these bursts (see, for example, ref. 2......), but intensive searches have not revealed such a counterpart. The distribution and properties of the bursts(3) are explained naturally if they lie at cosmological distances (a few Gpc)(4), but there is a countervailing view that they are relatively local objects(5), perhaps distributed in a very large halo...... around our Galaxy. Here we report the detection of a transient and fading optical source in the error box associated with the burst GRB970228, less than 21 hours after the burst(6,7). The optical transient appears to be associated with a faint galaxy(7,8), suggesting that the burst occurred...

  17. First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Abbott et al.

    2004-03-09

    We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h{sub rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h{sub rss} {approx} 10{sup -19} - 10{sup -17} strain/{radical}Hz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

  18. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  19. Probability assessment of burst limit state due to internal corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Sikder, E-mail: msh678@mun.ca [Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL A1B 3X5 (Canada); Khan, Faisal; Kenny, Shawn [Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL A1B 3X5 (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    The failure probability of an oil and gas pipeline, with longitudinally oriented internal corrosion defects, due to burst from internal operating pressure can be estimated through characterization of defect geometry, internal corrosion growth rate, and remaining mechanical hoop strength capacity. A number of candidate models to estimate the corrosion defect depth growth rate were evaluated. Defining a corrosion defect length, the corrosion feature geometry was integrated within burst pressure models, which have been adopted by oil and gas industry standards, codes or recommended practices. On this basis the burst pressure failure probability of a pipeline with internal corrosion defects can be estimated. A comparative analysis of pipe burst limit states and failure estimates were conducted, using Monte Carlo simulation and First Order Second Moment (FOSM) methods. Results from the comparative analysis closely matched and demonstrated consistent trends. Based on the probabilistic assessment, the relative conservatism between burst pressure models was analyzed and recommendations provided to assist designers on model selection. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied failure probability of pipeline due to internal corrosion defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compared the burst pressure models of recommended codes/standard or individual models Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discussed relative conservatism of recommended codes/standards or individual models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recommendations also provided to assist designer on model selection.

  20. The Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog: Four Years of Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, D.; Goldstein, A.; Weller von Ahlefeld, V.; Bhat, N.P.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M.S.; Byrne, D.; Cleveland, W.H.; Connaughton, V.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G.J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gibby, M.; Giles, M.M.; Greiner, J.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Layden, E.; Lin, L.; Meegan, C.A.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W.S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.D.; Rau, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Xiong, S.; Younes, G.; Yu, H-F.

    2014-01-01

    In this catalog we present the updated set of spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during its first four years of operation. It contains two types of spectra, time-integrated spectral fits and spectral fits at the brightest time bin, from 943

  1. Neuronal networks and energy bursts in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2015-02-26

    Epilepsy can be defined as the abnormal activities of neurons. The occurrence, propagation and termination of epileptic seizures rely on the networks of neuronal cells that are connected through both synaptic- and non-synaptic interactions. These complicated interactions contain the modified functions of normal neurons and glias as well as the mediation of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms with feedback homeostasis. Numerous spread patterns are detected in disparate networks of ictal activities. The cortical-thalamic-cortical loop is present during a general spike wave seizure. The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) is the major inhibitory input traversing the region, and the dentate gyrus (DG) controls CA3 excitability. The imbalance between γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition and glutamatergic excitation is the main disorder in epilepsy. Adjustable negative feedback that mediates both inhibitory and excitatory components affects neuronal networks through neurotransmission fluctuation, receptor and transmitter signaling, and through concomitant influences on ion concentrations and field effects. Within a limited dynamic range, neurons slowly adapt to input levels and have a high sensitivity to synaptic changes. The stability of the adapting network depends on the ratio of the adaptation rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory populations. Thus, therapeutic strategies with multiple effects on seizures are required for the treatment of epilepsy, and the therapeutic functions on networks are reviewed here. Based on the high-energy burst theory of epileptic activity, we propose a potential antiepileptic therapeutic strategy to transfer the high energy and extra electricity out of the foci. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Blocking performance of a burst-outputted model considering different service rates and different output port-selected probabilities in an optical burst switching core node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Rui; Changyue, Jiana; He, Tingting; Mao, Tengyue; Yu, Jianwei; Lei, Bo

    2013-04-01

    In an optical burst switching core node, each output port is equipped with a different network interface unit that can provide a specific data rate. Bursts will use different probabilities of select output ports, which is in accordance to the path-length metric-based routing optimal algorithm and wavelength resource situation. Previous studies ignore this issue. We establish a burst-outputted model considering the different service rate of output ports and different port-selected probabilities. We calculate burst-blocking probability and analyze the relationship between service rate and output-port-selected probability in detail.

  3. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  4. Detecting 3D vegetation structure with the Galileo space probe: Can a distant probe detect vegetation structure on Earth?

    OpenAIRE

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Wolf, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightn...

  5. Fast radio bursts: the last sign of supramassive neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcke, Heino; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2014-02-01

    Context. Several fast radio bursts have been discovered recently, showing a bright, highly dispersed millisecond radio pulse. The pulses do not repeat and are not associated with a known pulsar or gamma-ray burst. The high dispersion suggests sources at cosmological distances, hence implying an extremely high radio luminosity, far larger than the power of single pulses from a pulsar. Aims: We suggest that a fast radio burst represents the final signal of a supramassive rotating neutron star that collapses to a black hole due to magnetic braking. The neutron star is initially above the critical mass for non-rotating models and is supported by rapid rotation. As magnetic braking constantly reduces the spin, the neutron star will suddenly collapse to a black hole several thousand to million years after its birth. Methods: We discuss several formation scenarios for supramassive neutron stars and estimate the possible observational signatures making use of the results of recent numerical general-relativistic calculations. Results: While the collapse will hide the stellar surface behind an event horizon, the magnetic-field lines will snap violently. This can turn an almost ordinary pulsar into a bright radio "blitzar": accelerated electrons from the travelling magnetic shock dissipate a significant fraction of the magnetosphere and produce a massive radio burst that is observable out to z > 0.7. Only a few per cent of the neutron stars need to be supramassive in order to explain the observed rate. Conclusions: We suggest the intriguing possibility that fast radio bursts might trace the solitary and almost silent formation of stellar mass black holes at high redshifts. These bursts could be an electromagnetic complement to gravitational-wave emission and reveal a new formation and evolutionary channel for black holes and neutron stars that are not seen as gamma-ray bursts. If supramassive neutron stars are formed at birth and not by accretion, radio observations of these

  6. A Retroactive-Burst Framework for Automated Intrusion Response System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shameli-Sendi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an adaptive and cost-sensitive model to prevent security intrusions. In most automated intrusion response systems, response selection is performed locally based on current threat without using the knowledge of attacks history. Another challenge is that a group of responses are applied without any feedback mechanism to measure the response effect. We address these problems through retroactive-burst execution of responses and a Response Coordinator (RC mechanism, the main contributions of this work. The retroactive-burst execution consists of several burst executions of responses with, at the end of each burst, a mechanism for measuring the effectiveness of the applied responses by the risk assessment component. The appropriate combination of responses must be considered for each burst execution to mitigate the progress of the attack without necessarily running the next round of responses, because of the impact on legitimate users. In the proposed model, there is a multilevel response mechanism. To indicate which level is appropriate to apply based on the retroactive-burst execution, we get help from a Response Coordinator mechanism. The applied responses can improve the health of Applications, Kernel, Local Services, Network Services, and Physical Status. Based on these indexes, the RC gives a general overview of an attacker’s goal in a distributed environment.

  7. Can the comet assay be used reliably to detect nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna L; Di Bucchianico, Sebastiano; Collins, Andrew R; Dusinska, Maria

    2015-03-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive method to detect DNA strand breaks as well as oxidatively damaged DNA at the level of single cells. Today the assay is commonly used in nano-genotoxicology. In this review we critically discuss possible interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and the comet assay. Concerns for such interactions have arisen from the occasional observation of NPs in the "comet head", which implies that NPs may be present while the assay is being performed. This could give rise to false positive or false negative results, depending on the type of comet assay endpoint and NP. For most NPs, an interaction that substantially impacts the comet assay results is unlikely. For photocatalytically active NPs such as TiO2 , on the other hand, exposure to light containing UV can lead to increased DNA damage. Samples should therefore not be exposed to such light. By comparing studies in which both the comet assay and the micronucleus assay have been used, a good consistency between the assays was found in general (69%); consistency was even higher when excluding studies on TiO2 NPs (81%). The strong consistency between the comet and micronucleus assays for a range of different NPs-even though the two tests measure different endpoints-implies that both can be trusted in assessing the genotoxicity of NPs, and that both could be useful in a standard battery of test methods. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. How Can We Detect Life When We Cannot Define It in a General Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Johannes1, 2; Firneis, M. G. 1, 2

    2012-05-01

    During recent months and years a large number of proposals for the definitions of life have been published. Nevertheless, an international consensus on this question has not been achieved up to now. There is also an ongoing discussion if it is possible to define life with only the terrestrial sample at hand and the fact that a general theory of life is necessary before defining life as a universal concept (Cleland and Chyba, 2002). Considering this background a "definition" of life is not only of philosophical interest, but seems to be a necessary antecedent for the detection of extraterrestrial life. A number of definitions and hypotheses for life focus on the ability to reproduce itself and leads to the problem that a single individual cannot be considered formally as life as well as that sterile species of mules can also not considered to be alive. Viruses are classically also not categorized as life. Kolb (2007) defined the need of viruses to have host cells as "assisted reproduction". Also a human being is only able to manage essential parts of its metabolism with the help of microorganisms, which are needed for example for the supply of some vitamins or for the reduction of carbohydrates as well as the synthesis of some amino acids. This kind of symbiosis between microorganisms and humans could also be interpreted as "assisted metabolism" and leads once more to the question, how can we count humanity as being alive, but viruses declared as being not alive?

  9. Changes of proteins induced by anticoagulants can be more sensitively detected in urine than in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, MengLin; Zhao, MinDi; Gao, YouHe

    2014-07-01

    The most fundamental property of biomarkers is change. But changes are hard to maintain in plasma since it is strictly controlled by homeostatic mechanisms of the body. There is no homeostatic mechanism for urine. Besides, urine is partly a filtration of blood, and systematic information can be reflected in urine. We hypothesize that change of blood can be reflected in urine more sensitively. Here we introduce the interference into the blood by two anticoagulants heparin or argatroban. Plasma and urine proteins were profiled by LC-MS/MS and then validated by Western blot in totally six SD female rats before and after the drug treatments. In argatroban treated group, with exactly the same experimental procedure and the same cutoff value for both plasma and urine proteins, 62 proteins changed in urine, only one of which changed in plasma. In heparin treated group, 27 proteins changed in urine but only three other proteins changed in plasma. Both LC-MS/MS and Western blot analyses demonstrated drug-induced increases in transferrin and hemopexin levels in urine but not in plasma. Our data indicates that urine may serve as a source for more sensitive detection of protein biomarkers than plasma.

  10. Accretion Disk Signatures in Type I X-Ray Bursts: Prospects for Future Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keek, L.; Wolf, Z.; Ballantyne, D. R.

    2016-07-01

    Type I X-ray bursts and superbursts from accreting neutron stars illuminate the accretion disk and produce a reflection signal that evolves as the burst fades. Examining the evolution of reflection features in the spectra will provide insight into the burst-disk interaction, a potentially powerful probe of accretion disk physics. At present, reflection has been observed during only two bursts of exceptional duration. We investigate the detectability of reflection signatures with four of the latest well-studied X-ray observatory concepts: Hitomi, Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER), Athena, and Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT). Burst spectra are modeled for different values for the flux, temperature, and the disk ionization parameter, which are representative for most known bursts and sources. The effective area and throughput of a Hitomi-like telescope are insufficient for characterizing burst reflection features. NICER and Athena will detect reflection signatures in Type I bursts with peak fluxes ≳10-7.5 erg cm-2 s-1 and also effectively constrain the reflection parameters for bright bursts with fluxes of ˜10-7 erg cm-2 s-1 in exposures of several seconds. Thus, these observatories will provide crucial new insight into the interaction of accretion flows and X-ray bursts. For sources with low line-of-sight absorption, the wide bandpass of these instruments allows for the detection of soft X-ray reflection features, which are sensitive to the disk metallicity and density. The large collecting area that is part of the LOFT design would revolutionize the field by tracing the evolution of the accretion geometry in detail throughout short bursts.

  11. The First Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ackermann, M.; et al., [Unknown; van der Horst, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected

  12. Testing and Performance of UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rípa, Jakub; Bin Kim, Min; Lee, Jik

    2014-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory pathfinder (UFFO-p) is a new space mission dedicated to detect Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and rapidly follow their afterglows in order to provide early optical/ultraviolet measurements. A GRB location is determined in a few seconds by the UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger...... telescope (UBAT) employing the coded mask imaging technique and the detector combination of Yttrium Oxyorthosilicate (YSO) scintillating crystals and multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. The results of the laboratory tests of UBAT’s functionality and performance are described in this article. The detector...

  13. Seismic Azimuthal Anisotropy of the Lower Paleozoic Shales in Northern Poland: can we reliably detect it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyz, Marta; Malinowski, Michał

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of the azimuthal anisotropy is an important aspect of characterization the Lower Paleozoic shale play in northern Poland, since it can be used to map pre-existing fracture networks or help in optimal placement of the horizontal wells. Previous studies employed Velocity versus Azimuth (VVAz) method and found that this anisotropy is weak - on the order of 1-2%, only locally - close to major fault zones - being higher (ca. 7%). This is consistent with the recent re-interpretation of the cross-dipole sonic data, which indicates average shear wave anisotropy of 1%. The problem with the VVAz method is that it requires good definition of the interval, for which the analysis is made and it should be minimum 100 ms thick. In our case, the target intervals are thin - upper reservoir (Lower Silurian Jantar formation) is 15 m thick, lower reservoir (Upper Ordovician Sasino formation) is 25 m thick. Therefore, we prefer to use the Amplitude vs Azimuth (AVAz) method, which can be applied on a single horizon (e.g. the base of the reservoir). However, the AVAz method depends critically on the quality of the seismic data and preservation of amplitudes during processing. On top of the above mentioned issues, physical properties of the Lower Paleozoic shales from Poland seem to be unfavourable for detecting azimuthal anisotropy. For example, for both target formations, parameter g=(Vs/Vp)2 is close to 0.32, which implies that the anisotropy expressed by the anisotropic gradient in the dry (i.e. gas-filled fractures) case is close to zero. In case of e.g. the Bakken Shale, g is much higher (0.38-0.4), leading to a detectable anisotropic signature even in the dry case. Modelling of the synthetic AVAz response performed using available well data suggested that anisotropic gradient in the wet (fluid-filled) case should be detectable even in case of the weak anisotropy (1-2%). This scenario is consistent with the observation, that the studied area is located in the liquid

  14. Prompt Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlof; Balsano; Barthelmy; Bloch; Butterworth; Casperson; Cline; Fletcher; Frontera; Gisler; Heise; Hills; Hurley; Kehoe; Lee; Marshall; McKay; Pawl; Piro; Szymanski; Wren

    2000-03-20

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure simultaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A search for optical counterparts to six GRBs with localization errors of 1 deg2 or better produced no detections. The earliest limiting sensitivity is mROTSE>13.1 at 10.85 s (5 s exposure) after the gamma-ray rise, and the best limit is mROTSE>16.0 at 62 minutes (897 s exposure). These are the most stringent limits obtained for the GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. Consideration of the gamma-ray fluence and peak flux for these bursts and for GRB 990123 indicates that there is not a strong positive correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray emission.

  15. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    be burst by raising the temperature due to the temperature dependence of the fluid surface tension. We address individual valves by using a local heating platform based on a thin film of near infrared absorber dye embedded in the lid used to seal the microfluidic device [L. H. Thamdrup et al., Nano Lett...

  16. Respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinecke, J W; Shapiro, B M

    1989-02-01

    Partially reduced oxygen species are toxic, yet sea urchin eggs synthesize H2O2 in a "respiratory burst" at fertilization, as an extracellular oxidant to crosslink their protective surface envelopes. To study the biochemical mechanism for H2O2 production, we have isolated an NADPH-specific oxidase fraction from homogenates of unfertilized Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs that produces H2O2 when stimulated with Ca2+ and MgATP2-. Concentrations of free Ca2+ previously implicated in regulation of egg activation modulate the activity of the oxidase. Inhibitors were used to test the relevance of this oxidase to the respiratory burst of fertilization. Procaine, two phenothiazines, and N-ethylmaleimide (but not iodoacetamide) inhibited H2O2 production by the oxidase fraction and oxygen consumption by activated eggs. The ATP requirement suggested that protein kinase activity might regulate the respiratory burst of fertilization; consonant with this hypothesis, H-7 and staurosporine were inhibitory. The respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization is an NADPH:O2 oxidoreductase that appears to be regulated by a protein kinase; although it bears a remarkable resemblance to the neutrophil oxidase, unlike the latter it does not form O2- as its initial product.

  17. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note that...

  18. Leader neurons in population bursts of 2D living neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckmann, J-P; Zbinden, Cyrille [Departement de Physique Theorique, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneve 4 (Switzerland); Jacobi, Shimshon; Moses, Elisha [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Marom, Shimon [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa 31096 (Israel)], E-mail: elisha.moses@weizmann.ac.il

    2008-01-15

    Eytan and Marom (2006 J. Neurosci. 26 8465-76) recently showed that the spontaneous bursting activity of rat neuron cultures includes 'first-to-fire' cells that consistently fire earlier than others. Here, we analyze the behavior of these neurons in long-term recordings of spontaneous activity of rat hippocampal and rat cortical neuron cultures from three different laboratories. We identify precursor events that may either subside ('aborted bursts') or can lead to a full-blown burst ('pre-bursts'). We find that the activation in the pre-burst typically has a first neuron ('leader'), followed by a localized response in its neighborhood. Locality is diminished in the bursts themselves. The long-term dynamics of the leaders is relatively robust, evolving with a half-life of 23-34 h. Stimulation of the culture alters the leader distribution, but the distribution stabilizes within about 1 h. We show that the leaders carry information about the identity of the burst, as measured by the signature of the number of spikes per neuron in a burst. The number of spikes from leaders in the first few spikes of a precursor event is furthermore shown to be predictive with regard to the transition into a burst (pre-burst versus aborted burst). We conclude that the leaders play a role in the development of the bursts and conjecture that they are part of an underlying sub-network that is excited first and then acts as a nucleation center for the burst.

  19. Can pulpal floor debonding be detected from occlusal surface displacement in composite restorations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, João Batista; Talma, Elissa; Las Casas, Estevam Barbosa; Aregawi, Wondwosen; Kolstad, Lauren Wickham; Mantell, Sue; Wang, Yan; Fok, Alex

    2018-01-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of resin composite restorations can cause debonding at the tooth-restoration interface. Theory based on the mechanics of materials predicts that debonding at the pulpal floor would half the shrinkage displacement at the occlusal surface. The aim of this study is to test this theory and to examine the possibility of detecting subsurface resin composite restoration debonding by measuring the superficial shrinkage displacements. A commercial dental resin composite with linear shrinkage strain of 0.8% was used to restore 2 groups of 5 model Class-II cavities (8-mm long, 4-mm wide and 4-mm deep) in aluminum blocks (8-mm thick, 10-mm wide and 14-mm tall). Group I had the restorations bonded to all cavity surfaces, while Group II had the restorations not bonded to the cavity floor to simulate debonding. One of the proximal surfaces of each specimen was sprayed with fine carbon powder to allow surface displacement measurement by Digital Image Correlation. Images of the speckled surface were taken before and after cure for displacement calculation. The experiment was simulated using finite element analysis (FEA) for comparison. Group I showed a maximum occlusal displacement of 34.7±6.7μm and a center of contraction (COC) near the pulpal floor. Group II had a COC coinciding with the geometric center and showed a maximum occlusal displacement of 17.4±3.8μm. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p-value=0.0007). Similar results were obtained by FEA. The theoretical shrinkage displacement was 44.6 and 22.3μm for Group I and II, respectively. The lower experimental displacements were probably caused by slumping of the resin composite before cure and deformation of the adhesive layer. The results confirmed that the occlusal shrinkage displacement of a resin composite restoration was reduced significantly by pulpal floor debonding. Recent in vitro studies seem to indicate that this reduction in shrinkage displacement

  20. The gap detection test: can it be used to diagnose tinnitus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van Dijk; K. Boyen; D. Baskent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Animals with induced tinnitus showed difficulties in detecting silent gaps in sounds, suggesting that the tinnitus percept may be filling the gap. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of this approach to detect tinnitus in human patients. The authors first

  1. The Gap Detection Test : Can It Be Used to Diagnose Tinnitus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyen, Kris; Başkent, Deniz; van Dijk, Pim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Animals with induced tinnitus showed difficulties in detecting silent gaps in sounds, suggesting that the tinnitus percept may be filling the gap. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of this approach to detect tinnitus in human patients. The authors first

  2. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, R.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bianco, C. L.; Caito, L.; Chardonnet, P.; Cherubini, C.; Dainotti, M. G.; Fraschetti, F.; Geralico, A.; Guida, R.; Patricelli, B.; Rotondo, M.; Rueda Hernandez, J. A.; Vereshchagin, G.; Xue, S.-S.

    2008-09-01

    We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the process of gravitational collapse, leading to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma: the basic self-accelerating system explaining both the energetics and the high energy Lorentz factor observed in GRBs. We then turn to recall the two basic interpretational paradigms of our GRB model: 1) the Relative Space-Time Transformation (RSTT) paradigm and 2) the Interpretation of the Burst Structure (IBS) paradigm. These paradigms lead to a "canonical" GRB light curve formed from two different components: a Proper-GRB (P-GRB) and an extended afterglow comprising a raising part, a peak, and a decaying tail. When the P-GRB is energetically predominant we have a "genuine" short GRB, while when the afterglow is energetically predominant we have a so-called long GRB or a "fake" short GRB. We compare and contrast the description of the relativistic expansion of the electron-positron plasma within our approach and within the other ones in the current literature. We then turn

  3. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Rossoni

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  4. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Doughty

    Full Text Available Sagan et al. (1993 used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993 could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993 noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0-20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary.

  5. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christopher E; Wolf, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993) noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis) as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position) which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0-20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary.

  6. A Bubble Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    RCW 79 is seen in the southern Milky Way, 17,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Centaurus. The bubble is 70-light years in diameter, and probably took about one million years to form from the radiation and winds of hot young stars. The balloon of gas and dust is an example of stimulated star formation. Such stars are born when the hot bubble expands into the interstellar gas and dust around it. RCW 79 has spawned at least two groups of new stars along the edge of the large bubble. Some are visible inside the small bubble in the lower left corner. Another group of baby stars appears near the opening at the top. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope easily detects infrared light from the dust particles in RCW 79. The young stars within RCW 79 radiate ultraviolet light that excites molecules of dust within the bubble. This causes the dust grains to emit infrared light that is detected by Spitzer and seen here as the extended red features.

  7. Bursting in Cellular Automata and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bub, Gil; Shrier, Alvin; Glass, Leon

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the initiation and continuation of abnormal cardiac arrhythmias are incompletely understood. In this chapter, we summarize work that shows how simple cellular automata models of excitable media can display a range of interesting dynamical behavior including spontaneous bursts of reentrant spiral activity. Since the model incorporates basic physiological properties of excitability, heterogeneity, localized pacemakers, and fatigue in a schematic way, the model captures generic physiological dynamics that should be broadly observed in experimental and clinical settings as well as in more realistic mathematical models.

  8. A Fast Radio Burst Search Method for VLBI Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Tong, Fengxian; Zheng, Weimin; Zhang, Juan; Tong, Li

    2018-02-01

    We introduce the cross-spectrum-based fast radio burst (FRB) search method for Very Long Baseline Interferometer (VLBI) observation. This method optimizes the fringe fitting scheme in geodetic VLBI data post-processing, which fully utilizes the cross-spectrum fringe phase information and therefore maximizes the power of single-pulse signals. Working with cross-spectrum greatly reduces the effect of radio frequency interference compared with using auto-power spectrum. Single-pulse detection confidence increases by cross-identifying detections from multiple baselines. By combining the power of multiple baselines, we may improve the detection sensitivity. Our method is similar to that of coherent beam forming, but without the computational expense to form a great number of beams to cover the whole field of view of our telescopes. The data processing pipeline designed for this method is easy to implement and parallelize, which can be deployed in various kinds of VLBI observations. In particular, we point out that VGOS observations are very suitable for FRB search.

  9. BurstCube: A CubeSat for Gravitational Wave Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jeremy S.; Racusin, Judith; Briggs, Michael; de Nolfo, Georgia; Caputo, Regina; Krizmanic, John; McEnery, Julie E.; Shawhan, Peter; Morris, David; Connaughton, Valerie; Kocevski, Dan; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Hui, Michelle; Mitchell, Lee; McBreen, Sheila

    2018-01-01

    We present BurstCube, a novel CubeSat that will detect and localize Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). BurstCube is a selected mission that will detect long GRBs, attributed to the collapse of massive stars, short GRBs (sGRBs), resulting from binary neutron star mergers, as well as other gamma-ray transients in the energy range 10-1000 keV. sGRBs are of particular interest because they are predicted to be the counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) sources soon to be detectable by LIGO/Virgo. BurstCube contains 4 CsI scintillators coupled with arrays of compact low-power Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) on a 6U Dellingr bus, a flagship modular platform that is easily modifiable for a variety of 6U CubeSat architectures. BurstCube will complement existing facilities such as Swift and Fermi in the short term, and provide a means for GRB detection, localization, and characterization in the interim time before the next generation future gamma-ray mission flies, as well as space-qualify SiPMs and test technologies for future use on larger gamma-ray missions. The ultimate configuration of BurstCube is to have a set of ~10 BurstCubes to provide all-sky coverage to GRBs for substantially lower cost than a full-scale mission.

  10. Aliasing Effects of Q-bursts on Background Spectra of Schumann Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A.; Mushtak, V. C.; Williams, E.; Neska, M.; Nagy, T. G.; Satori, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's Schumann resonances (SR) manifest as a 'background' signal and as an occasional transient excitation (Q-burst) of substantially larger amplitude. The background signal is generally attributed to the superposition of radiated ELF signal from average lightning flashes originating in convective scale thunderstorms predominant in the late afternoon, and whose waveforms are all overlapping. The larger transient excitations are attributed to exceptionally energetic lightning flashes in larger mesoscale convective systems. These flashes stand out strongly against the background signal, and often produce sprites in the mesosphere. These exceptional events are often delayed in the diurnal cycle by many hours into the evening and even the early morning over land areas. This study is concerned with the idea that the spectral energy of a single transient event can compete with the background energy over 5-15 minute time scales, and so serve to alias the background spectrum and destroy that 'fingerprint' for the geographical origin of the background lightning. In the present work, an attempt is made to detect these large by simultaneous observation of SR electric field spectra from two stations in Europe, Belsk, Poland (BLK: 49.190 N, 22.550 E) and Nagycenk, Hungary (NCK: 47.60 N, 16.70 E), separated by 0.47 Mm, along with the same strokes identified by the World Wide Lighting Location Network (WWLLN). First, the energy contents (EC) for each five second spectra with up to four SR modes for the two stations are computed. Q-burst events are selected if: (1) the Core Standard Deviation (CSD) in any 5 second segment is above 16 CSD (2) the ratio of CSDs at both stations is within 0.5 to 2, and (3) the event occurs within 1-3 time samples at each station. Simultaneous observations at these nearby stations enable us to distinguish the cultural noise and lightning strokes originating close to each station. At the same time, the propagation path form the originating Q-burst

  11. Can Self-Censorship in News Media be Detected Algorithmically? A Case Study in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Rongrong; Zhou, Baojian; Chen, Feng; Liu, Naifeng; Mares, David; Butler, Patrick; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2016-01-01

    Censorship in social media has been well studied and provides insight into how governments stifle freedom of expression online. Comparatively less (or no) attention has been paid to detecting (self) censorship in traditional media (e.g., news) using social media as a bellweather. We present a novel unsupervised approach that views social media as a sensor to detect censorship in news media wherein statistically significant differences between information published in the news media and the co...

  12. An internally consistent gamma ray burst time history phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenology for gamma ray burst time histories is outlined. Order of their generally chaotic appearance is attempted, based on the speculation that any one burst event can be represented above 150 keV as a superposition of similarly shaped increases of varying intensity. The increases can generally overlap, however, confusing the picture, but a given event must at least exhibit its own limiting characteristic rise and decay times if the measurements are made with instruments having adequate temporal resolution. Most catalogued observations may be of doubtful or marginal utility to test this hypothesis, but some time histories from Helios-2, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and other instruments having one-to several-millisecond capabilities appear to provide consistency. Also, recent studies of temporally resolved Solar Maximum Mission burst energy spectra are entirely compatible with this picture. The phenomenology suggested here, if correct, may assist as an analytic tool for modelling of burst processes and possibly in the definition of burst source populations.

  13. Cancer phototherapy via selective photoinactivation of respiratory chain oxidase to trigger a fatal superoxide anion burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengnan; Zhou, Feifan; Wei, Yanchun; Chen, Wei R; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2014-02-10

    Here, we develop a novel cancer treatment modality using mitochondria-targeting, high-fluence, low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) in mouse tumor models and explore the mechanism of mitochondrial injury by HF-LPLI. We demonstrated that the initial reaction after photon absorption was photosensitization of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), to inhibit enzymatic activity of COX in situ and cause respiratory chain superoxide anion (O2(-•)) burst. We also found that HF-LPLI exerted its main tumor killing effect through mitochondrial O2(-•) burst via electron transport chain (ETC). These phenomena were completely absent in the respiration-deficient cells and COX knockdown cells. With a carefully selected irradiation protocol, HF-LPLI could efficaciously destroy tumors. The inhibition of enzymatic activity of COX and generation of O2(-•) by HF-LPLI in vivo were also detected. It is the first time that the mechanism involved in the interaction between light and its photoacceptor under HF-LPLI treatment is clarified. Our results clearly indicate that HF-LPLI initiates its effects via targeted COX photoinactivation and that the tumor-killing efficacy is dependent of the subsequent mitochondrial O2(-•) burst via ETC. Based on both in vitro and in vivo results, we conclude that HF-LPLI can selectively photoinactivate respiratory chain oxidase to trigger a fatal mitochondrial O2(-•) burst, producing oxidative damage on cancer cells. This study opens up the possibilities of applications of HF-LPLI as a mitochondria-targeting cancer phototherapy.

  14. Fast Radio Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akshaya Rane

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... and 1006. There are some records of possible novae or SNe before AD 1000 as well. All of these histori- cal observations are described in detail in Stephenson ...... Digital Sky Survey to estimate w. Weiet al.(2015) also proposed that FRBs can be used to test the accuracy of Einstein's Equivalence Principle.

  15. Early-time observations of gamma-ray burst error boxes with the Livermore optical transient imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G G

    2000-08-01

    Despite the enormous wealth of gamma-ray burst (GRB) data collected over the past several years the physical mechanism which causes these extremely powerful phenomena is still unknown. Simultaneous and early time optical observations of GRBs will likely make an great contribution t o our understanding. LOTIS is a robotic wide field-of-view telescope dedicated to the search for prompt and early-time optical afterglows from gamma-ray bursts. LOTIS began routine operations in October 1996 and since that time has responded to over 145 gamma-ray burst triggers. Although LOTIS has not yet detected prompt optical emission from a GRB its upper limits have provided constraints on the theoretical emission mechanisms. Super-LOTIS, also a robotic wide field-of-view telescope, can detect emission 100 times fainter than LOTIS is capable of detecting. Routine observations from Steward Observatory's Kitt Peak Station will begin in the immediate future. During engineering test runs under bright skies from the grounds of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Super-LOTIS provided its first upper limits on the early-time optical afterglow of GRBs. This dissertation provides a summary of the results from LOTIS and Super-LOTIS through the time of writing. Plans for future studies with both systems are also presented.

  16. A kinetic model for the burst phase of processive cellulases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Præstgaard, Eigil; Olsen, Jens Elmerdahl; Murphy, Leigh

    2011-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases (exocellulases) hydrolyze cellulose processively, i.e. by sequential cleaving of soluble sugars from one end of a cellulose strand. Their activity generally shows an initial burst, followed by a pronounced slowdown, even when substrate is abundant and product accumulation...... is negligible. Here, we propose an explicit kinetic model for this behavior, which uses classical burst phase theory as the starting point. The model is tested against calorimetric measurements of the activity of the cellobiohydrolase Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei on amorphous cellulose. A simple version...... of the model, which can be solved analytically, shows that the burst and slowdown can be explained by the relative rates of the sequential reactions in the hydrolysis process and the occurrence of obstacles for the processive movement along the cellulose strand. More specifically, the maximum enzyme activity...

  17. Personality and attention: Levels of neuroticism and extraversion can predict attentional performance during a change detection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sowon; Buttaccio, Daniel R; Hahn, Jungwon; Lee, Taehun

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that levels of extraversion and neuroticism can predict attentional performance during a change detection task. After completing a change detection task built on the flicker paradigm, participants were assessed for personality traits using the Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R). Multiple regression analyses revealed that higher levels of extraversion predict increased change detection accuracies, while higher levels of neuroticism predict decreased change detection accuracies. In addition, neurotic individuals exhibited decreased sensitivity A' and increased fixation dwell times. Hierarchical regression analyses further revealed that eye movement measures mediate the relationship between neuroticism and change detection accuracies. Based on the current results, we propose that neuroticism is associated with decreased attentional control over the visual field, presumably due to decreased attentional disengagement. Extraversion can predict increased attentional performance, but the effect is smaller than the relationship between neuroticism and attention.

  18. Parkinsonian rest tremor can be detected accurately based on neuronal oscillations recorded from the subthalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, J; Schoffelen, J M; Schnitzler, A; van Gerven, M A J

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the possibility of tremor detection based on deep brain activity. We re-analyzed recordings of local field potentials (LFPs) from the subthalamic nucleus in 10 PD patients (12 body sides) with spontaneously fluctuating rest tremor. Power in several frequency bands was estimated and used as input to Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) which classified short data segments as either tremor-free rest or rest tremor. HMMs were compared to direct threshold application to individual power features. Applying a threshold directly to band-limited power was insufficient for tremor detection (mean area under the curve [AUC] of receiver operating characteristic: 0.64, STD: 0.19). Multi-feature HMMs, in contrast, allowed for accurate detection (mean AUC: 0.82, STD: 0.15), using four power features obtained from a single contact pair. Within-patient training yielded better accuracy than across-patient training (0.84vs. 0.78, p=0.03), yet tremor could often be detected accurately with either approach. High frequency oscillations (>200Hz) were the best performing individual feature. LFP-based markers of tremor are robust enough to allow for accurate tremor detection in short data segments, provided that appropriate statistical models are used. LFP-based markers of tremor could be useful control signals for closed-loop deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electronic implementation of optical burst switching techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Ilijc; Darcie, Thomas E.; Ganti, Sudhakar

    2013-10-01

    Extensive research effort is ongoing in energy-efficient Internet-based communications. Optical Flow Switching (OFS) and Optical Burst Switching (OBS) offer potentially efficient alternatives to IP-router-based networks for large data transactions, but significant challenges remain. OFS requires each user to install expensive core network technology, limiting application to highly specialized nodes. OBS can achieve higher scalability but burst assembly/disassembly procedures reduce power efficiency. Finally both OFS and OBS use all-optical switching technologies for which energy efficiency and flexibility remain subject to debate. Our study aims at combining the advantages of both OBS and OFS while avoiding their shortcomings. We consider using a two-way resource reservation protocol for periodic concatenations of large (e.g. 1 Mb) packets or Media Frames (MFs). These chains of MFs (MFCs) are semi-transparent with a periodicity referred to as the "transparency degree". Each MFC is assembled and stored at an end-user machine during the resource reservation procedure and is then switched and buffered electronically along its path. The periodic configuration of each MFC enables interleaving of several chains using buffering only to align the MFs in each MFC in time, largely reducing the buffer requirements with respect to OBS. This periodicity also enables a simple scheduling algorithm to schedule large transactions with minimal control plane processing, achieving link utilization approaching 99.9%. In summary, results indicate that implementing optical burst switching techniques in the electronic domain is a compelling path forward to high-throughput power-efficient networking.

  20. Circulating cell-free DNA-based epigenetic assay can detect early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehiro, Natsue; Sato, Fumiaki; Pu, Fengling; Tanaka, Sunao; Kawashima, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Saji, Shigehira; Toi, Masakazu

    2016-12-19

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has recently been recognized as a resource for biomarkers of cancer progression, treatment response, and drug resistance. However, few have demonstrated the usefulness of cfDNA for early detection of cancer. Although aberrant DNA methylation in cfDNA has been reported for more than a decade, its diagnostic accuracy remains unsatisfactory for cancer screening. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a highly sensitive cfDNA-based system for detection of primary breast cancer (BC) using epigenetic biomarkers and digital PCR technology. Array-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis was performed using 56 microdissected breast tissue specimens, 34 cell lines, and 29 blood samples from healthy volunteers (HVs). Epigenetic markers for BC detection were selected, and a droplet digital methylation-specific PCR (ddMSP) panel with the selected markers was established. The detection model was constructed by support vector machine and evaluated using cfDNA samples. The methylation array analysis identified 12 novel epigenetic markers (JAK3, RASGRF1, CPXM1, SHF, DNM3, CAV2, HOXA10, B3GNT5, ST3GAL6, DACH1, P2RX3, and chr8:23572595) for detecting BC. We also selected four internal control markers (CREM, GLYATL3, ELMOD3, and KLF9) that were identified as infrequently altered genes using a public database. A ddMSP panel using these 16 markers was developed and detection models were constructed with a training dataset containing cfDNA samples from 80 HVs and 87 cancer patients. The best detection model adopted four methylation markers (RASGRF1, CPXM1, HOXA10, and DACH1) and two parameters (cfDNA concentration and the mean of 12 methylation markers), and, and was validated in an independent dataset of 53 HVs and 58 BC patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for cancer-normal discrimination was 0.916 and 0.876 in the training and validation dataset, respectively. The sensitivity and the specificity of the

  1. Respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization.

    OpenAIRE

    Heinecke, J W; Shapiro, B M

    1989-01-01

    Partially reduced oxygen species are toxic, yet sea urchin eggs synthesize H2O2 in a "respiratory burst" at fertilization, as an extracellular oxidant to crosslink their protective surface envelopes. To study the biochemical mechanism for H2O2 production, we have isolated an NADPH-specific oxidase fraction from homogenates of unfertilized Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs that produces H2O2 when stimulated with Ca2+ and MgATP2-. Concentrations of free Ca2+ previously implicated in regulation...

  2. On the neutron bursts origin.

    CERN Document Server

    Stenkin, Yu V

    2002-01-01

    The origin of the neutron bursts in Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is explained using results of the experiments and CORSIKA based Monte-Carlo simulations. It is shown that events with very high neutron multiplicity observed last years in neutron monitors as well as in surrounding detectors, are caused by usual EAS core with primary energies > 1 PeV. No exotic processes were needed for the explanation.

  3. The bursts of high energy events observed by the telescope array surface detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kishigami, S.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, K.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2017-08-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment is designed to detect air showers induced by ultra high energy cosmic rays. The TA ground Surface particle Detector (TASD) observed several short-time bursts of air shower like events. These bursts are not likely due to chance coincidence between single shower events. The expectation of chance coincidence is less than 10-4 for five-year's observation. We checked the correlation between these bursts of events and lightning data, and found evidence for correlations in timing and position. Some features of the burst events are similar to those of a normal cosmic ray air shower, and some are not. On this paper, we report the observed bursts of air shower like events and their correlation with lightning.

  4. Two-phase X-ray burst from GX 3+1 observed by INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.F.; Brandt, Søren

    2006-01-01

    emission up to 30 keV energy during the first few seconds of the burst where the bolometric peak luminosity approaches the Eddington limit. This peculiar burst is characterized by two distinct phases: an initial short spike of similar to 6 s consistent with being similar to a normal type I X-ray burst......INTEGRAL detected on August 31, 2004, an unusual thermonuclear X-ray burst from the low-mass X-ray binary GX 3 3+1. Its duration was 30 min, which is between the normal burst durations for this source (less than or similar to 10 s) and the superburst observed in 1998 ( several hours). We see...

  5. Discovery of burst oscillations near the spin frequency in the intermittent accreting millisecond pulsar HETE J1900.1-2455

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watts, A.; Altamirano, D.; Casella, P.; Cavecchi, Y.; Degenaar, N.; Linares, M.; Patruno, A.; Rea, N.; Soleri, P.; van der Klis, M.; Wijnands, R.

    2009-01-01

    RXTE observations of the intermittent accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar HETE J1900.1-2455 (Kaaret et al. 2006 ApJ 638, 963; Galloway et al. 2007 ApJ 654, L73) showed a Type I X-ray burst on April 2 2009 (08:57 UTC). We detect strong burst oscillations during the peak and initial decay of the burst,

  6. Fast Radio Burst Discovered in the Arecibo Pulsar ALFA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Cordes, J. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Wharton, R. S.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Knispel, B.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J. K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W. W.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm-3, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = -0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  7. Zebrafish larvae exhibit rheotaxis and can escape a continuous suction source using their lateral line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Olszewski

    Full Text Available Zebrafish larvae show a robust behavior called rheotaxis, whereby they use their lateral line system to orient upstream in the presence of a steady current. At 5 days post fertilization, rheotactic larvae can detect and initiate a swimming burst away from a continuous point-source of suction. Burst distance and velocity increase when fish initiate bursts closer to the suction source where flow velocity is higher. We suggest that either the magnitude of the burst reflects the initial flow stimulus, or fish may continually sense flow during the burst to determine where to stop. By removing specific neuromasts of the posterior lateral line along the body, we show how the location and number of flow sensors play a role in detecting a continuous suction source. We show that the burst response critically depends on the presence of neuromasts on the tail. Flow information relayed by neuromasts appears to be involved in the selection of appropriate behavioral responses. We hypothesize that caudally located neuromasts may be preferentially connected to fast swimming spinal motor networks while rostrally located neuromasts are connected to slow swimming motor networks at an early age.

  8. Firing pattern of bursting neurons under sinusoidal drive in mean-field modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Kim, J W; Robinson, P A; Drysdale, P M

    2009-07-07

    Bursting has been observed in many sensory neurons, and is thought to be important in neural signaling, sleep, and some disorders of the brain. Bursting neurons have been studied via various types of conductance-based models at the single-neuron level. Important features of bursting have been reproduced by this type of model, but it is not certain how well the behavior of populations of bursting neurons can be represented solely by that of individual neurons. To study bursting neurons at the population level, a conductance-based model is incorporated into a mean-field model to yield a mean-field bursting model. The responses of the model to sinusoidal inputs are studied, showing that neurons with various different initial states are capable of phase-locked or intermittent firing, depending on their baseline voltage. Furthermore, depending on this voltage, the bursting frequency either slaves to the original unperturbed bursting frequency or approaches a steady value when the external driving frequency increases. Finally, use of white noise perturbations shows that the bursting frequency of the neurons remains the same even under a more general external stimulus.

  9. Caries detection methods : Can they aid decision making for invasive sealant treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, AC; Verdonschot, EH; Huysmans, M

    2001-01-01

    The decision to place sealants is a difficult one, and it has been suggested that in a low risk population it may be efficient to wait until caries is detected in the fissure. An invasive sealant technique with fissure preparation may then be indicated. The diagnostic method used in the indication

  10. Identifying Severely Mentally Ill Inmates: Can Small Jails Comply with Detection Standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLearen, Alix M.

    Compares detection rates of the Referral Decision Scale (RDS) with a short, officer-administered booking questionnaire at a low capacity jail. Although RDS produced a higher number of false positives, it correctly identified more mentally ill inmates than did the booking procedure. Results suggest that combining both instruments may provide the…

  11. Outliers in Questionnaire Data: Can They Be Detected and Should They Be Removed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Wobbe P.; van der Ark, L. Andries; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    Outliers in questionnaire data are unusual observations, which may bias statistical results, and outlier statistics may be used to detect such outliers. The authors investigated the effect outliers have on the specificity and the sensitivity of each of six different outlier statistics. The Mahalanobis distance and the item-pair based outlier…

  12. Timed motor tests can detect subtle motor dysfunction in early Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaxma, C.A.; Bloem, B.R.; Overeem, S.; Borm, G.F.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.

    2010-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is important for putative neuroprotective therapies to be initiated in the earliest stage of the disease. We investigated whether a previously validated timed motor test (TMT) battery could detect subtle motor dysfunction in early PD patients and even in

  13. Can Sample-Specific Simulations Help Detect Low Base-Rate Taxonicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Steven R. H.; Amir, Nader; Bau, Jinn Jonp

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the role of the sample-specific simulations (SSS; A. M. Ruscio & J. Ruscio, 2002; J. Ruscio & A. M. Ruscio, 2004) procedure in detecting low base-rate taxa that might otherwise prove elusive. The procedure preserved key distributional characteristics for moderate to high base-rate taxa, but it performed inadequately for low…

  14. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    found no false-positive test reactions. Confirmatory testing was performed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and spectrophotometrically on extraction fluids. The use of DPC as a colorimetric spot test reagent appears to be a good and valid test method for detecting the release of chromium(VI) ions from...

  15. Image-guided diagnosis of prostate cancer can increase detection of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the largest prospective study to date of image-guided technology for identifying suspicious regions of the prostate to biopsy, researchers compared the ability of this technology to detect high-risk prostate cancer with that of the current standard of

  16. Measuring Cosmological Parameters with Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Della Valle, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    In a few dozen seconds, gamma ray bursts (GRBs) emit up to 1054 erg in terms of an equivalent isotropically radiated energy Eiso, so they can be observed up to z 10. Thus, these phenomena appear to be very promising tools to describe the expansion rate history of the universe. Here, we review the use of the Ep,i-Eiso correlation of GRBs to measure the cosmological density parameter ΩM. We show that the present data set of GRBs, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide independent evidence, from other probes, that ΩM 0.3. We show that current (e.g. Swift, Fermi/GBM, Konus-WIND) and forthcoming gamma ray burst (GRB) experiments (e.g. CALET/GBM, SVOM, Lomonosov/UFFO, LOFT/WFM) will allow us to constrain ΩM with an accuracy comparable to that currently exhibited by Type Ia supernovae (SNe-Ia) and to study the properties of dark energy and their evolution with time.

  17. Adding temporally localized noise can enhance the contribution of target knowledge on contrast detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Daphné; Cavanagh, Patrick; Arleo, Angelo; Allard, Rémy

    2017-02-01

    External noise paradigms are widely used to characterize sensitivity by comparing the effect of a variable on contrast threshold when it is limited by internal versus external noise. A basic assumption of external noise paradigms is that the processing properties are the same in low and high noise. However, recent studies (e.g., Allard & Cavanagh, 2011; Allard & Faubert, 2014b) suggest that this assumption could be violated when using spatiotemporally localized noise (i.e., appearing simultaneously and at the same location as the target) but not when using spatiotemporally extended noise (i.e., continuously displayed, full-screen, dynamic noise). These previous findings may have been specific to the crowding and 0D noise paradigms that were used, so the purpose of the current study is to test if this violation of noise-invariant processing also occurs in a standard contrast detection task in white noise. The rationale of the current study is that local external noise triggers the use of recognition rather than detection and that a recognition process should be more affected by uncertainty about the shape of the target than one involving detection. To investigate the contribution of target knowledge on contrast detection, the effect of orientation uncertainty was evaluated for a contrast detection task in the absence of noise and in the presence of spatiotemporally localized or extended noise. A larger orientation uncertainty effect was observed with temporally localized noise than with temporally extended noise or with no external noise, indicating a change in the nature of the processing for temporally localized noise. We conclude that the use of temporally localized noise in external noise paradigms risks triggering a shift in process, invalidating the noise-invariant processing required for the paradigm. If, instead, temporally extended external noise is used to match the properties of internal noise, no such processing change occurs.

  18. Possibility of observing high energy neutrinos from gamma bursts, with the Antanares telescope, feasibility study; Possibilite d'observation, par le telescope antares, de neutrinos de haute energie associes aux sursauts gamma et validation des techniques de detection a l'aide d'un prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouchner, A

    2001-04-01

    The European Antares collaboration intends to build a deep-sea neutrino telescope with a detection surface of about 1/10 km{sup 2} in the Mediterranean sea. The universe is transparent to neutrinos, so their study provides a unique means of improving our knowledge of the nature and origin of cosmic rays and their emission from the most powerful astrophysical sources in the cosmos. Neutrinos also offer the possibility of opening a new energy window (E>TeV) for observation of the universe. The first part of the thesis is dedicated to a study of the possibility of using the future telescope to look for correlations between gamma-ray bursts and high-energy neutrinos. It is based, on one hand, on the predictions of neutrino fluxes from gamma-ray bursts in the framework of the theoretical model of 'fireballs', and, on the other hand, on the temporal properties of the gamma-ray bursts in the 4. BATSE catalogue. The second part of the thesis presents the results obtained with a prototype detector line deployed, at the end of 1999, some forty km south-west off Marseilles. The objective was to operate a complete apparatus, similar to the future detector lines, from the shore, and under realistic conditions. Data from 7 photomultiplier tubes disposed along the detector line were transmitted through 37 km of optical fiber to the shore, where they were used to reconstruct tracks due to atmospheric muons, thus validating the detection principles and methods. (author)

  19. On the three harmonics of solar type III bursts at the decameter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhenko, Anatolii; Pylaev, Oleg; Melnik, Valentin; Konovalenko, Alexandr; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Rucker, Helmut; Frantsuzenko, Anatolii; Dorovskyy, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Harmonic structure of type III bursts are explained in terms of plasma emission mechanism. The second harmonic emission is well known. But there are theoretical papers about the third harmonic of type III bursts. And there were observations of the third harmonic of such types of bursts as U, J, V, II. We observed triple type III bursts where frequency ratio is close to 1:2:3. They are structures where type III emission is repeated at the double and triple frequencies. Incidentally, components of triple type III bursts are not only standard type III but also type IIIb bursts. We registered 30 triple bursts during 2011 and 2012 years. Observations were made by radio telescope URAN-2, Poltava, Ukraine. It enables polarization measurements at the frequencies 8 - 32 MHz. URAN-2 allows registration of radio emission with time and frequency resolution 10 ms and 4 kHz correspondingly. We analyze properties of the components of triple bursts and their dependencies on frequency, type of burst and on the position of the component within the triplet. The main properties of the components of triple bursts such as duration and drift rate are similar to those of standard type III and IIIb bursts. We find usual for type III bursts dependencies such as follow: duration decreases with frequency, the type IIIb bursts have always smaller duration at the same frequencies, all bursts drift from high to low frequencies. But we also find the linear dependence of drift rate on frequency. All components of a trio have the same sign of polarization. Polarization of the first component is always the highest in triple bursts. It corresponds to the generally accepted viewpoint about the first harmonic emission. The second and the third components of trio have low polarization. It is typical for the second and the third harmonics according to the plasma radiation mechanism. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and theoretical aspects of observed dependencies. The most of detected regularities

  20. Explaining the light curves of Gamma-ray Bursts with precessing jets

    OpenAIRE

    Zwart, Simon Portegies

    1999-01-01

    A phenomenological model is presented to explain the light curves of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-rays are produced in a narrow beam which sweeps through space due to the precession of a slaved accretion disc. The light curve expected from such a precessing luminosity cone can explain the complex temporal behavior of bright gamma-ray bursts.

  1. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Broadband Fitting Based Directly on Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.; van der Horst, A.; MacFadyen, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a powerful new tool for fitting broadband gamma-ray burst afterglow data, which can be used to determine the burst explosion parameters and the synchrotron radiation parameters. By making use of scale invariance between relativistic jets of different energies and different circumburst

  2. The effect of post-burst energy on exploding bridgewire output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elizabeth; Bowden, Mike

    2017-01-01

    For an EBW detonator, as the fireset energy is increased from threshold to all-fire level the post-burst energy delivered to the detonator increases, and the function times decrease. To gain an understanding of the processes through which the post-burst electrical energy influences the function times the effect of the post-burst energy on the explosion of bridgewires was studied. A fireset was developed which enabled the post-burst energy to be varied independently of the burst energy by terminating the current flow at pre-selected times. The effect of this on the bridgewires was characterized at a range of firing voltages and a range of termination times. The expansion and explosion of the bridgewire was characterized using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry. The velocimetry trace detected two families of velocities. The first family had initial velocities in the range 1-2 km.s-1 and the second family had velocities in the range 0-0.5 km.s-1. The relative position of the two families depended on the post burst energy. The results show that a reduction in the post-burst energy corresponds to a decrease in the acceleration and peak velocity of the bridgewire / plasma at burst.

  3. Properties of the complex type II burst with rich herringbone structure within 3-33 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. M.; Konovalenko, O. O.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H. O.; Poedts, S.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Mykhaylov, V. A.

    2013-06-01

    Characteristics of the type II burst with "herringbone" structure observed on 7 June 2011 within 3-33 MHz are considered. The burst was recorded both by the two ground-based radiotelescopes (UTR-2, URAN-2) and the spaceborne STEREO radio receivers. For the first time, a detailed statistical analysis of main parameters of the herringbone sub- bursts of type II (duration and frequency drift rate) was performed at decameter wavelengths separately for those positively and negatively drifting ones. Another new result within these frequencies is the measured degree of circular polarization of fine structure type II bursts. A fine frequency, structure of the sub-bursts herringbone was found to be, similar to the so-called "fringes" in the solar S-bursts. From the characteristic wave-like oscillations of the type II back-bone the parameters of coronal streamers intersected by the shock wave were derived. Using the observational data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, the speed and direction of the associated CME propagation were detected. From the ground-based radio observations the radial speed of type II burst source was found. As a result, possible location of the type II burst source was determined. In addition, the geoeffectiveness of the discussed solar event was estimated.

  4. Runtime Verification in Context : Can Optimizing Error Detection Improve Fault Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Matthew B.; Purandare, Rahul; Person, Suzette

    2010-01-01

    Runtime verification has primarily been developed and evaluated as a means of enriching the software testing process. While many researchers have pointed to its potential applicability in online approaches to software fault tolerance, there has been a dearth of work exploring the details of how that might be accomplished. In this paper, we describe how a component-oriented approach to software health management exposes the connections between program execution, error detection, fault diagnosis, and recovery. We identify both research challenges and opportunities in exploiting those connections. Specifically, we describe how recent approaches to reducing the overhead of runtime monitoring aimed at error detection might be adapted to reduce the overhead and improve the effectiveness of fault diagnosis.

  5. Nanoemulsions obtained via bubble-bursting at a compound interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Roché, Matthieu; Vigolo, Daniele; Arnaudov, Luben N.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Gurkov, Theodor D.; Tsutsumanova, Gichka G.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-08-01

    Bursting of bubbles at an air/liquid interface is a familiar occurrence relevant to foam stability, cell cultures in bioreactors and ocean-atmosphere mass transfer. In the latter case, bubble-bursting leads to the dispersal of sea-water aerosols in the surrounding air. Here we show that bubbles bursting at a compound air/oil/water-with-surfactant interface can disperse submicrometre oil droplets in water. Dispersal results from the detachment of an oil spray from the bottom of the bubble towards water during bubble collapse. We provide evidence that droplet size is selected by physicochemical interactions between oil molecules and the surfactants rather than by hydrodynamics. We demonstrate the unrecognized role that this dispersal mechanism may play in the fate of the sea surface microlayer and of pollutant spills by dispersing petroleum in the water column. Finally, our system provides an energy-efficient route, with potential upscalability, for applications in drug delivery, food production and materials science.

  6. A Novel QKD-based Secure Edge Router Architecture Design for Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Optical Burst Switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology issue that could achieve a viable network in future. They have the ability to meet the bandwidth requisite of those applications that call for intensive bandwidth. The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. The concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution and quality of service (QoS). This paper proposes a framework based on QKD based secure edge router architecture design to provide burst confidentiality. The QKD protocol offers high level of confidentiality as it is indestructible. The design architecture was implemented in FPGA using diverse models and the results were taken. The results show that the proposed model is suitable for real time secure routing applications of the Optical burst switched networks.

  7. Can a future mission detect a habitable ecosystem on Europa, or Ganymede?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chela Flores, Julian

    2010-05-01

    The considerable evidence for the presence of a liquid ocean over a silicate core makes Europa a candidate for the emergence of a second evolutionary pathway of autochthonous life. The most urgent question in astrobiology is the origin of habitable ecosystems—a question in geochemistry—rather than the alternative search for the origin of life itself—a question in chemical evolution (Chela-Flores, 2010). Since certain bodies may share a similar geophysical past with the Earth, a question suggests itself: Can available instrumentation be the ‘pioneer' in the discovery of habitable ecosystems in geophysical environments similar to the early Earth, where oceans were in contact with a silicate core? A central aspect of this dilemma is the element sulphur (S). A reliable window on the nature of the early terrestrial habitable ecosystems is the Pilbara Craton (Australia), a rich fossiliferous archive of the early steps of evolution, having preserved details of ancient hydrothermal vents. It contains a 3.47 Ga barite deposit with microfossils of a complex set of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Shen and Buick, 2004). The large spread in the delta 34S values provides the earliest reliable biomarker from the early Earth. Europa may represent the only other case in the Solar System in which liquid water has been in contact with a silicate core over geologic time in perfect analogy with the early Earth (Bland et al., 2009). The following hypothesis is forced upon us: The presence of hydrothermal activity at the interface of the silicate core and the Europan ocean can provide a variety of biogenic chemicals that play a role in sustaining microbial life at the ocean floor. This is the source of microbial life elsewhere in the ocean and of biomarkers on its icy surface. This hypothesis is subject to a feasible experimental test: Europa's non-ice surficial elements were found to be widespread, patchy and, most likely, endogenous. We argue that penetrators should be inserted in

  8. Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Hybrid Burst Assembly Technique for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Muhammad Umaru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS paradigm is perceived as an intermediate switching technology for future all-optical networks. Burst assembly that is the first process in OBS is the focus of this paper. In this paper, an intelligent hybrid burst assembly algorithm that is based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The new algorithm is evaluated against the traditional hybrid burst assembly algorithm and the fuzzy adaptive threshold (FAT burst assembly algorithm via simulation. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the hybrid and the FAT algorithms in terms of burst end-to-end delay, packet end-to-end delay, and packet loss ratio.

  9. Can magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0-Tesla reliably detect patients with endometriosis? Initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomeer, Maarten G; Steensma, Anneke B; van Santbrink, Evert J; Willemssen, Francois E; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Hunink, Myriam G; Spronk, Sandra; Laven, Joop S; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an optimized 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol is sensitive and specific enough to detect patients with endometriosis. This was a prospective cohort study with consecutive patients. Forty consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of endometriosis underwent 3.0-Tesla MRI, including a T2-weighted high-resolution fast spin echo sequence (spatial resolution=0.75 ×1.2 ×1.5 mm³) and a 3D T1-weighted high-resolution gradient echo sequence (spatial resolution=0.75 ×1.2 × 2.0 mm³). Two radiologists reviewed the dataset with consensus reading. During laparoscopy, which was used as reference standard, all lesions were characterized according to the revised criteria of the American Fertility Society. Patient-level and region-level sensitivities and specificities and lesion-level sensitivities were calculated. Patient-level sensitivity was 42% for stage I (5/12) and 100% for stages II, III and IV (25/25). Patient-level specificity for all stages was 100% (3/3). The region-level sensitivity and specificity was 63% and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity per lesion was 61% (90% for deep lesions, 48% for superficial lesions and 100% for endometriomata). The detection rate of obliteration of the cul-the-sac was 100% (10/10) with no false positive findings. The interreader agreement was substantial to perfect (kappa=1 per patient, 0.65 per lesion and 0.71 for obliteration of the cul-the-sac). An optimized 3.0-Tesla MRI protocol is accurate in detecting stage II to stage IV endometriosis. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. Plant immunity and film Noir: what gumshoe detectives can teach us about plant-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David S

    2002-05-31

    Plant cells practice constant vigilance using resistance (R) proteins to monitor pathogenic processes. Three papers published recently in Cell and one in Science provide support for a model in which plant cells set up surveillance of signal transduction pathways, preparing to destroy the cell if any untoward fiddling with cellular physiology is detected. The demonstration of three separate examples of such a system suggests that it is broadly used and should provoke a reexamination of microbial pathogenesis in animal cells to look for similar mechanisms.

  11. Can we use PCA to detect small signals in noisy data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, Jakob; Rusz, Ján

    2017-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is among the most commonly applied dimension reduction techniques suitable to denoise data. Focusing on its limitations to detect low variance signals in noisy data, we discuss how statistical and systematical errors occur in PCA reconstructed data as a function of the size of the data set, which extends the work of Lichtert and Verbeeck, (2013) [16]. Particular attention is directed towards the estimation of bias introduced by PCA and its influence on experiment design. Aiming at the denoising of large matrices, nullspace based denoising (NBD) is introduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Can DMCO Detect Visual Field Loss in Neurological Patients? A Secondary Validation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ane Sophie; Steensberg, Alvilda Thougaard; la Cour, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Unrecognized visual field loss is caused by a range of blinding eye conditions as well as serious brain diseases. The commonest cause of asymptomatic visual field loss is glaucoma. No screening tools have been proven cost-effective. Damato Multifixation Campimetry Online (DMCO), an inexpensive...... online test, has been evaluated as a future cost-beneficial tool to detect glaucoma. To further validate DMCO, this study aimed to test DMCO in a preselected population with neurological visual field loss. Methods : The study design was an evaluation of a diagnostic test. Patients were included...

  13. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berko, Netanel S.; Levin, Terry L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Hay, Arielle [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Miami, FL (United States); Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P < 0.001). The positive and negative predictive values for elastography in the determination of active myositis were 75% and 31

  14. The Most Remote Gamma-Ray Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    ESO Telescopes Observe "Lightning" in the Young Universe Summary Observations with telescopes at the ESO La Silla and Paranal observatories (Chile) have enabled an international team of astronomers [1] to measure the distance of a "gamma-ray burst", an extremely violent, cosmic explosion of still unknown physical origin. It turns out to be the most remote gamma-ray burst ever observed . The exceedingly powerful flash of light from this event was emitted when the Universe was very young, less than about 1,500 million years old, or only 10% of its present age. Travelling with the speed of light (300,000 km/sec) during 11,000 million years or more, the signal finally reached the Earth on January 31, 2000. The brightness of the exploding object was enormous, at least 1,000,000,000,000 times that of our Sun, or thousands of times that of the explosion of a single, heavy star (a "supernova"). The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) was also involved in trail-blazing observations of another gamma-ray burst in May 1999, cf. ESO PR 08/99. PR Photo 28a/00 : Sky field near GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28b/00 : The fading optical counterpart of GRB 000131 . PR Photo 28c/00 : VLT spectrum of GRB 000131 . What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the mysterious events known as "gamma-ray bursts" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by instruments on orbiting satellites. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite much effort, it is only within the last few years that it has become possible to locate the sites of some of these events (e.g. with the Beppo-Sax satellite ). Since the beginning of 1997, astronomers have identified about twenty optical sources in the sky that are associated with gamma-ray bursts. They have been found to be situated at extremely large (i.e., "cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy release during a gamma-ray burst within a few

  15. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2015-11-01

    Along with chromium, nickel and cobalt are the clinically most important metal allergens. However, unlike for nickel and cobalt, there is no validated colorimetric spot test that detects chromium. Such a test could help both clinicians and their patients with chromium dermatitis to identify culprit exposures. To evaluate the use of diphenylcarbazide (DPC) as a spot test reagent for the identification of chromium(VI) release. A colorimetric chromium(VI) spot test based on DPC was prepared and used on different items from small market surveys. The DPC spot test was able to identify chromium(VI) release at 0.5 ppm without interference from other pure metals, alloys, or leather. A market survey using the test showed no chromium(VI) release from work tools (0/100). However, chromium(VI) release from metal screws (7/60), one earring (1/50), leather shoes (4/100) and leather gloves (6/11) was observed. We found no false-positive test reactions. Confirmatory testing was performed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and spectrophotometrically on extraction fluids. The use of DPC as a colorimetric spot test reagent appears to be a good and valid test method for detecting the release of chromium(VI) ions from leather and metal articles. The spot test has the potential to become a valuable screening tool. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Distributions of solar drift-pair bursts in frequency from decameter radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Volvach, Yaroslav

    2017-04-01

    Statement of the Problem: Solar drift-pair (DP) bursts are one of interesting manifestations of solar activity. Observed during the solar storms of type III bursts, they demonstrate a very simple form on dynamic radio spectra as two short components separated in time, often the second component being the full repetition of the first. As is well known, type III bursts are produced by the accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines in solar corona. However, no each storm of type III bursts leads to any DP. The role of electron beams in the generation of DPs remains unclear. Solar DPs are detected by ground-based instruments at decameter and meter wavelengths, but each individual DP occupies only a limited bandwidth in the frequency range. The bursts drift in frequency, and their frequency drift rate can be both negative and positive (so-called the forward and reverse DPs), from -2 MHz/s to 6 MHz/s [1]. Besides, there are cases of vertical DPs, which occur simultaneously in all the frequencies within their bandwidth. It is difficult to interpret them by means of a moving source, as any exciting agent responsible for such bursts would travel with velocities faster than velocity of light [2]. Methodology & Experimental Orientation: New features of modern low-frequency radio astronomy allow us to study the empirical properties of DPs more deeply than ever before. Our results are based on the recent radio data (during 10-12 July of 2015) obtained with help of the UTR-2 radio telescope at frequencies 9-33 MHz with the time resolution of 50 ms and the frequency resolution of 4 kHz. We have identified 301 DP bursts in which 209 events were forward (FDP), and the rest were reverse (RDP). Results & Significance: According to the data, the occurrence of FDPs decreased at high frequencies, whereas the number of RDPs had an opposite tendency, they rarely occured at lower frequencies. During the observational session, at 20-25 MHz almost the same amount of

  17. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  18. The Arcminute Microkelvin Imager catalogue of gamma-ray burst afterglows at 15.7 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. E.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Fender, R. P.; Rowlinson, A.; Mooley, K. P.; Broderick, J. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Rumsey, C.; Titterington, D. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) Large Array catalogue of 139 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). AMI observes at a central frequency of 15.7 GHz and is equipped with a fully automated rapid-response mode, which enables the telescope to respond to high-energy transients detected by Swift. On receiving a transient alert, AMI can be on-target within 2 min, scheduling later start times if the source is below the horizon. Further AMI observations are manually scheduled for several days following the trigger. The AMI GRB programme probes the early-time (GRBs, and has obtained some of the earliest radio detections (GRB 130427A at 0.36 and GRB 130907A at 0.51 d post-burst). As all Swift GRBs visible to AMI are observed, this catalogue provides the first representative sample of GRB radio properties, unbiased by multiwavelength selection criteria. We report the detection of six GRB radio afterglows that were not previously detected by other radio telescopes, increasing the rate of radio detections by 50 per cent over an 18-month period. The AMI catalogue implies a Swift GRB radio detection rate of ≳ 15 per cent, down to ∼0.2 mJy beam-1. However, scaling this by the fraction of GRBs AMI would have detected in the Chandra & Frail sample (all radio-observed GRBs between 1997 and 2011), it is possible ∼ 44-56 per cent of Swift GRBs are radio bright, down to ∼0.1-0.15 mJy beam-1. This increase from the Chandra & Frail rate (∼30 per cent) is likely due to the AMI rapid-response mode, which allows observations to begin while the reverse-shock is contributing to the radio afterglow.

  19. Gamma Ray Bursts and Their Links With Supernovae and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Peter; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, whose origin and mechanism is the focus of intense interest. They appear connected to supernova remnants from massive stars or the merger of their remnants, and their brightness makes them temporarily detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. After pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with observations from the recently launched Fermi satellite, as well as the prospect of detections or limits from large neutrino and gravitational wave detectors. The interplay between such observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts is reviewed, as well as their connections to supernovae and cosmology.

  20. Interplanetary Shocks Lacking Type 2 Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Maekela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks (approximately 34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed approximately 535 km/s) and only approximately 40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km/s and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration approximately +6.8 m/s (exp 2)), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration approximately 3.5 m/s (exp 2)). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is

  1. Great cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) can detect auditory cues while diving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kirstin Anderson; Maxwell, Alyssa; Siebert, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    the water surface. Whether some of these birds make use of acoustic cues while underwater is unknown. An interesting species in this respect is the great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), being one of the most effective marine predators and relying on the aquatic environment for food year round. Here, its......In-air hearing in birds has been thoroughly investigated. Sound provides birds with auditory information for species and individual recognition from their complex vocalizations, as well as cues while foraging and for avoiding predators. Some 10% of existing species of birds obtain their food under...... underwater hearing abilities were investigated using psychophysics, where the bird learned to detect the presence or absence of a tone while submerged. The greatest sensitivity was found at 2 kHz, with an underwater hearing threshold of 71 dB re 1 μPa rms. The great cormorant is better at hearing underwater...

  2. Dual-energy CT can detect malignant lymph nodes in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Najami, I.; Lahaye, M. J.; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a need for an accurate and operator independent method to assess the lymph node status to provide the most optimal personalized treatment for rectal cancer patients. This study evaluates whether Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT) could contribute to the preoperative lymph...... node assessment, and compared it to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The objective of this prospective observational feasibility study was to determine the clinical value of the DECT for the detection of metastases in the pelvic lymph nodes of rectal cancer patients and compare the findings to MRI...... and histopathology. Materials and methods The patients were referred to total mesorectal excision (TME) without any neoadjuvant oncological treatment. After surgery the rectum specimen was scanned, and lymph nodes were matched to the pathology report. Fifty-four histology proven rectal cancer patients received...

  3. Detection of geoneutrinos: Can we make the gnus work for us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learned, John G.

    2008-11-01

    The detection of electron anti-neutrinos from natural radioactivity in the earth has been a goal of neutrino researchers for about half a century[21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26]. It was accomplished by the KamLAND Collaboration in 2005[27], and opens the way towards studies of the Earth's radioactive content, with very important implications for geology. New detectors are operating (KamLAND[3] and Borexino[2]), building (SNO+[4]) and being proposed (Hanohano, LENA, Earth and others) that will go beyond the initial observation and allow interesting geophysical and geochemical research, in a means not otherwise possible. Herein we describe the approaches being taken (large liquid scintillation instruments), the experimental and technical challenges (optical detectors, directionality), and prospects for growth of this field. There is related spino! in particle physics (neutrino oscillations and hierarchy determination), astrophysics (solar neutrinos, supernovae, exotica), and in the practical matter of remote monitoring of nuclear reactors.

  4. Detection of Geoneutrinos: Can We Make the Gnus Work for Us?

    CERN Document Server

    Learned, John G

    2008-01-01

    The detection of electron anti-neutrinos from natural radioactivity in the earth has been a goal of neutrino researchers for about half a century. It was accomplished by the KamLAND Collaboration in 2005, and opens the way towards studies of the Earth's radioactive content, with very important implications for geology. New detectors are operating (KamLAND and Borexino), building (SNO+) and being proposed (Hanohano, LENA, Earth and others) that will go beyond the initial observation and allow interesting geophysical and geochemical research, in a means not otherwise possible. Herein we describe the approaches being taken (large liquid scintillation instruments), the experimental and technical challenges (optical detectors, directionality), and prospects for growth of this field. There is related spinoff in particle physics (neutrino oscillations and hierarchy determination), astrophysics (solar neutrinos, supernovae, exotica), and in the practical matter of remote monitoring of nuclear reactors.

  5. Can we trust visual methods alone for detecting caries in teeth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskin, Eileen R; Keenan, Analia Veitz

    2016-06-01

    Data sourcesElectronic Databases searched in PubMed, Embase and Scopus. Unpublished literature was traced through OpenSIGLE, annals of IADR/AADR (International and American Associations for Dental Research) and ORCA (European Organisation for Caries Research) from 2003-2014. Studies were limited to English.Study selectionStudies involving visual inspection for detection of primary coronal caries lesions in primary or permanent human teeth were considered. All papers needed to include a clearly defined reference standard and the reporting of absolute numbers of true positives, false positives, true negatives and false negatives or a presentation of sufficient data to calculate these figures. Reference methods considered appropriate were histologic evaluation, operative intervention, direct visual inspection after temporary tooth separation and radiography. For studies with the same data set only the most complete study was included. Articles that reported caries detection using artificial caries, root caries or recurrent decay adjacent to restorations were excluded.Data extraction and synthesisStudy selection for inclusion was performed independently by two reviewers and disagreements were resolved by discussion with a third reviewer. Data were collected by two reviewers on structured tables. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. A meta-analysis was performed. The following information was extracted; reference standard method, setting (clinical or laboratory), type of teeth (primary or permanent), surface evaluated (smooth, proximal or occlusal), sample size, examiner's experience. Also recorded were visual scoring systems. Studies that did not report any criteria were classified as 'with no criteria'. If authors used criteria with no reference to previously published studies they were classified as 'own criteria'. The PRISMA guideline was followed to report the review and the QUADAS-2 checklist (Quality assessment of studies of diagnostic performance included

  6. Comparison between transperineal ultrasound and digital detection of levator ani trauma. Can we improve the odds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Jennifer A; Dietz, Hans Peter; Budgett, Stephanie C; Dumoulin, Chantale L

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the predictive ability of four digital assessment parameters to detect levator ani (LA) muscle defects (avulsion injury) and compare these to transperineal tomographic ultrasound images. This was an observational study imbedded in a larger quasi-experimental cohort study for women with urinary incontinence. Seventy-two women, ≥ 60 years who had attended or were going to attend physiotherapy for treatment of urinary incontinence, were included in the study. Inclusion criteria from the parent study were symptoms of stress, urge or both types of urinary incontinence. The predictive ability of the following digital parameters: direct palpation of a discontinuity of the LA muscle from insertion on the pubic ramus; palpation of the distance between the muscle insertion sites; palpation of LA strength; palpation of LA tone, were analyzed against findings from tomographic transperineal ultrasound images. Correlation between methods was measured using Cohen's kappa for each of the individual parameters. Seventeen women (24%) presented with a complete or partial avulsion of the puborectalis muscle as diagnosed with tomographic ultrasound imaging. Nine women (13%) had complete avulsions, one of which was bilateral. The predictive ability of the digital assessment parameters varied from poor (k = 0.187, 95% CI [0.02-0.36]) to moderate (k = 0.569, 95% CI [0.31-0.83]). The new parameter of 'width between insertion sites' performed best. Adding the parameter of "width between insertion sites" appears to enhance our ability to detect avulsion of the levator ani (LA) muscle by digital examination however it does not distinguish between unilateral or bilateral avulsion. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Burst Spectra of EXO 0748-676 during a Long 2003 XMM-Newton Observation

    OpenAIRE

    Cottam, J.; Paerels, F.; Méndez, M.; Boirin, L.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Kuulkers, E.; Miller, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Gravitationally redshifted absorption lines from highly ionized iron have been previously identified in the burst spectra of the neutron star in EXO 0748-676. To repeat this detection we obtained a long, nearly 600 ks observation of the source with XMM-Newton in 2003. The spectral features seen in the burst spectra from the initial data are not reproduced in the burst spectra from this new data. In this paper we present the spectra from the 2003 observations and discuss the sensitivity of the...

  8. BudBurst Buddies: Introducing Young Citizen Scientists to Plants and Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D.; Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.

    2011-12-01

    As part of Project BudBurst, the BudBurst Buddies recently moved to the National Ecological Network (NEON) as part of its Education and Public Engagement efforts. The BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) were created to engage elementary school age children in the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Hundreds of young students have participated in the inaugural year of BudBurst Buddies. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. The program was recently highlighted by education staff at the New York Hall of Science and numerous classrooms have been implementing this resource as part of their curriculum. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies resources including a new implementation guide and will also share feedback from the first year of implementation.

  9. Bursting as a source of non-linear determinism in the firing patterns of nigral dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jaeseung; Shi, Wei-Xing; Hoffman, Ralph; Oh, Jihoon; Gore, John C; Bunney, Benjamin S; Peterson, Bradley S

    2012-11-01

    Nigral dopamine (DA) neurons in vivo exhibit complex firing patterns consisting of tonic single-spikes and phasic bursts that encode information for certain types of reward-related learning and behavior. Non-linear dynamical analysis has previously demonstrated the presence of a non-linear deterministic structure in complex firing patterns of DA neurons, yet the origin of this non-linear determinism remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that bursting activity is the primary source of non-linear determinism in the firing patterns of DA neurons. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the dimension complexity of inter-spike interval data recorded in vivo from bursting and non-bursting DA neurons in the chloral hydrate-anesthetized rat substantia nigra. We found that bursting DA neurons exhibited non-linear determinism in their firing patterns, whereas non-bursting DA neurons showed truly stochastic firing patterns. Determinism was also detected in the isolated burst and inter-burst interval data extracted from firing patterns of bursting neurons. Moreover, less bursting DA neurons in halothane-anesthetized rats exhibited higher dimensional spiking dynamics than do more bursting DA neurons in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats. These results strongly indicate that bursting activity is the main source of low-dimensional, non-linear determinism in the firing patterns of DA neurons. This finding furthermore suggests that bursts are the likely carriers of meaningful information in the firing activities of DA neurons. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Radius expansion bursts from the neutron star transient XTE J1701-462; a new distance estimate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, D.; Homan, J.; Remillard, R.; Wijnands, R.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed spectral analysis of the second and third type-I X- ray bursts from the neutron star transient XTE J1701-462 (detected on July 20 and July 25, see also ATel #1165) reveals clear photospheric radius expansion in both of them. The bursts show radius expansion for about 2-3 seconds, with the

  11. VLT identification of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 at z=4.50

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. I.; Hjorth, J.; Pedersen, H.

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 and its optical afterglow. The optical identification was made with the VLT 84 hours after the burst following a BATSE detection and an Inter Planetary Network localization. GRB 000131 was a bright, long-duration GRB, with an apparent prec...

  12. VLT identification of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB000131 at z=4.50

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.I.; Hjorth, J.; Jesen, B.L.

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 and its optical afterglow. The optical identification was made with the VLT 84 hours after the burst following a BATSE detection and an Inter Planetary Network localization. GRB 000131 was a bright, long-duration GRB, with an apparent prec...

  13. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are now generally believed to originate from cosmological distances and represent the largest known explosions in the Universe. These lectures will describe the temporal and spectral characteristic of gamma-ray bursts, their intensity and sky distribution, and other observed characteristics in the gamma-ray region, primarily from data obtained with the BATSE experiment on the Compton Observatory. A summary of recent discoveries and observations in other wavelength regions will also be presented, along with their implications for models of the burst emission mechanism. Various possibilities and models for the energy source(s) of gamma-ray bursts will be described.

  14. Analysis of variability in the burst oscillations of the accreting millisecond pulsar XTE J1814-338

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Anna L.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2005-01-01

    The accreting millisecond pulsar XTE J1814-338 exhibits oscillations at the known spin frequency during Type I X-ray bursts. The properties of the burst oscillations reflect the nature of the thermal asymmetry on the stellar surface. We present an analysis of the variability of the burst oscillations of this source, focusing on three characteristics: fractional amplitude, harmonic content and frequency. Fractional amplitude and harmonic content constrain the size, shape and position of the emitting region, whilst variations in frequency indicate motion of the emitting region on the neutron star surface. We examine both long-term variability over the course of the outburst, and short-term variability during the bursts. For most of the bursts, fractional amplitude is consistent with that of the accretion pulsations, implying a low degree of fuel spread. There is however a population of bursts whose fractional amplitudes are substantially lower, implying a higher degree of fuel spread, possibly forced by the explosive burning front of a precursor burst. For the first harmonic, substantial differences between the burst and accretion pulsations suggest that hotspot geometry is not the only mechanism giving rise to harmonic content in the latter. Fractional amplitude variability during the bursts is low; we can only rule out the hypothesis that the fractional amplitude remains constant at the l(sigma) level for bursts that do not exhibit photospheric radius expansion (PRE). There are no significant variations in frequency in any of the bursts except for the one burst that exhibits PRE. This burst exhibits a highly significant but small (= 0.1Hz) drop in frequency in the burst rise. The timescale of the frequency shift is slower than simple burning layer expansion models predict, suggesting that other mechanisms may be at work.

  15. An Artificial Intelligence Classification Tool and Its Application to Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Giblin, Timothy; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Despite being the most energetic phenomenon in the known universe, the astrophysics of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has still proven difficult to understand. It has only been within the past five years that the GRB distance scale has been firmly established, on the basis of a few dozen bursts with x-ray, optical, and radio afterglows. The afterglows indicate source redshifts of z=1 to z=5, total energy outputs of roughly 10(exp 52) ergs, and energy confined to the far x-ray to near gamma-ray regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multi-wavelength afterglow observations have thus far provided more insight on the nature of the GRB mechanism than the GRB observations; far more papers have been written about the few observed gamma-ray burst afterglows in the past few years than about the thousands of detected gamma-ray bursts. One reason the GRB central engine is still so poorly understood is that GRBs have complex, overlapping characteristics that do not appear to be produced by one homogeneous process. At least two subclasses have been found on the basis of duration, spectral hardness, and fluence (time integrated flux); Class 1 bursts are softer, longer, and brighter than Class 2 bursts (with two second durations indicating a rough division). A third GRB subclass, overlapping the other two, has been identified using statistical clustering techniques; Class 3 bursts are intermediate between Class 1 and Class 2 bursts in brightness and duration, but are softer than Class 1 bursts. We are developing a tool to aid scientists in the study of GRB properties. In the process of developing this tool, we are building a large gamma-ray burst classification database. We are also scientifically analyzing some GRB data as we develop the tool. Tool development thus proceeds in tandem with the dataset for which it is being designed. The tool invokes a modified KDD (Knowledge Discovery in Databases) process, which is described as follows.

  16. Extracellular Processing of Molecular Gradients by Eukaryotic Cells Can Improve Gradient Detection Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Franck, Carl

    2017-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells sense molecular gradients by measuring spatial concentration variation through the difference in the number of occupied receptors to which molecules can bind. They also secrete enzymes that degrade these molecules, and it is presently not well understood how this affects the local gradient perceived by cells. Numerical and analytical results show that these enzymes can substantially increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the receptor difference and allow cells to respond to a much broader range of molecular concentrations and gradients than they would without these enzymes.

  17. Can the envisaged reductions of fossil fuel CO2 emissions be detected by atmospheric observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Ingeborg; Rödenbeck, Christian

    2008-03-01

    The lower troposphere is an excellent receptacle, which integrates anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions over large areas. Therefore, atmospheric concentration observations over populated regions would provide the ultimate proof if sustained emissions changes have occurred. The most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO(2)), also shows large natural concentration variations, which need to be disentangled from anthropogenic signals to assess changes in associated emissions. This is in principle possible for the fossil fuel CO(2) component (FFCO(2)) by high-precision radiocarbon ((14)C) analyses because FFCO(2) is free of radiocarbon. Long-term observations of (14)CO(2) conducted at two sites in south-western Germany do not yet reveal any significant trends in the regional fossil fuel CO(2) component. We rather observe strong inter-annual variations, which are largely imprinted by changes of atmospheric transport as supported by dedicated transport model simulations of fossil fuel CO(2). In this paper, we show that, depending on the remoteness of the site, changes of about 7-26% in fossil fuel emissions in respective catchment areas could be detected with confidence by high-precision atmospheric (14)CO(2) measurements when comparing 5-year averages if these inter-annual variations were taken into account. This perspective constitutes the urgently needed tool for validation of fossil fuel CO(2) emissions changes in the framework of the Kyoto protocol and successive climate initiatives.

  18. Mitochondrial D-loop mutations can be detected in sporadic malignant tumours in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ślaska Brygida

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify mutations in the D-loop region of mtDNA in head, neck, and limb tumours in dogs, and determination of their relationship with the process of neoplastic transformation. Blood and tumour tissue samples from 19 dogs with diagnosed sporadic malignant tumours were analysed. DNA extraction, amplification, and sequencing of the mtDNA D-loop, and bioinformatic analyses were performed. Five mutations and 19 polymorphisms were observed in 68.42% of all tumours. Polymorphic variants were noted in 42.86% of the head and neck tumours and in 58.33% of the limb tumours. Mutations were observed in 21.05% of dogs. The mutations were found in 28.57% of the head and neck tumours and in 16.66% of the limb tumours. The mutations were identified in 50% of the studied epithelial cancers. In the mesenchymal tumours, no mutations in the D-loop region were observed. Mitochondrial haplotype A17 was found in over 40% cases of limb tumours. No association between the age, breed, sex, type of tumour, and detected polymorphic variants were observed. Different mutational changes in the D-loop sequences of mtDNA identified in the blood and tumour tissues may indicate a relationship between the type of tumour and individual changes in the D-loop nucleotide sequences of mtDNA.

  19. Foam pad of appropriate thickness can improve diagnostic value of foam posturography in detecting postural instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Leng, Yangming; Zhou, Renhong; Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Dongdong; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Su-Lin; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2017-11-21

    The present study investigated the effect of foam thickness on postural stability in patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) during foam posturography. Static and foam posturography were performed in 33 patients (UVH group) and 30 healthy subjects (control group) with eyes open (EO) and closed (EC) on firm surface and on 1-5 foam pad(s). Sway velocity (SV) of center of pressure, standing time before falling (STBF) and falls reaction were recorded and analyzed. (1) SVs had an increasing tendency in both groups as the foam pads were added under EO and EC conditions. (2) STBFs, only in UVH group with EC, decreased with foam thickness increasing. (3) Significant differences in SV were found between the control and UVH group with EO (except for standing on firm surface, on 1 and 2 foam pad(s)) and with EC (all surface conditions). (4) Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the SV could better reflect the difference in postural stability between the two groups while standing on the 4 foam pads with EC. Our study showed that diagnostic value of foam posturography in detecting postural instability might be enhanced by using foam pad of right thickness.

  20. A little bit pregnant: modeling how the accurate detection of pregnancy can improve HIV prevention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Courtney A; Sammel, Mary; Hillier, Sharon L; Barnhart, Kurt T

    2009-02-15

    The prevalence of unplanned pregnancies contributes to the methodological challenges of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention trials. In this paper, the authors discuss the incidence of pregnancy, including chemical pregnancy, and how the different methods of pregnancy diagnosis could affect the statistical power and calculated outcomes of HIV prevention trials. Study sample size inflation factors are estimated to aid in the design of clinical trials.The authors used published data of women attempting pregnancy as well as data from HPTN 055 (www.HPTN.org/research_studies/hptn055.asp) to estimate the percentage of early study discontinuation that would be associated with 3 diagnostic methods for pregnancy in a hypothetical clinical trial. They classified chemical pregnancies as false-positive pregnancy tests and showed the sample size adjustment that would be necessary in clinical trial design because of the early discontinuations associated with pregnancy. There is a greater than 3-fold difference in the number of falsely positive pregnancy tests that will be detected, depending upon the diagnostic method used. The number of incident pregnancies may render HIV prevention trial sample sizes inadequate by as much as 50%. Pregnancy prevention and precise pregnancy diagnosis are critical to the statistical power and integrity of HIV prevention trials.

  1. Which orbital and charge ordering in transition metal oxides can resonant X-ray diffraction detect?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Matteo, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.dimatteo@univ-rennes1.f [Equipe de Physique des Surfaces et Interfaces, Institut de Physique de Rennes UMR UR1-CNRS 6251, Universite de Rennes 1, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2009-11-15

    The present article is a brief critical review about the possibility of detecting charge and/or orbital order in transition-metal oxides by means of resonant x-ray diffraction. Many recent models of transition-metal oxides are based on charge and/or orbitally ordered ground-states and it has been claimed in the past that resonant x-ray diffraction is able to confirm or reject them. However, in spite of the many merits of this technique, such claims are ambiguous, because the interpretative frameworks used to analyze such results in transition-metal oxides, where structural distortions are always associated to the claimed charged/orbitally ordered transition, strongly influence (not to say suggest) the answer. In order to clarify this point, I discuss the two different definitions of orbital and charge orderings which are often used in the literature without a clear distinction. My conclusion is that the answer to the question of the title depends on which definition is adopted.

  2. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on baryonic ejecta: high-energy gamma-ray flashes and afterglows from fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Tenuous wind bubbles, which are formed by the spin-down activity of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SNe). We study their high-energy signatures, focusing on the role of pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. (i) First, we study the nebular properties and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of ≳10-100 yr. In the rapidly rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at sub-mm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. (ii) Secondly, we consider the fate of bursting emission in the nebulae. We suggest that an impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward shock, leading to short-duration (maybe millisecond or longer) high-energy gamma-ray flashes. Possible dissipation at the reverse shock may also lead to gamma-ray emission. (iii) After such flares, interactions with the baryonic ejecta may lead to afterglow emission with a duration of days to weeks. In the magnetar scenario, this burst-in-bubble model leads to the expectation that nearby (≲10-100 Mpc) high-energy gamma-ray flashes may be detected by the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the Cherenkov Telescope Array, and the subsequent afterglow emission may be seen by radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. (iv) Finally, we discuss several implications specific to FRBs, including constraints on the emission regions and limits on soft gamma-ray counterparts.

  3. Networks on the Edge of Forever: Examining the Feasibility of using Meteor Burst (MB) Communication Networks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charania, A.

    2002-01-01

    The envisioned future may include continuous operating outposts and networks on other worlds supporting human and robotic exploration. Given this possibility, a feasibility analysis is performed of a communications architecture based upon reflection of ion trails from meteors in planetary atmospheres. Meteor Burst (MB) communication systems use meteoritic impacts on planetary atmospheres as two-way, short burst communication nodes. MB systems consist of semi-continuous, low bandwidth networks. These systems possess both long distance capability (hundred of kilometers) and have lower susceptibility to atmospheric perturbations. Every day millions of meteors come into Earth's upper atmosphere with enough energy to ionize gas molecules suitably to reflect radio waves and facilitate communications beyond line of site. The ionized trail occurs at altitudes of 100 km with lengths reaching 30 km. The trial sustains itself long enough to support typical network distances of 1800 km. The initial step to use meteors in this fashion includes detection of a usable ionic trail. A probe signal is sent from one station to another in the network. If there is a meteor trail present, the probe signal is reflected to a receiving station. When another station receives the probe signal, it sends an acknowledgement to the originating station to proceed with transfer on that trail in a high-speed digital data burst. This probe-main signal handshaking occurs each time a burst of data is sent and can occur several times over the course of just one useable meteor trail. Given the need for non-data sending probe signals and error correcting bits; typical transmission data rates vary from a few kilobits per second to over 100 kilobits per second. On Earth, MB links open up hundreds of time per hour depending upon daily and seasonal variations. Meteor bursts were first noticed in detail in the 1930s. With the capabilities of modern computer processing, MB systems have become both technically

  4. How Can Remote Sensing Help in Detecting the Threats to Archaeological Sites in Upper Egypt?

    OpenAIRE

    Julia M. Chyla

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of contemporary and archival satellite images and archaeological documentations presents the possibility of monitoring the state of archaeological sites in the Near East (for example, Palmyra in Syria). As it will be demonstrated in the case of Upper Egyptian sites, the rapid growth of agricultural lands and settlements can pose a great threat to sites localized on the border of fields and the desert. As a case study, the Qena district was chosen, a region of significance for the...

  5. Can Planck constrain indirect detection of dark matter in our galaxy?

    OpenAIRE

    Delahaye, Timur; Bœhm, Céline; Silk, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the synchrotron emission (both intensity and morphology) associated with generic dark matter particles and make predictions for the PLANCK experiment using the FERMI data and a model for the astrophysical sources. Our results indicate that the morphology of the dark matter plus astrophysical source synchrotron emission is frequency-dependent. We show that a thorough comparison between LFI and HFI data can potentially provide a new tool for constraining the dark matter particle ...

  6. Transcriptional Bursting in Gene Expression: Analytical Results for General Stochastic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Singh, Abhyudai; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2015-10-01

    Gene expression in individual cells is highly variable and sporadic, often resulting in the synthesis of mRNAs and proteins in bursts. Such bursting has important consequences for cell-fate decisions in diverse processes ranging from HIV-1 viral infections to stem-cell differentiation. It is generally assumed that bursts are geometrically distributed and that they arrive according to a Poisson process. On the other hand, recent single-cell experiments provide evidence for complex burst arrival processes, highlighting the need for analysis of more general stochastic models. To address this issue, we invoke a mapping between general stochastic models of gene expression and systems studied in queueing theory to derive exact analytical expressions for the moments associated with mRNA/protein steady-state distributions. These results are then used to derive noise signatures, i.e. explicit conditions based entirely on experimentally measurable quantities, that determine if the burst distributions deviate from the geometric distribution or if burst arrival deviates from a Poisson process. For non-Poisson arrivals, we develop approaches for accurate estimation of burst parameters. The proposed approaches can lead to new insights into transcriptional bursting based on measurements of steady-state mRNA/protein distributions.

  7. Transcriptional Bursting in Gene Expression: Analytical Results for General Stochastic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Singh, Abhyudai; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression in individual cells is highly variable and sporadic, often resulting in the synthesis of mRNAs and proteins in bursts. Such bursting has important consequences for cell-fate decisions in diverse processes ranging from HIV-1 viral infections to stem-cell differentiation. It is generally assumed that bursts are geometrically distributed and that they arrive according to a Poisson process. On the other hand, recent single-cell experiments provide evidence for complex burst arrival processes, highlighting the need for analysis of more general stochastic models. To address this issue, we invoke a mapping between general stochastic models of gene expression and systems studied in queueing theory to derive exact analytical expressions for the moments associated with mRNA/protein steady-state distributions. These results are then used to derive noise signatures, i.e. explicit conditions based entirely on experimentally measurable quantities, that determine if the burst distributions deviate from the geometric distribution or if burst arrival deviates from a Poisson process. For non-Poisson arrivals, we develop approaches for accurate estimation of burst parameters. The proposed approaches can lead to new insights into transcriptional bursting based on measurements of steady-state mRNA/protein distributions. PMID:26474290

  8. Two novel batch scheduling algorithms with insufficient wavelength converters in optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng; Pang, Hong-Feng; Li, Ling-Xia

    2013-03-01

    In optical burst switching networks, wavelength converters (WCs) of core nodes are used to decrease the burst loss rate. The implementation of the WCs is difficult in the current technology and the cost of WCs is high. So some core nodes may be configured insufficient WCs to reduce the cost in OBS networks. However, many data channel scheduling algorithms do not count the number of WCs and the performance of burst loss rate is not good in the condition of insufficient WCs. To overcome the defect, two novel batch scheduling algorithm with insufficiency of WC are proposed in this paper. The former algorithm improves the WCs' resource utilization probability to reduce the burst loss rate and the later algorithm saves the WCs' resource for the incoming bursts to use to improve the burst loss performance. The later algorithm can reduce more burst loss rate with the same number of WCs, compared with the other scheduling algorithms. The simulation results show that the later algorithm is more effective in reducing the burst loss rate with insufficient WCs.

  9. Electron cyclotron maser emission in coronal arches and solar radio type V bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J. F. [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 150 Science 1-Street, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China); Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tan, C. M., E-mail: jftang@xao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2013-12-10

    Solar radio type V bursts were classified as a special spectral class based on their moderately long duration, wide bandwidth, and sense of polarization opposite of associated type III bursts. However, type V bursts are also closely related to the preceding type III bursts. They have an approximately equal source height and the same dispersion of position with frequency. Electron cyclotron maser (ECM) instability driven by beam electrons has been used to explain type III bursts in recent years. We propose ECM emission as the physical process of type V solar radio bursts. According to the observed properties of type V and III bursts, we propose that energetic electrons in excited type V continuum are trapped in coronal loops, which are adjacent to the open field lines traced by type III electrons. With the proposed magnetic field configuration and the ECM emission mechanism, the observed properties of type V bursts, such as long duration, wide bandwidth, and opposite sense of polarization can be reasonably explained by our model.

  10. Can environmental DNA (eDNA) be used for detection and monitoring of introduced crab species in the Baltic Sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsström, Tiia; Vasemägi, Anti

    2016-08-15

    The need to detect and monitor introduced marine species has increased with the increasing number of marine invasions. To complement standard detection and monitoring techniques, new approaches using environmental DNA (eDNA) have recently been developed. However, most of the eDNA work has focused on vertebrate species in spatially limited freshwater habitats while benthic invertebrates in coastal environments have received much less attention. Here, we evaluated the suitability of the eDNA approach for detecting benthic, hard-shelled, crustacean mud crab species in a brackish water environment. We demonstrated for the first time that eDNA from an introduced mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii can be successfully amplified in aquarium water samples and detected in the brackish water environment. However, the detection rate was rather low. This suggests that in contrast to freshwater vertebrates, it may be more challenging to develop a highly sensitive eDNA method for detecting crustacean species in a marine environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Can Network Characteristics Detect Spam Effectively in a Stand-Alone Enterprise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Tu; Ray, Soumya; Rabinovich, Michael; Allman, Mark

    Previous work has shown that the network dynamics experienced by both the initial packet and an entire connection carrying an email can be leveraged to classify the email as spam or ham. In the case of packet properties, the prior work has investigated their efficacy based on models of traffic collected from around the world. In this paper, we first revisit the techniques when only using information from a single enterprise's vantage point and find packet properties to be less useful. We also show that adding flow characteristics to a model of packet features adds modest discriminating power, and some flow features' information is captured by packet features.

  12. Beyond initiation-limited translational bursting: the effects of burst size distributions on the stability of gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-04

    A main source of gene expression noise in prokaryotes is translational bursting. It arises from efficient translation of mRNAs with low copy numbers, which makes the production of protein copies highly variable and pulsatile. To obtain analytical solutions, previous models to capture this noise source had to assume translation to be initiation-limited, representing the burst size by a specific type of a long-tail distribution. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting that the initiation is not the rate-limiting step in certain settings, for example, under stress conditions. Here, to overcome the limitations imposed by the initiation-limited assumption, we present a new analytical approach that can evaluate biological consequences of the protein burst size with a general distribution. Since our new model can capture the contribution of other factors to the translational noise, it can be used to analyze the effects of gene expression noise in more general settings. We used this new model to analytically analyze the connection between the burst size and the stability of gene expression processes in various settings. We found that the burst size with different distributions can lead to quantitatively and qualitatively different stability characteristics of protein abundance and can have non-intuitive effects. By allowing analysis of how the stability of gene expression processes changes based on various distributions of translational noise, our analytical approach is expected to enable deeper insights into the control of cell fate decision-making, the evolution of cryptic genetic variations, and fine-tuning of gene circuits.

  13. The ``Christmas burst'' GRB 101225A revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Kann, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Long GRBs are related to the death of massive stars and reveal themselves through synchrotron emission from highly relativistic jets. The `Christmas Burst' GRB 101225A was an exceptionally long GRB with a thermal afterglow, very different from the standard GRB. Initially, no spectroscopic redshift could be obtained and SED modeling yielded z=0.33. A plausible model was a He-NS star merger where the He-star had ejected part of its envelope in the common envelope phase during inspiral. The interaction between the jet and the previously ejected shell can explains the thermal emission. We obtained deep spectroscopy of the host galaxy which leads to a correction of the redshift to z=0.847. Despite the higher redshift, our model is still valid and theoretically better justified than the alternative suggestion of a blue supergiant progenitor proposed by Levan et al. (2014) for several ``ultra-long'' GRBs.

  14. Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Dainotti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism responsible for the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs is still a debated issue. The prompt phase-related GRB correlations can allow discriminating among the most plausible theoretical models explaining this emission. We present an overview of the observational two-parameter correlations, their physical interpretations, and their use as redshift estimators and possibly as cosmological tools. The nowadays challenge is to make GRBs, the farthest stellar-scaled objects observed (up to redshift z=9.4, standard candles through well established and robust correlations. However, GRBs spanning several orders of magnitude in their energetics are far from being standard candles. We describe the advances in the prompt correlation research in the past decades, with particular focus paid to the discoveries in the last 20 years.

  15. [Can FT3 levels facilitate the detection of inflammation or catabolism and malnutrition in dialysis patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Reyes, M J; Sánchez, R; Heras, M; Tajada, P; Iglesias, P; García, L; García Arévalo, M C; Molina, A; Rodríguez, A; Alvarez-Ude, F

    2009-01-01

    with any data of fat mass. AMC was the only variable that independently correlated with FT3 levels in the multivariate regression analysis (r = 0,69; r2: 0,48; p = 0,000) Half of our dialysis patients have decreased levels of serum FT3 without alteration on FT4 or TSH. Low FT3 levels are correlated bioquimical and anthropometric parameters indicators of malnutrition and inflammation. Periodical measurement of FT3 levels could be used by clinicians as an accesible and reproducible method to detect such states.

  16. Effect of finite phosphor thickness on detective quantum efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, R.M.; Yaffe, M.J.; Holmes, R.B. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1989-09-01

    In this paper we describe theoretically the relationship between the finite thickness of a phosphor screen and its spatial-frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency DQE(f-). The finite thickness of the screen causes a variation in both the total number of light quanta emitted from the screen in a burst from a given x-ray interaction and in the spatial distribution of the quanta within the light burst (i.e., shape or point spread function (PSF) of the light burst). The variation in magnitude of the burst gives rise to a spatial-frequency-independent reduction in DQE, characterized by the scintillation efficiency As. The variation in PSF causes a roll off in DQE with increasing spatial frequency which we have characterized by the function Rc(f). Both As and Rc(f) can be determined from the moments of the distribution of the spatial Fourier spectrum of light bursts emitted from the phosphor and thus they are related: As is a scaling factor for Rc(f). Our theory predicts that it is necessary for all light bursts which appear at the output to have the same magnitude to maximize As and the same shape to maximize Rc(f). These requirements can lead to the result that the fluorescent screen with the highest modulation transfer function will not necessarily have the highest DQE(f) even at high spatial frequencies.

  17. Photospheric radius expansion during magnetar bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watts, A.L.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.J.; Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Harding, A.K.; Baring, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    On 2008 August 24 the new magnetar SGR 0501+4516 (discovered by Swift) emitted a bright burst with a pronounced double-peaked structure in hard X-rays, reminiscent of the double-peaked temporal structure seen in some bright thermonuclear bursts on accreting neutron stars. In the latter case this is

  18. A theory of gamma-ray bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, G.E.; Lee, C.-H.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Lee, H.K.; Israelian, G.; Bethe, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent observations and theoretical considerations have linked gamma-ray bursts with ultra-bright type Ibc supernovae (`hypernovae'). We here work out a specific scenario for this connection. Based on earlier work, we argue that especially the longest bursts must be powered by the Blandford-Znajek

  19. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘γ’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of

  20. Candidate diagnostic miRNAs that can detect cancer in prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paziewska, Agnieszka; Mikula, Michal; Dabrowska, Michalina; Kulecka, Maria; Goryca, Krzysztof; Antoniewicz, Artur; Dobruch, Jakub; Borowka, Andrzej; Rutkowski, Piotr; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2017-12-11

    While histopathological evaluation remains the gold standard for diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa), sampling errors remain a frequent problem; therefore, use of tissue biomarkers that can distinguish between benign and malignant prostate disease is a potentially beneficial diagnostic strategy. Deep sequencing of the miRNA transcriptome of 14 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 60 cancerous and non-cancerous prostate samples extracted from 34 cancer-bearing prostates removed by prostatectomy was performed; of the latter 60 samples, 16, 21, and 23 samples contained 30%, and no dysplastic cells, respectively. The predictive value of selected miRNAs was then tested by quantitative reverse-transcribed PCR (qRT-PCR), using two separate chemistries, Exiqon and Taqman, to evaluate the tissue samples obtained by prostatectomy. Validation experiments were also performed for a subset of miRNAs by qRT-PCR of 87 prostate core biopsies. We identified 123 miRNAs significantly dysregulated in PCa (adjusted P-values <0.05); 110 and 13 miRNAs were dysregulated only in cancerous samples and non-cancerous samples extracted from cancer-bearing prostates, respectively, while 31 were dysregulated regardless of the dysplastic cell content of the studied specimens. The clinical utility of eight selected miRNAs was analyzed using the same sample set with two qRT-PCR chemistries. Measurable qRT-PCR signals were obtained for seven and six miRNAs using the Exiqon and Taqman chemistries, respectively, and expression levels of six and four of these miRNAs differed significantly between BPH and PCa samples, regardless of dysplastic cell content. Validation experiments on core biopsies using qRT-PCR confirmed differential expression between BPH and PCa of four miRNAs (miR-187-3p, miR-183-5p, miR-32-5p, and miR-141-5p) using the Exiqon and one miRNA (miR-187-3p) with the Taqman chemistry. Our sequencing analyses identified several candidate diagnostic miRNAs and confirmed some which have

  1. Can texture analysis of tooth microwear detect within guild niche partitioning in extinct species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Mark; Nedza, Christopher; Rychlik, Leszek

    2017-04-01

    Recent work shows that tooth microwear analysis can be applied further back in time and deeper into the phylogenetic history of vertebrate clades than previously thought (e.g. niche partitioning in early Jurassic insectivorous mammals; Gill et al., 2014, Nature). Furthermore, quantitative approaches to analysis based on parameterization of surface roughness are increasing the robustness and repeatability of this widely used dietary proxy. Discriminating between taxa within dietary guilds has the potential to significantly increase our ability to determine resource use and partitioning in fossil vertebrates, but how sensitive is the technique? To address this question we analysed tooth microwear texture in sympatric populations of shrew species (Neomys fodiens, Neomys anomalus, Sorex araneus, Sorex minutus) from BiaŁ owieza Forest, Poland. These populations are known to exhibit varying degrees of niche partitioning (Churchfield & Rychlik, 2006, J. Zool.) with greatest overlap between the Neomys species. Sorex araneus also exhibits some niche overlap with N. anomalus, while S. minutus is the most specialised. Multivariate analysis based only on tooth microwear textures recovers the same pattern of niche partitioning. Our results also suggest that tooth textures track seasonal differences in diet. Projecting data from fossils into the multivariate dietary space defined using microwear from extant taxa demonstrates that the technique is capable of subtle dietary discrimination in extinct insectivores.

  2. Can EROS/MACHO be detecting the galactic spheroid instead of the galactic halo?

    CERN Document Server

    Giudice, Gian Francesco; Roulet, Esteban

    1994-01-01

    Models of our galaxy based on dynamical observations predict a spheroid component much heavier than accounted for by direct measurements of star counts and high velocity stars. If, as first suggested by Caldwell and Ostriker, this discrepancy is due to a large population of faint low-mass stars or dark objects in the spheroid, the spheroid could be responsible for microlensing events for sources in the LMC. We show that, although the rate of events is lower than predicted by a galactic halo made of microlensing objects, it is still significant for EROS/MACHO observations. Because of the different matter distributions in the halo and spheroid components, a comparison between microlensing event rates in the LMC, future measurements of microlensing in the galactic bulge and, possibly, in M31 can provide information about the amounts of dark objects in the different galactic components. If the EROS/MACHO collaborations find a deficiency with respect to their halo expectation, when more statistics are available, t...

  3. Nemesis, Tyche, Planet Nine Hypotheses. I. Can We Detect the Bodies Using Gravitational Lensing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippov, J. P.; Chobanu, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the hypothesis of the existence of a massive dark body (Nemesis, Tyche, Planet Nine, or any other trans-Plutonian planet) at the Solar system periphery is analysed. Basic physical properties and orbital characteristics of such massive bodies are considered. The problem of the definition of a scattering angle of a photon in the gravitational field of a spherical lens is studied. It is shown that, the required value of the scattering angle can be measured for the cases of Nemesis and Tyche. The formation of gravitational lensing images is studied here for a point mass event. It is demonstrated that in most cases of the close rapprochement of a source and the lens (for Nemesis and Tyche), it is possible to resolve two images. The possibility of resolving these images is one of the main arguments favouring the gravitational lensing method as its efficiency in searching for dark massive objects at the edge of the Solar System is higher than the one corresponding to other methods such as stellar occultation. For the cases of Planet Nine and any other trans-Plutonian planet, the strong gravitational lensing is impossible because at least one of the images is always eclipsed.

  4. How Can Remote Sensing Help in Detecting the Threats to Archaeological Sites in Upper Egypt?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Chyla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of contemporary and archival satellite images and archaeological documentations presents the possibility of monitoring the state of archaeological sites in the Near East (for example, Palmyra in Syria. As it will be demonstrated in the case of Upper Egyptian sites, the rapid growth of agricultural lands and settlements can pose a great threat to sites localized on the border of fields and the desert. As a case study, the Qena district was chosen, a region of significance for the history of ancient Egypt. To trace the expansion of agriculture and the development of modern settlements, a synthesis of archival maps (from the last 200 years, and archival and contemporary satellite images was created. By applying map algebra to these documents, it was possible to determine areas which may be marked as “Archaeological Hazard Zones”. The analysis helped to trace the expansion of agricultural areas during the last 200 years and the influence of both—ancient Egyptians and the Nile—on the local landscape.

  5. Can-rupture detection in gas-cooled nuclear reactors; La detection des ruptures de gaine dans les piles nucleaires refroidies par gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roguin, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Can-rupture detection (DRG) is one important aspect of pile safety, more particularly so in the case of gas-cooled reactors. A rapid and sure detection constitutes also an improvement as far as the efficiency of electricity-producing nuclear power stations are concerned. Among the numerous can-rupture detection methods, that based on the measurement of the concentration of short-lived fission gases in the heat-carrying fluid has proved to be the most sensitive and the most rapid. A systematic study of detectors based on the electrostatic collection of the daughter products of fission gases has been undertaken with a view to equip the reactors EL 2, G 3, EDF 1, EDF 2 and EDF 3, the gas loops of PEGASE and EL 4. The different parameters are studied in detail in order to obtain a maximum sensitivity and to make it possible to construct detection devices having the maximum operational reliability and requiring the minimum maintenance. The primary applications of these devices are examined in the case of the above-mentioned reactors. (author) [French] La Detection des Ruptures de Gaines (D. R. G.) est un aspect important de la securite des piles et plus particulierement des piles refroidies par un gaz. Une detection rapide et sure constitue aussi un element d'amelioration du rendement des centrales nucleaires productrices d'energie electrique. Parmi les nombreuses methodes de detection des ruptures de gaines, la mesure de la concentration dans le fluide caloporteur des gaz de fission a vie courte s'est revelee comme la plus sensible et la plus rapide. Une etude systematique des detecteurs a collection electrostatique des descendants des gaz de fission a ete entreprise en vue d'equiper les piles EL 2, G 3, EDF 1, EDF 2 et EDF 3, les boucles a gaz de la pile Pegase et la pile EL 4. Les divers parametres sont etudies en detail pour obtenir une sensibilite maximum et permettre la realisation de dispositifs de detection ayant le maximum de securite de

  6. Can you see me in the snow? Action simulation aids the detection of visually degraded human motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jim; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    Using a novel paradigm, we demonstrate that action simulation can directly facilitate ongoing perception of people's movements. Point-light actors (PLAs) representing common human motions were shown embedded in a visual noise reminiscent of "TV snow". At first, the PLAs were perceived clearly, then occluded from view for a short duration, during which it was hypothesized that a real-time action simulation was generated tracking the motion's course. The PLA then reappeared in motion at variable visibility against the noise, whilst detection thresholds for the reappearance were measured. In the crucial manipulation, the test motion was either temporally congruent with the motion as it would have continued during occlusion, and thus temporally matching the simulation, or temporally incongruent. Detection thresholds were lower for congruent than for incongruent reappearing motions, suggesting that reappearing motion that temporally matched the internal action simulation was more likely to be detected.

  7. Imaging spectroscopy of type U and J solar radio bursts with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Hamish A. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Radio U-bursts and J-bursts are signatures of electron beams propagating along magnetic loops confined to the corona. The more commonly observed type III radio bursts are signatures of electron beams propagating along magnetic loops that extend into interplanetary space. Given the prevalence of solar magnetic flux to be closed in the corona, why type III bursts are more frequently observed than U-bursts or J-bursts is an outstanding question. Aims: We use Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) imaging spectroscopy between 30-80 MHz of low-frequency U-bursts and J-bursts, for the first time, to understand why electron beams travelling along coronal loops produce radio emission less often. Radio burst observations provide information not only about the exciting electron beams but also about the structure of large coronal loops with densities that are too low for standard extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or X-ray analysis. Methods: We analysed LOFAR images of a sequence of two J-bursts and one U-burst. The different radio source positions were used to model the spatial structure of the guiding magnetic flux tube and then deduce the energy range of the exciting electron beams without the assumption of a standard density model. We also estimated the electron density along the magnetic flux rope and compared it to coronal models. Results: The radio sources infer a magnetic loop that is 1 solar radius in altitude with the highest frequency sources starting around 0.6 solar radii. Electron velocities were found between 0.13 c and 0.24 c with the front of the electron beam travelling faster than the back of the electron beam. The velocities correspond to energy ranges within the beam from 0.7-11 keV to 0.7-43 keV. The density along the loop is higher than typical coronal density models and the density gradient is smaller. Conclusions: We found that a more restrictive range of accelerated beam and background plasma parameters can result in U-bursts or J-bursts, causing type III

  8. Probing the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Burst Rate with Trigger Simulations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Amy; Sakamoto, Takanori; Gehrels, Neil; Palmer, David M.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Graziani, Carlo; Cannizzo, John K.

    2013-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies of the GRB rate usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously own GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we develop a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image threshold. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection rate of dim bursts. As a result, our simulations suggest bursts need to be dimmer than previously expected to avoid over-producing the number of detections and to match with Swift observations. Moreover, our results indicate that these dim bursts are more likely to be high redshift events than low-luminosity GRBs. This would imply an even higher cosmic GRB rate at large redshifts than previous expectations based on star-formation rate measurements, unless other factors, such as the luminosity evolution, are taken into account. The GRB rate from our best result gives a total number of 4568 +825 -1429 GRBs per year that are beamed toward us in the whole universe.

  9. Relative clock verifies endogenous bursts of human dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhou, Changsong

    2012-01-01

    Temporal bursts are widely observed in many human-activated systems, which may result from both endogenous mechanisms like the highest-priority-first protocol and exogenous factors like the seasonality of activities. To distinguish the effects from different mechanisms is thus of theoretical significance. This letter reports a new timing method by using a relative clock, namely the time length between two consecutive events of an agent is counted as the number of other agents' events appeared during this interval. We propose a model, in which agents act either in a constant rate or with a power-law inter-event time distribution, and the global activity either keeps unchanged or varies periodically vs. time. Our analysis shows that the bursts caused by the heterogeneity of global activity can be eliminated by setting the relative clock, yet the bursts from real individual behaviors still exist. We perform extensive experiments on four large-scale systems, the search engine by AOL, a social bookmarking system —Delicious, a short-message communication network, and a microblogging system —Twitter. Seasonality of global activity is observed, yet the bursts cannot be eliminated by using the relative clock.

  10. A New Clue in the Mystery of Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    .Bassa and collaborators also found that the properties of the host galaxy are consistent with those of a type of galaxy known as extreme emission line galaxies. This provides a tantalizing clue, as these galaxies are known to host both hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts.Linking to the CauseWhat can this tell us about the cause of FRB 121102? The fact that this burst repeats already eliminates cataclysmic events as the origin. But the projected location of FRB 121102 within a star-forming region especially in a host galaxy thats similar to those typically hosting superluminous supernovae and long gamma-ray bursts strongly suggests theres a relation between these events.Artists impression of a gamma-ray burst in a star-forming region. [NASA/Swift/Mary Pat Hrybyk-Keith and John Jones]The authors propose that this observed coincidence, supported by models of magnetized neutron star birth, indicate an evolutionary link between fast radio bursts and neutron stars. In this picture, neutron stars or magnetars are born as long gamma-ray bursts or hydrogen-poor supernovae, and then evolve into fast-radio-burst-emitting sources.This picture may finally explain the cause of fast radio bursts but Bassa and collaborators caution that its also possible that this model applies only to FRB 121102. Since FRB 121102 is unique in being the only burst discovered to repeat, its cause may also be unique. The authors suggest that targeted searches of star-forming regions in galaxies similar to FRB 121102s host may reveal other repeating burst candidates, helping us to unravel the ongoing mystery of fast radio bursts.CitationC. G. Bassa et al 2017 ApJL 843 L8. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa7a0c

  11. BudBurst Buddies: A New Tool for Engaging the Youngest Citizen Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.; Ward, D.

    2010-12-01

    BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) introduces elementary school age children to the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a new part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies newly developed resources. BudBurst Buddies is a part of Project BudBurst, a national citizen science program coordinated by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Chicago Botanic Garden. Funding for this resource was provided by NEON, NSF, NASA, and the National Geographic Education Foundation.

  12. Polarization measurements of gamma ray bursts and axion like particles

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2008-01-01

    A polarized gamma ray emission spread over a sufficiently wide energy band from a strongly magnetized astrophysical object like gamma ray bursts (GRBs) offers an opportunity to test the hypothesis of axion like particles (ALPs). Based on evidences of polarized gamma ray emission detected in several gamma ray bursts we estimated the level of ALPs induced dichroism, which could take place in the magnetized fireball environment of a GRB. This allows to estimate the sensitivity of polarization measurements of GRBs to the ALP-photon coupling. This sensitivity $\\gag\\le 2.2\\cdot 10^{-11} {\\rm GeV^{-1}}$ calculated for the ALP mass $m_a=10^{-3}~{\\rm eV}$ and MeV energy spread of gamma ray emission is competitive with the sensitivity of CAST and becomes even stronger for lower ALPs masses.

  13. Gamma-ray burst afterglow plateaus and gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corsi, Alessandra [Universita di Roma Sapienza and INFN-Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185-Roma (Italy); Meszaros, Peter, E-mail: alessandra.corsi@roma1.infn.i, E-mail: nnp@astro.psu.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2009-10-21

    The existence of a shallow decay phase in the early x-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts is a common feature. We discuss the possibility that such a feature is connected to the formation of a highly magnetized millisecond pulsar, pumping energy into the fireball via magnetic dipole emission, while undergoing a secular bar-mode instability. If this is the case, gravitational wave losses associated with the neutron star's ellipsoidal deformation, would affect the star's spin-down, possibly producing a gravitational wave signal detectable by the advanced LIGO and Virgo. Such a signal, being emitted in association with an observed x-ray light-curve plateau over relatively long timescales, could open a new interesting opportunity for multi-messenger studies to be carried out in coincidence with gamma-ray burst sources. We conclude that the hypothesis proposed here deserves further investigation.

  14. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; hide

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  15. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Asano, K. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Bissaldi, E. [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Bonnell, J.; Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bouvier, A., E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  16. Burst firing in a motion-sensitive neural pathway correlates with expansion properties of looming objects that evoke avoidance behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Allan McMillan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The locust visual system contains a well-defined motion-sensitive pathway that transfers visual input to motor centers involved in predator evasion and collision avoidance. One interneuron in this pathway, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD, is typically described as using rate coding; edge expansion of approaching objects causes an increased rate of neuronal firing that peaks after a certain retinal threshold angle is exceeded. However, evidence of intrinsic DCMD bursting properties combined with observable oscillations in mean firing rates and tight clustering of spikes in raw traces, suggest that bursting may be important for motion detection. Sensory neuron bursting provides important timing information about dynamic stimuli in many model systems, yet no studies have rigorously investigated if bursting occurs in the locust DCMD during object approach. We presented repetitions of 30 looming stimuli known to generate behavioural responses to each of 20 locusts in order to identify and quantify putative bursting activity in the DCMD. Overall, we found a bimodal distribution of inter-spike intervals (ISI with peaks of more frequent and shorter ISIs occurring from 1-8 ms and longer less frequent ISIs occurring from 40-50 ms. Subsequent analysis identified bursts and isolated single spikes from the responses. Bursting frequency increased in the latter phase of an approach and peaked at the time of collision, while isolated spiking was predominant during the beginning of stimulus approach. We also found that the majority of inter-burst intervals occurred at 40-50 ms (or 20-25 bursts/s. Bursting also occurred across varied stimulus parameters and suggests that burst timing may be a key component of looming detection. Our findings suggest that the DCMD uses two modes of coding to transmit information about looming stimuli and that these modes change dynamically with a changing stimulus at a behaviourally-relevant time.

  17. Burst Firing in a Motion-Sensitive Neural Pathway Correlates with Expansion Properties of Looming Objects that Evoke Avoidance Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Glyn A; Gray, John R

    2015-01-01

    The locust visual system contains a well-defined motion-sensitive pathway that transfers visual input to motor centers involved in predator evasion and collision avoidance. One interneuron in this pathway, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD), is typically described as using rate coding; edge expansion of approaching objects causes an increased rate of neuronal firing that peaks after a certain retinal threshold angle is exceeded. However, evidence of intrinsic DCMD bursting properties combined with observable oscillations in mean firing rates and tight clustering of spikes in raw traces, suggest that bursting may be important for motion detection. Sensory neuron bursting provides important timing information about dynamic stimuli in many model systems, yet no studies have rigorously investigated if bursting occurs in the locust DCMD during object approach. We presented repetitions of 30 looming stimuli known to generate behavioral responses to each of 20 locusts in order to identify and quantify putative bursting activity in the DCMD. Overall, we found a bimodal distribution of inter-spike intervals (ISI) with peaks of more frequent and shorter ISIs occurring from 1-8 ms and longer less frequent ISIs occurring from 40-50 ms. Subsequent analysis identified bursts and isolated single spikes from the responses. Bursting frequency increased in the latter phase of an approach and peaked at the time of collision, while isolated spiking was predominant during the beginning of stimulus approach. We also found that the majority of inter-burst intervals (IBIs) occurred at 40-50 ms (or 20-25 bursts/s). Bursting also occurred across varied stimulus parameters and suggests that burst timing may be a key component of looming detection. Our findings suggest that the DCMD uses two modes of coding to transmit information about looming stimuli and that these modes change dynamically with a changing stimulus at a behaviorally-relevant time.

  18. Mining continuous intracranial EEG in focal canine epilepsy: Relating interictal bursts to seizure onsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathryn A; Ung, Hoameng; Wulsin, Drausin; Wagenaar, Joost; Fox, Emily; Patterson, Ned; Vite, Charles; Worrell, Gregory; Litt, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Brain regions are localized for resection during epilepsy surgery based on rare seizures observed during a short period of intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) monitoring. Interictal epileptiform bursts, which are more prevalent than seizures, may provide complementary information to aid in epilepsy evaluation. In this study, we leverage a long-term iEEG dataset from canines with naturally occurring epilepsy to investigate interictal bursts and their electrographic relationship to seizures. Four dogs were included in this study, each monitored previously with continuous iEEG for periods of 475.7, 329.9, 45.8, and 451.8 days, respectively, for a total of >11,000 h. Seizures and bursts were detected and validated by two board-certified epileptologists. A published Bayesian model was applied to analyze the dynamics of interictal epileptic bursts on EEG and compare them to seizures. In three dogs, bursts were stereotyped and found to be statistically similar to periods before or near seizure onsets. Seizures from one dog during status epilepticus were markedly different from other seizures in terms of burst similarity. Shorter epileptic bursts explored in this work have the potential to yield significant information about the distribution of epileptic events. In our data, bursts are at least an order of magnitude more prevalent than seizures and occur much more regularly. Our finding that bursts often display pronounced similarity to seizure onsets suggests that they contain relevant information about the epileptic networks from which they arise and may aide in the clinical evaluation of epilepsy in patients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Mining Continuous Intracranial EEG in Focal Canine Epilepsy: Relating Interictal Bursts to Seizure Onsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathryn A.; Ung, Hoameng; Wulsin, Drausin; Wagenaar, Joost; Fox, Emily; Patterson, Ned; Vite, Charles; Worrell, Gregory; Litt, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain regions are localized for resection during epilepsy surgery based upon rare seizures observed during a short time period of intracranial EEG (iEEG) monitoring. Interictal epileptiform bursts, which are more prevalent than seizures, may provide complementary information to aid in epilepsy evaluation. In this study, we leverage a long-term iEEG dataset from canines with naturally occurring epilepsy to investigate interictal bursts and their electrographic relationship to seizures. Methods Four dogs were included in this study, each previously monitored with continuous iEEG for periods of 475.7, 329.9, 45.8, and 451.8 days respectively for a total of over 11,000 hours. Seizures and bursts were detected and validated by two board-certified epileptologists. A published Bayesian model was applied to analyze the dynamics of interictal epileptic bursts on EEG and compare them to seizures. Results In three dogs, bursts were stereotyped and found to be statistically similar to periods before or near seizure onsets. Seizures from one dog during status epilepticus were markedly different than other seizures in terms of burst similarity. Significance Shorter epileptic bursts explored in this work have the potential to yield significant information about the distribution of epileptic events. In our data, bursts are at least an order of magnitude more prevalent than seizures and occur much more regularly. Our finding that bursts often display pronounced similarity to seizure onsets suggests that they contain relevant information about the epileptic networks from which they arise and may aide in the clinical evaluation of epilepsy in patients. PMID:26608448

  20. MINIFILAMENT ERUPTION AS THE SOURCE OF A BLOWOUT JET, C-CLASS FLARE, AND TYPE-III RADIO BURST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Li, Haidong; Xu, Zhe, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 396 Yangfangwang, Guandu District, Kunming, 650216 (China); Center for Astronomical Mega-Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100012 (China)

    2017-01-20

    We report a strong minifilament eruption associated with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite C1.6 flare and WIND type-III radio burst. The minifilament, which lies at the periphery of active region 12259, is detected by H α images from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope. The minifilament undergoes a partial and then a full eruption. Simultaneously, two co-spatial jets are successively observed in extreme ultraviolet images from the Solar Dynamic Observatory . The first jet exhibits a typical fan-spine geometry, suggesting that the co-spatial minifilament is possibly embedded in magnetic fields with a fan-spine structure. However, the second jet displays blowout morphology when the entire minifilament erupts upward, leaving behind a hard X-ray emission source in the base. Differential emission measure analyses show that the eruptive region is heated up to about 4 MK during the fan-spine jet, while up to about 7 MK during the blowout jet. In particular, the blowout jet is accompanied by an interplanetary type-III radio burst observed by WIND /WAVES in the frequency range from above 10 to 0.1 MHz. Hence, the minifilament eruption is correlated with the interplanetary type-III radio burst for the first time. These results not only suggest that coronal jets can result from magnetic reconnection initiated by erupting minifilaments with open fields, but also shed light on the potential influence of minifilament eruption on interplanetary space.

  1. The stimulation of auroral kilometric radiation by type III solar radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    It has been found that the onset of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) frequently coincides with the arrival of type III solar radio bursts. Although the AKR onsets are usually abrupt and appear to be spontaneous, they sometimes develop from a discrete frequency near the leading edge of a type III burst or sometimes occur at progressively lower frequencies following that edge. From this, and the absence of the related solar electrons in specific cases, it was concluded that the incoming type III waves were sometimes responsible for stimulating auroral kilometric radiation. It was estimated that intense, isolated type III bursts were capable of stimulating AKR roughly one third of the time, and that at least ten percent of the observed AKR onsets could be attributed to these and weaker bursts, including some barely detectable by the ISEE plasma wave receivers.

  2. A statistical study of solar type III bursts and auroral kilometric radiation onsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrences of type III solar radio bursts and auroral kilometric radiation were observed by Calvert (1981) using ISEE 1 spectrograms. Calvert presented evidence suggesting that the incoming type III burst stimulates the onset of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). This paper presents a statistical study of the correlation between type III bursts and auroral kilometric radiation. A superposed epoch analysis was performed on as many as 186 type III events. The type III bursts were detected by the ISEE 3 spacecraft on the sunward side of the earth. At the same time the IMP 8 spacecraft was used to detect onsets of kilometric radiation on the nightside of the earth. For each event the intensities measured by ISEE 3 (type III intensities) were subtracted from the intensities measured by IMP 8 (type III and possible AKR intensities). The resulting intensities for each event were then added to determine if kilometric radiation was preferentially observed following a type III burst. This analysis was performed at frequencies of 100, 178, and 500 kHz. The results of this study show that a statistically significant correlation exists between incoming type III bursts from the sun and kilometric radiation from the earth.

  3. Two γ-ray bursts from dusty regions with little molecular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukade, B; Ohta, K; Endo, A; Nakanishi, K; Tamura, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kohno, K

    2014-06-12

    Long-duration γ-ray bursts are associated with the explosions of massive stars and are accordingly expected to reside in star-forming regions with molecular gas (the fuel for star formation). Previous searches for carbon monoxide (CO), a tracer of molecular gas, in burst host galaxies did not detect any emission. Molecules have been detected as absorption in the spectra of γ-ray burst afterglows, and the molecular gas is similar to the translucent or diffuse molecular clouds of the Milky Way. Absorption lines probe the interstellar medium only along the line of sight, so it is not clear whether the molecular gas represents the general properties of the regions where the bursts occur. Here we report spatially resolved observations of CO line emission and millimetre-wavelength continuum emission in two galaxies hosting γ-ray bursts. The bursts happened in regions rich in dust, but not particularly rich in molecular gas. The ratio of molecular gas to dust (forming regions of the Milky Way and nearby star-forming galaxies, suggesting that much of the dense gas where stars form has been dissipated by other massive stars.

  4. A Unified Model for Repeating and Non-repeating Fast Radio Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagchi, Manjari, E-mail: manjari@imsc.res.in [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences (IMSc-HBNI), 4th Cross Road, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2017-04-01

    The model that fast radio bursts (FRBs) are caused by plunges of asteroids onto neutron stars can explain both repeating and non-repeating bursts. If a neutron star passes through an asteroid belt around another star, there would be a series of bursts caused by a series of asteroid impacts. Moreover, the neutron star would cross the same belt repetitively if it were in a binary with the star hosting the asteroid belt, leading to a repeated series of bursts. I explore the properties of neutron star binaries that could lead to the only known repeating FRB so far (FRB121102). In this model, the next two epochs of bursts are expected around 2017 February 27 and 2017 December 18. On the other hand, if the asteroid belt is located around the neutron star itself, then a chance fall of an asteroid from that belt onto the neutron star would lead to a non-repeating burst. Even a neutron star grazing an asteroid belt can lead to a non-repeating burst caused by just one asteroid plunge during the grazing. This is possible even when the neutron star is in a binary with the asteroid-hosting star, if the belt and the neutron star orbit are non-coplanar.

  5. Observational properties of decameter type IV bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoly; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Briand, Carine; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Frantzusenko, Anatoly; Panchenko, Michael; Poedts, Stefan; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Shergelashvili, Bidzina

    2013-04-01

    Oscillations of decameter type IV bursts were registered during observations of solar radio emission by UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA in 2011-2012. Large majority of these bursts were accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were observed by SOHO and STEREO in the visible light. Only in some cases decameter type IV bursts were not associated with CMEs. The largest periods of oscillations P were some tens of minutes. There were some modes of long periods of oscillations simultaneously. Periods of oscillations in flux and in polarization profiles were close. Detailed properties of oscillations at different frequencies were analyzed on the example of two type IV bursts. One of them was observed on April 7, 2011 when a CME happened. Another one (August 1, 2011) was registered without any CME. The 7 April type IV burst had two periods in the frames 75-85 and 35-85 minutes. Interesting feature of these oscillations is decreasing periods with time. The observed decreasing rates dP/dt equaled 0.03-0.07. Concerning type IV burst observed on August 1, 2011 the period of its oscillations increases from 17 min. at 30 MHz to 44 min. at 10 MHz. Connection of type IV burst oscillations with oscillations of magnetic arches and CMEs at corresponding altitudes are discussed. The work is fulfilled in the frame of FP7 project "SOLSPANET".

  6. Determining hydrodynamic forces in bursting bubbles using DNA nanotube mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariadi, Rizal F.; Winfree, Erik; Yurke, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the mechanical forces produced by fluid flows within the ocean is critical to understanding the ocean’s environmental phenomena. Such forces may have been instrumental in the origin of life by driving a primitive form of self-replication through fragmentation. Among the intense sources of hydrodynamic shear encountered in the ocean are breaking waves and the bursting bubbles produced by such waves. On a microscopic scale, one expects the surface-tension–driven flows produced during bubble rupture to exhibit particularly high velocity gradients due to the small size scales and masses involved. However, little work has examined the strength of shear flow rates in commonly encountered ocean conditions. By using DNA nanotubes as a novel fluid flow sensor, we investigate the elongational rates generated in bursting films within aqueous bubble foams using both laboratory buffer and ocean water. To characterize the elongational rate distribution associated with a bursting bubble, we introduce the concept of a fragmentation volume and measure its form as a function of elongational flow rate. We find that substantial volumes experience surprisingly large flow rates: during the bursting of a bubble having an air volume of 10 mm3, elongational rates at least as large as ϵ˙=1.0×108 s−1 are generated in a fragmentation volume of ∼2×10−6 μL. The determination of the elongational strain rate distribution is essential for assessing how effectively fluid motion within bursting bubbles at the ocean surface can shear microscopic particles and microorganisms, and could have driven the self-replication of a protobiont. PMID:26504222

  7. Bifurcations of emergent bursting in a neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wu

    Full Text Available Complex neuronal networks are an important tool to help explain paradoxical phenomena observed in biological recordings. Here we present a general approach to mathematically tackle a complex neuronal network so that we can fully understand the underlying mechanisms. Using a previously developed network model of the milk-ejection reflex in oxytocin cells, we show how we can reduce a complex model with many variables and complex network topologies to a tractable model with two variables, while retaining all key qualitative features of the original model. The approach enables us to uncover how emergent synchronous bursting can arise from a neuronal network which embodies known biological features. Surprisingly, the bursting mechanisms are similar to those found in other systems reported in the literature, and illustrate a generic way to exhibit emergent and multiple time scale oscillations at the membrane potential level and the firing rate level.

  8. Detection and characterization of stainless steel SCC by the analysis of crack related acoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Jaka; Legat, Andraž; Zajec, Bojan; Kosec, Tadeja; Govekar, Edvard

    2015-09-01

    In the paper the results of the acoustic emission (AE) based detection and characterization of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in stainless steel are presented. As supportive methods for AE interpretation, electrochemical noise, specimen elongation measurements, and digital imaging of the specimen surface were used. Based on the defined qualitative and quantitative time and power spectra characteristics of the AE bursts, a manual and an automatic procedure for the detection of crack related AE bursts were introduced. The results of the analysis of the crack related AE bursts indicate that the AE method is capable of detecting large scale cracks, where, apart from intergranular crack propagation, also some small ductile fractures occur. The sizes of the corresponding ductile fracture areas can be estimated based on a relative comparison of the energies of the detected AE bursts. It has also been shown that AE burst time and power spectra features can be successfully used for the automatic detection of SCC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  10. On The Origin Of High Energy Correlations in Gamma-ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocevski, Daniel

    2012-04-03

    I investigate the origin of the observed correlation between a gamma-ray burst's {nu}F{sub {nu}} spectral peak E{sub pk} and its isotropic equivalent energy E{sub iso} through the use of a population synthesis code to model the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs. By using prescriptions for the distribution of prompt spectral parameters as well as the population's luminosity function and co-moving rate density, I generate a simulated population of GRBs and examine how bursts of varying spectral properties and redshift would appear to a gamma-ray detector here on Earth. I find that a strong observed correlation can be produced between the source frame Epk and Eiso for the detected population despite the existence of only a weak and broad correlation in the original simulated population. The energy dependance of a gamma-ray detector's flux-limited detection threshold acts to produce a correlation between the source frame E{sub pk} and E{sub iso} for low luminosity GRBs, producing the left boundary of the observed correlation. Conversely, very luminous GRBs are found at higher redshifts than their low luminosity counterparts due to the standard Malquest bias, causing bursts in the low E{sub pk}, high E{sub iso} regime to go undetected because their E{sub pk} values would be redshifted to energies at which most gamma-ray detectors become less sensitive. I argue that it is this previously unexamined effect which produces the right boundary of the observed correlation. Therefore, the origin of the observed correlation is a complex combination of the instrument's detection threshold, the intrinsic cutoff in the GRB luminosity function, and the broad range of redshifts over which GRBs are detected. Although the GRB model presented here is a very simplified representation of the complex nature of GRBs, these simulations serve to demonstrate how selection effects caused by a combination of instrumental sensitivity and the cosmological nature of an

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be detected in a polymicrobial competition model using impedance spectroscopy with a novel biosensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Ward

    Full Text Available Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS is a powerful technique that can be used to elicit information about an electrode interface. In this article, we highlight six principal processes by which the presence of microorganisms can affect impedance and show how one of these--the production of electroactive metabolites--changes the impedance signature of culture media containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EIS, was used in conjunction with a low cost screen printed carbon sensor to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa when grown in isolation or as part of a polymicrobial infection with Staphylococcus aureus. By comparing the electrode to a starting measurement, we were able to identify an impedance signature characteristic of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, we are able to show that one of the changes in the impedance signature is due to pyocyanin and associated phenazine compounds. The findings of this study indicate that it might be possible to develop a low cost sensor for the detection of P. aeruginosa in important point of care diagnostic applications. In particular, we suggest that a development of the device described here could be used in a polymicrobial clinical sample such as sputum from a CF patient to detect P. aeruginosa.

  12. Aphids preserved in propylene glycol can be used for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detection of Potato virus Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xianzhou; Pelletier, Yvan; Mason, Nicola; Dilworth, Andrea; Giguère, Marie-Andrée

    2011-08-01

    The effectiveness of propylene glycol on the retention of RNA target of Potato virus Y (PVY), an aphid stylet-borne virus, in Myzus persicae was investigated in comparison to ethanol and liquid nitrogen/-80°C. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the PVY targets from the propylene glycol/ethanol/liquid nitrogen preserved single aphids after a 5min acquisition period from infected potato plants. In the liquid nitrogen/-80°C and 70% ethanol treatments, 55.6% and 38.8% aphids tested PVY-positive, respectively. In the 0-75% propylene glycol treatments, 12.2-44.7% aphids tested PVY-positive. The lowest detection rate was in the 0% (positive rate, 15.2%) and the 10% propylene glycol (positive rate, 12.2%). As the propylene glycol concentration increased to 25%, 29.8% aphids tested positive. A high PVY-positive rate was also found in 35-75% propylene glycol treatments at 44.7% (35% propylene glycol), 36.7% (50% propylene glycol) and 34.8% (75% propylene glycol), which is comparable to the rate shown in 70% ethanol. No significant difference in the positive detection rate was observed in aphids preserved in 50% propylene glycol at room temperature for 2, 4 and 10 days. These results demonstrate that propylene glycol at 25-75% can retain PVY targets effectively in aphids for an extended time period, and thus can be used in aphid traps to preserve viruliferous aphids for later RT-PCR detection of PVY. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Radio Observations of the Repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, P.; Bogdanov, S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lynch, R. S.; Spitler, L. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Bower, G. C.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Butler, B. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Gourdji, K.; Kaspi, V. M.; Law, C. J.; Marcote, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Michilli, D.; Paragi, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Wharton, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    We undertook coordinated campaigns with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Arecibo radio telescopes during Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton observations of the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 to search for simultaneous radio and X-ray bursts. We find 12 radio bursts from FRB 121102 during 70 ks total of X-ray observations. We detect no X-ray photons at the times of radio bursts from FRB 121102 and further detect no X-ray bursts above the measured background at any time. We place a 5σ upper limit of 3 × 10‑11 erg cm‑2 on the 0.5–10 keV fluence for X-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts for durations < 700 ms, which corresponds to a burst energy of 4 × 1045 erg at the measured distance of FRB 121102. We also place limits on the 0.5–10 keV fluence of 5 × 10‑10 and 1 × 10‑9 erg cm‑2 for bursts emitted at any time during the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, respectively, assuming a typical X-ray burst duration of 5 ms. We analyze data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and place a 5σ upper limit on the 10–100 keV fluence of 4 × 10‑9 erg cm‑2 (5 × 1047 erg at the distance of FRB 121102) for gamma-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts. We also present a deep search for a persistent X-ray source using all of the X-ray observations taken to date and place a 5σ upper limit on the 0.5–10 keV flux of 4 × 10‑15 erg s‑1 cm‑2 (3 × 1041 erg s‑1 at the distance of FRB 121102). We discuss these non-detections in the context of the host environment of FRB 121102 and of possible sources of fast radio bursts in general.

  14. Mechanism of Rock Burst Occurrence in Specially Thick Coal Seam with Rock Parting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-chao; Jiang, Fu-xing; Meng, Xiang-jun; Wang, Xu-you; Zhu, Si-tao; Feng, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Specially thick coal seam with complex construction, such as rock parting and alternative soft and hard coal, is called specially thick coal seam with rock parting (STCSRP), which easily leads to rock burst during mining. Based on the stress distribution of rock parting zone, this study investigated the mechanism, engineering discriminant conditions, prevention methods, and risk evaluation method of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP through setting up a mechanical model. The main conclusions of this study are as follows. (1) When the mining face moves closer to the rock parting zone, the original non-uniform stress of the rock parting zone and the advancing stress of the mining face are combined to intensify gradually the shearing action of coal near the mining face. When the shearing action reaches a certain degree, rock burst easily occurs near the mining face. (2) Rock burst occurrence in STCSRP is positively associated with mining depth, advancing stress concentration factor of the mining face, thickness of rock parting, bursting liability of coal, thickness ratio of rock parting to coal seam, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal, whereas negatively associated with shear strength. (3) Technologies of large-diameter drilling, coal seam water injection, and deep hole blasting can reduce advancing stress concentration factor, thickness of rock parting, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal to lower the risk of rock burst in STCSRP. (4) The research result was applied to evaluate and control the risk of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP.

  15. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo eBojak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG is a well described phenomenon that occurs during deep anaesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterisation as a ``global brain state'' has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst suppression activity is highly asynchronous across cortex, but also that it may occur in isolated regions of circumscribed spatial extent. Here we outline a realistic neural field model for burst suppression by adding a slow process of synaptic resource depletion and recovery, which is able to reproduce qualitatively the empirically observed features during general anaesthesia at the whole cortex level. Simulations reveal heterogeneous bursting over the model cortex and complex spatiotemporal dynamics during simulated anaesthetic action, and provide forward predictions of neuroimaging signals for subsequent empirical comparisons and more detailed characterisation.Because burst suppression corresponds to a dynamical end-point of brain activity, theoretically accounting for its spatiotemporal emergence will vitally contribute to efforts aimed at clarifying whether a common physiological trajectory is induced by the actions of general anaesthetic agents. We have taken a first step in this direction by showing that a neural field model can qualitatively match recent experimental data that indicate spatial differentiation of burst suppression activity across cortex.

  16. All-Sky Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    We are currently monitoring the transient hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi. The twelve GBM NaI detectors span 8 keV to 1MeV, while the two GBM BGO detectors span about 150 keV to 40 MeV. With GBM, we detect transient events on multiple timescales. Brief events, such as Gamma Ray Bursts, Solar flares, and magnetar bursts are detected with on-board triggers. On longer timescales, we use the Earth occultation technique to monitor a number of sources, including X-ray binaries, AGN, and solar flaring activity. To date we have detected 7 sources above 100 keV. Transient activity from accretion-powered pulsars is monitored using epoch-folding techniques. With GBM we track the pulsed flux and frequency for a number of pulsars. We will present highlights of GBM observations on various timescales.

  17. Warning Method of Coal Bursting Failure Danger by Electromagnetic Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Jian Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic radiation (EMR can reflect the stress state and deformation level of coal, yet its warning indexes correlated with coal properties and roof caving is poorly understood. The laboratory observations of EMR effects of coal samples bursting failure and in situ investigations in the process of roof caving are presented in this paper. EMR peak with increasing stress is discussed when the failure of coal samples happens, which provides an explanation to EMR signals positively correlated well with the stress loaded. The linearly increasing relation is also found between EMR intensity and the uniaxial compressive strength, and EMR maximum amplitudes and pulses behave a logarithmic accretion tendency with bursting energy indexes of coal. By in situ investigations, it is well found that EMR amplitude can effectively warn coal deformation and failure based on the critical value 120 mV proposed from experiments.

  18. THE METHOD OF ASSESSING ROCK BURSTING HAZARD IN MINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna MANOWSKA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses a concept of forecasting accident risk during longwall extraction in crump-risk conditions. In Polish mines rock burst hazard can be described as high compared to other mines around the world. It's related to increase of depth of longwall field operation, preparation works, including drilling of mine face pavements which leads to systematic deterioration of geological and mining conditions. Depletion of coal is also the reason why mines operate in high mining tremor risk conditions. Mines more and more often operate in decks, where there is large number of edges and remains of older decks. Rocks bursts still remain one of the most dangerous natural hazards and therefore are fundamental prob-lem and have the greatest impact on safety in mining industry. The proposed method for forecasting accidents and loss-es in people and goods can contribute to improvement of work organization methods and mine safety management system.

  19. Testing Einstein's Equivalence Principle With Fast Radio Bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Gao, He; Wu, Xue-Feng; Mészáros, Peter

    2015-12-31

    The accuracy of Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) can be tested with the observed time delays between correlated particles or photons that are emitted from astronomical sources. Assuming as a lower limit that the time delays are caused mainly by the gravitational potential of the Milky Way, we prove that fast radio bursts (FRBs) of cosmological origin can be used to constrain the EEP with high accuracy. Taking FRB 110220 and two possible FRB/gamma-ray burst (GRB) association systems (FRB/GRB 101011A and FRB/GRB 100704A) as examples, we obtain a strict upper limit on the differences of the parametrized post-Newtonian parameter γ values as low as [γ(1.23  GHz)-γ(1.45  GHz)]GRBs.

  20. Coronas Mass Ejections, Shocks, and Type II Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most energetic phenomena in the interplanetary medium. Type II radio bursts are the earliest indicators of particle acceleration by CME-driven shocks. There is one-to-one correspondence between large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and long wavelength type II bursts because the same CME-driven shock is supposed to accelerate electrons and ions. However, there are some significant deviations: some CMEs lacking type II bursts (radio-quiet or RQ CMEs) are associated with small SEP events while some radioloud (RL) CMEs are not associated with SEP events, suggesting subtle differences in the acceleration of electrons and protons. Not all CME-driven shocks are radio loud: more than one third of the interplanetary shocks during solar cycle 23 were radio quiet. Some RQ shocks were associated with energetic storm particle (ESP) events, which are detected when the shocks arrive at the observing spacecraft. This paper attempts to explain these contradictory results in terms of the properties of CMEs, shocks, and the ambient medium.

  1. TORTORA discovery of Naked-Eye Burst fast optical variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, Grigory; Karpov, Sergey; Bondar, Sergey; Greco, Giuseppe; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Piccioni, Adalberto; Molinari, Emilio; Chincarini, Guido

    2008-10-01

    Features characterizing gamma-ray bursts in the different spectral bands may be a clue for the nature of their inner engine. Up to now, only several bursts have been observed in optical band during the gamma activity, and the only one-GRB080319B-was covered from rise till fall with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss these data, acquired with TORTORA fast wide-field monitoring optical camera, as well as results of its analysis. The camera observed the position of Naked-Eye Burst, GRB080318B, before, during and after the trigger. It detected the fast rise of optical emission, which reached the peak of V 5.3 at the eighteenth second, had a complex evolution till T+43s and monotonously faded then. The brightest part of the light curve contains two 15-20 s segments with different fluxes, each having two clearly-seen peaks of 5-8 s duration; all four peaks look quasi-periodic with separation of 9 s. There is no clear evidence of any sub-second variability. However, there are signs of quasi-periodic variability on 1s time scale at around the last peak (T+40 till T+50). The general properties of the optical light curve and its variability time scales look similar to the gamma one, but there is no clear correlation between them. This raises serious problems in interpretation of mechanisms generating such variability.

  2. Preliminary results of a gamma-ray burst study in the Konus experiment on the Venera-11 and Venera-12 space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazets, Y. P.; Golentskiy, S. V.; Ilinskiy, V. N.; Panov, V. N.; Aptekar, R. L.; Guryan, Y. A.; Sokolov, I. A.; Sokolova, Z. Y.; Kharitonova, T. V.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-one gamma-ray bursts and 68 solar flares in the hard X-ray range were detected on Venera-11 and Venera-12 space probes during the initial 50-day observation period. Major characteristics of the equipment used and preliminary data on the temporal structure and energy spectra of the gamma-ray bursts are considered. The pattern of gamma-ray burst frequency distribution vs. intensity, N(S), is established.

  3. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and commercial...

  4. Validation of burst overlapping for ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuaki, Ryo; Motohka, Takeshi; Ohki, Masato; Watanabe, Manabu; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    The Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) aboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite- 2 (ALOS-2, "DAICHI-2") is the latest L-band spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). PALSAR-2 observes the world mainly with 10 m resolution / 70 km swath Stripmap mode and 25 m resolution / 350 km swath ScanSAR mode. The 3-m resolution Stripmap mode is mainly used upon Japan. 350 km ScanSAR observation could detect large scale deformation e.g., the Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake and its aftershocks in 2015. ALOS-2 ScanSAR is the first one that supports ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry in L-band spaceborne SAR. However, because of the parameter setting error for the orbit estimation, ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR could achieve little number of interferometric pair until the software modification on February 8, 2015. That is, the burst overlap timing required for the interferometric analysis was insufficient and it depends on the observation date. In this paper, we report the investigation results of this case and discuss the current status of the ALOS-2 ScanSAR InSAR. Some archives achieved before February 8, 2015 can be used for interferometric analysis with after Feb. 8. However, most of them have no interferometric pair. We also report that the archives acquired after February 8, have enough burst overlapping.

  5. High-speed noncontact acoustic inspection method for civil engineering structure using multitone burst wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Sugimoto, Kazuko; Kosuge, Nobuaki; Utagawa, Noriyuki; Katakura, Kageyoshi

    2017-07-01

    The noncontact acoustic inspection method focuses on the resonance phenomenon, and the target surface is measured by being vibrated with an airborne sound. It is possible to detect internal defects near the surface layer of a concrete structure from a long distance. However, it requires a fairly long measurement time to achieve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio just to find some resonance frequencies. In our method using the conventional waveform “single-tone burst wave”, only one frequency was used for one-sound-wave emission to achieve a high S/N ratio using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) at a safe low power (e.g., He-Ne 1 mW). On the other hand, in terms of the difference in propagation velocity between laser light and sound waves, the waveform that can be used for high-speed measurement was devised using plural frequencies for one-sound-wave emission (“multitone burst wave”). The measurement time at 35 measurement points has been dramatically decreased from 210 to 28 s when using this waveform. Accordingly, 7.5-fold high-speed measurement became possible. By some demonstration experiments, we confirmed the effectiveness of our measurement technique.

  6. SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM THE MERGER OF TWO BLACK HOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, Rosalba [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Lazzati, Davide [Department of Physics, Oregon State University, 301 Weniger Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Giacomazzo, Bruno [Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2016-04-10

    Short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are explosions of cosmic origins believed to be associated with the merger of two compact objects, either two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole (BH). The presence of at least one neutron star has long been thought to be an essential element of the model: its tidal disruption provides the needed baryonic material whose rapid accretion onto the post-merger BH powers the burst. The recent tentative detection by the Fermi satellite of a short GRB in association with the gravitational wave signal GW150914 produced by the merger of two BHs has challenged this standard paradigm. Here, we show that the evolution of two high-mass, low-metallicity stars with main-sequence rotational speeds a few tens of percent of the critical speed eventually undergoing a weak supernova explosion can produce a short GRB. The outer layers of the envelope of the last exploding star remain bound and circularize at large radii. With time, the disk cools and becomes neutral, suppressing the magnetorotational instability, and hence the viscosity. The disk remains “long-lived dead” until tidal torques and shocks during the pre-merger phase heat it up and re-ignite accretion, rapidly consuming the disk and powering the short GRB.

  7. Tone Burst Electrocochleography for the Diagnosis of Clinically Certain Meniere's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Hornibrook

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The technique of transtympanic electrocochleography was initially developed as an objective hearing threshold test by Eggermont. Gibson et al. (1977 claimed that an enlarged direct current component of the action potential (AP called the summating potential (SP is an indication of endolymphatic hydrops, later confirmed by Coates who proposed an SP/AP ratio measure. This led to numerous publications using diagnostic ratios of 0.33–0.35. The insensitivity led to an eventual disenchantment with the test as a reliable objective test for Meniere's disease. It was further confused by audiologists employing remote canal or ear drum electrodes which give a response about one-fourth of the magnitude obtained by an electrode in contact with the cochlea. Subsequently Gibson stated that an SP/AP ratio of <0.5 is not diagnostic for hydrops. He then showed that a tone burst stimulus gave the test a significantly higher sensitivity and specificity, which has been supported by others. On MRI inner ear imaging with gadolinium hydrops can be seen, but the quality of images and what is seen may vary according to brand of scanner, settings, mode of gadolinium administration, and the possibility that gadolinium entry may favor the vestibule. Transtympanic tone burst electrocochleography is to date the simplest, cheapest and most sensitive technique for detecting cochlear endolymphatic hydrops to confirm a diagnosis of Meniere's disease.

  8. THE ENGINES BEHIND SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRYER, CHRISTOPHER LEE [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-23

    The authors review the different engines behind supernova (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), focusing on those engines driving explosions in massive stars: core-collapse SNe and long-duration GRBs. Convection and rotation play important roles in the engines of both these explosions. They outline the basic physics and discuss the wide variety of ways scientists have proposed that this physics can affect the supernova explosion mechanism, concluding with a review of the current status in these fields.

  9. Continuous Hidden Markov Models: Application to automatic earthquake detection and classification at Las Canãdas caldera, Tenerife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyreuther, Moritz; Carniel, Roberto; Wassermann, Joachim

    2008-10-01

    A possible interaction of (volcano-) tectonic earthquakes with the continuous seismic noise recorded in the volcanic island of Tenerife was recently suggested. Also recently the zone close to Las Canadas caldera shows unusual high number of near (speech recognition where statistical models, called Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), are widely used for spotting words in continuous audio data. In this study HMMs are used to detect and classify volcano-tectonic and/or tectonic earthquakes in continuous seismic data. Further the HMM detection and classification is evaluated and discussed for a one month period of continuous seismic data at a single seismic station. Being a stochastic process, HMMs provide the possibility to add a confidence measure to each classification made, basically evaluating how "sure" the algorithm is when classifying a certain earthquake. Moreover, this provides helpful information for the seismological analyst when cataloguing earthquakes. Combined with the confidence measure the HMM detection and classification can provide precise enough earthquake statistics, both for further evidence on the interaction between seismic noise and (volcano-) tectonic earthquakes as well as for incorporation in an automatic early warning system.

  10. FAST RADIO BURSTS AND RADIO TRANSIENTS FROM BLACK HOLE BATTERIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingarelli, Chiara M. F. [TAPIR, MC 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Levin, Janna [Institute for Strings, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics (ISCAP), Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Lazio, T. Joseph W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Most black holes (BHs) will absorb a neutron star (NS) companion fully intact without tidal disruption, suggesting the pair will remain dark to telescopes. Even without tidal disruption, electromagnetic (EM) luminosity is generated from the battery phase of the binary when the BH interacts with the NS magnetic field. Originally, the luminosity was expected to be in high-energy X-rays or gamma-rays, however, we conjecture that some of the battery power is emitted in the radio bandwidth. While the luminosity and timescale are suggestive of fast radio bursts (FRBs; millisecond-scale radio transients) NS–BH coalescence rates are too low to make these a primary FRB source. Instead, we propose that the transients form a FRB sub-population, distinguishable by a double peak with a precursor. The rapid ramp-up in luminosity manifests as a precursor to the burst which is 20%–80% as luminous given 0.5 ms timing resolution. The main burst arises from the peak luminosity before the merger. The post-merger burst follows from the NS magnetic field migration to the BH, causing a shock. NS–BH pairs are especially desirable for ground-based gravitational wave (GW) observatories since the pair might not otherwise be detected, with EM counterparts greatly augmenting the scientific leverage beyond the GW signal. The EM signal’s ability to break degeneracies in the parameters encoded in the GW and probe the NS magnetic field strength is quite valuable, yielding insights into open problems in NS magnetic field decay.

  11. Blockwise Repeated Burst Error Correcting Linear Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Dass

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a lower and an upper bound on the number of parity check digits required for a linear code that corrects a single sub-block containing errors which are in the form of 2-repeated bursts of length b or less. An illustration of such kind of codes has been provided. Further, the codes that correct m-repeated bursts of length b or less have also been studied.

  12. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  13. Environmental and cow-related factors affect cow locomotion and can cause misclassification in lameness detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuffel, A; Van De Gucht, T; Saeys, W; Sonck, B; Opsomer, G; Vangeyte, J; Mertens, K C; De Ketelaere, B; Van Weyenberg, S

    2016-09-01

    To tackle the high prevalence of lameness, techniques to monitor cow locomotion are being developed in order to detect changes in cows' locomotion due to lameness. Obviously, in such lameness detection systems, alerts should only respond to locomotion changes that are related to lameness. However, other environmental or cow factors can contribute to locomotion changes not related to lameness and hence, might cause false alerts. In this study the effects of wet surfaces, dark environment, age, production level, lactation and gestation stage on cow locomotion were investigated. Data was collected at Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research research farm (Melle, Belgium) during a 5-month period. The gait variables of 30 non-lame and healthy Holstein cows were automatically measured every day. In dark environments and on wet walking surfaces cows took shorter, more asymmetrical strides with less step overlap. In general, older cows had a more asymmetrical gait and they walked slower with more abduction. Lactation stage or gestation stage also showed significant association with asymmetrical and shorter gait and less step overlap probably due to the heavy calf in the uterus. Next, two lameness detection algorithms were developed to investigate the added value of environmental and cow data into detection models. One algorithm solely used locomotion variables and a second algorithm used the same locomotion variables and additional environmental and cow data. In the latter algorithm only age and lactation stage together with the locomotion variables were withheld during model building. When comparing the sensitivity for the detection of non-lame cows, sensitivity increased by 10% when the cow data was added in the algorithm (sensitivity was 70% and 80% for the first and second algorithm, respectively). Hence, the number of false alerts for lame cows that were actually non-lame, decreased. This pilot study shows that using knowledge on influencing factors on cow

  14. Conditional bursting enhances resonant firing in neocortical layer 2-3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Matthew H; Spain, William J

    2009-02-04

    The frequency response properties of neurons are critical for signal transmission and control of network oscillations. At subthreshold membrane potential, some neurons show resonance caused by voltage-gated channels. During action potential firing, resonance of the spike output may arise from subthreshold mechanisms and/or spike-dependent currents that cause afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and afterdepolarizations (ADPs). Layer 2-3 pyramidal neurons (L2-3 PNs) have a fast ADP that can trigger bursts. The present study investigated what stimuli elicit bursting in these cells and whether bursts transmit specific frequency components of the synaptic input, leading to resonance at particular frequencies. We found that two-spike bursts are triggered by step onsets, sine waves in two frequency bands, and noise. Using noise adjusted to elicit firing at approximately 10 Hz, we measured the gain for modulation of the time-varying firing rate as a function of stimulus frequency, finding a primary peak (7-16 Hz) and a high-frequency resonance (250-450 Hz). Gain was also measured separately for single and burst spikes. For a given spike rate, bursts provided higher gain at the primary peak and lower gain at intermediate frequencies, sharpening the high-frequency resonance. Suppression of bursting using automated current feedback weakened the primary and high-frequency resonances. The primary resonance was also influenced by the SK channel-mediated medium AHP (mAHP), because the SK blocker apamin reduced the sharpness of the primary peak. Our results suggest that resonance in L2-3 PNs depends on burst firing and the mAHP. Bursting enhances resonance in two distinct frequency bands.

  15. Can we detect, monitor, and characterize volcanic activity using 'off the shelf' webcams and low-light cameras?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to detect and monitor precursory events, thermal signatures, and ongoing volcanic activity in near-realtime is an invaluable tool. Volcanic hazards often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing to detect and monitor this activity is essential, but the required equipment is often expensive and difficult to maintain, which increases the risk to public safety and the likelihood of financial impact. Our investigation explores the use of 'off the shelf' cameras, ranging from computer webcams to low-light security cameras, to monitor volcanic incandescent activity in near-realtime. These cameras are ideal as they operate in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, are relatively cheap to purchase, consume little power, are easily replaced, and can provide telemetered, near-realtime data. We focus on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate each image according to pixel brightness, in order to automatically detect and identify increases in potentially hazardous activity. The cameras used here range in price from 0 to 1,000 and the script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential users and increase the accessibility of these tools, particularly in developing nations. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures to be correlated to pixel brightness. Data collected from several volcanoes; (1) Stromboli, Italy (2) Shiveluch, Russia (3) Fuego, Guatemala (4) Popcatépetl, México, along with campaign data from Stromboli (June, 2013), and laboratory tests are presented here.

  16. Phase analysis method for burst onset prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellino, Flavio; Mazzoni, Alberto; Storace, Marco

    2017-02-01

    The response of bursting neurons to fluctuating inputs is usually hard to predict, due to their strong nonlinearity. For the same reason, decoding the injected stimulus from the activity of a bursting neuron is generally difficult. In this paper we propose a method describing (for neuron models) a mechanism of phase coding relating the burst onsets with the phase profile of the input current. This relation suggests that burst onset may provide a way for postsynaptic neurons to track the input phase. Moreover, we define a method of phase decoding to solve the inverse problem and estimate the likelihood of burst onset given the input state. Both methods are presented here in a unified framework, describing a complete coding-decoding procedure. This procedure is tested by using different neuron models, stimulated with different inputs (stochastic, sinusoidal, up, and down states). The results obtained show the efficacy and broad range of application of the proposed methods. Possible applications range from the study of sensory information processing, in which phase-of-firing codes are known to play a crucial role, to clinical applications such as deep brain stimulation, helping to design stimuli in order to trigger or prevent neural bursting.

  17. Alfvenic accelerated electrons and short burst auroral kilometric radiations observed by the FAST satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lun

    This investigation is motivated by previous study of short burst radiations (S- bursts) reported by Ergun et al. [2006], who suggested two generation mechanisms of S-bursts: one is the electron cyclotron maser instability due to an unstable ring distribution; the other is an upward electron beam generating upper hybrid resonance. The simulation results reported by Su et al. [2007] support the former mechanism. Only one Earth-based S-burst event was reported prior to our study. A systematic study was performed on particle and field observations from the FAST spacecraft to search for events of S-bursts and Alfvén waves. Eight events involving coexistence were identified and are presented in this thesis. All of them were observed at altitudes greater than 2500 km during winter months. In addition, S-bursts associated with Alfvénic perturbations were detected during periods when the AE indices were high, indicating a possible association with substorms. Furthermore, 24 dayside Alfvénic events and 20 nightside events were examined in detail. We found that the electron phase space density peaks along the magnetic field line for the nightside, which supports the concept of field-aligned acceleration by inertial Alfvén waves. However, the electron anisotropies involving the phase space densities peaked perpendicular to the magnetic field were observed on the dayside.

  18. Role of Strain-Hardening Law on the Bursting Speed of a Rotating Thin-Walled Shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, U.

    2009-02-01

    In the present work, the bursting speed of a rotating thin-walled shaft is considered. Under usual assumptions, the roles of modified Ludwik and Ramberg-Osgood stress-strain laws on the bursting speed are discussed. It can be seen from the present analysis that the strain hardening law plays a significant role.

  19. A study of the temporal and spectral characteristics of gamma ray bursts. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst data obtained from the ISEE-3 Gamma Ray Burst Spectrometer and the Solar Maximum Mission's Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) were analyzed to yield information on burst temporal and spectral characteristics. A Monte Carlo approach was used to simulate the HXRBS response to candidate spectral models. At energies above about 100 keV, the spectra are well fit by exponential forms. At lower energies, 30 keV to 60 keV, depressions below the model continua are apparent in some bursts. The depressions are not instrumental or data-reduction artifacts. The event selection criterion of the ISEE-3 experiment is based on the time to accumulate a present number of photons rather than the photon count per unit time and is consequently independent of event duration for a given burst intensity, unlike most conventional systems. As a result, a significantly greater percentage of fast, narrow events have been detected. The ratio of count rates from two ISEE-3 detectors indicates that bursts with durations or approx. one second have much softer spectra than longer bursts.

  20. Design and implementation of the UFFO burst alert and trigger telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, J.E.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Ultra Fast Flash Observatory pathfinder (UFFO-p) is a telescope system designed for the detection of the prompt optical/UV photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), and it will be launched onboard the Lomonosov spacecraft in 2012. The UFFO-p consists of two instruments: the UFFO Burst Alert...... and Trigger telescope (UBAT) for the detection and location of GRBs, and the Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) for measurement of the UV/optical afterglow. The UBAT isa coded-mask aperture X-ray camera with a wide field of view (FOV) of 1.8 sr. The detector module consists of the YSO(Yttrium Oxyorthosilicate...

  1. Linear Polarization, Circular Polarization, and Depolarization of Gamma-ray Bursts: A Simple Case of Jitter Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng, E-mail: jirongmao@mail.ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 650011 Kunming, Yunnan Province (China)

    2017-04-01

    Linear and circular polarizations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected recently. We adopt a simplified model to investigate GRB polarization characteristics in this paper. A compressed two-dimensional turbulent slab containing stochastic magnetic fields is considered, and jitter radiation can produce the linear polarization under this special magnetic field topology. Turbulent Faraday rotation measure (RM) of this slab makes strong wavelength-dependent depolarization. The jitter photons can also scatter with those magnetic clumps inside the turbulent slab, and a nonzero variance of the Stokes parameter V can be generated. Furthermore, the linearly and circularly polarized photons in the optical and radio bands may suffer heavy absorptions from the slab. Thus we consider the polarized jitter radiation transfer processes. Finally, we compare our model results with the optical detections of GRB 091018, GRB 121024A, and GRB 131030A. We suggest simultaneous observations of GRB multi-wavelength polarization in the future.

  2. Photon Mass Limits from Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bonetti, Luca; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Sakharov, Alexander S.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward K.G.; Spallicci, Alessandro D.A.M.

    2016-06-10

    The frequency-dependent time delays in fast radio bursts (FRBs) can be used to constrain the photon mass, if the FRB redshifts are known, but the similarity between the frequency dependences of dispersion due to plasma effects and a photon mass complicates the derivation of a limit on $m_\\gamma$. The redshift of FRB 150418 has been measured to $\\sim 2$% and its dispersion measure (DM) is known to $\\sim 0.1$%, but the strength of the constraint on $m_\\gamma$ is limited by uncertainties in the modelling of the host galaxy and the Milky Way, as well as possible inhomogeneities in the intergalactic medium (IGM). Allowing for these uncertainties, the recent data on FRB 150418 indicate that $m_\\gamma \\lesssim 1.7 \\times 10^{-14}$ eV c$^{-2}$ ($4.6 \\times 10^{-50}$ kg). In the future, the different redshift dependences of the plasma and photon mass contributions to DM can be used to improve the sensitivity to $m_\\gamma$ if more FRB redshifts are measured. For a fixed fractional uncertainty in the extra-galactic cont...

  3. Compact solar UV burst triggered in a magnetic field with a fan-spine topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitta, L. P.; Peter, H.; Young, P. R.; Huang, Y.-M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Solar ultraviolet (UV) bursts are small-scale features that exhibit intermittent brightenings that are thought to be due to magnetic reconnection. They are observed abundantly in the chromosphere and transition region, in particular in active regions. Aims: We investigate in detail a UV burst related to a magnetic feature that is advected by the moat flow from a sunspot towards a pore. The moving feature is parasitic in that its magnetic polarity is opposite to that of the spot and the pore. This comparably simple photospheric magnetic field distribution allows for an unambiguous interpretation of the magnetic geometry leading to the onset of the observed UV burst. Methods: We used UV spectroscopic and slit-jaw observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to identify and study chromospheric and transition region spectral signatures of said UV burst. To investigate the magnetic topology surrounding the UV burst, we used a two-hour-long time sequence of simultaneous line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and performed data-driven 3D magnetic field extrapolations by means of a magnetofrictional relaxation technique. We can connect UV burst signatures to the overlying extreme UV (EUV) coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Results: The UV burst shows a variety of extremely broad line profiles indicating plasma flows in excess of ±200 km s-1 at times. The whole structure is divided into two spatially distinct zones of predominantly up- and downflows. The magnetic field extrapolations show a persistent fan-spine magnetic topology at the UV burst. The associated 3D magnetic null point exists at a height of about 500 km above the photosphere and evolves co-spatially with the observed UV burst. The EUV emission at the footpoints of coronal loops is correlated with the evolution of the underlying UV burst. Conclusions: The magnetic field around the null point is sheared by

  4. A Search for Fast Radio Bursts with the GBNCC Pulsar Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Josephy, A.; Rajwade, K. M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Archibald, A. M.; DeCesar, M. E.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaplan, D. L.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Levin, L.; Lynch, R. S.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Ransom, S. M.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J. K.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2017-08-01

    We report on a search for fast radio bursts (FRBs) with the Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap (GBNCC) Pulsar Survey at 350 MHz. Pointings amounting to a total on-sky time of 61 days were searched to a dispersion measure (DM) of 3000 pc cm-3, while the rest (23 days; 29% of the total time) were searched to a DM of 500 pc cm-3. No FRBs were detected in the pointings observed through 2016 May. We estimate a 95% confidence upper limit on the FRB rate of 3.6× {10}3 FRBs sky-1 day-1 above a peak flux density of 0.63 Jy at 350 MHz for an intrinsic pulse width of 5 ms. We place constraints on the spectral index α by running simulations for different astrophysical scenarios and cumulative flux density distributions. The nondetection with GBNCC is consistent with the 1.4 GHz rate reported for the Parkes surveys for α > +0.35 in the absence of scattering and free-free absorption and α > -0.3 in the presence of scattering, for a Euclidean flux distribution. The constraints imply that FRBs exhibit either a flat spectrum or a spectral turnover at frequencies above 400 MHz. These constraints also allow estimation of the number of bursts that can be detected with current and upcoming surveys. We predict that CHIME may detect anywhere from several to ˜50 FRBs per day (depending on model assumptions), making it well suited for interesting constraints on spectral index, the log N-log S slope, and pulse profile evolution across its bandwidth (400-800 MHz).

  5. TRIO: Burst Buffer Based I/O Orchestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Pritchard, Michael [Auburn University; Wang, Bin [Auburn University; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University

    2015-01-01

    The growing computing power on leadership HPC systems is often accompanied by ever-escalating failure rates. Checkpointing is a common defensive mechanism used by scientific applications for failure recovery. However, directly writing the large and bursty checkpointing dataset to parallel filesystem can incur significant I/O contention on storage servers. Such contention in turn degrades the raw bandwidth utilization of storage servers and prolongs the average job I/O time of concurrent applications. Recently burst buffer has been proposed as an intermediate layer to absorb the bursty I/O traffic from compute nodes to storage backend. But an I/O orchestration mechanism is still desired to efficiently move checkpointing data from bursty buffers to storage backend. In this paper, we propose a burst buffer based I/O orchestration framework, named TRIO, to intercept and reshape the bursty writes for better sequential write traffic to storage severs. Meanwhile, TRIO coordinates the flushing orders among concurrent burst buffers to alleviate the contention on storage server bandwidth. Our experimental results reveal that TRIO can deliver 30.5% higher bandwidth and reduce the average job I/O time by 37% on average for data-intensive applications in various checkpointing scenarios.

  6. Early Time Optical Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopac, D.; Gomboc, A.; Japelj, J.

    We present the study of a sample of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early time optical and gamma-ray detections. By performing detailed temporal and spectral analysis of 18 GRBs which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, we find that in most cases early time optical emission shows sharp and steep behavior, with a rich diversity of GRBs' broadband spectral properties. These observational results, supported by a simple internal shock dissipation model, show that the standard external shock interpretation for early time optical emission is disfavored in most cases where early time optical peaks are sharp (Delta t/t robotic optical telescopes.

  7. Magnetar-like X-Ray Bursts Suppress Pulsar Radio Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, R. F.; Lyutikov, M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S. P. [Department of Physics and McGill Space Institute, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Esposito, P.; Rea, N. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Israel, G. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy); Kerr, M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Sarkissian, J. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Parkes Observatory, P.O. Box 276, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia); Scholz, P., E-mail: archibald@astro.utoronto.ca [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, BC V2A 6J9 (Canada)

    2017-11-10

    Rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars are two different observational manifestations of neutron stars: rotation-powered pulsars are rapidly spinning objects that are mostly observed as pulsating radio sources, while magnetars, neutron stars with the highest known magnetic fields, often emit short-duration X-ray bursts. Here, we report simultaneous observations of the high-magnetic-field radio pulsar PSR J1119−6127 at X-ray, with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR , and at radio energies with the Parkes radio telescope, during a period of magnetar-like bursts. The rotationally powered radio emission shuts off coincident with the occurrence of multiple X-ray bursts and recovers on a timescale of ∼70 s. These observations of related radio and X-ray phenomena further solidify the connection between radio pulsars and magnetars and suggest that the pair plasma produced in bursts can disrupt the acceleration mechanism of radio-emitting particles.

  8. Solar type III radio bursts modulated by homochromous Alfvén waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J., E-mail: djwu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-12-10

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvén waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvén waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  9. AN ABSENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AT INTERMEDIATE GALACTIC LATITUDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroff, E.; Van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Coster, P.; Flynn, C.; Keane, E. F. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Johnston, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bates, S. D.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bhat, N. D. R. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), 44 Rosehill Street, Redfern, NSW 2016 (Australia); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Burke-Spolaor, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Champion, D.; Ng, C. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Levin, L., E-mail: epetroff@astro.swin.edu.au [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2014-07-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of bright, highly dispersed radio pulses. Recent work by Thornton et al. has revealed a population of FRBs in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey at high Galactic latitudes. A variety of progenitors have been proposed, including cataclysmic events at cosmological distances, Galactic flare stars, and terrestrial radio frequency interference. Here we report on a search for FRBs at intermediate Galactic latitudes (–15° detection rates at high and low Galactic latitudes. A revised rate estimate or another strong and heretofore unknown selection effect in Galactic latitude would provide closer agreement between the surveys' detection rates. The dearth of detections at low Galactic latitude disfavors a Galactic origin for these bursts.

  10. Achromatic late-time variability in thermonuclear X-ray bursts - an accretion disk disrupted by a nova-like shell?

    OpenAIRE

    Zand, J. J. M. in 't; Galloway, D. K.; Ballantyne, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    An unusual Eddington-limited thermonuclear X-ray burst was detected from the accreting neutron star in 2S 0918-549 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The burst commenced with a brief (40 ms) precursor and maintained near-Eddington fluxes during the initial 77 s. These characteristics are indicative of a nova-like expulsion of a shell from the neutron star surface. Starting 122 s into the burst, the burst shows strong (87 +/- 1% peak-to-peak amplitude) achromatic fluctuations for 60 s. We s...

  11. DNA from fecal immunochemical test can replace stool for detection of colonic lesions using a microbiota-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Nielson T; Koumpouras, Charles C; Rogers, Mary A M; Ruffin, Mack T; Schloss, Patrick D

    2016-11-14

    There is a significant demand for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening methods that are noninvasive, inexpensive, and capable of accurately detecting early stage tumors. It has been shown that models based on the gut microbiota can complement the fecal occult blood test and fecal immunochemical test (FIT). However, a barrier to microbiota-based screening is the need to collect and store a patient's stool sample. Using stool samples collected from 404 patients, we tested whether the residual buffer containing resuspended feces in FIT cartridges could be used in place of intact stool samples. We found that the bacterial DNA isolated from FIT cartridges largely recapitulated the community structure and membership of patients' stool microbiota and that the abundance of bacteria associated with CRC were conserved. We also found that models for detecting CRC that were generated using bacterial abundances from FIT cartridges were equally predictive as models generated using bacterial abundances from stool. These findings demonstrate the potential for using residual buffer from FIT cartridges in place of stool for microbiota-based screening for CRC. This may reduce the need to collect and process separate stool samples and may facilitate combining FIT and microbiota-based biomarkers into a single test. Additionally, FIT cartridges could constitute a novel data source for studying the role of the microbiome in cancer and other diseases.

  12. Can ischemia and dyssynchrony be detected during early stages of dobutamine stress echocardiography by 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Villarraga, Hector R; Saleh, Haydar K; Cha, Stephen S; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2013-01-01

    Strain and strain rate (SR) measured with 2-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2-D STE) can quantitatively assess myocardial function. Our aim was to evaluate whether we could detect abnormalities in strain, strain rate, and dyssynchrony by applying 2-D STE in patients with severe coronary artery disease during early stages of dobutamine stress echocardiography. Thirty-four patients with angiographically documented severe 3-vessel coronary artery disease and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction were compared with 42 control patients without evidence of coronary artery disease. Circumferential and longitudinal strain, SR, and left ventricular synchrony using standard deviation (SD) of time to systolic peak strain and SR were analyzed with 2-D STE at rest and at intermediate doses of dobutamine stress echocardiography. Compared with control subjects, patients with coronary artery disease showed lower circumferential SR [-1.42 (0.34) s(-1) vs -1.64 (0.34) s(-1); P strain [-15.41% (3.52%) vs -19.37% (3.21%); P intermediate doses; these values were also compromised at peak dose. The SD of longitudinal time to systolic peak strain at intermediate dose was significantly greater in patients with coronary artery disease than in control patients [37.89 (12.32) vs 27.21 (10.86); P strain and SR detected myocardial dysfunction and asynchrony in patients with coronary artery disease during intermediate doses of dobutamine stress, with minimal changes in regional wall motion abnormalities at this stage.

  13. Quark nova model for fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Zachary; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via β-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm-3 pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of β-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies (˜ 1041 erg) and spectral shapes, and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  14. Non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves traversing the head can be used to detect cerebrovascular autoregulation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oziel, M; Hjouj, M; Gonzalez, C A; Lavee, J; Rubinsky, B

    2016-02-22

    Monitoring changes in non-ionizing radiofrequency electromagnetic waves as they traverse the brain can detect the effects of stimuli employed in cerebrovascular autoregulation (CVA) tests on the brain, without contact and in real time. CVA is a physiological phenomenon of importance to health, used for diagnosis of a number of diseases of the brain with a vascular component. The technology described here is being developed for use in diagnosis of injuries and diseases of the brain in rural and economically underdeveloped parts of the world. A group of nine subjects participated in this pilot clinical evaluation of the technology. Substantial research remains to be done on correlating the measurements with physiology and anatomy.

  15. Cycle-Characteristic Odour of Cow Urine Can Be Detected by the Female Face Fly (Musca autumnalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordéus, K; Webster, B; Söderquist, L; Båge, R; Glinwood, R

    2014-01-01

    Contents Due to declining dairy cow fertility rates, there is great interest in developing tools for oestrus detection. Compounds in the volatile profile of oestrous cows are suggested as oestrus-specific, but consistent results have not been presented. Certain haematophagous arthropods can discriminate stages of the mammalian reproductive cycle based on host volatiles. This study investigated whether the face fly, Musca autumnalis de Geer (Diptera: Muscidae), can discriminate between urine from cows in oestrus and urine collected during the luteal phase. Individual flies were tested in a two-choice behavioural assay with choice between odour of oestrous or luteal urine and water (control). Flies chose the control arm significantly more when exposed to oestrous urine than when exposed to luteal urine. Analysis of volatiles showed that 1-hexadecanol (cetyl alcohol) was released in greater amounts from oestrous urine than from urine collected during the luteal phase. In a dose response assay, flies were significantly attracted by 0.01 ng of 1-hexadecanol but significantly repelled by 0.1 ng, a pattern consistent with fly responses to urine. In conclusion, M. autumnalis can discriminate between oestrous and luteal urine, and this may be mediated by differences in 1-hexadecanol concentration. PMID:25244510

  16. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts during the First Advanced LIGO Observing Run and Implications for the Origin of GRB 150906B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dalya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Galiana, A. Fernandez; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kaermer, C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGrath Hoareau, C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Castro-Perez, J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Szolgyen, A.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Hurley, K.; Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Rau, A.; Sanin, A. B.; Svinkin, D. S.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of the search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with gamma-ray bursts detected during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We find no evidence of a GW signal for any of the 41 gamma-ray bursts for which LIGO

  17. TeV-PeV neutrinos from low-power gamma-ray burst jets inside stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-09-20

    We study high-energy neutrino production in collimated jets inside progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and supernovae, considering both collimation and internal shocks. We obtain simple, useful constraints, using the often overlooked point that shock acceleration of particles is ineffective at radiation-mediated shocks. Classical GRBs may be too powerful to produce high-energy neutrinos inside stars, which is consistent with IceCube nondetections. We find that ultralong GRBs avoid such constraints and detecting the TeV signal will support giant progenitors. Predictions for low-power GRB classes including low-luminosity GRBs can be consistent with the astrophysical neutrino background IceCube may detect, with a spectral steepening around PeV. The models can be tested with future GRB monitors.

  18. Compact Binary Progenitors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Perna, Rosalba; Rezzolla, Luciano; Troja, Eleonora; Lazzati, Davide

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, detailed observations and accurate numerical simulations have provided support to the idea that mergers of compact binaries containing either two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a black hole (BH) may constitute the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The merger of such compact binaries is expected to lead to the production of a spinning BH surrounded by an accreting torus. Several mechanisms can extract energy from this system and power the SGRBs. Here we connect observations and numerical simulations of compact binary mergers, and use the current sample of SGRBs with measured energies to constrain the mass of their powering tori. By comparing the masses of the tori with the results of fully general-relativistic simulations, we are able to infer the properties of the binary progenitors that yield SGRBs. By assuming a constant efficiency in converting torus mass into jet energy epsilon(sub jet) = 10%, we find that most of the tori have masses smaller than 0.01 Solar M, favoring "high-mass" binary NSs mergers, i.e., binaries with total masses approx >1.5 the maximum mass of an isolated NS. This has important consequences for the gravitational wave signals that may be detected in association with SGRBs, since "high-mass" systems do not form a long-lived hypermassive NS after the merger. While NS-BH systems cannot be excluded to be the engine of at least some of the SGRBs, the BH would need to have an initial spin of approx. 0.9 or higher.

  19. Scientific Applications Performance Evaluation on Burst Buffer

    KAUST Repository

    Markomanolis, George S.

    2017-10-19

    Parallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing, especially in storing and processing very large datasets, such as the case of seismic imaging, CFD, combustion and weather modeling. The storage hierarchy includes nowadays additional layers, the latest being the usage of SSD-based storage as a Burst Buffer for I/O acceleration. We present an in-depth analysis on how to use Burst Buffer for specific cases and how the internal MPI I/O aggregators operate according to the options that the user provides during his job submission. We analyze the performance of a range of I/O intensive scientific applications, at various scales on a large installation of Lustre parallel file system compared to an SSD-based Burst Buffer. Our results show a performance improvement over Lustre when using Burst Buffer. Moreover, we show results from a data hierarchy library which indicate that the standard I/O approaches are not enough to get the expected performance from this technology. The performance gain on the total execution time of the studied applications is between 1.16 and 3 times compared to Lustre. One of the test cases achieved an impressive I/O throughput of 900 GB/s on Burst Buffer.

  20. Fast radio burst source properties and curvature radiation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Lu, Wenbin; Bhattacharya, Mukul

    2017-07-01

    We use the observed properties of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and a number of general physical considerations to provide a broad-brush model for the physical properties of FRB sources and the radiation mechanism. We show that the magnetic field in the source region should be at least 1014 G. This strong field is required to ensure that the electrons have sufficiently high ground state Landau energy so that particle collisions, instabilities and strong electromagnetic fields associated with the FRB radiation do not perturb electrons' motion in the direction transverse to the magnetic field and destroy their coherent motion; coherence is required by the high observed brightness temperature of FRB radiation. The electric field in the source region required to sustain particle motion for a wave period is estimated to be of the order of 1011 esu. These requirements suggest that FRBs are produced near the surface of magnetars perhaps via forced reconnection of magnetic fields to produce episodic, repeated, outbursts. The beaming-corrected energy release in these bursts is estimated to be about 1036 erg, whereas the total energy in the magnetic field is at least ˜1045 erg. We provide a number of predictions for this model which can be tested by future observations. One of which is that short duration FRB-like bursts should exist at much higher frequencies, possibly up to optical.

  1. Gamma Ray Burst Optical Counterpart Search Experiment (GROCSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. S.; Ables, E.; Bionta, R. M.; Ott, L.; Parker, E.; Akerlof, C.; Lee, B.; Wallace, S.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.

    1995-01-01

    GROCSE (Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiments) is a system of automated telescopes that search for simultaneous optical activity associated with gamma ray bursts in response to real-time burst notifications provided by the BATSE/BACODINE network. The first generation system, GROCSE 1, is sensitive down to Mv (approximately) 8.5 and requires an average of 12 seconds to obtain the first images of the gamma ray burst error box defined by the BACODINE trigger. The collaboration is now constructing a second generation system which has a 4 second slewing time and can reach Mv (approximately) 14 with a 5 second exposure. GROCSE 2 consists of 4 cameras on a single mount. Each camera views the night sky through a commercial Canon lens (f/1.8, focal length 200 mm) and utilizes a 2K x 2K Loral CCD. Light weight and low noise custom readout electronics were designed and fabricated for these CCDs. The total field of view of the 4 cameras is 17.6 x 17.6 (degree). GROCSE 2 will be operated by the end of 1995. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the GROCSE system and the results of measurements with a GROCSE 2 prototype unit.

  2. Sensitivity of Reaction Rates in X-Ray Burst Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak, Jessica; Elliott, Jacob; Estrade, Alfredo; Jacobs, Adam; Schatz, Hendrik; Schmidt, Konrad

    2017-09-01

    We present a computational project on the rapid-proton capture process that occurs in accreting neutron stars. Our research involves conducting a sensitivity study of the rp-process to nuclear reaction rates in simulations using various compositions for the accreted material onto the neutron stars. In this research, we analyze the effects these variations of composition have on the resulting X-ray bursts simulated by a single-zone rp-process model. Current work is focused on modifying the initial abundances of accreted hydrogen and helium, including a range of values that correspond to the expected composition of X-ray burst sources with reliable observational data. Our objective is to determine which reaction rates have the largest effect on the modeled bursts. A second goal of the project is to implement a script to run the rp-process code in a distributed mode in a computer cluster. With this, we will be able to extend the sensitivity study to a finer grid of different chemical compositions of the accreted material. By running the sensitivity study and examining how the computational data compares with observational data, we can identify nuclear reactions that would need better experimental constraints to improve the accuracy of the rp-process model.

  3. CT findings predictive of neurological deficits in throracolumbar burst fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Tae Yong; Jeong, Hee Seok; Jeong, Yeo Jin [Pusan National University and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine the computed tomography (CT) findings predictive of neurological deficits in thoracolumbar spine injuries. One hundred two patients with thoracolumbar spinal burst fractures, after excluding the patients with brain and cervical cord injuries and unconsciousness, who underwent consecutive spine 128-multidetector CT scan formed the study group. The neurological findings were clinically classified as no deficit (n = 58), complete deficit with paraplegia (n = 22), and incomplete deficit with either motor or sensory impairment (n = 22). The following four CT imaging parameters were analyzed: the level of the main burst fracture as the cord (n = 44) and the cauda equina (n = 58) levels; the extent of canal encroachment as central canal ratios (CCRs) below 0.5 (n = 43) and above 0.5 (n = 59); the degree of laminar fracture as no fracture (n = 33), linear fracture (n = 7), separated fracture (n = 27), and displaced fracture (n = 35); fractured vertebra counted as single (n = 53) and multiple (n = 49). Complete neurological deficit was associated with injuries at the cord level (p = 0.000) and displaced laminar fractures (p = 0.000); incomplete neurological deficit was associated with CCRs below 0.5 (p = 0.000) and multiple vertebral injuries (p = 0.002). CT scan can provide additional findings predictive of neurological deficits in thoracolumbar spinal burst fractures.

  4. Dynamics of gamma bursts in local field potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Priscilla E; McDonnell, Mark D; Ward, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we provide a stochastic analysis of, and supporting simulation data for, a stochastic model of the generation of gamma bursts in local field potential (LFP) recordings by interacting populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Our interest is in behavior near a fixed point of the stochastic dynamics of the model. We apply a recent limit theorem of stochastic dynamics to probe into details of this local behavior, obtaining several new results. We show that the stochastic model can be written in terms of a rotation multiplied by a two-dimensional standard Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process. Viewing the rewritten process in terms of phase and amplitude processes, we are able to proceed further in analysis. We demonstrate that gamma bursts arise in the model as excursions of the modulus of the OU process. The associated pair of stochastic phase and amplitude processes satisfies their own pair of stochastic differential equations, which indicates that large phase slips occur between gamma bursts. This behavior is mirrored in LFP data simulated from the original model. These results suggest that the rewritten model is a valid representation of the behavior near the fixed point for a wide class of models of oscillatory neural processes.

  5. The Musical Emotional Bursts: A validated set of musical affect bursts to investigate auditory affective processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien ePaquette

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Musical Emotional Bursts (MEB consist of 80 brief musical executions expressing basic emotional states (happiness, sadness and fear and neutrality. These musical bursts were designed to be the musical analogue of the Montreal Affective Voices (MAV – a set of brief non-verbal affective vocalizations portraying different basic emotions. The MEB consist of short (mean duration: 1.6 sec improvisations on a given emotion or of imitations of a given MAV stimulus, played on a violin (n:40 or a clarinet (n:40. The MEB arguably represent a primitive form of music emotional expression, just like the MAV represent a primitive form of vocal, nonlinguistic emotional expression. To create the MEB, stimuli were recorded from 10 violinists and 10 clarinetists, and then evaluated by 60 participants. Participants evaluated 240 stimuli (30 stimuli x 4 [3 emotions + neutral] x 2 instruments by performing either a forced-choice emotion categorization task, a valence rating task or an arousal rating task (20 subjects per task; 40 MAVs were also used in the same session with similar task instructions. Recognition accuracy of emotional categories expressed by the MEB (n:80 was lower than for the MAVs but still very high with an average percent correct recognition score of 80.4%. Highest recognition accuracies were obtained for happy clarinet (92.0% and fearful or sad violin (88.0% each MEB stimuli. The MEB can be used to compare the cerebral processing of emotional expressions in music and vocal communication, or used for testing affective perception in patients with communication problems.

  6. Can concurrent core biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy improve the false negative rate of sonographically detectable breast lesions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Tsai-Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to determine the accuracy of concurrent core needle biopsy (CNB and fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB for breast lesions and to estimate the false-negative rate using the two methods combined. Methods Over a seven-year period, 2053 patients with sonographically detectable breast lesions underwent concurrent ultrasound-guided CNB and FNAB. The sonographic and histopathological findings were classified into four categories: benign, indeterminate, suspicious, and malignant. The histopathological findings were compared with the definitive excision pathology results. Patients with benign core biopsies underwent a detailed review to determine the false-negative rate. The correlations between the ultrasonography, FNAB, and CNB were determined. Results Eight hundred eighty patients were diagnosed with malignant disease, and of these, 23 (2.5% diagnoses were found to be false-negative after core biopsy. After an intensive review of discordant FNAB results, the final false-negative rate was reduced to 1.1% (p-value = 0.025. The kappa coefficients for correlations between methods were 0.304 (p-value p-value p-value Conclusions Concurrent CNB and FNAB under ultrasound guidance can provide accurate preoperative diagnosis of breast lesions and provide important information for appropriate treatment. Identification of discordant results using careful radiological-histopathological correlation can reduce the false-negative rate.

  7. Bursting activity spreading through asymmetric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Onaga, Tomokatsu

    2014-01-01

    People communicate with those who have the same background or share a common interest by using a social networking service (SNS). News or messages propagate through inhomogeneous connections in an SNS by sharing or facilitating additional comments. Such human activity is known to lead to endogenous bursting in the rate of message occurrences. We analyze a multi-dimensional self-exciting process to reveal dependence of the bursting activity on the topology of connections and the distribution of interaction strength on the connections. We determine the critical conditions for the cases where interaction strength is regulated at either the point of input or output for each person. In the input regulation condition, the network may exhibit bursting with infinitesimal interaction strength, if the dispersion of the degrees diverges as in the scale-free networks. In contrast, in the output regulation condition, the critical value of interaction strength, represented by the average number of events added by a single ...

  8. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT FOR THORACOLUMBAR SPINE BURST FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barajas Vanegas Raymundo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the category of evidence and the strength of recommendation for the conservative treatment of thoracolumbar spine burst fractures. Method: A systematic review was conducted from April 2014 to June 2015, selecting articles according to their prospective design, related to thoracolumbar spine burst fractures and their treatment. These studies were published in the electronic bibliographic databases from January 2009 to January 2015. Results: A total of 9,504 articles were found in a free search, of which 7 met the selection criteria and were included for analysis in a study of a total of 435 patients, of whom 72 underwent surgical treatment and 363 received some type of conservative treatment, showing predominantly level of evidence "1b", with strength of recommendation type "A". Conclusions: According to the evidence obtained, the conservative treatment is a choice for patients with stable burst fracture in a single level of thoracolumbar spine and with no neurological injury.

  9. Predators, Prey and Habitat Structure: Can Key Conservation Areas and Early Signs of Population Collapse Be Detected in Neotropical Forests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit de Thoisy

    Full Text Available Tropical forests with a low human population and absence of large-scale deforestation provide unique opportunities to study successful conservation strategies, which should be based on adequate monitoring tools. This study explored the conservation status of a large predator, the jaguar, considered an indicator of the maintenance of how well ecological processes are maintained. We implemented an original integrative approach, exploring successive ecosystem status proxies, from habitats and responses to threats of predators and their prey, to canopy structure and forest biomass. Niche modeling allowed identification of more suitable habitats, significantly related to canopy height and forest biomass. Capture/recapture methods showed that jaguar density was higher in habitats identified as more suitable by the niche model. Surveys of ungulates, large rodents and birds also showed higher density where jaguars were more abundant. Although jaguar density does not allow early detection of overall vertebrate community collapse, a decrease in the abundance of large terrestrial birds was noted as good first evidence of disturbance. The most promising tool comes from easily acquired LiDAR data and radar images: a decrease in canopy roughness was closely associated with the disturbance of forests and associated decreasing vertebrate biomass. This mixed approach, focusing on an apex predator, ecological modeling and remote-sensing information, not only helps detect early population declines in large mammals, but is also useful to discuss the relevance of large predators as indicators and the efficiency of conservation measures. It can also be easily extrapolated and adapted in a timely manner, since important open-source data are increasingly available and relevant for large-scale and real-time monitoring of biodiversity.

  10. Ion-induced stacking of photosensitizer molecules can remarkably affect the luminescence detection of singlet oxygen in Candida albicans cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgenträger, Ariane; Gonzales, Fernanda Pereira; Maisch, Tim; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Singlet oxygen (O21) is an important reactive intermediate in photodynamic reactions, particularly in antimicrobial PDT (aPDT). The detection of O21 luminescence is frequently used to elucidate the role of O21 in various environments, particularly in microorganisms and human cells. When incubating the fungus, Candida albicans, with porphyrins XF73 (5,15-bis-[4-(3-Trimethylammonio-propyloxy)-phenyl]-porphyrin) or TMPyP (5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridinio)-porphyrin tetra(p-toluenesulfonate)), the O21 luminescence signals were excellent for TMPyP. In case of XF73, the signals showed strange rise and decay times. Thus, O21 generation of XF73 was investigated and compared with TMPyP. Absorption spectroscopy of XF73 showed a change in absorption cross section when there was a change in the concentration from 1×10-6 M to 1×10-3 M indicating an aggregation process. The addition of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) substantially changed O21 luminescence in XF73 solution. Detailed experiments provided evidence that the PBS constituents NaCl and KCl caused the change of O21 luminescence. The results also indicate that Cl- ions may cause aggregation of XF73 molecules, which in turn enhances self-quenching of O21 via photosensitizer molecules. These results show that some ions, e.g., those present in cells in vitro or added by PBS, can considerably affect the detection and the interpretation of time-resolved luminescence signals of O21, particularly in in vitro and in vivo. These effects should be considered for any other photosensitizer used in photodynamic processes.

  11. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  12. Analyzing Space-Based Interferometric Measurements of Stars and Network Measurements of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, L. G.

    1998-01-01

    Since the announcement of the discovery of sources of bursts of gamma-ray radiation in 1973, hundreds more reports of such bursts have now been published. Numerous artificial satellites have been equipped with gamma-ray detectors including the very successful Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE instrument. Unfortunately, we have made no progress in identifying the source(s) of this high energy radiation. We suspected that this was a consequence of the method used to define gamma-ray burst source "error boxes." An alternative procedure to compute gamma-ray burst source positions, with a purely physical underpinning, was proposed in 1988 by Taff. Since then we have also made significant progress in understanding the analytical nature of the triangulation problem and in computing actual gamma-ray burst positions and their corresponding error boxes. For the former, we can now mathematically illustrate the crucial role of the area occupied by the detectors, while for the latter, the Atteia et al. (1987) catalog has been completely re-reduced. There are very few discrepancies in locations between our results and those of the customary "time difference of arrival" procedure. Thus, we have numerically demonstrated that the end result, for the positions, of these two very different-looking procedures is the same. Finally, for the first time, we provide a sample of realistic "error boxes" whose non-simple shapes vividly portray the difficulty of burst source localization.

  13. Pattern Recognition of Signals for the Fault-Slip Type of Rock Burst in Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. S. Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fault-slip type of rock burst is a major threat to the safety of coal mining, and effectively recognizing its signals patterns is the foundation for the early warning and prevention. At first, a mechanical model of the fault-slip was established and the mechanism of the rock burst induced by the fault-slip was revealed. Then, the patterns of the electromagnetic radiation, acoustic emission (AE, and microseismic signals in the fault-slip type of rock burst were proposed, in that before the rock burst occurs, the electromagnetic radiation intensity near the sliding surface increases rapidly, the AE energy rises exponentially, and the energy released by microseismic events experiences at least one peak and is close to the next peak. At last, in situ investigations were performed at number 1412 coal face in the Huafeng Mine, China. Results showed that the signals patterns proposed are in good agreement with the process of the fault-slip type of rock burst. The pattern recognition can provide a basis for the early warning and the implementation of relief measures of the fault-slip type of rock burst.

  14. DIAGNOSING THE BURST INFLUENCE ON ACCRETION IN THE CLOCKED BURSTER GS 1826-238

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Long; Zhang, Shu; Chen, YuPeng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Chang, Zhi [Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China); Torres, Diego F. [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), E-08010 Barcelona (Spain); Kretschmar, Peter; Kuulkers, Erik [European Space Astronomy Centre (ESA/ESAC), Science Operations Department, Villanueva de la Cañada (Madrid) (Spain); Li, Jian [Institute of Space Sciences (CSIC–IEEC), Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans, s/n E-08193, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-06-10

    Type I X-ray bursts on the surface of a neutron star are a unique probe into accretion in X-ray binary systems. However, we know little about the feedback of the burst emission on accretion. Hard X-ray shortages and enhancements of the persistent emission at soft X-rays have been observed. To put these findings in context with the aim of understanding the possible mechanism underneath, we investigated 68 bursts seen by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from the clocked burster GS 1826-238. We diagnosed jointly the burst influence of both soft and hard X-rays, and we found that the observations can be described by the CompTT model with variable normalization, electron temperature, and optical depth. Putting these results in a scenario of coronal Compton cooling via the burst emission would lead to a shortage of cooling power, which may suggest that additional considerations, like the influence of the burst on corona formation, should be accounted for as well.

  15. Percutaneous vertebroplasty for treatment of thoracolumbar spine bursting fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jyi-Feng; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2004-12-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty can be very beneficial for patients with vertebral osteoporotic compression fractures. To the best of our knowledge, however, there has been no mention in any literature regarding the use of percutaneous vertebroplasty for the treatment of spinal burst fracture. A preliminary study was conducted on 6 patients with traumatic burst fractures of vertebrae treated with percutaneous vertebroplasty starting in June 2000. Fractures involving the anterior and middle columns of the vertebrae and the canal were mildly compressed by the retropulsed bone fragment. However, there was no obvious neurologic deficit in these patients. They initially underwent conservative treatment and thoracolumbar spinal orthosis (TLSO) brace for at least 3 months, but the intractable pain caused patients to be bedridden for prolonged periods of time and limited daily activity. As a result, the patients underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for treatment of spinal burst fractures. Six male patients (mean age: 38.2) who suffered from burst fractures of vertebrae with disabling back pain refractory to analgesic therapy and TLSO brace were treated in this study. The duration of conservation treatment period was 3.5 months to 8 months (mean: 5.2 months). There was no motility. However, 4 vertebrae (66.7%), on radiographs revealed evidence of PMMA leakage through the endplate fracture site into either the disc space or the paravertebral space, without any evident clinical symptoms. No intracanal leakage was seen, and no patient needed a secondary surgical intervention. Pain decreased from 84.3 +/- 5.4 mm at baseline to 34.7 +/- 4.4 mm at the third postoperative day, 30.2 +/- 5.8 at 3 months and 24 +/- 3.5 mm at 12 months. The reduction in pain from baseline to the 3-day and 3 month mark was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The mobility was at least 2 levels of improvement (mean improvement 2.7 points) at 12-months postoperative. In

  16. X-RAY EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES DURING AN ENERGETIC THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURST FROM IGR J17062-6143

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D. [Astronomical Institute ' ' Anton Pannekoek' ' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fabian, A. C., E-mail: degenaar@umich.edu [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-20

    Type-I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions occurring in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. These events are powerful probes of the physics of neutron stars and their surrounding accretion flow. We analyze a very energetic type-I X-ray burst from the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary IGR J17062-6143 that was detected with Swift on 2012 June 25. The light curve of the {approx_equal}18 minute long X-ray burst tail shows an episode of {approx_equal}10 minutes during which the intensity is strongly fluctuating by a factor of {approx_equal}3 above and below the underlying decay trend on a timescale of seconds. The X-ray spectrum reveals a highly significant emission line around {approx_equal}1 keV, which can be interpreted as an Fe-L shell line caused by the irradiation of cold gas. We also detect significant absorption lines and edges in the Fe-K band, which are strongly suggestive of the presence of hot, highly ionized gas along the line of sight. None of these features are present in the persistent X-ray spectrum of the source. The timescale of the strong intensity variations, the velocity width of the Fe-L emission line (assuming Keplerian motion), and photoionization modeling of the Fe-K absorption features each independently point to gas at a radius of {approx_equal} 10{sup 3} km as the source of these features. The unusual X-ray light curve and spectral properties could have plausibly been caused by a disruption of the accretion disk due to the super-Eddington fluxes reached during the X-ray burst.

  17. Fast radio burst event rate counts - I. Interpreting the observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquart, J.-P.; Ekers, R. D.

    2018-02-01

    The fluence distribution of the fast radio burst (FRB) population (the `source count' distribution, N (>F) ∝Fα), is a crucial diagnostic of its distance distribution, and hence the progenitor evolutionary history. We critically reanalyse current estimates of the FRB source count distribution. We demonstrate that the Lorimer burst (FRB 010724) is subject to discovery bias, and should be excluded from all statistical studies of the population. We re-examine the evidence for flat, α > -1, source count estimates based on the ratio of single-beam to multiple-beam detections with the Parkes multibeam receiver, and show that current data imply only a very weak constraint of α ≲ -1.3. A maximum-likelihood analysis applied to the portion of the Parkes FRB population detected above the observational completeness fluence of 2 Jy ms yields α = -2.6_{-1.3}^{+0.7 }. Uncertainties in the location of each FRB within the Parkes beam render estimates of the Parkes event rate uncertain in both normalizing survey area and the estimated post-beam-corrected completeness fluence; this uncertainty needs to be accounted for when comparing the event rate against event rates measured at other telescopes.

  18. Simmer analysis of prompt burst energetics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, J.T.

    1982-03-01

    The Prompt Burst Energetics experiments are designed to measure the pressure behavior of fuel and coolant as working fluids during a hypothetical prompt burst disassembly in an LMFBR. The work presented in this report consists of a parametric study of PBE-5S, a fresh oxide fuel experiment, using SIMMER-II. The various pressure sources in the experiment are examined, and the dominant source identified as incondensable contaminant gasses in the fuel. The important modeling uncertainties and limitations of SIMMER-II as applied to these experiments are discussed.

  19. Noise-induced bursting in Rulkov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryashko, L.; Slepukhina, E.; Nasyrova, V.

    2016-10-01

    A problem of mathematical modeling and analysis of the stochastic phenomena in neuronal activity is considered. As a basic example, we use the nonlinear Rulkov map-based neuron model with random disturbances. In deterministic case, this one-dimensional model demonstrates quiescence, tonic and chaotic spiking regimes. We show that due to presence of random disturbances, a new regime of noise-induced bursting is generated not only in bistability zones, but also in monostability zones. To estimate noise intensity corresponding to the onset of bursting, the stochastic sensitivity technique and confidence domains method are applied. An effciency of our approach is confirmed by the statistics of interspike intervals.

  20. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  1. Polyrhythmic synchronization in bursting networking motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilnikov, Andrey; Gordon, René; Belykh, Igor

    2008-09-01

    We study the emergence of polyrhythmic dynamics of motifs which are the building block for small inhibitory-excitatory networks, such as central pattern generators controlling various locomotive behaviors of animals. We discover that the pacemaker determining the specific rhythm of such a network composed of realistic Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons is identified through the order parameter, which is the ratio of the neurons' burst durations or of duty cycles. We analyze different configurations of the motifs and describe the universal mechanisms for synergetics of the bursting patterns. We discuss also the multistability of inhibitory networks that results in polyrhythmicity of its emergent synchronous behaviors. (c) 2008 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamborra, I.; Ando, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays,

  3. A 'kilonova' associated with the short-duration γ-ray burst GRB 130603B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanvir, N. R.; Levan, A. J.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Short-duration γ-ray bursts are intense flashes of cosmic γ-rays, lasting less than about two seconds, whose origin is unclear. The favoured hypothesis is that they are produced by a relativistic jet created by the merger of two compact stellar objects (specifically two neutron stars or a neutron...... detection of gravitational waves....

  4. Cosmology with Gamma-Ray Bursts Using k-correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kovács

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the case of Gamma Ray Bursts with measured redshift, we can calculate the k-correction to get the fluence and energy that were actually produced in the comoving system of the GRB. To achieve this we have to use well-fitted parameters of GRB spectrum, available in the GCN database. The output of the calculations is the comoving isotropic energy Eiso, but this is not the endpoint: this data can be useful forestimating the ΩM parameter of the Universe and for making a GRB Hubble diagram usig Amati’s relation.

  5. Portable radiation detection system for pulsed high energy photon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, Y.D.; Lawrence, R.S.; Yoon, W.Y. [Idaho National Engineering Lab, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Portable, battery-operated, radiation detection systems for measuring the intensity and energy characteristics of intense, pulsed photon sources (either high energy X-ray or gamma) have been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These field-deployable, suitcase-sized detection units are designed to measure and record the characteristics of a single radiation burst or multiple bursts from a pulsed ionizing radiation source. The recorded information can then be analyzed on a simple laptop computer at a location remote from the detection system and completely independent of the ongoing data acquisition process. Two detection unit designs are described. The first, called the MARK-1, has eight bismuth germanate (BGO) radiation detectors. Four of which are unshielded and have different thicknesses (diameters). The remaining four are the same size as the largest unshielded detector but have different thicknesses of lead shielding surrounding each detector. The second unit design, called the MARK-1 A, utilizes the same detection methodology as the MARK-1 but has ten BGO detectors instead of eight and utilizes a different method of amplifying detector signals enabling reduced overall size and weight of the detection unit. Both the detection system designs have sensitivity ranges from 3 x 10{sup {minus}9} cGy to 9 x 10{sup {minus}5} cGy per radiation burst. Experimental detection results will be presented and discussed along the systems` potential for commercial applications.

  6. The 3rd Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Six Years

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat, P. Narayana; Meegan, Charles A.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Burns, Eric; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William H.; Collazzi, Andrew C.; Connaughto, Valerie; Diekmann, Anne M.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa H.; Giles, Misty M.

    2016-01-01

    Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has triggered and located on average approximately two gamma-ray bursts (GRB) every three days. Here we present the third of a series of catalogs of GRBs detected by GBM, extending the second catalog by two more years, through the middle of July 2014. The resulting list includes 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of ...

  7. Design and Fabrication of Detector Module for UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, A.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, K. -B.

    2011-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) pathfinder is a space mission devoted to the measurement of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), especially their early light curves which will give crucial information on the progenitor stars and central engines of the GRBs. It consists of two instruments: the UFFO...... Burst Alert & Trigger telescope (UBAT) for the detection of GRB locations and the Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) for the UV/optical afterglow observations, upon triggering by UBAT. The UBAT employs a coded-mask {\\gamma}/X-ray camera with a wide field of view (FOV), and is comprised of three parts...

  8. LgrbWorldModel: Long-duration Gamma-Ray Burst World Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Nemiroff, Robert J.

    2017-12-01

    LgrbWorldModel is written in Fortran 90 and attempts to model the population distribution of the Long-duration class of Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) as detected by the NASA's now-defunct Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It is assumed that the population distribution of LGRBs is well fit by a multivariate log-normal distribution. The best-fit parameters of the distribution are then found by maximizing the likelihood of the observed data by BATSE detectors via a native built-in Adaptive Metropolis-Hastings Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (AMH-MCMC) Sampler.

  9. How can one detect the rotation of the Earth "around the Moon"? Part 2: Ultra-slow fall

    CERN Document Server

    Roehner, Bertrand M

    2011-01-01

    The paper proposes an alternative to the Foucault pendulum for detecting various movements of rotation of the Earth. Calculations suggest that if the duration of a "free" fall becomes longer the eastward deflection will be amplified in proportion with the increased duration. Instead of 20 micrometers for a one-meter fall, one can expect deflections more than 1,000 times larger when the fall lasts a few minutes. The method proposed in this paper consists in using the buoyancy of a (non viscous) liquid in order to work in reduced gravity. Not surprisingly, as in many astronomical observations, the main challenge is to minimize the level of "noise". Possible sources of noise are discussed and remedies are proposed. In principle, the experiment should be done in superfluid helium. However, a preliminary experiment done in water gave encouraging results in spite of a fairly high level of noise. In forthcoming experiments the main objective will be to identify and eliminate the main sources of noise. This experimen...

  10. Micelles entrapped Cresyl Violet can selectively detect copper and mercury ions in solution: A fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nirmal Kumar; Ghosh, Subhadip; Jaiswal, Sunidhi; Tewary, Anu; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2017-08-01

    The dynamic interaction of Cresyl Violet (CV) in different micellar systems has been demonstrated in single molecular level by FCS studies. The SDS micelle entrapped CV efficiently detected Cu2+ ions in solution with a limit of detection (LOD) of 70 nM, which is further substantiated with the gradual enhancement of the translational motion. The CV entrapped in the DTAB micelles could selectively detect Hg2+ ions in solution with a LOD of 35 nM. The micelle encapsulated CV was effective in detecting these metal ions in real water samples from different sources.

  11. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime. Moreover, a handful of long bursts have shown, before the extended decay phase, an initial spike similar to a normal short X-ray burst. Such twofold bursts might be a sort of link between short and super-bursts, where the premature ignition of a carbon layer could......Thermonuclear bursts on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries have been studied for many years and have in a few cases confirmed theoretical models of nuclear ignition and burning mechanisms. The large majority of X-ray bursts last less than 100s. A good number...... of the known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, in particular in the frame of the Key Programmes. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL instrumentation, an international collaboration led by the JEM-X team at the Danish National Space Institute has been monitoring the occurrence of uncommon burst...

  12. On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ai Hong

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of the γ-ray burst phenomena are presented. History of the γ-ray bursts, characteristics, and three radiation mechanisms of thermal bremsstrahlung, thermal synchrotron, and inverse Compton scattering processes are considered.

  13. Unusual Solar Decameter Radio Bursts with High Frequency Cut off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Melnik, V. M.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Panchenko, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar bursts with high frequency cut off were observed by the URAN-2 radio telescope (Poltava, Ukraine) on 18 August, 2012 in the frequency range 8-32 MHz. Durations of these bursts changed from 30 to 70 s. It is much longer than that for standard type III bursts. Drift rates are much smaller than those of type III bursts are, though much larger than those for decameter type II bursts. In some cases, the drift rate sign changes from the negative to positive one. Some of these bursts have fine structures. Stripes of the fine structures have small drift rates of 20-40 kHz/s. Polarizations of these bursts made about 10 % that apparently indicates that they are generated at the second harmonic of the local plasma frequency. The connection of bursts with the high frequency cut off with compact ejections from the behind-limb active regions is confirmed.

  14. Dogs can detect scat samples more efficiently than humans: an experiment in a continuous Atlantic Forest remnant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio L. de Oliveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Scat-detection dogs have been used to locate feces of rare and elusive species across tropical biomes. However their detection efficiency in relation to human observers has rarely been evaluated. In this study, we evaluated the ability of a scat detection dog to locate feces in comparison with human researchers. Human researchers and a scat detection dog surveyed for deer (Mazama spp. feces in dense ombrofilous Atlantic forest in the Paranapiacaba continuum, SP, Brazil. A controlled experiment was used to assess the maximum effective perpendicular distance from a transect search line that the dog could detect a Mazama spp fecal sample. Results from a linear regression model revealed that the maximum effective perpendicular distance from a transect search line that the dog could detect a scat was 7.2 m. The detection success from our surveys in the Atlantic forest was zero for humans and 0.15 samples/ha or 0.20 samples/km walked for the dog team. Our results demonstrated the importance of scat-detection dogs for non invasive sampling and provide data relevant for the design of future studies.

  15. An origin in the local Universe for some short gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanvir, N R; Chapman, R; Levan, A J; Priddey, R S

    2005-12-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) divide into two classes: 'long', which typically have initial durations of T90 > 2 s, and 'short', with durations of T90 origin of short bursts has remained mysterious until recently. A subsecond intense 'spike' of gamma-rays during a giant flare from the Galactic soft gamma-ray repeater, SGR 1806-20, reopened an old debate over whether some short GRBs could be similar events seen in galaxies out to approximately 70 Mpc (refs 6-10; redshift z approximately 0.016). Shortly after that, localizations of a few short GRBs (with optical afterglows detected in two cases) have shown an apparent association with a variety of host galaxies at moderate redshifts. Here we report a correlation between the locations of previously observed short bursts and the positions of galaxies in the local Universe, indicating that between 10 and 25 per cent of short GRBs originate at low redshifts (z < 0.025).

  16. THE SECOND KONUS- WIND CATALOG OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svinkin, D. S.; Frederiks, D. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Pal' shin, V. D.; Oleynik, Ph. P.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Cline, T. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    In this catalog, we present the results of a systematic study of 295 short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Konus- Wind (KW) from 1994 to 2010. From the temporal and spectral analyses of the sample, we provide the burst durations, the spectral lags, the results of spectral fits with three model functions, the total energy fluences, and the peak energy fluxes of the bursts. We discuss evidence found for an additional power-law spectral component and the presence of extended emission in a fraction of the KW short GRBs. Finally, we consider the results obtained in the context of the Type I (merger-origin)/Type II (collapsar-origin) classifications.

  17. Evidence of in-situ Type II radio bursts in interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Castillo, S. M.; Oliveros, J. C. Martínez; Calvo-Mozo, B.

    2017-10-01

    We present a database of 11 interplanetary shocks associated to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by STEREO and Wind missions between 2006 and 2011 that show evidence of Type II radio burst. For all events, we calculated the principal characteristics of the shock driver, the intensity and geometrical configuration of the in-situ shock and checked for the existence of in-situ type II radio burst. We made a comparative analysis of two CME events (on 18 August 2010 and 4 June 2011), which are apparently associated to two or more magnetic structures which interact in space (i.e. CMEs, SIRs, CIRs). These events show varied shock configurations and intensities. We found evidence of in-situ type II radio bursts in one of the events studied, suggesting that the geometry of the shock (quasi-perpendicularity) is also critical for the generation and/or detection of radio emission in-situ.

  18. The Fermi-GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs: The First Six Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bissaldi E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM has triggered and located on average approximately two gamma-ray bursts (GRBs every three days. Here we present the main results from the latest two catalogs provided by the Fermi-GBM science team, namely the third GBM GRB catalog [1] and the first GBM time-resolved spectral catalog [2]. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected bursts. It comprises 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. For each one, location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, the peak flux and the fluence are derived. The GBM time-resolved spectral catalog presents high-quality time-resolved spectral analysis with high temporal and spectral resolution of the brightest bursts observed by Fermi GBM in a shorter period than the former catalog, namely four years. It comprises 1491 spectra from 81 bursts. Distributions of parameters, statistics of the parameter populations, parameter-parameter and parameter-uncertainty correlations, and their exact values are obtained.

  19. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given ...

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.

    2003-01-01

    The unrivalled, extreme luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) make them the favored beacons for sampling the high redshift Universe. To employ GRBs to study the cosmic terrain -- e.g., star and galaxy formation history -- GRB luminosities must be calibrated, and the luminosity function versus redshift must be measured or inferred. Several nascent relationships between gamma-ray temporal or spectral indicators and luminosity or total energy have been reported. These measures promise to further our understanding of GRBs once the connections between the luminosity indicators and GRB jets and emission mechanisms are better elucidated. The current distribution of 33 redshifts determined from host galaxies and afterglows peaks near z $\\sim$ 1, whereas for the full BATSE sample of long bursts, the lag-luminosity relation predicts a broad peak z $\\sim$ 1--4 with a tail to z $\\sim$ 20, in rough agreement with theoretical models based on star formation considerations. For some GRB subclasses and apparently related phenomena -- short bursts, long-lag bursts, and X-ray flashes -- the present information on their redshift distributions is sparse or entirely lacking, and progress is expected in Swift era when prompt alerts become numerous.

  1. Hyperspectral microscopy can detect metabolic heterogeneity within bovine post-compaction embryos incubated under two oxygen concentrations (7% versus 20%).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Gosnell, Martin; Anwer, Ayad G; White, Melissa; Purdey, Malcolm; Abell, Andrew D; Goldys, Ewa M; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2017-10-01

    Can we separate embryos cultured under either 7% or 20% oxygen atmospheres by measuring their metabolic heterogeneity? Metabolic heterogeneity and changes in metabolic profiles in morula exposed to two different oxygen concentrations were not detectable using traditional fluorophore and two-channel autofluorescence but were detectable using hyperspectral microscopy. Increased genetic and morphological blastomere heterogeneity is associated with compromised developmental competence of embryos and currently forms the basis for embryo scoring within the clinic. However, there remains uncertainty over the accuracy of current techniques, such as PGS and time-lapse microscopy, to predict subsequent pregnancy establishment. The impact of two oxygen concentrations (7% = optimal and 20% = stressed) during post-fertilisation embryo culture was assessed. Cattle embryos were exposed to the different oxygen concentrations for 8 days (D8; embryo developmental competence) or 5 days (D5; metabolism measurements). Between 3 and 4 experimental replicates were performed, with 40-50 embryos per replicate used for the developmental competency experiment, 10-20 embryos per replicate for the fluorophore and two-channel autofluorescence experiments and a total of 21-22 embryos used for the hyperspectral microscopy study. In-vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos were utilised for this study. Post-fertilisation, embryos were exposed to 7% or 20% oxygen. To determine impact of oxygen concentrations on embryo viability, blastocyst development was assessed on D8. On D5, metabolic heterogeneity was assessed in morula (on-time) embryos using fluorophores probes (active mitochondria, hydrogen peroxide and reduced glutathione), two-channel autofluorescence (FAD and NAD(P)H) and 18-channel hyperspectral microscopy. Exposure to 20% oxygen following fertilisation significantly reduced total blastocyst, expanded and hatched blastocyst rates by 1.4-, 1.9- and 2.8-fold, respectively, compared to 7% oxygen

  2. Gamma-ray bursts and their use as cosmic probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schady, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    Since the launch of the highly successful and ongoing Swift mission, the field of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has undergone a revolution. The arcsecond GRB localizations available within just a few minutes of the GRB alert has signified the continual sampling of the GRB evolution through the prompt to afterglow phases revealing unexpected flaring and plateau phases, the first detection of a kilonova coincident with a short GRB, and the identification of samples of low-luminosity, ultra-long and highly dust-extinguished GRBs. The increased numbers of GRB afterglows, GRB-supernova detections, redshifts and host galaxy associations has greatly improved our understanding of what produces and powers these immense, cosmological explosions. Nevertheless, more high-quality data often also reveal greater complexity. In this review, I summarize some of the milestones made in GRB research during the Swift era, and how previous widely accepted theoretical models have had to adapt to accommodate the new wealth of observational data.

  3. Gamma-ray bursts and their use as cosmic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schady, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    Since the launch of the highly successful and ongoing Swift mission, the field of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has undergone a revolution. The arcsecond GRB localizations available within just a few minutes of the GRB alert has signified the continual sampling of the GRB evolution through the prompt to afterglow phases revealing unexpected flaring and plateau phases, the first detection of a kilonova coincident with a short GRB, and the identification of samples of low-luminosity, ultra-long and highly dust-extinguished GRBs. The increased numbers of GRB afterglows, GRB-supernova detections, redshifts and host galaxy associations has greatly improved our understanding of what produces and powers these immense, cosmological explosions. Nevertheless, more high-quality data often also reveal greater complexity. In this review, I summarize some of the milestones made in GRB research during the Swift era, and how previous widely accepted theoretical models have had to adapt to accommodate the new wealth of observational data.

  4. VLBA Locates Origin of Superenergetic Bursts Near Giant Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    important clues for understanding how such highly energetic emissions are produced in the jets of active galaxies," said Matthias Beilicke, of Washington University in St. Louis, MO. The gamma-ray flares from the galaxy were monitored by systems of large telescopes designed to detect faint flashes of blue light that result when gamma rays enter the Earth's atmosphere. Data from sensitive cameras in these systems can allow astronomers to infer the energy of the gamma rays and the direction from which they came. Their directional information, however, is not precise enough to narrow down the gamma-ray-emitting region within the galaxy. The VLBA offered a millionfold improvement in resolving power, allowing the scientists to determine that the gamma rays are coming from the immediate vicinity of the black hole. Though gamma rays are the most energetic form of electromagnetic radiation and radio waves the least energetic, both often arise from the same regions. This was shown clearly when M87's most energetic gamma-ray flares were accompanied by the largest flare of radio waves seen from that galaxy by the VLBA. The radio flare began at about the time of the gamma-ray flares, but continued to increase in brightness for at least two months. "This tells us that energetic material burst out very close to the black hole, causing the gamma rays to be emitted and the radio flare to begin. As that material traveled down the jet, expanding and losing energy, the gamma-ray emission ceased, but the radio continued to increase in brightness," Walker explained. "The VLBA showed us with great precision where the radio emission came from, so we know the gamma rays came from closer in toward the black hole," he added. The VLBA Very Long Baseline Array CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF M87 is the largest galaxy in the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, at the center of a supercluster of galaxies that includes the Local Group, of which our own Milky Way is a member. The black hole in M87 has an "event horizon

  5. Flux decay during thermonuclear X-ray bursts analysed with the dynamic power-law index method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuttila, J.; Kajava, J. J. E.; Nättilä, J.; Motta, S. E.; Sánchez-Fernández, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Cumming, A.; Poutanen, J.

    2017-08-01

    The cooling of type-I X-ray bursts can be used to probe the nuclear burning conditions in neutron star envelopes. The flux decay of the bursts has been traditionally modelled with an exponential, even if theoretical considerations predict power-law-like decays. We have analysed a total of 540 type-I X-ray bursts from five low-mass X-ray binaries observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We grouped the bursts according to the source spectral state during which they were observed (hard or soft), flagging those bursts that showed signs of photospheric radius expansion (PRE). The decay phase of all the bursts were then fitted with a dynamic power-law index method. This method provides a new way of probing the chemical composition of the accreted material. Our results show that in the hydrogen-rich sources the power-law decay index is variable during the burst tails and that simple cooling models qualitatively describe the cooling of presumably helium-rich sources 4U 1728-34 and 3A 1820-303. The cooling in the hydrogen-rich sources 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-536, and GS 1826-24, instead, is clearly different and depends on the spectral states and whether PRE occurred or not. Especially the hard state bursts behave differently than the models predict, exhibiting a peculiar rise in the cooling index at low burst fluxes, which suggests that the cooling in the tail is much faster than expected. Our results indicate that the drivers of the bursting behaviour are not only the accretion rate and chemical composition of the accreted material, but also the cooling that is somehow linked to the spectral states. The latter suggests that the properties of the burning layers deep in the neutron star envelope might be impacted differently depending on the spectral state.

  6. Empirical mode decomposition: a new tool for S-wave detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Oonincx

    2002-01-01

    textabstractSeismic signals consist of several typically short energy bursts, waves, exhibiting several patterns in terms of dominant frequency, amplitude and polarisation. Amongst others, a significant wave is the S-wave. To detect such S-waves one can use conventional techniques that are based on

  7. HOST GALAXIES AS GAMMA-RAY BURST DISTANCE INDICATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. BAND; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the distributions of the total burst energy, the peak luminosity and the X-ray afterglow energy using burst observations and distances to the associated host galaxies. To expand the sample, we include redshift estimates for host galaxies without spectroscopic redshifts. The methodology requires a model of the host galaxy population; we find that in the best model the burst rate is proportional to the host galaxy luminosity at the time of the burst.

  8. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  9. Testing the Isotropic Universe Using the Gamma-Ray Burst Data of Fermi/GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řípa, Jakub; Shafieloo, Arman

    2017-12-01

    The sky distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has been intensively studied by various groups for more than two decades. Most of these studies test the isotropy of GRBs based on their sky number density distribution. In this work, we propose an approach to test the isotropy of the universe through inspecting the isotropy of the properties of GRBs such as their duration, fluences, and peak fluxes at various energy bands and different timescales. We apply this method on the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data sample containing 1591 GRBs. The most noticeable feature we found is near the Galactic coordinates l≈ 30^\\circ , b≈ 15^\\circ , and radius r≈ 20^\\circ {--}40^\\circ . The inferred probability for the occurrence of such an anisotropic signal (in a random isotropic sample) is derived to be less than a percent in some of the tests while the other tests give results consistent with isotropy. These are based on the comparison of the results from the real data with the randomly shuffled data samples. Considering the large number of statistics we used in this work (some of which are correlated with each other), we can anticipate that the detected feature could be a result of statistical fluctuations. Moreover, we noticed a considerably low number of GRBs in this particular patch, which might be due to some instrumentation or observational effects that can consequently affect our statistics through some systematics. Further investigation is highly desirable in order to clarify this result, e.g., utilizing a larger future Fermi/GBM data sample as well as data samples of other GRB missions and also looking for possible systematics.

  10. Predictive features of persistent activity emergence in regular spiking and intrinsic bursting model neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriaki Sidiropoulou

    Full Text Available Proper functioning of working memory involves the expression of stimulus-selective persistent activity in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC, which refers to neural activity that persists for seconds beyond the end of the stimulus. The mechanisms which PFC pyramidal neurons use to discriminate between preferred vs. neutral inputs at the cellular level are largely unknown. Moreover, the presence of pyramidal cell subtypes with different firing patterns, such as regular spiking and intrinsic bursting, raises the question as to what their distinct role might be in persistent firing in the PFC. Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS and an intrinsic bursting (IB model neuron. We identify synaptic location within the basal dendrites as a feature of stimulus selectivity. Specifically, persistent activity-inducing stimuli consist of activated synapses that are located more distally from the soma compared to non-inducing stimuli, in both model cells. In addition, the action potential (AP latency and the first few inter-spike-intervals of the neuronal response can be used to reliably detect inducing vs. non-inducing inputs, suggesting a potential mechanism by which downstream neurons can rapidly decode the upcoming emergence of persistent activity. While the two model neurons did not differ in the coding features of persistent activity emergence, the properties of persistent activity, such as the firing pattern and the duration of temporally-restricted persistent activity were distinct. Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given

  11. Climbing fiber burst size and olivary sub-threshold oscillations in a network setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jornt R De Gruijl

    Full Text Available The inferior olivary nucleus provides one of the two main inputs to the cerebellum: the so-called climbing fibers. Activation of climbing fibers is generally believed to be related to timing of motor commands and/or motor learning. Climbing fiber spikes lead to large all-or-none action potentials in cerebellar Purkinje cells, overriding any other ongoing activity and silencing these cells for a brief period of time afterwards. Empirical evidence shows that the climbing fiber can transmit a short burst of spikes as a result of an olivary cell somatic spike, potentially increasing the information being transferred to the cerebellum per climbing fiber activation. Previously reported results from in vitro studies suggested that the information encoded in the climbing fiber burst is related to the occurrence of the spike relative to the ongoing sub-threshold membrane potential oscillation of the olivary cell, i.e. that the phase of the oscillation is reflected in the size of the climbing fiber burst. We used a detailed three-compartmental model of an inferior olivary cell to further investigate the possible factors determining the size of the climbing fiber burst. Our findings suggest that the phase-dependency of the burst size is present but limited and that charge flow between soma and dendrite is a major determinant of the climbing fiber burst. From our findings it follows that phenomena such as cell ensemble synchrony can have a big effect on the climbing fiber burst size through dendrodendritic gap-junctional coupling between olivary cells.

  12. A search for Gamma Ray Burst Neutrinos in AMANDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvoort, M. R.

    2009-11-01

    To date, no neutrinos with energies in or above the GeV range have been identified from astrophysical objects. The aim of the two analyses described in this dissertation is to observe high-energy muon neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). GRBs are distant sources, which were discovered by satellites recording their flashes of high-energy electromagnetic radiation. In some cases, the gamma-ray flashes are followed by lower energy radiation. GRBs are observed to have a well localized position and a short duration. This allows us to reduce the background in searching the data of the AMANDA/IceCube detector for a possible signal. As no detection of those highly energetic neutrinos has succeeded so far, we aim to analyze our data in a rather unbiased way and limit the dependence on theoretical modelling of the GRB engine. To this end we filter the data using parameters which depend only weakly on the neutrino energy spectrum (unlike a previous analysis in Achterberg et al. (2007)). Besides this, we allow for a possible time di erence between the arrival time of the prompt photon emission and the neutrino signal: our analyses are sensitive to signals arriving within one hour of the satellite trigger time (whereas previous analyses followed an approach which is only sensitive for signals within ten minutes centered around the arrival of the prompt -s (Achterberg et al. 2008)). The two separate analyses presented here di er in one important aspect: in the analysis of the specific burst GRB080319B we analyze the data of one single GRB event for the presence of neutrinos from this GRB. The central assumption is that this ”brightest GRB observed to date” might produce a high-energy neutrino flux which is significantly higher than the average GRB neutrino flux. (This approach was also followed in the analysis of the data of GRB030329 (Stamatikos & et al. 2005).) The second analysis we present is based on stacking the data of multiple GRBs (with average properties) to

  13. IGR J17254-3257, a new bursting neutron star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. The study of the observational properties of uncommonly long bursts from low luminosity sources is important when investigating the transition from a hydrogen - rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning as predicted by current burst theories. On ...

  14. Measurement of the Shape of the Optical-IR Spectrum of Prompt Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossan, Bruce; Kistaubayev, M.; Smoot, G.; Scherr, L.

    2017-06-01

    While the afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has been extensively measured, detections of prompt emission (i.e. during bright X-gamma emission) are more limited. Some prompt optical measurements are regularly made, but these are typically in a single wide band, with limited time resolution, and no measurement of spectral shape. Some models predict a synchrotron self-absorption spectral break somewhere in the IR-optical region. Measurement of the absorption frequency would give extensive information on each burst, including the electron Lorentz factor, the radius of emission, and more (Shen & Zhang 2008). Thus far the best prompt observations have been explained invoking a variety of models, but often with a non-unique interpretation. To understand this apparently heterogeneous behavior, and to reduce the number of possible models, it is critical to add data on the optical - IR spectral shape.Long GRB prompt X-gamma emission typically lasts ~40-80 s. The Swift BAT instrument rapidly measures GRB positions to within a few arc minutes and communicates them via the internet within a few seconds. We have measured the time for a fast-moving D=700 mm telescope to point and settle to be less than 9 s anywhere on the observable sky. Therefore, the majority of prompt optical-IR emission can be measured responding to BAT positions with this telescope. In this presentation, we describe our observing and science programs, and give our design for the Burst Simultaneous Three-channel Instrument (BSTI), which uses dichroics to send eparate bands to 3 cameras. Two EMCCD cameras, give high-time resolution in B and V; a third camera with a HgCdTe sensor covers H band, allowing us to study extinguished bursts. For a total exposure time of 10 s, we find a 5 sigma sensitivity of 21.3 and 20.3 mag in B and R for 1" seeing and Kitt Peak sky brightness, much fainter than typical previous prompt detections. We estimate 5 sigma H-band sensitivity for an IR optimized telescope to be

  15. Unveiling the origin of fast radio bursts by optical follow-up observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niino, Yuu; Totani, Tomonori; Okumura, Jun E.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss how we can detect and identify counterparts of fast radio bursts (FRBs) in future optical follow-up observations of FRBs if real-time alerts for FRBs become available. We consider kilonovae as candidates for FRB optical counterparts, as expected in the case that FRBs originate from mergers of double neutron star binaries. Although theoretical predictions on luminosities of kilonovae are still highly uncertain, recent models suggest that kilonovae can be detected at redshifts up to z ˜ 0.3 within the range of the uncertainties. We expect ˜ 1-5 unrelated supernovae (SNe) down to a similar variability magnitude in a five-day interval within the typical error radius of an FRB. We show, however, that a kilonova can be distinguished from these SNe by its rapid decay and/or color evolution, making it possible to verify the existence of a kilonova associated with an FRB. We also discuss the case that SNe Ia are FRB optical counterparts, as might be the case if FRBs originate from double white dwarf binaries. Verification of this scenario is also possible, since the chance probability of finding a SNe Ia having a consistent explosion time with that of an FRB within the FRB error region is small (typically ≲ 0.01).

  16. Phase-dependent stimulation effects on bursting activity in a neural network cortical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William S; Kudela, Pawel; Weinberg, Seth; Bergey, Gregory K; Franaszczuk, Piotr J

    2009-03-01

    A neural network simulation with realistic cortical architecture has been used to study synchronized bursting as a seizure representation. This model has the property that bursting epochs arise and cease spontaneously, and bursting epochs can be induced by external stimulation. We have used this simulation to study the time-frequency properties of the evolving bursting activity, as well as effects due to network stimulation. The model represents a cortical region of 1.6 mm x 1.6mm, and includes seven neuron classes organized by cortical layer, inhibitory or excitatory properties, and electrophysiological characteristics. There are a total of 65,536 modeled single compartment neurons that operate according to a version of Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics. The intercellular wiring is based on histological studies and our previous modeling efforts. The bursting phase is characterized by a flat frequency spectrum. Stimulation pulses are applied to this modeled network, with an electric field provided by a 1mm radius circular electrode represented mathematically in the simulation. A phase dependence to the post-stimulation quiescence is demonstrated, wit