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Sample records for bursitis

  1. Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be ordered include: Removing fluid from the bursa Culture of the fluid Ultrasound MRI Treatment Your provider ... JJ. Bursitis, tendinitis, and other periarticular disorders of sports medicine. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  2. Trochanteric bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the hip; Hip bursitis References Fredericson M, Lin C, Chew K. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome. In: ... Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  3. Olecranon bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Danielle; Kamineni, Srinath

    2016-01-01

    Bursitis is a common medical condition, and of all the bursae in the body, the olecranon bursa is one of the most frequently affected. Bursitis at this location can be acute or chronic in timing and septic or aseptic. Distinguishing between septic and aseptic bursitis can be difficult, and the current literature is not clear on the optimum length or route of antibiotic treatment for septic cases. The current literature was reviewed to clarify these points. The reported data for olecranon bursitis were compiled from the current literature. The most common physical examination findings were tenderness (88% septic, 36% aseptic), erythema/cellulitis (83% septic, 27% aseptic), warmth (84% septic, 56% aseptic), report of trauma or evidence of a skin lesion (50% septic, 25% aseptic), and fever (38% septic, 0% aseptic). General laboratory data ranges were also summarized. Distinguishing between septic and aseptic olecranon bursitis can be difficult because the physical and laboratory data overlap. Evidence for the optimum length and route of antibiotic treatment for septic cases also differs. In this review we have presented the current data of offending bacteria, frequency of key physical examination findings, ranges of reported laboratory data, and treatment practices so that clinicians might have a better guide for treatment. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Bursitis iliopectinea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudela, K; Koudelová, J; Koudela, K; Kunesová, M

    2008-10-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY To present clinical and radiographic findings of iliopectineal bursitis and draw attention to some related etiopathogenetic factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS Six patients followed up between 2005 and 2007 were evaluated. They included four women and two men (average age, 58 years; range, 35 to 80 years) who presented with a tender mass in the hip region (four right and two left sides). Each patient underwent an examination involving a clinical check-up, imaging methods (CT, MR, angio-CT) and standard laboratory tests. RESULTS Iliopectineal bursitis clinically manifested as a tender mass in the groin and hip region in five patients; in one it was pulsating. The sixth case was asymptomatic. In three patients iliopectineal bursitis was found in association with steroid therapy and subsequent avascular necrosis of the femoral head and chronic synovitis. It followed tularemia with hip joint involvement in one patient, salmonella arthritis in one, and kidney transplant rejection in one. Also, iliopectineal bursitis was diagnosed in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis treated with steroids, but without femoral head avascular necrosis, and was incidentally found in another patient examined for digestive problems. Of the six cases of swollen bursa detected by the imaging methods used, five were found to communicate with the hip joint cavity, with four being so large that the bursa extended into the retroperitoneum. Two patients underwent excision or resection of the bursa; in addition, one of them had revitalizing graft surgery for femoral head necrosis. The patient with salmonella arthritis had to undergo a Girdlestone procedure. One patient was treated by draining of the bursa and, after inflammation resolved, total hip replacement surgery was carried out during which the iliopectineal bursa was removed. The patient with rheumatoid arthritis was treated by bursa draining and refused further surgical therapy (total hip replacement). DISCUSSION In our group

  5. Ischiogluteal bursitis: an uncommon type of bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Mieghem, Isabelle M.; Boets, An; Sciot, Raf; Van Breuseghem, Iwan [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Catholic University Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2004-07-01

    Ischiogluteal bursitis is a rare, infrequently recognized soft tissue mass of the buttock region. Of importance is the radiological differential diagnosis with other benign and malignant soft-tissue tumors. We describe the imaging findings of bursitis. (orig.)

  6. Ischiogluteal bursitis: an uncommon type of bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Mieghem, Isabelle M.; Boets, An; Sciot, Raf; Van Breuseghem, Iwan

    2004-01-01

    Ischiogluteal bursitis is a rare, infrequently recognized soft tissue mass of the buttock region. Of importance is the radiological differential diagnosis with other benign and malignant soft-tissue tumors. We describe the imaging findings of bursitis. (orig.)

  7. Bursitis of the Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficile (C. diff.) InfectionHerpes Home Diseases and Conditions Bursitis of the Hip Condition Bursitis of the Hip Share Print Table of Contents1. ... Prevention5. Treatment6. Everyday Life7. Questions8. Resources What is bursitis of the hip? Bursitis is the painful swelling ...

  8. Retrocalcaneal bursitis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis is an inflammation of the bursa at the back of the heel bone. A bursa is a ... bursa to become irritated and inflamed. Symptoms of bursitis include pain in the heel, especially with walking, ...

  9. Common Superficial Bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaee, Morteza

    2017-02-15

    Superficial bursitis most often occurs in the olecranon and prepatellar bursae. Less common locations are the superficial infrapatellar and subcutaneous (superficial) calcaneal bursae. Chronic microtrauma (e.g., kneeling on the prepatellar bursa) is the most common cause of superficial bursitis. Other causes include acute trauma/hemorrhage, inflammatory disorders such as gout or rheumatoid arthritis, and infection (septic bursitis). Diagnosis is usually based on clinical presentation, with a particular focus on signs of septic bursitis. Ultrasonography can help distinguish bursitis from cellulitis. Blood testing (white blood cell count, inflammatory markers) and magnetic resonance imaging can help distinguish infectious from noninfectious causes. If infection is suspected, bursal aspiration should be performed and fluid examined using Gram stain, crystal analysis, glucose measurement, blood cell count, and culture. Management depends on the type of bursitis. Acute traumatic/hemorrhagic bursitis is treated conservatively with ice, elevation, rest, and analgesics; aspiration may shorten the duration of symptoms. Chronic microtraumatic bursitis should be treated conservatively, and the underlying cause addressed. Bursal aspiration of microtraumatic bursitis is generally not recommended because of the risk of iatrogenic septic bursitis. Although intrabursal corticosteroid injections are sometimes used to treat microtraumatic bursitis, high-quality evidence demonstrating any benefit is unavailable. Chronic inflammatory bursitis (e.g., gout, rheumatoid arthritis) is treated by addressing the underlying condition, and intrabursal corticosteroid injections are often used. For septic bursitis, antibiotics effective against Staphylococcus aureus are generally the initial treatment, with surgery reserved for bursitis not responsive to antibiotics or for recurrent cases. Outpatient antibiotics may be considered in those who are not acutely ill; patients who are acutely ill

  10. Hemorrhagic prepatellar bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donahue, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Turkel, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Mnaymneh, W. [Dept. of Orthopedics, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Ghandur-Mnaymneh, L. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Simple prepatellar bursitis is easily diagnosed both clinically and by MRI. MRI shows the typical T1 and T2 lengthening of fluid within the bursa. However, because of complex MRI appearance of hemorrhage, chronic hemorrhagic bursitis and the size of the prepatellar mass the clinical and MRI appearance can be very different. (orig.)

  11. Trochanteric bursitis: radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revilla, T.Y.; Manjon, P.; Lozaono, C.

    1997-01-01

    To describe the radiological findings associated with trochanteric bursitis. Six patients studied by means of plain radiography (n=6), CT(n=4) and MR(n=2). The conventional radiography study was normal in two patients and disclosed bone abnormalities in four. US showed a hypoechoic or anechoic collection in all the patients. Two patients presented areas suggestive of calcification, and septa were observed in one. CT disclosed the presence of well defined, low-attenuation, unenhanced collections. MR images identified collections with a signal intensity similar to that of water. Trochanteric bursitis is a relatively common cause of hip pain, and can involve any one of a number of etiologies. US is a good imaging technique for diagnosing this pathology. (Author) 10 refs

  12. Traumatic olecranon bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, M.; Canoso, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    The affected elbow of 28 patients with traumatic olecranon bursitis was radiographically compared with the homologous elbow of 28 matched controls. Olecranon spurs, amorphous calcium deposits, or both, were present in 16 patients and 4 controls (p<0.01). Air was injected in the bursa in 12 additional patients. Nodules in the bursal floor were noted in 10, and the bursa was partially septated in 8. Olecranon spurs, present in 6 patients, corresponded to the insertion of the triceps tendon. With elbow flexion the bursa flattened and lengthened while the olecranon process glided distally beneath the bursal floor. (Auth.)

  13. Endoscopic treatment of prepatellar bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chih; Yeh, Wen-Lin

    2011-03-01

    Operative treatment of prepatellar bursitis is indicated in intractable bursitis. The most common complication of surgical treatment for prepatellar bursitis is skin problems. For traumatic prepatellar bursitis, we propose a protocol of outpatient endoscopic surgery under local anaesthesia. From September 1996 to February 2001, 60 cases of failed nonoperative treatment for prepatellar bursitis were included. The average age was 33.5 ± 11.1 years (range 21-55). The average operation duration was 18 minutes. Two to three mini-arthroscopic portals were used in our series. No sutures or a simple suture was needed for the portals after operation. After follow-up for an average of 36.3 months, all patients are were symptom-free and had regained knee function. None of the population had local tenderness or hypo-aesthesia around their wound. Their radiographic and sonographic examinations showed no recurrence of bursitis. Outpatient arthroscopic bursectomy under local anaesthesia is an effective procedure for the treatment of post-traumatic prepatellar bursitis after failed conservative treatments. Both the cosmetic results and functional results were satisfactory.

  14. Pisiform bursitis: a forgotten pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Ferdinando; Gregoli, Bettina; Bortolotto, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Pisiform bursitis is a disease often forgotten in both everyday practice and medical literature. The pisiform bursa is not constant; when present, it is located between the tendon of the flexor carpi ulnaris and pisiform bone. Bursitis causes pain in the medial side of the wrist and enters into the differential diagnosis of various diseases of this anatomic region, in particular, with enthesitis of the flexor carpi ulnaris and the ganglion of piso-pyramidal compartment. We present the sonographic appearance of pisiform bursitis in a symptomatic patient. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Septic bursitis in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschmann, R A; Bell, C L

    1987-10-01

    A retrospective analysis of 29 patients with septic bursitis was undertaken to ascertain if immunocompromised patients differed in their clinical presentations, type of organisms cultured, and outcome when compared with their non-immunocompromised cohorts. Thirty episodes of septic bursitis occurred in 29 patients, 43 percent of which occurred in immunocompromised patients. Despite similar clinical presentations, the bursae of immunocompromised patients took three times longer to sterilize and had a much higher bursal white blood cell count when compared with the bursae of non-immunocompromised patients. The bacteriologic spectrum was essentially identical in both groups; there were no cases in which gram-negative organisms were recovered from infected bursae. No cases of septic bursitis were seen in neutropenic patients. The most common factors contributing to an immunocompromised state were alcoholism or steroid therapy. A successful resolution of septic bursitis was seen in all the patients in the immunocompromised groups.

  16. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.

  17. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography. Images PMID:1444631

  18. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of septic bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Sarah B; Fowler, Mary Louise; Zhu, Clara; Moore, Andrew; Shmerling, Robert H; Paz, Ziv

    2017-12-01

    Limited data guide practice in evaluation and treatment of septic bursitis. We aimed to characterize clinical characteristics, microbiology, and outcomes of patients with septic bursitis stratified by bursal involvement, presence of trauma, and management type. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients admitted to a single center from 1998 to 2015 with culture-proven olecranon and patellar septic bursitis. Baseline characteristics, clinical features, microbial profiles, operative interventions, hospitalization lengths, and 60-day readmission rates were determined. Patients were stratified by bursitis site, presence or absence of trauma, and operative or non-operative management. Of 44 cases of septic bursitis, patients with olecranon and patellar bursitis were similar with respect to age, male predominance, and frequency of bursal trauma; patients managed operatively were younger (p = 0.05). Clinical features at presentation and comorbidities were similar despite bursitis site, history of trauma, or management. The most common organism isolated from bursal fluid was Staphylococcus aureus. Patients managed operatively were discharged to rehabilitation less frequently (p = 0.04). This study of septic bursitis is among the largest reported. We were unable to identify presenting clinical features that differentiated patients treated surgically from those treated conservatively. There was no clear relationship between preceding trauma or bursitis site and clinical course, management, or outcomes. Patients with bursitis treated surgically were younger. Additional study is needed to identify patients who would benefit from early surgical intervention for septic bursitis.

  19. Imaging features of iliopsoas bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderbaldinger, P. [Department of Radiology, University of Vienna (Austria); Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States); Bremer, C. [Department of Radiology, University of Muenster (Germany); Schellenberger, E. [Center of Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany); Cejna, M.; Turetschek, K.; Kainberger, F. [Department of Radiology, University of Vienna (Austria)

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was firstly to describe the spectrum of imaging findings seen in iliopsoas bursitis, and secondly to compare cross-sectional imaging techniques in the demonstration of the extent, size and appearance of the iliopsoas bursitis as referenced by surgery. Imaging studies of 18 patients (13 women, 5 men; mean age 53 years) with surgically proven iliopsoas bursitis were reviewed. All patients received conventional radiographs of the pelvis and hip, US and MR imaging of the hip. The CT was performed in 5 of the 18 patients. Ultrasound, CT and MR all demonstrated enlarged iliopsoas bursae. The bursal wall was thin and well defined in 83% and thickened in 17% of all cases. The two cases with septations on US were not seen by CT and MRI. A communication between the bursa and the hip joint was seen, and surgically verified, in all 18 patients by MR imaging, whereas US and CT failed to demonstrate it in 44 and 40% of the cases, respectively. Hip joint effusion was seen and verified by surgery in 16 patients by MRI, whereas CT (4 of 5) and US (n=12) underestimated the number. The overall size of the bursa corresponded best between MRI and surgery, whereas CT and US tended to underestimate the size. Contrast enhancement of the bursal wall was seen in all cases. The imaging characteristics of iliopsoas bursitis are a well-defined, thin-walled cystic mass with a communication to the hip joint and peripheral contrast enhancement. The most accurate way to assess iliopsoas bursitis is with MR imaging; thus, it should be used for accurate therapy planning and follow-up studies. In order to initially prove an iliopsoas bursitis, US is the most cost-effective, easy-to-perform and fast alternative. (orig.)

  20. Imaging features of iliopsoas bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderbaldinger, P.; Bremer, C.; Schellenberger, E.; Cejna, M.; Turetschek, K.; Kainberger, F.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was firstly to describe the spectrum of imaging findings seen in iliopsoas bursitis, and secondly to compare cross-sectional imaging techniques in the demonstration of the extent, size and appearance of the iliopsoas bursitis as referenced by surgery. Imaging studies of 18 patients (13 women, 5 men; mean age 53 years) with surgically proven iliopsoas bursitis were reviewed. All patients received conventional radiographs of the pelvis and hip, US and MR imaging of the hip. The CT was performed in 5 of the 18 patients. Ultrasound, CT and MR all demonstrated enlarged iliopsoas bursae. The bursal wall was thin and well defined in 83% and thickened in 17% of all cases. The two cases with septations on US were not seen by CT and MRI. A communication between the bursa and the hip joint was seen, and surgically verified, in all 18 patients by MR imaging, whereas US and CT failed to demonstrate it in 44 and 40% of the cases, respectively. Hip joint effusion was seen and verified by surgery in 16 patients by MRI, whereas CT (4 of 5) and US (n=12) underestimated the number. The overall size of the bursa corresponded best between MRI and surgery, whereas CT and US tended to underestimate the size. Contrast enhancement of the bursal wall was seen in all cases. The imaging characteristics of iliopsoas bursitis are a well-defined, thin-walled cystic mass with a communication to the hip joint and peripheral contrast enhancement. The most accurate way to assess iliopsoas bursitis is with MR imaging; thus, it should be used for accurate therapy planning and follow-up studies. In order to initially prove an iliopsoas bursitis, US is the most cost-effective, easy-to-perform and fast alternative. (orig.)

  1. MRI-induced retrocalcaneal bursitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J. L.; van Dijk, C. N.; Maas, M.

    1999-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with acute retrocalcaneal bursitis, which developed after MRI examination of the ankle. The sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence revealed an extensive susceptibility artifact in the area surrounding the Achilles tendon near its insertion at the os calcis.

  2. Treatment of olecranon bursitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Eli T; Strauch, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    The optimal management of olecranon bursitis is ill-defined. The purposes of this review were to systematically evaluate clinical outcomes for aseptic versus septic bursitis, compare surgical versus nonsurgical management, and examine the roles of corticosteroid injection and aspiration in aseptic bursitis. The English-language literature was searched using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Allied and Complementary Medicine, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Analyses were performed for clinical resolution and complications after treatment of aseptic and/or septic olecranon bursitis. Twenty-nine studies containing 1278 patients were included. Compared with septic bursitis, aseptic bursitis was associated with a significantly higher overall complication rate (p = 0.0108). Surgical management was less likely to clinically resolve septic or aseptic bursitis (p = 0.0476), and demonstrated higher rates of overall complications (p = 0.0117), persistent drainage (p = 0.0194), and bursal infection (p = 0.0060) than nonsurgical management. Corticosteroid injection for aseptic bursitis was associated with increased overall complications (p = 0.0458) and skin atrophy (p = 0.0261). Aspiration did not increase the risk of bursal infection for aseptic bursitis. Based primarily on level IV evidence, nonsurgical management of olecranon bursitis is significantly more effective and safer than surgical management. The clinical course of aseptic bursitis appears to be more complicated than that of septic bursitis. Corticosteroid injection is associated with significant risks without improving the outcome of aseptic bursitis. Therapeutic IV.

  3. Septic trochanteric bursitis in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makki, Daoud; Watson, Alex James

    2010-01-01

    Trochanteric bursitis, whether septic or inflammatory in origin, is a condition that affects middle-aged patients. Here we report the rare case of an adolescent with septic trochanteric bursitis (treated successfully with intravenous antibiotics), review the available literature on septic bursitis, illustrate the importance of prompt recognition and treatment of this condition in any age group, and describe the clinical presentation and the radiologic findings.

  4. Sarcoidosis presenting as prepatellar bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Hajime; Shimofusa, Ryota; Shimoyama, Katsuhito; Nagashima, Ryota; Eguchi, Masanobu

    2006-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman complained of a subcutaneous mass in her right knee. MR images revealed a well-defined subcutaneous mass in the prepatellar region, containing some fluid and foci of short T2. The lesion showed some marginal contrast uptake after an administration of meglumine gadopentetate (Gd-DTPA), consistent with prepatellar bursitis. The pathological specimen, however, revealed subcutaneous sarcoidosis involving the bursa. (orig.)

  5. MRI-induced retrocalcaneal bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol, J.L.; Dijk, C.N. van; Maas, M.

    1999-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with acute retrocalcaneal bursitis, which developed after MRI examination of the ankle. The sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence revealed an extensive susceptibility artifact in the area surrounding the Achilles tendon near its insertion at the os calcis. This artifact was caused by postsurgical metallic particles. We postulate that these particles were mechanically stimulated by the magnetic field and induced the inflammatory response. (orig.)

  6. MRI-induced retrocalcaneal bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tol, J.L.; Dijk, C.N. van [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, M. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-10-01

    This case report describes a patient with acute retrocalcaneal bursitis, which developed after MRI examination of the ankle. The sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence revealed an extensive susceptibility artifact in the area surrounding the Achilles tendon near its insertion at the os calcis. This artifact was caused by postsurgical metallic particles. We postulate that these particles were mechanically stimulated by the magnetic field and induced the inflammatory response. (orig.)

  7. Tuberculous, trochanteric and ischial bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Roman, R.; Manjon, P.; Revilla, Y.; Rodriguez, P.

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the radiological signs and clinical presentation of tuberculous bursitis arising in the ischial and trochanteric territories, given the limited available knowledge on these entities and in view of the growing prominence of extra pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in the field of infectious diseases. We present seven cases dealt with in our hospital from the first medical consultation to the definitive diagnosis and treatment. Five of the patients presented greater trochanter involvement, while ischium was the site in the remaining two, in one of whom the bursitis extended toward pubis. The radiographic images revealed demineralization and/or erosion of the bone surface in six cases, soft tissue calcification in four, soft tissue mass in two, coccygeal involvement in one and avulsion of a bone fragment one. An ultrasound study was carried out in a of case soft tissue abscess and fistulography in a case of peri-ischial abscess reaching the cutaneous level. Images of the ischial and trochanteric tuberosities such as those described in the present report should lead to a suspicion of bursitis accompanied by local osteitis. One of the etiologies that should be considered, probably the most common one, is tuberculosis, given the serious consequences that poor initial management would have (if is often treated as pyogenic) and its growing incidence. (Author) 10 refs

  8. Four common types of bursitis: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Daniel L; Patel, Amar; Kayiaros, Stephen; Calfee, Ryan

    2011-06-01

    Bursitis is a common cause of musculoskeletal pain and often prompts orthopaedic consultation. Bursitis must be distinguished from arthritis, fracture, tendinitis, and nerve pathology. Common types of bursitis include prepatellar, olecranon, trochanteric, and retrocalcaneal. Most patients respond to nonsurgical management, including ice, activity modification, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In cases of septic bursitis, oral antibiotics may be administered. Local corticosteroid injection may be used in the management of prepatellar and olecranon bursitis; however, steroid injection into the retrocalcaneal bursa may adversely affect the biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon. Surgical intervention may be required for recalcitrant bursitis, such as refractory trochanteric bursitis.

  9. Ultrasonographic evaluation of lschial bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Kyung Sook; Chang, Jae Suck; Lee, Soo Ho [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Joong Mo [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kil Ho [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Kyongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the findings of ultrasonography (US) in patients with ischial bursitis. Our study included 27 patients (mean age 62 years) who underwent US for a painful mass or tenderness in the buttock area. In six of these 27, serous fluid was obtained by needle aspiration, and in five cases, bursal excision permitted histologic confirmation. The other sixteen patients were followed up for one or two months with only NSAID medication; all showed some improvement or remission of symptoms. Using a 5-10 MHz linear array probe, US examination was performed while the patient was lying face down. US images were analyzed with regard to location and size of the lesions, thickness of cyst wall, the presence of internal septa or mural nodules, echogenicity of the cyst wall, fluid content, internal septa, compressibility by a probe, and Doppler signals within the cyst wall. In all 27 patients, ischial bursitis was located superficially to ischial tuberosity. Lesion size(maximum diameter) was 1.5-7(mean 3.8)cm, and the cyst wall was 0.2-0.8cm thick. Internal septa and mural nodules were seen in 12 cases (44%) and 13 cases (48%), respectively. The cyst wall was identifiable in 21 cases (78%), appearing as a single layer with low echogenicity (n=10) or with high echogenicity (n=1); it also appeared as two (n=6) or three (n=4) layers of different echogenicities. When internal septa were present, fluid within the cyst was low echoic in 59% of cases, high echoic in 30%, and of mixed echogenicity (so-called compartmentalization) in 15%. In all cases, the cyst became deformed, when compressed by a probe. In all patients who underwent doppler examination, some vascularity was found within the cyst wall. US helped to detect ischial bursitis; US findings were thin-walled cystic lesion located superficially to ischial tuberosity, with or without internal septa and mural nodules, and easy compressibility.

  10. Ultrasonographic evaluation of lschial bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Kyung Sook; Chang, Jae Suck; Lee, Soo Ho; Ahn, Joong Mo; Cho, Kil Ho

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the findings of ultrasonography (US) in patients with ischial bursitis. Our study included 27 patients (mean age 62 years) who underwent US for a painful mass or tenderness in the buttock area. In six of these 27, serous fluid was obtained by needle aspiration, and in five cases, bursal excision permitted histologic confirmation. The other sixteen patients were followed up for one or two months with only NSAID medication; all showed some improvement or remission of symptoms. Using a 5-10 MHz linear array probe, US examination was performed while the patient was lying face down. US images were analyzed with regard to location and size of the lesions, thickness of cyst wall, the presence of internal septa or mural nodules, echogenicity of the cyst wall, fluid content, internal septa, compressibility by a probe, and Doppler signals within the cyst wall. In all 27 patients, ischial bursitis was located superficially to ischial tuberosity. Lesion size(maximum diameter) was 1.5-7(mean 3.8)cm, and the cyst wall was 0.2-0.8cm thick. Internal septa and mural nodules were seen in 12 cases (44%) and 13 cases (48%), respectively. The cyst wall was identifiable in 21 cases (78%), appearing as a single layer with low echogenicity (n=10) or with high echogenicity (n=1); it also appeared as two (n=6) or three (n=4) layers of different echogenicities. When internal septa were present, fluid within the cyst was low echoic in 59% of cases, high echoic in 30%, and of mixed echogenicity (so-called compartmentalization) in 15%. In all cases, the cyst became deformed, when compressed by a probe. In all patients who underwent doppler examination, some vascularity was found within the cyst wall. US helped to detect ischial bursitis; US findings were thin-walled cystic lesion located superficially to ischial tuberosity, with or without internal septa and mural nodules, and easy compressibility

  11. Nasopharyngeal bursitis: from embryology to clinical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AE El-Shazly

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available AE El-Shazly, S Barriat, PP LefebvreDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Liege University Hospital, Liege, BelgiumAbstract: Nasopharyngeal bursitis is a relatively rare syndrome characterized by a collection of symptoms that multidisciplinary specialists should be aware of. Here we present an audit of cases presenting to a rhinology clinic over a two-year period, as well as an overview of the relevant embryology and different clinical presentations of nasopharyngeal bursitis. For 2008–2009, six patients were diagnosed to have nasopharyngeal bursitis, including four males and two females, of mean age 54 years. Two distinct pathologic types were observed, comprising three patients with classical Tornwaldt’s cyst and three with crust-type bursitis. This audit highlights the importance of recognition of the crust-type of nasopharyngeal bursitis and its anatomic and clinical features. A combined endonasal and transoral endoscopic approach is a minimally invasive procedure and an effective method of treating both types of the disease. Our findings are discussed in relation to the embryology of the disorder, with a clinical emphasis on crust-type nasopharyngeal bursitis.Keywords: nasopharyngeal bursitis, crust type, Tornwaldt’s cyst, endoscopic disruption

  12. Olecranon bursitis: a systematic overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Bruce A; Bolt, Alexander M; Hay, Stuart M

    2014-01-01

    Background Olecranon bursitis is a common condition where the bursal cavity, superficial to the olecranon, becomes inflamed. This can occur either with or without infection and has been given pseudonyms relating to the repeated minor trauma from external pressure that often predisposes. As a result of the multiple aetiologies, olecranon bursitis can present to any medical specialty with reasonable frequency and, although many therapies are described, a single, evidence-based and standardized treatment pathway is not well described. Methods We summarize the key points within the literature and subsequently propose an evidence-based treatment pathway. Results Relevant evidence is presented from appropriate publications to add rational to existing decision-making processes, together with personal experience and suggested operative bursectomy techniques from an established upper limb surgeon. The common and significant aetiologies are summarized and, in particular, red flag symptoms are highlighted by way of warning to the unsuspecting investigator. Conclusions The conclusion is provided in diagrammatic form, providing a suggested treatment pathway from history and examination through to operative intervention. PMID:27582935

  13. Calcifying Bursitis ischioglutealis: A Case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Alexander; Narayan, Chirag Thonse; Schuh, Ralph; Hönle, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The ischiogluteal bursa is an inconstant anatomical finding located between the ischial tuberosity and the gluteus maximus. Ischiogluteal bursitis is a rare disorder. Case Report: We report the case of a 43-year-old female patient with bilateral calcifying ischiogluteal bursitis. The patient had no relevant medical history of systemic illness or major trauma to the buttock. After aspiration of both ischiogluteal bursitis which delievered calcareous deposits and instillation of a mixture of 1cc betamethasone (6 mg) and 4 cc of 1% lidocaine the patient was out of any complaints. Conclusion: Calcifying ischiogluteal bursitis is a rare entity but easily diagnosed on radiographs. Aspiration and local steroid instillation give good relief from symptoms. PMID:27298836

  14. MR features of bursitis around the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Joo; Sung, Mi Sook; Yu, Won Jong; You, Ie Ryung; Yang, Hae Jeom; Lee, Hae Giu; Im, Jung Ik

    1998-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of MR imaging for differentiation between infectious and non-infectious bursitis. MR images of 16 patients (18 lesions) in whom bursitis around the hip had been diagnosed were analyzed for homogeneity of the bursa, the presence of septation, the enhancement pattern, and associated findings. Clinical data (symptoms and signs, laboratory data, aspiration of the bursa, and surgical findings) were available for correlation. The location of bursitis was trochanteric (n=3D9), ischiogluteal (n=3D5), iliopsoas (n=3D3), or ischiotrochanteric (n=3D1). Etiologies included infection in seven cases (3 pyogenic; 4 tuberculous) and noninfection in 11 (6 inflammation; 3 hemorrhage; 2 metabolic disease). In seven patients with infectious bursitis, T1-weighted enhanced image revealed thick rim enhancement of the bursa (n=3D7) association with changes in bone marrow signal intensity (n=3D2), bone erosion (n=3D2), and cellulitis (n=3D1). Of 11 cases of noninfectious bursitis, three demonstrated typical signal characteristics of hematoma within the distended bursa. In six of seven patients who underwent contrast-enhancement, thick and thin peripheral enhancement of the bursa was noted. Bone erosion was found in one case of tuberculous bursitis and two of metabolic disease. Internal septation (n=3D4) and internal debris (n=3D3) were found in both infected and noninfected patients. MR imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of bursitis around the hip. MR findings of thick rim enhancement, associated cellulitis, and changes in bone marrow signal intensity are suggestive of infectious bursitis.=20

  15. MR features of bursitis around the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Joo; Sung, Mi Sook; Yu, Won Jong; You, Ie Ryung; Yang, Hae Jeom; Lee, Hae Giu; Im, Jung Ik [The Catholic Univ. of Korea Holy Family Hospital, Puchun (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-01

    To determine the usefulness of MR imaging for differentiation between infectious and non-infectious bursitis. MR images of 16 patients (18 lesions) in whom bursitis around the hip had been diagnosed were analyzed for homogeneity of the bursa, the presence of septation, the enhancement pattern, and associated findings. Clinical data (symptoms and signs, laboratory data, aspiration of the bursa, and surgical findings) were available for correlation. The location of bursitis was trochanteric (n=3D9), ischiogluteal (n=3D5), iliopsoas (n=3D3), or ischiotrochanteric (n=3D1). Etiologies included infection in seven cases (3 pyogenic; 4 tuberculous) and noninfection in 11 (6 inflammation; 3 hemorrhage; 2 metabolic disease). In seven patients with infectious bursitis, T1-weighted enhanced image revealed thick rim enhancement of the bursa (n=3D7) association with changes in bone marrow signal intensity (n=3D2), bone erosion (n=3D2), and cellulitis (n=3D1). Of 11 cases of noninfectious bursitis, three demonstrated typical signal characteristics of hematoma within the distended bursa. In six of seven patients who underwent contrast-enhancement, thick and thin peripheral enhancement of the bursa was noted. Bone erosion was found in one case of tuberculous bursitis and two of metabolic disease. Internal septation (n=3D4) and internal debris (n=3D3) were found in both infected and noninfected patients. MR imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of bursitis around the hip. MR findings of thick rim enhancement, associated cellulitis, and changes in bone marrow signal intensity are suggestive of infectious bursitis.=20.

  16. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V.

    2003-01-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  17. Atypical retroperitoneal extension of iliopsoas bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B.; Cloots, V. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Cliniques St. Luc, Rue St Luc 8, 5004, Bouge, Namur (Belgium)

    2003-05-01

    We report two rare cases of iliopsoas bursitis extending into the retroperitoneal space. The first lesion contained much gas, mimicking a retroperitoneal abscess, and the second was responsible for atypical inguinal pain. The diagnosis was made by contrast-enhanced CT in both cases and arthrography in the first case. Iliopsoas bursitis in these two patients, it is hypothesized, extended into the retroperitoneum, at least in part, by way of intraneural or perineural structures. (orig.)

  18. Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  19. Treatment of nonseptic bursitis with endoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Yıldırım

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to show that endoscopic surgery is a simple and acceptable method for various problems associated with wounds, range of motion and that such surgery ensures an early return to work after treatment of nonresponding nonseptic bursitis. Methods: Thirty-two patients with nonseptic bursitis caused by repeated minor trauma that did not respond to medical treatment from 2008 to 2012 were included in this study. Radiographic [anteroposterior and lateral], ultrasound, macro and microscopic analyses of drainage liquid and aerobic and anaerobic cultures were obtained from the patients for the diagnosis. Results: The mean age was 40.8 years. Fifteen patients had prepatellar bursitis, 13 had olecranon bursitis and 4 had ankle bursitis. Two patients had a history of falling on their knee. The other patients had a history of repetitive stimulation .The mean follow up period was 2.6 years [range. 2-5 years] and no medical complications occurred after the endoscopic surgery; such as scarring, loss of sensation and infection. One recurrence in response to medical treatment was observed. Conclusion: Endoscopic bursectomy is a short and acceptable procedure with excellent results in terms of returning to work early and minimal wound related problems. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (3: 220-223

  20. Scapulothoracic Bursitis in a Patient With Quadriparesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Seung Jun; Han, Seung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Scapulothoracic bursitis is a rare disease and presents as pain or swelling around the bursa of the scapulothoracic articulation. It has been reported to be related to chronic repetitive mechanical stress of the periscapular tissue, trauma, overuse, and focal muscle weakness. The authors experienced an atypical case of scapulothoracic bursitis with shoulder and periscapular pain after quadriparesis. This case implies that muscular atrophy around the scapula and chest wall from quadriparesis may contribute to the development of scapulothoracic bursitis with shoulder and periscapular pain. In addition, clinician should be alert to it as a possible cause when a patient with quadriparesis complains of shoulder and periscapular pain and consider proper diagnostic options such as ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25906107

  1. Lumbar interspinous bursitis in active polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarani, Carlo; Barozzi, Libero; Boiardi, Luigi; Pipitone, Nicolò; Bajocchi, Gian Luigi; Macchioni, Pier Luigi; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Pazzola, Giulia; Valentino, Massimo; De Luca, Carlo; Hunder, Gene G

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the inflammatory involvement of lumbar interspinous bursae in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten consecutive, untreated new patients with PMR and pain in the shoulder and pelvic girdles were investigated. Seven patients with spondyloarthritis (4 with psoriatic spondyloarthrits, one with entheropatic spondyloarthritis, and 2 with ankylosing spondylitis) as well as 2 patients with spinal osteoarthritis and 2 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with lumbar pain served as controls. MRI of lumbar spine was performed in all PMR patients and controls. Nine patients (5 PMR patients and 4 controls) also had MRI of the thoracic spine. MRI evidence of interspinous lumbar bursitis was found in 9/10 patients with PMR and in 5/11 controls. A moderate to marked (grade ≥2 on a semiquantitative 0-3 scale) lumbar bursitis occurred significantly more frequently in patients with PMR than in control patients (60% vs. 9%, p=0.020). In most of the patients and controls lumbar bursitis was found at the L3-L5 interspaces. Only 2 patients had bursitis at a different level (one patient had widespread lumbar bursitis, and one control at L2-L4). No interspinous bursitis was demonstrated by MRI of the thoracic spine in patients and controls. Inflammation of lumbar bursae may be responsible for the low back pain reported by patients with PMR. The prominent inflammatory involvement of bursae including those of the lumbar spine supports the hypothesis that PMR may be a disorder affecting predominantly extra-articular synovial structures.

  2. Acute gouty bursitis: report of 15 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canoso, J J; Yood, R A

    1979-01-01

    Fifteen cases of acute gouty bursitis were seen among 136 crystal-proved cases of gout. Bursal aspirate yielded yellow or pink fluid in 10, chalky white fluid in 1, and a small amount of bloody fluid in 4. Monosodium urate crystals were present in all. Bursal fluid leucocyte counts averaged 2.9 X 10(9)/1 compared with synovial fluid leucocyte counts that averaged 25.5 X 10(9)/1 in cases of articular gout (P less than 0.05). Gouty, septic, and idiopathic (traumatic) bursitis share clinical features, and detailed bursal fluid analysis is crucial for diagnosis. PMID:496446

  3. Management and outcome of infective prepatellar bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-MacDonald, J.

    1987-01-01

    Forty seven cases of prepatellar bursitis are reported. Twenty one patients had sustained a recent injury with a break in the skin which had caused the infection and seventeen patients were employed in jobs which involved kneeling. Oral antibiotics proved to be inadequate treatment in many cases. Splintage and intravenous antibiotics with or without aspiration of the bursa were usually successful in treating the condition, although nine patients required surgical drainage of the bursa. Twelve patients continued to have symptoms months or years after the infection, particularly those with preexisting chronic bursitis, or those who kneeled at work. There was little difference in the results between the different treatment groups. PMID:3447109

  4. Trochanteric bursitis: the last great misnomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Tim N; Hughes, Simon J; Freemont, Anthony J

    2014-12-05

    Trochanteric bursitis has been used as a general term to describe pain around the greater trochanteric region of the hip. We hypothesised that trochanteric bursitis may not however have an inflammatory component and that accordingly, bursal inflammation has no role in lateral hip pain. This study was designed to test this hypothesis. Patients undergoing primary total hip replacement were enrolled in this prospective, case-controlled, blinded study. Twenty-five patients who met the criteria for diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis (group A) were matched with a control group of 25 patients (group B). Trochanteric bursal samples were harvested from all patients intraoperatively and sent for histological analysis for the presence of inflammation. The intraoperative appearance of the abductor tendon insertion was also noted. None of the samples showed any evidence of acute or chronic inflammatory changes. Intraoperatively, five patients (20%) in group A were noted to have thinning of the gluteus medius tendon but no macroscopic tendon tears were detected in any bursal samples. This study suggests that there is no inflammatory component to so-called trochanteric bursitis, which accordingly casts doubt on both the terminology and the existence of this condition as a separate clinical entity. Clinicians should search for an alternative cause of symptoms in such cases.

  5. Surgical Treatment of Chronic Retrocalcaneal Bursitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Johannes I.; Kok, Aimee C.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to analyze the results of surgical treatments for chronic retrocalcaneal bursitis (RB). Methods: Medline, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Embase, and the Cochrane Library (1945 to December 2010) were systematically

  6. Tuberculous bicipitoradial bursitis: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Jun; Shimamura, Tadashi [Iwate Medical University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Furumachi, Katsuro [Iwate Medical University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Morioka (Japan); Ehara, Shigeru [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Satoh, Takashi [Iwate Medical University, Pathology, Morioka (Japan); Okada, Kyoji [Akita University School of Medicine, Orthopaedics, Akita (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    An 76-year-old man with an indolent soft tissue mass on the volar aspect of the left elbow was referred to our institution with a diagnosis of a soft tissue tumor. He had a history of lung tuberculosis since the age of 30. The mass was adjacent to the biceps brachi tendon. It demonstrated homogeneous low-signal intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images and heterogeneous relatively high signal intensity with scattered low and high signal intensity areas on T2-weighted MR images. An excision was performed after needle biopsy with presumptive diagnosis of bicipitoradial bursitis. The histological specimen revealed an epithelioid cell granuloma with central necrosis. While the occurrence of tuberculous bicipitoradial bursitis has never been reported, this case demonstrates that it can be considered to be among the causes of a cystic lesion around the elbow joint. (orig.)

  7. Tuberculous bicipitoradial bursitis: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Jun; Shimamura, Tadashi; Furumachi, Katsuro; Ehara, Shigeru; Satoh, Takashi; Okada, Kyoji

    2007-01-01

    An 76-year-old man with an indolent soft tissue mass on the volar aspect of the left elbow was referred to our institution with a diagnosis of a soft tissue tumor. He had a history of lung tuberculosis since the age of 30. The mass was adjacent to the biceps brachi tendon. It demonstrated homogeneous low-signal intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images and heterogeneous relatively high signal intensity with scattered low and high signal intensity areas on T2-weighted MR images. An excision was performed after needle biopsy with presumptive diagnosis of bicipitoradial bursitis. The histological specimen revealed an epithelioid cell granuloma with central necrosis. While the occurrence of tuberculous bicipitoradial bursitis has never been reported, this case demonstrates that it can be considered to be among the causes of a cystic lesion around the elbow joint. (orig.)

  8. Nasopharyngeal bursitis: from embryology to clinical presentation

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shazly, Amr

    2010-01-01

    AE El-Shazly, S Barriat, PP LefebvreDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Liege University Hospital, Liege, BelgiumAbstract: Nasopharyngeal bursitis is a relatively rare syndrome characterized by a collection of symptoms that multidisciplinary specialists should be aware of. Here we present an audit of cases presenting to a rhinology clinic over a two-year period, as well as an overview of the relevant embryology and different clinical presentations of nasopharyngeal bu...

  9. First case of Roussoella percutanea bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro-Molto, M; Haas, A; Melcher, C; Nam-Apostolopoulos, Y C; Schubert, S

    2017-02-01

    Roussoella percutanea is a novel opportunistic pathogen firstly identified in 2014. It is known to cause subcutaneous infection in immunosuppressed patients. We report on the first case of R. percutanea bursitis in a renal transplant patient. We provide new data about its identification, drug susceptibility, and treatment outcome. Here we demonstrate that R. percutanea is a potential human pathogen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kil Ho; Jang, Han Won [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hwan [Daegu Hyosung Catholic University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kyung Jin [Suh and Joo MR Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to report on the MRI findings of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis. The MRI findings of 17 confirmed cases of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis were analyzed: four out of the 17 cases were confirmed with surgery, and the remaining 13 cases were confirmed with MRI plus the clinical data. The enlarged bursae were located deep to the gluteus muscles and postero-inferior to the ischial tuberosity. The superior ends of the bursal sacs abutted to the infero-medial aspect of the ischial tuberosity. The signal intensity within the enlarged bursa on T1-weighted image (WI) was hypo-intense in three cases (3/17, 17.6%), iso-intense in 10 cases (10/17, 58.9%), and hyper-intense in four cases (4/17, 23.5%) in comparison to that of surrounding muscles. The bursal sac appeared homogeneous in 13 patients (13/17, 76.5%) and heterogeneous in the remaining four patients (4/17, 23.5%) on T1-WI. On T2-WI, the bursa was hyper-intense in all cases (17/17, 100%); it was heterogeneous in 10 cases and homogeneous in seven cases. The heterogeneity was variable depending on the degree of the blood-fluid levels and the septae within the bursae. With contrast enhancement, the inner wall of the bursae was smooth (5/7 cases), and irregular (12/17 cases) because of the synovial proliferation and septation. Ischiogluteal bursitis can be diagnosed with MRI by its characteristic location and cystic appearance.

  11. Non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kil Ho; Jang, Han Won; Lee, Sung Moon; Lee, Young Hwan; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin

    2004-01-01

    We wished to report on the MRI findings of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis. The MRI findings of 17 confirmed cases of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis were analyzed: four out of the 17 cases were confirmed with surgery, and the remaining 13 cases were confirmed with MRI plus the clinical data. The enlarged bursae were located deep to the gluteus muscles and postero-inferior to the ischial tuberosity. The superior ends of the bursal sacs abutted to the infero-medial aspect of the ischial tuberosity. The signal intensity within the enlarged bursa on T1-weighted image (WI) was hypo-intense in three cases (3/17, 17.6%), iso-intense in 10 cases (10/17, 58.9%), and hyper-intense in four cases (4/17, 23.5%) in comparison to that of surrounding muscles. The bursal sac appeared homogeneous in 13 patients (13/17, 76.5%) and heterogeneous in the remaining four patients (4/17, 23.5%) on T1-WI. On T2-WI, the bursa was hyper-intense in all cases (17/17, 100%); it was heterogeneous in 10 cases and homogeneous in seven cases. The heterogeneity was variable depending on the degree of the blood-fluid levels and the septae within the bursae. With contrast enhancement, the inner wall of the bursae was smooth (5/7 cases), and irregular (12/17 cases) because of the synovial proliferation and septation. Ischiogluteal bursitis can be diagnosed with MRI by its characteristic location and cystic appearance

  12. Non-Infectious Ischiogluteal Bursitis: MRI Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Moon; Lee, Young Hwan; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Jang, Han Won

    2004-01-01

    Objective We wished to report on the MRI findings of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis. Materials and Methods The MRI findings of 17 confirmed cases of non-infectious ischiogluteal bursitis were analyzed: four out of the 17 cases were confirmed with surgery, and the remaining 13 cases were confirmed with MRI plus the clinical data. Results The enlarged bursae were located deep to the gluteus muscles and postero-inferior to the ischial tuberosity. The superior ends of the bursal sacs abutted to the infero-medial aspect of the ischial tuberosity. The signal intensity within the enlarged bursa on T1-weighted image (WI) was hypo-intense in three cases (3/17, 17.6%), iso-intense in 10 cases (10/17, 58.9%), and hyper-intense in four cases (4/17, 23.5%) in comparison to that of surrounding muscles. The bursal sac appeared homogeneous in 13 patients (13/17, 76.5%) and heterogeneous in the remaining four patients (4/17, 23.5%) on T1-WI. On T2-WI, the bursa was hyper-intense in all cases (17/17, 100%); it was heterogeneous in 10 cases and homogeneous in seven cases. The heterogeneity was variable depending on the degree of the blood-fluid levels and the septae within the bursae. With contrast enhancement, the inner wall of the bursae was smooth (5/17 cases), and irregular (12/17 cases) because of the synovial proliferation and septation. Conclusion Ischiogluteal bursitis can be diagnosed with MRI by its characteristic location and cystic appearance. PMID:15637479

  13. [Trochanteric bursitis due to tuberculosis in an immunocompetent young woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soro Marín, Sandra; Sánchez Trenado, María Asunción; Mínguez Sánchez, María Dolores; Paulino Huertas, Marcos; García Morales, Paula Virginia; Salas Manzanedo, Verónica

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can affect muscle, tendons, fascia, bursa and synovial tissue. Tuberculous trochanteric bursitis is a rare entity that usually affects immunocompromised patients. Manifestations usually occur insidiously, which delays diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of an immunocompetent young woman who came to our department for chronic left hip pain. The study confirms the diagnosis of tuberculous trochanteric bursitis. This case demonstrates the importance of considering a possible infectious origin of bursitis in immunocompetent patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Pes anserine bursitis: incidence in symptomatic knees and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennie, W.J.; Saifuddin, A.

    2005-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated clinical symptoms of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic adult knees. A retrospective review was performed of the reports of 509 knee MRI studies obtained from July 1998 to June 2004 on 488 patients presenting to an orthopaedic clinic with knee pain suspected to be due to internal derangement. The MRI studies and case histories of all patients reported to have pes anserine bursitis were reviewed. The management of these patients was also noted. The prevalence of pes anserine bursitis as detected on MRI is 2.5%. The commonest clinical presentation was pain along the medial joint line mimicking a medial meniscal tear. We suggest that an accurate diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis on MRI will help prevent unnecessary arthroscopy and possibly initiate early treatment of the condition. Axial imaging is important in these cases to differentiate the bursa from other medial fluid collections. (orig.)

  15. Candida glabrata olecranon bursitis treated with bursectomy and intravenous caspofungin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedros, John G; Keenan, Kendra E; Trachtenberg, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons are becoming more involved in the care of patients with septic arthritis and bursitis caused by yeast species. This case report involves a middle-aged immunocompromised female who developed a Candida glabrata septic olecranon bursitis that developed after she received a corticosteroid injection in the olecranon bursa for presumed aseptic bursitis. Candida (Torulopsis) glabrata is the second most frequently isolated Candida species from the bloodstream in the United States. Increased use of fluconazole and other azole antifungal agents as a prophylactic treatment for recurrent Candida albicans infections in immunocompromised individuals is one reason why there appears to be increased resistance of C. glabrata and other nonalbicans Candida (NAC) species to fluconazole. In this patient, this infection was treated with surgery (bursectomy) and intravenous caspofungin, an echinocandin. This rare infectious etiology coupled with this intravenous antifungal treatment makes this case novel among cases of olecranon bursitis caused by yeasts.

  16. Ischiogluteal bursitis: a report of three cases with MR findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitora, Toshiaki; Kawaguchi, Yoji; Mori, Masaki; Imaizumi, Yasuhiko; Akisue, Toshihiro; Sasaki, Kanji; Yamada, Eiji; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2009-02-01

    Ischiogluteal bursitis is an uncommon disorder which can be confused with neoplastic conditions in the buttock. Three cases of ischiogluteal bursitis in a 57-year-old man, a 73-year-old woman and a 73-year-old man are presented. All patients presented with a gradually increasing, painful buttock mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a soft tissue mass around the ischial tuberosity and showed various features in the three cases. Two patients underwent excision of the lesion, which was histologically diagnosed as ischiogluteal bursitis. One patient was conservatively treated and the symptoms gradually decreased. MRI was very useful in diagnosing and detecting the lesion. Ischiogluteal bursitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a buttock mass.

  17. Pes anserine bursitis: incidence in symptomatic knees and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennie, W.J. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated clinical symptoms of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic adult knees. A retrospective review was performed of the reports of 509 knee MRI studies obtained from July 1998 to June 2004 on 488 patients presenting to an orthopaedic clinic with knee pain suspected to be due to internal derangement. The MRI studies and case histories of all patients reported to have pes anserine bursitis were reviewed. The management of these patients was also noted. The prevalence of pes anserine bursitis as detected on MRI is 2.5%. The commonest clinical presentation was pain along the medial joint line mimicking a medial meniscal tear. We suggest that an accurate diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis on MRI will help prevent unnecessary arthroscopy and possibly initiate early treatment of the condition. Axial imaging is important in these cases to differentiate the bursa from other medial fluid collections. (orig.)

  18. Evidence-Based Soft Tissue Rheumatology IV: Anserine Bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Nemegyei, Jose; Canoso, Juan J

    2004-08-01

    Anserine bursitis is a frequent cause of medial knee pain. Despite its name, the structure at fault causing the symptoms remains unknown. Diabetes mellitus is a known predisposing factor leading to the condition. Overweight and knee osteoarthritis are possible additional risk factors, but their role has yet to be assessed. Anserine bursitis is diagnosed clinically based on medial knee pain and localized tenderness at the inferomedial knee. Current treatment of anserine bursitis includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory dugs, physiotherapy, and local glucocorticoid injections. Of these, only the latter has been shown effective in clinical trials. Knowledge gaps in the epidemiology, pathology, and pathogenesis of anserine bursitis should lead to additional research efforts on this common and perplexing condition.

  19. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  20. Diagnosis and management of olecranon bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Buono, Angelo; Franceschi, Francesco; Palumbo, Alessio; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    We aim to review the current knowledge on diagnosis, clinical features and main management modalities of olecranon bursitis. We underline that the first treatment line is conservative, including ice, rest, anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs and, occasionally, bursal fluid aspiration. In unresponsive patients, although open excisional procedures allow to completely remove the pathological bursal tissue, arthroscopy is increasingly being considered as a suitable new modality of management. These minimally invasive procedures, although not free from complications, avoid the wound problems often occurring following open excision. Copyright © 2012 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diclofenac Patch for Treatment of Mild to Moderate Tendonitis or Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-05

    Rotator Cuff Tendonitis; Bicipital Tendonitis; Subdeltoid Bursitis of the Shoulder; Subacromial Bursitis of the Shoulder; Medial Epicondylitis of the Elbow; Lateral Epicondylitis of the Elbow; DeQuervain's Tenosynovitis of the Wrist

  2. Ischial Pain and Sitting Disability Due to Ischiogluteal Bursitis: Visual Vignette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz, Timur; Biçici, Vedat; Hatioglu, Cem; Yalçın, Süha; Cingöz, Kagan

    2015-01-01

    Ischial bursitis or ischiogluteal bursitis is the inflammation of the ischiogluteal bursa due to excessive or inappropriate physical exercise, prolonged sitting, running, repetitive jumping, and kicking. Since ischial bursitis is a rare, infrequently recognized pathology and is difficult to differentiate from the soft tissue disease and tumors (both malignant and benign), herein exemplified is a case with ischiogluteal bursitis whereby the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the prompt diagnosis has been highlighted.

  3. Ultrasonographic findings of aspergillus bursitis in a patient with a renal transplantation: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Byeong Seong; Yang, Myeon Jun; Kim, Young Min; Youm, Yoon Seok; Choi, Seong Hoon; Park, Sung Bin; Jeong, Ae Kyung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Aspergillus bursitis is an uncommon condition demonstrated as a nonspecific soft tissue mass. To our knowledge, the ultrasonographic findings of aspergillus bursitis in immunocompromised patients have not been previously reported. Here, we report a case of aspergillus bursitis in a renal transplant recipient, accompanied by the associated ultrasonographic findings.

  4. Ultrasonographic findings of aspergillus bursitis in a patient with a renal transplantation: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byeong Seong; Yang, Myeon Jun; Kim, Young Min; Youm, Yoon Seok; Choi, Seong Hoon; Park, Sung Bin; Jeong, Ae Kyung

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus bursitis is an uncommon condition demonstrated as a nonspecific soft tissue mass. To our knowledge, the ultrasonographic findings of aspergillus bursitis in immunocompromised patients have not been previously reported. Here, we report a case of aspergillus bursitis in a renal transplant recipient, accompanied by the associated ultrasonographic findings

  5. Effect of polydeoxyribonucleotide injection on pes anserine bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Jong-Uk; Cho, Hyung R.; Bae, Sae M.; Park, Soo K.; Choi, Soo .l; Seo, Mi S.; Lim, Young S.; RN, Soo H. Woo; Kim, Young U.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Pes anserine (PA) bursitis is an inflammatory condition of the medial knee. The PA bursa becomes more painful when infected, damaged, or irritated. Although various treatment options have been attempted to treat PA bursitis, optimal treatments are still debated. This study aims to investigate the effect of polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) injection on reducing pain and inflammation in a patient presenting with PA bursitis. Patient concerns: A 50-year-old female patient was admitted to our pain clinic with symptoms of tenderness and pain over the medial knee. Physical examination revealed the pain to be located over the proximal medial tibia at the insertion of the conjoined tendons of the PA. The knee had lost its range of movement and strength, and resisted knee flexion. Diagnoses: She was diagnosed as having PA bursitis. Interventions: Ultrasound guided PA bursa injection was carried out. Outcomes: Follow-up for the patient was more than eight months. She showed good improvement in PA bursitis without any complications. Lessons: This is the first successful report of successful PDRN injection for PA bursa. PMID:29069005

  6. Scapulothoracic bursitis in a patient with quadriparesis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Seung Jun; Han, Seung Hoon

    2015-04-01

    Scapulothoracic bursitis is a rare disease and presents as pain or swelling around the bursa of the scapulothoracic articulation. It has been reported to be related to chronic repetitive mechanical stress of the periscapular tissue, trauma, overuse, and focal muscle weakness. The authors experienced an atypical case of scapulothoracic bursitis with shoulder and periscapular pain after quadriparesis.This case implies that muscular atrophy around the scapula and chest wall from quadriparesis may contribute to the development of scapulothoracic bursitis with shoulder and periscapular pain. In addition, clinician should be alert to it as a possible cause when a patient with quadriparesis complains of shoulder and periscapular pain and consider proper diagnostic options such as ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Endoscopic versus open bursectomy of lateral malleolar bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Kyung Tai; Lee, Young Koo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ryoul; Chung, Woo Chull; Cha, Seung Do

    2012-06-01

    Compare the result of endoscopic versus open bursectomy in lateral malleolar bursitis. Prospective evaluation of 21 patients (22 ankles) undergoing either open or endoscopic excision of lateral malleolar bursitis. The median age was 64 (38-79) years old. The median postoperative follow-up was 15 (12-18) months. Those patients undergoing endoscopic excision showed a higher satisfaction rate (excellent 9, good 2) than open excision (excellent 4, good 3, fair 1). The wounds also healed earlier in the endoscopic group although the operation time was slightly longer. One patient in the endoscopic group had recurrence of symptoms but complications in the open group included one patient with skin necrosis, one patient with wound dehiscence, and two patients of with superficial peroneal nerve injury. Endoscopic resection of the lateral malleolar bursitis is a promising technique and shows favorable results compared to the open resection. Therapeutic studies-Investigating the result of treatment, Level II.

  8. Subacromial bursitis following human papilloma virus vaccine misinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Soshi; Sakai, Akinori; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2012-12-17

    A patient presented at our clinic with severe subacromial bursitis, which persisted for several months following a third booster injection with Cervarix™. Chronic subacromial bursitis manifested itself in this patient after what appeared to be the misinjection of vaccine in close proximity to the acromion. This bursitis was resistant to conventional physiotherapy and to corticosteroid therapy, but was responsive to arthroscopic surgery. Since such patients may present to an arthroscopic surgeon only months after receiving a vaccine injection, this etiological link may not be fully appreciated by treating clinicians. Further, the accuracy of injection in the deltoid region also appears under appreciated, and this report highlights the importance of accurate injection to the deltoid region or in certain cases, the value of simply changing the injection site to another larger muscle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

  10. Septic Bursitis in an 8-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Kratimenos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prepatellar bursa can become inflamed owing to repeated trauma. Prepatellar bursitis is extremely rare in children. Methods. We report the case of an 8-year-old boy who was treated for an erythematous, swollen, and severely painful right knee, fever, inability to bear weight on the leg, and purulent material draining from a puncture wound. We describe the differential diagnosis for tender swollen knee, including infection, gout, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis. If untreated, prepatellar bursitis can progress to patellar osteomyelitis. Results. Wound cultures grew Streptococcus pyogenes, with the infection resolving with amoxicillin. Conclusions. A high index of suspicion is necessary in children presenting with prepatellar bursitis to prevent potentially devastating sequelae of infection of the septic joint.

  11. Calcific bursitis mimicking a parosteal osteogenic sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavin, J.D. Jr.; Vento, J.A.; Haugh, J.D.; Spencer, R.P.; Connecticut Univ., Farmington

    1986-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman with no history of trauma or major medical illness, presented with a ten day history of right hip and thigh pain. The pain was described as constant, dull, and aching. It was nonradiating and was not relieved by analgesics. Physical examination revealed diffuse tenderness over the right hip and right lateral thigh region; no mass was palpable. The CBC, serum electrolytes, calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase determinations were all normal. Radiographs of the right hip demonstrated amorphous soft tissue calcification adjacent to the lateral aspect of the right femur as well as periosteal reaction and apparent destruction in the adjacent bone. Because of these suspicious X-rays findings, the initial working diagnosis was parosteal osteogenic sarcoma. A bone scan was performed two hours after the intravenous administration of 15 millicuries of Tc-99m-MDP. It showed focal uptake overlying the upper femur, approximately where the X-ray had shown periosteal reaction and apparent bony destruction. In addition, the bone images also demonstrated a linear band of activity extending through the soft tissues from the greater trochanter to the lower lateral thigh. Because of the unexpected and quite extensive soft tissue uptake seen on the scan, the possibility that a benign process was involved was then considered seriously for the first time. An open biopsy was then performed. It revealed acute calcific trochanteric bursitis; there was no evidence of bone involvement. The patient was treated conservatively and symptoms gradually resolved. (orig.) [de

  12. Management of acute bursitis: outcome study of a structured approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stell, I M

    1999-01-01

    In patients with septic bursitis the indications for admission and surgical intervention remain unclear, and practice has varied widely. The effectiveness of a conservative outpatient based approach was assessed by an outcome study in a prospective case series. Consecutive patients attending an emergency department with acute swelling of the olecranon or prepatellar bursa were managed according to a structured approach, subjective and objective outcomes being assessed after two to three days, and subsequently as required until clinical discharge. Long-term outcomes were assessed by telephone follow-up for up to eighteen months. 47 patients were included in the study: 22 had septic bursitis, 15 of the olecranon bursa and 7 of the prepatellar bursa. The mean visual analogue pain scores of those with septic bursitis improved from 4.8 at presentation to 1.7 at first follow-up for olecranon bursitis, and from 3.8 to 2.7 for prepatellar bursitis. Symptoms improved more slowly for patients with non-septic bursitis. No patients were admitted initially, but 2 were admitted (two days each) after the first follow-up appointment. One patient had incision and drainage on the third attendance, and 3 patients developed discharging sinuses, which all healed spontaneously. All patients made a good long-term symptomatic recovery and all could lean on the elbow or kneel by the end of the follow-up period. The management protocol, with specific criteria for admission and surgical intervention, thus produced good results with little need for operation or admission. PMID:10692903

  13. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head presenting as trochanteric bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, B F

    1990-01-01

    Five patients are described with avascular necrosis of the femoral head who presented with ipsilateral trochanteric bursitis, in the absence of clearcut hip joint disease. Avascular necrosis was indicated by magnetic resonance imaging. It is suggested that clinical trochanteric bursitis, especially when refractory to local corticosteroid treatment, may be the initial sign of hip disease. In the patient with risk factor(s) for avascular necrosis that diagnosis should be considered and evaluated with appropriate studies, such as magnetic resonance imaging, to prevent weight bearing at an early stage and permit possible surgical decompression in the hope of postponing or obviating the need for total hip replacement. PMID:2241294

  14. Subacromial bursitis with rice bodies. Finding in magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguel Campos, E. de; Hernandez Moreno, L.; Lafuente Martinez, J.; Godoy Lopez, M.A.; Ruiz Noguero, P.

    1994-01-01

    We present a case of subacromial bursitis associated with intraarticular loose bodies, constituted by accumulations of fibrin referred to as rice bodies, in a woman with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. We demonstrate the clinical and imaging features of this disorder, especially stressing the magnetic resonance (MR) findings. The literature is reviewed. (Author) 14 refs

  15. Preoperative diagnosis of bicipitoradial bursitis: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inflammation of the bicipitoradial bursa is a rare condition and only few reports can be found in literature. Several causes for a cubital bursitis have been suggested in the past. The need to include a malignant lesion in the differential diagnosis has only been mentioned in one of these reports. May main objective in reporting ...

  16. Subdeltoid/subacromial bursitis associated with influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old male presented with subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis following influenza vaccine administration into the left deltoid muscle. This shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) could have been prevented by the use of a safe, evidence based protocol for the intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle.

  17. Mineralized fibroma of the tendon sheath presenting as a bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Champsaur, Pierre [Hopital Sainte-Marguerite, Service de Radiologie, Marseille (France); Faculte de Medecine de Marseille, Departement d' Anatomie, Marseille (France); Bouvier-Labit, Corinne [Hopital La Timone, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Marseille (France); Sbihi, Abderrahmane [Clinique Juge, Service de Chirurgie orthopedique, Marseille (France)

    2008-12-15

    We report on the clinical, imaging - including ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - and histological features of a fibroma of the tendon sheath with mineralized chondroid and osseous metaplasia, presenting as a semimembranosus bursitis. The anatomical characteristics of the semimembranosus bursa are demonstrated by dissection in a cadaveric specimen and correlated with the imaging findings in our patient. (orig.)

  18. Trochanteric reduction osteotomy as a treatment for refractory trochanteric bursitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govaert, L. H. M.; van der Vis, H. M.; Marti, R. K.; Albers, G. H. R.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new operative procedure for patients with chronic trochanteric bursitis. Between March 1994 and May 2000, a trochanteric reduction osteotomy was performed on ten patients (12 hips). All had received conservative treatment for at least one year. Previous surgical treatment with a

  19. [Current treatment concepts for olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, S F; Michel, M; Wyen, H; Buschmann, C T; Kdolsky, R; Kanz, K-G

    2013-04-01

    The limited evidence available on the diagnosis and treatment of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis indicates nationally varying treatment approaches. Therefore the aim of this study was to survey the current treatment concepts of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria. An online questionnaire comprising of demographic data, questions regarding diagnostics and differentiation between septic bursitis (SB) and non-septic bursitis (NSB) as well as two case reports for therapy appraisal were sent to members of the Austrian Society of Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery (ÖGO) and the Austrian Society of Traumatology (ÖGU). The overall response rates were 46 % (ÖGU)/12 % (ÖGO). Differentiation between SB and NSB was predominantly based on medical history/clinical presentation (ÖGU: 100 %/ÖGO: 84 %) and blood sampling (ÖGU: 82 %/ÖGO: 77 %). 64/36 % of surveyed members of ÖGO/OGU performed a bursal aspiration. 95/55 % of Austrian ÖGU opinion leaders favoured a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB/NSB. Conversely, ÖGO members rather favoured a conservative treatment approach (28/27 %). Significant differences were found between ÖGO and ÖGU, with the latter favouring a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB and NSB. However, the international literature argues for a conservative treatment approach. Further high quality research is needed to establish an evidence-based treatment approach. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Calcifying supracoracoid bursitis as a cause of chronic shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mens, J; van der Korst, J K

    1984-01-01

    A case of chronic shoulder pain is reported with marked limitation of both active and passive elevations and a normal range of motion of the glenohumeral joint. X-ray examination demonstrated cloudy calcification in the coracoclavicular region, presumably indicating calcifying supracoracoid bursitis. Images PMID:6497468

  1. Mineralized fibroma of the tendon sheath presenting as a bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Champsaur, Pierre; Bouvier-Labit, Corinne; Sbihi, Abderrahmane

    2008-01-01

    We report on the clinical, imaging - including ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - and histological features of a fibroma of the tendon sheath with mineralized chondroid and osseous metaplasia, presenting as a semimembranosus bursitis. The anatomical characteristics of the semimembranosus bursa are demonstrated by dissection in a cadaveric specimen and correlated with the imaging findings in our patient. (orig.)

  2. Bursectomy, Curettage, and Chemotherapy in Tuberculous Trochanteric Bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Pascua, Luis R; Carro-Fernández, José A; Santos-Sánchez, José A; Casas Ramos, Paula; Díez-Romero, Luis J; Izquierdo-García, Francisco M

    2016-03-01

    We presented three patients with trochanteric tuberculosis and described the clinical and imaging findings of the infection. Histology revealed a necrotizing granulomatous bursitis and microbiology confirmed tuberculosis. All cases were successfully treated with bursectomy and curettage of the trochanteric lesion and antituberculous chemotherapy including isoniazid, pyrazinamide, rifampicin, and ethambutol.

  3. Tuberculosis of the patella masquerading as prepatellar bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis of bone is an uncommon entity in the Western world. We present a case of tuberculosis of the patella mimicking prepatellar bursitis in an otherwise fit and well woman of Bangladeshi origin. We believe tuberculosis of bone should form a differential diagnosis of the swollen knee in high risk patients. PMID:23317718

  4. Phomopsis bougainvilleicola Prepatellar Bursitis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Cariello, Paloma F.; Wickes, Brian L.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Castlebury, Lisa A.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Finberg, Robert W.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Daly, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Prepatellar bursitis is typically a monomicrobial bacterial infection. A fungal cause is rarely identified. We describe a 61-year-old man who had received a renal transplant 21 months prior to presentation whose synovial fluid and surgical specimens grew Phomopsis bougainvilleicola, a pycnidial coelomycete.

  5. Phomopsis bougainvilleicola Prepatellar Bursitis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickes, Brian L.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Castlebury, Lisa A.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Finberg, Robert W.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Daly, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Prepatellar bursitis is typically a monomicrobial bacterial infection. A fungal cause is rarely identified. We describe a 61-year-old man who had received a renal transplant 21 months prior to presentation whose synovial fluid and surgical specimens grew Phomopsis bougainvilleicola, a pycnidial coelomycete. PMID:23196359

  6. Bilateral olecranon bursitis – A rare clinical presentation of gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betul Sargın

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gout is the most common form of crystal arthropathy. Monoarthritis affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint is the common initial presentation. Bilateral olecranon bursitis is a rare presentation of gout. Aim of the work: To describe the clinical features of bilateral olecranon bursitis as an initial presentation of gout. Case report: A 62-year old male patient presented to the rheumatology clinic , Adnan Menderes University with sudden bilateral elbow pain and swelling for three months . Swellings gradually increased to the size of a golf ball with minimal restriction in the elbow extension (170°. He didn’t have arthritis in the elbows. The patient had medical history of heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and medications received included acetylsalicylic acid and diuretics. Blood tests revealed elevated serum uric acid (12.6 mg/dL, with normal renal function tests, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR 43 mm/h and C-reactive protein (CRP 8.8 mg/L. Rheumatoid factor and hepatitis markers were negative. Diagnostic bursal aspiration excluded septic bursitis and under polarized microscopy monosodium urate (MSU crystals were identified with typical negative birefringence. A diagnosis of gout was established. ESR and CRP were normalized after diclofenac potassium (100 mg and colchicine (1.5 mg. Allopurinol 300 mg was added when his joint pain was relieved. Conclusion: This is the first gout case initially presenting with bilateral olecranon bursitis. Bursal fluid analysis is important in such atypical presentation to look for MSU crystals and establish a diagnosis. Keywords: Olecranon bursitis, Gout, Crystal arthropathy, Monosodium urate

  7. Hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Soon; Diwanji, Sanket R; Kim, Hyung Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo; Yoon, Taek Rim

    2009-08-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of total hip arthroplasty and is usually associated with polyethylene wear. Here, the authors report a case of hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating an otherwise well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic arthroplasty performed by minimal invasive modified 2-incision technique. The bursitis in turn resulted in femoral nerve palsy and femoral vein compression. In this report, there was no evidence to support that the bursitis was due to an inflammatory response to ceramic wear particles or any other wear particles originating from the total hip arthroplasty.

  8. Preoperative diagnosis of bicipitoradial bursitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhilan, Asim Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the bicipitoradial bursa is a rare condition and only few reports can be found in literature. Several causes for a cubital bursitis have been suggested in the past. The need to include a malignant lesion in the differential diagnosis has only been mentioned in one of these reports. May main objective in reporting this case is to make this pathological entity better known.

  9. Subcalcaneal Bursitis With Plantar Fasciitis Treated by Arthroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent ...

  10. Antecubital Fossa Solitary Osteochondroma with Associated Bicipitoradial Bursitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecubital fossa lesions are uncommon conditions that present to the orthopaedic clinic. Furthermore, the radius bone is an uncommonly reported location for an osteochondroma, especially when presenting with a concurrent reactive bicipitoradial bursitis. Osteochondromas are a type of developmental lesion rather than a true neoplasm. They constitute up to 15% of all bone tumours and up to 50% of benign bone tumours. They may occur as solitary or multiple lesions. Multiple lesions are usually associated with a syndrome known as hereditary multiple exostoses (HME. Malignant transformation is known to occur but is rare. Bicipitoradial bursitis is a condition which can occur as primary or secondary (reactive pathology. In our case, the radius bone osteochondroma caused reactive bicipitoradial bursitis. The differential diagnosis of such antecubital fossa masses is vast but may be narrowed down through a targeted history, stepwise radiological investigations, and histological confirmation. Our aim is to ensure that orthopaedic clinicians keep a wide differential in mind when dealing with antecubital fossa mass lesions.

  11. Iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein resulting in acute lower leg edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Seung Bae; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Jeong, Yeon Jun

    2006-01-01

    The clinical manifestations related to iliopsoas bursitis can vary due to compression of the adjacent structure such as the common femoral vein, nerve and bladder. We report here on a rare case of iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein that resulted in acute lower leg edema

  12. Iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein resulting in acute lower leg edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seung Bae; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Jeong, Yeon Jun [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    The clinical manifestations related to iliopsoas bursitis can vary due to compression of the adjacent structure such as the common femoral vein, nerve and bladder. We report here on a rare case of iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein that resulted in acute lower leg edema.

  13. Subacromial bursitis with rice bodies : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Hak Soo; Oh, Jae Cheon; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Won Mi

    1998-01-01

    Multiple rice bodies in joints or bursae are rarely encountered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We report the radiologic findings of massive subacromial bursitis with innumerable rice bodies on the right shoulder of a 38-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis. Subacromial bursography showed markedly distended bursa with multiple nodular filling defects. Precontrast CT scanning revealed well-demarcated hypodense lesion without calcification in subacromio-subdeltoid bursa. Multiple rice bodies showed slightly high signal intensity of T1WI and T2WI, and no enhancement after gadolinium injection. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs

  14. Subacromial bursitis with rice bodies : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Hak Soo; Oh, Jae Cheon; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Won Mi [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    Multiple rice bodies in joints or bursae are rarely encountered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We report the radiologic findings of massive subacromial bursitis with innumerable rice bodies on the right shoulder of a 38-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis. Subacromial bursography showed markedly distended bursa with multiple nodular filling defects. Precontrast CT scanning revealed well-demarcated hypodense lesion without calcification in subacromio-subdeltoid bursa. Multiple rice bodies showed slightly high signal intensity of T1WI and T2WI, and no enhancement after gadolinium injection. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Surgical treatment and histopathology of different forms of olecranon and presternal bursitis in cattle and buffalo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    Thirty seven cases of bursitis presented to our Veterinary Teaching Hospital from 2001 to 2005. There were 10 adult female buffalos with olecranon bursitis (one had bilateral bursitis) and 26 calves (7 cattle and 19 buffalos, 16 males and 10 females) with presternal bursitis. There were 10 out of 11 cases of olecranon bursitis and 21 out of 26 cases of presternal bursitis with different forms (cystic, proliferative and fibrous) that were removed surgically. The remaining 6 cases, cystic bursitis (olecranon = 1, presternal = 5), were treated by aspiration of their contents and injection of 4% iodine tincture intrabursally. Only 2 cases recovered, 3 cases progressed to fibrosis and required further surgical treatment 2 to 3 weeks later, and 1 case continued to have a cystic lesion. Histopathological examination of tissue specimens from different forms of bursitis revealed that the acquired bursae were generally lined with synovial-like membrane formed from 2-3 cellular layers that covered the connective tissue capsule. The connective tissue capsule differed from one type to another and consisted of fibrous tissues containing numerous small blood vessels, blood capillaries, lymphatics and nerves. There was also evidence for inflammation within the capsule represented by congestion of blood vessels and the presence of perivascular inflammatory cells, mostly mononuclear. In conclusion, surgical treatment was successful and effective for treatment of olecranon and presternal bursitis particularly for the chronic proliferative and fibrous form in cattle and buffalo. The histological structure of the acquired bursae was relatively similar consisting of a synovial-like membrane and a connective tissue capsule with varying degrees of the inflammatory process. PMID:16871025

  16. Subcalcaneal Bursitis With Plantar Fasciitis Treated by Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent to the calcaneal tubercle on T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images and thickening of the plantar fascia on T2-weighted sagittal images. A diagnosis of a recalcitrant subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis was made, and surgery was performed. The arthroscope was placed between the calcaneus and the plantar fascia. With the surgeon viewing from the lateral portal and working from the medial portal, the dorsal surface of the degenerative plantar fascia was debrided and the medial half of the plantar fascia was released, followed by debridement of the subcalcaneal bursal cavity through the incised plantar fascia. Full weight bearing and gait were allowed immediately after the operation. At the latest follow-up, the patient had achieved complete resolution of heel pain without a recurrence of the mass, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23875139

  17. OK-432 sclerotherapy for malleolar bursitis of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang Hwan; Lee, Jongseok; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Jin Woo

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes and usefulness of OK-432 (Picibanil) sclerotherapy as a new option in the conservative treatment of patients with malleolar bursitis of the ankle. Retrospectively, we reviewed a total of 20 consecutive patients (20 feet) in whom OK-432 sclerotherapy had been performed between March 2009 and June 2010. After aspiration of fluid in the malleolar bursal sac, 0.05 mg of OK-432 was injected into the malleolar bursal sac. We evaluated the clinical outcomes and side effects at the following time points: 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after OK-432 sclerotherapy. The responses to the treatment were assessed according to the degree of fluctuation, shrinkage of the bursal sac, and soft tissue swelling. Complete resolution was observed in 19 patients (95%) after the first or second application of OK-432 sclerotherapy, and a partial response was observed in 1 patient (5%) after a second application of OK-432 sclerotherapy. The physical component scores of SF-36 improved from 70.0 ± 6.8 to 76.5 ± 7.3 at the last follow-up (P = .0002). OK-432 sclerotherapy was a useful procedure for patients not responding to the usual conservative treatment of malleolar bursitis of the ankle. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  18. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resorlu Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears.

  19. Recalcitrant Lateral Premalleolar Bursitis of the Ankle Associated with Lateral Ankle Instability

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    Masashi Naito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle is a rarely reported disorder in the English literature although it is not uncommon in Asian countries where people commonly sit on their feet. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old woman with recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis associated with lateral ankle instability which was successfully treated with surgical resection of the bursa and repair of the anterior talofibular ligament. Operative findings revealed a communication between the bursa and articular cavity of the ankle joint via the sheath of the extensor digitorum longus tendon, which was considered to act as a check valve leading to a large and recalcitrant bursitis. This report provides a novel concept about the etiology of recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle.

  20. Trochanteric bursitis after total hip arthroplasty: incidence and evaluation of response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin W; Jones, Lynne C; Brownson, Kirstyn E; Khanuja, Harpal S; Hungerford, Marc W

    2010-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of corticosteroid injection as treatment for postarthroplasty trochanteric bursitis and the risk factors for failure of nonoperative treatment. There were 32 (4.6%) cases of postsurgical trochanteric bursitis in 689 primary total hip arthroplasties. Of the 25 hips with follow-up, 11 (45%) required multiple injections. Symptoms resolved in 20 (80%) but persisted in 5. We found no statistically significant differences between patients who did and did not develop trochanteric bursitis, or between those who did and did not respond to treatment. There was a trend toward younger age and greater limb-length discrepancy in nonresponders. In conclusion, (1) corticosteroid injection(s) for postoperative trochanteric bursitis is effective; and (2) nonoperative management may be more likely to fail in young patients and those with leg-length discrepancy. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. First report of Nocardia asiatica olecranon bursitis in an immunocompetent traveler returning to Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Eva; Valentin, Thomas; Hoenigl, Martin; Lanz, Philipp; Flick, Holger; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Grisold, Andrea J; Feierl, Gebhard; Krause, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Nocardia spp. are rarely isolated in extrapulmonary clinical specimens. We describe the first case of olecranon bursitis caused by Nocardia asiatica. The patient, a traveler returning from Thailand, was successfully treated with linezolid.

  2. A Rare Form of Brucella Bursitis with Negative Serology: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    F. M. Almajid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is still endemic in certain parts of the world including the Mediterranean, the Middle East, Latin America, and African regions. Osteoarticular manifestations are common presenting features. Brucellosis presenting as prepatellar bursitis has already been reported. We present a case of seronegative olecranon bursitis with positive blood and aspirate cultures. The patient improved remarkably by treatment with streptomycin and doxycycline with no evidence or relapse.

  3. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Albert; Wong, Lun-Yick; Sheu, Chin-Yin; Chen, Be-Fong

    2002-01-01

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Albert; Wong, Lun-Yick; Sheu, Chin-Yin [Department of Radiology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Chen, Be-Fong [Department of Pathology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2002-02-01

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Trochanteric bursitis--a frequent cause of 'hip' pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, D; Haslock, I

    1982-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were examined for the presence of trochanteric bursitis. This condition was found in 15. Ten patients responded to a single local injection of corticosteroid and the remaining 5 to a second injection. Trochanteric bursitis is an underdiagnosed, easily remediable cause of pain in RA. Specific examination for in presence should be a routine in all patients with RA, especially those with hip pain. PMID:7149797

  6. Efficacy of Treatment of Trochanteric Bursitis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, David P; Ng, Vincent Y; Best, Thomas M; Ellis, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Objective Trochanteric bursitis (TB) is a self-limiting disorder in the majority of patients and typically responds to conservative measures. However, multiple courses of nonoperative treatment or surgical intervention may be necessary in refractory cases. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment of TB. Data Sources A literature search in the PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases was performed for all English language studies up to April 2010. Terms combined in a Boolean search were greater trochanteric pain syndrome, trochanteric bursitis, trochanteric, bursitis, surgery, therapy, drug therapy, physical therapy, rehabilitation, injection, Z-plasty, Z-lengthening, aspiration, bursectomy, bursoscopy, osteotomy, and tendon repair. Study Selection All studies directly involving the treatment of TB were reviewed by 2 authors and selected for further analysis. Expert opinion and review articles were excluded, as well as case series with fewer than 5 patients. Twenty-four articles were identified. According to the system described by Wright et al, 2 studies, each with multiple arms, qualified as level I evidence, 1 as level II, 1 as level III, and the rest as level IV. More than 950 cases were included. Data Extraction The authors extracted data regarding the type of intervention, level of evidence, mean age of patients, patient gender, number of hips in the study, symptom duration before the study, mean number of injections before the study, prior hip surgeries, patient satisfaction, length of follow-up, baseline scores, and follow-up scores for the visual analog scale (VAS) and Harris Hip Scores (HHS). Data Synthesis Symptom resolution and the ability to return to activity ranged from 49% to 100% with corticosteroid injection as the primary treatment modality with and without multimodal conservative therapy. Two comparative studies (levels II and III) found low-energy shock-wave therapy (SWT) to be

  7. Paecilomyces lilacinus septic olecranon bursitis in an immunocompetent host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Karl M; Richard, Marc J; Leversedge, Fraser J; Ruch, David S

    2012-05-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus is a filamentous fungus that is a rare cause of infection in immunocompromised human hosts. We present a case of lilacinus septic olecranon bursitis in an otherwise healthy 78-year-old male. This patient's case was complicated by wound breakdown after bursectomy and appropriate anti-fungal treatment, requiring a local soft tissue rearrangement. This case demonstrates the need for appropriate and timely medical and surgical treatment in infections involving lilacinus, which are not isolated solely to systemically immunocompromised and medically-ill patient populations. In cases where the patient is systemically immumocompromised or has been rendered locally immunocompromised, it is essential to obtain a full culture work-up, including fungi.

  8. Bilateral patellar tuberculosis masquerading as infected infrapatellar bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Ravi; Haq, Rehan Ul

    2017-04-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented to our outpatient department with complaints of pain and swelling in bilateral infrapatellar regions and a discharging sinus in the right knee over the duration of one year. Radiographs showed lytic regions in bilateral patellae. Samples sent from material curetted from sinus yielded no organism but histopathology reported granulomatous inflammation. Following a fresh magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan that revealed the infrapatellar pad of fat communicating with the patellar lesions, an exploration and evacuation was done. Material sent revealed epithelioid cell granulomas with caseous necrosis consistent with tuberculosis (TB). The patient was put on first line anti-tubercular treatment (ATT) and has responded favourably with healing of sinus and patellar lesions. Bilateral infrapatellar bursitis is not rare. However patellar TB as a cause for OMIT is not a common diagnosis. A bilateral patellar involvement has not been reported in literature to the best of our knowledge.

  9. Bicipitoradial Bursitis: A Review of Clinical Presentation and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz-Lung Choi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The bicipitoradial bursa lies at the insertion of the biceps tendon on the radial tuberosity. It is an unusual site for chronic bursitis and most often results from repetitive mechanical trauma or overuse. Other causes include tuberculosis, immunological complications of rheumatological disease and synovial chondromatosis. Accurate diagnosis requires imaging studies and sometimes histological study. It can be treated conservatively with aspiration and steroid injection. Surgical excision of the bursa is indicated in the case of infection cause, failed conservative treatment with recurrence of the enlarged bursa and pain after aspiration, presence of nerve compression with neurological impairment, mechanical limitation to flexion, and extension of the elbow or biceps tendon degeneration and/or functional impairment.

  10. Prevalence of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic osteoarthritis patients: an ultrasonographic prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Fatma; Akbal, Ayla; Gökmen, Ferhat; Adam, Gürhan; Reşorlu, Mustafa

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the prevalence of pes anserine bursitis (PAB) in patients with osteoarthritis. A total of 85 patients with primary knee osteoarthritis diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria were included in the study. The patients were divided into four groups using the Kellgren-Lawrence staging system. The knee X-rays evaluated according to this system indicated that 15.6% of patients were grade 1, 34.1% grade 2, 37.1% grade 3, and 13.5% grade 4. Ultrasonography (USG) was performed on both knees by a radiologist experienced in musculoskeletal system ultrasonography and unaware of the patients' physical examination or direct X-ray findings. The presence of PAB, longest diameter of bursitis, and area of bursitis were recorded. The average age of the 11 male and 74 female patients included in the study was 58.9 ± 9.0 years. A total of 170 knees of 85 patients were examined. The incidence of bursitis was significantly higher in females (p = 0.026). The incidence of bursitis on ultrasound was 20% (34/170). There was a statistical difference between the grades for bursitis incidence (p = 0.004). There was a significant positive correlation between both the longest length (p = 0.015, r = 0.187) and area (p = 0.003, r = 0.231) of PAB with osteoarthritis grade. The mean age of bursitis patients was higher than that of those without the condition (p = 0.038). In addition, the osteoarthritis (OA) grade and bursitis prevalence increased as the patients' age increased, and these increases were statistically significant (p bursitis was observed in one out of every five symptomatic OA patients and was more common in female patients and with advanced age. A positive correlation was found between OA grade and PAB size and area.

  11. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear.

  12. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Results Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. Conclusions We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear. PMID:29333118

  13. Infrapatellar bursitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqanatish, Jubran T; Petty, Ross E; Houghton, Kristin M; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori B; Cabral, David A; Cairns, Robyn A

    2011-02-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may infrequently present with localized anterior knee pain or swelling, in addition to generalize knee pain induced by JIA. We report five cases of deep infrapatellar bursitis in children with JIA. The clinical features, radiological findings, management, and outcome of five children with JIA and deep infrapatellar bursitis are reviewed. Three boys and two girls with a mean age of 9.8 years (range 6-14 years) were reviewed. Four children had persistent oligoarticular JIA, and one child had extended oligoarticular JIA. The presentation of deep infrapatellar bursitis was variable. In only one patient was the bursal swelling painful. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in four patients and demonstrated coexistent knee joint synovitis in three. Treatment included targeted corticosteroid injections into the deep infrapatellar bursa in two cases with complete resolution. One case was treated with corticosteroid injection by an outside health care provider with poor clinical response. Two cases are being treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and methotrexate. Deep infrapatellar bursitis can occur as an isolated finding or concurrently with knee joint synovitis in patients with JIA. Awareness of this entity is important because direct injection of the bursa may be needed for treatment, as the bursa does not communicate with the knee joint. Furthermore, when bursitis is suspected in JIA, MRI can be helpful to confirm the diagnosis, detect concurrent knee joint synovitis, and exclude other pathologies.

  14. Effect of polydeoxyribonucleotide injection on pes anserine bursitis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Jong-Uk; Cho, Hyung R; Bae, Sae M; Park, Soo K; Choi, Soo L; Seo, Mi S; Lim, Young S; Rn, Soo H Woo; Kim, Young U

    2017-10-01

    Pes anserine (PA) bursitis is an inflammatory condition of the medial knee. The PA bursa becomes more painful when infected, damaged, or irritated. Although various treatment options have been attempted to treat PA bursitis, optimal treatments are still debated. This study aims to investigate the effect of polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) injection on reducing pain and inflammation in a patient presenting with PA bursitis. A 50-year-old female patient was admitted to our pain clinic with symptoms of tenderness and pain over the medial knee. Physical examination revealed the pain to be located over the proximal medial tibia at the insertion of the conjoined tendons of the PA. The knee had lost its range of movement and strength, and resisted knee flexion. She was diagnosed as having PA bursitis. Ultrasound guided PA bursa injection was carried out. Follow-up for the patient was more than eight months. She showed good improvement in PA bursitis without any complications. This is the first successful report of successful PDRN injection for PA bursa.

  15. Cement technique for reducing post-operative bursitis after trochanteric fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Peter B; Horneff, John G; Kamath, Atul F; Garino, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    Post-operative trochanteric bursitis is a known complication secondary to the surgical approach in total hip arthroplasty. This phenomenon may be partially attributable to repetitive microtrauma generated when soft tissues rub against implanted hardware. Significant rates of post-operative trochanteric bursitis have been observed following procedures in which a trochanteric fixation device, such as a bolt-washer mechanism or a cable-grip/claw system, is used to secure the trochanteric fragment after trochanteric osteotomy. We present a simple technique for use with a bolt-washer system or grip plate in which trochanteric components are covered in bone wax followed by a layer of cement to decrease friction and to diminish the risk of post-operative bursitis.

  16. Mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex causing olecranon bursitis and prosthetic joint infection in an immunocompromised host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene M. Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case: A 73-year-old immunocompromised male presented with recurrent left elbow swelling due to Mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex (MAC olecranon bursitis. 3 years after completing MAC treatment, he underwent right total knee arthroplasty (TKA. 1 year later, he developed TKA pain and swelling and was diagnosed with MAC prosthetic joint infection (PJI. He underwent TKA resection, reimplantation, and 12 months of anti-MAC therapy. This patient is the seventh case report of MAC olecranon bursitis and the third case report of MAC PJI. He is the only report of both MAC olecranon bursitis and PJI occurring in the same patient. Informed consent: This patient was informed and agreed to the publication of this material.

  17. Sonography of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and the rarity of primary bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne S; Surrey, David E; Nazarian, Levon N

    2013-11-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome is a common condition with clinical features of pain and tenderness at the lateral aspect of the hip. Diagnosing the origin of greater trochanteric pain is important because the treatment varies depending on the cause. We hypothesized that sonographic evaluation of sources for greater trochanteric pain syndrome would show that bursitis was not the most commonly encountered abnormality. We performed a retrospective review of musculoskeletal sonographic examinations performed at our institution over a 6-year period for greater trochanteric pain syndrome; completed a tabulation of the sonographic findings; and assessed the prevalence of trochanteric bursitis, gluteal tendon abnormalities, iliotibial band abnormalities, or a combination of findings. Prevalence of abnormal findings, associations of bursitis, gluteal tendinosis, gluteal tendon tears, and iliotibial band abnormalities were calculated. The final study population consisted of 877 unique patients: 602 women, 275 men; average age, 54 years; and age range, 15-87 years). Of the 877 patients with greater trochanteric pain, 700 (79.8%) did not have bursitis on ultrasound. A minority of patients (177, 20.2%) had trochanteric bursitis. Of the 877 patients with greater trochanteric pain, 438 (49.9%) had gluteal tendinosis, four (0.5%) had gluteal tendon tears, and 250 (28.5%) had a thickened iliotibial band. The cause of greater trochanteric pain syndrome is usually some combination of pathology involving the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus tendons as well as the iliotibial band. Bursitis is present in only the minority of patients. These findings have implications for treatment of this common condition.

  18. Calcific haemorrhagic bursitis anterior to the knee mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahnke, M.; Davies, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Woodlands, B31 2AP, Northfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mangham, D.C. [Department of Pathology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Woodlands, B31 2AP, Northfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    We describe the radiological and pathological findings of two cases of calcific haemorrhagic bursitis, one involving the superficial infrapatellar bursa and the other the prepatellar bursa. It was the presence of dystrophic calcification within the lesion that suggested a mineralizing soft tissue sarcoma such as synovial sarcoma. As the radiographic and MR features of the two conditions can be similar but the appropriate management very different, rare calcifying haemorrhagic bursitis needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of masses adjacent to the knee joint showing calcification. (orig.)

  19. Calcific haemorrhagic bursitis anterior to the knee mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahnke, M.; Davies, A.M.; Mangham, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the radiological and pathological findings of two cases of calcific haemorrhagic bursitis, one involving the superficial infrapatellar bursa and the other the prepatellar bursa. It was the presence of dystrophic calcification within the lesion that suggested a mineralizing soft tissue sarcoma such as synovial sarcoma. As the radiographic and MR features of the two conditions can be similar but the appropriate management very different, rare calcifying haemorrhagic bursitis needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of masses adjacent to the knee joint showing calcification. (orig.)

  20. Ischiogluteal bursitis mimicking soft-tissue metastasis from a renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelk, M.; Gmeinwieser, J.; Manke, C.; Strotzer, M.; Hanika, H.

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of ischiogluteal bursitis mimicking a soft-tissue metastasis from a renal cell carcinoma. A 66-year-old woman suffered from pain over the left buttock 6 months after she was operated on for renal cell carcinoma of the left kidney. CT of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a tumor-like lesion adjacent to the left os ischii, which was suspected to be a soft-tissue metastasis. Percutaneous biopsy revealed no evidence of malignancy, but the histopathological diagnosis of chronic bursitis. (orig.)

  1. Long-term follow-up of corticosteroid injection for traumatic olecranon bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, P S; Canoso, J J; Wohlgethan, J R

    1984-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with traumatic olecranon bursitis were evaluated after a mean follow-up of 31 months (range 6 to 62 months). Twenty-two patients treated with bursal aspiration had delayed recovery and no complications of therapy. Twenty-five patients treated with intrabursal injection of 20 mg of triamcinolone hexacetonide had rapid recovery, usually within one week, but suffered complications such as infection (3 cases), skin atrophy (5 cases), and chronic local pain (7 cases). Since spontaneous resolution can be expected, a conservative approach is suggested in the treatment of traumatic olecranon bursitis. Images PMID:6696516

  2. Ischiogluteal bursitis mimicking soft-tissue metastasis from a renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelk, M.; Gmeinwieser, J.; Manke, C.; Strotzer, M. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Regensburg (Germany); Hanika, H. [Department of Urology, St. Josef Hospital, Regensburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    We report a case of ischiogluteal bursitis mimicking a soft-tissue metastasis from a renal cell carcinoma. A 66-year-old woman suffered from pain over the left buttock 6 months after she was operated on for renal cell carcinoma of the left kidney. CT of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a tumor-like lesion adjacent to the left os ischii, which was suspected to be a soft-tissue metastasis. Percutaneous biopsy revealed no evidence of malignancy, but the histopathological diagnosis of chronic bursitis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 8 refs.

  3. Group B streptococcal meningitis in an adult: A possible complication of olecranon bursitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Colosimo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a man with septic olecranon bursitis who had an early development of meningitis. Case Summary: A 74-year-old man presented to the emergency room with malaise, headache, mental confusion, a fever unsuccessfully treated with oral NSAIDs and ice, and with a 10-day history of pain and swelling in his right elbow. Clinical and laboratory evaluation excluded other causes and microbiological evaluation documented a S. agalactiae infection. Antibiotic treatment induced a rapid improvement, without the development of side effects. Conclusion: This is the first report on olecranon bursitis and concomitant meningitis related to S. agalactiae infection.

  4. Ultrasound-Guided 50% Ethyl Alcohol Injection for Patients With Malleolar and Olecranon Bursitis: A Prospective Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Seong; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effect of ultrasound-guided ethyl alcohol injection on malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. Methods Twenty-four patients received ultrasound-guided 50% diluted ethyl alcohol injection at the site of synovial proliferative bursitis after aspiration of the free fluid. Results Swelling and symptoms significantly decreased in 13 of the 24 patients without any complications. Eleven patients had partial improvement in swelling and symptoms. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided alcohol injection could be an alternative therapeutic option before surgery in patients with chronic intractable malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. PMID:27152282

  5. Rice body formation in bicipito-radial bursitis: ultrasound, CT, and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, L.D.; Adams, J.; Eustace, S.; Gibbons, D.; Mason, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The bicipito-radial bursa, which lies at the biceps tendon insertion on the radial tuberosity, is a rare site of chronic bursitis. We describe the clinical, radiological, and pathological findings in a case complicated by multiple rice body formation. In so doing, we describe MR appearances that allow discrimination of this entity from both synovial chondromatosis and pigmented villonodular synovitis. (orig.)

  6. Appearance of the weight-bearing lateral radiograph in retrocalcaneal bursitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sterkenburg, M.N.; Muller, B.; Maas, M.; Sierevelt, I.N.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose A retrocalcaneal bursitis is caused by repetitive impingement of the bursa between the Achilles tendon and the posterosuperior calcaneus. The bursa is situated in the posteroinferior corner of Kager's triangle (retrocalcaneal recess), which is a radiolucency with sharp borders

  7. [Treatment of traumatic lesions of the bursa olecrani and chronic bursitis olecrani].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, D; Dresing, K

    2017-06-01

    Complete olecranon bursectomy with debridement, protection of veins and nerves. Risk-adapted antibiotic therapy and early functional aftercare. Acute, traumatic laceration of the bursa olecrani, chronic therapy-resistant bursitis olecrani. For traumatic bursa injuries: general contraindications for anesthesia and surgery; chronic bursitis: initially not closable skin defect (plastic surgery required), hemodynamically instable patient (e.g. systemic inflammatory response syndrome [SIRS] or sepsis), pre-existing skin infection. Local anesthesia beyond the lesion, careful debridement, identification and removal of the entire bursa, excision of contaminated skin, lavage, drain insertion (Redon, Easy-flow, Penrose). Wound closure, elastic bandage, and splint. Elastic bandage for 2 days, followed by drain removal. Wound assessment, early functional aftercare without splint, antibiotic therapy in septic bursitis for 2 weeks, PRICE scheme. Removal of stitches after 10-12 days. Over 5 years, 138 cases of traumatic bursa lesion or chronic bursitis olecrani were treated in our clinic, 82 patients underwent surgery. Ten patients were treated with vacuum-assisted closure therapy and consecutive wound healing; fistulae occurred in two patients and in another two dehiscence developed. All of the defects could be closed without flaps.

  8. Appearance of the weight-bearing lateral radiograph in retrocalcaneal bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bart; Maas, Mario; Sierevelt, Inger N; van Dijk, C Niek

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose A retrocalcaneal bursitis is caused by repetitive impingement of the bursa between the Achilles tendon and the posterosuperior calcaneus. The bursa is situated in the posteroinferior corner of Kager's triangle (retrocalcaneal recess), which is a radiolucency with sharp borders on the lateral radiograph of the ankle. If there is inflammation, the fluid-filled bursa is less radiolucent, making it difficult to delineate the retrocalcaneal recess. We assessed whether the radiographic appearance of the retrocalcaneal recess on plain digital (filmless) radiographs could be used in the diagnosis of a retrocalcaneal bursitis. Methods Whether or not there was obliteration of the retrocalcaneal recess (yes/no) on 74 digital weight-bearing lateral radiographs of the ankle was independently assessed by 2 observers. The radiographs were from 24 patients (25 heels) with retrocalcaneal bursitis (confirmed on endoscopic calcaneoplasty); the control group consisted of 50 patients (59 heels). Results The sensitivity of the test was 83% for observer 1 and 79% for observer 2. Specificity was 100% and 98%, respectively. The kappa value of the interobserver reliability test was 0.86. For observer 1, intraobserver reliability was 0.96 and for observer 2 it was 0.92. Interpretation On digital weight-bearing lateral radiographs of a retrocalcaneal bursitis, the retrocalcaneal recess has a typical appearance. PMID:20450438

  9. The US, CT and MR findings of cubital bursitis: a report of five cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liessi, G.; Cesari, S.; Spaliviero, B.; Dell'Antonio, C.; Avventi, P.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the appearance of ''cubital bursitis'' on ultrasonography and CT and MR imaging. ''Cubital bursitis'' is a rare pathological condition involving a large swelling of the bicipito-radial or interosseous bursae located at the insertion of the distal biceps tendon on the radial tuberosity. Design and patients. We report on five patients with ''cubital bursitis'' resulting from their work or sporting activities. All patients underwent an ultrasound and MR examination. CT scans were performed on two patients before and after contrast enhancement. Results. Ultrasound studies showed a fusiform anechoic or hypoechoic lesion. CT images showed the lesions but there were some difficulties in determining the exact extent of the bursae. MR imaging showed the enlarged bursae and their fluid content. Four patients each underwent a surgical procedure. Conclusion. Ultrasound and CT were effective in the evaluation of ''cubital bursitis'', but with some diagnostic difficulties. MR imaging is probably the method of choice for determining both the development of the bursae and their fluid content. (orig.)

  10. Bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies: Ultrasound, CT and MR appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, T.C.; Chong, S.F.; Lu, P.P.; Mak, K.H.

    1998-01-01

    The radiological findings of ultrasound, CT and MR of a case of bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies is described. MRI is the investigation of choice and the intravenous gadolinium-enhanced usefulness was noted. The previous literature is also reviewed. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. Interspinous bursitis is common in polymyalgia rheumatica, but is not associated with spinal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camellino, Dario; Paparo, Francesco; Morbelli, Silvia; Cutolo, Maurizio; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Cimmino, Marco A

    2014-12-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a common inflammatory disease in older people characterized by shoulder and/or pelvic girdle, and cervical and, occasionally, lumbar pain. Interspinous bursitis has been suggested as a potential cause of spinal symptoms. We evaluated, by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography integrated with computed tomography (PET/CT), the vertebral structures involved in PMR in a cohort of consecutive, untreated patients. Sixty-five consecutive patients with PMR were studied. After a standardized physical examination, which included evaluation of pain and tenderness in the vertebral column, they underwent FDG-PET/CT. Sites of increased uptake and their correlation with spontaneous and provoked pain were recorded. For comparison, FDG-PET/CT was performed also in 65 age- and sex-matched controls and in 10 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The most frequent site of spontaneous and provoked pain was the cervical portion. FDG uptake was more frequent in the lumbar portion than at any other location, and in the cervical rather than in the thoracic portion (P bursitis (r = 0.34, P = 0.007). None of the control patients and one out of ten RA patients showed interspinous bursitis. Interspinous bursitis is a frequent finding in the lumbar spine of patients with PMR. However, it is not associated with clinical symptoms and can hardly explain the spinal pain reported by the patients. Cervical pain is more frequent than lumbar pain in PMR patients and may be caused by shoulder girdle involvement.

  12. Epidural cystic masses associated with interspinous bursitis, synovial and discal cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Frederico Guilherme de Paula Lopes; Souza, Ricardo Andre de; Brotto, Marcos Pama D'Almeida; Suguita, Fabio Massaaki; Amaral, Denise Tokechi; Amaral, Lazaro Luis Faria do

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe some cases of epidural cysts, namely synovial, discal, ligamentum flavum cysts, and cysts secondary to interspinous bursitis, all of these conditions determining radicular, dural sac compression or spinal canal stenosis. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and localization of these entities are described. (author)

  13. Results of operative treatment for recalcitrant retrocalcaneal bursitis and midportion Achilles tendinopathy in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja

    2014-08-01

    The results of operative treatment for recalcitrant midportion Achilles tendinopathy and recalcitrant retrocalcaneal bursitis were evaluated using the patient administered, disease specific, and validated VISA-A-G questionnaire. A cohort of 89 patients was prospectively followed. These patients underwent operations for sport induced midportion Achilles tendinopathy (39 procedures) or retrocalcaneal bursitis (55 procedures). Depending on the individual intraoperative findings the patients of either disease were treated with two respective operative modifications (tendon repair or no tendon repair). Preoperative and follow-up status (3, 6, and 12 months) were investigated using the VISA-A-G questionnaire. Preoperatively, the four groups scored from 37.0 ± 17.6 to 45.9 ± 15.2 (p = 0.376-0.993) on the VISA-A-G questionnaire. Six and 12 months postoperatively, the VISA-A-G scores improved significantly (p bursitis and midportion Achilles tendinopathy responded equally well to operative treatment. When repaired, additional tendon lesions did not influence this result. We demand to differentiate not only between midportion Achilles tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis but also to identify additional Achilles tendon lesions to specifically address these lesions during operative procedures.

  14. Olecranon bursitis as initial presentation of gout in asymptomatic normouricemic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El Shaarawy, Nashwa; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute bursitis is a less frequent presentation of gout, especially in normouricemic subjects compared to the typical pattern of acute gouty arthritis. Aim of the work The aim of the current case reports is to describe the clinical and the magnetic resonance imaging features of acute gouty

  15. Relationship between width of greater trochanters and width of iliac wings in tronchanteric bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viradia, Neal K; Berger, Alex A; Dahners, Laurence E

    2011-09-01

    Trochanteric bursitis is a common disorder that is characterized by inflammation of the bursa, superficial to the greater trochanter of the femur, leading to pain in the lateral hip, and often occurs because of acute trauma or repetitive friction involving the iliotibial band, the greater trochanter, and the bursa. In the study reported here, we hypothesized that the increased incidence of bursitis may be the result of the increased prominence of the trochanter in relation to the wings of the iliac crest. Distances between the outermost edges of trochanters and iliac wings were measured in 202 patients from the University of North Carolina Health Care System-101 without a known diagnosis and 101 with a clinical diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis. To determine significance, t tests for nonpaired data were used. Mean (SD) difference between trochanter and iliac wing widths was 28 (20) mm in the group diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and 17 (18) mm in the control group. The difference between the groups in this regard was significant (Pbursitis group and 1.05 (.06) in the control group. The difference between these groups was significant (Pbursitis.

  16. The US, CT and MR findings of cubital bursitis: a report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liessi, G. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale, I-31033 Castelfranco V.to, Ulss 8 (Tuvalu) (Italy); Cesari, S. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale, I-31033 Castelfranco V.to, Ulss 8 (Tuvalu) (Italy); Spaliviero, B. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale, I-31033 Castelfranco V.to, Ulss 8 (Tuvalu) (Italy); Dell`Antonio, C. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale, I-31033 Castelfranco V.to, Ulss 8 (Tuvalu) (Italy); Avventi, P. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale, I-31033 Castelfranco V.to, Ulss 8 (Tuvalu) (Italy)

    1996-07-01

    Objective. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the appearance of ``cubital bursitis`` on ultrasonography and CT and MR imaging. ``Cubital bursitis`` is a rare pathological condition involving a large swelling of the bicipito-radial or interosseous bursae located at the insertion of the distal biceps tendon on the radial tuberosity. Design and patients. We report on five patients with ``cubital bursitis`` resulting from their work or sporting activities. All patients underwent an ultrasound and MR examination. CT scans were performed on two patients before and after contrast enhancement. Results. Ultrasound studies showed a fusiform anechoic or hypoechoic lesion. CT images showed the lesions but there were some difficulties in determining the exact extent of the bursae. MR imaging showed the enlarged bursae and their fluid content. Four patients each underwent a surgical procedure. Conclusion. Ultrasound and CT were effective in the evaluation of ``cubital bursitis``, but with some diagnostic difficulties. MR imaging is probably the method of choice for determining both the development of the bursae and their fluid content. (orig.)

  17. Bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies: Ultrasound, CT and MR appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, T.C.; Chong, S.F.; Lu, P.P. [Kwong Wah Hospital (Hong Kong). Department of Radiology; Mak, K.H. [Kwong Wah Hospital (Hong Kong). Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology

    1998-05-01

    The radiological findings of ultrasound, CT and MR of a case of bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies is described. MRI is the investigation of choice and the intravenous gadolinium-enhanced usefulness was noted. The previous literature is also reviewed. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  18. Scapulothoracic bursitis as a significant cause of breast and chest wall pain: underrecognized and undertreated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneti, Cristiano; Arentz, Candy; Klimberg, V Suzanne

    2010-10-01

    Pain is one of the most commonly reported breast complaints. Referred pain from inflammation of the shoulder bursa is often overlooked as a cause of breast pain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the role of shoulder bursitis as a cause of breast/chest pain. An IRB-approved retrospective review from July 2005 to September 2009 identified 461 patients presenting with breast/chest pain. Cases identified with a trigger point in the medial aspect of the ipsilateral scapula were treated with a bursitis injection at the point of maximum tenderness. The bursitis injection contains a mixture of local anesthetic and corticosteroid. Presenting complaint, clinical response and associated factors were recorded and treated with descriptive statistics. Average age of the study group was 53.4 ± 12.7 years, and average BMI was 30.4 ± 7.4. One hundred and three patients were diagnosed with shoulder bursitis as the cause of breast pain and received the bursitis injection. Most cases (81/103 or 78.6%) presented with the breast/chest as the site of most significant discomfort, where 8.7% (9/103) had the most severe pain at the shoulder, 3.9% (4/103) at the axilla and 3.9% (4/103) at the medial scapular border. Of the treated patients, 83.5% (86/103) had complete relief of the pain, 12.6% (13/103) had improvement of symptoms with some degree of residual pain, and only 3.9%(4/103) did not respond at all to the treatment. The most commonly associated factor to the diagnosis of bursitis was the history of a previous mastectomy, present in 27.2% (28/103) of the cases. Shoulder bursitis represents a significant cause of breast/chest pain (22.3% or 103/461) and can be successfully treated with a local injection at site of maximum tenderness in the medial scapular border.

  19. Pes Anserine Bursitis in Symptomatic Osteoarthritis Patients: A Mesotherapy Treatment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggini, Raoul; Di Stefano, Alexandra; Dodaj, Ira; Scarcello, Laura; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia

    2015-08-01

    Pes anserine bursitis strongly affects quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis. Treatment includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses; recovery can take 10 days to 36 months. Mesotherapy is a minimally invasive technique consisting of subcutaneous injections of bioactive substances. The goal is to modulate the pharmacokinetics of the injected substance and prolong the effects at a local level. To evaluate the effects of mesotherapy with diclofenac for anserine bursitis associated with knee osteoarthritis. One hundred and seventeen patients with anserine bursitis associated with grade II Kellgren-Lawrence knee osteoarthritis, assessed by clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic examination, were evaluated and treated. They were randomly divided into two groups (A, mesotherapy; B, control). Group A completed nine sessions of mesotherapy with sodium diclofenac (25 mg/1 mL; Akis®, IBSA, Lugano, Switzerland), 1 mL for each session, three times per week. Group B received 21 oral administrations of sodium diclofenac (50 mg; Voltaren®, Novartis, Parsippany, NJ), once a day for 3 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain intensity assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), along with ability to perform activities of daily living, ability to participate in sports, level of pain, symptoms, and quality of life, as assessed by the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. These measures were performed before and after the treatment period and at 30 and 90 days' follow up. In both groups pain level decreased significantly after the treatment period. Ultrasonography showed a reduction of the hypoechoic area related to anserine bursitis only in group A. Administration of conventional NSAIDs (diclofenac) by mesotherapy is effective in managing anserine bursitis in knee osteoarthritis in the short term and mid-term. These observations could be of interest for efforts

  20. One- vs 2-Stage Bursectomy for Septic Olecranon and Prepatellar Bursitis: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçkay, Ilker; von Dach, Elodie; Perez, Cédric; Agostinho, Americo; Garnerin, Philippe; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Pittet, Didier

    2017-07-01

    To assess the optimal surgical approach and costs for patients hospitalized with septic bursitis. From May 1, 2011, through December 24, 2014, hospitalized patients with septic bursitis at University of Geneva Hospitals were randomized (1:1) to receive 1- vs 2-stage bursectomy. All the patients received postsurgical oral antibiotic drug therapy for 7 days. Of 164 enrolled patients, 130 had bursitis of the elbow and 34 of the patella. The surgical approach used was 1-stage in 79 patients and 2-stage in 85. Overall, there were 22 treatment failures: 8 of 79 patients (10%) in the 1-stage arm and 14 of 85 (16%) in the 2-stage arm (Pearson χ 2 test; P=.23). Recurrent infection was caused by the same pathogen in 7 patients (4%) and by a different pathogen in 5 (3%). Outcomes were better in the 1- vs 2-stage arm for wound dehiscence for elbow bursitis (1 of 66 vs 9 of 64; Fisher exact test P=.03), median length of hospital stay (4.5 vs 6.0 days), nurses' workload (605 vs 1055 points), and total costs (Sw₣6881 vs Sw₣11,178; all Pbursitis requiring hospital admission, bursectomy with primary closure, together with antibiotic drug therapy for 7 days, was safe, effective, and resource saving. Using a 2-stage approach may be associated with a higher rate of wound dehiscence for olecranon bursitis than the 1-stage approach. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01406652. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk of bursitis and other injuries and dysfunctions of the shoulder following vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Arias, L H; Sanz Fadrique, R; Sáinz Gil, M; Salgueiro-Vazquez, M E

    2017-09-05

    While vaccination injection site adverse reactions are usually mild and transient in nature, several cases of bursitis and other shoulder injuries have been reported in the medical literature. However, these lesions are not included in vaccine label inserts. To identify the characteristics of post-vaccination shoulder injuries and those of patients and involved vaccines, as well as their potential causes, a systematic review of the cases of vaccination-related bursitis and other shoulder injuries reported in the literature and notified to the Spanish Pharmacovigilance System database (FEDRA) have been conducted. We found 45 cases of bursitis and other shoulder injuries that appeared following the vaccine intramuscular injection given into the deltoid muscle (37 from the systematic review of the literature, and 8 from the scrutiny in the Spanish Pharmacovigilance System database, FEDRA). All the patients were adult, 71.1% females, with a mean and median age of 53.6years (range: 22-89). The most frequently involved vaccines were influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, respectively; followed by diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, diphtheria-tetanus toxoid, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis A vaccines. The most frequent shoulder lesion was bursitis. Most of patients required medical care due to severe local pain and arm mobility restriction. In a majority of cases, symptoms started 48h post vaccination. Subdeltoid or subacromial bursitis and other shoulder lesions may be more common than suspected. Such lesions predominantly affect women. The cause may be related to antigens or adjuvants contained in the vaccines that would trigger an immune or inflammatory response. However, they are more likely to be the consequence of a poor injection technique (site, angle, needle size, and failure to take into account patient's characteristics, i. e., sex, body weight, and physical constitution). Therefore, vaccination-related shoulder injuries would be amenable to prevention. Copyright

  2. VALORACION DEL TRATAMIENTO CON ACUPUNTURA Y MOXIBUSTION EN PACIENTES CON BURSITIS DE HOMBRO DE LA CLINICA DE ACUPUNTURA DE LA ESCUELA NACIONAL DE MEDICINA Y HOMEOPATIA.

    OpenAIRE

    DE LEON POLANCO, ALEJANDRO PACIANO

    2009-01-01

    LA BURSITIS ES LA INFLAMACION DE LAS BURSAS, QUE SON PEQUENAS BOLSAS LLENAS DE LIQUIDO SEROSO QUE SE ENCUENTRAN ENTRE LOS TENDONES Y EL PLANO OSEO. LA CINTURA ESCAPULAR TIENE 11 BURSAS LAS CUALES SE PUEDEN AFECTAR UNA O MAS EN FORMA SIMULTANEA CONDICIONANDO DOLOR, INFLAMACION Y LIMITACION FUNCIONAL QUE TRAE COMO CONSECUENCIA TRASTORNOS EN LA VIDA COTIDIANA DEL INDIVIDUO. LA BURSITIS SE CLASIFICA EN AGUDAS Y CRONICAS. LAS POSIBLES ETIOLOGIAS DE LA BURSITIS PUEDEN SER TRAUMATISMOS AGUDOS, PROC...

  3. Septic and non-septic olecranon bursitis in the accident and emergency department--an approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stell, I M

    1996-01-01

    Olecranon bursitis is relatively common. One third of episodes are septic. Most of the remainder are non-septic, with occasional rheumatological causes. Trauma can cause both septic and non-septic olecranon bursitis. Clinical features are helpful in separating septic from non-septic olecranon bursitis, but there may be local erythema in both. Aspiration should be carried out in all cases, and if the presence of infection is still in doubt, microscopy, Gram staining, and culture of the aspirate will resolve the issue. Septic olecranon bursitis should be treated by aspiration, which may need to be repeated, and a long course of antibiotics. Some cases will need admission, and a few will need surgical treatment. Non-septic olecranon bursitis can be managed with aspiration alone. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs probably hasten symptomatic improvement. Intrabursal corticosteroids produce a rapid resolution but concern remains over their long term local effects. Recovery from septic olecranon bursitis can take months. PMID:8894865

  4. Olecranon Bursitis Caused by Candida parapsilosis in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Gamarra-Hilburn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic bursitis is usually caused by bacterial organisms. However, infectious bursitis caused by fungi is very rare. Herein, we present a 68-year-old woman with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis who developed pain, erythema, and swelling of the right olecranon bursa. Aspiration of the olecranon bursa showed a white blood cell count of 3.1×103/μL (41% neutrophils, 30% lymphocytes, and 29% monocytes. Fluid culture was positive for Candida parapsilosis. She was treated with caspofungin 50 mg intravenously daily for 13 days followed by fluconazole 200 mg orally daily for one week. She responded well to this treatment but had recurrent swelling of the bursa. Bursectomy was recommended but she declined this option. This case, together with other reports, suggests that the awareness of uncommon pathogens, their presentation, and predisposing risk factors are important to establish an early diagnosis and prevent long-term complications.

  5. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Resorlu Mustafa; Doner Davut; Karatag Ozan; Toprak Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed al...

  6. OSTEOCHONDROMA OF THE PROXIMAL HUMERUS WITH FRICTIONAL BURSITIS AND SECONDARY SYNOVIAL OSTEOCHONDROMATOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, J; Geerts, B; Mermuys, K; Verstraete, K

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of multiple hereditary exostosis in a 33-year old patient with clinical symptoms of pain and impression of a growing mass of the left shoulder alerting potential risk of malignant transformation of an osteochondroma. Imaging studies illustrated perilesional bursitis surrounding an osteochondroma of the proximal humerus. Malignant transformation was excluded with MRI. Fragments of the osteochondroma were dislocated in the inflammatory synovial bursa illustrating a case of secondary synovial osteochondromatosis.

  7. [Treatment of septic olecranon and patellar bursitis by excision and vacuum-assisted closure therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, G; Kemmerer, M; Hoffmann, R

    2013-08-01

    Treatment of septic olecranon and patellar bursitis differs considerably and is currently under discussion. We therefore performed a retrospective study of our patients with septic bursitis in the past 5 years. Between March 2007 and February 2012 we treated 79 patients with septic olecranon (n = 43) and patellar (n = 36) bursitis surgically: 61-males, 18 females, age 51 (range: 11-91) years. Four patients had not been treated before, 25 had suffered recurrences after 1-10 previous procedures, and 9 patients had not improved after conservative therapy. 34 patients presented with traumatic rupture or fistula of their bursae. In all cases we performed a radical bursectomy and vacuum-assisted therapy for 4 to 5 days. In addition, patients received systemic antibiotics. We phoned all patients and were successful in 57 cases (72 %). We questioned these patients for range of movement, limitations at work, pain, sensibility disorder, satisfaction with the result and further surgical procedures. In all cases we took tissue specimens for cultures, in 48 preparations histological examination was performed. Microbiological and histological results are discussed in detail. 40 patients were free of complaints, 15 complained of mild pain, 54 of 57 had unlimited range of motion. Minor discomforts at desk work were reported by 5 of 43 patients, 12 out of 36 patient reported discomfort when performing on their knees. There was no recurrence in the period of investigation. We recommend our treatment concept for septic olecranon and patellar bursitis because patient satisfaction is high and recurrences are reliably avoided. The soft tissue is spared, so that plastic covering procedures are seldom necessary. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Rice body formation in bicipito-radial bursitis: ultrasound, CT, and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, L.D.; Adams, J.; Eustace, S. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, One Boston Medical Center Place, Boston MA 02118 (United States); Gibbons, D. [Department of Pathology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mason, M.D. [Department of Orthopedics, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The bicipito-radial bursa, which lies at the biceps tendon insertion on the radial tuberosity, is a rare site of chronic bursitis. We describe the clinical, radiological, and pathological findings in a case complicated by multiple rice body formation. In so doing, we describe MR appearances that allow discrimination of this entity from both synovial chondromatosis and pigmented villonodular synovitis. (orig.) With 3 figs., 8 refs.

  9. Heel pain due to retrocalcaneal bursitis-radiographic diagnosis (with an historical footnote on Sever's disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heneghan, M.A.; Wallace, T.

    1985-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis is a distinct condition causing posterior heel pain in active, healthy children. It appears to result from post-traumatic inflammation of the soft tissues of the posterior heel, and is unrelated to avascular necrosis of the calcaneal apophysis. The diagnosis may be confirmed radiographically by the loss of the lucent retrocalcaneal recess, with a normal Achilles tendon and superficial soft tissue contour, and intact cortex of the underling os calcis. (orig.)

  10. Citric acid treatment of chronic nonhealing ulcerated tophaceous gout with bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoba, Basavaraj S; Punpale, Ajay; Poddar, Ashok; Suryawanshi, Namdev M; Swami, Ganesh A; Selkar, Sohan P

    2013-12-01

    The ulceration associated with gout tophi is very difficult to treat because of impaired and halted local inflammatory response resulting from the gout treatment regimen. We report chronic nonhealing tophaceous gout with bursitis in an 80-year-old male, not responding to conventional treatment modality for months together. This nonhealing ulcer was treated successfully with local application of 3% citric acid ointment for 22 days.

  11. Heel pain due to retrocalcaneal bursitis-radiographic diagnosis (with an historical footnote on Sever's disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heneghan, M A; Wallace, T

    1985-02-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis is a distinct condition causing posterior heel pain in active, healthy children. It appears to result from post-traumatic inflammation of the soft tissues of the posterior heel, and is unrelated to avascular necrosis of the calcaneal apophysis. The diagnosis may be confirmed radiographically by the loss of the lucent retrocalcaneal recess, with a normal Achilles tendon and superficial soft tissue contour, and intact cortex of the underling os calcis.

  12. Large bursitis formation associated with osteochondroma of the scapula: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Karadeli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondroma is the most common benign bone tumors. 27-year-old man was admitted with complaints of increased swelling of the left shoulder motion. After imaging and histological examination diagnosed osteochondroma. Pain is often connected to the mechanical effect of environmental osteochondroma tissue mass is the result of symptoms. This can result in bursitis. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 95-97

  13. Atypical extraspinal musculoskeletal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients: Part II, tuberculous myositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahab, I.F. [Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Bianchi, S. [Clinique et Fondation des Grangettes, Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: stefanobianchi@bluewin.ch; Martinoli, C. [Universita di Genova, Cattedra di Radiologia, DICMI, Genoa (Italy); Klein, M. [Univ. of Alabama School of Medicine, Dept. of Pathology, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Hermann, G. [Mount Sinai Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, New York, New York (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Tuberculosis involving the soft tissue from adjacent bone or joint is well recognized. However, primary tuberculous pyomyositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovitis are rare entities constituting 1% of skeletal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis involves most commonly the tendon sheaths of the hand and wrist, and tuberculous bursitis occurs most commonly around the hip. The greater trochanteric bursa and the greater trochanter are the most frequent sites of tuberculous bursitis. Cases of primary tuberculous pyomyositis and tenosynovitis of the tendons of the ankle and foot are seldom reported in the radiology literature. All imaging modalities - plain radiography, bone scan, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - provide information that is helpful in determining therapy. MRI in particular, with its multiplanar capabilities and superb contrast of soft tissue, can demonstrate the extent of the soft tissue mass and access the adjacent bones and joints. However, MRI has no diagnostic specificity in regard to tuberculosis, and in nonendemic areas, biopsy is strongly recommended. All patients in this review were permanent residents of North America or Western Europe and were immunocompetent. Examples of atypical presentations of the above entities are demonstrated. (author)

  14. Use of X-rays to treat shoulder tendonitis/bursitis: a historical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J; Dhawan, Gaurav; Kapoor, Rachna

    2014-08-01

    This article assesses the therapeutic efficacy of ionizing radiation for the treatment of shoulder tendonitis/bursitis in the USA over the period of its use (human 1936-1961; veterinary 1954-1974). Results from ~3,500 human cases were reported in the clinical case studies over 30 articles, and indicated a high treatment efficacy (>90 %) for patients. Radiotherapy was effective with a single treatment. The duration of treatment effectiveness was prolonged, usually lasting until the duration of the follow-up period (i.e., 1-5 years). Therapeutic effectiveness was reduced for conditions characterized as chronic. Similar findings were reported with race horses in the veterinary literature. These historical findings are consistent with clinical studies over the past several decades in Germany, which have used more rigorous study designs and a broader range of clinical evaluation parameters. Radiotherapy treatment was widely used in the mid twentieth century in the USA, but was abandoned following the discovery of anti-inflammatory drugs and the fear of radiation-induced cancer. That X-ray treatment could be an effective means of treating shoulder tendonitis/bursitis, as a treatment option, and is essentially unknown by the current medical community. This paper is the first comprehensive synthesis of the historical use of X-rays to treat shoulder tendonitis/bursitis and its efficacy in the USA.

  15. Retrocalcaneal bursitis but not Achilles tendinopathy is characterized by increased pressure in the retrocalcaneal bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja

    2014-03-01

    We questioned whether different forms of Achilles tendon overuse injuries can be differentiated by retrocalcaneal bursa pressure measurement. Retrocalcaneal bursa pressure was determined by using invasive pressure measurement in patients suffering from retrocalcaneal bursitis (n=13) or Achilles tendinopathy (n=15), respectively. Standardized measurements were taken with the subject lying prone. Initially, the foot and ankle was in a spontaneous, unsupported position. Then passive dorsiflexion was induced by an increasing pressure which was applied in five defined steps against the plantar forefoot. Mean pressures found in unloaded position were 30.5 (SD 28.9) mmHg in retrocalcaneal bursitis and -9.9 (SD 17.2) mmHg in Achilles tendinopathy (pbursitis and 32.5 (SD 48.9) mmHg for Achilles tendinopathy (p=0,051). Higher retrocalcaneal bursa pressure values were found in patients suffering from chronic retrocalcaneal bursitis. This result supports the hypothesis that retrocalcaneal bursa hypertension leads to an impingement lesion of the corresponding anterior Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bursite iliopectínea: relato de caso Iliopectineal bursitis: case report

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    Eduardo Amaral Gomes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A bursite iliopectínea, embora não tenha muitos relatos na literatura, apresenta-se clinicamente com sinais e sintomas frequentemente encontrados nos ambulatórios e consultórios. Sua clínica é de dor na parte anterior do quadril que piora à extensão, abdução e rotação interna do mesmo. O diagnóstico é confirmado pelo ultrassom ou ressonância nuclear magnética do quadril. A bursite iliopectínea responde bem ao tratamento conservador com anti-inflamatório não hormonal e repouso. Devido a esta boa evolução, não raro, pode-se tratar uma bursite iliopectínea com sucesso sem se saber o que está tratando.Although there are not many reports in literature, iliopectineal bursitis presents clinically with signs and symptoms frequently found in outpatient services and practice. Its clinical presentation is anterior hip pain that worsens with the extension, abduction and internal rotation of the hip. The diagnosis is confirmed by ultrasound or magnetic nuclear resonance imaging of the hip. The iliopectineal bursitis responds well to conservative treatment with non-hormonal anti-inflammatory drugs and rest. Due to its good evolution, it is not rare to treat iliopectineal bursitis successfully without even knowing what is being treated.

  17. Chronic Open Infective Lateral Malleolus Bursitis Management Using Local Rotational Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Beom Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Using a sinus tarsi rotational flap is an uncommon approach to treating chronic open infective lateral malleolus bursitis. Methods. We treated eight patients, including six males, using this approach. First, we debrided all the infected tissues and used a negative pressure wound closure system where needed. After acute infection had been controlled, the local rotational flap was used for cases where the wound could not be closed by a simple suture or bone exposure. The rotational flap was detached with a curved skin incision at the sinus tarsi next to the open wound and sutured to the defect, paying careful attention to the superficial peroneal nerve. The donor site was managed with a split-thickness skin graft. Results. The patients’ mean age was 74.1 years. Six patients had a wound after suppurative infection, but two patients had ulcer-type bursitis. Six patients demonstrated full flap healing, but two patients had venous congestion necrosis. Conclusion. A sinus tarsi rotational flap is a useful method to ensure healing and coverage of chronic open lateral malleolus bursitis, especially for small to medium wounds with cavity and bone exposure.

  18. Endoscopic bursectomy for the treatment of septic pre-patellar bursitis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, John P; Freedman, Ilan; Tan, James S M; Mitchell, David; English, Shaun

    2012-07-01

    Operative treatment for septic pre-patellar bursitis generally involves open debridement in addition to an extended course of intravenous antibiotics. Skin necrosis and wound breakdown are potential complications of this procedure in addition to scar sensitivity and a prolonged recovery. We report endoscopic bursectomy for the treatment of septic pre-patellar bursitis in eight patients over a 3-year period. All patients had microbiological confirmation of an infective process. The average age was 36 years (23-68 years). The average hospital stay was 6 days (4-9 days). No patient had a recurrence or complained of tenderness or hypoaesthesia around their wound. No patient experienced wound complications or skin necrosis. The average return to work time was 18 days (7-22 days). We conclude that endoscopic bursectomy is a safe and effective treatment for septic pre-patellar bursitis with a shortened hospital stay and a quicker return to work than conventional open debridement.

  19. Atypical extraspinal musculoskeletal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients: Part II, tuberculous myositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, I.F.; Bianchi, S.; Martinoli, C.; Klein, M.; Hermann, G.

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis involving the soft tissue from adjacent bone or joint is well recognized. However, primary tuberculous pyomyositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovitis are rare entities constituting 1% of skeletal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis involves most commonly the tendon sheaths of the hand and wrist, and tuberculous bursitis occurs most commonly around the hip. The greater trochanteric bursa and the greater trochanter are the most frequent sites of tuberculous bursitis. Cases of primary tuberculous pyomyositis and tenosynovitis of the tendons of the ankle and foot are seldom reported in the radiology literature. All imaging modalities - plain radiography, bone scan, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - provide information that is helpful in determining therapy. MRI in particular, with its multiplanar capabilities and superb contrast of soft tissue, can demonstrate the extent of the soft tissue mass and access the adjacent bones and joints. However, MRI has no diagnostic specificity in regard to tuberculosis, and in nonendemic areas, biopsy is strongly recommended. All patients in this review were permanent residents of North America or Western Europe and were immunocompetent. Examples of atypical presentations of the above entities are demonstrated. (author)

  20. Femoral nerve palsy caused by ileopectineal bursitis after total hip replacement: a case report

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    Bähr Mathias

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Infectious ileopectineal bursitis is a rare complication after total hip replacement and is associated mainly with rheumatoid arthritis. The main complications are local swelling and pain, but communication of the inflamed bursa with the joint can occur, leading to subsequent cartilage damage and bone destruction. Case presentation We report a case of a 47-year-old Caucasian woman without rheumatoid arthritis who reported pain and palsy in her left leg almost one year after total hip replacement. She was diagnosed with an ileopectineal bursitis after total hip replacement, leading to femoral nerve palsy. The diagnosis was obtained by thorough clinical examination, the results of focused computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of non-infectious ileopectineal bursitis in a patient without rheumatoid arthritis as a complication of total hip replacement. This rare case underlines the importance of proper neurologic examination of persistent conditions after orthopedic intervention in otherwise healthy individuals. We believe this case should be useful for a broad spectrum of medical specialties, including orthopedics, neurology, radiology, and general practice.

  1. Diagnosis and management of cranial and caudal nuchal bursitis in four horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, José M; Jenei, Thomas; Chope, Kate; Bubeck, Kirstin A

    2010-10-01

    4 horses with a history of neck pain, abnormal head carriage, and related inability to perform were examined. Cranial nuchal bursitis was diagnosed in 2 horses, and caudal nuchal bursitis was diagnosed in the other 2. All 4 horses had prominent swelling in the region between the frontal bone and temporal fossa (ie, the poll) and abnormal head carriage. Ultrasonographic examination revealed fluid distention and synovial thickening of the cranial or caudal nuchal bursa in all 4 horses. Ultrasonography-guided aspiration of the affected region was performed successfully in 3 horses. Radiography revealed bony remodeling and mineralization over the dorsal aspect of the atlas in 1 horse and a radiolucency at the axis in another. Nuclear scintigraphy revealed an increase in radioisotope uptake at the level of C2 in 1 horse. Although a septic process was considered among the differential diagnoses in all horses, a septic process could only be confirmed in 1 horse. All horses were refractory to conservative management consisting of intrabursal injection of anti-inflammatory medications. Bursoscopic debridement and lavage of the affected bursae resulted in resolution of the clinical signs in all horses, and they all returned to their intended use. Cranial and caudal nuchal bursitis, of nonseptic or septic origin, should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with head and neck pain. Horses undergoing surgical intervention consisting of nuchal bursoscopy have the opportunity to return to their original degree of exercise.

  2. Tratamiento acupuntural de la bursitis subdeltoidea calcificada en la atención primaria de salud Acupuncture treatment of calcified subdeltoid bursitis in health primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Manuel Pérez Rivera

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente del sexo masculino, de 43 años de edad, con historia de dolor en el hombro derecho desde hace aproximadamente 3 meses, a raíz de una contusión superficial, el cual recibió tratamiento conservador con reposo y medicamentos, pero no resolvió la sintomatología. Ahora, con diagnóstico de bursitis subdeltoidea calcificada, recibe tratamiento acupuntural en el Departamento de Medicina Natural y Tradicional de la sala de rehabilitación de su área de salud. Se presenta esta variante de tratamiento mediante sus estudios radiológicos.This is the case of a male patient aged 43 with a pain history in right shoulder of approximately 3 months ago caused by a superficial contusion receiving conservative treatment with rest and drugs, without symptoms resolution. For the tine being time diagnosed with calcified subdeltoid bursitis and acupuncture treatment in Natural and Traditional Medicine Service of rehabilitation ward of his health area. This treatment variant is presented by its radiologic studies.

  3. Popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis are associated with knee symptoms and structural abnormalities in older adults: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuelong; Jones, Graeme; Han, Weiyu; Antony, Benny; Wang, Xia; Cicuttini, Flavia; Ding, Changhai

    2014-03-03

    The role of popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis in knee joint homeostasis is uncertain. The aim of this study is to describe cross-sectional associations between popliteal cysts, subgastrocnemius bursitis, knee symptoms and structural abnormalities in older adults. A cross-sectional sample of 900 randomly-selected subjects (mean age 63 years, 48% female) were studied. Knee pain, stiffness and dysfunction were assessed by self-administered Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire. Radiographic knee osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) were recorded. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was utilized to assess popliteal cysts, subgastrocnemius bursitis, cartilage defects and bone marrow lesions (BMLs). Popliteal cysts were present in 11.7% and subgastrocnemius bursitis in 12.7% of subjects. Subgastrocnemius bursitis was more common in those with popliteal cyst (36.2% versus 9.7%, P bursitis was associated with increased osteophytes and JSN in the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Both were significantly associated with cartilage defects in all compartments, and with BMLs in the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Furthermore, both popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis were significantly associated with increased weight-bearing knee pain but these associations became non-significant after adjustment for cartilage defects and BMLs. Popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis are associated with increased symptoms as well as radiographic and MRI-detected joint structural abnormalities. Longitudinal data will help resolve if they are a consequence or a cause of knee joint abnormalities.

  4. MR imaging after rotator cuff repair: full-thickness defects and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities in asymptomatic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J.; Jost, B.; Gerber, C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities on MR images after rotator cuff repair in asymptomatic subjects, and to define the clinical relevance of these findings.Design and patients. Fourteen completely asymptomatic patients and 32 patients with residual symptoms were investigated 27-53 months (mean 39 months) after open transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Coronal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and turbo STIR or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MR images were obtained. The prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears of the rotator cuff and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities were determined.Results. Residual defects or retears were detected in three (21%) and bursitis-like abnormalities in 14 (100%) of the 14 asymptomatic patients. Fifteen (47%) residual defects or retears and 31 (97%) bursitis-like abnormalities were diagnosed in the 32 patients with residual symptoms. The size of the residual defects/retears was significantly smaller in the asymptomatic group (mean 8 mm, range 6-11 mm) than in the symptomatic group (mean 32 mm, range 7-50 mm) (t-test, P=0.001). The extent of the bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities did not significantly differ (t-test, P>0.05) between asymptomatic (mean 28 x 3 mm) and symptomatic patients (mean 32 x 3 mm).Conclusion. Small residual defects or retears (<1 cm) of the rotator cuff are not necessarily associated with clinical symptoms. Subacromial bursitis-like MR abnormalities are almost always seen after rotator cuff repair even in patients without residual complaints. They may persist for several years after rotator cuff repair and appear to be clinically irrelevant. (orig.)

  5. MR imaging after rotator cuff repair: full-thickness defects and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Jost, B.; Gerber, C. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2000-06-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities on MR images after rotator cuff repair in asymptomatic subjects, and to define the clinical relevance of these findings.Design and patients. Fourteen completely asymptomatic patients and 32 patients with residual symptoms were investigated 27-53 months (mean 39 months) after open transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Coronal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and turbo STIR or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MR images were obtained. The prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears of the rotator cuff and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities were determined.Results. Residual defects or retears were detected in three (21%) and bursitis-like abnormalities in 14 (100%) of the 14 asymptomatic patients. Fifteen (47%) residual defects or retears and 31 (97%) bursitis-like abnormalities were diagnosed in the 32 patients with residual symptoms. The size of the residual defects/retears was significantly smaller in the asymptomatic group (mean 8 mm, range 6-11 mm) than in the symptomatic group (mean 32 mm, range 7-50 mm) (t-test, P=0.001). The extent of the bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities did not significantly differ (t-test, P>0.05) between asymptomatic (mean 28 x 3 mm) and symptomatic patients (mean 32 x 3 mm).Conclusion. Small residual defects or retears (<1 cm) of the rotator cuff are not necessarily associated with clinical symptoms. Subacromial bursitis-like MR abnormalities are almost always seen after rotator cuff repair even in patients without residual complaints. They may persist for several years after rotator cuff repair and appear to be clinically irrelevant. (orig.)

  6. Case Report of Pes Anserine Bursitis patient treated with Bee Venom Acua-Acupuncture Therapy by Using DITI

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    Moon Ja-Young

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The purpose of this study is to report the effect of Bee Venom Acua-Acupuncture Therapy to the patient of Pes Anserine Bursitis by using DITI. Patient & Methods : The patient was 60-year-old woman who complained severe knee pain. She was treated by bee venom acuaacupuncture therapy. To estimate the efficacy of tratment, we used DITI, visual analog scale, knee joint check(ROM. Results : In this case, we treated patient of Pes Anserine Bursitis for 28 days. bee venom acua-acupuncture therapy efficiently relieved patient's pain and improved ROM. DITI and Visual analog scale also showed significantly valuable changes.

  7. Prepatellar and olecranon bursitis: literature review and development of a treatment algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Sebastian F; Lobo, Christopher M; Badyine, Ilias; Mutschler, Wolf; Kanz, Karl-Georg

    2014-03-01

    Olecranon bursitis and prepatellar bursitis are common entities, with a minimum annual incidence of 10/100,000, predominantly affecting male patients (80 %) aged 40-60 years. Approximately 1/3 of cases are septic (SB) and 2/3 of cases are non-septic (NSB), with substantial variations in treatment regimens internationally. The aim of the study was the development of a literature review-based treatment algorithm for prepatellar and olecranon bursitis. Following a systematic review of Pubmed, the Cochrane Library, textbooks of emergency medicine and surgery, and a manual reference search, 52 relevant papers were identified. The initial differentiation between SB and NSB was based on clinical presentation, bursal aspirate, and blood sampling analysis. Physical findings suggesting SB were fever >37.8 °C, prebursal temperature difference greater 2.2 °C, and skin lesions. Relevant findings for bursal aspirate were purulent aspirate, fluid-to-serum glucose ratio 3,000 cells/μl, polymorphonuclear cells >50 %, positive Gram staining, and positive culture. General treatment measures for SB and NSB consist of bursal aspiration, NSAIDs, and PRICE. For patients with confirmed NSB and high athletic or occupational demands, intrabursal steroid injection may be performed. In the case of SB, antibiotic therapy should be initiated. Surgical treatment, i.e., incision, drainage, or bursectomy, should be restricted to severe, refractory, or chronic/recurrent cases. The available evidence did not support the central European concept of immediate bursectomy in cases of SB. A conservative treatment regimen should be pursued, following bursal aspirate-based differentiation between SB and NSB.

  8. Is ultrasound-guided injection more effective in chronic subacromial bursitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Lin, Yi-Jia; Wu, Shih-Hui; Chang, Kae-Chwen; Chang, Hsiao-Lan

    2013-12-01

    Although ultrasound (US)-guided subacromial injection has shown increased accuracy in needle placement, whether US-guided injection produces better clinical outcome is still controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the efficacy of subacromial corticosteroid injection under US guidance with palpation-guided subacromial injection in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis. Patients with chronic subacromial bursitis were randomized to a US-guided injection group and a palpation-guided injection group. The subjects in each group were injected with a mixture of 0.5 mL dexamethasone suspension and 3 mL lidocaine into the subacromial bursa. The primary outcome measures were the visual analog scale for pain and active and passive ranges of motion of the affected shoulder. Secondary outcome measures were the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The primary outcome measures were evaluated before, immediately, 1 wk, and 1 month after the injection; the secondary outcome measures were evaluated before, 1 wk, and 1 month after the injection. Of the 145 subjects screened, 46 in each group completed the study. Significantly greater improvement in passive shoulder abduction and in physical functioning and vitality scores on the SF-36 were observed in the US-guided group. The pre- and postinjection within-group comparison revealed significant improvement in the visual analog scale for pain and range of motion, as well as in the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and SF-36 scores, in both groups. The US-guided subacromial injection technique produced significantly greater improvements in passive shoulder abduction and in some items of the SF-36. US is effective in guiding the needle into the subacromial bursa in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis.

  9. Synovial cysts of the hip joint and iliopsoas bursitis: A spectrum of imaging abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.; Greenway, G.

    1985-01-01

    Synovium-related soft tissue disease around the hip constitutes a spectrum ranging from isolated iliopsoas bursitis to pure articular synovial herniations without bursal involvement. The clinical, pathologic, and radiographic features of these entities are discussed as they pertain to the variety of underlying disorder which predispose to their occurrence. Nine case reports are utilized to illustrate the variable clinical and radiographic presentations which may be encountered. Based upon these cases as well as those in the literature, an imaging algorithm has been developed which should eliminate unnecessary studies and allow prompt and accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically.

  11. Septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common condition. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration is one of several options to treat this condition. The main advantages of this procedure are short duration, good outcome, and low cost. Furthermore, only minor complications have been reported in the literature, namely, vagal reactions during the procedure and mild postprocedural pain. We report the first case of septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy. Although this is generally considered a very safe procedure, a risk of infection should be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Successful Treatment of Gluteal Pain from Obturator Internus Tendinitis and Bursitis with Ultrasound-Guided Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Boqing; Rispoli, Leia; Stitik, Todd; Leong, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    This case report describes what the authors believe is the first case of a patient with obturator internus tendinitis and bursitis successfully treated with a corticosteroid injection using a trans-tendinous lateral to medial approach. The patient presented with right gluteal pain not relieved by physical therapy or right hip and ischial bursa corticosteroid injections. Pelvic and lumbar spine MRIs and EMG/NCS findings were unremarkable. Physical examination demonstrated tenderness to palpation at the right middle lower gluteal region. Ultrasound imaging with sonopalpation identified the maximal local tender point as the right obturator internus muscle and/or its underlying bursa. A 22-gauge 3.5-inch needle was inserted in-plane to the transducer and longitudinal to the obturator internus from a lateral to medial direction, an approach previously described in cadavers. The obturator internus tendon sheath and bursa were injected with 2.5 ml of 0.5% lidocaine combined with 10 mg of triamcinolone. The patient reported immediate complete relief of pain with continued relief at 2 and 6 months post-injection. This case report demonstrates an injection of the obturator internus tendon sheath and bursa using a trans-tendinous approach, which may be successful for treatment of patients presenting with persistent gluteal pain from obturator internus tendinitis and bursitis.

  13. Groin pain and iliopsoas bursitis: always a cause-effect relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Luca; Paoloni, Marco; De Benedittis, Stefano; Tognolo, Lucrezia; Santilli, Valter

    2014-01-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis (IB) is characterized by inflammation and enlargement of the iliopsoas bursa. Although this condition is often associated with degenerative or inflammatory arthritis, infections, trauma, overuse and impingement syndromes, osteonecrosis and hip replacement, the pathogenesis of IB remains uncertain. We present a case report of IB associated with moderate hip osteoarthritis (HOA). We present a case report of a 73-year-old man with chronic left hip pain that did not respond to conservative treatments. An ultrasonography examination of the left hip revealed fluid-induced distension of the iliopsoas bursa, which was treated with aspiration followed by a corticosteroid-anesthetic injection. At the 30-day follow-up, despite an initial improvement in the patient's symptoms, both the pain and functional limitation returned, though not in association with bursa distension. The patient therefore underwent a total hip arthroplasty, which fully relieved the symptoms. We hypothesize that iliopsoas bursitis may, when associated with other pathological conditions, not be the only source of pain. It should, nevertheless, be considered for differential diagnosis purposes.

  14. Bursitis with severe tendom and muscle necrosis on the lateral stifle area in cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuss, K.; Muggli, E.; Hässig, M.; Räber, M.; Sydler, T.; Guscetti, F.

    2011-01-01

    In 21 animals, chronic swelling on the lateral aspect of the stifle also known as perigonitis, stable-syndrome or bursitis bicipitalis femoris were evaluated. Ultrasonography showed increased fluid in the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle and structural changes in the tendons, muscles, subcutis and fasciae. Soft tissue swelling and an irregular contour of the lateral tibial condyle were typical signs on radiographs. Macroscopic changes were found at the insertion of the biceps femoris muscle, the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle, the lateral collateral ligament of the stifle, the origin of muscles on the lateral femoral condyle and the lateral tibial condyle. They mainly consisted of tendon and muscle tissue necrosis with granulation tissue. Histology revealed areas of coagulation necrosis in tendons and ligaments, in which occasionally Onchocerca spp. were seen. The severity of lesions correlated well with the clinical signs, which were associated with a poor prognosis in advanced cases

  15. Suture slippage in knotless suture anchors resulting in subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayeri, Mohammad Reza; Keefe, Daniel T; Chang, Eric Y

    2016-05-01

    Rotator cuff repair using a suture bridge and knotless suture anchors is a relatively new, but increasingly used technique. The suture bridge technique creates an anatomically similar and more secure rotator cuff repair compared with conventional arthroscopic techniques and the use of knotless anchors eliminates the challenges associated with knot tying during arthroscopic surgery. However, previous in vitro biomechanical tests have shown that the hold of the suture in a knotless suture anchor is far lower than the pullout strength of the anchor from bone. Up until now slippage has been a theoretical concern. We present a prospectively diagnosed case of in vivo suture loosening after rotator cuff repair using a knotless bridge technique resulting in subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis.

  16. Protothecal bursitis after simultaneous kidney/liver transplantation: a case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, I; Nieto-Ríos, J F; Ocampo-Kohn, C; Aristizábal-Alzate, A; Zuluaga-Valencia, G; Muñoz Maya, O; Pérez, J C

    2016-04-01

    Solid organ transplantation is an accepted therapy for end-stage diseases of the kidneys, liver, heart, and lungs. Unfortunately, transplantation is associated with infectious complications. Here, we present a case report of Prototheca wickerhamii olecranon bursitis and review all of the cases in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients published in the literature to date. In our patient, the infection resolved with surgical therapy and limited antifungal therapy, and no symptoms have recurred over 24 months of follow-up. A review of the literature suggests that 50% of SOT recipients with Prototheca infection present with disseminated infection, and the overall mortality is 75%. More studies are required to determine the optimal management of protothecosis in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Scapulothoracic bursitis and snapping scapula syndrome: a critical review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Ryan J; Spiegl, Ulrich J; Millett, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic scapulothoracic disorders, such as painful scapular crepitus and/or bursitis, are uncommon; however, they can produce significant pain and disability in many patients. To review the current knowledge pertaining to snapping scapula syndrome and to identify areas of further research that may be helpful to improve clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. Systematic review. We performed a preliminary search of the PubMed and Embase databases using the search terms "snapping scapula," "scapulothoracic bursitis," "partial scapulectomy," and "superomedial angle resection" in September 2013. All nonreview articles related to the topic of snapping scapula syndrome were included. The search identified a total of 167 unique articles, 81 of which were relevant to the topic of snapping scapula syndrome. There were 36 case series of fewer than 10 patients, 16 technique papers, 11 imaging studies, 9 anatomic studies, and 9 level IV outcomes studies. The level of evidence obtained from this literature search was inadequate to perform a formal systematic review or meta-analysis. Therefore, a critical review of current evidence is presented. Snapping scapula syndrome, a likely underdiagnosed condition, can produce significant shoulder dysfunction in many patients. Because the precise origin is typically unknown, specific treatments that are effective for some patients may not be effective for others. Nevertheless, bursectomy with or without partial scapulectomy is currently the most effective primary method of treatment in patients who fail nonoperative therapy. However, many patients experience continued shoulder disability even after surgical intervention. Future studies should focus on identifying the modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes after operative and nonoperative management for snapping scapula syndrome in an effort to improve clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. © 2014 The Author(s).

  18. Sustained-release indomethacin in the management of the acute painful shoulder from bursitis and/or tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabro, J J; Londino, A V; Eyvazzadeh, C

    1985-10-25

    Of all the forms of nonarticular rheumatism, by far the most common are bursitis and tendinitis. Yet, the bursae and neighboring tendon sheaths are the most neglected anatomic structures of the body. Moreover, like the joints, they are lined by synovial membrane, secrete synovial fluid, and are common sites of rheumatic problems. The vast majority of painful shoulder problems are caused by acute subacromial (subdeltoid) bursitis and bicipital tendinitis. In the management of these periarticular disorders, the ultimate goal is to preserve shoulder motion. Although this is accomplished by daily range-of-motion exercises, it is clearly facilitated by suppression of periarticular inflammation and discomfort through the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Of these, sustained-release indomethacin provides the anti-inflammatory efficacy of indomethacin and by virtue of its sustained-release formulation, may promote patient compliance since it need be given only once or twice daily.

  19. Giant iliopectineal bursitis presenting as neuropathy and severe edema of the lower limb: case illustration and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Takahiro; Nozawa, Satoshi; Ohashi, Minoru; Sakai, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-05-01

    We report a 61-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis (RA: Steinblocker stage III, class 3) who developed severe swelling and neuropathy of the right lower limb caused by an iliopectineal bursa associated with destruction of the hip joint. Physical examination revealed an inguinal mass and groin pain. X-ray examination indicated destruction of the hip joint. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed the bursa connected with the hip joint and a markedly compressed external iliac vein among the inguinal ligament, pubis, and bursa. The patient underwent partial synovial resection and total hip arthroplasty for recovery of hip function, and this led to successful resolution of the symptoms and bursa. We present the characteristic images from this case and review all previously reported cases of RA iliopsoas bursitis causing leg swelling or neuropathy, and summarize the background. Since this lesion may cause various symptoms, clinical awareness that iliopsoas bursitis may present with unique clinical symptoms may aid correct diagnosis.

  20. RS3PE Syndrome with Iliopsoas Bursitis Distinguished from an Iliopsoas Abscess Using a CT-guided Puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Shoichi; Iwamoto, Naoki; Tsuji, Sosuke; Umeda, Masataka; Nishino, Ayako; Nakashima, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Takahisa; Horai, Yoshiro; Koga, Tomohiro; Kawashiri, Shin-ya; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old man was diagnosed with remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) syndrome. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography for cancer screening showed a mass with low-density centers with an enhanced rim in the left iliopsoas muscle. We suspected an iliopsoas abscess and performed computed-tomography-guided puncture of the mass. Both Gram staining and the culture of the fluid were negative. We diagnosed the patient with RS3PE syndrome with iliopsoas bursitis and administered low-dose corticosteroids without antibiotics. The symptoms, including left hip pain, quickly disappeared following treatment. Clinicians should be aware that iliopsoas bursitis may resemble an iliopsoas abscess. As a result, it is important to make an accurate differential diagnosis.

  1. Infectious olecranon and patellar bursitis: short-course adjuvant antibiotic therapy is not a risk factor for recurrence in adult hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Cédric; Huttner, Angela; Assal, Mathieu; Bernard, Louis; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Uçkay, Ilker

    2010-05-01

    No evidence-based recommendations exist for the management of infectious bursitis. We examined epidemiology and risk factors for recurrence of septic bursitis. Specifically, we compared outcome in patients receiving bursectomy plus short-course adjuvant antibiotic therapy (7 days). Retrospective study of adult patients with infectious olecranon and patellar bursitis requiring hospitalization at Geneva University Hospital from January 1996 to March 2009. We identified 343 episodes of infectious bursitis (237 olecranon and 106 patellar). Staphylococcus aureus predominated among the 256 cases with an identifiable pathogen (85%). Three hundred and twelve cases (91%) were treated surgically; 142 (41%) with one-stage bursectomy and closure and 146 with two-stage bursectomy. All received antibiotics for a median duration of 13 days with a median intravenous component of 3 days. Cure was achieved in 293 (85%) episodes. Total duration of antibiotic therapy [odds ratio (OR) 0.9; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.8-1.1] showed no association with cure. In multivariate analysis, only immunosuppression was linked to recurrence (OR 5.6; 95% CI 1.9-18.4). Compared with 14 days of antibiotic treatment (OR 0.9; 95% CI 0.1-10.7) was equivalent, as was the intravenous component (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.3). In severe infectious bursitis requiring hospitalization, adjuvant antibiotic therapy might be limited to 7 days in non-immunosuppressed patients.

  2. Olecranon Bursitis in a Military Population: Epidemiology and Evidence for Prolonged Morbidity in Combat Recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermann, Haggai; Karakis, Isabella; Dolkart, Oleg; Maman, Eran; Kadar, Assaf; Chechik, Ofir

    2017-09-01

    Olecranon bursitis (OB) is a benign but disturbing condition that may adversely affect a military recruit's combat preparedness. This study was designed to assess incidence, risk factors, and associated medical burden of OB in the Israel Defense Forces. This is a retrospective study drawing on medical records of all Israel Defense Forces soldiers diagnosed as having OB between 2005 and 2015. OB was classified as septic and noninfectious. Crude incidence rates and duty-specific incidence rates were calculated. Medical burden was defined by the number of physician visits, referrals to orthopedic specialist consultations, duration of symptoms, and duration of pharmaceutical treatment. Demographic and occupational information (age, sex, height, weight, socioeconomic status, country of origin, type of military service, time of presentation to medical services) was used to identify risk factors for septic bursitis and longer duration of symptoms. Statistical analysis was performed in R statistical software. Risk factors were evaluated using the Chi-square test for categorical variables and Pearson correlation coefficients were used for continuous variables. The study was approved by the Israeli Defense Force IRB. A total of 2,692 soldiers were diagnosed with OB during the study period. The crude annual incidence rate of OB was 29/100,000 person-years (PY). Combat duty had an incidence of 97/100,000 PY, and noncombat duties had an incidence of 12/10,000 PY (p Origin from the former USSR was associated with a higher duration of symptoms (p = 0.012). Type of military service was the principal risk factor for OB, as indicated by a higher incidence of the disorder among combat compared to noncombat units, possibly the result of field training without protective gear and repetitive trauma to elbows. The greater number of diagnoses of OB during summer and autumn, when training is more intensive, support that explanation. Sex did not affect incidence of OB in administrative

  3. Bone erosion and subacromial bursitis caused by diphtheria-tetanus-poliomyelitis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, J H; Geoffroy, M; Eschard, J P; Ohl, X

    2015-11-17

    Revaxis(®) is a vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis (dT-IPV). This vaccine should not be administered by the intradermal or intravenous route. Poor injection techniques and related consequences are rare. We report a case of bursitis associated with reactive glenohumeral effusion complicated by bone erosion occurring after injection of the dT-IPV vaccine. A 26 year old patient was admitted for painful left shoulder causing functional impairment. Control magnetic resonance imaging showed bone oedema on the upper outer part of the humeral head, with a slight cortical irregularity, indicating that the vaccine was injected in contact with the bone at this location, causing erosion. Outcome was favourable after intra-articular corticosteroids. Reports of articular or periarticular injury after vaccination are extremely rare, in view of the substantial number of vaccines administered every year. The potential complications of vaccination are well known to general practitioners but under-reported in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Massive subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis with rice bodies secondary to an orthopedic implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urruela, Adriana M; Rapp, Timothy B; Egol, Kenneth A

    2012-09-01

    Both early and late complications following open reduction and internal fixation of proximal humerus fractures have been reported extensively in the literature. Although orthopedic implants are known to cause irritation and inflammation, to our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe a patient with rice bodies secondary to an orthopedic implant. Although the etiology of rice bodies is unclear, histological studies reveal that they are composed of an inner amorphous core surrounded by collagen and fibrin. The differential diagnosis in this case included synovial chondromatosis, infection, and the formation of a malignant tumor. Additional imaging studies, such as magnetic resonance imaging, and more specific tests were necessary to differentiate the rice bodies due to bursitis versus neoplasm, prior to excision. The patient presented 5 years following open reduction and internal fixation of a displaced proximal humerus fracture, with swelling in the area of the previous surgical site. Examination revealed a large, painless tumor-like mass on the anterior aspect of the shoulder. The patient's chief concern was the unpleasant aesthetic of the mass; no pain was reported. Upon excision of the mass, the patient's full, painless range of motion returned.

  5. [Bursitis with severe tendon and muscle necrosis on the lateral stifle area in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, K; Räber, M; Sydler, T; Muggli, E; Hässig, M; Guscetti, F

    2011-11-01

    In 21 animals, chronic swelling on the lateral aspect of the stifle also known as «perigonitis», «stable-syndrome» or «bursitis bicipitalis femoris» were evaluated. Ultrasonography showed increased fluid in the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle and structural changes in the tendons, muscles, subcutis and fasciae. Soft tissue swelling and an irregular contour of the lateral tibial condyle were typical signs on radiographs. Macroscopic changes were found at the insertion of the biceps femoris muscle, the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle, the lateral collateral ligament of the stifle, the origin of muscles on the lateral femoral condyle and the lateral tibial condyle. They mainly consisted of tendon and muscle tissue necrosis with granulation tissue. Histology revealed areas of coagulation necrosis in tendons and ligaments, in which occasionally Onchocerca spp. were seen. The severity of lesions correlated well with the clinical signs, which were associated with a poor prognosis in advanced cases.

  6. A Randomized Trial Among Compression Plus Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs, Aspiration, and Aspiration With Steroid Injection for Nonseptic Olecranon Bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon Yub; Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Joo Hak; Jung, Jae Hong; Sung, Gwang Young; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Jong Soo

    2016-03-01

    Olecranon bursitis might be a minor problem in the outpatient clinic but relatively be common to occur. However, there are few well-designed studies comparing approaches to treatment. (1) Which treatment (compression bandaging with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspiration, or aspiration with steroid injections) is associated with the highest likelihood of resolution of nonseptic olecranon bursitis? (2) Which treatment is associated with earliest resolution of symptoms? (3) What factors are associated with treatment failure by 4 weeks? We enrolled 133 patients from two centers; after applying prespecified exclusions (septic bursitis or concomitant inflammatory arthritis, intraarticular elbow pathology, recent aspiration or steroid injection done elsewhere, and refusal to participate), 90 patients were randomly allocated to receive compression bandaging with NSAIDs (C), aspiration (A), or aspiration with steroid injection (AS) groups (30 patients in each). The groups were similar at baseline in terms of age and gender. Seven patients (four from Group A and three from Group AS) were lost to followup. All patients were followed up weekly for 4 weeks, and the same treatment procedure was repeated if the bursitis recurred with any substantial fluid collection. At 4 weeks, the state of resolution and pain visual analog scale (VAS) were evaluated. Failed resolution was defined as presence of persistent olecranon bursal fluid collection at Week 4 after the initiation of the treatment; on the contrary, if bursal fluid collection was clinically reduced or completely disappeared by the end of Week 4, the treatment was considered successful. We compared the proportion of resolution by Week 4 and the median times to resolution among the treatment groups. In addition, we evaluated whether the resolution affected pain VAS and what factors were associated with the resolution. There were no differences in the proportion of patients whose bursitis resolved by Week 4

  7. Surgery for Retrocalcaneal Bursitis: A Tendon-splitting versus a Lateral Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John A.; Suero, Eduardo; O’Loughlin, Padhraig F.

    2008-01-01

    For patients with refractory retrocalcaneal bursitis (Haglund’s syndrome), the most effective surgical approach has not been defined. We asked whether patients undergoing the tendon-splitting approach and the lateral approach would have comparably effective relief of pain for both types of calcaneal ostectomies. We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients (31 feet) who underwent the tendon-splitting approach and compared their results with 32 previous patients (35 feet) who had a lateral incision. Minimum followup was 12 months (mean, 16 months; range, 12–23 months) for the tendon-splitting group and 15 months (mean, 51 months; range, 15–109 months) for the lateral group. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score improved from 43 points preoperatively to 81 points (range, 8–100 points) postoperatively in the tendon-splitting group and from 54 points to 86 points (range, 55–100 points) in the lateral group. The mean physical component score of the Short Form-36, version 2, at followup was 52 (range, 22–61) in the tendon-splitting group and 49 (range, 34–63) in the lateral group. The median return to normal function was 4.1 months (range, 3–13 months) in the tendon-splitting group and 6.4 months (range, 4–20 months) in the lateral group. Both approaches to calcaneal ostectomy provided symptomatic pain relief. However, patients in the tendon-splitting group returned to normal function quicker than patients in the lateral group. Level of Evidence: Level III, retrospective comparative study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18465183

  8. Epidural cystic masses associated with interspinous bursitis, synovial and discal cysts; Formacoes cisticas epidurais relacionadas a bursite interespinhosa, cisto sinovial e cisto discal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Frederico Guilherme de Paula Lopes; Souza, Ricardo Andre de; Brotto, Marcos Pama D' Almeida; Suguita, Fabio Massaaki; Amaral, Denise Tokechi; Amaral, Lazaro Luis Faria do [Hospital Beneficencia Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). MedImagem], e-mail: fgpls@yahoo.com.br

    2009-03-15

    The authors describe some cases of epidural cysts, namely synovial, discal, ligamentum flavum cysts, and cysts secondary to interspinous bursitis, all of these conditions determining radicular, dural sac compression or spinal canal stenosis. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and localization of these entities are described. (author)

  9. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Fusaro, Isabella; Galletti, Stefano; Volini, Silvia; Benedetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the association of exercises for the shoulder with ultrasound-guided injection into the bursa significantly improves the treatment outcome in adhesive bursitis. Two groups of 35 patients, one treated with ultrasound-guided injection (UGI) and the other one with ultrasound-guided injection and home exercise program (UGI-exercise) for 1 month, were assessed for pain and shoulder function before treatment, 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Fourteen patients in UGI group and 23 patients in the UGI-exercises group were completely free of pain after 1 month (p = 0.031). At 3 months' follow-up, patients in the UGI-exercise group showed a significant improvement with respect to the other group (p = 0.005). No differences were found in function assessment. The UGI combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis is effective to ensure a more frequent complete pain relief in the medium term.

  10. Relation Between Subacromial Bursitis on Ultrasonography and Efficacy of Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection in Rotator Cuff Disease: A Prospective Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Hong, Ji Yeon; Lee, Michael Young; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Yoon, Seung-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the correlations between subacromial bursitis (bursal thickening and effusion) on ultrasonography and its response to subacromial corticosteroid injection in patients with rotator cuff disease. Prospective, longitudinal comparison study. University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Patients with rotator cuff disease (N=69) were classified into 3 groups based on ultrasonographic findings; (1) normative bursa group (group 1, n=23): bursa and effusion thickness 2mm and effusion thickness 2mm. A single subacromial injection with 20mg of triamcinolone acetonide. Visual analog scale (VAS) of shoulder pain, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), angles of active shoulder range of motion (flexion, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation), and bursa and effusion thickness at pre- and posttreatment at week 8. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups in demographic characteristics pretreatment. Groups 2 and 3 showed a significant difference compared with group 1 in changes on the VAS and abduction; group 3 showed a significant difference compared with group 1 in changes of the SDQ, internal rotation, and external rotation; and all groups showed significant differences when compared with each other (groups 1 and 3, 2 and 3, and 1 and 2) in changes of thickness. A patient with ultrasonographic observation of subacromial bursitis, instead of normative bursa, can expect better outcome with subacromial corticosteroid injection. Therefore, we recommend a careful selection of patients using ultrasonography prior to injection. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes of synovial fluid protein concentrations in supra-patellar bursitis patients after the injection of different molecular weights of hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Carl P C; Hsu, Chih Chin; Pei, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Ruo Li; Zhou, Shaobo; Shen, Hsuan-Chen; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Tsai, Wen Chung

    2014-04-01

    Knee pain is commonly seen in orthopedic and rehabilitation outpatient clinical settings, and in the aging population. Bursitis of the knee joint, especially when the volume of the synovial fluid is large enough, can compress and distend the nearby soft tissues, causing pain in the knee joint. Out of all the bursae surrounding the knee joint, supra-patellar bursitis is most often associated with knee pain. Treatment strategies in managing supra-patellar bursitis include the aspiration of joint synovial fluid and then followed by steroid injection into the bursa. When supra-patellar bursitis is caused by degenerative disorders, the concept of viscosupplementation treatment may be effective by injecting hyaluronic acid into the bursa. However, the rheology or the changes in the concentrations of proteins (biomarkers) that are related to the development of bursitis in the synovial fluid is virtually unexplored. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the concentration changes in the synovial fluid total protein amount and individual proteins associated with supra-patellar bursitis using the Bradford protein assay and western immunoglobulin methods. A total of 20 patients were divided into two groups with 10 patients in each group. One group received the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid product of Synvisc Hylan G-F 20 and the other group received the low molecular weight hyaluronic acid product of Hya-Joint Synovial Fluid Supplement once per week injection into the bursa for a total of 3 weeks. Significant decreases in the synovial fluid total protein concentrations were observed after the second dosage of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid injections. Apolipoprotein A-I, interleukin 1 beta, alpha 1 antitrypsin, and matrix metalloproteinase 1 proteins revealed a trend of decreasing western immunoblotting band densities after hyaluronic acid injections. The decreases in apolipoprotein A-I and interleukin 1 beta protein band densities were significant in the high

  12. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage of calcific bursitis of the medial collateral ligament of the knee: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; González-Pérez, José; Jiménez-Herranz, Elena; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Calcification of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee is rare. The literature reports no positive outcomes when conservative treatment has been followed. This paper reports a case of such calcification and its treatment using ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage (UGPL). A 66-year-old patient presented with medial knee pain. X-ray, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance (MR) examinations revealed calcific bursitis of the MCL, which was treated by UGPL. One month after treatment the patient was asymptomatic. X-ray, ultrasound, and MR examinations confirmed the almost complete disappearance of the calcification; only very tiny fragments remained. Calcific bursitis of the MCL of the knee is very uncommon, but should be taken into account in differential diagnoses for medial knee pain. UGPL is proposed as a treatment for this condition.

  13. Pharmacopuncture and Autohemo-Seperated Regeneration Pharmacopuncture for Acute Traumatic Subdeltoid Bursitis with Patial Tear of Subscapularis Tendon After Bongchuna Treatment - A Case Report -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Kyo Oh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report about effect of soyeom pharmacopuncture, bee venom and autohemo-seperated regeneration pharmacopuncture(ASRP for acute traumatic subdeltoid bursitis with partial tear of subscapularis tendon, which was diagnosed by symptoms and MRI(Magnetic resonance imaging and caused by bongchuna treatment. We evaluated the patient using Visual Analogue Scale(VAS every two or four days and range of movement(ROM, physical examination of shoulder about one per ten days and observed improvement with reexamination by ultrasonography and MRI as well. Pharmacopuncture rapidly reduced pain and improved range of motion and function of shoulder in patients with acute sub-deltoid bursitis even though it was severe symptom. Our result suggest that autohemo-seperated regeneration pharmacopuncture might be effective in regenerating the tear of soft tissue such as subscapularis tendon.

  14. Effects of kinesiotaping versus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy for treatment of pes anserinus tendino-bursitis: A randomized comparative clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayouni, Kaynoosh; Foruzi, Shima; Kalhori, Fereshte

    2016-09-01

    Pes anserinus tendino-bursitis is a condition caused by repetitive friction over the bursa or direct trauma to knee joint and it presents with proximal medial tibial pain and swelling. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of kinesiotaping in comparison with naproxen and physical therapy in treatment of pes anserinus tendino-bursitis. In a randomized comparative clinical trial 56 patients with clinical diagnosis of pes anserinus tendino-bursitis were randomly assigned to kinesiotaping and naproxen/physical therapy (28 patients in each group). Kinesiotaping on the tender area in the form of space-correction (lifting) technique was used and repeated for three times with a one-week interval. Another group received naproxen (250mg TID for 10 days) and ten sessions of daily physical therapy. The visual analog scale (VAS) was used for evaluation of pain. The depth of swelling of the area was measured with sonography before and after treatment. Wilcoxon signed ranks test has been used for determining the influence of interventions on pain (VAS) and swelling scores in each group. The ANCOVA (Analysis of covariance) test was applied for comparing the influence of interventions on VAS and swelling scores after adjustment for co-variables. At end of the study, 27 patients remained in the kinesiotaping group and 19 patients in naproxen/physical therapy group. Treatment with kinesiotaping significantly decreased the pain (P=0.0001) and swelling scores (P=0.0001) in comparison with naproxen/physical therapy after adjustment for baseline characteristics. Kinesiotaping was safe without any complications except for a mild local skin irritation in one patient. Kinesiotaping is more effective than naproxen plus physical therapy in reduction of pain and swelling in patients with pes anserinus tendino-bursitis. www.ClinicalTrials.gov identifier is NCT01680263.

  15. Ultrasonographic assessment of pes anserinus tendon and pes anserinus tendinitis bursitis syndrome in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toktas, Hasan; Dundar, Umit; Adar, Sevda; Solak, Ozlem; Ulasli, Alper Murat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ultrasonographic (US) findings of pes anserinus tendon and bursa in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) with or without clinical pes anserinus tendinitis bursitis syndrome (PATBS). A total of 157 female patients with the diagnosis of knee OA on both knees (314 knees), and 30 age, and body mass index- matched healthy female controls without knee pain (60 knees), were included in the study. PATBS was clinically diagnosed. US evaluation parameters were the measurement of the thickness of pes anserinus tendon insertion region (PA) and examination of the morphologic intratendinous PA tissue characteristics and pes anserinus bursitis (PAB). Radiographic knee osteoarthritis graded I-IV according to Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) for each knee was recorded. Pain and functional status were assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). There were 183 PATBS (58.3%) clinical diagnoses among the 314 knees with OA. The mean thickness of PA in the patients with knee OA graded 1,2,3,4 with/without PATBS was significantly greater than the controls (p = 0.001). The mean thickness of PA in knees with OA KL graded 3 and 4 with/without PATBS, was greater than knees with OA KL graded 1 and 2 with/without PATBS (p < 0,05) (except knee OA KL graded 2 with PATBS versus knee OA KL graded 4 without PATBS).The knee OA KL graded 1,2,3,4 with PATBS had significantly more PAB and less loss of normal fibrillar echotexture of PA compared to controls and knees with OA KL graded 1,2,3,4 without PATBS (p < 0.05). The VAS scores of knees with OA KL graded 3, 4 with PATBS were significantly greater than those of knees with OA KL graded 3,4 without PATBS (p < 0.05). PA thickness was significantly associated with the KL grade (r: 0.336, p:0.001) and PATBS (r: 0.371, p < 0.001). It is concluded that the mean thickness of PA in knees with OA with/without PATBS was significantly greater than the

  16. Surgical Correction of Posttraumatic Scapulothoracic Bursitis, Rhomboid Major Muscle Injury, Ipsilateral Glenohumeral Instability, and Headaches Resulting from Circus Acrobatic Maneuvers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Skedros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 28-year-old transgender (male-to-female patient that had a partial tear of the rhomboid major tendon, scapulothoracic bursitis, and glenohumeral instability on the same side. These conditions resulted from traumatic events during circus acrobatic maneuvers. Additional aspects of this case that make it unique include (1 the main traumatic event occurred during a flagpole exercise, where the patient’s trunk was suspended horizontally while a vertical pole was grasped with both hands, (2 headaches were associated with the periscapular injury and they improved after scapulothoracic bursectomy and rhomboid tendon repair, (3 surgical correction was done during the same operation with an open anterior capsular-labral reconstruction, open scapulothoracic bursectomy without bone resection, and rhomboid tendon repair, (4 a postoperative complication of tearing of the serratus anterior and rhomboid muscle attachments with recurrent scapulothoracic pain occurred from patient noncompliance, and (5 the postoperative complication was surgically corrected and ultimately resulted in an excellent outcome at the one-year final follow-up.

  17. Current evidence for effectiveness of interventions for cubital tunnel syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome, instability, or bursitis of the elbow: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkel, Willem D; Schreuders, Ton A R; Koes, Bart W; Huisstede, Bionka M A

    2013-12-01

    To provide an evidence-based overview of the effectiveness of interventions for 4 nontraumatic painful disorders sharing the anatomic region of the elbow: cubital tunnel syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome, elbow instability, and olecranon bursitis. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, PEDro, and CINAHL were searched to identify relevant reviews and randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the quality of the methodology. A best-evidence synthesis was used to summarize the results. One systematic review and 6 RCTs were included. For the surgical treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome (1 review, 3 RCTs), comparing simple decompression with anterior ulnar nerve transposition, no evidence was found in favor of either one of these. Limited evidence was found in favor of medial epicondylectomy versus anterior transposition and for early postoperative therapy versus immobilization. No evidence was found for the effect of local steroid injection in addition to splinting. No RCTs were found for radial tunnel syndrome. For olecranon bursitis (1 RCT), limited evidence for effectiveness was found for methylprednisolone acetate injection plus naproxen. Concerning elbow instability, including 2 RCTs, one showed that nonsurgical treatment resulted in similar results compared with surgery, whereas the other found limited evidence for the effectiveness in favor of early mobilization versus 3 weeks of immobilization after surgery. In this review no, or at best, limited evidence was found for the effectiveness of nonsurgical and surgical interventions to treat painful cubital tunnel syndrome, radial tunnel syndrome, elbow instability, or olecranon bursitis. Well-designed and well-conducted RCTs are clearly needed in this field.

  18. Rilonacept in the treatment of subacromial bursitis: A randomized, non-inferiority, unblinded study versus triamcinolone acetonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Matthew B; Motley, Spencer A; Wohlford, Susanna; Ramsey, Bryan C

    2015-12-01

    Subacromial bursitis is caused by inflammation of the bursa that separates the superior surface of the supraspinatus tendon from the overlying coraco-acromial ligament and acromion. While multiple cytokines are implicated, interleukin-1 beta appears to play a prominent role. Rilonacept, an interleukin-1 trap, may be an alternative to corticosteroid injection for the management of this condition. This single center, randomized, non-inferiority, unblinded study recruited 33 subjects over 9 months. Twenty subjects received 160mg intrabursal injection of rilonacept and 13 received a 6mL mixture of lidocaine, bupivacaine, and 80mg triamcinolone acetonide. QuickDASH, subject reported pain, and adverse events were recorded at time of injection, 2 days later, 2 weeks later, and 4 weeks later. Primary outcome was improvement in QuickDASH 4 weeks post-injection. Secondary outcomes were improvement in subject reported pain and occurrence of adverse events at 4 weeks. Both study groups were equally matched for age, gender, ethnicity, and site of bursa injection. Both medications demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in QuickDASH 4 weeks post-injection, but triamcinolone acetonide injection offered greater improvement (P=0.004). Both medications demonstrated improvement in subject reported pain but between group comparison at 4 weeks showed that triamcinolone was superior (P=0.044). No statistically significant differences in adverse events were noted between groups, but subjects who received rilonacept experienced more episodes of diarrhea and headache. While improvement in QuickDASH and pain was noted with a single intrabursal injection of rilonacept at 4 weeks, injection with triamcinolone acetonide was more efficacious. This trial was registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01830699). Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship between years in the trade and the development of radiographic knee osteoarthritis and MRI-detected meniscal tears and bursitis in floor layers. A cross-sectional study of a historical cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Rytter, Søren; Marott, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    An increased risk of developing knee disorders including radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been shown among workers with kneeling working demands. There may also be a dose-related association between duration of employment in occupations with kneeling work and development of radiographic...... knee OA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected meniscal tears and bursitis....

  20. Comparative efficacy and safety of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs nimesulide and diclofenac in patients with acute subdeltoid bursitis and bicipital tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wober, W; Rahlfs, V W; Büchl, N; Grässle, A; Macciocchi, A

    1998-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of nimesulide, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) 100 mg twice daily were compared with diclofenac 75 mg b.i.d. in short term treatment of acute shoulder (acute subdeltoid bursitis and bicipital tendinitis) in adult patients. In this double-blind (double-dummy), randomised, parallel group study over two weeks, 122 patients were included. The Mann-Whitney statistics revealed therapeutic equivalence of both treatments with a slight superiority for nimesulide. The tolerability of nimesulide, judged by investigators and patients and analysed statistically, was superior to that of diclofenac. Thus, the benefit-risk relationship was better for the test drug than for the reference drug.

  1. Efectividad de la acupuntura y la auriculoterapia en la bursitis de hombro de pacientes atendidos en el policlínico Tula Aguilera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arely Díaz Cifuentes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio experimental con el objetivo de comparar la efectividad de la acupuntura y la auriculoterapia en el tratamiento de la bursitis de hombro, en pacientes que fueron atendidos en el policlínico “Tula Aguilera” de Camagüey, durante el periodo de enero a diciembre de 2013. El universo de estudio estuvo integrado por 250 pacientes que asistieron a la consulta de fisiatría, de dicha área de salud, con el diagnóstico de bursitis de hombro, quedando conformada la muestra por 180 pacientes mayores de 30 años. Se excluyeron los pacientes que usaron tratamiento farmacológico una semana antes, con lesiones dermatológicas en los lugares a puncionar, con trastornos de coagulación y/o psiquiátricos. La muestra se dividió en dos grupos de 90 pacientes cada uno, asignados aleatoriamente, el A tratado con acupuntura y el B con auriculoterapia. Predominaron los pacientes de 40 a 49 años, para un 66,1 %. Los síntomas clínicos se redujeron notablemente a los 15 días con la acupuntura y a los 30 con la auriculoterapia. La recuperación del grado de arco articular, tanto para los movimientos de rotación interna como para los de abducción, fue mayor en los pacientes tratados con acupuntura. Los pacientes que tuvieron un tiempo corto de evolución de la enfermedad antes del tratamiento fueron los que tuvieron mejor respuesta al mismo, con un 52,7 %. Los resultados evidencian la mayor efectividad de la acupuntura

  2. Tendinitis and Bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OII) Timed Up & Go (TUG) Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Young Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning Treatments Patient ...

  3. A double-blind comparison of slow-release and standard tablet formulations of fentiazac in the treatment of patients with tendinitis and bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, F; Famaey, J P

    1985-01-01

    Two double-blind studies were carried out to compare the effectiveness and tolerance of a slow-release tablet formulation of 300 mg fentiazac, given once daily, with the standard tablet formulations of 100 mg, given 4-times daily, or 200 mg, given twice daily. A total of 60 patients suffering from acute bicipital tendinitis and/or subdeltoid bursitis was studied, 15 patients on the slow-release and 15 on one of the two standard tablets in each of the two trials. Patients were assessed on entry and at Days 7 and 14 of treatment. The results in both studies showed that there was significant improvement in tenderness, pain on movement, overall pain and in the range of movement after treatment, there being no significant difference between those receiving the slow-release form or the standard tablets. Tolerance was good in all groups and only a few minor or moderate side-effects, mainly of a gastro-intestinal type, were reported.

  4. The Morel-Lavallée Lesion as a Rare Differential Diagnosis for Recalcitrant Bursitis of the Knee: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor S. Vanhegan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 72 year-old-male was referred to our institution with recalcitrant prepatellar bursitis. The injury was sustained after striking his right knee against a post whilst horse riding 9 months ago. Previous treatments included repeated aspiration and excision of the bursa with elastic compression bandaging. A diagnosis of a Morel-Lavallée internal degloving injury was made, and the lesion was satisfactorily managed by an internal quilting procedure to eliminate the potential dead space. A review of the literature reveals 29 published reports of Morel-Lavallée lesions with sufficient information for inclusion. These came from 14 separate countries with a total of 204 lesions in 195 patients. The most common anatomical location was the greater trochanter/hip (36%, followed by the thigh (24% and the pelvis (19%. Most were managed surgically with evacuation of the haematoma and necrotic tissue followed by debridement, which was often repeated (36%. Conservative treatment with percutaneous aspiration and compression bandaging was the next most common treatment (23%. The knee was the fourth most common region affected (16%, and only 3 other lesions in the literature have been managed with a quilting procedure.

  5. Investigating the Effect of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on reducing Chronic Pain in Patients with Pes Anserine Bursitis: A Randomized, Clinical- Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Khosrawi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee pain, is one of the most common causes of patients' referring to physiatric clinics, and several factors, are involved in its creation. One of these factors is pes anserine bursitis (PAB for which various treatment methods are used. This study aims to investigate the effect of this method on reducing chronic pain in these patients. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in 2013- 2014 on patients with PAB referring to academic, physical medicine clinics. The patients with chronic PAB (pain duration more than 3 months, who were refractory to conservative treatments, were randomly divided into two 20-member experimental groups (extracorporeal shock wave therapy [ESWT] and sham ESWT. Pain scores of all patients were measured using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ (total and present pain indexes [TPIs and PPIs] before intervention, immediately after intervention (3rd week, and after 8 weeks. The pain scores were then compared and statistically analyzed. Results: In the ESWT group, the mean patient pain score of the VAS and TPI in MPQ were significantly lower than in the sham ESWT group immediately after intervention (3rd week: P=0.02, P= 0.04 respectively; and 8 weeks after the end of treatment: P=0.01, P= 0.000. Moreover, the PPI in both groups had significantly decreased over time, although in ESWT group this decrement was significantly more than sham ESWT group (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The results showed that ESWT could be effective in reducing the pain and treating PAB.

  6. Brucelose em bovinos com bursite cervical diagnosticada em abatedouro sob inspeção federal Brucelosis in cattle with supraspinous bursitis diagnosed in an abattoir under federal inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laerte Pereira de Almeida

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Estudo epidemiológico tipo caso-controle realizado em Uberlândia, Minas Gerais (MG, Brasil, pesquisou a ocorrência de brucelose em bovinos com bursite cervical, abatidos no período de agosto de 1993 a julho de 1994. O diagnóstico sorológico de brucelose foi realizado mediante a prova de soroaglutinação rápida em placa. Os casos de bursite foram identificados por técnico do Serviço de Inspeção Federal (SIF, com base em características morfológicas, previamente padronizadas. Para a determinação da "Razão de Odds" e do risco atribuível entre bursite e brucelose, utilizaram-se 30 animais com o quadro e, como controle, 90 bovinos sem a patologia. Dos animais com bursite, 13,3% eram brucélicos, contra 5,6% do grupo controle (P=0,115. Dentre aqueles com brucelose e bursite, as bolsas continham fibrina (40,0% e projeções digitiformes (33,3%; apenas nas bursites dos sorologicamente negativos encontraram-se presença de pus, de nódulos e de líquido viscoso. A "Razão de Odds" encontrada entre brucelose e bursite foi da ordem de 2,61, não sendo demonstrado associação entre bursite cervical e sorologia positiva para brucelose (P>0,05. No âmbito da Saúde Pública e ocupacional, sugere-se a atenção de técnicos e profissionais, visando diminuir o risco de infecção e evitar contaminação de carcaças, equipamentos e instalações.Epidemiological study case-control type carried out in Triângulo abattoir in the city of Uberlândia in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, has identified the ocorrence of brucelosis in bovine with supraspinous bursitis, slaughtered from August, 1993 to July, 1994. To diagnose brucelosis "Rapid Agglutination" test was performed on plate with the padronizated antigen count considered positive over 100. The bursas examined were identified by technicians of the Federal Inspection Service based on the presence of ten standardized morphological characteristics. Using the case-control design, 30 animals

  7. Targeted knockout of TNF-α by injection of lentivirus-mediated siRNA into the subacromial bursa for the treatment of subacromial bursitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Quan; Wei, Xianzhao; Xu, Jie; Chen, Qi; Song, Shuang; Lu, Zhe; Wang, Zimin

    2015-09-01

    Subacromial bursitis (SAB) is the major source of pain in rotator cuff disease. Although multiple investigations have provided support for the role of inflammatory cytokines in SAB, few have focussed on the use these cytokines in the treatment of SAB. The aim of the present study was to observe the therapeutic efficacy of lentivirus‑mediated RNA interference (RNAi) on carrageenan‑induced SAB by injecting lentivirus‑tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑RNAi expressing TNF‑α small interfering (si)RNA. Using screened siRNA segments, an siRNA was designed. A lentivirus vector expressing siRNA was established and packed as lentivirus particles. A lentivirus that expressed the negative sequence was used as a lentivirus‑negative control (NC). The carrageenan‑induced SAB model was established in 32 male Sprague‑Dawley rats. The modeled rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Lentivirus‑RNAi treatment group, lentivirus‑NC group, SAB group and phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) blank control group. The lentivirus was injected (1x10(7) transducing units) into the subacromial bursa of the rats in the lentivirus‑RNAi group and lentivirus‑NC group, whereas 100 µl PBS was injected at the same site in the SAB group and the PBS blank control group. At 5 weeks following injection, the animals were sacrificed and venous blood was obtained. The effect of TNF‑α interference and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were determined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, hematoxylin and eosin staining, Van Gieson's staining and immunofluorescence. The expression of TNF‑α was decreased in the lentivirus‑TNF‑α‑RNAi group compared with that in the SAB group. Morphological observations revealed that the number of inflammatory cells were reduced and damage to tendon fibers was attenuated in this group, suggesting that the downregulation of the protein expression levels of TNF‑α‑associated nuclear

  8. Formações císticas epidurais relacionadas a bursite interespinhosa, cisto sinovial e cisto discal Epidural cystic masses associated with interspinous bursitis, synovial and discal cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Guilherme de Paula Lopes Santos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam casos de cistos epidurais, dentre eles os cistos sinoviais, discais, do ligamento amarelo e relacionados a bursite interespinhosa, todas essas condições determinando compressão radicular, do saco dural ou estenose do canal vertebral. Descrevem as características de imagem e localização na ressonância magnética nessas diferentes afecções.The authors describe some cases of epidural cysts, namely synovial, discal, ligamentum flavum cysts, and cysts secondary to interspinous bursitis, all of these conditions determining radicular, dural sac compression or spinal canal stenosis. Magnetic resonance imaging findings and localization of these entities are described.

  9. Bilateral Olecranon Tophaceous Gout Bursitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güzelali Özdemir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this case, we present a patient with the diagnosis of bilateral olecranon tophaceous gout. After the surgical treatment, there was no limitation of range of motion or wound problem at 6th month control.

  10. Bursitis efter vaccination i skulderregionen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Falk-Riecke, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder pain may develop after vaccination in the deltoid area due to inadvertent injection of the vaccine into the subdeltoid bursa, which may be located close to the skin. As far as we know, such vaccination reactions occur more frequently than officially registered, and doctors may not be awa...

  11. Fasciitis necroticans efter artroskopi af præpatellar bursitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlesinger, NH; Friis-Møller, Alice; Hvolris, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening soft tissue infection in superficial and deep fascias. NF is most often caused by mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The treatment is early and aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics and hyperbaric oxygen. In this case description, a nearly...

  12. Mycobacterium bovis hip bursitis in a lung transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, J M; Crespo, M; Silveira, F P; Kaplan, R; Aslam, S

    2016-02-01

    We present a report of extrapulmonary Mycobacterium bovis infection in a lung transplant recipient. M. bovis is acquired predominantly by zoonotic transmission, particularly from consumption of unpasteurized foods. We discuss epidemiologic exposure, especially as relates to the Mexico-US border, clinical characteristics, resistance profile, and treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Fasciitis necroticans efter artroskopi af præpatellar bursitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlesinger, NH; Friis-Møller, Alice; Hvolris, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening soft tissue infection in superficial and deep fascias. NF is most often caused by mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The treatment is early and aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics and hyperbaric oxygen. In this case description, a nearly...... 60-year-old man developed NF after arthroscopic synovectomy of an infected prepatellar bursa. We stress the point that the endoscopic technique itself might be responsible for the spreading of bacteria to the fascias. This is a subject for further investigation Udgivelsesdato: 30. april...

  14. Bursitis por mercurio tras accidente laboral: a propósito de un caso Bursitis due to Mercury after a work accident: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Susana Lastras González; Ignacio Sánchez-Arcilla; Marina Fernández Escribano; Magdalena Muedra Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    Auxiliar de enfermería de 28 años que acude al Servicio de Urgencias porque refiere dolor y dificultad para la movilización en rodilla derecha, tras accidente laboral, hace dos días. Refiere que se resbaló mientras transportaba 32 termómetros de mercurio, rompiéndose éstos sobre su rodilla, creando una pequeña herida, siendo la puerta de entrada del metal. En la radiografía, se objetiva el cuerpo extraño metálico, correspondiente a mercurio, en bursa rotuliana. Tras el diagnóstico, se realizó...

  15. Bursitis por mercurio tras accidente laboral: a propósito de un caso Bursitis due to Mercury after a work accident: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Lastras González

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Auxiliar de enfermería de 28 años que acude al Servicio de Urgencias porque refiere dolor y dificultad para la movilización en rodilla derecha, tras accidente laboral, hace dos días. Refiere que se resbaló mientras transportaba 32 termómetros de mercurio, rompiéndose éstos sobre su rodilla, creando una pequeña herida, siendo la puerta de entrada del metal. En la radiografía, se objetiva el cuerpo extraño metálico, correspondiente a mercurio, en bursa rotuliana. Tras el diagnóstico, se realizó la extracción de la bursa, recuperándose la trabajadora totalmente tras la intervención. Con este caso clínico que aportamos, queremos conocer los efectos del mercurio en la salud de las personas expuestas a dicho metal, estudiar los errores acontecidos en este accidente laboral, valorando cuáles hubieran sido las medidas de actuación preventiva adecuadas para evitar la repetición de este tipo de accidentes y, por último, reflexionar acerca de la relación beneficio-riesgo del uso del mercurio en aparatos de medición en el ámbito sanitario.A 28-year-old woman, nursing assistant, who attends to emergency service, referring pain and difficulty mobilizing right knee after a work accident two days ago. She relates that slipped while carrying 32 mercury thermometers, breaking them on her knee, creating a small wound, being the gateway to the metal. In the radiograph, we objective a metallic foreign body, corresponding to mercury, in patellar bursa. After the diagnosis, the bursa was extracted, and the worker recovered completely, after surgery. With this case report we bring, we want to know the health effects of mercury in people exposed to this metal, studying the errors occurred in this accident, assessing measures of preventive action that would have been neccesary to preclude recurrence of this type accidents and, finally, think about the risk-benefit balance the use of mercury in measuring devices in healthcare.

  16. Tuberculous trochanteric bursitis, a rare cause of hip pain in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    was no history of trauma, diabetes mellitus, renal failure and immunosuppressant or corticosteroid use. Constitutional symptoms like fever, weight loss and anorexia were absent. There was no obvious history of contact with tuberculosis. She reported a similar episode of pain and swelling at the same site about 10 years ...

  17. Distal fascia lata lengthening: an alternative surgical technique for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Javier; García-Rayo, Ramón; Resines, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a simple technique for fascia lata lengthening that is less aggressive, can be performed under local anaesthetic with little morbidity and disability, and has excellent results. Eleven patients (13 hips) were enrolled in this study. Mean age was 54.6 years, there was one man and ten women. Outcomes were assessed by using a visual analog pain scale, Harris hip score and Lickert scale (satisfaction). There was a mean follow-up time of 43 months (range 15–84). All patients were scored by the Harris hip scale with a mean improvement from 61 (range 48–77) to 91 (range 76–95) after surgery. The mean visual analogue scale (VAS) score improved from 83 (range 60–99) to 13 (range 0–70). We had 12 of 13 patients reporting a good result. Mean surgical time was 15 min, and only one seroma was reported as a complication. No inpatient management was needed. In conclusion, distal “Z” lengthening of the fascia lata appears to be a good alternative for treatment of this condition. PMID:19214507

  18. Proliferating Trichilemmal Tumor of the Knee Mimicking Prepatellar Bursitis on Ultrasonogram: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Il Jin; Kim, Tae Eun; Lee, Il Gi; Shin, Hyeon Woong [Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Proliferating trichilemmal tumor is a rare benign tumor of skin appendage. It is usually solitary, more common in women after the fourth decade of life, and almost exclusively confined to the scalp and back of the neck. We report herein an unusual case of proliferating trchilemmal tumor which occurred on the knee

  19. Proliferating Trichilemmal Tumor of the Knee Mimicking Prepatellar Bursitis on Ultrasonogram: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Il Jin; Kim, Tae Eun; Lee, Il Gi; Shin, Hyeon Woong

    2011-01-01

    Proliferating trichilemmal tumor is a rare benign tumor of skin appendage. It is usually solitary, more common in women after the fourth decade of life, and almost exclusively confined to the scalp and back of the neck. We report herein an unusual case of proliferating trchilemmal tumor which occurred on the knee

  20. Orthopedic Health: Healthy Joints for a Lifetime / Keep Your Moving Parts Moving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common problems: Osteoarthritis, sprains and strains, rheumatoid arthritis, sports injuries (ligaments and tendons), bursitis. Hip Common problems: Osteoporosis, fracture, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, bursitis. Ankle ...

  1. Arm Care. Relief and Prevention for Shoulder Tendonitis, Tennis Elbow, Bursitis and Wrist Sprain in Athletics and Other Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirschl, Robert P.

    The book provides a practical and meaningful treatment program for athletes involved in sports which injure the arm or shoulder to a high degree, such as tennis, baseball, swimming, raquetball, pole vaulting, javelin throwing, and weight training. The book's chapters present information on: (1) symptoms of injury; (2) the anatomy of injury; (3)…

  2. Mycobacterium avium complex olecranon bursitis resolves without antimicrobials or surgical intervention: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Working

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This case raises an important clinical question of whether close observation off antimicrobials is appropriate in select cases of immunocompetent patients with localized atypical mycobacterial disease of soft tissue and skeletal structures.

  3. Repetitive Motion Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or daily activities. RMDs include carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis, tendonitis, epicondylitis, ganglion cyst, tenosynovitis, and trigger finger. ... or daily activities. RMDs include carpal tunnel syndrome, bursitis, tendonitis, epicondylitis, ganglion cyst, tenosynovitis, and trigger finger. ...

  4. Joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: Gout (especially ...

  5. Early diagnosis of bilateral sub-deltoid bursitis using clinic-based ultrasonography in a patient receiving infliximab therapy for ulcerative pouchitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Veerappan, S G

    2010-12-01

    Infliximab, a monoclonal chimeric antibody to tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α, is a novel therapy used in the management of chronic refractory pouchitis that is unresponsive to conventional medical therapy.

  6. Radiotherapy for treatment of bursitis. Indication, technique, own results, literature survey; Strahlentherapie bei der Periarthropathia humeroscapularis (PHS). Indikation, Technik, eigene Ergebnisse, Literaturuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyd, R. [Staedtische Kliniken Offenbach am Main (Germany). Strahlenklinik]|[Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Onkologie; Schopohl, B.; Boettcher, H.D. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Onkologie

    1998-12-31

    Our own experience covers 41 primarily chronic cases. The patients have been irradiated with a telecobalt device with isocentric opposing fields, receiving 4x1.0 Gy within two weeks; 15 patients (36.6%) received a second radiation treatment (8 Gy), and one patient (2.4%) a third (12 Gy). After a follow-up period of 44 months on the average, the results were: Complete remittence of pain in 44%, abatement of pain in 44%, and no effect in 12%. Improvement of shoulder joint motility was achieved in 78%. The rate of recidivation was as low as 3%. A statistical evaluation of data acquired revealed that the prognosis is worst in case of a long period of pain preceding commencement of radiotherapy, combined with intensive prior therapy. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In einer eigenen Untersuchung wurden 41 ueberwiegend chronische Faelle mit 4x1,0 Gy in 2 Wochen an einem Telekobaltgeraet mit isozentrischen Gegenfeldern behandelt, 15 (36,6%) erhielten eine 2. Bestrahlungsserie (8 Gy), ein Fall (2,4%) eine Dritte (12 Gy). Nach einem Nachbeobachtungszeitraum von median 44 Monaten fand sich bei 44% eine komplette Schmerzremission, bei 44% eine Linderung und 12% waren ohne einen Einfluss der Behandlung. Eine Verbesserung der Motilitaet des Schultergelenkes wurde bei 78% erreicht. Die Rezidivrate lag bei nur 3%. Nach statistischer Bearbeitung der Daten erwies sich die Kombination einer langen Beschwerdedauer vor Einleitung der Radiotherapie und intensiver Vortherapie als prognostisch unguenstiger (p=0,02). (orig.)

  7. A placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of Benorylate tablets in the treatment of bursitis and synovitis due to sports injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, G

    1977-08-01

    In this two-week study, Benoral tablets, at a 4.5 g daily dosage were compared with a matching placebo in 20 patients suffering from sports injury. Four assessments were made: pain at rest, pain on movement, tenderness and soft tissue swelling. In each case the active treatment group (benorylate) was statistically greater than that in the placebo group at one week and after two weeks' treatment.

  8. Tennis elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epitrochlear bursitis; Lateral epicondylitis; Epicondylitis - lateral; Tendonitis - elbow ... tennis or other racket sports, hence the name "tennis elbow." Backhand is the most common stroke to cause ...

  9. Knee pain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The location of knee pain can help identify the problem. Pain on the front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or ... synovial fluid) that forms behind the knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in ...

  10. Experience with Ultrasound of the Knee Joint at Mulago Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    as anaechoic area bounded by the joint capsule. A simple effusion was anaechoic. Diffuse increase in echogenicity suggested infection or haemoarthrosis. Simple bursitis was depicted as anechoic fluid, with or without septa (fig 1A). In chronic bursitis, there was bursal thickening seen as a band of moderate echogenicity.

  11. Musculoskeletal and Medical Morbidity Associated with Rigorous Physical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    71881 I 0.2 Tendinitis , rotator cuff (RC) 72610 1 0.2 Subacromial bursitis 72619 1 0.2 Sprain/strain/tear, RC 84040 1 0.2 TABLE 4. Incidence’ of...84509 5 1.0 military investigators, although iliotibial band syn- Tendinitis , ant/post tibialis 72672 5 1.0 Tendinitis /bursitis, Achilles 72671 4 0.8...91730 3 0.6 SEAL clinic providers with ITBS and other muscu- Tendinitis /bursitis, peroneal 72679 3 0.6 Sprain/strain, foot, cuboid 84519 2 0.4

  12. True bursal pigmented villonodular synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, Ibrahim Fikry; Kenan, Samuel; Steiner, German C.; Abdul-Quader, Mohammed

    2002-01-01

    We describe two cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis affecting true bursae. This study was also designed to discuss the term ''pigmented villonodular bursitis'', not confined to true synovial bursae, sometimes creating misunderstanding. (orig.)

  13. True bursal pigmented villonodular synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahab, Ibrahim Fikry [Department of Radiology, New York Methodist Hospital, Affiliated with New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Kenan, Samuel [Department of Orthopedics, New York University Medical Center, NY (United States); Steiner, German C. [Department of Pathology, Hospital for Joint Diseases/Orthopedic Institute, New York, NY (United States); Abdul-Quader, Mohammed [Department of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2002-06-01

    We describe two cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis affecting true bursae. This study was also designed to discuss the term ''pigmented villonodular bursitis'', not confined to true synovial bursae, sometimes creating misunderstanding. (orig.)

  14. Shoulder Problems: Symptom Checker Flowchart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in adults, often causing severe pain, discomfort and immobility. Follow this chart to help you talk to ... Start OverDiagnosisYou may have BURSITIS or ROTATOR CUFF SYNDROME. Self CareUse an anti-inflammatory medicine, such as ...

  15. Integrating Targeted MedlinePlus Health Prescriptions Into Clinic Practice Workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Allergic Rhinitis; Asthma; Back Pain; Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy; Bursitis; Depression; Anxiety; Diabetes Mellitus; Esophageal Reflux; HIV Infections; Hyperlipidemia; Hypertension; Insomnia; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Obesity; Osteoporosis (Senile); Shoulder Pain; Sinusitis; Symptomatic Menopause; Urinary Incontinence; Urinary Tract Infection; Vaginitis

  16. Sindromes Dolorosos Regionales, Columna, Hombro y Rodilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolff C. Verónica, Dra.

    2012-07-01

    En la rodilla, los trastornos periarticulares incluyen bursitis y tendinitis de distintas estructuras, y hay que considerar la osteonecrosis dentro del diagnóstico diferencial del dolor de rodilla del adulto mayor.

  17. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Yvonne M.; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E.; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Ángel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subjects. For DM patients, disease duration, glycemic control, and DM long-term complications were also examined. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders. The mean (SD) age for DM patients and non-diabetic controls were 53.3 (12.9) and 50.0 (13.1) years; 64.0 and 64.7 % of DM patients and controls were females, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of bursitis/tendonitis was higher in DM patients than among non-diabetics (59.0 % vs. 29.4 %, pdiabetics. Specifically, DM patients had a higher frequency of flexor tenosynovitis, De Quervain’s tenosynovitis, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, trochanteric bursitis, and anserine bursitis than non-diabetic subjects (p<0.05). Among DM patients, multivariate analyses showed that those with bursitis/tendonitis were more likely to be female [OR (95 % CI) 4.55 (1.42, 14.55)] and have peripheral vascular disease [OR (95 % CI) 8.48 (1.71, 41.93)]. In conclusion, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were common in this population of Hispanics with DM. Among DM patients, bursitis/tendonitis disorders were more frequent in women and those with long-term complications such as peripheral vascular disease. PMID:24522480

  18. Subdeltoid Bursa Tuberculosis with Rice Body Formation–A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh L. Munde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous tenosynovitis and bursitis account for approximately 1%. A 56 years old female presented with swelling in left shoulder, gradually increasing in size with slight restriction in movement since last three months. X-ray revealed no abnormality of humerus head. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous tissue with multiple rice bodies. A positive culture of mycobacterium tuberculosis confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculosis. We here report a case of subdeltoid bursitis with rice body formation and without active bone and joint tuberculosis.

  19. MR imaging of abnormal synovial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, S.F.; Sanchez, R.; Murray, W.T.; Silbiger, M.L.; Ogden, J.; Cochran, C.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging can directly image abnormal synovium. The authors reviewed over 50 cases with abnormal synovial processes. The abnormalities include Baker cysts, semimembranous bursitis, chronic shoulder bursitis, peroneal tendon ganglion cyst, periarticular abscesses, thickened synovium from rheumatoid and septic arthritis, and synovial hypertrophy secondary to Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. MR imaging has proved invaluable in identifying abnormal synovium, defining the extent and, to a limited degree, characterizing its makeup

  20. Acetabular anteversion is associated with gluteal tendinopathy at MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulton, Kyle M. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Royal University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Aly, Abdel-Rahman [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Rajasekaran, Sathish [Health Pointe - Pain, Spine and Sport Medicine, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Shepel, Michael; Obaid, Haron [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Gluteal tendinopathy and greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) remain incompletely understood despite their pervasiveness in clinical practice. To date, no study has analyzed the morphometric characteristics of the hip on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may predispose to gluteal tendinopathy. This study aimed to evaluate whether acetabular anteversion (AA), femoral neck anteversion (FNA), and femoral neck-shaft angle (FNSA) are associated with MRI features of gluteal tendinopathy. A total of 203 MRI examinations of the hip met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. A single blinded investigator measured AA, FNA, and FNSA according to validated MRI techniques. Two blinded subspecialty-trained musculoskeletal radiologists then independently evaluated the presence of gluteal tendinosis, trochanteric bursitis, and subgluteal bursitis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; post-hoc Tukey's range test). At MRI, 57 patients had gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis, 26 had isolated trochanteric bursitis, and 11 had isolated subgluteal bursitis. AA was significantly (p = 0.01) increased in patients with MRI evidence of gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis [mean: 18.4 , 95 % confidence interval (CI): 17.2 -19.6 ] compared with normal controls (mean: 15.7 , 95 % CI: 14.7 -16.8 ). Similarly, AA was significantly (p = 0.04) increased in patients with isolated trochanteric bursitis (mean: 18.8 , 95 % CI: 16.2 -21.6 ). No association was found between FNA or FNSA and the presence of gluteal tendinopathy. Interobserver agreement for the presence and categorization of gluteal tendinopathy was very good (kappa = 0.859, 95 % CI: 0.815-0.903). Our MRI study suggests that there is an association between increased AA and gluteal tendinopathy, which supports a growing body of evidence implicating abnormal biomechanics in the development of this condition. (orig.)

  1. Acetabular anteversion is associated with gluteal tendinopathy at MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulton, Kyle M.; Aly, Abdel-Rahman; Rajasekaran, Sathish; Shepel, Michael; Obaid, Haron

    2015-01-01

    Gluteal tendinopathy and greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) remain incompletely understood despite their pervasiveness in clinical practice. To date, no study has analyzed the morphometric characteristics of the hip on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may predispose to gluteal tendinopathy. This study aimed to evaluate whether acetabular anteversion (AA), femoral neck anteversion (FNA), and femoral neck-shaft angle (FNSA) are associated with MRI features of gluteal tendinopathy. A total of 203 MRI examinations of the hip met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. A single blinded investigator measured AA, FNA, and FNSA according to validated MRI techniques. Two blinded subspecialty-trained musculoskeletal radiologists then independently evaluated the presence of gluteal tendinosis, trochanteric bursitis, and subgluteal bursitis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA; post-hoc Tukey's range test). At MRI, 57 patients had gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis, 26 had isolated trochanteric bursitis, and 11 had isolated subgluteal bursitis. AA was significantly (p = 0.01) increased in patients with MRI evidence of gluteal tendinosis with or without bursitis [mean: 18.4 , 95 % confidence interval (CI): 17.2 -19.6 ] compared with normal controls (mean: 15.7 , 95 % CI: 14.7 -16.8 ). Similarly, AA was significantly (p = 0.04) increased in patients with isolated trochanteric bursitis (mean: 18.8 , 95 % CI: 16.2 -21.6 ). No association was found between FNA or FNSA and the presence of gluteal tendinopathy. Interobserver agreement for the presence and categorization of gluteal tendinopathy was very good (kappa = 0.859, 95 % CI: 0.815-0.903). Our MRI study suggests that there is an association between increased AA and gluteal tendinopathy, which supports a growing body of evidence implicating abnormal biomechanics in the development of this condition. (orig.)

  2. Herd- and sow-related risk factors for lameness in organic and conventional sow herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knage-Rasmussen, Kristian Møllegaard; Houe, Hans; Rousing, Tine

    2014-01-01

    included in the study were clinical parameters and factors related to the production system. Sows were examined visually by one of four trained observers. The organic sows were assigned scores for lameness, body condition, hoof length, bursitis, abscesses and leg wounds, while the conventional sows were...... assigned scores for lameness, body condition and bursitis. A multivariable analysis was carried out by logistic regression with the herd and observer as random effects. The average herd lameness prevalence in gestation and lactation sows in organic herds was 11% in summer/autumn and 4.6% in winter....../spring. ‘Wounds, bursitis and abscess’ on legs (OR=4.7, P3 (OR=1.79, P=0.008) were associated with increased risk of lameness in Danish organic sow herds. Season (winter/spring v. summer/autumn) lowered the risk of lameness (OR=0.37, P

  3. Rhabdomyolysis in DOMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Carsi, C. [Hospital 9 d' Octubre, Valencia (Spain). Serveis de Medicina Nuclear; Ruiz Hernandez, G. [Hospital Clinic Universitari, Valencia (Spain). Serveis de Medicina Nuclear; Sanchez Marchori, C.; Munoz Moliner, J. [Hospital 9 d' Octubre, Valencia (Spain). Serveis de Traumatologia

    1999-07-01

    A 26-year-old man with a previous history of external twin bursitis was remitted to our Department for a bone scintigraphy. Before the study, the patient performed an elevated number of intense sprints. Bone scintigraphy showed a bilaterally increased activity in both anterior rectum muscles suggesting rhabdomyolysis. Biochemical studies and MRT confirmed the diagnosis. (orig.) [German] Ein 26jaehriger Mann mit vorausgehender M.-gastrocnemius-Bursitis wurde zur Skelettszintigraphie in unsere Abteilung ueberwiesen. Vor der Untersuchung fuehrte der Patient mehrere Kurzstreckensprints durch. Die Skelettszintigraphie ergab eine erhoehte Aktivitaet in beiden Mm. recti femoris, die auf eine Rhabdomyolyse hinweist. Biochemische Untersuchungen und MRT bestaetigten die Diagnose. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, N.J.; Dussault, R.G.; Keats, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs

  5. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, N.J. [Department of Radiology, Hotel-Dieu de Montreal Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dussault, R.G. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Keats, T.E. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs.

  6. “Liquid elbows” due to afatinib administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Zarogoulidis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer adenocarcinoma in the past decade has targeted therapies as the cornerstone for therapy. In specific patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation have three different therapy approaches with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors: erlotinib, gefitinib and afatinib. Nowadays we can use tyrosine kinase inhibitors as second line treatment for squamous cell carcinoma. We present a case with a patient with squamous cell carcinoma receiving afatinib tyrosine kinase inhibitor who presented elbow bursitis or olecranon bursitis in both elbows.

  7. Structure and function, injury, pathology, and treatment of the medial collateral ligament of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Aaron; Matcuk, George; Patel, Dakshesh; Gottsegen, Christopher J; Hartshorn, Timothy; Forrester, Deborah; White, Eric

    2012-12-01

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. There is a spectrum of injury severity, and injuries may be acute or chronic. The MCL is also frequently injured in conjunction with other knee structures. Clinical evaluation of the knee is important to assess the degree of surgical acuity, but magnetic resonance imaging can provide details about the injury that may not be obvious clinically. In addition to injury, MCL bursitis can occur and may be treated with needle aspiration and corticosteroid injection. This review article covers the anatomy and biomechanics of the MCL, its injury patterns and approach to management, and MCL bursitis.

  8. Rhabdomyolysis in DOMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Carsi, C.; Ruiz Hernandez, G.; Sanchez Marchori, C.; Munoz Moliner, J.

    1999-01-01

    A 26-year-old man with a previous history of external twin bursitis was remitted to our Department for a bone scintigraphy. Before the study, the patient performed an elevated number of intense sprints. Bone scintigraphy showed a bilaterally increased activity in both anterior rectum muscles suggesting rhabdomyolysis. Biochemical studies and MRT confirmed the diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  9. MR Imaging Features of Obturator Internus Bursa of the Hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Jong Oh

    2008-01-01

    The authors report two cases with distension of the obturator internus bursa identified on MR images, and describe the location and characteristic features of obturator internus bursitis; the 'boomerang'-shaped fluid distension between the obturator internus tendon and the posterior grooved surface of the ischium

  10. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Rytter, Søren; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA), meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling w...... work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks....

  11. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    18 mai 2017 ... J Bone Joint Surg. 1934; 16(3): 631-. 9. PubMed | Google Scholar. 7. Abdelwahab I F, Bianchi S, Martinoli C, Klein M, Hermann G. Atypical extraspinal musculoskeletal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients : Part II, Tuberculous myositis, tuberculous bursitis, and tuberculous tenosynovitis. Can Assoc.

  12. Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Acute BronchitisHigh Blood PressureBursitis of the HipHigh CholesterolExercise-induced UrticariaMicroscopic HematuriaKidney CystsDe Quervain’s Tenosynovitis Home Diseases and Conditions Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) ...

  13. Achilles Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  14. The appearance of the pre-Achilles fat pad after endoscopic calcaneoplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Johannes I.; Zwiers, Ruben; van Sterkenburg, Maayke N.; Maas, Mario M.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether the imaging features of the retrocalcaneal recess normalize on a conventional radiograph after surgery for retrocalcaneal bursitis and evaluate whether it can be reused if complaints reoccur. Patients who underwent an endoscopic calcaneoplasty at least 2 years before were

  15. MR Imaging Features of Obturator Internus Bursa of the Hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Jong Oh [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    The authors report two cases with distension of the obturator internus bursa identified on MR images, and describe the location and characteristic features of obturator internus bursitis; the 'boomerang'-shaped fluid distension between the obturator internus tendon and the posterior grooved surface of the ischium

  16. Radiology of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1989-01-01

    The author describes some particularities seen in the abnormal or pathological image of the cervical spine: The osteolysis of the cortical bone in the spinous processes, the 'Y' shaped course of the corporeal veins, the notch in interspinous bursitis, and the main forms of constitutional stenosis of the cervical canal. (orig.) [de

  17. Tubercular tenosynovitis of extensor tendons of foot--a rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of soft tissues as a result of spread from adjacent bone or joint is a well recognized entity. However isolated tuberculous pyomyositis, bursitis and tenosynovitis are rare, constituting about 1% of skeletal tuberculosis. Tubercular tenosynovitis commonly involves tendon sheaths of wrist and hand. Cases of ...

  18. Infectious bursal disease outbreak in 19-week old commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necropsy revealed a markedly enlarged, oedematous and haemorrhagic bursa. Histopathologic findings including lympho-cytolysis and oedema were characteristic of an acute bursitis and a positive agar-gel precipitation test were used to confirm the diagnosis of Infectious bursal disease. Keywords: Agar gel precipitation, ...

  19. Cervical Spondylitis and Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucellosis: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reşorlu Hatice

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease widely seen in endemic regions and that can lead to systemic involvement. The musculoskeletal system is frequently affected, and the disease can exhibit clinical involvements such as arthritis, spondylitis, spondylodiscitis, osteomyelitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis. Spondylitis and spondylodiscitis, common complications of brucellosis, predominantly affect the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae.

  20. Sinding-Larsen-Johansson syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dislocation, chondromalacia patellae and prepatellar bursitis.1. Imaging of Sinding-Larsen-Johansson syndrome may require a combination of radiographs, MRI and ultrasound. Lateral radiographs may reveal peripatellar soft-tissue swelling, patella-alta deformity and one or multiple tiny osseous fragments adjacent to.

  1. Primary hip spica with crossed retrograde intramedullary rush pins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bursitis and penetration of pins at the site of Rush pin insertion is a complication associated with this method of treatment. Conclusion: Closed reduction and internal fixation with crossed Rush pins was a superior treatment method in terms of early weight bearing and restoration of normal anatomy. Keywords: Femoral ...

  2. Capitellocondylar total elbow replacement in late-stage rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Janne; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    2012-01-01

    of instability. Other complications included 2 maltracking elbows, 2 triceps tendon ruptures, 2 cases of operative olecranon bursitis, and 2 ulnar nerve palsies. One elbow showed radiolucent lines of more than 1 mm in the circumference of the ulnar component; none of the other elbows showed any signs...

  3. East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 4, No.2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For example, bursitis and tendinitis demand not just a physical examination but magnetic resonance imaging as well. A sprainedjoint is thought to require, in addition to magnetic resonance imaging, a n arthroscopic procedz~re. followed by eqensive and prolonged physical therapy. Low-back pain, even in the absence of.

  4. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umer, M.; Qadir, I.; Azam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a

  5. Radiotherapy in degenerative-dystrophic and inflammatory diseases of the osteoarticular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslegin, I.A.; Zolotkov, A.G.; Alejnikov, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of a 3-6 year follow-up of 565 patients with deforming arthrosis, spondylosis, osteochondrosis, spondylarthrosis and calcareous bursitis indicates the efficacy of the proposed standardized complex of topometric and roentgenotherapeutic methods. Medical and social rehabilitation was achieved in most of the patients. The quantitative assessment of the therapeutic results makes it possible to interpret them objectively and unambiguously

  6. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    15 mars 2016 ... Médecine et Chirurgie du Pied. 2011; 27(4):106-108. PubMed | Google Scholar. 2. Jaffe HL, Lichtenstein L, Sutro CJ. Pigmented villonodularsynovitis,bursitis and tenosynovitis. Archives. Pathology.1941;31(3):731-765. PubMed | Google Scholar. 3. Myers BW, Masi AT. Pigmented villonodular synovitis and.

  7. The Achilles heel of adults and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, J.I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the imaging and treatment of the Achilles heel of adults and children. The figurative and literal Achilles heel consists of a number of pathologies: ankle impingement, Achilles tendinopathy, retrocalcaneal bursitis and calcaneal apophysitis. Research as well as diagnosis and

  8. CASE REPORT CASE Atypical tuberculosis of the knee joint CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRI of TB arthritis can present with a wide range of findings.2. These include bone marrow oedema, synovitis, cartilage/bony destruc- tion, myositis, cellulitis, granulation tissue, abscess-fistula, tenosynovitis, bursitis, fibrosis, etc.2. Findings which should alert one to the possibility of TB include. T1WI hyperintense soft tissue, ...

  9. Prototecosis Informe de tres casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Guzmán

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan tres casos clínicos de prototecosis vistos y estudiados en el lnstituto Nacional de Salud. Uno corresponde a la forma tegumentaria y los otros dos a formas de bursitis del olécranon. Se discuten los aspectos biológicos, clínicos y de laboratorio de esta rara entidad causada por algas.

  10. Locomotor diseases among male long-haul truck drivers and other professional drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Kaerlev, Linda; Tüchsen, Finn

    2007-01-01

    -249) and for other truck drivers (SHR: 130, 95% CI: 108-156) compared to bus drivers (SHR: 110, 95% CI: 79-149). All drivers had high SHR for lesions of the ulnar nerve (SHR: 159, 95% CI: 119-207), especially bus drivers (SHR: 197, 95% CI: 116-311). Long-haul truck drivers had high SHRs for synovitis and bursitis...

  11. Radiotherapy in degenerative-dystrophic and inflammatory diseases of the osteoarticular system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereslegin, I.A.; Zolotkov, A.G.; Alejnikov, G.E. (Vtoroj Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Meditsinskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-07-01

    Analysis of a 3-6 year follow-up of 565 patients with deforming arthrosis, spondylosis, osteochondrosis, spondylarthrosis and calcareous bursitis indicates the efficacy of the proposed standardized complex of topometric and roentgenotherapeutic methods. Medical and social rehabilitation was achieved in most of the patients. The quantitative assessment of the therapeutic results makes it possible to interpret them objectively and unambiguously.

  12. Ultrasonography of the Rotator Cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Yong Cheol

    2006-01-01

    The ultrasonography (US) is an important modality in evaluating shoulder disease. It is accurate in diagnosing the various shoulder diseases including tendinosis, calcific tendinitis, and subacromial bursitis as well as rotator cuff tears. This article presents a pictorial review of US anatomy of the shoulder, the technical aspects of shoulder US, major types of shoulder pathology, and interventional procedure under US guidance

  13. Ultrasonography of the Rotator Cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yong Cheol [Samsung Medica Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    The ultrasonography (US) is an important modality in evaluating shoulder disease. It is accurate in diagnosing the various shoulder diseases including tendinosis, calcific tendinitis, and subacromial bursitis as well as rotator cuff tears. This article presents a pictorial review of US anatomy of the shoulder, the technical aspects of shoulder US, major types of shoulder pathology, and interventional procedure under US guidance

  14. Ergonomic Assessment of Handheld Laser Technology in De-painting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-11

    abducted (similar to cradling a phone). This awkward posture can cause unnecessary stress at the shoulder ( acromioclavicular joint and the...awkward posture can cause unnecessary stress at the shoulder ( acromioclavicular joint and the glenohumeral joint) and may contribute to bursitis or

  15. triceps tendon avulsion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... trauma. Systemic causes such as chronic renal failure, steriod use, diabetes mellitus, hyperparathyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, osteogensis imperfecta and local causes like local steriod injection, olecranon bursitis and attritional changes due to degenerative arthritis are associated with tendon weakening.

  16. Features of Onset and Clinical Course of Reactive Arthritis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.S. Lebets

    2013-09-01

    Results. Reactive arthritis of chlamydial etiology is characterized by lesion of large and medium-sized joints of the lower limbs, which is often accompanied by short-term morning stiffness and rapid onset of transient hypomyatrophy. Reiter’s disease may develop rarely. Mycoplasma-induced reactive arthritis is characterized by debut with arthritis of knee, ankle, wrist and small joints of the hand, the development of bursitis and hypomyatrophy. Feature of Ureaplasma arthritis is the formation of bursitis in the heel and tendinitis. Reactive arthritis associated with elevated titers to antistreptolysin O differs with polymorphism of articular syndrome manifestations and, to some extent, of similarity with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Unspecified reactive arthritis has a number of the general features with others reactive arthritis and it is characterized by rather benign clinical course, long preservation of joints function and low laboratory activity. Relapse rate of reactive arthritis increases with an increase of duration of illness.

  17. Anserina Bursitis—A Treatable Cause of Knee Pain in Patients with Degenerative Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookler, Morton I.; Mongan, Edward S.

    1973-01-01

    The anserina bursa is located on the medial surface of the tibia deep to the tendons of the sartorius, gracilis, and semimembranosus muscles and superficial to the insertion of the tibial collateral ligament. Knee pain, a palpable swelling of the bursa, and tenderness over the medial anterior aspect of the tibia just below the knee are the hallmarks of anserina bursitis. In a three-year period, 24 patients with anserina bursitis were seen in a rheumatology clinic. All but one were women, 18 were obese, and only four were under 50 years old. Knee x-ray studies showed degenerative arthritis in 20 of the 24 patients. In ten, varus knee deformities were present, while three had valgus deformities. Ultrasound or local steroid injections gave dramatic relief in all but one patient. PMID:4731586

  18. MRI of the Achilles tendon: A comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and imaging of overuse tendinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R. (Dept. of Radiology, Emory Univ. Orthopedics and Spine Center, Atlanta, GA (United States)), e-mail: cpierr3@emory.edu

    2010-05-15

    The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body; it plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. It can withstand great forces, especially during sporting exercises and pivoting. The pathologies related to the Achilles tendon are diverse and many carry undesirable consequences. We retrospectively analyzed the images of patients who underwent examinations of the ankle/foot region to review the anatomy of the Achilles tendon and its surroundings and to search for pathologies consistent with overuse injuries. The anatomy of the tendon is described from origin to insertion. The imaging characteristics of the Achilles tendon including pitfalls are reviewed. We also describe the Achilles overuse injuries: paratenonitis, tendinosis, tendon tear, atypical tear, tendon re-tear, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retro-Achilles bursitis, Haglund's deformity, and tendon calcification. We present other entities like tendon ossification and failed transplanted Achilles tendon, with emphasis on MRI

  19. MRI of the Achilles tendon: A comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and imaging of overuse tendinopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body; it plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. It can withstand great forces, especially during sporting exercises and pivoting. The pathologies related to the Achilles tendon are diverse and many carry undesirable consequences. We retrospectively analyzed the images of patients who underwent examinations of the ankle/foot region to review the anatomy of the Achilles tendon and its surroundings and to search for pathologies consistent with overuse injuries. The anatomy of the tendon is described from origin to insertion. The imaging characteristics of the Achilles tendon including pitfalls are reviewed. We also describe the Achilles overuse injuries: paratenonitis, tendinosis, tendon tear, atypical tear, tendon re-tear, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retro-Achilles bursitis, Haglund's deformity, and tendon calcification. We present other entities like tendon ossification and failed transplanted Achilles tendon, with emphasis on MRI

  20. MRI findings of prepatellar Morel-Lavallee effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrero, Camilo G.; Maxwell, Norman; Kavanagh, Eoin

    2008-01-01

    To describe MR imaging characteristics and treatment options for prepatellar closed degloving injuries or Morel-Lavallee effusions. Imaging features are discussed that may aid in the distinguishing of this entity from ''housemaid's knee'' or prepatellar bursitis. MR images of four young wrestlers were reviewed by two attending radiologists and one fellow, and correlative clinical data were collected using the electronic medical database. MR images in all cases showed a unilocular, T2 hyperintense prepatellar collection extending beyond the normal boundaries of the prepatellar bursa. No necrotic fat or blood products were identified in the collections. Surgical pathology proving the absence of synovial tissue was available for one case, and differentiation of the collection from the adjacent bursa was confirmed visually by the surgeon in a second case. Although prepatellar hemorrhagic bursitis and Morel-Lavallee effusions share many imaging features, making a specific diagnosis in most cases is not necessary, as treatment is often similar for both entities. (orig.)

  1. MedlinePlus Health Prescriptions: Developing a Pragmatic Approach for Clinic Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Acne Vulgaris; Allergic Rhinitis; Anxiety; Asthma; Back Pain; Prostatic Hyperplasia; Bursitis; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Cough; Coronary Artery Disease; Depression; Diabetes Mellitus; Diarrhea; Gastroesophageal Reflux; Fibromyalgia; Headache; HIV Infections; Hypothyroidism; Hyperlipidemia; Hypertension; Influenza; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Irritable Bowel Syndrome; Migraine Disorders; Obesity; Obstructive Sleep Apnea; Osteoarthritis; Senile Osteoporosis; Shoulder Pain; Sinusitis; Smoking Cessation; Tobacco Use Cessation; Menopause; Urinary Incontinence; Urinary Tract Infection; Vaginitis; Vertigo

  2. Sliding-screw plate fixation of proximal femoral fractures: Radiographic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.; Kerr, R.; Goergen, T.

    1985-07-01

    The sliding compression screw-sideplate combination is currently the most widely employed device for internal fixation of stable and unstable intertrochanteric fractures of the femur. The normal and abnormal radiographic appearances of this device in the immediate post-operative period are discussed. Potential long-term complications including mal- or non-union, intra-articular penetration, metal failure, rotation of the proximal fracture fragment, disengagement, trochanteric bursitis, leg length discrepancy, delayed cervical stress fracture, and ischemic necrosis are reviewed.

  3. Sliding-screw plate fixation of proximal femoral fractures: Radiographic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla; Kerr, R.; Goergen, T.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding compression screw-sideplate combination is currently the most widely employed device for internal fixation of stable and unstable intertrochanteric fractures of the femur. The normal and abnormal radiogrpahic appearances of this device in the immediate post-operative period are discussed. Potential long-term complications including mal- or non-union, intra-articular penetration, metal failure, rotation of the proximal fracture fragment, disengagement, trochanteric bursitis, leg length discrepancy, delayed cervical stress fracture, and ischemic necrosis are reviewed. (orig.)

  4. Comparison the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination or ultrasound methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karimzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to compare the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound methods. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted in Al-Zahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran during 2014–2015. In our study, ninety patients were selected based on the American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria. All patients were examined by a rheumatologist to find the existence of effusion, and the data were filled in the checklist. The ultrasonography for detecting effusion in periarticular structures was done by an expert radiologist with two methods, including high-resolution ultrasonography and power Doppler. The percentage of effusion existence found by physical examination was compared by sonography, and the Chi-square and t-tests were used for data analysis. Results: The percentage of effusion found in areas with physical examination by rheumatologist was lower than the frequency distribution of effusions found by sonography (8.3% VS 14.2% (P < 0.001. In sonography, rotator cuff tendonitis is the most common periarthritis. Other findings in sonography were biceps tendinitis (10 cases, wrist tendonitis (13 cases, olecranon bursitis (9 cases, golfers elbow (4 cases, tennis elbow (4 cases, trochanteric bursitis (6 cases, anserine bursitis (6 cases, prepatellar bursitis (11 cases, and ankle tendonitis (7 cases. Tenderness on physical examination was found in 15% of the cases, and the evidence of periarthritis was found in 21/7% through sonography (P < 0.001 and 34% through Doppler sonography (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The percentage of periarthritis detection by ultrasonography and power Doppler sonography was higher than clinical examination. Hence, the ultrasonography is more accurate than physical examination.

  5. Calcaneal tendon: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montandon, Cristiano; Fonseca, Cristiano Rezio; Montandon Junior, Marcelo Eustaquio; Lobo, Leonardo Valadares; Ribeiro, Flavia Aparecida de Souza; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed the radiological and clinical features of 23 patients with calcaneal tendon diseases, who were submitted to ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. The objective of this study was to characterize the lesions for a precise diagnosis of calcaneal tendon injuries. A wide range of calcaneal tendon diseases include degenerative lesions, inflammation of the peritendinous tissue such as peritendinitis and bursitis, and rupture. Imaging methods are essential in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of calcaneal tendon diseases. (author)

  6. Detecting Gait Asymmetry with Wearable Accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-18

    by overuse. Common overuse injuries include stress fractures , tendinitis, bursitis, fasciitis, and medial tibial stress syndrome (shin splints) [11...magnitude feature values for subject 1 are shown in (a), before and after repetitive stress injury. Magnitude and pattern features are plotted in...Dudziñski, A. Lees, M. Lake, and M. Wychowañski, “Adjustments in gait symmetry with walking speed in trans-femoral and trans- tibial amputees,” Gait

  7. Correlation between Ultrasonographic Findings and The Response to Corticosteroid Injection in Pes Anserinus Tendinobursitis Syndrome in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Ho Sung; Kim, Sung Eun; Suh, Young Ran; Seo, Young-Il; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the ultrasonographic (US) findings in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) with pes anserinus tendinitis or bursitis (PATB) syndrome and to determine the correlation between the US findings and the response to local corticosteroid injection. We prospectively studied 26 patients with knee OA with clinically diagnosed PATB syndrome. A linear array 7 MHz transducer was used for US examination of the knee. Seventeen patients were injected locally with...

  8. Comparison the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination or ultrasound methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Hadi; Seyedbonakdar, Zahra; Mousavi, Maryam; Karami, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the percentage of detection of periarthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using clinical examination and ultrasound methods. This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted in Al-Zahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran) during 2014-2015. In our study, ninety patients were selected based on the American College of Rheumatology 2010 criteria. All patients were examined by a rheumatologist to find the existence of effusion, and the data were filled in the checklist. The ultrasonography for detecting effusion in periarticular structures was done by an expert radiologist with two methods, including high-resolution ultrasonography and power Doppler. The percentage of effusion existence found by physical examination was compared by sonography, and the Chi-square and t -tests were used for data analysis. The percentage of effusion found in areas with physical examination by rheumatologist was lower than the frequency distribution of effusions found by sonography (8.3% VS 14.2%) ( P tendinitis (10 cases), wrist tendonitis (13 cases), olecranon bursitis (9 cases), golfers elbow (4 cases), tennis elbow (4 cases), trochanteric bursitis (6 cases), anserine bursitis (6 cases), prepatellar bursitis (11 cases), and ankle tendonitis (7 cases). Tenderness on physical examination was found in 15% of the cases, and the evidence of periarthritis was found in 21/7% through sonography ( P < 0.001) and 34% through Doppler sonography ( P < 0.001). The percentage of periarthritis detection by ultrasonography and power Doppler sonography was higher than clinical examination. Hence, the ultrasonography is more accurate than physical examination.

  9. Factors associated with regional rheumatic pain disorders in a population of Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Font, Yvonne M.; Castro-Santana, Lesliane E.; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Maldonado, Mirna; Mayor, Ángel M.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with bursitis/tendonitis disorders in Puerto Ricans with diabetes mellitus (DM). A cross-sectional study was performed in 202 adult Puerto Ricans (100 DM patients and 102 non-diabetic subjects). For each participant, a complete medical history and a musculoskeletal exam were systematically performed. Socio-demographic parameters, health-related behaviors, comorbidities, and pharmacotherapy were determined for all subj...

  10. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, C.L.F. [Department of Radiology, North District Hospital, NTEC, Fanling, NT, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: c8681@yahoo.com; Griffith, J.F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, NTEC, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented.

  11. Non-neoplastic conditions presenting as soft-tissue tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crundwell, N. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); O' Donnell, P. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asif.saifuddin@rnoh.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Review of referrals to our unit over the last 7 years showed that of approximately 750 cases referred as soft-tissue tumours, 132 were subsequently diagnosed as non-neoplastic lesions. The imaging characteristics of these lesions are presented to differentiate them from neoplasms. The most common diagnoses were myositis ossificans, ganglion cyst, abscess/infection, bursitis and synovitis. The imaging features of other rarer conditions will also be discussed.

  12. Medical Services: Medical Record Administration and Health Care Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-03

    medical condition caused by it. Explain conditions, such as traumatic bursitis, traumatic neuritis, traumatic myositis , or traumatic synovitis, by... histopathologic findings have a direct bearing on diagnosis and treatment (AR 40-31/BUMEDINST 6510.2F/AFR 160-55). In such cases, the attending physician...Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and Armed Forces Histopathology Centers AR 40–35 Preventive Dentistry AR 40–48 Nonphysician Health Care Providers

  13. Tubercular myositis of infraspinatus: a rare clinical entity

    OpenAIRE

    Vikas Verma; Yogesh Kumar Yadav; Anuj Rastogi; Farid Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the musculoskeletal system is generally confined to bones and joints. The surrounding soft tissue is secondarily infected. Tuberculous bursitis, tenosynovitis and primary pyomyositis are rarer manifestations of the disease. Of these, primary tuberculouspyomyositis is probably the rarest entity. We report a case of tubercular myositis of infraspinatus in an 8 year-old female who presented with pain, low grade fever, weight loss, anorexia, progressively increasing pain in the sc...

  14. The ''hot'' patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipper, M.S.; Alazraki, N.P.; Feiglin, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    Increased patellar uptake on bone scans is seen quite commonly but the possible or probable etiologies of this finding have not been previously well described. A review of 100 consecutive bone scans showed that the incidence of bilateral ''hot'' patellae is 15%. Identified etiologies include osteoarthritic degenerative disease (35%), fracture, possible metastatic disease, bursitis, Paget's disease, and osteomyelitis. The value of careful history, physical examination, and radiographs is stressed

  15. Greater trochanter pain syndrome: A descriptive MR imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Objective: Greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS) is a diverse clinical entity caused by a variety of underlying conditions. We sought to explore the impact of (1) hip morphology, namely the center-edge angle (CEa) and femoral neck-shaft (NSa) angle, (2) hip abductor tendon degeneration, (3) the dimensions of peritrochanteric edema and (4) bursitis, on the presence of GTPS, using MR imaging. Materials and methods: The presence of pain was prospectively assessed blindly by the senior author. CEa and NSa were blindly measured in 174 hip MR examinations, after completion of the clinical evaluation by another evaluator. The existence and dimensions of T2 hyperintensity of the peritrochanteric soft tissues, the existence and dimensions of bursae, as well as degeneration and tearing of gluteus tendons were also recorded. Results: Out of 174 examinations, 91 displayed peritrochanteric edema (group A) and 34 bursitis, all with peritrochanteric edema (group B). A number of 78 patients from both A and B groups, showed gluteus medius tendon degeneration and one tendon tear. CEa of groups A and B were 6° higher than those of normals (group C, P = 0.0038). The mean age of normals was 16.6 years less than in group A and 19.8 years less than in group B (P < 0.0001). Bursitis was associated with pain with a negative predictive value of 97% (P = 0.0003). Conclusion: Acetabular morphology is associated with GTPS and the absence of bursitis was proved to be clinically relevant. Peritrochanteric edema alone was not associated with local pain.

  16. Non-neoplastic conditions presenting as soft-tissue tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crundwell, N.; O'Donnell, P.; Saifuddin, A.

    2007-01-01

    Review of referrals to our unit over the last 7 years showed that of approximately 750 cases referred as soft-tissue tumours, 132 were subsequently diagnosed as non-neoplastic lesions. The imaging characteristics of these lesions are presented to differentiate them from neoplasms. The most common diagnoses were myositis ossificans, ganglion cyst, abscess/infection, bursitis and synovitis. The imaging features of other rarer conditions will also be discussed

  17. Fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder: spectrum of MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado, J.M.; Salvado, E.; Camins, A.; Ramos, A.; Sauri, A. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona (Spain); Merino, X. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Vall' Ebron, Barcelona (Spain); Calmet, J. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital Joan XXIII, Carrer Doctor Mallafre Guasch, Tarragona (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    The MR imaging features of fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder are discussed, with special focus on those related to subacromial impingement and rotator cuff tears. Other more unusual fluid collections and cystic lesions are described, including rice-bodies bursitis, idiopathic synovial osteochondromatosis, dialysis-related amyloid arthropathy, hemophilic arthropathy, infectious conditions, non-infectious inflammatory arthritis, and paralabral cysts. (orig.)

  18. Calcaneal tendon: imaging findings; Tendao calcaneo: avaliacao por imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montandon, Cristiano; Fonseca, Cristiano Rezio; Montandon Junior, Marcelo Eustaquio [Colegio Brasileiro de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: crismontandon@hotmail.com; Lobo, Leonardo Valadares; Ribeiro, Flavia Aparecida de Souza; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos [Goias Univ., Goiania, GO (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem e Anatomia Patologica

    2003-12-01

    We reviewed the radiological and clinical features of 23 patients with calcaneal tendon diseases, who were submitted to ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. The objective of this study was to characterize the lesions for a precise diagnosis of calcaneal tendon injuries. A wide range of calcaneal tendon diseases include degenerative lesions, inflammation of the peritendinous tissue such as peritendinitis and bursitis, and rupture. Imaging methods are essential in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of calcaneal tendon diseases. (author)

  19. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, C.L.F.; Griffith, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented

  20. Greater trochanter pain syndrome: A descriptive MR imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klontzas, Michail E.; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS) is a diverse clinical entity caused by a variety of underlying conditions. We sought to explore the impact of (1) hip morphology, namely the center-edge angle (CEa) and femoral neck-shaft (NSa) angle, (2) hip abductor tendon degeneration, (3) the dimensions of peritrochanteric edema and (4) bursitis, on the presence of GTPS, using MR imaging. Materials and methods: The presence of pain was prospectively assessed blindly by the senior author. CEa and NSa were blindly measured in 174 hip MR examinations, after completion of the clinical evaluation by another evaluator. The existence and dimensions of T2 hyperintensity of the peritrochanteric soft tissues, the existence and dimensions of bursae, as well as degeneration and tearing of gluteus tendons were also recorded. Results: Out of 174 examinations, 91 displayed peritrochanteric edema (group A) and 34 bursitis, all with peritrochanteric edema (group B). A number of 78 patients from both A and B groups, showed gluteus medius tendon degeneration and one tendon tear. CEa of groups A and B were 6° higher than those of normals (group C, P = 0.0038). The mean age of normals was 16.6 years less than in group A and 19.8 years less than in group B (P < 0.0001). Bursitis was associated with pain with a negative predictive value of 97% (P = 0.0003). Conclusion: Acetabular morphology is associated with GTPS and the absence of bursitis was proved to be clinically relevant. Peritrochanteric edema alone was not associated with local pain

  1. Musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging of the plantar forefoot in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: inter-observer agreement between a podiatrist and a radiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Catherine J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS in the diagnosis and management of foot and ankle musculoskeletal pathology is increasing. Due to the wide use of MSUS and the depth and breadth of training required new proposals advocate tailored learning of the technique to discrete fields of practice. The aims of the study were to evaluate the inter-observer agreement between a MSUS radiologist and a podiatrist, who had completed basic skills training in MSUS, in the MSUS assessment of the forefoot of patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Methods A consecutive sample of thirty-two patients with rheumatoid arthritis was assessed for presence of synovitis, erosions and bursitis within the forefoot using MSUS. All MSUS assessments were performed independently on the same day by a podiatrist and one of two Consultant Radiologists experienced in MSUS. Results Moderate agreement on image acquisition and interpretation was achieved for bursitis (kappa 0.522; p Conclusion This study demonstrated good inter-observer agreement between a podiatrist and radiologist on MSUS assessment of the forefoot, particularly for bursitis and erosions, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. There is scope to further evaluate and consider the role of podiatrists in the MSUS imaging of the foot following appropriate training and also in the development of reliable protocols for MSUS assessment of the foot.

  2. BURSITIS—OFTEN AN INEXACT DIAGNOSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Donald P.

    1958-01-01

    The word bursitis is like arthritis in that it must be modified by another before it has meaning precise enough for useful medical description and communication. It is used loosely and generally to describe a number of clinical and pathological entities, among which are true primary bursitis, cystic degenerations, calcareous deposits in ligaments and tendons, and so-called “chronic sprains” where a calcified deposit cannot be demonstrated. It is possible to differentiate between these four entities in the light of present-day knowledge and to make a more accurate statement of diagnosis. Bursitis is often a symptom... not a primary disease and hence not a proper diagnosis. Calcareous deposits in ligaments and tendons with evident inflammatory reaction have been described in many locations. No area seems to be immune but the rotator cuff and supraspinatus tendon of the shoulder show the greatest incidence. The term inflammatory tendinitis appears to be a reasonably useful one for describing the clinical manifestations of the disease. For further accuracy it can be modified by saying that it is with calcification or without calcification as the case may be. There might be serious consequences from confusing the pain radiation of inflammatory tendinitis (with or without calcification) around the trochanteric region of the hip with true sciatic neuritis arising from a herniated intervertebral disk. PMID:13500222

  3. Radiographic changes in the os calcis in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakits, A.

    1994-01-01

    Plain films of the calcanea of 768 patients with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis were examined retrospectively with reference to inflammatory rheumatic changes. 42 patients (5.5%) showed an erosion of the posterior upper calcaneal margin related to an Achilles bursitis. In three patients there were additional plantar erosions. The Achilles bursitis was bilateral in 50% of cases, particularly in patients in stages 2 and 3 according to Steinbrocker. In the majority of bilateral cases (62%) the size or shape of the lesions was asymmetrical. Our observations indicate that involvement of the os calcis is not uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis; routine examination of this bone would appear to be indicated even in patients without symptoms. Since the defect is unilateral in half the patients, unilateral occurrence of an erosive lesion cannot be regarded as a criterion for a bacterial-inflammatory bursitis. Contrary to the symmetrical involvement of joints in the hands in rheumatoid arthritis, defects in the calcanea are often unilateral or asymmetrical. (orig.) [de

  4. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)], E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Tekin, Nilgun Solak [Department of Dermatology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Sarikaya, Selda [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot.

  5. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal; Tekin, Nilgun Solak; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot

  6. Prevalence and pattern of gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Andrew S. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Long, Suzanne S.; Zoga, Adam C.; Read, Paul J.; Deely, Diane M.; Parker, Laurence; Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI. A retrospective MRI study of 185 individuals was performed. The inclusion criterion was age ≥50. Exclusion criteria were hip surgery, fracture, infection, tumor, or inadequate image quality. Greater trochanteric bursitis was graded none, mild, moderate, or severe. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and iliopsoas tendinopathy was graded normal, tendinosis, low-grade partial tear, high-grade partial tear, or full thickness tear. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, tensor fascia lata, and iliopsoas muscle atrophy was scored using a standard scale. Insertion site of tendinopathy and location of muscle atrophy were assessed. Descriptive and statistical analysis was performed. There was increasing greater trochanteric bursitis and gluteus medius and minimus tendinopathy and atrophy with advancing age with moderate to strong positive associations (p < 0.0001) for age and tendinopathy, age and atrophy, bursitis and tendinopathy, and tendinopathy and atrophy for the gluteus medius and minimus. There is a weak positive association (p < 0.0001) for age and tensor fascia lata atrophy, and no statistically significant association between age and tendinopathy or between age and atrophy for the iliopsoas. Fisher's exact tests were statistically significant (p < 0.0001) for insertion site of tendon pathology and location of muscle atrophy for the gluteus medius. Gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy increase with advancing age with progression of tendinosis to low-grade tendon tears to high-grade tendon tears. There is an associated progression in atrophy of these muscles, which may be important in fall-related hip fractures. (orig.)

  7. Preoperative conventional magnetic resonance images versus magnetic resonance arthrography of subacromial impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Hyuk; Park, Jung Hwan; Moon, Tae Yong; Lee, In Sook; Lee, Seung Jun

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of conventional magnetic resonance images (MRI) for arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images (MRA). The preoperative MRI of 77 patients (45 females, 32 males) (52 right, 25 left) and MRA of 34 patients (14 females, 20 males) (24 right, 10 left) with subsequent arthroscopic confirmation of subacromial impingement syndrome were reviewed retrospectively. The lesions requiring arthroscopic surgery were 95 subacromial spurs, 101 subacromial bursitis, and 51 full-thickness and 44 partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus among 111 cases for both studies. A two by two table was constructed in order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of both studies against arthroscopic outcomes. Also we analyzed the false positive and false negative cases of the full-thickness tears individually. The detection rates of subacromial spur and bursitis and full and partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus were 91%, 94%, 77%, and 65% in MRI and 93%, 100%, 83%, and 77% in MRA respectively. Their specificities were 33%, 33%, 90%, and 76% in MRI and 50%, 75%, 100%, and 71% in MRA respectively. Eleven false negative cases in regards to MRI resulted in Ellman's grade 3 partial thickness tear (72.7%), mild bursitis (63.6%), greater tuberosity erosion (45.5%), and negative fluid signal of the glenohumeral joint (81.8%). Three false positive cases on the MRI were induced from errors with lower window depth and width on the imagings. Two false negative cases on MRA were induced from the adhesion between Ellman's grade 3 rim rent tear and the glenohumeral joint cavity. Conventional MR images could be used to decide the arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images

  8. Ultrasonographic findings of Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in patients with calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellabban, Abdou S; Kamel, Shereen R; Abo Omar, Hanaa A S; El-Sherif, Ashraf M H; Abdel-Magied, Rasha A

    2012-04-01

    The aims of the study were to detect the frequency of involvement of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in patients with calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) by high-frequency gray-scale ultrasonography (US) and power Doppler sonography (PDS) and to correlate these findings with demographic and clinical data. Two groups of patients were enrolled: group I (38 patients with CPPD) and group II (22 patients with knee OA). US/PDS examination of the heels was performed to both groups. In the CPPD group, US/PDS examination of the Achilles tendon revealed: calcification in 57.9%, enthesophytosis in 57.9%, enthesopathy in 23.7%, vascular sign in 21%, bursitis in 13.2%, and cortical bone irregularity in 10.5%. US/PDS examination of plantar fascia in the CPPD group revealed: calcification in 15.8%, cortical bone irregularity in 78.9%, enthesophytosis in 60.5%, and planter fasciitis in 42.1%. In patients with CPPD, age was significantly correlated with enthesophytosis and deep retrocalcaneal bursitis (p = 0.01 and p = 0.04, respectively). Heel tenderness and posterior talalgia were significantly correlated with Achilles tendon enthesopathy, vascular sign, and deep retrocalcaneal bursitis (p = 0.0001 for each). Inferior talalgia was significantly correlated with plantar fasciitis (p = 0.0001). The sensitivity of ultrasonography for detection of calcifications in Achilles tendon and plantar fascia was 57.9% and 15.8%, respectively, and the specificity was 100% for both. To conclude, ultrasonographic Achilles tendon and plantar fascia calcifications are frequent findings in patients with CPPD. These calcifications have a high specificity and can be used as a useful indirect sign of CPPD.

  9. Prevalence and pattern of gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Andrew S.; Long, Suzanne S.; Zoga, Adam C.; Read, Paul J.; Deely, Diane M.; Parker, Laurence; Morrison, William B.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy in older individuals using MRI. A retrospective MRI study of 185 individuals was performed. The inclusion criterion was age ≥50. Exclusion criteria were hip surgery, fracture, infection, tumor, or inadequate image quality. Greater trochanteric bursitis was graded none, mild, moderate, or severe. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, and iliopsoas tendinopathy was graded normal, tendinosis, low-grade partial tear, high-grade partial tear, or full thickness tear. Gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, tensor fascia lata, and iliopsoas muscle atrophy was scored using a standard scale. Insertion site of tendinopathy and location of muscle atrophy were assessed. Descriptive and statistical analysis was performed. There was increasing greater trochanteric bursitis and gluteus medius and minimus tendinopathy and atrophy with advancing age with moderate to strong positive associations (p < 0.0001) for age and tendinopathy, age and atrophy, bursitis and tendinopathy, and tendinopathy and atrophy for the gluteus medius and minimus. There is a weak positive association (p < 0.0001) for age and tensor fascia lata atrophy, and no statistically significant association between age and tendinopathy or between age and atrophy for the iliopsoas. Fisher's exact tests were statistically significant (p < 0.0001) for insertion site of tendon pathology and location of muscle atrophy for the gluteus medius. Gluteus medius and minimus tendon pathology and muscle atrophy increase with advancing age with progression of tendinosis to low-grade tendon tears to high-grade tendon tears. There is an associated progression in atrophy of these muscles, which may be important in fall-related hip fractures. (orig.)

  10. Preoperative conventional magnetic resonance images versus magnetic resonance arthrography of subacromial impingement syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang Hyuk; Park, Jung Hwan; Moon, Tae Yong [Pusan National Univ. Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Sook; Lee, Seung Jun [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of conventional magnetic resonance images (MRI) for arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images (MRA). The preoperative MRI of 77 patients (45 females, 32 males) (52 right, 25 left) and MRA of 34 patients (14 females, 20 males) (24 right, 10 left) with subsequent arthroscopic confirmation of subacromial impingement syndrome were reviewed retrospectively. The lesions requiring arthroscopic surgery were 95 subacromial spurs, 101 subacromial bursitis, and 51 full-thickness and 44 partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus among 111 cases for both studies. A two by two table was constructed in order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of both studies against arthroscopic outcomes. Also we analyzed the false positive and false negative cases of the full-thickness tears individually. The detection rates of subacromial spur and bursitis and full and partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus were 91%, 94%, 77%, and 65% in MRI and 93%, 100%, 83%, and 77% in MRA respectively. Their specificities were 33%, 33%, 90%, and 76% in MRI and 50%, 75%, 100%, and 71% in MRA respectively. Eleven false negative cases in regards to MRI resulted in Ellman's grade 3 partial thickness tear (72.7%), mild bursitis (63.6%), greater tuberosity erosion (45.5%), and negative fluid signal of the glenohumeral joint (81.8%). Three false positive cases on the MRI were induced from errors with lower window depth and width on the imagings. Two false negative cases on MRA were induced from the adhesion between Ellman's grade 3 rim rent tear and the glenohumeral joint cavity. Conventional MR images could be used to decide the arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images.

  11. Clinical anatomy of the elbow and shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Vargas, Angélica; Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Canoso, Juan J; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Kalish, Robert A

    The elbow patients herein discussed feature common soft tissue conditions such as tennis elbow, golfers' elbow and olecranon bursitis. Relevant anatomical structures for these conditions can easily be identified and demonstrated by cross examination by instructors and participants. Patients usually present rotator cuff tendinopathy, frozen shoulder, axillary neuropathy and suprascapular neuropathy. The structures involved in tendinopathy and frozen shoulder can be easily identified and demonstrated under normal conditions. The axillary and the suprascapular nerves have surface landmarks but cannot be palpated. In neuropathy however, physical findings in both neuropathies are pathognomonic and will be discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Shoulder pain: the role of diagnostic injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H M; O'Connor, F G; Nirschl, R P

    1996-04-01

    Many different shoulder disorders cause similar symptoms and pain patterns. An accurate diagnosis can generally be made by obtaining a detailed history, performing a comprehensive, directed physical examination and obtaining selected radiographs. Occasionally, shoulder injections can be of great assistance in establishing a clear diagnosis and providing relief of symptoms. Subacromial space injection, acromioclavicular joint injection, intra-articular injection and injection of the biceps tendon are helpful in identifying such disorders as subacromial bursitis, acromioclavicular arthritis, injury to the glenohumeral joint and bicipital tendinitis.

  13. Miscellaneous conditions of tendons, tendon sheaths, and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, S J; Dik, K J

    1995-08-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasonography has greatly enhances our ability to diagnose injuries of tendons and tendon sheaths that were previously either unrecognized or poorly understood. For may of these injuries, there is currently only a small amount of follow-up data. This article considers injuries of the deep digital flexor tendon and its accessory ligament, the carpal tunnel syndrome soft tissue swellings on the dorsal aspect of the carpus, intertubercular (bicipital) bursitis and bicipital tendinitis, injuries of the gastrocnemius tendon, common calcaneal tendinitis, rupture of peroneus (fibularis tertius) and ligaments injuries of the back.

  14. Autologous implant of bone marrow mononuclear stem-cells as treatment for equine bicipital tendonitis: case report Implante autólogo de células mononucleares de médula ósea como tratamiento de tendinitis bicipital equina: reporte de caso clínico

    OpenAIRE

    BC Menarim; GA Fortini; PS Álvarez; J Gómez; CD Jarrín; A Ramírez; JS Galecio

    2012-01-01

    Bicipital bursitis in the horse, the inflammation of the bicipital tendon and its surrounding bursa, has been reported to represent a low percentage of lameness cause. However, it is the main cause of lameness associated to the shoulder region and it has been under diagnosed. Due to high recurrence in different types of tendon injuries, treatments aiming to re-establish tendon functionality have been a focus of research. The aim of this study is to report the implant of a bone marrow mononucl...

  15. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Khalil, Chadi; Jaspart, Matthieu; Marie-Helene, Vieillard; Demondion, Xavier; Cotten, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  16. Radiographic changes in the os calcis in rheumatoid arthritis; Radiographische Veraenderungen am Fersenbein im Rahmen der chronischen Polyarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakits, A. [Krankenhaus Lainz (Austria). Zentralroentgeninstitut; Haller, J. [Hanusch-Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Roentgenabteilung; Steiner, E. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Klinik fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Stenzel, I. [Krankenhaus Lainz (Austria). Zentralroentgeninstitut; Schneider, B. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik und Dokumentation; Czembirek, H. [Krankenhaus Lainz (Austria). Zentralroentgeninstitut; Smolen, J. [Krankenhaus Lainz (Austria). 2. Medizinische Abt. (Rheumatologie)

    1994-02-01

    Plain films of the calcanea of 768 patients with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis were examined retrospectively with reference to inflammatory rheumatic changes. 42 patients (5.5%) showed an erosion of the posterior upper calcaneal margin related to an Achilles bursitis. In three patients there were additional plantar erosions. The Achilles bursitis was bilateral in 50% of cases, particularly in patients in stages 2 and 3 according to Steinbrocker. In the majority of bilateral cases (62%) the size or shape of the lesions was asymmetrical. Our observations indicate that involvement of the os calcis is not uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis; routine examination of this bone would appear to be indicated even in patients without symptoms. Since the defect is unilateral in half the patients, unilateral occurrence of an erosive lesion cannot be regarded as a criterion for a bacterial-inflammatory bursitis. Contrary to the symmetrical involvement of joints in the hands in rheumatoid arthritis, defects in the calcanea are often unilateral or asymmetrical. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Nativroentgenaufnahmen des Fersenbeins von 768 Patienten mit gesicherter chronischer Polyarthritis wurden retrospektiv hinsichtlich des Auftretens entzuendlich-rheumatischer Veraenderungen beurteilt. 42 Patienten (5,5%) zeigten eine Erosion der hinteren oberen Fersenbeinkante im Sinne eines Achillobursitisdefektes. Bei drei Patienten gelangte zusaetzlich eine plantare Erosion zur Darstellung. Der Achillobursitisdefekt war in 50% der Faelle beidseitig ausgebildet, wobei das bilaterale Auftreten bei Patienten in den Stadien II und III nach Steinbrocker ueberwog. Bei bilateralem Befall waren die Laesionen allerdings in der Mehrzahl der Faelle (62%) hinsichtlich Groesse und/oder Form asymmetrisch ausgebildet. Unsere Beobachtungen belegen, dass eine Fersenbeinbeteiligung im Rahmen der chronischen Polyarthritis nicht selten auftritt, weshalb routinemaessig Roentgenaufnahmen des Fersenbeins bei Patienten mit

  17. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, Nathalie [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)]. E-mail: nboutry@chru-lille.fr; Khalil, Chadi [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Jaspart, Matthieu [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Marie-Helene, Vieillard [Department of Rheumatology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Demondion, Xavier [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Cotten, Anne [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)

    2007-07-15

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  18. MRI and US of gluteal tendinopathy in greater trochanteric pain syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Andrew; Van der Vliet, Andrew [Regional Imaging Border, Albury, NSW (Australia); Zadow, Steven [Dr Jones and Partners Medical Imaging, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2007-07-15

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome is commonly due to gluteus minimus or medius injury rather than trochanteric bursitis. Gluteal tendinopathy most frequently occurs in late-middle aged females. In this pictorial review the pertinent MRI and US anatomy of the gluteal tendon insertions on the greater trochanter and the adjacent bursae are reviewed. The direct (peritendinitis, tendinosis, partial and complete tear) and indirect (bursal fluid, bony changes and fatty atrophy) MRI signs of gluteal tendon injury are illustrated. The key sonographic findings of gluteal tendinopathy are also discussed. (orig.)

  19. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Umer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However the etiology is multi-factorial, and has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patients, surgery. No high-quality RCTs are available so far to provide possible evidence for differences in outcome of different treatment strategies. There remains a need for high-quality clinical research on the diagnosis and treatment of SAIS.

  20. Ultrasonography of the equine shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dik, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Six horses with shoulder injuries were presented in this report with emphasis on the use of ultrasonography vs. radiography in diagnosis. The two imaging modalities represented valuable and complementary diagnostic procedures. Two horses had fracture fragments of the lateral humeral tuberosity, the accurate ultrasonographic findings encouraging clearer radiographic identification by oblique projections. In one horseultrasonography enabled more accurate localization of calcification within the supraspinatus muscle. In the remaining three cases ultrasonography visualized distension of the bicipital bursa due to aseptic bursitis, bursal hemorrhage, or associated with injury of the biceps brachii muscle and the underlying intermediate humeral tubercle, the bony involvement more clearly demonstrated radiographically

  1. Ultrasonography of the painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terriza, M.D.; Manzanares, R.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough knowledge of the normal anatomy was applied in the study of 132 patients with painful shoulder to establish the ultrasonographic findings that indicate the diagnosis of lesions of the rotator cuff of the shoulder (tendentious, tendons degeneration and the different types of fracture) as well as bursitis, lesions of the tendon of the long head of the biceps, joint effusions, lesions of the humeral head, etc. As an initial method of studying painful shoulder using standard plain radiography, this techniques is considered a reliable diagnostic procedure. (Author)

  2. Evaluacion de los desórdenes musculo-esqueléticos (DMEs) mediante el método ERIN: caso de los conductores de autobús de la Universidad del Quindío

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Yepes, Milena Elizabeth; Cremades Oliver, Lázaro Vicente; Montoya Taborda, Juan Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Uno de los mayores retos de la ergonomía ha sido el estudio de la interacción del hombre frente a los requerimientos físicos (postura, fuerza, movimiento). Cuando estos requerimientos sobrepasan la capacidad de respuesta del individuo o no hay una adecuada recuperación biológica de los tejidos, este esfuerzo puede asociarse a la presencia de los Desórdenes Musculo-Esqueléticos (DME) causantes de ausentismo laboral. Los DME ocupacionales más conocidos son: cervicalgia, epicondiditis, bursitis,...

  3. Impact of radiation therapy for benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, G.; Van Houtte, P.; Beauvois, S.; Roelandts, M.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation therapy of benign diseases represent a wide panel of indications. Some indications are clearly identified as treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM), hyperthyroid ophthalmopathy, postoperative heterotopic bone formations or keloid scars. Some indications are under evaluation as complications induced by neo-vessels of age-related macular degeneration or coronary restenosis after angioplasty. Some indications remain controversial with poor evidence of efficiency as treatment of bursitis, tendinitis or Dupuytren's disease. Some indications are now obsolete such as warts, or contra-indicated as treatment of infant and children. (authors)

  4. Impact of radiation therapy for benign diseases; Role de la radiotherapie dans les affections benignes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantor, G. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Fondation Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Van Houtte, P.; Beauvois, S.; Roelandts, M. [Institut Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-12-31

    Radiation therapy of benign diseases represent a wide panel of indications. Some indications are clearly identified as treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM), hyperthyroid ophthalmopathy, postoperative heterotopic bone formations or keloid scars. Some indications are under evaluation as complications induced by neo-vessels of age-related macular degeneration or coronary restenosis after angioplasty. Some indications remain controversial with poor evidence of efficiency as treatment of bursitis, tendinitis or Dupuytren`s disease. Some indications are now obsolete such as warts, or contra-indicated as treatment of infant and children. (authors)

  5. Percutaneous Fascia Release for Treating Chronic Recurrent Gluteal Myofascial Pain—A Pilot Study of a New Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Shui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of percutaneous fascia release to treat chronic recurrent gluteal myofascial pain related to recurrent tendonitis or bursitis at the attachment sites. Methods Five patients (three males, two females; aged 48.6 ± 8.9 years with myofascial trigger points in the gluteus medius muscle were treated. Outcome measures, including pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, and the relative strength of hip abduction, were assessed before, immediately after, and six months after the treatment. The data measured before and after treatment (different times on visual analog scale, pressure pain threshold, and relative hip abduction strength were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed-rank test and paired t -test, respectively, for the comparisons between time points. Results Reduction in pain intensity and increase in the pressure pain threshold and the relative hip abduction strength were found in all five patients after treatment when compared with those of before treatment ( P 0.05. Conclusions Percutaneous fascia release of gluteal muscle insertion sites can be used to treat chronic gluteal pain related to subtrochanteric bursitis to avoid recurrence, if other treatment cannot control the recurrence, although this was demonstrated only on a small sample size without control and blind assessment in the pilot study.

  6. Anserine syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Milton; Kuromoto, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Knee pain is a common complaint in clinical practice, and pes anserinus tendino-bursitis syndrome (PATB) has been frequently diagnosed based only on clinical features that may cause equivocal interpretations. Patients complain of characteristic spontaneous medial knee pain with tenderness in the inferomedial aspect of the joint. Studies with different imaging modalities have been undertaken during the last years to identify whether these patients suffer from bursitis, tendinitis, or both. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the structural defect responsible for this disturbance. Due to these problems and some controversies, we suggest the term "anserine syndrome" for this condition. Diabetes Mellitus is a known predisposing factor for this syndrome. Overweight and osteoarthritis seem to represent additional risk factors; however, their role in the pathophysiology of the disease is not yet understood. Treatment includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses, from 10 days to 36 months to achieve recovery. The lack of knowledge about its epidemiological, etiological, and pathophysiological aspects requires future studies for this common and intriguing disorder.

  7. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the pelvis and lower extremity: Diagnosis and treatment. Part 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain associated with rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST of the pelvis and lower extremity is a frequent reason for seeking advice from general practitioners and rheumatologists. However, the true cause of painful sensations is often overlooked by a physician and the patient is long and frequently treated unsuccessfully for lumbago, coxarthrosis, or gonarthrosis.The complexities of topical diagnosis are largely associated with the fact that instrumental methods virtually always determine these or those degenerative changes in the lumbar spine and hip joint (HJ, which formally supports the presence of nonspecific low back pain and coxarthrosis. Differential diagnosis can be made between these conditions if their clinical features are considered, by discriminating symptoms, such as pains in the back or buttock, and those located predominantly in the hip and groin area.The most known forms of RDJAST of the pelvis and HJ may include trochanteritis, hip abductor and adductor syndromes, iliopectineal bursitis, and ischial tuberosity bursitis.This review briefly describes the major forms of RDJAST of the mentioned area, their clinical manifestations, and topical diagnostic techniques. It also considers main therapeutic approaches: the administration of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, local injections of glucocorticoids and plateletrich plasma, and physiotherapy.

  8. MRI findings of prepatellar Morel-Lavallee effusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrero, Camilo G.; Maxwell, Norman; Kavanagh, Eoin [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    To describe MR imaging characteristics and treatment options for prepatellar closed degloving injuries or Morel-Lavallee effusions. Imaging features are discussed that may aid in the distinguishing of this entity from 'housemaid's knee' or prepatellar bursitis. MR images of four young wrestlers were reviewed by two attending radiologists and one fellow, and correlative clinical data were collected using the electronic medical database. MR images in all cases showed a unilocular, T2 hyperintense prepatellar collection extending beyond the normal boundaries of the prepatellar bursa. No necrotic fat or blood products were identified in the collections. Surgical pathology proving the absence of synovial tissue was available for one case, and differentiation of the collection from the adjacent bursa was confirmed visually by the surgeon in a second case. Although prepatellar hemorrhagic bursitis and Morel-Lavallee effusions share many imaging features, making a specific diagnosis in most cases is not necessary, as treatment is often similar for both entities. (orig.)

  9. Intramuscular myxoid lipoma in the proximal forearm presenting as an olecranon mass with superficial radial nerve palsy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildebrand Kevin A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extremity lipomas may occur in any location, including the proximal forearm. We describe a case of a patient with an intramuscular lipoma presenting as an unusual posterior elbow mass. Case presentation We discuss the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a tender, posterior elbow mass initially diagnosed as chronic olecranon bursitis. A minor sensory disturbance in the distribution of the superficial radial nerve was initially thought to be unrelated, but was likely caused by mass effect from the lipoma. No pre-operative advanced imaging was obtained because the diagnosis was felt to have already been made. At the time of surgery, a fatty mass originating in the volar forearm muscles was found to have breached the dorsal forearm fascia and displaced the olecranon bursa. Tissue diagnosis was made by histopathology as a myxoid lipoma with no aggressive features. Post-operative recovery was uneventful. Conclusion We present a case of an unusual elbow mass presenting with symptoms consistent with chronic olecranon bursitis, a relatively common condition. The only unexplained pre-operative finding was the non-specific finding of a transient superficial radial nerve deficit. We remind clinicians to be cautious when diagnosing soft tissue masses in the extremities when unexplained physical findings are present.

  10. Artroscopia da articulação escapulotorácica: relato de casos Arthroscopy of the scapulothoracic joint: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vicente Andreoli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A artroscopia escapulotorácica é um procedimento que apresenta indicações restritas, para ressecção de corpos livres, tumores benignos, bursites e escápulas em ressalto. Os autores relatam quatro casos de artroscopia da articulação escapulotorácica; no primeiro caso, foi realizada apenas a visualização do tumor benigno (osteocondroma; no segundo caso, a ressecção artroscópica de um osteocondroma; no terceiro caso, a bursectomia artroscópica devido à bursite escapulotorácica; e no quarto caso, bursectomia e escapulectomia súpero-medial parcial artroscópica devido à escápula em ressalto.Scapulothoracic arthroscopy is a procedure presenting restricted indications, for resecting free bodies, benign tumors, bursitis, and snaping scapula. The authors report four cases of scapulothoracic joint arthroscopy; in the first case, only a benign tumor (osteochondroma could be visualized; in the second case, arthroscopic resection of an osteochondroma was found; in the third case, arthroscopic bursectomy due to scapulothoracic bursitis, and; in the fourth case, bursectomy and partial superomedial arthroscopic scapulectomy due to snaping scapula.

  11. Interobserver reliability of the 'Welfare Quality(®) Animal Welfare Assessment Protocol for Growing Pigs'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czycholl, I; Kniese, C; Büttner, K; Beilage, E Grosse; Schrader, L; Krieter, J

    2016-01-01

    The present paper focuses on evaluating the interobserver reliability of the 'Welfare Quality(®) Animal Welfare Assessment Protocol for Growing Pigs'. The protocol for growing pigs mainly consists of a Qualitative Behaviour Assessment (QBA), direct behaviour observations (BO) carried out by instantaneous scan sampling and checks for different individual parameters (IP), e.g. presence of tail biting, wounds and bursitis. Three trained observers collected the data by performing 29 combined assessments, which were done at the same time and on the same animals; but they were carried out completely independent of each other. The findings were compared by the calculation of Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficients (RS), Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC), Smallest Detectable Changes (SDC) and Limits of Agreements (LoA). There was no agreement found concerning the adjectives belonging to the QBA (e.g. active: RS: 0.50, ICC: 0.30, SDC: 0.38, LoA: -0.05 to 0.45; fearful: RS: 0.06, ICC: 0.0, SDC: 0.26, LoA: -0.20 to 0.30). In contrast, the BO showed good agreement (e.g. social behaviour: RS: 0.45, ICC: 0.50, SDC: 0.09, LoA: -0.09 to 0.03 use of enrichment material: RS: 0.75, ICC: 0.68, SDC: 0.06, LoA: -0.03 to 0.03). Overall, observers agreed well in the IP, e.g. tail biting (RS: 0.52, ICC: 0.88; SDC: 0.05, LoA: -0.01 to 0.02) and wounds (RS: 0.43, ICC: 0.59, SDC: 0.10, LoA: -0.09 to 0.10). The parameter bursitis showed great differences (RS: 0.10, ICC: 0.0, SDC: 0.35, LoA: -0.37 to 0.40), which can be explained by difficulties in the assessment when the animals moved around quickly or their legs were soiled. In conclusion, the interobserver reliability was good in the BO and most IP, but not for the parameter bursitis and the QBA.

  12. Muscle gene expression patterns in human rotator cuff pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Alexander; McCarthy, Meagan; Pichika, Rajeswari; Sato, Eugene J; Lieber, Richard L; Schenk, Simon; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-09-17

    Rotator cuff pathology is a common source of shoulder pain with variable etiology and pathoanatomical characteristics. Pathological processes of fatty infiltration, muscle atrophy, and fibrosis have all been invoked as causes for poor outcomes after rotator cuff tear repair. The aims of this study were to measure the expression of key genes associated with adipogenesis, myogenesis, and fibrosis in human rotator cuff muscle after injury and to compare the expression among groups of patients with varied severities of rotator cuff pathology. Biopsies of the supraspinatus muscle were obtained arthroscopically from twenty-seven patients in the following operative groups: bursitis (n = 10), tendinopathy (n = 7), full-thickness rotator cuff tear (n = 8), and massive rotator cuff tear (n = 2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to characterize gene expression pathways involved in myogenesis, adipogenesis, and fibrosis. Patients with a massive tear demonstrated downregulation of the fibrogenic, adipogenic, and myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle was not in a state of active change and may have difficulty responding to stimuli. Patients with a full-thickness tear showed upregulation of fibrotic and adipogenic genes; at the tissue level, these correspond to the pathologies most detrimental to outcomes of surgical repair. Patients with bursitis or tendinopathy still expressed myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle may be attempting to accommodate the mechanical deficiencies induced by the tendon tear. Gene expression in human rotator cuff muscles varied according to tendon injury severity. Patients with bursitis and tendinopathy appeared to be expressing pro-myogenic genes, whereas patients with a full-thickness tear were expressing genes associated with fatty atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, patients with a massive tear appeared to have downregulation of all gene programs except inhibition of myogenesis. These data highlight the

  13. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  14. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos [Department of CT and MR Imaging, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Narvaez, Javier [Department of Medicine, Delfos Medical Center, Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  15. MRI of cystic collection of the three joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, N.; Cotten, A.; Dewatre, F.; Chastanet, P.; Gougeon, F.

    1997-01-01

    We present the main MR features of cystic lesions around the knee joint. Popliteal cysts are the most frequently seen. The usually result from extrusion of joint fluid into the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa but they can have an atypical location or extension. They are most often due to a meniscal, ligamentous, degenerative or inflammatory joint disease responsible for a chronic joint effusion. Meniscal cysts are always associated with a horizontal tear. Medial meniscal cysts are larger and can extend far from the joint. Bursitis occur as a result of inflammation or infection of a bursa. Their location is stereotyped and they do not communicate with the knee joint. Ganglion cysts or ganglia are benign cystic lesions which can affect peri-articular tissues as well as subchondral bone or cruciate ligaments. MRI is now a simple and noninvasive way of obtaining etiologic diagnosis and guiding therapy. (authors)

  16. Imaging of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turecki, Marcin B.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Holden, Dean A.; Hunter, Tim B.; Rogers, Lee F. [University of Arizona HSC, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Stubbs, Alana Y. [Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Graham, Anna R. [University of Arizona HSC, Department of Pathology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Prompt and appropriate imaging work-up of the various musculoskeletal soft tissue infections aids early diagnosis and treatment and decreases the risk of complications resulting from misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. The signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections can be nonspecific, making it clinically difficult to distinguish between disease processes and the extent of disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of soft tissue infections. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, radiography and nuclear medicine studies are considered ancillary. This manuscript illustrates representative images of superficial and deep soft tissue infections such as infectious cellulitis, superficial and deep fasciitis, including the necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis/soft tissue abscess, septic bursitis and tenosynovitis on different imaging modalities, with emphasis on MRI. Typical histopathologic findings of soft tissue infections are also presented. The imaging approach described in the manuscript is based on relevant literature and authors' personal experience and everyday practice. (orig.)

  17. [A rare cause of oral pain: The pterygoid hamulus syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, M; Corre, P; Huet, P; Khonsari, R H

    2015-12-01

    Pterygoid hamulus syndrome (PHS) is a rare cause of orofacial and oropharyngeal pain. PHS can be associated with a hamulus hypertrophy or with a bursitis of the palatosalpingeus but it has not always an anatomic cause. A 36-year-old woman was seen for a constant posterior palatal pain spreading towards oropharynx, increasing during swallowing and lasting for more than 6 months. Physical examination showed an erythema of the soft palate, medially to the hamulus. Hamulus palpation was painful and revealed hamulus hypertrophia on both sides. A bilateral PHS was evocated. This observation is typical of a PHS. We propose a review of the literature of this little-known syndrome. Treatment is initially conservative (corticosteroids) but surgery can be proposed in case of morphological anomalies of the hamulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos; Narvaez, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  19. Joint involvement in patients with early polymyalgia rheumatica using high-resolution ultrasound and its contribution to the EULAR/ACR 2012 classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, Sandra; Ehrenstein, Boris; Fleck, Martin; Hartung, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    To assess joint involvement and the contribution of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) to the novel European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology (EULAR/ACR) 2012 classification criteria in patients with polymyalgia rheumatic (PMR). MSUS was performed in 54 consecutive patients with recent-onset PMR. Biceps tenosynovitis of at least 1 shoulder has been observed in 70.4% of patients, and 64.8% had a bilateral biceps tenosynovitis. Subdeltoid bursitis (27.8% unilateral, 5.6% bilateral), glenohumeral synovitis (22.2% unilateral, 9.3% bilateral), and hip involvement (22.2% unilateral, 16.7% bilateral) were observed less frequently. The sensitivities of the classification criteria were 85.2% for EULAR/ACR without MSUS and 81.5% for EULAR/ACR with MSUS. The most common MSUS pathology was a biceps tenosynovitis. However, US findings had no effect on the sensitivity of the novel EULAR/ACR criteria for PMR.

  20. Disorders of the hallux sesamoid complex: MR features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Schweitzer, M.E. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-08-01

    Numerous painful conditions can affect the first metatarsophalangeal-sesamoid joint complex. Symptoms can be of sudden or insidious onset, and be of acute or chronic duration. Although conventional radiography is recognized as the initial diagnostic procedure for these symptoms, there is often a need to proceed to MR imaging. MR imaging is sensitive and can be utilized in the investigation of the hallux sesamoid complex to differentiate soft tissue from osseous pathology. Synovitis, tendonitis, and bursitis can be distinguished from bony abnormalities such as sesamoid fracture, avascular necrosis, and osteomyelitis. An understanding of MR imaging features and techniques will result in the highest diagnostic yield. Early and accurate diagnosis of sesamoid complex disorders can guide the physician to the appropriate clinical management and prevent potentially harmful longstanding joint dysfunction. (orig.) With 11 figs., 30 refs.

  1. The distal semimembranosus complex: normal MR anatomy, variants, biomechanics and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Javier; Jbara, Marlena; Maimon, Ron; Matityahu, Amir; Hwang, Ki; Padron, Mario; Mota, Javier; Beltran, Luis; Sundaram, Murali

    2003-01-01

    To describe the normal MR anatomy and variations of the distal semimembranosus tendinous arms and the posterior oblique ligament as seen in the three orthogonal planes, to review the biomechanics of this complex and to illustrate pathologic examples. The distal semimembranosus tendon divides into five tendinous arms named the anterior, direct, capsular, inferior and the oblique popliteal ligament. These arms intertwine with the branches of the posterior oblique ligament in the posterior medial aspect of the knee, providing stability. This tendon-ligamentous complex also acts synergistically with the popliteus muscle and actively pulls the posterior horn of the medial meniscus during knee flexion. Pathologic conditions involving this complex include complete and partial tears, insertional tendinosis, avulsion fractures and bursitis. (orig.)

  2. Enlargement of the iliopsoas comportment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Martinez, A.; Garcia, M.A.; Relea, A.; Narajo, G.

    1996-01-01

    The iliopsoas or iliopectineal comportment is a normal structure that occasionally communicates with the synovial cavity of the hip. Rarely, in association with certain pathologies that raise the intraarticular pressure, it becomes enlarged, producing an inguinal or pelvic mass, also referred to as iliopsas bursitis. We present five cases of this pathology detected over the past year in our hospitals. Three of the patients had undergone previous vascular punctures in the hip involved, one presented brucellosis-related arthropathy and the fifth had generative joint abnormalities. The plain radiography, arthrography, ultrasound, CT,CT-guided arthrography and MR images are provided and discussed. We present an etiological factor of this process (previous vascular puncture) that has not been previously reported in the literature. 13 refs

  3. The pelvis and hips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.; Coventry, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic evaluation of joint replacements requires close communication between the radiologist and referring physician. Routine films, radioisotope scans, and subtraction arthrography (including aspiration and injection of the pseudocapsule) may be indicated in different clinical situations. This paper summarizes the accuracy of these modalities. Most patients present with pain. One must exclude loosening, infection, and other problems. The arthrogram is most useful in defining anatomy and most causes of hip pain. Culture studies and diagnostic injections add to the versatility of subtraction arthrography and increase its accuracy. If plain films are negative, a Tc-99m scan can be obtained. If this is negative, loosening is unlikely. If pain persists or if the scan is positive, an arthrogram should be performed. Pain may be secondary to bursitis rather than loosening, and the arthrogram will assist in diagnosis and treatment. When films suggest loosening, arthrography is the procedure of choice to confirm the diagnosis and to exclude infection

  4. Disorders of the hallux sesamoid complex: MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasick, D.; Schweitzer, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    Numerous painful conditions can affect the first metatarsophalangeal-sesamoid joint complex. Symptoms can be of sudden or insidious onset, and be of acute or chronic duration. Although conventional radiography is recognized as the initial diagnostic procedure for these symptoms, there is often a need to proceed to MR imaging. MR imaging is sensitive and can be utilized in the investigation of the hallux sesamoid complex to differentiate soft tissue from osseous pathology. Synovitis, tendonitis, and bursitis can be distinguished from bony abnormalities such as sesamoid fracture, avascular necrosis, and osteomyelitis. An understanding of MR imaging features and techniques will result in the highest diagnostic yield. Early and accurate diagnosis of sesamoid complex disorders can guide the physician to the appropriate clinical management and prevent potentially harmful longstanding joint dysfunction. (orig.)

  5. Imaging of musculoskeletal tuberculosis; Imagerie de la tuberculose osteo-articulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussel, L.; Marchand, B.; Blineau, N.; Picaud, G.; Emn, M.; Coulon, A.; Pagnon, P.; Rode, A.; Pin-Leveugle, J.; Berthezene, Y.; Pariset, C.; Boibieux, A. [Hopital de la Croix-Rousse, 69 - Lyon (France); Hermier, M. [Hopital de la Croix-Rousse, Serv. de Neuroradiologie, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2002-09-01

    Purpose and methods. To perform an illustrated and educational review of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Results. As the incidence of musculoskeletal tuberculosis still increases, a review appears justified. The following four main presentations are detailed and illustrated, by emphasizing the value of both CT and MR imaging: a) spine tuberculosis ({approx} 50 %/) commonly involves two adjacent vertebral bodies with usual large paravertebral abscesses. The following lesions are highly suggestive of tuberculosis: solitary vertebral involvement, solitary epidural abscess with or without erosive spondylitis; b) osteo-arthritis: peripherally located erosions at synovial insertions with gradual narrowing of the joint space are highly suggestive; c) osteomyelitis: unusual, may involve any bones; d) tenosynovitis and bursitis. Conclusion. Imaging studies are essential for diagnosis and to assess the extent of musculo-skeletal tuberculosis. (author)

  6. The distal semimembranosus complex: normal MR anatomy, variants, biomechanics and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, Javier; Jbara, Marlena; Maimon, Ron [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 Tenth Avenue, NY 11219, Brooklyn (United States); Matityahu, Amir; Hwang, Ki [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Padron, Mario [Department of Radiology, Clinica CEMTRO, Madrid (Spain); Mota, Javier [Department of Radiology, Instituto Clinica Corachan, Barcelona (Spain); Beltran, Luis [New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Sundaram, Murali [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2003-08-01

    To describe the normal MR anatomy and variations of the distal semimembranosus tendinous arms and the posterior oblique ligament as seen in the three orthogonal planes, to review the biomechanics of this complex and to illustrate pathologic examples. The distal semimembranosus tendon divides into five tendinous arms named the anterior, direct, capsular, inferior and the oblique popliteal ligament. These arms intertwine with the branches of the posterior oblique ligament in the posterior medial aspect of the knee, providing stability. This tendon-ligamentous complex also acts synergistically with the popliteus muscle and actively pulls the posterior horn of the medial meniscus during knee flexion. Pathologic conditions involving this complex include complete and partial tears, insertional tendinosis, avulsion fractures and bursitis. (orig.)

  7. Osteomyelitis Infection of Mycobacterium marinum: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao H. Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium marinum (M. marinum is a ubiquitous waterborne organism that grows optimally at temperatures around 30°C. It is a nontuberculous Mycobacterium found in nonchlorinated water with worldwide prevalence. It is the most common atypical Mycobacterium that causes opportunistic infection in humans. M. marinum can cause superficial infections and localized invasive infections in humans, with the hands being the sites most frequently affected. It can cause skin lesions, which are either single, papulonodular lesions, confined to an extremity, or may resemble cutaneous sporotrichosis. This infection can also cause deeper infections including tenosynovitis, bursitis, arthritis, and osteomyelitis. Disseminated infections and visceral involvements have been reported in immunocompromised patients. We here report a case of severe deep soft tissue infection with necrotizing fasciitis and osteomyelitis of the left upper extremity (LUE caused by M. marinum in an immunocompromised patient.

  8. MRI of cystic collection of the three joint; Les collections kystiques du genou en IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, N.; Cotten, A.; Dewatre, F.; Chastanet, P.; Gougeon, F. [Hopital R. Salengro, C.H.U., 59 - Lille (France)

    1997-09-01

    We present the main MR features of cystic lesions around the knee joint. Popliteal cysts are the most frequently seen. The usually result from extrusion of joint fluid into the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa but they can have an atypical location or extension. They are most often due to a meniscal, ligamentous, degenerative or inflammatory joint disease responsible for a chronic joint effusion. Meniscal cysts are always associated with a horizontal tear. Medial meniscal cysts are larger and can extend far from the joint. Bursitis occur as a result of inflammation or infection of a bursa. Their location is stereotyped and they do not communicate with the knee joint. Ganglion cysts or ganglia are benign cystic lesions which can affect peri-articular tissues as well as subchondral bone or cruciate ligaments. MRI is now a simple and noninvasive way of obtaining etiologic diagnosis and guiding therapy. (authors). 46 refs.

  9. Muscle impingement: MR imaging of a painful complication of osteochondromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uri, D.S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dalinka, M.K. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kneeland, J.B. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of a newly recognized complication of osteochondromas. Two patients presented with pain and swelling over known osteochondromas. Plain radiographic studies were unrevealing. MR examinations were obtained to characterize the exostoses further and evaluate areas of palpable fullness. Increased signal was present in the muscles on T2-weighted images, which correlated with physical findings and was believed to represent muscle injury due to the osteochondroma. Pain and fullness may result from a number of osteochondroma-related complications, the most worrisome of which is malignant degeneration. Muscular impingement and injury should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain and swelling in the region of an exostosis. MR imaging allows distinction of this entity, which may be radiographically occult and confused clinically with fracture, bursitis, or malignant degeneration. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  10. Tendon overuse syndrome: imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, W.; Nehrer, S.; Muellner, T.; Kainberger, F.; Ulreich, N.; Bernhard, C.; Imhof, H.

    2001-01-01

    Injuries of muscles and tendons occur commonly during various sporting activities and in most cases the athletes feel such an accident to be sudden and unavoidable. The rupture of a tendon, however, has to be considered in many cases as the final stage of a long-standing progressive degeneration of collagen fibers. This process con be described as 'tendon overuse syndrome (TOS)'. Diagnostic imaging modalities, especially sonography and MRI, are suitable to detect and analyse the different stages of this syndrome and the degree of morphological abnormalities. The first stage is painful functional derangement, followed by tendovaginitis, peritendinitis, or bursitis. The third stage is tendinosis resulting from biomechanical or ischaemic injury of tendon fibers which may eventually be followed by partial or complete rupture. Regional or individual specifications of these four stages may occur at anatomically predisposing sites, so-called critical zones, or during periods of specific proneness, the vulnerable phases. (author)

  11. The safety of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Riente

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The safety profile of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra has been studied with randomised, placebo-controlled trials involving 2932 patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis. The most frequently reported adverse events were represented by injection site reactions (71% and headache (13.6%. No statistically significant difference in the incidence of infections was observed among the patients treated with the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and the patients receiving placebo. In particular, the incidence of serious infections was 1,8% in rheumatoid arthritis patients on anakinra therapy and 0,7% in patients on placebo. The reported serious infections consisted of pneumonia, cellulitis, bone and joint infections, bursitis. No case of opportunistic infections or tubercolosis was observed. The results of clinical studies suggest that anakinra is a new well-tolerated drug for the treatment of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Surgical treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip using a modified-Hardinge approach with a Z-shaped capsular incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takeda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip is a rare condition, and the surgical treatment approach for this condition requires complete removal of loose bodies combined with synovectomy. While these, procedures are generally accepted as the optimal treatment method, this is still controversial topic. Recent studies have reported that open surgical procedures remain acceptable for synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip. These procedures include the dislocation of the femoral head, and complications such as femoral head necrosis and bursitis or great trochanter non-union due to trochanteric osteotomy have been reported. The present study reports a modified technique for surgical dislocation through a Z-shaped capsular incision without trochanteric flip osteotomy for the treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip.

  13. Muscle impingement: MR imaging of a painful complication of osteochondromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uri, D.S.; Dalinka, M.K.; Kneeland, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of a newly recognized complication of osteochondromas. Two patients presented with pain and swelling over known osteochondromas. Plain radiographic studies were unrevealing. MR examinations were obtained to characterize the exostoses further and evaluate areas of palpable fullness. Increased signal was present in the muscles on T2-weighted images, which correlated with physical findings and was believed to represent muscle injury due to the osteochondroma. Pain and fullness may result from a number of osteochondroma-related complications, the most worrisome of which is malignant degeneration. Muscular impingement and injury should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain and swelling in the region of an exostosis. MR imaging allows distinction of this entity, which may be radiographically occult and confused clinically with fracture, bursitis, or malignant degeneration. (orig.). With 2 figs

  14. Imaging of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turecki, Marcin B.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Holden, Dean A.; Hunter, Tim B.; Rogers, Lee F.; Stubbs, Alana Y.; Graham, Anna R.

    2010-01-01

    Prompt and appropriate imaging work-up of the various musculoskeletal soft tissue infections aids early diagnosis and treatment and decreases the risk of complications resulting from misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. The signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections can be nonspecific, making it clinically difficult to distinguish between disease processes and the extent of disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of soft tissue infections. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, radiography and nuclear medicine studies are considered ancillary. This manuscript illustrates representative images of superficial and deep soft tissue infections such as infectious cellulitis, superficial and deep fasciitis, including the necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis/soft tissue abscess, septic bursitis and tenosynovitis on different imaging modalities, with emphasis on MRI. Typical histopathologic findings of soft tissue infections are also presented. The imaging approach described in the manuscript is based on relevant literature and authors' personal experience and everyday practice. (orig.)

  15. Results of Closed Intramedullary Nailing using Talwarkar Square Nail in Adult Forearm Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem A Lil

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate results of closed intramedullary nailing using Talwarkar square nails in adult forearm fractures. We prospectively evaluated 34 patients with both bone forearm fractures. The average time to union was 12.8 (SD +3.2 weeks with cast support for a mean of 8.2 weeks. Union was achieved in 31 out of 34 patients. Using the Grace and Eversmann rating system, 17 patients were excellent, 10 were good, and 4 had an acceptable result. Three patients had non-unions, 2 for the radius and one for the ulna. There were two cases of superficial infection, one subject had olecranon bursitis, and one case of radio-ulnar synostosis. Complication rates associated with the use of square nails were lower compared to plate osteosynthesis and locked intramedullary nails. To control rotation post- operatively, there is a need for application of an above-elbow cast after nailing.

  16. Scapulothoracic Anatomy and Snapping Scapula Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Frank

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The scapulothoracic articulation is a sliding junction between the deep aspect of the scapula and thoracic rib cage at the levels of ribs 2 through 7. Motion at this articulation is dynamically stabilized by a variety of muscular attachments, allowing for controlled positioning of the glenoid to assist in glenohumeral joint function. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomic relationships, including the various muscles, and bursa, is critical to the evaluation of patients presenting with scapulothoracic disorders. The snapping scapula syndrome is caused by either osseous lesions or scapulothoracic bursitis and can be difficult to recognize and treat. The purpose of this review is to discuss the anatomy of the scapulothoracic articulation with an emphasis on the pathology associated with snapping scapula syndrome.

  17. Arthroscopic Treatment of a Case with Concomitant Subacromial and Subdeltoid Synovial Chondromatosis and Labrum Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevres Hurriyet Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed.

  18. Caracterización de patologías del hombro relacionadas con el origen y prestaciones asistenciales y económicas en una EPS, Bogotá, 2012 a 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Villa Rodriguez, Marilyn Esther

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: Las patologías del hombro suelen ser una de las causas de mayor solicitud de consulta en el ámbito laboral, con generación de incapacidad y pérdidas económicas, tanto para el afectado como para la empresa e incluso, la Entidad Promotora de Salud responsable de la atención y tratamiento. Entre las patologías de hombro más frecuentes se hallan el síndrome del manguito rotador, bursitis del hombro, síndrome de abducción dolorosa del hombro, tendinitis del bíceps, traumatismos del t...

  19. Spinal antinflammatory action of Diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Diclofenac is a non-steroidal antinflammatory drug (NSAID) that finds indication in the treatment of debilitating pathologies characterized by chronic pain sustained by inflammation, such as in rheumatic disease (rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis) or periarthritis, bursitis, tendonitis, myositis and sciatica. Its properties differentiate it from other NSAIDs. In fact, diclofenac's increased effect on spinal nociception and chronic neuro-inflammatory pain may be referred to: 1) its synergistic effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR- γ) activation and prostaglandin synthesis inhibition (COX-2 inhibition); 2) its capacity of suppressing neuronal hyperexcitability through the blockage of neuronal K+ channels in a concentration-dependant manner; and 3) its facility to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  20. Interobserver reliability in musculoskeletal ultrasonography: results from a "Teach the Teachers" rheumatologist course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, ee.; Møller, I.; Moragues, C.

    2006-01-01

    , tendon lesions, bursitis, and power Doppler signal. Afterwards they compared the ultrasound findings and re-examined the patients together while discussing their results. RESULTS: Overall agreements were 91% for joint effusion/synovitis and tendon lesions, 87% for cortical abnormalities, 84......: The shoulder, wrist/hand, ankle/foot, or knee of 24 patients with rheumatic diseases were evaluated by 23 musculoskeletal ultrasound experts from different European countries randomly assigned to six groups. The participants did not reach consensus on scanning method or diagnostic criteria before...... the investigation. They were unaware of the patients' clinical and imaging data. The experts from each group undertook a blinded ultrasound examination of the four anatomical regions. The ultrasound investigation included the presence/absence of joint effusion/synovitis, bony cortex abnormalities, tenosynovitis...

  1. Morel-Lavallee Lesions-Review of Pathophysiology, Clinical Findings, Imaging Findings and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diviti, Sreelatha; Gupta, Nishant; Hooda, Kusum; Sharma, Komal; Lo, Lawrence

    2017-04-01

    Morel-Lavallee lesion is a post-traumatic soft tissue degloving injury. This is commonly associated with sports injury caused by a shearing force resulting in separation of the hypodermis from the deeper fascia. Most common at the greater trochanter, these injuries also occur at flank, buttock, lumbar spine, scapula and the knee. Separation of the tissue planes result in a complex serosanguinous fluid collection with areas of fat within it. The imaging appearance is variable and non specific, potentially mimicking simple soft tissue haematoma, superficial bursitis or necrotic soft tissue neoplasms. If not treated in the acute or early sub acute settings, these collections are at risk for superinfection, overlying tissue necrosis and continued expansion. In this review article, we discuss the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnostic considerations of Morel-Lavallee lesions. Role of imaging in guiding prompt and appropriate treatment has also been discussed.

  2. Morel-Lavallée Injuries: A Multimodality Approach to Imaging Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, James A; Rheinboldt, Matthew; Parrish, David; Rinker, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Morel-Lavallée lesions are relatively rare closed degloving injuries caused by a shearing force resulting in separation of the dermis and the hypodermis from the subjacent deeper fascia. Although most commonly encountered lateral to the greater trochanter, these injuries may occur throughout the body in a variety of locations. Separation of the hypodermal tissue planes results in a complex serosanguinous fluid collection with areas of internal fat necrosis. The imaging appearance is variable and nonspecific, potentially mimicking superficial hemorrhagic bursitis, or cystic or necrotic primary soft tissue neoplasms. If not treated in the acute or early subacute setting, these collections are at risk of superinfection, overlying tissue necrosis, and continued expansion. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology, cross-sectional imaging features, and differential diagnostic considerations of Morel-Lavallée lesions as well as discuss management and treatment options. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. EULAR RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE USE OF IMAGING IN SPONDYLOARTHRITIS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandl, P; Navarro-Compán, V; Terslev, L

    2014-01-01

    , tenosynovitis, bursitis and particularly peripheral enthesitis, which may support the diagnosis of SpA. MRI of the SIJ and/or spine may be used to assess and monitor disease activity, while CR of the SIJ and/or spine may be used for long-term monitoring of structural damage, particularly new bone formation...... of the included studies was performed using the QUADAS-2 tool. Results: A total of 7550 references were identified in the search process, from which 157 studies were included in the systematic review. Ten recommendations were produced encompassing the role of imaging in making a diagnosis of axial Sp...... in axial SpA. In patients with AS (not nonradiographic axial SpA), initial CRs of the lumbar and cervical spine are recommended to detect syndesmophytes, which are predictive of development of new syndesmophytes. MRI (vertebral corner inflammatory lesion) may also be used to predict development of new...

  4. Common Ice Hockey Injuries and Treatment: A Current Concepts Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosenthal, William; Kim, Michael; Holzshu, Robert; Hanypsiak, Bryan; Athiviraham, Aravind

    Injuries are common in ice hockey, a contact sport where players skate at high speeds on a sheet of ice and shoot a vulcanized rubber puck in excess of one hundred miles per hour. This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of concussions, injuries to the cervical spine, and lower and upper extremities as they pertain to hockey players. Soft tissue injury of the shoulder, acromioclavicular joint separation, glenohumeral joint dislocation, clavicle fractures, metacarpal fractures, and olecranon bursitis are discussed in the upper-extremity section of the article. Lower-extremity injuries reviewed in this article include adductor strain, athletic pubalgia, femoroacetabular impingement, sports hernia, medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament tears, skate bite, and ankle sprains. This review is intended to aid the sports medicine physician in providing optimal sports-specific care to allow their athlete to return to their preinjury level of performance.

  5. MR imaging of the pelvis: a guide to incidental musculoskeletal findings for abdominal radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Girish, Gandikota; Kaza, Ravi K; Jacobson, Jon; Fessell, David; Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David

    2014-08-01

    Occasionally patients who undergo magnetic resonance imaging for presumed pelvic disease demonstrate unexpected musculoskeletal imaging findings in the imaged field. Such incidental findings can be challenging to the abdominal radiologist, who may not be familiar with their appearance or know the appropriate diagnostic considerations. Findings can include both normal and abnormal bone marrow, osseous abnormalities such as Paget's disease, avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, stress and insufficiency fractures, and athletic pubalgia, benign neoplasms such as enchondroma and bone island, malignant processes such as metastasis and chondrosarcoma, soft tissue processes such as abscess, nerve-related tumors, and chordoma, joint- and bursal-related processes such as sacroiliitis, iliopsoas bursitis, greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and labral tears, and iatrogenic processes such as bone graft or bone biopsy. Though not all-encompassing, this essay will help abdominal radiologists to identify and describe this variety of pelvic musculoskeletal conditions, understand key radiologic findings, and synthesize a differential diagnosis when appropriate.

  6. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST (tendinitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, etc. are one of the most common causes of disability and one the most common reasons for seeking medical advice. To manage patients with RDJAST is an important part of practising rheumatologists’ work. But unfortunately, the issues of diagnosis and therapy of this pathology have been relatively rarely discussed on the pages of Russian medical journals and at the scientific congresses and conferences of rheumatologists in recent years. This review is to refresh physicians’interest in this problem. Part 1 of this review briefly considers the general issues relating to the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of RDJAST of the upper extremity, such as rotator cuff tendinitis, lateral and medial epicondylitis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, de Quervain’s syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  7. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-01-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  8. Isolated subacromial bursal fluid on MRI of the shoulder in symptomatic patients: correlation with arthroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monu, J.U.V. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pruett, S. [Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vanarthos, W.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pope, T.L. Jr. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Fluid in the subacromial bursa (SAB) is a common finding on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder, and the implications of this finding have not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed and correlated the MR features with arthroscopic findings in 21 symptomatic patients who had fluid in the SAB on MR imaging without demonstrable rotator cuff tear. Rotator cuff impingement was the most frequent surgical finding (42.9%). Other frequent surgical observations were glenbid labrum abnormality (28.6%), bursitis (19%), and supraspinatus tendinitis (14.3%). Distribution of acromial types was similar to that reported by Bigliani et al., and impingement was evenly distributed among acromial types in our study population. We conclude that in our patient population group the MR finding of isolated SAB fluid in symptomatic patients is highly likely to be associated with the finding of other abnormalities in the shoulder joint at surgery. (orig.)

  9. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritts, H.M.; Craig, E.; Kyle, R.; Strefling, M.; Miller, D.; Heithoff, K.; Schellhas, K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed in over 600 shoulders to evaluate shoulder pain. Ultrasound (US) and arthrography were performed in over 100 patients. Surgery was performed in over 75 patients. MR imaging offers information not well evaluated with other modalities, including bony impingement, tendinitis, bursitis, and osseous abnormalities, such as primary arthritis, avascular necrosis, occult fractures, and tumors. US and MR findings correlate well with surgical findings for medium to large rotator cuff tears. MR imaging with T2 weighting is superior for differentiating small tears from associated tendinitis. An algorithm for cost-effective shoulder imaging integrating US, MR imaging, arthrography, and computed tomographic arthrography are presented

  10. Current concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of shoulder impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijayendra Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is a very common cause of shoulder pain in the young adults. It can cause debilitating pain, dysfunction, and affects the activities of daily living. It represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy which can ultimately lead to degenerative tear of the rotator cuff. Various theories and concepts have been described and it is still a matter of debate. However, most published studies suggest that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have a role in the development of SIS. The management is controversial as both nonoperative and operative treatments have shown to provide good results. This article aims to provide a comprehensive current concepts review of the pathogenesis, etiologies, clinical diagnosis, appropriate use of investigations, and discussion on the management of SIS.

  11. Ultrasonography as a prognostic and objective parameter in Achilles tendinopathy:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakkegaard, Mads; Johannsen, Finn E; Højgaard, Betina

    2015-01-01

    eccentric exercises of the calf muscles and if needed supplemented with corticosteroid injections. The patients were examined clinically and by US (tendon thickness, hyper- and hypoechogenicity, calcification, bursitis, calcaneusspure, tenosynovitis, gray scale and color Doppler focusing on increased flow...... was statistically associated with a decrease in palpatory pain. CONCLUSION: Heterogeneity is a prognostic marker in AT. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased Doppler activity can be used as objective outcome parameters for the treatment effect of AT....... intra- or peritendinous). The clinical and US examination were performed at entry, 1, 2, 3 and at 6 month. RESULTS: 42 women and 50 men were included (mean age of 47 years). They had symptoms for more than 13 months and a symptomatic Achilles tendon mean thickness of 7.4±2.3mm. Heterogeneity...

  12. Isolated subacromial bursal fluid on MRI of the shoulder in symptomatic patients: correlation with arthroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monu, J.U.V.; Pruett, S.; Vanarthos, W.J.; Pope, T.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid in the subacromial bursa (SAB) is a common finding on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder, and the implications of this finding have not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed and correlated the MR features with arthroscopic findings in 21 symptomatic patients who had fluid in the SAB on MR imaging without demonstrable rotator cuff tear. Rotator cuff impingement was the most frequent surgical finding (42.9%). Other frequent surgical observations were glenbid labrum abnormality (28.6%), bursitis (19%), and supraspinatus tendinitis (14.3%). Distribution of acromial types was similar to that reported by Bigliani et al., and impingement was evenly distributed among acromial types in our study population. We conclude that in our patient population group the MR finding of isolated SAB fluid in symptomatic patients is highly likely to be associated with the finding of other abnormalities in the shoulder joint at surgery. (orig.)

  13. El En Dehors en la danza clásica: mecanismos de producción de lesionesg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián G. Lozano

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available El en dehors es la posición base del ballet clásico. Consiste en mantener las caderas y extremidades inferiores en rotación externa. Se pretende que los pies lleguen a formar 180º ente sí. Cuando la movilidad articular y flexibilidad muscular es menor que la requerida, se suele compensar forzando la posición presionando con los pies el suelo, llegando a provocar una rotación externa de la tibia sobre el fémur. Esto suele desencadenar desalineaciones femoropatelares, subluxación rotuliana, tendinitis tibial, hiperextensión de rodillas e hiperlordosis lumbar.Pero a pesar de que su ejecución técnica sea correcta, también puede originar algias por sobresolicitación ,tales como artritis a nivel coxofemoral, bursitis glútea y tendinitis de los músculos aductores entre otros.

  14. Imaging of musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussel, L.; Marchand, B.; Blineau, N.; Picaud, G.; Emn, M.; Coulon, A.; Pagnon, P.; Rode, A.; Pin-Leveugle, J.; Berthezene, Y.; Pariset, C.; Boibieux, A.; Hermier, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose and methods. To perform an illustrated and educational review of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Results. As the incidence of musculoskeletal tuberculosis still increases, a review appears justified. The following four main presentations are detailed and illustrated, by emphasizing the value of both CT and MR imaging: a) spine tuberculosis (∼ 50 %/) commonly involves two adjacent vertebral bodies with usual large paravertebral abscesses. The following lesions are highly suggestive of tuberculosis: solitary vertebral involvement, solitary epidural abscess with or without erosive spondylitis; b) osteo-arthritis: peripherally located erosions at synovial insertions with gradual narrowing of the joint space are highly suggestive; c) osteomyelitis: unusual, may involve any bones; d) tenosynovitis and bursitis. Conclusion. Imaging studies are essential for diagnosis and to assess the extent of musculo-skeletal tuberculosis. (author)

  15. MRI of lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plate tears and associated adjacent interspace lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umans, Hilary [Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Lenox Hill Radiology Imaging and Associates, Bronx, NY (United States); Srinivasan, Ramya; Elsinger, Elisabeth [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Wilde, Gregory E. [Lenox Hill Radiology Imaging and Associates, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2014-10-15

    To identify the variety of second and third intermetatarsal space (IS) lesions that may coexist with and without adjacent metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP) plantar plate (PP) tears. One hundred forefoot MRIs in 96 patients with metatarsalgia obtained between 30 September 2011 and 21 July 2012 using 1.5- or 3-T MRI were retrospectively reviewed in consensus by two MSK radiologists and one podiatrist (DPM). MRI was evaluated for second and third MTP PP tear and the presence/nature of second and third IS lesions. Second and third IS neuromas were measured in transverse (trans) dimension. A total of 40 PP tears were identified: 36 at the second and 4 at the third MTP. Second MTP PP tear was identified in 33 % of females and 40.5 % of males. In the 63 female feet there were 21 second MTP PP tears, all of which also had second IS lesions: pericapsular fibrosis (16), bursitis (4), and ganglion (1). In the 37 male feet there were 15 second MTP PP tears, 14 of which had second IS lesions: pericapsular fibrosis (8), bursitis (5), and ganglion (1). There was no definite second IS neuroma adjacent to any second MTP PP tear. In females without PP tear, there were 24 second (3 mm trans average) and 43 third IS neuromas (4.1 mm trans average). In males without PP tear, there were 9 second (3.4 mm trans average) and 16 third IS neuromas (4.1 mm trans average). MTP PP tears occurred in 40 % of our cases, 90 % of which occurred at the second MTP. Almost all coexisted with non-neuromatous second IS lesions. (orig.)

  16. Comparison between ultrasound and plain X-ray in evaluating the cause of shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, K M; Mannan, M; Chowdhury, A Z; Haque, M A; Kaiser, M S; Nabi, S; Ferdousee, R A; Paul, B K; Ahmed, S M; Khan, M; Begum, M

    2011-01-01

    Painful shoulder is a common painful condition among patients. Apart from acute traumatic lesions such as fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains and ruptured tendons, 85 to 90% of painful shoulders are due to adhesive capsulitis, acute or chronic calcific tendinitis, bursitis, bicipital tendinitis and lesions of the musculotendinous cuff. Arthritis is the cause of less than 5% of painful shoulders. For evaluating conditions of shoulder joint, X-ray has been regarded as only method of choice for long time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an alternative procedure but the cost limits its utilization especially in Bangladesh. Ultrasonography is an effective imaging modality in the evaluation of both rotator and non-rotator cuff disorders. Because of low cost and availability, it can be an alternative procedure for the diagnosis of painful shoulder. The present study was conducted to assess ultrasonography as a useful modality in evaluating cases of shoulder pain and to compare the findings with X-ray findings. Thirty two patients with shoulder pain were evaluated by X-ray and Ultrasonography (USG). Clinical diagnosis was done for correlation. To identify the cause of shoulder pain, 100% patients were found normal in plain X-ray. On Ultrasonography (USG) 12.5% patients had displaced long head of biceps, 21.9% had biceps tendinitis, and 3.1% had bursitis. In the assessment of shoulder pathology, USG had a sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 88.2%, Positive predictive value (PPV) of 84.6%, Negative predictive value (NPV) of 78.9% and an accuracy of 81.3%. USG is a useful modality for evaluation the shoulder joint in case of painful shoulder even plain X-ray is non conclusive.

  17. Differences in fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings between elderly onset rheumatoid arthritis and polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Kazuo; Miyata, Yoko; Okasaki, Momoko; Morooka, Miyako; Takahashi, Yuko; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kano, Toshikazu; Mimori, Akio

    2015-07-01

    To compare the fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) findings in patients with elderly-onset rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) with those in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), two conditions with similar clinical presentations. We retrospectively analyzed the FDG-PET/CT findings in 10 patients with EORA and 27 patients with PMR admitted to our department between 2006 and 2012. No significant difference was observed in the median patient ages at the time of FDG-PET/CT scans in the EORA and PMR groups (73.5 vs. 78.0 years, respectively). Significant differences in both FDG uptake scores and standardized uptake values were observed between the two groups in the ischial tuberosities, spinous processes, and wrists. No significant differences were detected in the shoulders and hips. However, specific uptake patterns were observed in each group: circular and linear uptake patterns were observed around the humeral head in the EORA group, whereas focal and non-linear uptake patterns were observed in the PMR group. Moreover, focal uptake in front of the hip joint, indicating iliopectineal bursitis, tended to be limited to the PMR group. High sensitivity (92.6%) and specificity (90%) were observed for PMR diagnoses when at least three of the following five items were satisfied: characteristic findings of shoulder and iliopectineal bursitis, FDG uptake in ischial tuberosities and spinal spinous processes, and lack of FDG uptake in the wrists. The differences in the degree of uptake at each lesion and in uptake patterns at the shoulders and hips are potentially useful for obtaining a definitive diagnosis.

  18. Incidence of greater trochanteric pain syndrome in patients suspected for femoroacetabular impingement evaluated using magnetic resonance arthrography of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Grazia; Lanza, Ezio; Parra, Cleber Garcia; Merli, Ilaria; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Zerbi, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the incidence of greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS) in patients who underwent magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the hip for a suspected femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome. Hip MRA performed at our institution (3/2012-1/2014) were reviewed. The absence/presence of FAI (cam, pincer, and mixed) was noted. GTPS diagnosis was based on gluteus medius/minimus tendinopathy/tears, trochanteric bursitis, fascia lata thickening, and trochanter bone oedema/erosion. Subgroup analysis for age (under/over 40 years) and FAI type (cam, pincer, and mixed) was also performed. N = 189 patients were included (n = 125 males; age 39 ± 12 years). FAI was diagnosed in n = 133 (70, 4%): cam type, n = 85 (63, 9%); pincer type, n = 22 (16, 6%); and mixed type, n = 26 (19, 5%). N = 72 patients (38.1%) had tendinopathy, n = 14 (7.4%) had trochanter erosion, n = 31 (16.4%) had bursitis, n = 4 had bone oedema (2.1%), and n = 3 (1.6%) had fascia lata thickening, resulting in GTPS diagnosis in n = 74 patients (39.2%). The association of normal hip morphology/GTPS was significantly higher (P = 0.023) than that of FAI/GTPS. Under 40 years, GTPS incidence was higher in patients with normal hip and pincer-type FAI (P = 0.028). Over 40 years, no difference between patients with/without FAI (P = 0.119) was seen. GTPS was more frequently observed in patients with normal hip morphology than in patients with FAI, particularly in patients under 40.

  19. MRI EVALUATION OF PAINFUL KNEE JOINT- THE CORRELATION OF MULTIPLE COEXISTING PATHOLOGIES, AGE AND SEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukheswar Pame

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND 1. To evaluate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies causing painful knee and their correlation to age and sex. 2. To evaluate the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI features in various knee pathologies and to identify the common lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed using the clinical data of patients presenting with painful knee joint which were evaluated with MRI. Data from 200 patients examined between September 2015 and August 2016 were included into this study. The data was analysed statistically to evaluate the correlation between the MR pathological findings to age and sex of the patients. RESULTS The patient’s age ranged between 8 and 75 years (mean: 36 years. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear was the commonest finding (60% followed by bursitis (55%, meniscal degeneration (54.6% and meniscal tear (52%. Primary signs of ACL tear were hyperintensity, discontinuity and nonvisualisation. Secondary signs like Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL buckling, PCL index of greater than 0.5, uncovered Lateral meniscus (LM and bone contusion assisted in diagnosis in indeterminate cases. Mid substance was the commonest site of ACL tear (64%. PCL tear accounted for only a small percentage (7%. Medial Meniscus (MM tear (35% was commoner than LM tear (17%. The posterior horn of meniscus was the commonest site of injury (86.5%. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tear, Medial collateral ligament (MCL degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. A significant correlation between male gender and ACL injury was noted. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well with MCL injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with ACL injury, MCL injury and Lateral collateral ligament (LCL injury. CONCLUSIONS MRI findings of certain pathologies in a painful knee can coexist and significantly correlate with each other, age and sex of

  20. MRI of lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plate tears and associated adjacent interspace lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umans, Hilary; Srinivasan, Ramya; Elsinger, Elisabeth; Wilde, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    To identify the variety of second and third intermetatarsal space (IS) lesions that may coexist with and without adjacent metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP) plantar plate (PP) tears. One hundred forefoot MRIs in 96 patients with metatarsalgia obtained between 30 September 2011 and 21 July 2012 using 1.5- or 3-T MRI were retrospectively reviewed in consensus by two MSK radiologists and one podiatrist (DPM). MRI was evaluated for second and third MTP PP tear and the presence/nature of second and third IS lesions. Second and third IS neuromas were measured in transverse (trans) dimension. A total of 40 PP tears were identified: 36 at the second and 4 at the third MTP. Second MTP PP tear was identified in 33 % of females and 40.5 % of males. In the 63 female feet there were 21 second MTP PP tears, all of which also had second IS lesions: pericapsular fibrosis (16), bursitis (4), and ganglion (1). In the 37 male feet there were 15 second MTP PP tears, 14 of which had second IS lesions: pericapsular fibrosis (8), bursitis (5), and ganglion (1). There was no definite second IS neuroma adjacent to any second MTP PP tear. In females without PP tear, there were 24 second (3 mm trans average) and 43 third IS neuromas (4.1 mm trans average). In males without PP tear, there were 9 second (3.4 mm trans average) and 16 third IS neuromas (4.1 mm trans average). MTP PP tears occurred in 40 % of our cases, 90 % of which occurred at the second MTP. Almost all coexisted with non-neuromatous second IS lesions. (orig.)

  1. Partial tears of the distal biceps tendon: MR appearance and associated clinical findings

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    Williams, B.D.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Weishaupt, D.; Miller, L.S. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lerman, J. [Lerman Imaging, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Rubenstein, D.L. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rosenberg, Z.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States)

    2001-10-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance and associated clinical findings of partial distal biceps tendon tears. Design: Twenty elbow MR images at 1.5 T, performed over a 7 year period, were reviewed for an appearance of partial tears in the distal biceps. These images were assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists for the extent of: (a) abnormal signal intensity within the tendon, and the presence of (b) bicipitoradial bursitis, and (c) bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity. Medical records for nine of the 20 cases were reviewed for the clinical findings of ecchymosis, trauma, sensation of a ''pop'', loss of function, and acuity of onset. Results: Twenty partial distal biceps tendon tears were seen. All displayed an abnormally increased signal in the distal biceps tendon. Three of 20 (15%) showed a 25% to 50% tear, ten of 20 (50%) showed a 50% tear, and seven of 20 (35%) showed a 75% to 90% tear. Bicipitoradial bursitis was seen in 11 of 20 (55%) cases. Bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity was observed in 10 of 20 (50%). Of the nine cases reviewed for associated clinical findings, surprisingly, only three (33%) experienced an acute traumatic episode with an abrupt onset of pain. An insidious onset was reported in four of nine (44%). Sensation of a ''pop'' was recorded in only two of nine (22%) cases. Ecchymosis and loss of function were not seen in any of the cases. Finally, surgical conformation was obtained for three cases. Conclusion: Partial distal biceps tendon tears have a characteristic MR appearance, demonstrate little functional deficit, and may be attritional in their etiology due to the observation of a low number of patients reporting trauma or an acute onset. (orig.)

  2. Ultrasonography assessment of heel entheses in patients with spondyloarthritis: a comparative study with magnetic resonance imaging and conventional radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila Maldonado, Rodrigo; Ruta, Santiago; Valuntas, María Laura; García, Mercedes

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the agreement between ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and conventional radiography (CR) in the detection of findings indicative of enthesopathy in spondyloarthritis (SpA) patients. A cross-sectional study was performed in 40 SpA patients. Heel entheses (Achilles tendon and plantar fascia) were bilaterally examined by US, MRI, and CR. The three imaging modalities were carried out by three independent operators blinded to the other imaging modality data. Soft tissue abnormalities indicative of enthesopathy as thickening, structural changes, and bursitis were assessed by both US and MRI, and cortical bone abnormalities indicative of enthesopathy as erosions and enthesophytes were assessed by the three imaging modalities. The unweighted kappa values between US and MRI were 0.80, 0.66, 0.69, 0.70, and 0.70 for thickening, structural changes, bursitis, enthesophytes, and bone erosions, respectively. With respect to the detection of enthesophytes, the unweighted kappa values between CR and both US and MRI were 0.78 and 0.76, respectively. At last, for the recognition of bone erosions, the unweighted kappa values between CR and both US and MRI were 0.38 and 0.45, respectively. Using MRI as standard reference method, US was more sensitive with respect to CR revealing bone erosions. The present study provides evidence about the high overall agreement between US and MRI for all abnormal comparable findings at entheseal level and between US, MRI, and CR for the detection of enthesophytes in SpA patients.

  3. Partial tears of the distal biceps tendon: MR appearance and associated clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, B.D.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Weishaupt, D.; Miller, L.S.; Rubenstein, D.L.; Rosenberg, Z.S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance and associated clinical findings of partial distal biceps tendon tears. Design: Twenty elbow MR images at 1.5 T, performed over a 7 year period, were reviewed for an appearance of partial tears in the distal biceps. These images were assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists for the extent of: (a) abnormal signal intensity within the tendon, and the presence of (b) bicipitoradial bursitis, and (c) bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity. Medical records for nine of the 20 cases were reviewed for the clinical findings of ecchymosis, trauma, sensation of a ''pop'', loss of function, and acuity of onset. Results: Twenty partial distal biceps tendon tears were seen. All displayed an abnormally increased signal in the distal biceps tendon. Three of 20 (15%) showed a 25% to 50% tear, ten of 20 (50%) showed a 50% tear, and seven of 20 (35%) showed a 75% to 90% tear. Bicipitoradial bursitis was seen in 11 of 20 (55%) cases. Bony microavulsive injury of the radial tuberosity was observed in 10 of 20 (50%). Of the nine cases reviewed for associated clinical findings, surprisingly, only three (33%) experienced an acute traumatic episode with an abrupt onset of pain. An insidious onset was reported in four of nine (44%). Sensation of a ''pop'' was recorded in only two of nine (22%) cases. Ecchymosis and loss of function were not seen in any of the cases. Finally, surgical conformation was obtained for three cases. Conclusion: Partial distal biceps tendon tears have a characteristic MR appearance, demonstrate little functional deficit, and may be attritional in their etiology due to the observation of a low number of patients reporting trauma or an acute onset. (orig.)

  4. Bursite peritrocantérica: descrição de nova manobra semiológica para auxílio diagnóstico Peritrochanteric bursits: a description of a new semiologic maneuver for diagnostic assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Noburo Fujiki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O estudo tem como objetivo testar a validade de nova manobra semiológica no diagnóstico de bursite peritrocantérica. Foram avaliados 30 pacientes, com diagnóstico clínico de bursite do grande trocanter. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos à radiografia de bacia AP e Perfil. Quando necessário, outros exames de imagem foram realizados, com a finalidade de descartar doenças associadas; os pacientes foram submetidos a duas manobras semiológicas no quadril são e afetado. TESTE 1: paciente em decúbito dorsal, o membro examinado é aduzido em extensão cruzando sobre o membro contralateral, com o calcâneo em contato com a maca, faz-se a flexão do quadril até aproximadamente 90º, o quadril ao final da manobra estará em flexão, adução e leve rotação externa, durante a manobra poderá ser referida dor na região do trocanter maior. TESTE 2: a posição final do TESTE 1, é a posição inicial desta, faz-se a adução forçada do quadril, pode haver referencia de dor ou exacerbação. Os resultados das manobras foram submetidos ao estudo estatístico, que demonstrou serem os exames diferentes entre si, porém complementares. O teste 2 mostrou ser positivo em 96,6%. As manobras semiológicas denominadas de TESTE 1 e 2, podem ser utilizadas como auxiliares nos diagnósticos clínicos das bursites peritrocanterianas.The objective of the present study was to test the validity of a semiologic maneuver on the diagnosis of peritrochanteric bursitis. Thirty patients with a clinical diagnosis of great trochanter bursitis were assessed. All patients were submitted to X-ray studies at AP and LP. Whenever necessary, other imaging tests were performed, intending to rule out any associated diseases; the patients were submitted to two semiologic maneuvers on both hips, the affected and the normal one. TEST 1: with patient at supine position, the examined limb is adduced in extension and crossing it over the contralateral limb, with the calcaneus

  5. DEGRO guidelines for the radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part II: Painful degenerative skeletal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Oliver J. [University Hospitals Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Niewald, Marcus [Saarland University Medical School, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Weitmann, Hajo-Dirk [Fulda Hospital, Dept. of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Fulda (Germany); Jacob, Ingrid [Municipal Hospital Traunstein, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Traunstein (Germany); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Marien Hospital Herne/Ruhr University Bochum, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Herne (Germany); Schaefer, Ulrich [Lippe Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Lemgo (Germany); Keilholz, Ludwig [Bayreuth Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Bayreuth (Germany); Heyd, Reinhard [Center for Radiosurgery, Frankfurt a. M. (Germany); Muecke, Ralph [Marien Hospital Herne/Ruhr University Bochum, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Herne (Germany); Lippe Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Lemgo (Germany); Collaboration: German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD)

    2014-09-20

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the updated DEGRO consensus S2e guideline recommendations for the treatment of benign painful degenerative skeletal disorders with low-dose radiotherapy. This overview reports on the role of low-dose radiotherapy in the treatment of enthesiopathies (shoulder syndrome, trochanteric bursitis, plantar fasciitis, and elbow syndrome) and painful arthrosis (knee, hip, hand, and finger joints). The most relevant aspects of the DEGRO S2e Consensus Guideline Radiation Therapy of Benign Diseases 2014 regarding diagnostics, treatment decision, dose prescription as well as performance of radiotherapy and results are summarized. For all indications mentioned above, retrospective and some prospective analyses have shown remarkable effects in terms of pain relief. Nevertheless, the Level of Evidence (LoE) and the Grade of Recommendation (GR) vary: LoE 1b-4 and GR A-C. Low-dose radiotherapy for painful degenerative skeletal disorders is effective in the majority of the patients and therefore it may be a reasonable therapeutic alternative when simple and non-invasive methods have been used without persistent success. For all discussed entities, single fraction doses of 0.5-1.0 Gy and total doses of 3.0-6.0 Gy/series applied with 2-3 fractions per week are recommended. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung der Empfehlungen der DEGRO-S2e-Leitlinie zur Niedrigdosis-Radiotherapie von gutartigen schmerzhaften degenerativen Skeletterkrankungen. Die vorliegende Zusammenfassung berichtet ueber die Bedeutung der Niedrigdosis-Radiotherapie in der Behandlung von Enthesiopathien (Schultersyndrom, Ellenbogensyndrom, Bursitis trochanterica, Fasciitis plantaris) und schmerzhaften Arthrosen (Knie-, Hueft, Hand- und Fingergelenksarthrosen). Die wichtigsten Aspekte der aktuellen DEGRO-S2e-Konsensus-Leitlinie Strahlentherapie gutartiger Erkrankungen bezueglich Diagnostik, Therapieentscheidungen, Dosisempfehlungen und Durchfuehrung einer Radiotherapie werden

  6. [True/Flex intramedullary nailing for forearm shaft fractures. Long-term results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trlica, J; Počepcov, I; Kočí, J; Frank, M; Holeček, T; Dědek, T

    2012-01-01

    Presentation of technical experience and the clinical and functional results of intramedullary fixation of forearm shaft fractures. Between January 1994 and December 2009, a total of 96 patients with 144 radial and/or ulnar fractures (ulna, 33; radius,15; both, 48) were treated by nailing (True/Flex®). According to the AO classification there were 22-A, 22-B and 22-C type fractures in 39 (41%), 44 (46%) and 13 (13%).cases, respectively. Of these, 82 (85%) were closed (types: 0, 48; I, 33; II, 1) and 14 (15%) were open (types: I, 13; II, 1; III, 0) fractures. Seventy-eight patients (81%) were followed up and their functional outcomes were evaluated according to the criteria of Anderson et al. The average interval between the operation and final follow-up was 28 months (15 to 96 months) The average time to surgery was 2.2 days (0 to 25 days). Early complications were recorded in 4% of the patients (1x bursitis olecrani; 1x end cup replacement; 1x bending of nails) and late complications in 15% (5x non-union; 2x delay union; 4x bursitis olecrani; 1x ruptured tendon). Bone healing was achieved in 95% of the cases and took on average 16 weeks (7 to 34 weeks). No infection, refracture or synostosis occurred. Primary loss of reduction was recorded in four cases due to distraction in one, bent nails in two and a wrong size of the implant in one; secondary loss of reduction was found in three cases, with two cases of radius shortening and one 10°malrotation. No primary malrotation was recorded, but secondary loss of alignment was seen in the distal part of the radius and the proximal part of the ulna. Functional results according to the Anderson criteria were excellent and good in 87% of the cases. Intramedullary mailing provides good stability to mid- and distal-third shaft fractures of the ulna and mid- and proximalthird shaft fractures of the radius, particularly in AO type A and type B fractures. The technical aspects of the method are analysed in detail in this paper

  7. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance findings and correlation in hemiplegic patients with shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğun, Asuman; Karabay, İlkay; Hatipoğlu, Cem; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ultrasonography (US) and MRI findings in hemiplegic patients with shoulder pain and investigate the correlation between them. It is not possible for these patients to fully perform active range of motion (ROM) and stress tests, so imaging methods take center stage in diagnosis and treatment planning. A total of 68 hemiplegic patients with shoulder pain attending the inpatient rehabilitation program were included in the study. MRI and US results from the patient files were recorded. The frequency of each pathology identified by US and MRI was determined. The distribution of MRI and US findings was investigated to see whether there was a statistical difference between the correlation of MRI and US results. The mean (SD) age of the patients was 63.7 (8.3) years and the mean (SD) duration of hemiplegia was 49 (8.9) days. According to the MRI results, glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joint degeneration was found in 77.9% and 79.7% of the patients, respectively; subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis in 80.9%; fluid increase in the joint space in 41.2%; supraspinatus tendinitis in 36.8%; and supraspinatus partial rupture in 33.8%. Shoulder US findings were supraspinatus tendinitis in 54.4%, acromioclavicular joint degeneration in 26.5%, bicipital tendinitis in 20.6%, and subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis in 19.1%. There was a statistically significant difference between MRI and US findings. The results were not compatible with each other (P ≯ .05), and these findings were not consistent with each other since the kappa coefficient was under 0.40 for all these results. Although US is recommended as the first method in determining shoulder pathologies in hemiplegic patients, we suggest that MRI should be used as the first choice in hemiplegic patients with shoulder pain. MRI and US findings were not consistent, and US is dependent on the experience of the operator. MRI should be the first choice in cases where the diagnosis will affect

  8. [Clinical Results of Endoscopic Treatment of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, P; Rafi, M; Skala, P; Zeman, J; Matějka, J; Pavelka, T

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY This retrospective study aims to present short-term clinical outcomes of endoscopic treatment of patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). MATERIAL AND METHODS The evaluated study population was composed of a total of 19 patients (16 women, 3 men) with the mean age of 47 years (19-63 years). In twelve cases the right hip joint was affected, in the remaining seven cases it was the left side. The retrospective evaluation was carried out only in patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome caused by independent chronic trochanteric bursitis without the presence of m. gluteus medius tear not responding to at least 3 months of conservative treatment. In patients from the followed-up study population, endoscopic trochanteric bursectomy was performed alone or in combination with iliotibial band release. The clinical results were evaluated preoperatively and with a minimum follow-up period of 1 year after the surgery (mean 16 months). The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for assessment of pain and WOMAC (Western Ontario MacMaster) score were used. In both the evaluated criteria (VAS and WOMAC score) preoperative and postoperative results were compared. Moreover, duration of surgery and presence of postoperative complications were assessed. Statistical evaluation of clinical results was carried out by an independent statistician. In order to compare the parameter of WOMAC score and VAS pre- and post-operatively the Mann-Whitney Exact Test was used. The statistical significance was set at 0.05. RESULTS The preoperative VAS score ranged 5-9 (mean 7.6) and the postoperative VAS ranged 0-5 (mean 2.3). The WOMAC score ranged 56.3-69.7 (mean 64.2) preoperatively and 79.8-98.3 (mean 89.7) postoperatively. When both the evaluated parameters of VAS and WOMAC score were compared in time, a statistically significant improvement (ppain syndrome yields statistically significant improvement of clinical results with the concurrent minimum incidence of

  9. Correlation of MRI findings with clinical findings of trochanteric pain syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Ullrick, Steven R.; Davis, Kirkland W.; De Smet, Arthur A. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Haaland, Ben; Fine, Jason P. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Departments of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics and Statistics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Greater trochanter pain syndrome due to tendinopathy or bursitis is a common cause of hip pain. The previously reported magnetic resonance (MR) findings of trochanteric tendinopathy and bursitis are peritrochanteric fluid and abductor tendon abnormality. We have often noted peritrochanteric high T2 signal in patients without trochanteric symptoms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the MR findings of peritrochanteric fluid or hip abductor tendon pathology correlate with trochanteric pain. We retrospectively reviewed 131 consecutive MR examinations of the pelvis (256 hips) for T2 peritrochanteric signal and abductor tendon abnormalities without knowledge of the clinical symptoms. Any T2 peritrochanteric abnormality was characterized by size as tiny, small, medium, or large; by morphology as feathery, crescentic, or round; and by location as bursal or intratendinous. The clinical symptoms of hip pain and trochanteric pain were compared to the MR findings on coronal, sagittal, and axial T2 sequences using chi-square or Fisher's exact test with significance assigned as p<0.05. Clinical symptoms of trochanteric pain syndrome were present in only 16 of the 256 hips. All 16 hips with trochanteric pain and 212 (88%) of 240 without trochanteric pain had peritrochanteric abnormalities (p=0.15). Eighty-eight percent of hips with trochanteric symptoms had gluteus tendinopathy while 50% of those without symptoms had such findings (p=0.004). Other than tendinopathy, there was no statistically significant difference between hips with or without trochanteric symptoms and the presence of peritrochanteric T2 abnormality, its size or shape, and the presence of gluteus medius or minimus partial thickness tears. Patients with trochanteric pain syndrome always have peritrochanteric T2 abnormalities and are significantly more likely to have abductor tendinopathy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, although the absence of peritrochanteric T2 MR abnormalities

  10. MR imaging features of foot involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L. Oktay; Ozdolap, Senay; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissue, tendon, cartilage, joint space, and bone of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Materials and Method: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 23 AS patients (46 feet). Ten asymptomatic volunteers (20 feet) were studied on MR imaging, as a control group. MR imaging protocol included; T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted fast-field echo (FFE) and fat-suppressed short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences in sagittal, sagittal oblique, and coronal planes using a head coil. Specifically, we examined: bone erosions, tendinitis (acute and chronic), para-articular enthesophyte, joint effusion, plantar fasciitis, joint space narrowing, soft tissue edema, bone marrow edema, enthesopathy in the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia attachment, subchondral signal intensity abnormalities (edema and sclerosis), tenosynovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, subchondral cysts, subchondral fissures, and bony ankylosis. Midfoot, hindfoot, and ankle were included in examined anatomic regions. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in 3 (13%) of the patients while frequency of involvement was 21 (91%) with MR imaging assessment. The MR imaging findings were bone erosions (65%), Achilles tendinitis (acute and chronic) (61%), para-articular enthesophyte (48%), joint effusion (43%), plantar fasciitis (40%), joint space narrowing (40%), subchondral sclerosis (35%), soft tissue edema (30%), bone marrow edema (30%), enthesopathy of the Achilles attachment (30%), subchondral edema (26%), enthesopathy in the plantar fascia attachment (22%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (22%), subchondral cysts (17%), subchondral fissures (17%), tendinitis and enthesopathy of the plantar ligament (13%), and bony ankylosis (9%). The most common involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (83%) following by midfoot (69% ) and ankle (22

  11. MR imaging features of foot involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L. Oktay; Ozdolap, Senay; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissue, tendon, cartilage, joint space, and bone of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Materials and Method: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 23 AS patients (46 feet). Ten asymptomatic volunteers (20 feet) were studied on MR imaging, as a control group. MR imaging protocol included; T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted fast-field echo (FFE) and fat-suppressed short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences in sagittal, sagittal oblique, and coronal planes using a head coil. Specifically, we examined: bone erosions, tendinitis (acute and chronic), para-articular enthesophyte, joint effusion, plantar fasciitis, joint space narrowing, soft tissue edema, bone marrow edema, enthesopathy in the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia attachment, subchondral signal intensity abnormalities (edema and sclerosis), tenosynovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, subchondral cysts, subchondral fissures, and bony ankylosis. Midfoot, hindfoot, and ankle were included in examined anatomic regions. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in 3 (13%) of the patients while frequency of involvement was 21 (91%) with MR imaging assessment. The MR imaging findings were bone erosions (65%), Achilles tendinitis (acute and chronic) (61%), para-articular enthesophyte (48%), joint effusion (43%), plantar fasciitis (40%), joint space narrowing (40%), subchondral sclerosis (35%), soft tissue edema (30%), bone marrow edema (30%), enthesopathy of the Achilles attachment (30%), subchondral edema (26%), enthesopathy in the plantar fascia attachment (22%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (22%), subchondral cysts (17%), subchondral fissures (17%), tendinitis and enthesopathy of the plantar ligament (13%), and bony ankylosis (9%). The most common involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (83%) following by midfoot (69% ) and ankle (22

  12. A síndrome anserina Anserine syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Helfenstein Jr

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Dor no joelho é uma condição comum na clínica diária e a patologia anserina, também conhecida como pata de ganso, tem sido considerada uma das principais causas. O diagnóstico tem sido realizado de maneira eminentemente clínica, o que tem gerado equívocos. Os pacientes queixam-se tipicamente de dor na parte medial do joelho, com sensibilidade na porção ínferomedial. Estudos de imagem têm sido realizados para esclarecer se tais pacientes possuem bursite, tendinite ou ambos os distúrbios na região conhecida como pata de ganso. Entretanto, o defeito estrutural responsável pelos sintomas permanece desconhecido, motivo pelo qual preferimos intitular como "Síndrome Anserina". O diabetes mellitus é um fator predisponente bem reconhecido. O sobrepeso e a osteoartrite de joelho parecem ser fatores adicionais de risco, contudo, seus papéis na gênese da moléstia ainda não são bem entendidos. O tratamento atual inclui anti-inflamatório, fisioterapia e infiltração de corticoide, com evolução muito variável, que oscila entre 10 dias e 36 meses. A falta de conhecimento sobre a etiofisiopatologia e dados epidemiológicos exige futuros estudos para esse frequente e intrigante distúrbio.Knee pain is a common complaint in clinical practice, and pes anserinus tendino-bursitis syndrome (PATB has been frequently diagnosed based only on clinical features that may cause equivocal interpretations. Patients complain of characteristic spontaneous medial knee pain with tenderness in the inferomedial aspect of the joint. Studies with different imaging modalities have been undertaken during the last years to identify whether these patients suffer from bursitis, tendinitis, or both. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the structural defect responsible for this disturbance. Due to these problems and some controversies, we suggest the term "anserine syndrome" for this condition. Diabetes Mellitus is a known predisposing factor for this syndrome

  13. [Evolution of the technique of arthroscopic reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Our experience from the years 1998 to 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holibka, R; Neoral, P; Kalina, R; Radová, L; Gallo, J

    2012-01-01

    A rotator cuff tear is a relatively frequent cause of pain and restricted motion of the shoulder. Some orthopaedists believe that any attempt at rotator cuff reconstruction will fail. The aim of this paper is to present our experience with arthroscopic reconstruction of rotator cuff tears. Between January 1998 and December 2008, 319 patients with an early diagnosis of rotator cuff rupture were treated. The group included 67 women and 252 men, with an average age of 37 years (range, 24 to 71 years) at the time of surgery. The patients indicated for arthroscopic reconstruction had to show free motion of the shoulder, had a full thickness tear up to 3 cm in size in the sagittal plane and a Patte stage 2 tear in the frontal plane at the maximum. The outcome of surgery was evaluated at one year of follow-up and included the patient's self-assessment, modified UCLA score and incidence of complications. The probability of failure was calculated as an odds ratio of an implant failure to failure of the other implants and the probability of repeat surgery in a given implant was calculated as a relative risk in relation to the other implants. The average operative time was 52 minutes (range, 25 to 85); the average UCLA score increased from 10 to 31 points (pRC anchors had the odds ratio for mechanical failure equal to 0.55 (95 % CI, 0.25 to 1.24) and the relative risk of repeat surgery equal to 0.41 (95% CI, 0.12 to 1.43). In addition, 18 complications were recorded. The frequency of deep wound infection was 0.7% (2/319). Six patients (2.1%) required repeat surgery for symptomatic bursitis and adhesive capsulitis. A recent meta-analysis has found no significant difference between the results of surgical rotator cuff reconstruction and its conservative treatment. We do not support this view but present here evidence that, when certain conditions are fulfilled, arthroscopic reconstruction can produce a very good clinical outcome. The arthroscopic reconstruction of a rotator

  14. Acupuncture and rehabilitation of the painful shoulder: study protocol of an ongoing multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN28687220

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimenez Carmen

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the painful shoulder is one of the most common dysfunctions of the locomotor apparatus, and is frequently treated both at primary healthcare centres and by specialists, little evidence has been reported to support or refute the effectiveness of the treatments most commonly applied. According to the bibliography reviewed, physiotherapy, which is the most common action taken to alleviate this problem, has not yet been proven to be effective, because of the small size of sample groups and the lack of methodological rigor in the papers published on the subject. No reviews have been made to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating this complaint, but in recent years controlled randomised studies have been made and these demonstrate an increasing use of acupuncture to treat pathologies of the soft tissues of the shoulder. In this study, we seek to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy applied jointly with acupuncture, compared with physiotherapy applied with a TENS-placebo, in the treatment of painful shoulder caused by subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis. Methods/design Randomised controlled multicentre study with blind evaluation by an independent observer and blind, independent analysis. A study will be made of 465 patients referred to the rehabilitation services at participating healthcare centres, belonging to the regional public health systems of Andalusia and Murcia, these patients presenting symptoms of painful shoulder and a diagnosis of subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis. The patients will be randomised into two groups: 1 experimental (acupuncture + physiotherapy; 2 control (TENS-placebo + physiotherapy; the administration of rescue medication will also be allowed. The treatment period will have a duration of three weeks. The main result variable will be the change produced on Constant's Shoulder Function Assessment (SFA Scale

  15. Correlation of MRI findings with clinical findings of trochanteric pain syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Ullrick, Steven R.; Davis, Kirkland W.; De Smet, Arthur A.; Haaland, Ben; Fine, Jason P.

    2008-01-01

    Greater trochanter pain syndrome due to tendinopathy or bursitis is a common cause of hip pain. The previously reported magnetic resonance (MR) findings of trochanteric tendinopathy and bursitis are peritrochanteric fluid and abductor tendon abnormality. We have often noted peritrochanteric high T2 signal in patients without trochanteric symptoms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the MR findings of peritrochanteric fluid or hip abductor tendon pathology correlate with trochanteric pain. We retrospectively reviewed 131 consecutive MR examinations of the pelvis (256 hips) for T2 peritrochanteric signal and abductor tendon abnormalities without knowledge of the clinical symptoms. Any T2 peritrochanteric abnormality was characterized by size as tiny, small, medium, or large; by morphology as feathery, crescentic, or round; and by location as bursal or intratendinous. The clinical symptoms of hip pain and trochanteric pain were compared to the MR findings on coronal, sagittal, and axial T2 sequences using chi-square or Fisher's exact test with significance assigned as p<0.05. Clinical symptoms of trochanteric pain syndrome were present in only 16 of the 256 hips. All 16 hips with trochanteric pain and 212 (88%) of 240 without trochanteric pain had peritrochanteric abnormalities (p=0.15). Eighty-eight percent of hips with trochanteric symptoms had gluteus tendinopathy while 50% of those without symptoms had such findings (p=0.004). Other than tendinopathy, there was no statistically significant difference between hips with or without trochanteric symptoms and the presence of peritrochanteric T2 abnormality, its size or shape, and the presence of gluteus medius or minimus partial thickness tears. Patients with trochanteric pain syndrome always have peritrochanteric T2 abnormalities and are significantly more likely to have abductor tendinopathy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, although the absence of peritrochanteric T2 MR abnormalities

  16. Prevalence of bovine brucellosis and related risk behavior in the suburban area of Dakar, Senegal

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    D. Tialla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and the frequency of risk behaviors in the zoonotic transmission of bovine brucellosis in suburban Dakar. The individual serological status of 300 cattle distributed in thirty farms in this area was determined by the rose Bengal and complement fixation tests. The frequency of risk behaviors toward this zoonosis was determined using two epidemiological surveys that inventoried the known risk factors of brucellosis transmission between animals and humans. Taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of rose Bengal and complement fixation tests used in series, i.e. 85% and 98.75 %, respectively, the true prevalence was estimated to be 36.36%. At least one animal was infected in 96.6% of the herds. Positivity to the complement fixation test was significantly associated with age, breed, abortion and the presence of bursitis in cattle. The risk behaviors the most frequently observed in humans in this area were: assisting during calving and abortion, handling of aborted fetuses without gloves, and consuming unpasteurized raw or curd milk and fresh cheese. These results show that brucellosis is present in dairy cattle farms in suburban Dakar. Since the milk produced in these farms is used to supply the city of Dakar, measures must be developed to promote brucellosis prevention methods aimed at Dakar’s population.

  17. THE EFFECT OF HOUSING ON THE OCCURANCE OF HIND LEG WEAKNESSES IN MARKET PIGS OF THREE GENOTYPES

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    Blaž Šegula

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative changes of joints due to osteoarthrosis in tarsal joint, peritarsitis, tarsal bursitis and asymmetry of claws was studied on legs of 175 commercial pigs, with prolonged fattening (250 days of age of three genotypes (landrace pigs-11, crosses between landrace females and large white males-12, crosses between female 12 and duroc male- 123 housed either individually on the zincifi ed metal slatted fl oor or in groups of 8-9 pigs on the concrete slatted fl oor. Degenerative changes due to osteoarthrosis (OATD in small joints of the hock - os tarsale tertium (T3, os tarsale quartum (T4, os metatarsale tertium (Mt3 and os metatarsale quatrum (Mt4 and due to the peritarsitis were signifi cantly more important in pigs housed individually (P<0.001. Individually housed pigs grew faster and were signifi cantly heavier for the similar slaughter age (P<0.001. The effect of genotype was only minor; the crosses 12 had lesser asymmetry of claws (P<0.001 than pigs 11 or 123, whereas crosses 123 had signifi cantly (P<0.005 less pronounced degenerative changes due to osteoarthrosis on Mt3 and T3.

  18. Diagnostic imaging of sacroiliac joints and the spine in the course of spondyloarthropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopinska, Iwona; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Summary Spondyloarthropathies belong to a group of rheumatic diseases, in which inflammatory changes affect mainly the sacroiliac joints, spine, peripheral joints, tendon, ligaments and capsule attachments (entheses). This group includes 6 entities: ankylosing spondylitis, arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease, reactive arthritis, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis and juvenile spondyloarthropathy. In 2009, ASAS (Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society) association, published classification criteria for spondyloarthropathies, which propose standardization of clinical-diagnostic approach in the case of sacroiliitis, spondylitis and arthritis. Radiological diagnosis of inflammatory changes of sacroiliac joints is based on a 4 step radiographic grading method from 1966. According to modified New York criteria, the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis is made based on the presence of advanced lesions, sacroiliitis of at least 2 grade bilaterally or 3–4 unilaterally. In case of other types of spondyloarthropathies diagnosis is made based on presence of at least grade 1 changes. In MRI, active inflammation of sacroiliac joints is indicated by the presence of subchondral bone marrow edema, synovitis, bursitis, or enthesitis. ASAS discusses only the classic form of axial spondyloarthropathies, which is ankylosing spondylitis. To quantify radiological inflammatory changes in the course of the disease, Stoke Ankylosing spondylitis classification Spinal Score (SASSS) is recommended. The signs of inflammation and scarrying of the spinal cord in the course of ankylosing spondylitis, present in MRI include: bone marrow edema, sclerosis, fat metaplasia, formation of syndesmophytes, and ankylosis. PMID:23807884

  19. MR imaging as a problem solving tool in posterior ankle pain: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Gloria N.L., E-mail: gnlwong@gmail.com; Tan, Tien Jin, E-mail: tien_jin_tan@cgh.com.sg

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Conditions causing posterior ankle pain may occur in isolation or in co-existence. • Identification of the causative pathology is therefore often difficult. • The pathology and MR imaging findings of common causative conditions are discussed. • MRI aids accurate and timely diagnoses in cases of posterior ankle pain. - Abstract: Posterior ankle pain is a cause of chronic pain and disability, afflicting a wide range of individuals. While proper identification of the cause is essential for timely and adequate treatment, identifying the cause and excluding mimickers is often challenging for the physician due to the complex nature of the joint. In addition, pathology that can cause posterior ankle pain may occur on their own or in co-existence. Clinical conditions that can present as posterior ankle pain include: posterior ankle impingement, Achilles tendon pathology, medial flexor tendon pathology, peroneal pathology, retrocalcaneal bursitis, posterior subtalar tarsal coalition, sinus tarsi, and tarsal tunnel syndrome. In this review we introduce current concepts of pathophysiology in the main conditions involved in posterior ankle pain, and review the role of MR in the diagnosis and management of each condition. When pathology can be detected earlier and with more specificity, appropriate and time-sensitive treatment can be commenced, thus improving clinical outcomes.

  20. Shaggy Lame Fox Syndrome in Pribilof Island Arctic Foxes ( Alopex lagopus pribilofensis), Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraker, T R; White, P A

    2017-03-01

    A previously unrecognized condition is described in wild free-ranging Pribilof arctic foxes ( Alopex lagopus pribilofensis) from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, USA. This condition is called shaggy lame fox syndrome (SLFS) denoting the primary clinical signs first observed. Criteria used to suspect SLFS on gross examination included emaciation, failure to shed winter pelage and moderate to severe polyarthritis. Criteria used to confirm SLFS histologically included polyarthritis (characterized by lymphoplasmacytic synovitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, periosteal bony proliferation, and periarticular lymphoplasmacytic vasculitis) and systemic leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Other histological lesions often found included renal cortical infarcts, myocarditis with myocardial infarcts, lymphoplasmacytic meningitis, lymphoplasmacytic cuffing of meningeal and a few cerebral vessels, and cavitating infarcts of the brainstem and thalamus. The cause of SLFS is not known at this time; however, the gross and histological lesions suggest that the cause of SLFS may be a bacterial polyarthritis with a secondary immune-mediated vasculitis. These lesions are consistent with changes described with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in domestic dogs; E. rhusiopathiae was identified from the synovial membrane of a swollen stifle joint and the kidney from one fox using real-time polymerase chain reaction and with culture from a fox that had gross and histological lesions of SLFS. Therefore, E. rhusiopathiae is a possible etiological agent for SLFS.

  1. Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome—Hypermobility Type: A Much Neglected Multisystemic Disorder

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    Yael Gazit

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS—hypermobility type (HT is considered to be the most common subtype of EDS and the least severe one; EDS-HT is considered to be identical to the joint hypermobility syndrome and manifests with musculoskeletal complaints, joint instability, and soft tissue overuse injury. Musculoskeletal complaints manifest with joint pain of non-inflammatory origin and/or spinal pain. Joint instability leads to dislocation or subluxation and involves peripheral joints as well as central joints, including the temporomandibular joints, sacroiliac joints, and hip joints. Soft tissue overuse injury may lead to tendonitis and bursitis without joint inflammation in most cases. Ehlers–Danlos syndrome-HT carries a high potential for disability due to recurrent dislocations and subluxations and chronic pain. Throughout the years, extra-articular manifestations have been described, including cardiovascular, autonomic nervous system, gastrointestinal, hematologic, ocular, gynecologic, neurologic, and psychiatric manifestations, emphasizing the multisystemic nature of EDS-HT. Unfortunately, EDS-HT is under-recognized and inadequately managed, leading to neglect of these patients, which may lead to severe disability that almost certainly could have been avoided. In this review article we will describe the known manifestations of the extra-articular systems.

  2. MRI for the diagnosis of scapular dyskinesis: a report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Wataru; Tasaki, Atsushi; Nozaki, Taiki

    2017-01-01

    Scapular dyskinesis describes the altered position of the scapula and/or abnormal movements of the scapulothoracic joint. It is caused by bony anatomical variations, bursitis, tumors, and muscular pathological conditions including loss of innervation and fibrosis. Scapular dyskinesis is just as often subclinical as it is symptomatic, and as the periscapular anatomical changes may not result in patient symptoms, a precise diagnosis of the etiology and pathophysiology has been a challenge. Scapular bony prominence is a common etiology of scapular dyskinesis, but does not always result in morbidity. We report a case of a 39-year-old man in whom an extensive MRI with fluid-sensitive imaging sequences covering the whole of the scapula was beneficial in diagnosing the inflammation adjacent to the bony deformity, which confirmed the etiology of scapular dyskinesis. Furthermore, in a 41-year old man without any anatomical variances, a similar MRI showed inflammation at the subscapular fossa that suggested altered scapular kinematics. An arthroscopic debridement of the lesion improved the symptoms. MRI in conjunction with plain radiographs, CT and physical examination enabled a precise diagnosis of the etiology. Fluid-sensitive MR images are important in defining the presence of inflammation, and are beneficial in determining the pathological significance of findings through other diagnostic measures. (orig.)

  3. Do we really need radiographic assessment for the diagnosis of non-specific heel pain (calcaneal apophysitis) in children?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Ozkan

    2010-01-01

    Non-specific heel pain (calcaneal apophysitis) is a common disorder, particularly in physically active growing children. Foot radiographs are usually obtained as part of the clinical evaluation in routine orthopaedic practice. However, there is still controversy about the specific findings on radiographs, and it is unclear what information is present on radiographs that may alter the diagnosis and management. The purpose of this study was to review a consecutive series of patients with the diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis to assess the yield of routine radiographs of the foot. A prospective study was performed on 61 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis in a single-surgeon practice. Standard anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing foot radiographs were obtained for each patient. Seventy-one sets of foot radiographs were reviewed to determine whether radiographs had an impact on diagnosis and management. Patients with antecedent trauma, penetrating injury, foot deformity, achilles tendonitis, bursitis and infections were excluded from the study. Seventy foot radiographs were considered to be normal. The radiographs changed the diagnosis in only one patient, in whom a simple bone cyst of the calcaneous was seen. Calcaneal apophysitis is a self-limiting disease, and patients can be treated conservatively. Neither the sclerosis nor the fragmentation of the apophysis could be used to establish the diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis. Therefore, obtaining radiographs as an initial step in their evaluation does not seem to be justified. (orig.)

  4. Can We Measure the Heel Bump? Radiographic Evaluation of Haglund's Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulstra, Gythe H; van Rheenen, Thijs A; Scholtes, Vanessa A B

    2015-01-01

    Haglund's deformity is a symptomatic posterosuperior deformity of the heel. The lateral radiograph of the ankle will show a prominent, large, posterosuperior part of the calcaneus, which can be measured using the Fowler and Philips angle (FPA, the angle between the posterior and plantar surface of the calcaneus) and the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA, the angle between the sole of the foot and the plantar part of the calcaneus). Although these angles are commonly used, these radiographic angle measurements have never shown a relationship with Haglund's deformity. In 78 patients (51% male) with symptomatic Haglund's deformity and a control group of 100 patients (41% male) with no heel complaints, we measured the FPA and CPA on weightbearing lateral radiographs of the foot. Using an unpaired t tests, no significant difference was found between the 2 groups in the FPA (p = .40). We measured a significant difference in the CPA between the Haglund group and the control group (p = .014). Subgroup analysis showed that this difference was mainly found in females (p verticalization of the calcaneus. This change in position results in extra traction on the Achilles tendon and can eventually cause tendinitis and bursitis. Radiographic measurement should be used as an auxiliary tool. If the calcaneus tends to change position, it would be interesting to understand this process, which could eventually lead to improvement in the treatment of Haglund's deformity. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlation between ultrasonographic findings and the response to corticosteroid injection in pes anserinus tendinobursitis syndrome in knee osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ho Sung; Kim, Sung Eun; Suh, Young Ran; Seo, Young-Il; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the ultrasonographic (US) findings in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) with pes anserinus tendinitis or bursitis (PATB) syndrome and to determine the correlation between the US findings and the response to local corticosteroid injection. We prospectively studied 26 patients with knee OA with clinically diagnosed PATB syndrome. A linear array 7 MHz transducer was used for US examination of the knee. Seventeen patients were injected locally with tramcinolone acetonide in the anserine bursa area. Response to local corticosteroid injection was evaluated by pain visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and MacMaster (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index and Global patient/physician assessment using Likert scale. On US examination, only 2 patients (8.7%) showed evidence of PATB. Pain VAS, WOMAC pain index and WOMAC physical function index improved significantly after corticosteroid injection. Global patient assessment revealed that 2 patients showed best response, 6 good, 1 fair, 8 the same, and none worse. It is of note that the 2 patients who showed the best response were those who showed US evidence of PATB. This finding shows that US can serve as a useful diagnostic tool for guiding treatment in PATB syndrome of OA patients.

  6. [Is therapy with local infiltrations feasible in primary care consultations?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña Loarte, J E; Pérez Franco, J; Sánchez Sánchez, G

    1999-01-01

    To study the feasibility of local infiltration in primary care consultations. Before-and-after intervention study. Two clinics at an urban health centre. Patients diagnosed with pathology of tender areas and treated with corticosteroid infiltration between May 1997 and May 1998. Corticoid infiltration plus local anaesthetic. Weekly check-up. Analysis of the variables: sex, age, diagnosis, time elapsed between indication and start of treatment, subjective assessment of pain before and after treatment (VRS scale), number of infiltrations per patient, side-effects. Evaluation of overall and individual effectiveness. 41 patients were infiltrated. Average age was 58. Most common pathologies were: rotary joint tendinitis (48.7%), anserine bursitis (24.4%), plantar fasciitis (7.3%). Average number of infiltrations per pathology: 1.3. Mean waiting time: 3.5 days. Comparison of pain by means of VRS (range 0-5) before and after treatment used the Wilcoxon test, with a statistically significant difference and p < 0.001 (z = -5.5109). For 35 patients (85.4%), pain was solved very well (values 0 and 1 on the VRS). For 3 patients (7.3%), improvement was moderate; and for 3 (7.3%) there was no improvement. 1. Treatment with local infiltration of corticosteroids is effective in dealing with pain, and is an alternative to treatment with NSAIDs. 2. It is feasible in primary care, and there are many advantages if the general practitioner employs this therapeutic technique.

  7. Improved training of house officers in a rheumatology consult service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, S A; Brandt, K D; Katz, B P

    1993-06-01

    This study examined whether the clinical environment could be used to increase internal medicine house officers' adoption of care recommendations taught in a didactic conference. Subjects were 11 internal medicine house officers who served 6-week rheumatology elective rotations. At the start of each of four rotation periods, house officers attended a 1-hour conference in which periarticular rheumatic disorders associated with knee pain (anserine bursitis, pseudothrombophlebitis) and shoulder pain (bicipital tendinitis) were discussed. All house officers also practiced physical examination techniques on anatomic models simulating the disorders. During alternate rotation periods, reminder sheets were appended to the records of arthritis patients with histories of chronic knee or shoulder pain. The frequency with which house officers followed conference recommendations was documented by direct observation (6 house officers in 17 encounters with reminders, 5 house officers in 30 encounters without reminders). Specific questioning about a recent history of knee or shoulder pain and the performance of four of five recommended physical examination maneuvers were increased significantly by reminder sheets in patients' charts (P < 0.05 for all). Although rheumatology faculty often have limited options available to increase the number of house officer trainees or to intensify clinical activity, qualitative improvements within existing logistic parameters are feasible by assuring that the clinical environment (e.g., patient records) contains salient cues that will prompt desired actions.

  8. [Overuse injury syndromes of the knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećina, M; Bojanić, I; Haspl, M

    2001-12-01

    Overuse injuries are frequent in the knee joint. The reason for this is that the knee joint is engaged in all sports activities. Furthermore, the joint area has numerous attachment points for muscles and tendons and numerous bursae. Another reason is that the specific joint between the patella and femur (patellofemoral joint) constitutes a part of the knee joint. Speaking in general terms, all overuse injuries in the knee joint can be divided in four groups according to the aspect: anterior aspect--patellofemoral pain syndrome, patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee), Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding Larson Johanson disease, stress fracture of the patella, fat pad syndrome; medial aspect--plica syndrome, semimembranosus tendinitis, pes anserinus tendinitis (bursitis), breaststroker's knee, medial retinaculitis; lateral aspect--Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee), Popliteal Tendinitis, Bicipital tendinitis; posterior aspect--fabellitis, medial gastrocnemius strain. There are numerous possible reasons for pain caused by overuse injuries around the knee joint, but two are the most frequent: patellar tendinitis (jumper's knee) and Iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee). This paper gives a brief overview of overuse injuries of the knee joint including their definition, anatomy, aetiology, clinical symptoms and signs, and non-operative and surgical treatment.

  9. A different approach to the management of greater trochanter pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Van Rooy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS, also known astrochanteric bursitis, is a regional pain syndrome that is frequently treatedby physiotherapists in private practice or out-patient departments.  It is classi -fied as an overuse injury that could become chronic in nature and frequentlyco-exists with other pathologies.This case study describes the treatment of a 61-year-old female with GTPS of her left hip. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of specificsoft tissue mobilisation (SSTM and eccentric strengthening of the Gluteus Medius (GM muscle in treating this condition. Particular emphasis was placed on rehabilitation of lumbar spine control in order to improve proximal stability. A nother aim was to return the patient faster to her functional activitiesthan had been reported in the literature. The patient could return to her normal daily activities after four treatment sessions and was completely pain free after 12 weeks. This case study presents a different approach to the treatment of GTPS and proposes that GTPS maypresent in a similar manner to GM tendinosis. This phenomenon could therefore possibly explain the chronic nature ofthe condition.

  10. [Acute and overuse injuries of the shoulder in sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyscher, R; Kraus, K; Finke, B; Scheibel, M

    2014-03-01

    During sports the shoulder complex is exposed to considerable load especially where throwing is important and various pathological changes can occur. In the last two decades the shoulder in athletes has become a special term in clinical sports medicine Selective literature review in PubMed and consideration of personal experience, research results as well as national and international recommendations In general acute lesions of the shoulder caused by sudden sport injuries, such as traumatic luxation, acromioclavicular (AC) joint disruption, traumatic tendon ruptures, labral lesions, cartilage defects and fractures have to be distinguished from chronic or long-standing pathologies due to recurrent microtrauma, such as overuse bursitis and tendinitis, as well as secondary forms of impingement along with rotator cuff tears and labral lesions. Besides common pathological changes that can be observed in almost all overhead-sports, there are also injuries that are more sport-specific due to the particular load profile in each sport. These injuries are especially common in racquet and throwing sports (e.g. golf, tennis, handball and volleyball) as well as in individual and artistic sports (e.g. swimming, gymnastics, dancing and rowing), contact and extreme sports (e.g. judo, mixed martial arts, bodybuilding, weightlifting, motocross and downhill mountain biking). Knowledge about sport-specific load profiles as well as about the variety of treatment options is crucial for successful treatment of these injuries.

  11. MRI findings in renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: fuldemyildirim@yahoo.com; Basaran, Ceyla [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ceylab@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: emkayahanulu@yahoo.com; Uyusur, Arzu [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: arzuuyusur@yahoo.com; Tarhan, Nefise Cagla [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: caglat@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Muhtesem Agildere, A. [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: amuhtesem@superonline.com

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the MRI findings of renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain and to investigate the most common etiology of pain. Materials and methods: 69 hip MRIs of 57 patients with hip pain and 30 knee MRIs of 24 patients with knee pain with no history of trauma were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: In the evaluation of hip MRIs, 24 patients had avascular necrosis and effusion, 2 patients had bone marrow edema consistent with early stage of avascular necrosis. 18 patients had only intraarticular effusion, 6 patients had tendinitis, 6 patients had bursitis and 1 patient had soft tissue abscess. Five patients had muscle edema and five patients had muscle atrophy as additional findings to the primary pathologies. Among patients with knee pain, nine patients had degenerative joint disease. Seven patients had chondromalacia, five had bone marrow edema, six had meniscal tear, six had ligament rupture and two had bone infarct. Three of the patients had muscle edema accompanying to other pathologies. Conclusion: The most common etiology of hip pain in renal transplant recipients is avascular necrosis as expected, intraarticular effusion is found to be Second reason for pain. However, knee pain is explained by ligament pathology, meniscal tear, chondromalacia or degenerative joint disease rather than osteonecrosis.

  12. Ultrasound in Total Hip Replacement: Value of Anterior Acetabular Cup Visibility and Contact With the Iliopsoas Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillin, Raphaël; Bertaud, Valérie; Garetier, Marc; Fantino, Olivier; Polard, Jean-Louis; Lambotte, Jean-Christophe

    2018-06-01

    To assess visibility of the acetabular cup in total hip replacement and to determine the value of direct and indirect signs of iliopsoas impingement syndrome with ultrasound. Ultrasound examinations were performed by a single operator in 17 patients with iliopsoas impingement syndrome and 48 control patients. Cup visibility, contact between the cup and psoas tendon, and the presence of indirect signs of iliopsoas impingement syndrome were investigated in all patients. When the acetabular cup was visible, its size and position in relation to the psoas tendon were recorded. Anterior cup visibility (P = .03), contact with the psoas tendon (P cup shift of 3 mm or greater yielded respective sensitivities of 82% and 59% and specificities of 81% and 100%. When iliopsoas impingement syndrome is clinically suspected, the presence of iliopsoas bursitis or a posteroanterior cup shift of greater than 3 mm under the psoas tendon serve to confirm the diagnosis. In the absence of these conditions, a therapeutic test may be necessary because of the incomplete, albeit high, specificity of other signs. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  13. Analysing the protective potential of padded soccer goalkeeper shorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, K U; Nusser, M; Derler, S; Boesiger, P

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the potential of currently available padded soccer goalkeeper shorts to prevent hip injuries sustained in side jumps was investigated. Within the scope of this study, a survey among professional and amateur goalkeepers, trainers and the medical staff was performed. In addition, commercially available shorts were impact-tested using an artificial hip model. The results were compared with requirements established for hip protectors for elderly. The results of the survey found that contusions and abrasions were observed most often for all players. Fractures and arthritis were only reported by amateur players, whereas bursitis was more frequently observed by professional players. Amateurs have a significantly higher risk of injury than professional players, and the higher injury risk during training is significantly higher compared with the injury risk during a match. No difference of the injury risk was found between goalkeepers wearing padded shorts and those who did not. Impact tests indicated a wide range of performance of the currently available products. The padded shorts generally reduce impact forces, but mostly perform poorly. Only shorts that were made of visco-elastic foam fulfilled the basic requirements requested for hip protectors for elderly. The quality of most of the currently available goalkeeper shorts needs to be improved to effectively prevent hip injury sustained in side jumps.

  14. MR Imaging in symptomatic osteochondromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Chun, Kyung Ah; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the MR findings of symptomatic osteochondromas. We evaluated 31 patients who between July, 1994 and May, 1997 underwent MR imaging for symptomatic osteochondroma. Fourteen were males and 17 were females, and their ages ranged from 8 to 49 (mean, 23) years. Using T1WI, T2WI and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced T1WI, images were analysed according to signal intensity in the osseous component of the osteochondroma, thickness of the cartilage cap, and associated change in surrounding soft tissue. Clinical manifestation included a palpable mass or tendency to grow (n=22) and pain on movement (n=9). Complications were of three types : that which followed change in the osseous component of the tumor, associated change in surrounding soft tissue, and malignant transformation. In the osseous component, bone marrow edema or contusion was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), and in two (65%), fracture was observed. In surrounding soft tissue, muscle impingement was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), bursitis was in 7 cases (22.6 %), tenosynovitis in seven (22.6 %), and vascular compression in five (16.1 %). In three cases (9.7%), transformation to chondrosarcoma had occurred; two of these were derived from osteochondromatosis and one from a single osteochondroma. The thickness of the cartilage cap was as follow : 10 mm (n=3). In patients with symptomatic osteochondroma, MR imaging is useful for detecting both complications and malignant transformation. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  15. Power Doppler Ultrasound Evaluation of Peripheral Joint, Entheses, Tendon, and Bursa Abnormalities in Psoriatic Patients: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanjiao; Yang, Yujia; Xiang, Xi; Wang, Liyun; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2018-04-15

    To evaluate the prevalence rates of peripheral joint, enthesis, tendon, and bursa abnormalities by power Doppler (PD) ultrasonic examination in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), psoriatic patients without clinical signs of arthritis (non-PsA psoriasis group), and healthy individuals, to detect subclinical PsA. A total of 253 healthy volunteers, 242 non-PsA psoriatic patients, and 86 patients with PsA were assessed by 2-dimensional and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound. Peripheral joint, enthesis, tendon, and bursa abnormalities were observed, characterizing abnormal PD. The affected patients and sites with abnormalities in various ages were compared among groups; PD signal grades for the abnormalities were also compared. In the PsA group, significantly higher percentages of sites showing joint effusion/synovitis, enthesitis, and tenosynovitis in all age groups, and markedly higher rates of sites with bursitis were found in young and middle age groups, compared with the non-PsA and control groups (all p the non-PsA group showed significantly higher rates of joint effusion/synovitis and enthesitis sites, and elevated PD signal grades of synovitis, enthesitis, and tenosynovitis in comparison with the control group, both in young and middle age groups (all p tenosynovitis.

  16. Role of FDG PET/CT in Baastrup's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanyam, Padma; Palaniswamy, Shanmuga Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Baastrup's disease is a benign condition, which presents as chronic low back pain. It is also known as “kissing spine syndrome” and refers to close approximation of adjacent spinous processes producing inflammation and back pain. This condition is often misdiagnosed, resulting in incorrect treatment and persistence of symptoms. Diagnosis of Baastrup's disease is verified with clinical examination and imaging studies. Conventionally, clinicians resort to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spine rather than X-ray or computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of back pain. MRI can additionally identify flattening, sclerosis, enlargement, cystic lesions, and bone edema at the articulating surfaces of the two affected spinous processes. Studies have reported that 18 Fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) can detect a bursitis or an inflammation as a form of stress reaction despite a negative MRI and 99m Tc Methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scan. PET/CT is usually not a recommended investigation for this condition. However, this case report highlights the benefit of FDG-PET/CT in identifying the site of inflammatory pathology. It is also known to identify the exact site of inflammation where steroid or local anesthetic injection can be administered to alleviate pain, especially in patients with multilevel vertebral involvement

  17. DEGRO guidelines for the radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part II: Painful degenerative skeletal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Oliver J.; Niewald, Marcus; Weitmann, Hajo-Dirk; Jacob, Ingrid; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Schaefer, Ulrich; Keilholz, Ludwig; Heyd, Reinhard; Muecke, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the updated DEGRO consensus S2e guideline recommendations for the treatment of benign painful degenerative skeletal disorders with low-dose radiotherapy. This overview reports on the role of low-dose radiotherapy in the treatment of enthesiopathies (shoulder syndrome, trochanteric bursitis, plantar fasciitis, and elbow syndrome) and painful arthrosis (knee, hip, hand, and finger joints). The most relevant aspects of the DEGRO S2e Consensus Guideline Radiation Therapy of Benign Diseases 2014 regarding diagnostics, treatment decision, dose prescription as well as performance of radiotherapy and results are summarized. For all indications mentioned above, retrospective and some prospective analyses have shown remarkable effects in terms of pain relief. Nevertheless, the Level of Evidence (LoE) and the Grade of Recommendation (GR) vary: LoE 1b-4 and GR A-C. Low-dose radiotherapy for painful degenerative skeletal disorders is effective in the majority of the patients and therefore it may be a reasonable therapeutic alternative when simple and non-invasive methods have been used without persistent success. For all discussed entities, single fraction doses of 0.5-1.0 Gy and total doses of 3.0-6.0 Gy/series applied with 2-3 fractions per week are recommended. (orig.) [de

  18. Do we really need radiographic assessment for the diagnosis of non-specific heel pain (calcaneal apophysitis) in children?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kose, Ozkan [Diyarbakir Education and Research Hospital, Orthopaedics and Traumatology Clinic, Diyarbakir (Turkey); Diclekent Bulvari, Ataslar Serhat Evleri, Diyarbakir (Turkey)

    2010-04-15

    Non-specific heel pain (calcaneal apophysitis) is a common disorder, particularly in physically active growing children. Foot radiographs are usually obtained as part of the clinical evaluation in routine orthopaedic practice. However, there is still controversy about the specific findings on radiographs, and it is unclear what information is present on radiographs that may alter the diagnosis and management. The purpose of this study was to review a consecutive series of patients with the diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis to assess the yield of routine radiographs of the foot. A prospective study was performed on 61 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis in a single-surgeon practice. Standard anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing foot radiographs were obtained for each patient. Seventy-one sets of foot radiographs were reviewed to determine whether radiographs had an impact on diagnosis and management. Patients with antecedent trauma, penetrating injury, foot deformity, achilles tendonitis, bursitis and infections were excluded from the study. Seventy foot radiographs were considered to be normal. The radiographs changed the diagnosis in only one patient, in whom a simple bone cyst of the calcaneous was seen. Calcaneal apophysitis is a self-limiting disease, and patients can be treated conservatively. Neither the sclerosis nor the fragmentation of the apophysis could be used to establish the diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis. Therefore, obtaining radiographs as an initial step in their evaluation does not seem to be justified. (orig.)

  19. Fluid-fluid level on MR image: significance in Musculoskeletal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Kyung Won [Seoul Naitonal University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang Wook; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul Naitonal University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency, number and signal intensity of fluid-fluid levels of musculoskeletal diseases on MR images, and to determine the usefulness of this information for the differentiation of musculoskeletal diseases. MR images revealed fluid-fluid levels in the following diseases : giant cell tumor(6), telangiectatic osteosarcoma(4), aneurysmal bone cyst(3), synovial sarcoma(3), chondroblastoma(2), soft tissue tuberculous abscess(2), hematoma(2), hemangioma (1), neurilemmoma(1), metastasis(1), malignant fibrous histiocytoma(1), bursitis(1), pyogenic abscess(1), and epidermoid inclusion cyst(1). Fourteen benign tumors and ten malignant, three abscesses, and the epidermoid inclusion cyst showed only one fluid-fluid level in a unilocular cyst. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensities of fluid varied, but on T2-weighted images, superior layers were in most cases more hyperintense than inferior layers. Because fluid-fluid layers are a nonspecific finding, it is difficult to specifically diagnose each disease according to the number of fluid-fluid levels or signal intensity of fluid. In spite of the nonspecificity of fluid-fluid levels, they were frequently seen in cases of giant cell tumor, telangiectatic osteosarcoma, aneurysmal bone cycle, and synovial sarcoma. Nontumorous diseases such abscesses and hematomas also demonstrated this finding. (author). 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  20. External Snapping Hip Syndrome: Emphasis on the MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Eun; Lee, Bae Young; Sung, Mi Sook; Lee, Ki Haeng; Yoo, Won Jong; Lim, Hyun Wook; Chung, Myung Hee; Park, Jeong Mi; Kim, Jee Young

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the MR imaging features of patients with external snapping hip syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 63 hip MR images. The images were analyzed according to the thickness and contour of the iliotibial band and the gluteus maximus, the presence of bone marrow edema, bursitis, joint effusion and other associated findings. The MR imaging of 22 hips with snapping hip syndrome depicted the causes of external snapping hip syndrome in twenty cases (90%). The MR imaging features of the snapping hip included thickening of the iliotibial band in twelve cases (55%) and/or thickening of the anterior band of the gluteus maximus in nineteen (86%), and a wavy contour of the iliotibial band or the anterior band of the gluteus maximus in ten cases (45%). These findings show a significant p value (<0.01). The majority of patients with snapping hip syndrome revealed thickening of the iliotibial band, thickening of the anterior band of the gluteus maximus and wavy contour of the those structures on MR imaging

  1. A Large Rice Body-Containing Cyst Mimicking Infection following Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Bayoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Soft tissue mass following total hip arthroplasty raises several differential diagnoses not limited to infection, hematoma, wear debris, malignancy, and bursitis. Rice body formation in the hip region is an uncommon process denoting a chronic inflammation. We report here the second case of its kind in the medical literature of a wide symptomatic rice-like body cyst complicating a total hip arthroplasty. Case Presentation. This is the case of an 82-year-old white female, presenting with a warm, red, and inflated groin five years after revision of right total hip arthroplasty. Surgical intervention reveals a large well circumscribed cyst containing well-organized rice-like bodies. This eventuality was never reported in differential diagnosis of hip periprosthetic soft tissue masses before. Conclusion. This case report helps widening the array of the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with a slow growing soft tissue mass following total hip arthroplasty, making rice-like bodies cyst a valid one to consider.

  2. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R.; Steinbach, Lynne S.

    2004-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  3. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Rt. 140, 101 The City Drive ZC 5005, CA 92868-3298, Orange (United States); Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R. [College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  4. Radiographic features of tuberculous osteitis in greater trochanter and lschium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, So Hee; Lee, Ye Ri; Kim, Dong Jin; Sung, Ki Jun; Lim, Jong Nam

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate, if possible, the radiographic features of tuberculous osteitis in the greater trochanter and ischium, and to determine the cause of the lesions. We reterospectively reviewed the plain radiographic findings of 14 ptients with histologically proven tuberculous osteitis involving the greater trochanter and ischium. In each case, the following were analyzed:morphology of bone destruction, including cortical erosion;periosteal reaction;presence or abscence of calcific shadows in adjacent soft tissue. On the basis of an analysis of radiographic features and correlation of the anatomy with adjacent structures we attempted to determine causes. Of the 14 cases evaluated, 12 showed varrious degrees of extrinsic erosion on the outer cortical bone of the greater trochanter and ischium ; in two cases, bone destruction was so severe that the radiographic features of advanced perforated osteomyelitis were simulated. In addition to findings of bone destruction, in these twelve cases, the presence of sequestrum or calcific shadows was seen in adjacent soft tissue. Tuberculous osteitis in the greater trochanter and ischium showed the characteristic findings of chronic extrinsic erosion. On the basis of these findings we can suggest that these lesions result from an extrinsic pathophysiologic cause such as adjacent bursitis

  5. Fluid-fluid level on MR image: significance in Musculoskeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Kyung Won; Han, Sang Wook; Kang, Heung Sik

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency, number and signal intensity of fluid-fluid levels of musculoskeletal diseases on MR images, and to determine the usefulness of this information for the differentiation of musculoskeletal diseases. MR images revealed fluid-fluid levels in the following diseases : giant cell tumor(6), telangiectatic osteosarcoma(4), aneurysmal bone cyst(3), synovial sarcoma(3), chondroblastoma(2), soft tissue tuberculous abscess(2), hematoma(2), hemangioma (1), neurilemmoma(1), metastasis(1), malignant fibrous histiocytoma(1), bursitis(1), pyogenic abscess(1), and epidermoid inclusion cyst(1). Fourteen benign tumors and ten malignant, three abscesses, and the epidermoid inclusion cyst showed only one fluid-fluid level in a unilocular cyst. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensities of fluid varied, but on T2-weighted images, superior layers were in most cases more hyperintense than inferior layers. Because fluid-fluid layers are a nonspecific finding, it is difficult to specifically diagnose each disease according to the number of fluid-fluid levels or signal intensity of fluid. In spite of the nonspecificity of fluid-fluid levels, they were frequently seen in cases of giant cell tumor, telangiectatic osteosarcoma, aneurysmal bone cycle, and synovial sarcoma. Nontumorous diseases such abscesses and hematomas also demonstrated this finding. (author). 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  6. Polymyalgia Rheumatica Revealing a Lymphoma: A Two-Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Verhoeven

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR is one of the most common inflammatory rheumatism types in elderly population. The link between cancer and PMR is a matter of debate. Methods. We report two cases of PMR leading to the diagnosis of lymphoma and the growing interest of PET-TDM in this indication. Results. A 84-year-old man known for idiopathic neutropenia presented an inflammatory arthromyalgia of the limb girdle since one month. Blood exams highlighted the presence of a monoclonal B cell clone. Bone marrow concluded to a B cell lymphoma of the marginal zone. He was successfully treated with 0.3 mg/kg/d of prednisone, and response was sustained after 6 months. A 73-year-old man known for prostatic neoplasia in remission for 5 years presented arthromyalgia of the limb girdle since one month. PET-CT revealed bursitis of the hips and the shoulders, no prostatic cancer recurrence, and a metabolically active iliac lymphadenopathy whose pathologic exam concluded to a low grade follicular lymphoma. He was successfully treated with 0.3 mg/kg/d of prednisone. Conclusion. These observations may imply that lymphoma is sometimes already present when PMR is diagnosed and PET-CT is a useful tool in the initial assessment of PMR to avoid missing neoplasia.

  7. Multiple intramedullary nailing of proximal phalangeal fractures of hand

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    Patankar Hemant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proximal phalangeal fractures are commonly encountered fractures in the hand. Majority of them are stable and can be treated by non-operative means. However, unstable fractures i.e. those with shortening, displacement, angulation, rotational deformity or segmental fractures need surgical intervention. This prospective study was undertaken to evaluate the functional outcome after surgical stabilization of these fractures with joint-sparing multiple intramedullary nailing technique. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with 35 isolated unstable proximal phalangeal shaft fractures of hand were managed by surgical stabilization with multiple intramedullary nailing technique. Fractures of the thumb were excluded. All the patients were followed up for a minimum of six months. They were assessed radiologically and clinically. The clinical evaluation was based on two criteria. 1. total active range of motion for digital functional assessment as suggested by the American Society for Surgery of Hand and 2. grip strength. Results: All the patients showed radiological union at six weeks. The overall results were excellent in all the patients. Adventitious bursitis was observed at the point of insertion of nails in one patient. Conclusion: Joint-sparing multiple intramedullary nailing of unstable proximal phalangeal fractures of hand provides satisfactory results with good functional outcome and fewer complications.

  8. Oxaprozin: Synthesis, SAR study, physico-chemical characteristics and pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božić Bojan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaprozin (3-(4,5-difeniloksazol-2-ylpropanoic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID used in the treatment of numerous inflammatory musculoskeletal diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, tendonitis, ankylosing spondylitis and bursitis. It is the first representative member of the diaryl-substituted heterocyclic compounds, which have found clinical use as selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors. U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved its official use in 1992. Both anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of oxaprozin are mainly due to the potent inhibition of COX. However, oxaprozin-induced benefits might be also regulated by other COX-independent pathways. It has been shown that oxaprozin induced direct proapoptotic effects in CD40L-treated human monocytes independently of COX inhibition. It also has several advantages in the treatment of inflammatory diseases in comparison to other NSAIDs such as aspirin, naproxen, indomethacin and phenylbutazone, which enabled oxaprozin to become one of the most used NSAIDs in America. Oxaprozin, as other members of the group of NSAIDs, can cause gastrointestinal complications, but significantly lower due to relatively high pKa value. In this paper, importance of oxaprozin in the treatment of arthritis and its pharmacokinetic properties were described, therewith its activity and side effects were compared with other commercially available anti-inflammatory drugs.

  9. Radiographic features of tuberculous osteitis in greater trochanter and lschium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, So Hee; Lee, Ye Ri [Hanil Hospital Affiliated to KEPCO, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Jin; Sung, Ki Jun [Yonsei Univ. Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jong Nam [Konkuk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate, if possible, the radiographic features of tuberculous osteitis in the greater trochanter and ischium, and to determine the cause of the lesions. We reterospectively reviewed the plain radiographic findings of 14 ptients with histologically proven tuberculous osteitis involving the greater trochanter and ischium. In each case, the following were analyzed:morphology of bone destruction, including cortical erosion;periosteal reaction;presence or abscence of calcific shadows in adjacent soft tissue. On the basis of an analysis of radiographic features and correlation of the anatomy with adjacent structures we attempted to determine causes. Of the 14 cases evaluated, 12 showed varrious degrees of extrinsic erosion on the outer cortical bone of the greater trochanter and ischium ; in two cases, bone destruction was so severe that the radiographic features of advanced perforated osteomyelitis were simulated. In addition to findings of bone destruction, in these twelve cases, the presence of sequestrum or calcific shadows was seen in adjacent soft tissue. Tuberculous osteitis in the greater trochanter and ischium showed the characteristic findings of chronic extrinsic erosion. On the basis of these findings we can suggest that these lesions result from an extrinsic pathophysiologic cause such as adjacent bursitis.

  10. Evaluation of a PCR multiplex for detection and differentiation of Mycoplasma synoviae, M. gallisepticum, and M. gallisepticum strain F-vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Mettifogo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS are the mycoplasma infections of most concern for commercial poultry industry. MG infection is commonly designated as chronic respiratory disease (CRD of chickens and infections sinusitis of turkeys. MS causes sub clinical upper respiratory infection and tenosynovitis or bursitis in chickens and turkeys. The multiplex PCR was standardized to detect simultaneously the MS, MG field strains and MG F-vaccine strain specific. The generic PCR for detection of any species of Mollicutes Class was performed and compared to the multiplex PCR and to PCR using species-specific primers. A total of 129 avian tracheal swabs were collected from broiler-breeders, layer hens and broilers in seven different farms and were examined by multiplex PCR methods. The system (multiplex PCR demonstrated to be very rapid, sensitive, and specific. Therefore, the results showed a high prevalence of MS in the flocks examined (27.9%, and indicate that the MS is a recurrent pathogen in Brazilian commercial poultry flocks.

  11. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome in Iranian Female Athletes

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    Hamid Reza Baradaran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is the most common overuse syndrome in athletes. It is one of the causes of anterior knee pain in athletic population who come to the sports medicine clinic. Patellofemoral pain is more common among female athletes especially adolescents and young adults. Symptoms include: persistent pain behind the patella or peripatella. Pain increases on ascending and descending stairs and squatting and prolonged sitting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PFPS in Iranian female athletes. 418 female athletes aged 15-35 years were examined in five sports: Soccer (190, volleyball (103, running (42, fencing (45 and rock climbing (38. The athletes who had non- traumatic onset anterior knee pain of at least 3 months that increased in descending and ascending stairs and squatting, had no other causes of anterior knee pain such as ligament instability, bursitis, meniscal injury, tendonitis and arthritis and no history of knee surgery during the one past year were diagnosed as PFPS. 26/190 (13.68 % soccer players, 21/103(20.38 % volleyball players, 7/42 (16.66 % runners, 6/45(13.33 % fencers and 10/38 (26.31% rock climbers had patellofemoral pain. Among the 418 female athletes who were evaluated 70 had PFPS. Rock climbers were the most common athletes with PFPS followed by volleyball players and runners.

  12. Diagnostic imaging of sacroiliac joints and the spine in the course of spondyloarthropathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudoł-Szopinska, Iwona; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Spondyloarthropathies belong to a group of rheumatic diseases, in which inflammatory changes affect mainly the sacroiliac joints, spine, peripheral joints, tendon, ligaments and capsule attachments (entheses). This group includes 6 entities: ankylosing spondylitis, arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease, reactive arthritis, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis and juvenile spondyloarthropathy. In 2009, ASAS (Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society) association, published classification criteria for spondyloarthropathies, which propose standardization of clinical-diagnostic approach in the case of sacroiliitis, spondylitis and arthritis. Radiological diagnosis of inflammatory changes of sacroiliac joints is based on a 4 step radiographic grading method from 1966. According to modified New York criteria, the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis is made based on the presence of advanced lesions, sacroiliitis of at least 2 grade bilaterally or 3–4 unilaterally. In case of other types of spondyloarthropathies diagnosis is made based on presence of at least grade 1 changes. In MRI, active inflammation of sacroiliac joints is indicated by the presence of subchondral bone marrow edema, synovitis, bursitis, or enthesitis. ASAS discusses only the classic form of axial spondyloarthropathies, which is ankylosing spondylitis. To quantify radiological inflammatory changes in the course of the disease, Stoke Ankylosing spondylitis classification Spinal Score (SASSS) is recommended. The signs of inflammation and scarrying of the spinal cord in the course of ankylosing spondylitis, present in MRI include: bone marrow edema, sclerosis, fat metaplasia, formation of syndesmophytes, and ankylosis

  13. Phaeohyphomycosis infection in the knee

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    David Sadigursky

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phaeohyphomycosis is caused by cutaneous fungi and rarely affects large joints. This is a case report on phaeohyphomycosis in the left knee of an elderly individual without immunosuppression. It was accompanied by pain and swelling the anterior knee. The case was first suspected to be suprapatellar bursitis, and was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without remission of symptoms. Surgical treatment was performed, with resection of the suprapatellar bursa and anterior region of the quadriceps tendon. The material was sent for anatomopathological examination and culturing. The pathological examination showed phaeohyphomycosis. The treatment instituted consisted of itraconazole, 200 mg/day for six weeks, and complete remission of symptoms was achieved. The physical examination remained normal after one year of follow-up. This is the first published case of phaeohyphomycosis infection in the suprapatellar region of the knee. Although almost all the cases reported have been associated with immunosuppressed patients, this was an exception. It is important to suspect phaeohyphomycosis in cases of knee infection, in the area of the suprapatellar bursa, when the symptoms do not resolve after clinical treatment.

  14. The support of the ultrasonography of the shoulder in the diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica with normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate

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    G. Frisone

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR is a cronic inflammatory syndrome that affects the elderly population and whose diagnosis is mainly based on clinical criteria taking little advantage of the latest innovatory methods of diagnostic imaging, for instance ultrasonography. Although it is generally characterised by increasing of inflammation values as well as pain and stiffness on the shoulder and pelvic girdles, there is a significant percentage of patients with PMR whose erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR is normal; in this case to make a diagnosis is difficult. The purpose of our study is to demonstrate how useful ultrasound investigations on the shoulders joints could be in order to make a diagnosis of PMR, especially for those patients with atypical normal ESR. Our case control study included 23 patients with atypical PMR and 88 patients with standard symptomatic PMR; both groups underwent shoulder ultrasound scans before receiving steroid therapy. As it has been previously shown, the ultrasound method is able to detect distinctive aspects in the joints and tissues of the patients with PMR; so that we could find that 90% of the patients with PMR of both groups suffered from bilateral subdeltoid bursitis. This disorder is seldom found in healthy people and consequently its presence could be considered a useful diagnostic test/check for/of PMR independently from ESR values.

  15. MRI for the diagnosis of scapular dyskinesis: a report of two cases

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    Morita, Wataru; Tasaki, Atsushi [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokyo (Japan); Nozaki, Taiki [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Scapular dyskinesis describes the altered position of the scapula and/or abnormal movements of the scapulothoracic joint. It is caused by bony anatomical variations, bursitis, tumors, and muscular pathological conditions including loss of innervation and fibrosis. Scapular dyskinesis is just as often subclinical as it is symptomatic, and as the periscapular anatomical changes may not result in patient symptoms, a precise diagnosis of the etiology and pathophysiology has been a challenge. Scapular bony prominence is a common etiology of scapular dyskinesis, but does not always result in morbidity. We report a case of a 39-year-old man in whom an extensive MRI with fluid-sensitive imaging sequences covering the whole of the scapula was beneficial in diagnosing the inflammation adjacent to the bony deformity, which confirmed the etiology of scapular dyskinesis. Furthermore, in a 41-year old man without any anatomical variances, a similar MRI showed inflammation at the subscapular fossa that suggested altered scapular kinematics. An arthroscopic debridement of the lesion improved the symptoms. MRI in conjunction with plain radiographs, CT and physical examination enabled a precise diagnosis of the etiology. Fluid-sensitive MR images are important in defining the presence of inflammation, and are beneficial in determining the pathological significance of findings through other diagnostic measures. (orig.)

  16. External Snapping Hip Syndrome: Emphasis on the MR Imaging

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    Choi, Jung Eun; Lee, Bae Young [Catholic University St. Paul' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Mi Sook; Lee, Ki Haeng; Yoo, Won Jong; Lim, Hyun Wook; Chung, Myung Hee [Catholic University Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jee Young [Catholic University St. Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the MR imaging features of patients with external snapping hip syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 63 hip MR images. The images were analyzed according to the thickness and contour of the iliotibial band and the gluteus maximus, the presence of bone marrow edema, bursitis, joint effusion and other associated findings. The MR imaging of 22 hips with snapping hip syndrome depicted the causes of external snapping hip syndrome in twenty cases (90%). The MR imaging features of the snapping hip included thickening of the iliotibial band in twelve cases (55%) and/or thickening of the anterior band of the gluteus maximus in nineteen (86%), and a wavy contour of the iliotibial band or the anterior band of the gluteus maximus in ten cases (45%). These findings show a significant p value (<0.01). The majority of patients with snapping hip syndrome revealed thickening of the iliotibial band, thickening of the anterior band of the gluteus maximus and wavy contour of the those structures on MR imaging.

  17. Veal calves’ clinical/health status in large groups fed with automatic feeding devices

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    Giulio Cozzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the current study was to evaluate the clinical/health status of veal calves in 3 farms that adopt large group housing and automatic feeding stations in Italy. Visits were scheduled in three phases of the rearing cycle (early, middle, and end. Results showed a high incidence of coughing, skin infection and bloated rumen particularly in the middle phase while cross-sucking signs were present at the early stage when calves’ nibbling proclivity is still high. Throughout the rearing cycle, the frequency of bursitis increased reaching 53% of calves at the end. The percentage of calves with a poorer body condition than the mid-range of the batch raised gradually as well, likely due to the non-proportioned teat/calves ratio that increases competition for feed and reduces milk intake of the low ranking animals. The remarked growth differences among pen-mates and the mortality rate close to 7% showed by the use of automatic feeding devices for milk delivery seem not compensating the lower labour demand, therefore its sustainability at the present status is doubtful both for the veal calves’ welfare and the farm incomes.

  18. The pathogenecity of H5N1 highly pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI virus clade 2.3.2. in Indonesian indigenous chicken by contact tranmission with infected duck

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    R. Damayanti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental transmission study was conducted using nine healthy Indonesian indigenous chickens placed together with two 30 days old ducks which were experimentally infected with H5N1 HPAI clade 2.3.2 virus in the Biosafety Laboratory Level 3 (BSL-3 facilities. The aim of the study was to find out the pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI virus clade 2.3.2 in Indonesian indigenous chickens. The study showed that within twenty four hours rearing, the chickens were exhibited mild clinical signs and by 48 hours, all of the chickens died, whereas the ducks survived but with severe clinical signs. The H5N1 HPAI virus has been successfully isolated from chickens and ducks swabs, confirming that those animals were infected by the virus. Histologically, the infected chicken encountered with severe inflammation reaction namely non suppuratives encephalitis, tracheitis, myocarditis, interstitial pneumonia, hepatitis, proventriculitis, enteritis, pancreatitis, nephritis and bursitis. Necrotizing spleen and pancreas were also prominent. Viral antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry staining in various affected visceral organs. This suggests that Indonesian indigenous chickens were susceptible to H5N1 HPAI virus clade 2.3.2 and it can be transmitted easily to Indonesian indigenous chickens by contact transmission with infected ducks.

  19. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klontzas, Michail E.; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D.; Vagios, Ilias; Karantanas, Apostolos H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: Comparison of low-field and high-field strength units

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    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Feist, Eugen [Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Minden, Kirsten [Helios Clinics, 2nd Children' s Hospital Berlin-Buch, Rheumatology Unit, Berlin (Germany); German Rheumatology Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Schink, Tania [Department of Medical Biometry, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany); Hermann, Kay-Geert A. [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: kgh@charite.de

    2008-01-15

    Objective: To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Materials and methods: Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39 {+-} 1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. Results: MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot involvement in patients with spondyloarthritides: Comparison of low-field and high-field strength units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E.; Feist, Eugen; Minden, Kirsten; Schink, Tania; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare MRI evaluation of a painful hindfoot of patients with spondyloarthritides (SpA) on low-field (0.2 T) versus high-field (1.5 T) MRI. Materials and methods: Patients with SpA and hindfoot pain were randomly referred to either high-field or low-field MRI. Twenty-seven patients were evaluated (male/female: 17:10; mean age: 39 ± 1.4 years). Fifteen patients were examined by low-field and 12 by high-field MRI. Two patients (evaluated by high-field MRI) were excluded. Images were separately read by two radiologists who later reached a consensus. In each patient the prevalence of erosions, fluid, synovitis or bone marrow edema of the hindfoot joints, tendinosis or tenosynovitis of tendons, enthesitis of the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon and retrocalcaneal bursitis were recorded. Clinical and demographic parameters were comparable between both groups. Results: MRI evaluation of joints and tendons of the hindfoot revealed no significant differences in patients with SpA groups for all parameters. Analyzing all joints or tendons together, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: Low-field and high-field MRI provide comparable information for evaluation of inflammatory hindfoot involvement. Thus, low-field MRI can be considered as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of hindfoot abnormalities in SpA patients

  2. Foot Disability in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Clinical and Ultrasonographic Assessment

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    Erkan Mesci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to perform a clinical and ultrasonographic assessment of foot disability and related factors among patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Material and Method: The study enrolled 40 patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis (AS according to the modified New York criteria and 30 matched healthy controls. In addition to the assessments for Disease activity (BASDAI and functional status (BASFI, foot functioning was evaluated using the Foot Function Index (FFI and quality of life using the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL questionnaire. Thickness of plantar fascia (PF and Achilles tendon (AT, changes in echogenicity and presence of bone erosions, entesophytes and bursitis were examined using ultrasound. Results: The mean age of patients was 39.9 ± 10.4 years and median disease duration was 48 (1-288 months. Sixteen patients (40% had foot pain. Thirteen patients (32.5% had clinical evidence for enthesitis. Thirty patients (75% showed at least one pathological finding at ultrasonographic examination. Mean FFI score was higher in the AS group versus control group (p

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Asymptomatic Knees in Collegiate Basketball Players: The Effect of One Season of Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, George P; Vogelsong, Melissa A; Staroswiecki, Ernesto; Gold, Garry E; Safran, Marc R

    2016-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of abnormal structural findings using 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the asymptomatic knees of male and female collegiate basketball players before and after a season of high-intensity basketball. Institutional review board-approved prospective case series. Asymptomatic knees of 24 NCAA Division I collegiate basketball players (12 male, 12 female) were imaged using a 3.0-T MRI scanner before and after the end of the competitive season. Three subjects did not undergo scanning after the season. Images were evaluated for prepatellar bursitis, fat pad edema, patellar and quadriceps tendinopathy, bone marrow edema, and articular cartilage and meniscal injury. Every knee imaged had at least 1 structural abnormality both preseason and postseason. A high preseason and postseason prevalence of fat pad edema (75% and 81%), patellar tendinopathy (83% and 90%), and quadriceps tendinopathy (75% and 90%) was seen. Intrameniscal signal change was observed in 50% preseason knees and 62% of postseason knees, but no discrete tears were found. Bone marrow edema was seen in 75% and 86% of knees in the preseason and postseason, respectively. Cartilage findings were observed in 71% and 81% of knees in the preseason and postseason, respectively. The cartilage injury score increased significantly in the postseason compared with the preseason (P = 0.0009). A high prevalence of abnormal knee MRI findings was observed in a population of asymptomatic young elite athletes. These preliminary data suggest that high-intensity basketball may have potentially deleterious effects on articular cartilage.

  4. Leprae reaction resembling rheumatologic disease as presenting feature of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharuddin, Hazlyna; Taib, Tarita; Zain, Mollyza Mohd; Ch'ng, Shereen

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae with predominant involvement of skin and nerves. We present a 70-year-old man with leprosy whose initial presentation resembled rheumatologic disease, due to leprae reaction. He presented with an 8-week history of worsening neuropathic pain in the right forearm, associated with necrotic skin lesions on his fingers that had ulcerated. Physical examination revealed two tender necrotic ulcers at the tip of the right middle finger and the dorsal aspect of the left middle finger. The patient had right wrist tenosynovitis and right elbow bursitis. Apart from raised inflammatory markers, the investigations for infection, connective tissue disease, vasculitis, thromboembolic disease and malignancy were negative. During the fourth week of hospitalization, we noticed a 2-cm hypoesthetic indurated plaque on the right inner arm. Further examination revealed thickened bilateral ulnar, radial and popliteal nerves. A slit skin smear was negative. Two skin biopsies and a biopsy of the olecranon bursa revealed granulomatous inflammation. He was diagnosed with paucibacillary leprosy with neuritis. He responded well to multidrug therapy and prednisolone; his symptoms resolved over a few weeks. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing a case of leprosy with atypical presentation in a non-endemic country. © 2016 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Caused by a Voluminous Subdeltoid Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Murray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right shoulder. Despite a well-followed 6-months physiotherapy program, the patient was still suffering from his right shoulder. The MRI scan revealed a well-circumscribed 6 cm × 2 cm × 5 cm homogenous lesion compatible with a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma. The mass was excised en bloc, and subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed a benign lipoma. At 6-months follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with a complete return to his activities. Based on this case and a review of the literature, a subacromial lipoma has to be included in the differential diagnosis of a subacromial impingement syndrome refractory to nonoperative treatment. Complementary imaging modalities are required only after a failed conservative management to assess the exact etiology and successfully direct the surgical treatment.

  6. Health conditions of prisoners in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza; Ribeiro, Adalgisa Peixoto

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a quantitative and qualitative study on the living conditions and health of prisoners in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The goal was to produce strategic information to support the action of public officials who work in prisons. The results show that prisoners are young (average age: 30 years), poor, mostly black and brown (70.5%), have little education (only 1.5% of them have a higher education), and have been in prison for less than four years. Among the problems that indirectly affect their health, we emphasize: overcrowding (1.39 prisoners per one vacancy), idleness (only 4.4% of them work), lack of perspective, violence and relationships of conflict. The most common physical health problems include: musculoskeletal problems, such as pain in the neck, back, and spine (76.7%), joint dislocation (28.2%), bursitis (22.9%), sciatica (22, 1%), arthritis (15.9%), bone fracture (15.3%), problems with bone and cartilage (12.5%), and muscle and tendon injuries (15.7%); respiratory problems, such as sinusitis (55.6%), allergic rhinitis (47%), chronic bronchitis (15.6%), tuberculosis (4.7%) and others (11.9%); and skin diseases. Despite legal requirements that include prison health care among the Universal Health System's (SUS) obligations, services are scarce and inefficient and a major cause of inmate dissatisfaction.

  7. Shockwave treatment for musculoskeletal diseases and bone consolidation: qualitative analysis of the literature

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    Paulo Kertzman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shockwave treatment is an option within orthopedics. The exact mechanism through which shockwaves function for treating musculoskeletal diseases is unknown. The aim of this study was to make a qualitative analysis on the effectiveness of shockwave treatment among patients with musculoskeletal pathological conditions and pseudarthrosis. Searches were conducted in the Cochrane Library, Medline and Lilacs databases. Thirty-nine studies that reported using shockwave treatment for musculoskeletal diseases were found. Their results varied greatly, as did the types of protocol used. The studies that evaluated the effectiveness of shockwave treatment for lateral epicondylitis, shoulder tendinopathy, knee osteoarthrosis, femoral head osteonecrosis and trochanteric bursitis reported inconsistent results for most of their patients. Those that evaluated patients with calcifying tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy and pseudarthrosis showed benefits. Shockwave treatment is a safe and non-invasive method for chronic cases in which conventional techniques have been unsatisfactory and should be used in association with other treatment methods for tendinopathy. Further quality studies are needed.

  8. Detection of soft tissue pathology on the blood pool phase of bone scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondo, A.J.; Turner, H.A.; Kitchener, M.I.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: It is important to optimize information obtained from isotope bone scanning in musculoskeletal imaging. Although important at all times, it is especially imperative in the current climate of health services rationalization, capping of imaging expenditure and the promotion of newer modalities that are increasingly versatile and sensitive for imaging the musculoskeletal system. Careful attention must be paid to the blood flow and blood pool images, to visualize soft tissue as well as bony pathology. A series of cases and images will be presented that demonstrated blood pool pathology that was not appreciated on delayed imaging, or where reliance only on the delayed images would have led to an incorrect diagnosis. These include the detection of tendonitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, muscle tears and soft tissue neoplasms, including neuromas. In cases where the bone scan cannot provide a definitive diagnosis, it will at least direct the referring clinician to the most appropriate confirmatory diagnostic imaging modality, thus reinforcing the value that isotope imaging provides in musculoskeletal medicine

  9. Articular manifestations in patients with Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-López, María Esther; Díez-Morrondo, Carolina; Sánchez-Andrade, Amalia; Pego-Reigosa, Robustiano; Díaz, Pablo; Castro-Gago, Manuel

    To determine the percentage of Lyme patients with articular manifestations in NW Spain and to know their evolution and response to treatment. A retrospective study (2006-2013) was performed using medical histories of confirmed cases of Lyme disease showing articular manifestations. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the treatment and evolution of the patients, were analysed. Seventeen out of 108 LD confirmed patients (15.7%) showed articular manifestations. Regarding those 17 patients, 64.7%, 29.4% and 5.9% presented arthritis, arthralgia and bursitis, respectively. The knee was the most affected joint. Articular manifestations were often associated to neurological, dermatological and cardiac pathologies. Otherwise, most patients were in Stage III. The 11.8% of the cases progressed to a recurrent chronic arthritis despite the administration of an appropriate treatment. Lyme disease patients showing articular manifestations should be included in the diagnosis of articular affections in areas of high risk of hard tick bite, in order to establish a suitable and early treatment and to avoid sequels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. MRI findings in renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim; Basaran, Ceyla; Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan; Uyusur, Arzu; Tarhan, Nefise Cagla; Muhtesem Agildere, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the MRI findings of renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain and to investigate the most common etiology of pain. Materials and methods: 69 hip MRIs of 57 patients with hip pain and 30 knee MRIs of 24 patients with knee pain with no history of trauma were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: In the evaluation of hip MRIs, 24 patients had avascular necrosis and effusion, 2 patients had bone marrow edema consistent with early stage of avascular necrosis. 18 patients had only intraarticular effusion, 6 patients had tendinitis, 6 patients had bursitis and 1 patient had soft tissue abscess. Five patients had muscle edema and five patients had muscle atrophy as additional findings to the primary pathologies. Among patients with knee pain, nine patients had degenerative joint disease. Seven patients had chondromalacia, five had bone marrow edema, six had meniscal tear, six had ligament rupture and two had bone infarct. Three of the patients had muscle edema accompanying to other pathologies. Conclusion: The most common etiology of hip pain in renal transplant recipients is avascular necrosis as expected, intraarticular effusion is found to be Second reason for pain. However, knee pain is explained by ligament pathology, meniscal tear, chondromalacia or degenerative joint disease rather than osteonecrosis.

  11. Decline causes of Koalas in South East Queensland, Australia: a 17-year retrospective study of mortality and morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Astudillo, Viviana; Allavena, Rachel; McKinnon, Allan; Larkin, Rebecca; Henning, Joerg

    2017-02-01

    Koala populations are in catastrophic decline in certain eastern Australian regions. Spanning from 1997-2013, a database derived from wildlife hospitals in southeast Queensland with N = 20,250 entries was classified by causes of morbidity and mortality. A total of 11 aetiologies were identified, with chlamydiosis, trauma, and wasting being most common. The clinical diagnosis at submission varied significantly over the observation period. Combinations of aetiologies were observed in 39% of koalas submitted, with chlamydiosis frequently co-occurring. Urogenital (cystitis 26.8%, bursitis 13.5%) and ocular (conjunctivitis 17.2%) chlamydiosis were the most frequently diagnosed representations of the infection. Approximately 26% of submissions comprised koalas involved in vehicle accidents that were otherwise healthy. Age and sex of the koala as well as season and submission period were compared for the case outcomes of ‘dead on arrival’, ‘euthanized’, or ‘released’ for the four most common clinical diagnoses using multinomial logistic regression models. Exploratory space-time permutation scans were performed and overlapping space-time clusters for chlamydiosis, motor vehicle traumas and wasting unveiled high risk areas for koala disease and injury. Our results suggest that these aetiologies are acting jointly as multifactorial determinants for the continuing decline of koalas.

  12. MR imaging as a problem solving tool in posterior ankle pain: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Gloria N.L.; Tan, Tien Jin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Conditions causing posterior ankle pain may occur in isolation or in co-existence. • Identification of the causative pathology is therefore often difficult. • The pathology and MR imaging findings of common causative conditions are discussed. • MRI aids accurate and timely diagnoses in cases of posterior ankle pain. - Abstract: Posterior ankle pain is a cause of chronic pain and disability, afflicting a wide range of individuals. While proper identification of the cause is essential for timely and adequate treatment, identifying the cause and excluding mimickers is often challenging for the physician due to the complex nature of the joint. In addition, pathology that can cause posterior ankle pain may occur on their own or in co-existence. Clinical conditions that can present as posterior ankle pain include: posterior ankle impingement, Achilles tendon pathology, medial flexor tendon pathology, peroneal pathology, retrocalcaneal bursitis, posterior subtalar tarsal coalition, sinus tarsi, and tarsal tunnel syndrome. In this review we introduce current concepts of pathophysiology in the main conditions involved in posterior ankle pain, and review the role of MR in the diagnosis and management of each condition. When pathology can be detected earlier and with more specificity, appropriate and time-sensitive treatment can be commenced, thus improving clinical outcomes.

  13. MR patterns of rotator cuff impingement lesions and histopathologic correlation of cadaver tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, M.; Firooznia, H.; Minkoff, J.; Sherman, O.; Schinella, R.; Weinreb, J.C.; Golimbu, C.; Zazlav, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports shoulder MR examinations of 250 patients retrospectively evaluated and correlated with surgical/arthrographic results in 68 patients and with clinical data in all for assessment of the signal pattern and the configuration of rotator cuff lesions. MR-histopathologic evaluation of the supraspinatus tendon of 8 cadaver shoulders was also correlated with these findings. MR imaging had a sensitivity of 92% in the diagnosis of cuff tears. The most common and accurate criterion for a tear was a tendinous defect, characterized by intense signal on T2-weighted images; less often the torn region consisted of an extremely degenerated and attenuated tendon or was obscured by scar. Presence of secondary findings was mandatory for diagnosis in the latter group. Signal pattern associated with tendonitis varied, and in some simulated that of tendon degeneration (fatty infiltration and fibrillation) or cellular proliferation observed on anatomic specimens. Associated tendinous enlargement and subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis in these patients best correlated with the severity of clinical and surgical findings

  14. Retrospective Evaluation Of MRI Findings Of Knee Joint In 255 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Mete

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Retrospective evaluation of knee MRI obtained from 255 cases and to demonstrate most common knee joint pathologies in our region.In our study knee joints of 255 cases who admitted to different clinics of our hospital with various complains of knee between October 1996 and December 1998 were examined in wide spectrum with MRI. Via 1.0 Tesla MRI device and special knee coil in sagittal, coronal and axial plains MRI images were obtained. The number of male and female patients were 173 and 82 and their ages were ranged between 14 and 70, and the mean age was 3413.The most common knee pathologies were intra-articular fluid (%58.04, medial (%46,66 and lateral (%12.55 meniscal injuries, anterior cruciate ligament injury (%17.25 and osteoarthritis (%14.9. The other important lesions were degeneration of medial and lateral meniscus, Baker’s cyst, bursitis, posterior cruciate ligament injury , medial and lateral collateral ligament injuries, synovial hypertrophy, chondromalasia of patella, and contusion.In our images of knee the most common lesions were injuries of meniscus and ligament. Because of being noninvasive technique for knee joint pathologies, capacity of multiplanar imaging, high contrast resolution and chance of detailed anatomic evaluation MR imaging was found to be most appropriate imaging technique for knee joint pathologies.

  15. Rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeau, I.; Doursounian, L.; Maigne, J.Y.; Guinet, C.; Meary, E.; Buy, J.N.; Touzard, R.C.; Vadrot, D.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1989-01-01

    Fifteen volunteers and 73 patients with suspected rotator cuff lesions were examined at 0.5 T with T2 * -weighted gradient-echo (GE) MR imaging (700/33/30 degrees) (oblique coronal and sagittal 3 mm thick, surface coil). Results were compared with those of arthrography (all cases), T1-weighted GE imaging (400/20/90 degrees) (35 cases), surgery (28 cases), and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) images (2,000/60-120) (17 cases). GE images demonstrated all tears (complete, 32, partial, 12) and was superior to arthrography in determining site and size and in displaying muscles (critical point in surgical planning). In 20 cases without tears on arthrography, GE imaging demonstrated five cases of tendinitis, five cases of bursitis, and six probable intratendinous or superficial partial tears. T2 * -weighted GE imaging was superior to T2-weighted SE and T1-weighted GE imaging, with higher fluid contrast and a low fat signal. Therefore, it might replace arthrography in the diagnosis and surgical approach to this pathology

  16. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D., E-mail: ioannis.akoumianakis@gmail.com; Vagios, Ilias, E-mail: iliasvagios@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  17. Sport specialization's association with an increased risk of developing anterior knee pain in adolescent female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Randon; Barber Foss, Kim; Hewett, Timothy E; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-02-01

    To determine if sport specialization increases the risk of anterior knee pain in adolescent female athletes. Retrospective cohort epidemiology study. Female basketball, soccer, and volleyball players (N = 546) were recruited from a single county public school district in Kentucky consisting of 5 middle schools and 4 high schools. A total of 357 multisport and 189 single-sport (66 basketball, 57 soccer, and 66 volleyball) athlete subjects were included due to their diagnosis of patellofemoral pain (PFP) on physical exam. Testing consisted of a standardized history and physician-administered physical examination to determine the presence of PFP. This study compared self-reported multisport athletes with sport-specialized athletes participating in only 1 sport. The sports-participation data were normalized by sport season, with each sport accounting for 1 season of exposure. Incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated and used to determine significant differences between athletes who specialized in sport in early youth and multisport athletes. Specialization in a single sport increased the relative risk of PFP incidence 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.0-2.2, P = .038) for cumulative PFP diagnoses. Specific diagnoses such as Sinding Larsen Johansson/ patellar tendinopathy (95% CI 1.5-10.1, P = .005) and Osgood Schlatter disease (95% CI 1.5-10.1, P = .005) demonstrated a 4-fold greater relative risk in single-sport compared with multisport athletes. Incidence of other specific PFP diagnoses such as fat pad, plica, trauma, pes anserine bursitis, and iliotibial-band tendonitis was not different between single-sport and multisport participants (P > .05). Early sport specialization in female adolescents is associated with increased risk of anterior knee-pain disorders including PFP, Osgood Schlatter, Sinding Larsen-Johansson compared with multisport athletes.

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Iliopsoas Strain with Findings from Diagnostic Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Agility Performance Canines – 73 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cullen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Iliopsoas injury and strain is a commonly diagnosed disease process, especially amongst working and sporting canines. There has been very little published literature regarding iliopsoas injuries and there is no information regarding the ultrasound evaluation of abnormal iliopsoas muscles. This manuscript is intended to describe the ultrasound findings in 73 canine agility athletes who had physical examination findings consistent with iliopsoas discomfort. The population was chosen given the high incidence of these animals for the development of iliopsoas injury; likely due to repetitive stress.Methods: Medical records of 73 agility performance canines that underwent musculoskeletal ultrasound evaluation of bilateral iliopsoas muscle groups were retrospectively reviewed. Data included signalment, previous radiographic findings, and ultrasound findings. A 3-tier grading scheme for acute strains was used while the practitioner also evaluated for evidence of chronic injury and bursitis.Results: The majority of pathologies were localised to the tendon of insertion, with the majority being low grade I-II strains (80.8%. Tendon fibre disruption (71.2% and indistinct hypoechoic lesions (91.8% were the most common of acute changes noted. Hyperechoic chronic changes were noted in 84.9 percent of cases. Acute and chronic changes were commonly seen together (62.8%.Conclusion: Diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound was used to identify lesions of the iliopsoas tendon consistent with acute and chronic injury, as well as identifying the region of pathology. The majority of agility performance dogs had low grade acute strains based on the tiered system, with mixed acute and chronic lesions being noted frequently.Application: Diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound provides a non-invasive diagnostic modality for patients suspected of having an iliopsoas strain.

  19. Ultrasonography as a prognostic and objective parameter in Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakkegaard, Mads; Johannsen, Finn E.; Højgaard, Betina; Langberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study prospectively whether structural changes determined by ultrasound scanning (US) can be used as prognostic markers for outcome in patients with symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and to investigate whether there exists an association between US findings and pain measured by visual analog scale (VAS) and a general assessment score (GA). Methods: 92 consecutive patients with AT symptoms were recruited from two outpatient clinics in rheumatology. The patients underwent a conservative treatment protocol consisting of reduced activities, controlled rehabilitation including eccentric exercises of the calf muscles and if needed supplemented with corticosteroid injections. The patients were examined clinically and by US (tendon thickness, hyper- and hypoechogenicity, calcification, bursitis, calcaneusspure, tenosynovitis, gray scale and color Doppler focusing on increased flow intra- or peritendinous). The clinical and US examination were performed at entry, 1, 2, 3 and at 6 month. Results: 42 women and 50 men were included (mean age of 47 years). They had symptoms for more than 13 months and a symptomatic Achilles tendon mean thickness of 7.4 ± 2.3 mm. Heterogeneity at the initial examination was found to be a prognostic marker for the clinical outcome. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased flow at any time point were significantly correlated to pain at function, palpatory pain and morning pain at the same time points. A reduction in tendon thickness was statistically associated with a decrease in palpatory pain. Conclusion: Heterogeneity is a prognostic marker in AT. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased Doppler activity can be used as objective outcome parameters for the treatment effect of AT

  20. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of the shoulder: How we do it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corazza, Angelo, E-mail: angelcoraz@libero.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Orlandi, Davide, E-mail: theabo@libero.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Fabbro, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.fabbro@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Ferrero, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.ferrero@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Messina, Carmelo, E-mail: carmelomessina.md@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Piazza Malan 2, 20097 San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sartoris, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.sartoris@hotmail.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Perugin Bernardi, Silvia, E-mail: silvy-86-@hotmail.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Arcidiacono, Alice, E-mail: a.arcidiacono84@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Silvestri, Enzo, E-mail: silvi.enzo@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Radiologia, Ospedale Evangelico Internazionale, Corso Solferino 29A, 16121 Genova (Italy); and others

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • This paper shows how to apply US technique to image soft tissues around the shoulder. • Readers will learn to recognize normal US anatomy of tendons of the shoulder. • Readers will learn to apply dynamic maneuvers to improve rotator cuff visibility. - Abstract: Ultrasonography (US) is an established and well-accepted modality that can be used to evaluate articular and peri-articular structures around the shoulder. US has been proven to be useful in a wide range of rotator cuff diseases (tendon tears, tendinosis, and bursitis) as well as non-rotator cuff abnormalities (instability problems, synovial joint diseases, and nerve entrapment syndromes). Diagnostic accuracy of shoulder US when evaluating rotator cuff tears can reach 91–100% for partial and full thickness tears detection, respectively, having been reported to be as accurate as magnetic resonance imaging in experienced hands. US is cheap, readily available, capable to provide high-resolution images, and does not use ionizing radiations. In addition, US is the only imaging modality that allows performing dynamic evaluation of musculoskeletal structures, that may help to further increase diagnostic performance. In this setting, a standardized imaging protocol is essential for an exhaustive and efficient examination, also helping reducing the intrinsic dependence from operators of US. Furthermore, knowledge of pitfalls that can be encountered when examining the shoulder may help to avoid erroneous images interpretation. In this article we use detailed anatomic schemes and high-resolution US images to describe the normal US anatomy of soft tissues, articular, and para-articular structures located in and around the shoulder. Short video clips emphasizing the crucial role of dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US examination of these structures are included as supplementary material.

  1. MR imaging after therapeutic injection of the subacromial bursa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, N.M. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division Musculoskeletal, Durham, NC (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Objective. As a therapeutic injection into the subacromial bursa (SAB) is commonly performed for impingement syndrome, it is important to know whether this fluid can be retained for a period of time and cause confusion with a pathologic collection of fluid. This study identifies and describes the appearance of recent subacromial injection using MR imaging, and the appearance of a potential complication.Design and patients. Fourteen asymptomatic shoulders were studied with MR imaging using fast spin echo T2-weighted imaging (1.5 T) prior to injection with 7 cm{sup 3} of xylocaine. Four shoulders had subacromial fluid and were eliminated from the study. The remaining 10 (9 men, 1 woman; age range 27-36 years, average age 33 years) were then re-imaged immediately, and at 6, 12 and 24 h after the injection or until fluid resolved. Each set of images was reviewed for the presence of fluid in the SAB and for additional abnormalities.Results. Fluid was identified in all subjects in the SAB in the immediate, 6 and 12 h post-injection images. At 24 h, fluid was not identified within the SAB in eight of 10 patients. In one patient fluid resolved in 48 h. The other continued to demonstrate fluid in the SAB and in the joint as well as abnormal signal in the infraspinatus muscle from a presumed myositis. Imaging was performed up to 10 days after the injection in this patient.Conclusions. It is known that fluid identified in the SAB without evidence of a cuff tear may be due to bursitis. However, if MR imaging is performed within 24 h of injection, the presence of the fluid may be iatrogenic. In addition, the history of recent therapeutic injection is very important as complications such as myositis can occur as a result of the injection. Knowledge of injection prior to imaging is vital for accurate interpretation of MR shoulder examinations. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of Outcomes of Open Reduction and Internal Fixation Surgery in Patients with Type C Distal Humeral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadhadi Nouraei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study, functional state of patients with Type C distal humerus fractures undergone surgical plating was evaluated 6 and 12 months after the surgery in order to record postsurgical factors such as pain level and job/performance satisfaction. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 46 patients with humerus fractures were recruited and their ability to do daily tasks, presence of degenerative changes, stability of elbow joint, and range of motion was evaluated. For assessment of response to surgery, Mayo score was used. Results: Among 46 patients, 45 (97.8% of them had joint stability. Evaluation of postsurgical complications showed that six subjects (13% had no complications, but superficial infection was observed in 12 (26.1% subjects. Neuromuscular disorders in ulnar nerve were present in 11 subjects (23.9%, recurrent articular bursitis of elbow joint in 6 subjects (13%, stiffness of elbow joint in 29 subjects (63%, nonunion of fracture in 3 subjects (6.5%, and myositis ossification in 4 (8.7% subjects. Furthermore, 18 (39.1% patients presented with more than one (2–4 complications. Conclusion: Open reduction and internal fixation surgery with dual plating is the method of choice for treatment of Type C distal humeral fractures. Evaluation of long-term outcomes of this surgery could be done via several different questionnaires as many studies suggest. This study demonstrated that the outcomes of this surgery in Isfahan, Iran, have been noticeably inferior compared to results of the studies in other parts of the world.

  3. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF DEEP GLUTEAL PAIN IN A FEMALE RUNNER WITH PELVIC INVOLVEMENT: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschun, Laura; Kolber, Morey J.; Garcia, Ashley; Rothschild, Carey E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gluteal injuries, proximal hamstring injuries, and pelvic floor disorders have been reported in the literature among runners. Some suggest that hip, pelvis, and/or groin injuries occur in 3.3% to 11.5% of long distance runners. The purpose of this case report is to describe the differential diagnosis and treatment approach for a patient presenting with combined hip and pelvic pain. Case description: A 45-year-old female distance runner was referred to physical therapy for proximal hamstring pain that had been present for several months. This pain limited her ability to tolerate sitting and caused her to cease running. Examination of the patient's lumbar spine, pelvis, and lower extremity led to the initial differential diagnosis of hamstring syndrome and ischiogluteal bursitis. The patient's primary symptoms improved during the initial four visits, which focused on education, pain management, trunk stabilization and gluteus maximus strengthening, however pelvic pain persisted. Further examination led to a secondary diagnosis of pelvic floor hypertonic disorder. Interventions to address the pelvic floor led to resolution of symptoms and return to running. Outcomes: Pain level on the Visual Analog Scale decreased from 7/10 to 1/10 over the course of treatment. The patient was able to return to full sport activity and improved sitting tolerance to greater then two hours without significant discomfort. Discussion: This case suggests the interdependence of lumbopelvic and lower extremity kinematics in complaints of hamstring, posterior thigh and pelvic floor disorders. This case highlights the importance of a thorough examination as well as the need to consider a regional interdependence of the pelvic floor and lower quarter when treating individuals with proximal hamstring pain. Level of Evidence: Level 4 PMID:24175132

  4. Baseline Shoulder Ultrasonography Is Not a Predictive Marker of Response to Glucocorticoids in Patients with Polymyalgia Rheumatica: A 12-month Followup Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Maria Concetta; Zoli, Angelo; Peluso, Giusy; Bosello, Silvia; Gremese, Elisa; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated whether ultrasound (US) subdeltoid bursitis (SB) and/or biceps tenosynovitis (BT) presence at baseline could represent a predictive marker of response to standard therapy after 12 months of followup, and whether a positive US examination could highlight the need of higher maintenance dosage of glucocorticoids (GC) at 6 and 12 months in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Sixty-six consecutive patients with PMR underwent bilateral shoulder US evaluations before starting therapy and after 12 months of followup. Absence of girdle pain and morning stiffness (clinical remission) and laboratory variables were evaluated. After diagnosis, all patients were treated with prednisone. At baseline, SB and/or BT were present in 46 patients (70%), of whom 33 (72%) became negative while 13 (28%) remained positive at the 12-month US evaluation. All patients rapidly achieved a clinical remission, and at 6 months 26 (39%) also achieved a laboratory variable normalization. According to US positivity at baseline, no difference was found in remission or relapse rate after 12 months. Thirty patients (46%) at 6 months and 7 (11%) at 12 months were still taking more than 5 mg/day of prednisone. According to the US pattern at baseline, no difference was found in the mean GC dose at 6 and 12 months. In patients with PMR, the presence of SB and/or BT on US at diagnosis is not a predictive marker of GC response or of a higher GC dosage to maintain remission in a 12-month prospective followup study.

  5. The utility of MR imaging of the shoulder joint: comparison of the MR imaging between conventional MR imaging and arthrographic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Sik; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Kim, Ihn Sub; Rhee, Yong Girl

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI of the shoulder. Between January and June 1997, shoulder MRI and arthroscopy were performed in a total of 48 patients with shoulder pain (n=3D30) or shoulder instability (n=3D18). Forty-five were males and three were females; their ages ranged from 16 to 67 (mean 32.5) years. The period between shoulder MRI and arthroscopy was between one and 390 (mean, 42.2) days. Twenty-six patents underwent MR arthrography (AMR), and 22 conventional MRI(CMR). Each image was analyzed for rotator cuff injury, glenoid labral injury, SLAP lesion, and biceps tendon injury. On arthroscopy, one disease was found in 34 patients, two were found in six, three diseases were found in seven, and one patient had four diseases. Arthroscopic diagnosis was as follows:rotator cuff injury, 29;SLAP lesion, 12;glenoid labral injury, 10;biceps tendon injury, 4;subacromial bursitis, 2;chronic synovitis, 1;adhesive capsulitis, 1;superior glenohumeral ligament injury, 1;normal, 1. For rotator cuff injury, the sensitivity of MRI was 65.5% and specificity was 93.0% (AMR:66.7%, 95.8%, CMR:65.2%, 86.4%). For SLAP lesion, sensitivity was 58.3% and specificity was 97.2% (AMR:66.7%, 100%, CMR:50%, 93.8%);for glenoid labral injury, sensitivity was 80.0% and specificity was 89.5% (AMR:85.7%, 84.2%, CMR:66.7%, 94.7%), and for biceps tendon injury, the false negative rate was 100%. In cases involving glenoid labral injury, the diagnostic accuracy of shoulder MRI was relatively high;in rotator cuff injury and SLAP lesion, however, diagnosis was limited, and in biceps tendon injury was difficult. We suggest, however, that MR arthrography has certain diagnostic advantages over conventional MRI.=20

  6. Hereditary multiple exostoses: from genetics to clinical syndrome and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Hul, Wim van; Wuyts, Wim; Willems, P.J.; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To give an overview of genetic, clinical and radiological aspects in two families over four generations with known hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Methods and material: After linkage analysis in both families to localize the defective gene, mutation analysis was performed in these genes to identify the underlying mutation. In the 31 affected individuals, location, number and morphology and evolution of exostosis, evolution of remodeling defects at the metaphysis, and the extent of possible complications were evaluated on clinical and imaging (plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) data over a lifetime period. Results and conclusions: Both families demonstrate the gene defect in the same EXT-2 gene locus on chromosome 11p. Exostoses are preferentially located in the lower extremity (hip, knee and lower leg), humerus, and forearm. Any other bone may be involved, except for the calvaria of the skull and the mandible. Exostoses are rather sessile than pedunculated. Exostosis is rarely present at birth but develops gradually and may persist to grow slowly after closure of the growth plates. Preferential expression of the remodeling defect was seen in the hip, distal femur (trumpet-shaped metaphysis) and forearm (shortening of the ulna with secondary bowing of the radius and development of a pseudo-Madelung deformity). These radiological manifestations start at the age of 4-5 years and become more obvious as the enchondral bone formation progresses with age. Reported complications in these families consist of local entrapment phenomenons (vessel, tendon, nerve), frictional bursitis, and sarcomatous transformation. MRI was able to suggest these complications and is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of symptomatic exostoses.

  7. A cross sectional study of the prevalence, risk factors and population attributable fractions for limb and body lesions in lactating sows on commercial farms in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillman Claire E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lesions on sows' limbs and bodies are an abnormality that might impact on their welfare. The prevalence of and risks for limb and body lesions on lactating sows on commercial English pig farms were investigated using direct observation of the sows and their housing. Results The prevalence of lesions on the limbs and body were 93% (260/279 and 20% (57/288 respectively. The prevalence of limb and body lesions was significantly lower in outdoor-housed sows compared with indoor-housed sows. Indoor-housed sows had an increased risk of wounds (OR 6.8, calluses (OR 8.8 and capped hock (OR 3.8 on their limbs when housed on fully slatted floors compared with solid concrete floors. In addition, there was an increased risk of bursitis (OR 2.7, capped hock (OR 2.3 and shoulder lesions (OR 4.8 in sows that were unwilling to rise to their feet. There was a decreased risk of shoulder lesions (OR 0.3 and lesions elsewhere on the body (OR 0.2 in sows with more than 20 cm between their tail and the back of the crate compared with sows with less than 10 cm. Conclusion The sample of outdoor housed sows in this study had the lowest prevalence of limb and body lesions. In lactating sows housed indoors there was a general trend for an increased risk of limb and body lesions in sows housed on slatted floors compared with those housed on solid concrete floors with bedding. Sows that were less responsive to human presence and sows that had the least space to move within their crates had an additional increased risk of lesions.

  8. MR Imaging in symptomatic osteochondromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Chun, Kyung Ah; Park, Young Ha [Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the MR findings of symptomatic osteochondromas. We evaluated 31 patients who between July, 1994 and May, 1997 underwent MR imaging for symptomatic osteochondroma. Fourteen were males and 17 were females, and their ages ranged from 8 to 49 (mean, 23) years. Using T1WI, T2WI and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced T1WI, images were analysed according to signal intensity in the osseous component of the osteochondroma, thickness of the cartilage cap, and associated change in surrounding soft tissue. Clinical manifestation included a palpable mass or tendency to grow (n=22) and pain on movement (n=9). Complications were of three types : that which followed change in the osseous component of the tumor, associated change in surrounding soft tissue, and malignant transformation. In the osseous component, bone marrow edema or contusion was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), and in two (65%), fracture was observed. In surrounding soft tissue, muscle impingement was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), bursitis was in 7 cases (22.6 %), tenosynovitis in seven (22.6 %), and vascular compression in five (16.1 %). In three cases (9.7%), transformation to chondrosarcoma had occurred; two of these were derived from osteochondromatosis and one from a single osteochondroma. The thickness of the cartilage cap was as follow : < 5 mm (n=16), 5-10 mm (n=12), and > 10 mm (n=3). In patients with symptomatic osteochondroma, MR imaging is useful for detecting both complications and malignant transformation. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  9. The utility of MR imaging of the shoulder joint: comparison of the MR imaging between conventional MR imaging and arthrographic MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Dong Sik; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Kim, Ihn Sub; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyunghee Univ., College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI of the shoulder. Between January and June 1997, shoulder MRI and arthroscopy were performed in a total of 48 patients with shoulder pain (n=3D30) or shoulder instability (n=3D18). Forty-five were males and three were females; their ages ranged from 16 to 67 (mean 32.5) years. The period between shoulder MRI and arthroscopy was between one and 390 (mean, 42.2) days. Twenty-six patents underwent MR arthrography (AMR), and 22 conventional MRI(CMR). Each image was analyzed for rotator cuff injury, glenoid labral injury, SLAP lesion, and biceps tendon injury. On arthroscopy, one disease was found in 34 patients, two were found in six, three diseases were found in seven, and one patient had four diseases. Arthroscopic diagnosis was as follows:rotator cuff injury, 29;SLAP lesion, 12;glenoid labral injury, 10;biceps tendon injury, 4;subacromial bursitis, 2;chronic synovitis, 1;adhesive capsulitis, 1;superior glenohumeral ligament injury, 1;normal, 1. For rotator cuff injury, the sensitivity of MRI was 65.5% and specificity was 93.0% (AMR:66.7%, 95.8%, CMR:65.2%, 86.4%). For SLAP lesion, sensitivity was 58.3% and specificity was 97.2% (AMR:66.7%, 100%, CMR:50%, 93.8%);for glenoid labral injury, sensitivity was 80.0% and specificity was 89.5% (AMR:85.7%, 84.2%, CMR:66.7%, 94.7%), and for biceps tendon injury, the false negative rate was 100%. In cases involving glenoid labral injury, the diagnostic accuracy of shoulder MRI was relatively high;in rotator cuff injury and SLAP lesion, however, diagnosis was limited, and in biceps tendon injury was difficult. We suggest, however, that MR arthrography has certain diagnostic advantages over conventional MRI.=20.

  10. Hereditary multiple exostoses: from genetics to clinical syndrome and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Hul, Wim van; Wuyts, Wim; Willems, P.J.; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To give an overview of genetic, clinical and radiological aspects in two families over four generations with known hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Methods and material: After linkage analysis in both families to localize the defective gene, mutation analysis was performed in these genes to identify the underlying mutation. In the 31 affected individuals, location, number and morphology and evolution of exostosis, evolution of remodeling defects at the metaphysis, and the extent of possible complications were evaluated on clinical and imaging (plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) data over a lifetime period. Results and conclusions: Both families demonstrate the gene defect in the same EXT-2 gene locus on chromosome 11p. Exostoses are preferentially located in the lower extremity (hip, knee and lower leg), humerus, and forearm. Any other bone may be involved, except for the calvaria of the skull and the mandible. Exostoses are rather sessile than pedunculated. Exostosis is rarely present at birth but develops gradually and may persist to grow slowly after closure of the growth plates. Preferential expression of the remodeling defect was seen in the hip, distal femur (trumpet-shaped metaphysis) and forearm (shortening of the ulna with secondary bowing of the radius and development of a pseudo-Madelung deformity). These radiological manifestations start at the age of 4-5 years and become more obvious as the enchondral bone formation progresses with age. Reported complications in these families consist of local entrapment phenomenons (vessel, tendon, nerve), frictional bursitis, and sarcomatous transformation. MRI was able to suggest these complications and is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of symptomatic exostoses

  11. INTEGRATION BETWEEN MRI AND PHYSICAL THERAPY TO IMPROVE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Mohamed Elkhadir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder pain is the second most common musculoskeletal disorder treated by physical therapists. The cause for the shoulder pain is multifactorial. However, a specific diagnosis is crucial in the right management of shoulder dysfunction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of integrating the MRI for the accurate diagnosis and impact of this on rendering the effective physical therapy interventions in shoulder dysfunction patients. Methods: A retrospective study conducted on 14 patients who undergone an MRI with a 1.5 T unit MAGNETOM Symphony (Siemens, for their shoulder pain, where the diagnosis might be Muscle tears like, subscapularis, infraspinatus,supraspinatus and teres minor muscles; subacromial or subdeltoid bursitis and labral tears were included. All the subjects were then continued with usual physical therapy treatments for four weeks depending on their diagnosis which includes; advice, stretching, mobilization and strengthening exercises, manual therapy, massage, strapping, and electrotherapy . The outcome measures documented from the case sheet were; Visual Analogue Scale grade and passive range of motion of shoulder external / internal rotation and abduction. Results: Paired t test was used to compare the PROM between pre rehabilitation and post rehabilitation testing and the non parametric test, Mann Whitney U test was used for the comparison of VAS. All patients showed a significant improvement in VAS and PROM of abduction, internal and external rotation following physical therapy (P≤ 0.05. Conclusion: MRI is found to be a reliable method of diagnostic procedure for the shoulder pain and the integration of MRI and physical therapy to treat shoulder dysfunction leads to a better outcome.

  12. Safety of achilles detachment and reattachment using a standard midline approach to insertional enthesophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F

    2015-01-01

    Detachment with reattachment of the Achilles tendon is a common surgery for debridement of retrocalcaneal exostosis, bursitis, and other insertional pathologic entities. The technique involves a midline skin incision on the posterior Achilles to the tendon. The distal Achilles attachment is removed in a U-shaped manner, leaving the medial and lateral flares, but exposing the posterior spur. This midline approach provides excellent exposure and allows for rapid and efficient surgical debridement. The tendon is reapproximated and repaired with a suture anchor to facilitate fixation to the posterior calcaneus. Some surgeons have expressed concerned that the rupture risk could be increased in the postoperative period using this technique. The present study was a retrospective medical record review of 98 patients (100 feet) who had undergone a midline approach with Achilles reattachment after insertional Achilles debridement during a 3-year period. The demographic and comorbidity data were collected and analyzed. The outcome measures were postoperative rupture and the need for revision surgery. The mean age was 51.9 years, and the patients included 59 females (60.2%) and 39 males (39.8%). The complications included 4 rupture or avulsion revisions (4.0%) and 2 recurrent pain and tendinitis revisions (2.0%). The most common repeat repair procedure included hardware removal and a flexor hallucis longus transfer or augmentation. Nine patients (9.0%) had wound complications, 7 (77.8%) of which necessitated incision and drainage. The midline approach with Achilles detachment and reattachment is a safe and effective method of surgical treatment of insertional Achilles pathologic entities. The low reoperation rate of 4.0% will allow foot and ankle surgeons to safely rely on this approach. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of the shoulder: How we do it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corazza, Angelo; Orlandi, Davide; Fabbro, Emanuele; Ferrero, Giulio; Messina, Carmelo; Sartoris, Riccardo; Perugin Bernardi, Silvia; Arcidiacono, Alice; Silvestri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper shows how to apply US technique to image soft tissues around the shoulder. • Readers will learn to recognize normal US anatomy of tendons of the shoulder. • Readers will learn to apply dynamic maneuvers to improve rotator cuff visibility. - Abstract: Ultrasonography (US) is an established and well-accepted modality that can be used to evaluate articular and peri-articular structures around the shoulder. US has been proven to be useful in a wide range of rotator cuff diseases (tendon tears, tendinosis, and bursitis) as well as non-rotator cuff abnormalities (instability problems, synovial joint diseases, and nerve entrapment syndromes). Diagnostic accuracy of shoulder US when evaluating rotator cuff tears can reach 91–100% for partial and full thickness tears detection, respectively, having been reported to be as accurate as magnetic resonance imaging in experienced hands. US is cheap, readily available, capable to provide high-resolution images, and does not use ionizing radiations. In addition, US is the only imaging modality that allows performing dynamic evaluation of musculoskeletal structures, that may help to further increase diagnostic performance. In this setting, a standardized imaging protocol is essential for an exhaustive and efficient examination, also helping reducing the intrinsic dependence from operators of US. Furthermore, knowledge of pitfalls that can be encountered when examining the shoulder may help to avoid erroneous images interpretation. In this article we use detailed anatomic schemes and high-resolution US images to describe the normal US anatomy of soft tissues, articular, and para-articular structures located in and around the shoulder. Short video clips emphasizing the crucial role of dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US examination of these structures are included as supplementary material

  14. Radiotherapy for shoulder impingement; Bestrahlung beim Impingementsyndrom des Schultergelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamietz, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Sauer, R.; Keilholz, L. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik

    2008-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Up to now, degenerative shoulder diseases were summarized by the term 'periarthritis humeroscapularis'. Actual shoulder diseases can be differentiated etiopathologically according to a primary and secondary impingement syndrome. Narrowing of the subacromial space, which is caused by an osseous shape variant, leads to primary impingement. Secondary impingement develops, when the subacromial space is reduced by swelling tissue below the osseous shoulder roof. This study aimed for the exact diagnosis to indicate therapy and to classify the results according to the Constant score. Patients and Methods: From August 1999 to September 2002, 102 patients with 115 shoulder joint conditions underwent radiation therapy (RT). All joints received two RT series (6 x 0.5 Gy/series) applied in two to three weekly fractions, totaling a dosage of 6.0 Gy (250 kV, 15 mAs, 1-mm Cu filter). The second RT course started 6 weeks after the end of the first. 115 shoulders were examined before RT, 6 weeks after the second RT course and, finally, during the follow-up from January to May 2003. Results: Pain relief was achieved in 94/115 shoulder joints (82%) after 18-month follow-up (median). A significant difference existed between secondary impingement and primary/non-impingement according to response. Tendinosis calcarea, bursitis subdeltoidea, tendovaginitis of the long biceps tendon, and capsulitis adhaesiva responded well to therapy. Conclusion: Shoulder diseases of secondary impingement demonstrate a good response to RT. Less or no benefit was found in primary impingement syndrome or complete rotator cuff disruption and acute shoulder injuries, respectively. (orig.)

  15. Ultrasound in the evaluation of enthesitis: status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Terslev, Lene; Joshua, Fredrick; Wakefield, Richard J; Naredo, Esperanza; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have applied ultrasound to the evaluation of entheses in spondyloarthritis patients. However, no clear agreement exists on the definition of enthesitis, on the number and choice of entheses to examine and on ultrasound technique, which may all affect the results of the examination. The objectives of this study were to first determine the level of homogeneity in the ultrasound definitions for the principal lesions of enthesitis in the published literature and second, to evaluate the metric properties of ultrasound for detecting enthesitis according to the OMERACT filter. Search was performed in PUBMED and EMBASE. Both grey-scale and Doppler definitions of enthesitis, including describing features of enthesitis, were collected and metrological qualities of studies were assessed. After selection, 48 articles were analyzed. The definition of ultrasound enthesitis and elementary features varied among authors. Grey-scale enthesitis was characterized by increasing thickness (94% of studies), hypoechogenicity (83%), enthesophytes (69%), erosions (67%), calcifications (52%), associated bursitis (46%) and cortical irregularities (29%). Only 46% of studies reported the use of Doppler. High discrepancies were observed on frequency, type of probe and Doppler mode used. Face and content validity were the most frequently evaluated criteria (43%) followed by reliability (29%) and responsiveness (19%). Ultrasound has evidence to support face, content validity and reliability for the evaluation of enthesitis, though there is a lack of well-reported methodology in most of the studies. Consensus on elementary lesions and standardization of exam is needed to determine the ultrasound definition of enthesitis in grey-scale and in Doppler for future applications.

  16. The effectiveness of diagnostic imaging methods for the assessment of soft tissue and articular disorders of the shoulder and elbow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabpour, M. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: Maryam@shahabpour.uzbrussel; Kichouh, M.; Laridon, E. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Gielen, J.L. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, Universiteit Antwerpen, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem (Belgium); De Mey, J. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-02-15

    There are no clear guidelines for diagnostic imaging of articular and soft tissue pathologies of the shoulder and elbow. Several methods are used, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and ultrasound (US). Their cost-effectiveness is still unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of the relevant literature and discussed the role of MR imaging of the shoulder and elbow compared with other diagnostic imaging modalities. For the shoulder impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears, MRI and US have a comparable accuracy for detection of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. MRA and US might be more accurate for the detection of partial-thickness tears than MRI. Given the large difference in cost of MR and US, ultrasound may be the most cost-effective diagnostic method for identification of full-thickness tears in a specialist hospital setting (Evidence level 3). Both MRA and CT arthrography (CTA) are effective methods for the detection of labrum tears. More recently, multidetector CTA has offered the advantages of thinner slices than with MRA in a shorter examination time. Still, MRA has the advantage towards CTA to directly visualize the affected structures with a better evaluation of extent and location and to detect associated capsuloligamentous injuries. For the elbow pathologies, plain MRI or MRA have the advantage towards CTA to detect occult bone injuries. CTA is better for the assessment of the thin cartilage of the elbow. Both US and MRI are reliable methods to detect chronic epicondylitis; US is more available and far more cost-effective (Evidence level 2). MRA can differentiate complete from partial tears of the medial collateral ligament. US or MRI can detect partial and complete biceps tendon tears and/or bursitis. MRI can provide important diagnostic information in lesions of the ulnar, radial, or median nerve.

  17. Assessment of peritrochanteric high T2 signal depending on the age and gender of the patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haliloglu, Nuray, E-mail: nurayunsal2@hotmail.co [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Inceoglu, Deniz; Sahin, Gulden [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of peritrochanteric high T2 signal (peritrochanteric edema, peritendinitis) on routine MR imaging studies and to determine whether reporting peritrochanteric edema is always clinically relevant depending on the age and gender of the patients. Materials and methods: We evaluated 79 consecutive bilateral hip MR images performed in our department between January 2006 and December 2006 (57 female, 22 male patients, mean age 49 years). Each study was evaluated for areas of T2 hyperintensity representing edema around the greater trochanter. Patients with a known fracture, tumor, history of radiation therapy, history of hip surgery and prothesis were excluded from the study. Patients with signal intensity alterations within the thickened gluteus medius/minimus tendons (tendinitis) or peritrochanteric bursal fluid accumulation (bursitis) were also excluded. All patients were scanned with our routine MR imaging protocol for hip imaging. Results: In 55 of the 79 patients (70%) peritrochanteric edema was detected on MR images and 52 of these 55 patients (95%) had these changes on both hips. The median age was 56 years for the patients with peritrochanteric edema and 35.5 years for the patients without peritrochanteric edema. There was statistical significance between the median ages of the patients and a significant increased risk of peritrochanteric edema was found over 40 years of age. There was no significant difference between male and female patients. Conclusion: Bilateral peritrochanteric high T2 signal may be a part of the degeneration process and we suggest that it may not be necessarily reported if the clinical findings do not support greater trochanteric pain syndrome.

  18. MR imaging after therapeutic injection of the subacromial bursa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. As a therapeutic injection into the subacromial bursa (SAB) is commonly performed for impingement syndrome, it is important to know whether this fluid can be retained for a period of time and cause confusion with a pathologic collection of fluid. This study identifies and describes the appearance of recent subacromial injection using MR imaging, and the appearance of a potential complication.Design and patients. Fourteen asymptomatic shoulders were studied with MR imaging using fast spin echo T2-weighted imaging (1.5 T) prior to injection with 7 cm 3 of xylocaine. Four shoulders had subacromial fluid and were eliminated from the study. The remaining 10 (9 men, 1 woman; age range 27-36 years, average age 33 years) were then re-imaged immediately, and at 6, 12 and 24 h after the injection or until fluid resolved. Each set of images was reviewed for the presence of fluid in the SAB and for additional abnormalities.Results. Fluid was identified in all subjects in the SAB in the immediate, 6 and 12 h post-injection images. At 24 h, fluid was not identified within the SAB in eight of 10 patients. In one patient fluid resolved in 48 h. The other continued to demonstrate fluid in the SAB and in the joint as well as abnormal signal in the infraspinatus muscle from a presumed myositis. Imaging was performed up to 10 days after the injection in this patient.Conclusions. It is known that fluid identified in the SAB without evidence of a cuff tear may be due to bursitis. However, if MR imaging is performed within 24 h of injection, the presence of the fluid may be iatrogenic. In addition, the history of recent therapeutic injection is very important as complications such as myositis can occur as a result of the injection. Knowledge of injection prior to imaging is vital for accurate interpretation of MR shoulder examinations. (orig.)

  19. Epidemiological profile of workers with musculoskeletal disorders of a supermarket company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Benites da Silva

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction The epidemiological profile is considered a sensitive indicator of living conditions and the disease process. The musculoskeletal disorders are the most common causes of pain and can lead to disability or restriction of daily activities. These disorders take the name of RCT/OWRD when they are associated with work activities and may be associated with risk conditions at work.Objectives To describe the epidemiological profile of supermarket workers with musculoskeletal disorders under treatment at a physiotherapy clinic in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil.Methods This was a cross-sectional, observational study which used retrospective data collected from 360 records of patients treated from January 2010 to December 2011 in a physiotherapy clinic that provides health services for a supermarket chain.Results There was a predominance of females (73.9%, aged 30–39 years (35.1%; 63.0% reported being single and 73.4% lived in Porto Alegre. The most commonly reported occupation was cashier (31.2%. The main reasons for referral to physiotherapy treatment were low back pain (21.4%, neck pain (19.7%, pain (16.1%, subacromial bursitis (13.9% and back pain (12.2%. Among the signs and symptoms 95.8% of the sample reported pain in chronic phase.Conclusion The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was high in this group. The presence of pain can disable the worker for daily activities and physiotherapy becomes the therapeutic procedure of choice for their rehabilitation.

  20. Ultrasonography as a prognostic and objective parameter in Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkegaard, Mads, E-mail: mbakkegaard@hotmail.com [Department of Rheumatology, Holbæk Hospital, Smedelundsgade 60, 4300 Holbæk (Denmark); Johannsen, Finn E., E-mail: f.e.johannsen@dadlnet.dk [Private Department of Rheumatology, Furesø-reumatologerne, Farum and ISMC, Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2. Tværvej, Indgang 8, 1. sal, 2400 København NV (Denmark); Højgaard, Betina, E-mail: beho@kora.dk [Danish Institute for Local and Regional Government Research, Købmagergade 22, 1150 København K (Denmark); Langberg, Henning, E-mail: henninglangberg@gmail.com [Institute of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Centre for Healthy Ageing, Faculty of Heath Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, bygn. 24, postboks 2099, 1014 København (Denmark)

    2015-03-15

    Objectives: To study prospectively whether structural changes determined by ultrasound scanning (US) can be used as prognostic markers for outcome in patients with symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) and to investigate whether there exists an association between US findings and pain measured by visual analog scale (VAS) and a general assessment score (GA). Methods: 92 consecutive patients with AT symptoms were recruited from two outpatient clinics in rheumatology. The patients underwent a conservative treatment protocol consisting of reduced activities, controlled rehabilitation including eccentric exercises of the calf muscles and if needed supplemented with corticosteroid injections. The patients were examined clinically and by US (tendon thickness, hyper- and hypoechogenicity, calcification, bursitis, calcaneusspure, tenosynovitis, gray scale and color Doppler focusing on increased flow intra- or peritendinous). The clinical and US examination were performed at entry, 1, 2, 3 and at 6 month. Results: 42 women and 50 men were included (mean age of 47 years). They had symptoms for more than 13 months and a symptomatic Achilles tendon mean thickness of 7.4 ± 2.3 mm. Heterogeneity at the initial examination was found to be a prognostic marker for the clinical outcome. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased flow at any time point were significantly correlated to pain at function, palpatory pain and morning pain at the same time points. A reduction in tendon thickness was statistically associated with a decrease in palpatory pain. Conclusion: Heterogeneity is a prognostic marker in AT. Tendon thickness, hypoechogenicity and increased Doppler activity can be used as objective outcome parameters for the treatment effect of AT.

  1. Use of the S-hook for Pelvic Fixation in Rib-Based Treatment of Early-Onset Scoliosis: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Norman; Flynn, John M; Smith, John T; Vitale, Michael; Sturm, Peter F; DʼAmato, Charles; Samdani, Amer; Machiavelli, Raul; El-Hawary, Ron

    2015-06-01

    Retrospective review. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how several preoperative variables affect the outcome using the rib-to-pelvis S-hook constructs of a rib-based distraction implant (Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Rib). Rib-to-pelvis fixation with S-hooks is one of the options for distal anchoring of rib-based distraction growing rod construct to control early-onset spinal deformity. Since the initial report, the indications of pelvic fixation with S-hooks have been extended and modified. This is an institutional review board-approved retrospective study of patients who underwent rib-based growing rod system surgery-rib-to-pelvis construct with Dunn-McCarthy S-hook. Data evaluation included history, physical examination, preoperative and postoperative radiographs, surgical variables, and complications. Sixty-five patients were evaluated; 38 were male and 27 were female. Mean age at initial procedure was 71 months. The mean follow-up was 46 months. There was a statistically significant improvement of the immediate postoperative Cobb angle and the last follow-up Cobb angle (P < 0.0001). Fifty percent of the patients (32/65) had S-hook-related complications. The most common complication was sliding of the S-hook out of the iliac crest, followed by infection, neuropathic pain, distal migration of more than 2 cm, fracture of the hook, and bursitis. The complications were related to the preoperative ambulatory status, the use of end-to-end rod connectors, surgical time, and not positioning the hook over the central one-third of the iliac crest at the initial implantation. The use of the S-hook as a pelvic attachment of the rib-based system is indicated in nonambulatory patients with progressive, early-onset scoliosis curve with a lack of adequate anchor at the lumbar spine. Several technical factors should be considered to reduce the complication rate. 3.

  2. Excessive progression in weekly running distance and risk of running-related injuries: an association which varies according to type of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Sørensen, Henrik; Lind, Martin; Rasmussen, Sten

    2014-10-01

    An explorative, 1-year prospective cohort study. Objective To examine whether an association between a sudden change in weekly running distance and running-related injury varies according to injury type. It is widely accepted that a sudden increase in running distance is strongly related to injury in runners. But the scientific knowledge supporting this assumption is limited. A volunteer sample of 874 healthy novice runners who started a self-structured running regimen were provided a global-positioning-system watch. After each running session during the study period, participants were categorized into 1 of the following exposure groups, based on the progression of their weekly running distance: less than 10% or regression, 10% to 30%, or more than 30%. The primary outcome was running-related injury. A total of 202 runners sustained a running-related injury. Using Cox regression analysis, no statistically significant differences in injury rates were found across the 3 exposure groups. An increased rate of distance-related injuries (patellofemoral pain, iliotibial band syndrome, medial tibial stress syndrome, gluteus medius injury, greater trochanteric bursitis, injury to the tensor fascia latae, and patellar tendinopathy) existed in those who progressed their weekly running distance by more than 30% compared with those who progressed less than 10% (hazard ratio = 1.59; 95% confidence interval: 0.96, 2.66; P = .07). Novice runners who progressed their running distance by more than 30% over a 2-week period seem to be more vulnerable to distance-related injuries than runners who increase their running distance by less than 10%. Owing to the exploratory nature of the present study, randomized controlled trials are needed to verify these results, and more experimental studies are needed to validate the assumptions. Still, novice runners may be well advised to progress their weekly distances by less than 30% per week over a 2-week period.

  3. Differentiation between peri-prosthetic infection and aseptic loosening using quantitative analysis of triphasic 99Tcm-MDP bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinxin; Zhang Yanyan; Zhang Weifang; Mao Yuan; Zhao Meixin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To differentiate between peri-prosthetic infection and aseptic loosening using quantitative analysis of triphasic bone scintigraphy. Methods: Twenty-eight patients (9 males, 19 females; mean age 67.5 years, range 49-80 years) with recurrent joint pain after arthroplasty were retrospectively assessed. All patients underwent triphasic bone scintigraphy. ROI of each joint was drawn and the ratios of affected to unaffected side were calculated. The ratios of blood flow phase, blood pool phase, static phase, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation (ESR) were quantitatively analyzed by ROC curve. The final diagnosis was based on microbiological and histological examinations. The optimal cut-off value was chosen based on the ideal sensitivity and specificity. Results: Nine patients were diagnosed as septic loosening, 17 patients aseptic loosening, 1 patient bursitis of hip joint and 1 patient suture reaction. Taking the positive results of blood flow phase or blood pool phase as standard for diagnosing septic loosening, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of bone scintigraphy were 7/9, 78.9% (15/19) and 78.6% (22/28), respectively. The AUC of blood pool phase was 0.942, and the sensitivity and specificity were 8/9 and 78.9% (15/19), respectively, with the optimal cut-off value of 1.40. The AUCs of blood flow ratio and CRP were 0.816 and 0.795, with cut-off values of 1.53 and 1.20, respectively. The AUCs of static phase ratio and ESR were 0.474 and 0.722, respectively, both P>0.05. Conclusions: For the diagnosis of septic loosening, quantitative analysis of triphasic 99 Tc m -MDP bone scintigraphy, particularly with the ratio of blood pool phase, is more accurate than qualitative analysis. (authors)

  4. Mycobacterium smegmatis infection of a prosthetic total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffo, Zaid; Ognjan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The most common organisms causing prosthetic knee joint infections are staphylococci. However, arthroplasty infections with atypical microbial pathogens, such as Mycobacteria can occur. Due to the rarity of mycobacterial prosthetic joint infections, diagnosis, treatment, and management of these atypical infections represent a clinical challenge. A 71-year old female post-operative day 40 after a left total knee arthroplasty was hospitalized secondary to left knee pain and suspected arthroplasty infection. She had failed outpatient oral antimicrobial treatment for superficial stitch abscess; and outpatient IV/Oral antimicrobials for a clinical postoperative septic bursitis. Ultimately, resection arthroplasty with operative tissue acid fast bacterial cultures demonstrated growth of the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Post-operatively, she completed a combination course of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin and successfully completed a replacement arthroplasty with clinical and microbial resolution of the infection. To our knowledge, literature review demonstrates three case of knee arthroplasty infection caused by the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Correspondingly, optimal surgical procedures and antimicrobial management including antimicrobial selection, treatment duration are not well defined. Presently, the best treatment options consists of two step surgical management including prosthesis hardware removal followed by extended antimicrobial therapy, followed by consideration for re-implantation arthroplasty. Our case illustrates importance of considering atypical mycobacterial infections in post-operative arthroplasty infections not responding to traditional surgical manipulations and antimicrobials. For an arthroplasty infection involving the atypical Mycobacterium smegmatis group, two step arthroplasty revision, including arthroplasty resection, with a combination of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin can lead to successful infection resolution, allowing for a

  5. Assessment of peritrochanteric high T2 signal depending on the age and gender of the patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haliloglu, Nuray; Inceoglu, Deniz; Sahin, Gulden

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of peritrochanteric high T2 signal (peritrochanteric edema, peritendinitis) on routine MR imaging studies and to determine whether reporting peritrochanteric edema is always clinically relevant depending on the age and gender of the patients. Materials and methods: We evaluated 79 consecutive bilateral hip MR images performed in our department between January 2006 and December 2006 (57 female, 22 male patients, mean age 49 years). Each study was evaluated for areas of T2 hyperintensity representing edema around the greater trochanter. Patients with a known fracture, tumor, history of radiation therapy, history of hip surgery and prothesis were excluded from the study. Patients with signal intensity alterations within the thickened gluteus medius/minimus tendons (tendinitis) or peritrochanteric bursal fluid accumulation (bursitis) were also excluded. All patients were scanned with our routine MR imaging protocol for hip imaging. Results: In 55 of the 79 patients (70%) peritrochanteric edema was detected on MR images and 52 of these 55 patients (95%) had these changes on both hips. The median age was 56 years for the patients with peritrochanteric edema and 35.5 years for the patients without peritrochanteric edema. There was statistical significance between the median ages of the patients and a significant increased risk of peritrochanteric edema was found over 40 years of age. There was no significant difference between male and female patients. Conclusion: Bilateral peritrochanteric high T2 signal may be a part of the degeneration process and we suggest that it may not be necessarily reported if the clinical findings do not support greater trochanteric pain syndrome.

  6. Transmission of infectious diseases from internationally adopted children to their adoptive families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciauvaud, J; Rigal, E; Pascal, J; Nourrisson, C; Poirier, P; Poirier, V; Vidal, M; Mrozek, N; Laurichesse, H; Beytout, J; Labbe, A; Lesens, O

    2014-08-01

    Internationally adopted children may suffer from different pathologies, including infectious diseases contracted in the country of origin. We evaluated the frequency of infectious diseases that may disseminate from adoptees to adoptive families on their arrival in France. All children who attended the clinic for international adoption in Clermont-Ferrand from January 2009 through to December 2011 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Standardized medical records dedicated to international adoption were retrospectively reviewed for demographic data, clinical diagnosis, and biological and radiological results. Data were completed by phone interviews with adoptive families after informed consent. One hundred and forty-two medical records were retrospectively reviewed and 86% of families agreed to be interviewed. One hundred and seventy-one potentially transmissible infections were diagnosed in 142 children, 12% (n = 20) of which were transmitted to adoptive families. Most of these infections were benign and transmission was restricted to the close family. Tinea was diagnosed in 44 adoptees and transmitted in 15 cases. Panton Valentine leukocidin producing methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was transmitted to an adoptive father who required hospitalization for bursitis. Transmission also occurred for CMV (n = 1), hepatitis A (n = 1), giardiasis (n = 1), scabies (n = 1), Moluscum (n = 2) and pediculosis (n = 2). Two cases of chronic hepatitis B and latent tuberculosis were diagnosed without subsequent transmission. In conclusion, infectious diseases are common in internationally adopted children and should be detected shortly after arrival to avoid transmission. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  7. Teaching enthesis ultrasound: experience of an ultrasound training workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Cláudia; De Miguel, Eugenio; Batlle-Gualda, Enrique; Rejón, Eduardo; Lojo, Leticia

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate a standardised enthesis ultrasound training method, a workshop was conducted to train rheumatologists on enthesis ultrasound. After a theoretical session about ultrasound elementary enthesis lesions (changes in tendon architecture/thickness, bone proliferation/erosion, bursitis or Doppler signal), a reading exercise of 28 entheses' ultrasonographic images (plantar fasciae, Achilles, origin and insertion of patellar tendon) was completed. Participants scored through an electronic multiple-choice device with six possible lesions in each enthesis. To assess the adequacy and efficacy of the workshop, we explored the following: (1) subjective outcomes: a 12-item structured satisfaction questionnaire (graded 1-5 using Likert scale) and (2) objective outcomes of reliability: sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and percentage of correctly classified cases (CC). Forty-nine participants attended the workshop. The satisfaction questionnaire demonstrated a 4.7 mean global value. The inter-reader Kappa reliability coefficient was moderate for the plantar fascia (0.47), Achilles tendon (0.47), and distal patellar tendons (0.50) and good for the proximal patellar tendon (0.63). The whole group means comparing to teachers' consensus were as follows: (a) plantar fascia: Se, 73.2%; Sp, 87.7%; CC, 83.3%; (b) Achilles: Se, 66.9%; Sp, 85.0%; CC, 79.5%; (c) distal patellar tendon: Se, 74.6%; Sp, 85.3%; CC, 82.1%; and (d) proximal patellar tendon: Se, 82.2%; Sp, 90.6%; CC, 88%. The proposed learning method seemed to be simple, easily performed, effective and well accepted by the target audience.

  8. Profile of the subjects with soft tissue injuries attended at an occupational health service and the RSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Freitas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the profile of subjects with soft tissue injuries attended at the Reference Center of Occupational Health – CEREST in the municipality of Santos, Sao Paulo state, in 2010, and the social insurance benefits granted.Materials and Methods: Analysis of medical records of the subjects assisted at CEREST in 2010, surveying data on gender, age, occupation, clinical diagnostics, clinical complaints, retirement, etc. The clinical diagnostics were categorized according to the International Classification of Diseases - ICD-10, subjects with soft tissue injuries were selected, and the diagnostics related to mental health disorders were registered. Data were recorded in Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analyzed using statistical software R Development Core Team.Results: Of the 206 medical records analyzed, 18.0% (n=37 showed soft tissue injuries, 81.1% were female and 18.9% were male, and the subjects’ mean age was 43.24 years (SD=8.76. Subjects between 31 and 50 years old (70.2% were the most affected. The most affected occupations were cleaners, general service workers, and bank clerks. The most prevalent clinical diagnoses were synovitis and tenosynovitis, shoulder bursitis, and rotator cuff syndrome, with 62.2% of the subjects presenting more than one clinical diagnosis. 13.5% of the subjects also presented mental disorders. Association between retirement from work and the presence of soft tissue injury was observed (p=0.032. Only 13.5% of the diagnoses had some association with the work conditions.Conclusions: The general profile of the workers with soft tissue injuries was obtained: prevalence in women, diseases manifested in productive age, difficulty of association with work conditions, need for interdisciplinary interventions.

  9. Total hip arthroplasty by the direct anterior approach using a neck-preserving stem: Safety, efficacy and learning curve

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    Aditya Khemka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concept of femoral neck preservation in total hip replacement (THR was introduced in 1993. It is postulated that retaining cortical bone of the femoral neck offers triplanar stability, uniform stress distribution, and accommodates physiological anteversion. However, data on safety, efficacy and learning curve are lacking. Materials and Methods: We prospectively assessed all patients who were operated for a THR with a short neck preserving stem (MiniHip between 2012 and 2014. The safety and learning curve were assessed by recording operative time; stem size; and adverse events including periprosthetic fracture; paresthesia; and limb length discrepancy (LLD. The cohort was divided into equal groups to assess the learning curve effect, and the cumulative sums (CUSUM test was performed to monitor intraoperative neck fractures. For assessment of efficacy, Oxford Hip Score (OHS and Short Form-36 (SF-36 scores were compared preoperatively and postoperatively. Results: 138 patients with median age 62 years (range 35–82 years were included with a median followup of 42 months (range 30–56 months. The minimum followup was 2.5 years. The OHS, SF-36 (physical and mental component scores improved by a mean score of 26, 28, and 27 points, respectively. All patients had LLD of <10 mm (1.9 mm ± 1.3. Adverse events included intraoperative neck fracture (n = 6, subsidence (n = 1, periprosthetic fracture (n = 1, paresthesia (n = 12, and trochanteric bursitis (n = 2. After early modification of the technique to use a smaller finishing broach, the CUSUM test demonstrated acceptable intraoperative neck fracture risk. The second surgery group had a reduced risk of intraoperative neck fracture (5/69 vs. 1/69 P = 0.2, reduced operative time (66 vs. 61 min, P = 0.06, and increased stem size (5 vs. 6, P = 0.09 although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The MiniHip stem is safe alternative to standard THR with good

  10. Prolonged knee pain relief by saphenous block (new technique

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    Rajeev Harshe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain in the knee joint can be from a variety of reasons. It can be either from the joint itself, it can be myofascial or it can be neuropathy, radicular pain. The myofascial component can be in different forms, namely, collateral ligament pain, bursitis, tendinitis, and so on. This responds well to local injections of steroids. Pain from the joint can be because of osteoarthritis (OA, rheumatoid arthritis or any other variety of arthritis. Among these osteoarthritis is the most common and naturally occurring pain. There are several modalities used for managing pain in the knee joint. They include medicines and physiotherapy, intra-articular steroid injection, intra-articular Hyalgan, Synvisc injection, prolotherapy, genicular nerve block, ablation, intra-articular pulsed radio frequency (PRF ablation, acupuncture, injection of platelet-rich plasma in the joint, total knee replacement, high tibial osteotomy, arthroscopy and lavage, and so on. All these modalities have their pros and cons. Literature and experience state that the pain relief provided may last for a few months with these modalities except in surgical interventions in advanced OA. The saphenous nerve is termination of femoral nerve and it is essentially sensory nerve. It supplies the medial compartment and some part of the anterior compartment of the knee joint. This nerve has been blocked near the knee joint by way of infiltration by surgeons and anesthetists, for relief of pain after knee surgery, with varying pain relief of postoperative pain. When we block the saphenous in the mid thigh in the sartorial canal, the fluid tends to block the medial branch of the anterior femoral cutaneous nerve also. It is hypothesized that this may give complete medial and anterior knee pain relief and as most of the knee OA patients have medial and anterior knee pain, this may prove useful. Use of ultrasonography helps to locate the nerve better, ensuring perfection. An effort has been made to

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor 121 and 165 in the subacromial bursa are involved in shoulder joint contracture in type II diabetics with rotator cuff disease.

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    Handa, Akiyoshi; Gotoh, Masafumi; Hamada, Kazutoshi; Yanagisawa, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Masato; Ueyama, Yoshito; Mochida, Joji; Fukuda, Hiroaki

    2003-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a glycoprotein that plays an important role in neovascularization and increases vascular permeability. We reported that VEGF is involved in motion pain of patients with rotator cuff disease by causing synovial proliferation in the subacromial bursa (SAB). The present study investigates whether VEGF is also involved in the development of shoulder contracture in diabetics with rotator cuff disease. We examined 67 patients with rotator cuff disease, including 36 with complete cuff tears, 20 with incomplete tears, and 11 without apparent tears (subacromial bursitis). The patients were into groups according to the presence or absence of diabetes (14 type II diabetics and 53 non-diabetics). Specimens of the synovium of the SAB were obtained from all patients during surgery. Expression of the VEGF gene in the synovium of the subacromial bursa was evaluated by using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The VEGF protein was localized by immunohistochemistry, and the number of vessels was evaluated based on CD34 immunoreactivity. The results showed that VEGF mRNA was expressed in significantly more diabetics (100%, 14/14) than in non-diabetics (70%, 37/53) (P=0.0159, Fisher's test). Investigation of VEGF isoform expression revealed VEGF121 in all 14 diabetics and in 37 of the 53 non-diabetics, VEGF165 in 12 of the 14 diabetics and in 21 of the 53 non-diabetics, and VEGF189 in 1 of the 14 diabetics and in 2 of the 53 non-diabetics. No VEGF206 was expressed in either group. VEGF protein was localized in both vascular endothelial cells and synovial lining cells. The mean number of VEGF-positive vessels and the vessel area were also significantly greater in the diabetics (pshoulder joint contracture were more common in the diabetics (P=0.0329 and P=0.073, respectively; Fisher's test). The mean preoperative range of shoulder motion significantly differed in terms of elevation between two groups: 103.8 degrees in

  12. Sex and growth effect on pediatric hip injuries presenting to sports medicine clinic.

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    Stracciolini, Andrea; Yen, Yi-Meng; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A; Lewis, Cara L; Sugimoto, Dai

    2016-07-01

    To compare sports-related hip injuries on the basis of sex and age in a cohort of young athletes. A 5% random probability sample of all new patients' charts over a 10-year time period was selected for investigation. The most common hip injury diagnoses, sport at time of injury, mechanism (acute/traumatic vs. overuse), and types (bony vs. soft tissue) were compared by sex and age (preadolescent vs. adolescent). Descriptive and χ-analyses were carried out. The interaction of sex and age with respect to hip injury over time was examined by two-way (sex, age) analysis of variance. A total of 2133 charts were reviewed; N=87 hip injuries. The main diagnoses for males included labral tear (23.1%), avulsion fracture (11.5%), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (11.5%), dislocation (7.7%), and tendonitis (7.7%). The main diagnoses for females were labral tear (59.0%), tendonitis (14.8%), snapping hip syndrome (6.6%), strain (4.9%), and bursitis (4.9%). The five most common sports/activities at the time of hip injury were dancing/ballet (23.0%), soccer (18.4%), gymnastics (9.2%), ice hockey (8.1%), and track and field (6.9%). Age by sex comparisons showed a greater proportion of the total hip injuries (38.5%) in males compared with females (8.2%) during preadolescence (5-12 years). However, in adolescence (13-17 years), the hip injury proportion was significantly higher in females (91.8%) compared with males (61.5%; PInjury mechanism and type differed by sex, with females sustaining more chronic/overuse (95.1%) and soft tissue type injuries (93.4%) compared with males (50.0 and 53.8%, respectively; Pinjury proportion as they progressed through puberty compared with males (analysis of variance sex-by-age interaction; Pinjury mechanism and type differed significantly between males and females during growth. Notably, the proportion of hip injuries in the young female athletes showed a significantly greater increase with advancing age compared with males. Hip injuries in children

  13. The effects of intratendinous and retrocalcaneal intrabursal injections of corticosteroid on the biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons.

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    Hugate, Ronald; Pennypacker, Jason; Saunders, Marnie; Juliano, Paul

    2004-04-01

    The use of corticosteroid injections in the treatment of retrocalcaneal bursitis is controversial. We assessed the effects of corticosteroid injections, both within the tendon substance and into the retrocalcaneal bursa, on the biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons. The systemic effects of bilateral corticosteroid injections were also studied. The rabbits were divided into three treatment groups. The rabbits in Group I received injections of corticosteroid into the Achilles tendon on the left side and injections of normal saline solution into the Achilles tendon on the right, those in Group II received injections of corticosteroid into the retrocalcaneal bursa on the left side and injections of saline solution into the Achilles tendon on the right, and those in Group III received injections of corticosteroid into the Achilles tendon on the left side and injections of corticosteroid into the retrocalcaneal bursa on the right. These injections were given weekly for three weeks. At four weeks after the final injection, the tendons were harvested and were tested biomechanically to determine failure load, midsubstance strain and total strain, modulus of elasticity, failure stress, and total energy absorbed. The site of failure was also documented. The groups were compared according to the location of the injections, the type of injection (steroid or saline solution), and the total systemic load of steroid. Specimens from limbs that had received intratendinous injections of corticosteroid showed significantly decreased failure stress compared with those from limbs that had received intratendinous injections of saline solution (p = 0.008). Specimens from limbs that had received intrabursal injections of corticosteroid demonstrated significantly decreased failure stress (p = 0.05), significantly decreased total energy absorbed (p = 0.017), and significantly increased total strain (p = 0.049) compared with specimens from limbs that had received intratendinous

  14. The outcome of endoscopy for recalcitrant greater trochanteric pain syndrome.

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    Drummond, James; Fary, Camdon; Tran, Phong

    2016-11-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS), previously referred as trochanteric bursitis, is a debilitating condition characterised by chronic lateral hip pain. The syndrome is thought to relate to gluteal tendinopathy, with most cases responding to non-operative treatment. A number of open and endoscopic surgical techniques targeting the iliotibial band, trochanteric bursa and gluteal tendons have, however, been described for severe recalcitrant cases. We report the outcomes of one such endoscopic approach here. We retrospectively reviewed 49 patients (57 operations) who had undergone endoscopic longitudinal vertical iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy. Inclusion criteria included diagnosed GTPS with a minimum of six months of non-operative treatment. Exclusion criteria included concomitant intra- or extra-articular hip pathology and previous hip surgery including total hip arthroplasty. Outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale, Oxford hip Score and International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33). The series included 42 females and 7 males with a mean age of 65.0 years (26.7-88.6). Mean follow-up time was 20.7 months (5.3-41.2). Eight patients had full thickness gluteal tendon tears, of which 7 were repaired. Adjuvant PRP was injected intraoperatively in 38 of 57 operations (67.2 %). At follow-up, overall mean Visual Analogue Scale values had decreased from 7.8 to 2.8 (p < 0.001), Oxford hip Scores had increased from 20.4 to 37.3 (p < 0.001) and iHOT-33 scores had increased from 23.8 to 70.2 (p < 0.001). Of the 57 operations performed, patients reported feeling very satisfied with the surgical outcome in 28 operations (49.1 %), satisfied in 17 operations (29.8 %) and less than satisfied in 12 operations (21.1 %). While the majority of patients with GTPS will improve with non-operative management, endoscopic iliotibial band release, trochanteric bursectomy and gluteal tendon repair is a safe and effective treatment for severe

  15. Effect of corticosteroid injection for trochanter pain syndrome: design of a randomised clinical trial in general practice

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    Verhaar Jan AN

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regional pain in the hip in adults is a common cause of a general practitioner visit. A considerable part of patients suffer from (greater trochanteric pain syndrome or trochanteric bursitis. Local corticosteroid injections is one of the treatment options. Although clear evidence is lacking, small observational studies suggest that this treatment is effective in the short-term follow-up. So far, there are no randomised controlled trials available evaluating the efficacy of injection therapy. This study will investigate the efficacy of local corticosteroid injections in the trochanter syndrome in the general practice, using a randomised controlled trial design. The cost effectiveness of the corticosteroid injection therapy will also be assessed. Secondly, the role of co-morbidity in relation to the efficacy of local corticosteroid injections will be investigated. Methods/Design This study is a pragmatic, open label randomised trial. A total of 150 patients (age 18–80 years visiting the general practitioner with complaints suggestive of trochanteric pain syndrome will be allocated to receive local corticosteroid injections or to receive usual care. Usual care consists of analgesics as needed. The randomisation is stratified for yes or no co-morbidity of low back pain, osteoarthritis of the hip, or both. The treatment will be evaluated by means of questionnaires at several time points within one year, with the 3 month and 1 year evaluation of pain and recovery as primary outcome. Analyses of primary and secondary outcomes will be made according to the intention-to-treat principle. Direct and indirect costs will be assessed by questionnaires. The cost effectiveness will be estimated using the following ratio: CE ratio = (cost of injection therapy minus cost of usual care/(effect of injection therapy minus effect of usual care. Discussion This study design is appropriate to estimate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the

  16. The Maastricht Ultrasound Shoulder pain trial (MUST: Ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of patients with non-chronic shoulder pain in primary care

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    Cals Jochen WL

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial disorders are considered to be one of the most common pathologies affecting the shoulder. Optimal therapy for shoulder pain (SP in primary care is yet unknown, since clinical history and physical examination do not provide decisive evidence as to the patho-anatomical origin of the symptoms. Optimal decision strategies can be furthered by applying ultrasound imaging (US, an accurate method in diagnosing SP, demonstrating a clear relationship between diagnosis and available therapies. Yet, the clinical cost-effectiveness of applying US in the management of SP in primary care has not been studied. The aim of this paper is to describe the design and methods of a trial assessing the cost-effectiveness of ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of primary care patients with non-chronic shoulder pain. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial (RCT will involve 226 adult patients with suspected subacromial disorders recruited by general practitioners. During a Qualification period of two weeks, patients receive care as usual as advised by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, and patients are referred for US. Patients with insufficient improvement qualify for the RCT. These patients are then randomly assigned to the intervention or the control group. The therapies used in both groups are the same (corticosteroid injections, referral to a physiotherapist or orthopedic surgeon except that therapies used in the intervention group will be tailored based on the US results. Ultrasound diagnosed disorders include tendinopathy, calcific tendinitis, partial and full thickness tears, and subacromial bursitis. The primary outcome is patient-perceived recovery at 52 weeks, using the Global Perceived Effect questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are disease specific and generic quality of life, cost-effectiveness, and the adherence to the initial applied treatment. Outcome measures will be assessed

  17. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

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    Jensen Lilli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA, meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks. Methods Data on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS were collected by questionnaires. In total 134 floor layers and 120 graphic designers had a bilateral radiographic knee examination to detect TF OA and patella-femoral (PF OA. A random sample of 92 floor layers and 49 graphic designers had Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of both knees to examine meniscal tears. Means of the subscales of KOOS were compared by analysis of variance. The risk ratio of symptomatic knee disorders defined as a combination of radiological detected knee OA or MRI-detected meniscal tears combined with a low KOOS score was estimated by logistic regression in floor layers with 95% confidence interval (CI and adjusted for age, body mass index, traumas, and knee-straining sports activities. Symptomatic knee OA or meniscal tears were defined as a combination of low KOOS-scores and radiographic or MRI pathology. Results Symptomatic TF and medial meniscal tears were found in floor layers compared to graphic designers with odds ratios 2.6 (95%CI 0.99-6.9 and 2.04 (95% CI 0.77-5.5, respectively. There were no differences in PF OA. Floor layers scored significantly lower on all KOOS subscales compared to graphic designers. Significantly lower scores on the KOOS subscales were also found for radiographic TF and PF OA regardless of trade but not for meniscal tears. Conclusions The study showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic TF OA in a group of floor layers with a substantial amount of kneeling work positions. Prevention would be appropriate to reduce the

  18. Prototecose: uma doença emergente Protothecosis: an emergent disease

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    Expedito K.A. Camboim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prototecose, causada por Prototheca zopfii ou P. wickerhamii, é uma doença emergente em animais e humanos. Em bovinos, P. zopfii é uma importante causa de mastite ambiental. Em cães e gatos, a prototecose é causada principalmente por P. zopfii. Em cães, causa infecção cutânea ou uma forma sistêmica envolvendo diversos órgãos. Em gatos, predominam as lesões tegumentares na região da face e plano nasal. No homem, a prototecose, causada principalmente por P. wickerhamii, manifesta-se sob três formas: cutânea, articular com bursite do olécrano e sistêmica. Pode ocorrer em indivíduos imunocompetentes, os quais podem apresentar bursite e/ou infecções cutâneas localizadas, ou em indivíduos imunossuprimidos, nos quais a enfermidade pode ser disseminada e/ou com envolvimento visceral. A prototecose causada por P. wickerhamii foi descrita recentemente em caprinos como causa de rinite afetando o vestíbulo nasal, união mucocutânea, pele da face e orelha. Nesta revisão são abordadas as características microbiologias e susceptibilidade a antimicrobianos do agente, e a epidemiologia, sinais clínicos, patologia, diagnóstico, tratamento e controle da prototecose em animais domésticos e no homem.Protothecosis, caused by Prototheca zopfii or P. wickerhamii, is an emergent disease of human and animals. In cattle, P. zopfii is an important cause of environmental mastitis. In dogs and cats protothecosis is caused mainly by P. zopfii, causing cutaneous infections or a systemic form affecting many organs in dogs, and cutaneous infection affecting mainly the skin of the face and nose in cats. In humans, protothecosis, caused mainly by P. wickerhamii, occurs in three forms: cutaneous; olecran bursitis; and disseminated. The lesion is usually localized in the site of inoculation in immunocompetent individuals; however, in immunocompromised patients, it can become widespread. Protothecosis caused by P. wickerhamii was recently reported in

  19. Imaging of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karantanas, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Standard radiographs represent the basic tool of hip joint imaging. For detailed analysis of abnormalities related to bone marrow, articular cartilage, labrum and periarticular soft tissues, MRI has become the method of choice. MR arthrography is superior to standard MRI with regard to depicting the intra-articular abnormalities. CT is supporting plain radiographs for accurate depiction of subtle bone details. Ultrasound is commonly used in postoperative hematoma, bursitis, initial diagnosis of cysts and solid soft tissue tumors as well as for image guided injections and biopsies. Bone scintigraphy is suitable for the mapping of multifocal disease, such as osseous metastatic deposits. PET and PET/CT may be able to differentiate malignant neoplasm and infection from other abnormalities. A common disorder often requested for evaluation, is osteoarthritis. MRI is able to depict early degenerative changes which are occult on plain radiographs. CT- or MR arthrography provide a better evaluation of these changes but should only be performed in cases in which conservative surgery is considered to offer a significant clinical improvement for the patient. These cases include cam type femoroacetabular impingement and traumatic chondrolysis. MRI is an imaging technique that allows direct visualization of the bone marrow. Marrow disorders of the hip may induce a variety of imaging findings and frequently are not detected by conventional radiographic techniques until they have reached an advanced clinical stage. The excellent spatial and contrast resolution provided by MRI facilitates early detection and evaluation of various disorders allowing thus prompt treatment. Imaging findings may alter or guide the correct treatment. In addition, the association of marrow changes and pain such as in osteonecrosis and osteoarthritis is clinically relevant. For imaging the bone marrow, we use a combination of pulse sequences, including T1-w spin echo, PD/T2-w turbo spin echo

  20. Ultra-sonografia na artrite reumatóide: aplicabilidade e perspectivas Ultrasonography in rheumatoid arthritis: applicability and expectations

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    Eloy de Ávila Fernandes

    2008-02-01

    between active inflammatory tissue (pannus and inactive inflammatory tissues. Erosions, tenossynovitis, bursitis, cysts and effusions can also be found. This article demonstrates that methods to quantify de inflammatory activity on ultrasound must yet be established.