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Sample records for burning imaging studies

  1. A thematic study of the role of social support in the body image of burn survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie Hodder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that social support is important for the development and mainte- nance of body image satisfaction for people who have sustained burn injuries. This qualitative study explored the specific mechanisms by which social support impacts the body image satisfaction of burn survivors, drawing on nine participants’ in depth accounts. Participants were recruited through a burns unit at a public hospital in South Australia. Interviews were conducted with nine female burn survivors aged between 24 and 65 (mean age 44.6. Participants described their perceptions about their appearance post burn and their social support experiences. Four themes were identified: acceptance, social comparison, talking about appearance concerns, and the gaze of others. Results indicate that for these participants, social support was an important factor in coming to terms with changes in appearance, specifically support that helps to minimise feelings of difference. Unhelpful aspects of social support were also identified included feeling that suffering was being dismissed and resenting the perceived expectation from supports to be positive. Social supports are important to consider in relation to body image for those working with people who have survived burn injuries.

  2. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2004-12-19

    Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and {sigma}{sub {lambda}}, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, {gamma} and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu}) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between f{Delta}{mu}s in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the

  3. Assessing differences in phenology patterns between burned and non burned areas using MODIS and Landsat time series satellite images. A case study in Peloponnisos (Greece) and Sardinia (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsias, Nikos; Bajocco, Sofia

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation phenology is an important element of vegetation characteristics that can be useful in vegetation monitoring especially when satellite remote sensing observations are used. In that sense temporal profiles extracted from spectral signal of time series satellite images can be used to characterize vegetation phenology and thus can be helpful for assessing, for example, phenology patterns between burned and non-burned areas. The aim of this study is to define phenological patterns for the fire ignition points in two Mediterranean study areas located in Italy (Sardinia) and Greece (Peloponnisos) and compare them with control points created after random sampling techniques restricted to certain buffer zones. Remotely sensed data from MODIS (2000-2015) and LANDSAT (1984-2015) satellites were acquired and processed to extract the temporal profiles of the spectral signal of fire ignition points and of control points. Apart of the use of the original spectral data, we used vegetation indices commonly found in vegetation studies as well as in burned area mapping studies. Different metrics linked to key phenological events have been derived and used to assess vegetation phenology in the fire-affected areas.

  4. Study of flow field of burning particles in a pyrotechnic flame based on particle image and particle velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, R.; Xu, H. Q.; Li, Y.; Zhu, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    Studying the burning particles in the pyrotechnic flame is important to acquire the decomposition mechanism and spectral radiance of pyrotechnics. The high speed video (HSV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used in this paper to analyze the flow field and velocity of burning particles in the flame of pyrotechnics. The binary image was obtained through gray scale treatment and adaptive threshold segmentation from HSV and PIV data, by which the coordinate of each particle was marked. On the basis, the movement trajectory of each particle during combustion was pursued by the most recent guidelines algorithm of cancroids matching. Through the method proposed in this study, the velocity variation of each particle was obtained, the approximate distribution of particle quantity at each zone was visualized and the mathematical model of pyrotechnic particle velocity flow field was established.

  5. Spatial frequency domain imaging of burn wounds in a preclinical model of graded burn severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, John Quan; Crouzet, Christian; Mai, Tuan; Riola, Kathleen; Uchitel, Daniel; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Bernal, Nicole; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2013-06-01

    Frequent monitoring of early-stage burns is necessary for deciding optimal treatment and management. Both superficial and full thickness burns are relatively easy to diagnose based on clinical observation. In between these two extremes are superficial-partial thickness and deep-partial thickness burns. These burns, while visually similar, differ dramatically in terms of clinical treatment and are known to progress in severity over time. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) for noninvasively mapping quantitative changes in chromophore and optical properties that may be an indicative of burn wound severity. A controlled protocol of graded burn severity was developed and applied to 17 rats. SFDI data was acquired at multiple near-infrared wavelengths over a course of 3 h. Burn severity was verified using hematoxylin and eosin histology. From this study, we found that changes in water concentration (edema), deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and optical scattering (tissue denaturation) to be statistically significant at differentiating superficial partial-thickness burns from deep-partial thickness burns.

  6. BACTERIOLOGICAL STUDY OF BURNS INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Shareen; Basavarajappa; Hanumanthappa

    2015-01-01

    A burn is a wound in which there is coagulative necrosis of the tissue, majority of which are caused by heat. Burn injury is a major public health problem in many areas of the world. Burns predispose to infection by damaging the protective barrier function of the skin, thus facilitating the entry of pa thogenic microorganisms and by inducing systemic immunosuppression . (1) OBJECTIVE : The present study was therefore undertaken to isolate and identify the a...

  7. Reclaiming body image: the hidden burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis-Helmich, J J

    1992-01-01

    At the age of 4, I incurred a major burn injury that left 45% of my body with permanent scars. Normal clothing covers most of the scars. I was able to reclaim a positive body image through a gradual process of verbal and "body" disclosure. As an adult, I joined a burn survivors' self-help group; as a result of talking with other burn survivors, my self expectations increased. Later, I joined a facilitated group in which nudity and personal growth were the norm. In this group, I was the only person who had experienced a major physical trauma. I replaced my strongly held beliefs that others could not accept my unclothed, burn-injured body with the belief that some persons can, and I came to a personal understanding of why others could not. Fun, exercise, and relaxation led to a reclamation of positive feelings about my unclothed body and allowed my femininity and the character of my body image to emerge and become integrated. PMID:1572860

  8. BACTERIOLOGICAL STUDY OF BURNS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shareen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A burn is a wound in which there is coagulative necrosis of the tissue, majority of which are caused by heat. Burn injury is a major public health problem in many areas of the world. Burns predispose to infection by damaging the protective barrier function of the skin, thus facilitating the entry of pa thogenic microorganisms and by inducing systemic immunosuppression . (1 OBJECTIVE : The present study was therefore undertaken to isolate and identify the aerobic bacterial flora in burn patients and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern. MATERIAL & METHODS : A total of 100 patients admitted with different degree of burns were studied. Wound swabs were taken with aseptic precautions by dry sterile cotton swab sticks. These swabs were transported to the microbiology laboratory and the isolates were identified based on standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done by Kirby Bauer’s disc diffusion method. RESULT : A total of 127 bacterial pathogens were isolated from 100 patients. Of these, 69% were monomicrobial in nature and 28% wer e polymicrobial. The most frequent cause of infection was found to be Staphylococcus aureus (39.4%, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14.2%, Klebsiella pneumonia (13.4%, E.coli (8.7% and Acinetobacter species (7.9%.Out of the total Staphylococcus au reus isolates, 19 were Methicillin sensitive and 31 were Methicillin resistant (MRSA. All the MRSA strains were 100% sensitive to Vancomycin and Linezolid. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were most sensitive to Amikacin (9 4.4%, Fluroquinolones (61.1% . CONCLUSION : Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were major causes of infection in burn wounds. Therefore it is necessary to implement urgent measures for restriction of nosocomial infections, sensible limitation on the use of antimicrobial agents, strict disinfection and hygiene.

  9. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Imaging Studies of in vitro Carcinoma and Normal Cells Utilizing a Mitochondrial Specific Dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Joseph Walsh

    2002-06-27

    Low temperature Nonphotochemical Hole Burning (NPHB) Spectroscopy of the dye rhodamine 800 (MF680) was applied for the purpose of discerning differences between cultured normal and carcinoma ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. Both the cell lines were developed and characterized at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN), with the normal cell line having been transfected with a strain of temperature sensitive Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen (SV40) for the purpose of extending the life of the cell culture without inducing permanent changes in the characteristics of the cell line. The cationic lipophilic fluorophore rhodamine 800 preferentially locates in in situ mitochondria due to the high lipid composition of mitochondria and the generation of a large negative membrane potential (relative to the cellular cytoplasm) for oxidative phosphorylation. Results presented for NPHB of MF680 located in the cells show significant differences between the two cell lines. The results are interpreted on the basis of the NPHB mechanism and characteristic interactions between the host (cellular mitochondrial) and the guest (MF680) in the burning of spectral holes, thus providing an image of the cellular ultrastructure. Hole growth kinetics (HGK) were found to differ markedly between the two cell lines, with the carcinoma cell line burning at a faster average rate for the same exposure fluence. Theoretical fits to the data suggest a lower degree of structural heterogeneity in the carcinoma cell line relative to the normal cell line. Measurement of changes in the permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu}) were accomplished by measurement of changes in hole width in response to the application of an external electric field (the Stark effect), and found that {Delta}{mu} values for the carcinoma line were 1.5x greater than those of the SV40 antigen-free normal analogs. These findings are interpreted in terms of effects from the mitochondrial membrane potential. Results for HGK on the scale of

  10. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Imaging Studies of In Vitro Carcinoma and Normal Cells Utilizing a Mitochondrial Specific Dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Joseph Walsh

    2002-08-01

    Low temperature Nonphotochemical Hole Burning (NPHB) Spectroscopy of the dye rhodamine 800 (MF680) was applied for the purpose of discerning differences between cultured normal and carcinoma ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. Both the cell lines were developed and characterized at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN), with the normal cell line having been transfected with a strain of temperature sensitive Simian Virus 40 Large T Antigen (SV40) for the purpose of extending the life of the cell culture without inducing permanent changes in the characteristics of the cell line. The cationic lipophilic fluorophore rhodamine 800 preferentially locates in in situ mitochondria due to the high lipid composition of mitochondria and the generation of a large negative membrane potential (relative to the cellular cytoplasm) for oxidative phosphorylation. Results presented for NPHB of MF680 located in the cells show significant differences between the two cell lines. The results are interpreted on the basis of the NPHB mechanism and characteristic interactions between the host (cellular mitochondrial) and the guest (MF680) in the burning of spectral holes, thus providing an image of the cellular ultrastructure. Hole growth kinetics (HGK) were found to differ markedly between the two cell lines, with the carcinoma cell line burning at a faster average rate for the same exposure fluence. Theoretical fits to the data suggest a lower degree of structural heterogeneity in the carcinoma cell line relative to the normal cell line. Measurement of changes in the permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu})were accomplished by measurement of changes in hole width in response to the application of an external electric field (the Stark effect), and found that {Delta}{mu} values for the carcinoma line were 1.5x greater than those of the SV40 antigen-free normal analogs. These findings are interpreted in terms of effects from the mitochondrial membrane potential. Results for HGK on the scale of

  11. [Quantification of crop residue burned areas based on burning indices using Landsat 8 image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-hang; Song, Kai-shar; Wen, Zhi-dan; Shao, Tian-tian; Li, Bo-nan; Qi, Cai

    2015-11-01

    Crop residue burning leads to atmospheric pollution and is an enormous waste of crop residue resource. Crop residue burning can be monitored timely in large regions as the fire points can be recognized through remotely sensed image via thermal infrared bands. However, the area, the detailed distribution pattern and especially the severity of the burning areas cannot be derived only by the thermal remote sensing approach. The burning index, which was calculated with two or more spectral bands at where the burned and unburned areas have distinct spectral characteristics, is widely used in the forest fire investigation. However its potential application for crop residue burning evaluation has not been explored. With two Landsat 8 images that cover a part of the Songnen Plain, three burning indices, i.e., the normalized burned ratio (NBR), the normalized burned ratio incorporating the thermal band (NBRT), and the burned area index (BAI), were used to classify the crop residue burned and unburned areas. The overall classification accuracies were 91.9%, 92.3%, and 87.8%, respectively. The correlation analysis between the indices and the crop residue coverage indicated that the NBR and NBRT were positively correlated with the crop residue coverage (R2 = 0.73 and 0.64, respectively) with linear regression models, while the BAI was exponentially correlated with the crop residue coverage (R2 = 0.68). The results indicated that the use of burning indices in crop residue burning monitoring could quantify crop residue burning severity and provide valuable data for evaluating atmospheric pollution. PMID:26915202

  12. In vivo imaging of human burn injuries with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

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    Kim, Ki Hean; Pierce, Mark C.; Maguluri, Gopi; Park, B. Hyle; Yoon, Sang June; Lydon, Martha; Sheridan, Robert; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-06-01

    The accurate determination of burn depth is critical in the clinical management of burn wounds. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been proposed as a potentially non-invasive method for determining burn depth by measuring thermally induced changes in the structure and birefringence of skin, and has been investigated in pre-clinical burn studies with animal models and ex vivo human skin. In this study, we applied PS-OCT to the in-vivo imaging of two pediatric burn patients. Deep and superficial burned skins along with contralateral controls were imaged in 3D. The imaging size was 8 mm×6 mm×2 mm in width, length, and depth in the air respectively, and the imaging time was approximately 6 s per volume. Superficially burned skins exhibited the same layered structure as the contralateral controls, but more visible vasculature and reduced birefringence compared to the contralateral controls. In contrast, a deeply burned skin showed loss of the layered structure, almost absent vasculature, and smaller birefringence compared to superficial burns. This study suggested the vasculature and birefringence as parameters for characterizing burn wounds.

  13. Burned Area Mapping in Greece Using SPOT-4 HRVIR Images and Object-Based Image Analysis

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    Anastasia Polychronaki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The devastating series of fire events that occurred during the summers of 2007 and 2009 in Greece made evident the need for an operational mechanism to map burned areas in an accurate and timely fashion to be developed. In this work, Système pour l’Observation de la Terre (SPOT-4 HRVIR images are introduced in an object-based classification environment in order to develop a classification procedure for burned area mapping. The development of the procedure was based on two images and then tested for its transferability to other burned areas. Results from the SPOT-4 HRVIR burned area mapping showed very high classification accuracies ( 0.86 kappa coefficient, while the object-based classification procedure that was developed proved to be transferable when applied to other study areas.

  14. Burn severity estimation using GeoEye imagery, object-based image analysis (OBIA), and Composite Burn Index (CBI) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragozi, E.; Gitas, Ioannis Z.; Stavrakoudis, Dimitris G.; Minakou, C.

    2015-06-01

    Forest fires greatly influence the stability and functions of the forest ecosystems. The ever increasing need for accurate and detailed information regarding post-fire effects (burn severity) has led to several studies on the matter. In this study the combined use of Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite data (GeoEye), Objectbased image analysis (OBIA) and Composite Burn Index (CBI) measurements in estimating burn severity, at two different time points (2011 and 2012) is assessed. The accuracy of the produced maps was assessed and changes in burn severity between the two dates were detected using the post classification comparison approach. It was found that the produced burn severity map for 2011 was approximately 10% more accurate than that of 2012. This was mainly attributed to the increased heterogeneity of the study area in the second year, which led to an increased number of mixed class objects and consequently made it more difficult to spectrally discriminate between the severity classes. Following the post-classification analysis, the severity class changes were mainly attributed to the trees' ability to survive severe fire damage and sprout new leaves. Moreover, the results of the study suggest that when classifying CBI-based burn severity using VHR imagery it would be preferable to use images captured soon after the fire.

  15. In vivo terahertz imaging of rat skin burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Priyamvada; Kealey, Colin P.; Bennett, David B.; Bajwa, Neha; Barnett, Kelli S.; Singh, Rahul S.; Culjat, Martin O.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zachary D.

    2012-04-01

    A reflective, pulsed terahertz (THz) imaging system was used to acquire high-resolution (d10-90/ λ~1.925) images of deep, partial thickness burns in a live rat. The rat's abdomen was burned with a brass brand heated to ~220°C and pressed against the skin with contact pressure for ~10 sec. The burn injury was imaged beneath a Mylar window every 15 to 30 min for up to 7 h. Initial images display an increase in local water concentration of the burned skin as evidenced by a marked increase in THz reflectivity, and this likely correlates to the post-injury inflammatory response. After ~1 h the area of increased reflectivity consolidated to the region of skin that had direct contact with the brand. Additionally, a low reflecting ring of tissue could be observed surrounding the highly reflective burned tissue. We hypothesize that these regions of increased and decreased reflectivity correlate to the zones of coagulation and stasis that are the classic foundation of burn wound histopathology. While further investigations are necessary to confirm this hypothesis, if true, it likely represents the first in vivo THz images of these pathologic zones and may represent a significant step forward in clinical application of THz technology.

  16. Burns

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    ... Chemical burns Burns can be the result of: House and industrial fires Car accidents Playing with matches ... hairs Burned lips and mouth Coughing Difficulty breathing Dark, black-stained mucus Voice changes Wheezing

  17. Diagnosis of Burn Images using Template Matching, k-Nearest Neighbor and Artificial Neural Network

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    Malini Suvarna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop an automated method of determining the severity of skin burn wounds. Towards achieving this aim, a database of skin burn images has been created by collecting images from hospitals, doctors and the Internet. The initial pre-processing involves contrast enhancement in lab color space by taking luminance component. Various pattern analysis or pattern classifier techniques viz. Template Matching (TM, k Nearest Neighbor Classifier (kNN and Artificial Neural Network (ANN have been applied on skin burn images and a performance comparison of the three techniques has been made. The help of dermatologists and plastic surgeons has been taken to label the images with skin burn grades and are used to train the classifiers. The algorithms are optimized on pre-labeled images, by fine-tuning the classifier parameters. During the course of research, of the three classifier methods used for classification of burn images it has been observed that the ANN technique reflected the best results. This has been inferred based on the comparative studies of the three methods. In the ANN method the classification of the image of burns has been found to be the nearest to the actual burns. The efficiency of the analysis and classification of the ANN technique has been of the order of 95% for Grade-1 burns, 97.5% for Grade-2 burns and 95% for Grade-3 burns. As compared to 55%, 72.5% and 70% for Grade1, Grade2, and Grade 3 burns respectively for the TM Method and 67.5%, 82.5% and 75% for kNN method. It is therefore felt that the ANN technique could be applied to analyze and classify the severity of burns. This burn analysis technique could be safely used in remote location where specialists’ services are not readily available. The local doctors could use the analyzer and classify the grade of the burn with a good degree of accuracy and certainty. They could start preliminary treatment accordingly, prior to specialists’ services. This

  18. The Research on Transient Burning Rate of Solid Propellant by Digital Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain the burn rate of the solid propellant that is the important parameter of transient burning, the new method named digital image processing is presented. In the article , the principle of digital image processing is analysed; The burning face of the sample in the each time is located according the image and the coordinates of the burning face is obtained. In experiment the transient burn rate is measured by digital image processing and the accuracy is acceptable.

  19. Zone-plate coded imaging of thermonuclear burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first high-resolution, direct images of the region of thermonuclear burn in laser fusion experiments have been produced using a novel, two-step imaging technique called zone-plate coded imaging. This technique is extremely versatile and well suited for the microscopy of laser fusion targets. It has a tomographic capability, which provides three-dimensional images of the source distribution. It is equally useful for imaging x-ray and particle emissions. Since this technique is much more sensitive than competing imaging techniques, it permits us to investigate low-intensity sources

  20. Thermal parametric imaging in the evaluation of skin burn depth.

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    Rumiński, Jacek; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Renkielska, Alicja; Nowakowski, Antoni

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the extent to which infrared (IR) thermal imaging may be used for skin burn depth evaluation. The analysis can be made on the basis of the development of a thermal model of the burned skin. Different methods such as the traditional clinical visual approach and the IR imaging modalities of static IR thermal imaging, active IR thermal imaging and active-dynamic IR thermal imaging (ADT) are analyzed from the point of view of skin burn depth diagnostics. In ADT, a new approach is proposed on the basis of parametric image synthesis. Calculation software is implemented for single-node and distributed systems. The properties of all the methods are verified in experiments using phantoms and subsequently in vivo with animals with a reference histopathological examination. The results indicate that it is possible to distinguish objectively and quantitatively burns which will heal spontaneously within three weeks of infliction and which should be treated conservatively from those which need surgery because they will not heal within this period. PMID:17278587

  1. Outlier detection and removal improves accuracy of machine learning approach to multispectral burn diagnostic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weizhi; Mo, Weirong; Zhang, Xu; Squiers, John J.; Lu, Yang; Sellke, Eric W.; Fan, Wensheng; DiMaio, J. Michael; Thatcher, Jeffrey E.

    2015-12-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) was implemented to develop a burn tissue classification device to assist burn surgeons in planning and performing debridement surgery. To build a classification model via machine learning, training data accurately representing the burn tissue was needed, but assigning raw MSI data to appropriate tissue classes is prone to error. We hypothesized that removing outliers from the training dataset would improve classification accuracy. A swine burn model was developed to build an MSI training database and study an algorithm's burn tissue classification abilities. After the ground-truth database was generated, we developed a multistage method based on Z-test and univariate analysis to detect and remove outliers from the training dataset. Using 10-fold cross validation, we compared the algorithm's accuracy when trained with and without the presence of outliers. The outlier detection and removal method reduced the variance of the training data. Test accuracy was improved from 63% to 76%, matching the accuracy of clinical judgment of expert burn surgeons, the current gold standard in burn injury assessment. Given that there are few surgeons and facilities specializing in burn care, this technology may improve the standard of burn care for patients without access to specialized facilities.

  2. The importance of illumination in a non-contact photoplethysmography imaging system for burn wound assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Weirong; Mohan, Rachit; Li, Weizhi; Zhang, Xu; Sellke, Eric W.; Fan, Wensheng; DiMaio, J. Michael; Thatcher, Jeffery E.

    2015-02-01

    We present a non-contact, reflective photoplethysmogram (PPG) imaging method and a prototype system for identifying the presence of dermal burn wounds during a burn debridement surgery. This system aims to provide assistance to clinicians and surgeons in the process of dermal wound management and wound triage decisions. We examined the system variables of illumination uniformity and intensity and present our findings. An LED array, a tungsten light source, and eventually high-power LED emitters were studied as illumination methods for our PPG imaging device. These three different illumination sources were tested in a controlled tissue phantom model and an animal burn model. We found that the low heat and even illumination pattern using high power LED emitters provided a substantial improvement to the collected PPG signal in our animal burn model. These improvements allow the PPG signal from different pixels to be comparable in both time-domain and frequency-domain, simplify the illumination subsystem complexity, and remove the necessity of using high dynamic range cameras. Through the burn model output comparison, such as the blood volume in animal burn data and controlled tissue phantom model, our optical improvements have led to more clinically applicable images to aid in burn assessment.

  3. Exploration of the effects of burn parameters on THz wound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Neha; Sung, Shijun; Fishbein, Michael; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zachary D.

    2015-08-01

    The high contrast resolution afforded by terahertz (1 THz = 1012 Hz) imaging of physiologic tissue continues to drive explorations into the utility of THz technology for burn wound detection. Although we have previously reported the use of a novel, reflective THz imaging technology to sense spatiotemporal differences in reflectivity between partial and full thickness burn wounds, no evidence exists of a one-to-one correlation between structural damage observed in histological assessments of burn severity and THz signal. For example, varying burn induction methods may all result in a common burn wound severity, however, burn features observed in parallel THz imagery may not be identical. Successful clinical translation of THz technology as a comprehensive burn guidance tool, therefore, necessitates an understanding of THz signal and its relation to wound pathophysiology. In this work, longitudinal THz imagery was acquired with a quartz (n = 2.1, 500 μm) window of cutaneous wounds induced with the same brand geometry and contact pressure but varying contact times (5, 7, and 10 seconds) in in vivo, pre-clinical rat models (n=3) over a period of 3 days. Though all burn wounds were evaluated to be deep partial thickness with histology, THz contrasts observed for each burn contact time were intrinsically unique. This is the first preliminary in vivo evidence of a many-to-one relationship between changes in THz contrast and burn severity as ascertained by histology. Future large-scale studies are required to assess whether these observed changes in THz contrast may be interpreted as physiological changes occurring over time, morphometric changes related to anatomical change, or electromagnetic changes between dielectric substrate windows and the underlying tissue.

  4. Near-infrared hyperspectral imaging: the road traveled to a clinical burn application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Michelle; Leonardi, Lorenzo; Payette, Jeri; Kohlenberg, Elicia; Sowa, Michael; Fish, Joel S.; Cross, Karen; Gomez, Manuel

    2005-09-01

    The process of taking a concept to a clinical device begins with the idea for a technological solution to an unmet clinical challenge. Burns are one of the most destructive insults to the skin causing damage, scarring, and in some cases death. The approach most commonly used to evaluate burns is based on the appearance of the wound. This technique is somewhat subjective and unreliable, relying on clinical experience to assess the burn. Instrument based diagnostic techniques as an adjunct to current practices has the potential to enhance the quality and timeliness of decisions concerning wound assessment and treatment. Near Infrared Spectroscopy is a promising technique that can track changes within the tissue, and can therefore provide insight as to how deep the burn actually penetrates before visual signs become apparent. Preliminary bench and animal studies were used to prove the concept of a near infrared based method of burn assessment. This study demonstrated the ability of near infrared imaging to detect and monitor the hemodynamics of burn injuries in the early post-burn period. Based on this study, a pre-prototype near infrared spectroscopic system was built with the goal of developing a reliable yet simple system that could be used in a clinical setting. A pilot clinical study was designed and implemented at the Ross Tilley Burn Center (Toronto, Canada) in order to assess the feasibility of our strategy in the clinical realm. The goal of this preliminary clinical study was to determine if the pre-prototype could be integrated into the strict regiment of an active burn centre. Both the instrument performance in a clinical setting and the injury assessment based on the analysis of near infrared reflectance measurements were a success.

  5. Microbiological Monitoring and Proteolytic Study of Clinical Samples From Burned and Burned Wounded Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, clinical samples were collected from 100 patients admitted to Burn and Plastic Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Egypt, over a period of 12 months. The proteolytic activity of 110 clinical samples taken from surfaces swabs which taken from burned and burned wounded patients with different ages and gender was examined. Screening for the proteolytic activity produced by pathogenic bacteria isolated from burned and burned wounded patients was evaluated as gram positive Bacilli and gram negative bacilli showed high proteolytic activity (46.4%) while 17.9% showed no activity. The isolated bacteria proved to have proteolytic activity were classified into high, moderate and weak. The pathogenic bacteria isolated from burned and burned wounded patients and showing proteolytic activity were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella ozaeanae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas fluoresces.

  6. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... touching the stove This list is not all-inclusive. You can also burn your airways if you ... extinguishers in key locations at home, work, and school. Remove electrical cords from floors and keep them ...

  7. Spectral hole burning studies of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.C.

    1995-11-01

    Low temperature absorption and hole burning spectroscopies were applied to the D1-D2-cyt b{sub 559} and the CP47 and CP43 antenna protein complexes of Photosystem H from higher plants. Low temperature transient and persistent hole-burning data and theoretical calculations on the kinetics and temperature dependence of the P680 hole profile are presented and provide convincing support for the linker model. Implicit in the linker model is that the 684-nm-absorbing Chl a serve to shuttle energy from the proximal antenna complex to reaction center. The stoichiometry of isolated Photosystem H Reaction Center (PSII RC) in several different preparations is also discussed. The additional Chl a are due to 684-nm-absorbing Chl a, some contamination by the CP47 complex, and non-native Chl a absorbing near 670 nm. In the CP47 protein complex, attention is focused on the lower energy chlorophyll a Q{sub y}-states. High pressure hole-burning studies of PSII RC revealed for the first time a strong pressure effect on the primary electron transfer dynamics. The 4.2 K lifetime of P680*, the primary donor state, increases from 2.0 ps to 7.0 ps as pressure increases from 0.1 to 267 MPa. Importantly, this effect is irreversible (plastic) while the pressure induced effect on the low temperature absorption and non-line narrowed P680 hole spectra are reversible (elastic). Nonadiabatic rate expressions, which take into account the distribution of energy gap values, are used to estimate the linear pressure shift of the acceptor state energy for both the superexchange and two-step mechanisms for primary charge separation. It was found that the pressure dependence could be explained with a linear pressure shift of {approximately} 1 cm{sup -1}/MPa in magnitude for the acceptor state. The results point to the marriage of hole burning and high pressures as having considerable potential for the study of primary transport dynamics in reaction centers and antenna complexes.

  8. Epidemiologic study of scald burns in victims in Tehran burn hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Aghakhani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Damages caused by scald burns are common and can cause severe complications and death. The purpose of this study was to define risk groups and then methods of prevention and treatment is designed to fit. Methods: Data for this retrospective study of hospitalized patients in Shahid Motahari Hospital in Tehran from 2007-2011 were compiled. Data including age, sex, cause of burn, and degree of burn and ultimate fate of the victims were collected from scald burns. Burns caused by boiling water and hot food (Scald , in two age groups : 12 and under 12 years ( children and more than 12 years ( adults were compared in terms of statistics . Results: A total of 1150 patients consisting of males (57.9% and females (42.1% were studied. The most common age was 1 year old and 50% of patients were under 3 years of age. 87.9% burned with boiling water and 12.1% had experienced burns with hot food. Incentive to burn was 0.3% cross burning and 99.7% incident. A maximum number of burns in children 12 years and younger males (42.1% and a minimum number in men over 12 years (15.7% were observed. Mean percentage of burns was 11% in over 12 years group and 30.9% in 12 and under 12 years group. The average hospital stay was 11.4 days and the mortality rate was 4.8%. The final status of the patients was as fallows: full recovery 904 cases (78.6%, partial recovery 134 (11.7%, clearance with personal consent 41 (3.6%, death 55 (4.8% and 16 cases (3.1% were among other reasons. Conclusion: In general it can be said, scald burns incidence in individuals aged 12 and younger were more than the older ones and the mean of burns was lower in individuals with over 12 years old. There was a sexual preference for males under 12 years. Mortality rate in the two groups has not any statistically significant difference. There was no statistically significant association between sex and mortality rate. Some of our findings are depending on cultural, social and economic

  9. Burning Rate Studies of Energetic Double Base Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Bhat

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study was carried out on the combustion characteristics of CMDB propellants containing ammonium nitrate, ammonium perchlorate, potassium nitrate, potassium perchlorate, RDX and PETN. While ammonium and potassium perchlorates increased burning rates, other additives maintained either the same burning rate or reduced burning rates marginally. Propellants containing these additives showed marginally higher peak temperatures, indicating interaction among the species of double base propellant decomposition and those of additives.

  10. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Answers page . Share Print E-mail House Image Highlight Header Learn More Highlight Body Other NIGMS Fact Sheets Related Links Up to top This page last reviewed on April 06, 2016 Social Media Links Bookmark & Share Free Subscriptions Twitter Facebook YouTube ...

  11. Predictors of Discharge Disposition in Older Adults With Burns: A Study of the Burn Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tam N; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Martinez, Erin; Lezotte, Dennis; Rietschel, Carly; Holavanahalli, Radha; Kowalske, Karen; Esselman, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Older patients with burn injury have a greater likelihood for discharge to nursing facilities. Recent research indicates that older patients discharged to nursing facilities are two to three times as likely to die within a 3-year period relative to those discharged to home. In light of these poor long-term outcomes, we conducted this study to identify predictors for discharge to independent vs nonindependent living status in older patients hospitalized for burns. We retrospectively reviewed all older adults (age ≥ 55 years) who were prospectively enrolled in a longitudinal multicenter study of outcomes from 1993 to 2011. Patient, injury, and treatment outcomes data were analyzed. Recognizing that transfer to inpatient rehabilitation may have impacted final hospital discharge disposition: we assessed the likelihood of inpatient rehabilitation stay, based on identified predictors of inpatient rehabilitation. We subsequently performed a logistic regression analysis on the clustered, propensity-matched cohort to assess associations of burn and injury characteristics on the primary outcome of final discharge status. A total of 591 patients aged ≥55 years were treated and discharged alive from three participating U.S. burn centers during the study period. Mean burn size was 14.8% (SD 11.2%) and mean age was 66.7 years (SD 9.3 years). Ninety-three patients had an inpatient rehabilitation stay before discharge (15.7%). Significant factors predictive of inpatient rehabilitation included a burn >20% TBSA, mechanical ventilation, older age, range of motion deficits at acute care discharge, and study site. These factors were included in the propensity model. Four hundred seventy-one patients (80%) were discharged to independent living status. By matched propensity analysis, older age was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of discharge to nonindependent living (P patient factors. Furthermore, clinical practice variations among the three study sites also

  12. Study on acute burn injury survivors and the associated issues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan Bayuo; Pius Agbenorku; Richcane Amankwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the phenomenon of surviving burn injury and its associated issues and concerns. Methods: A cross sectional survey approach was utilized to obtain data from one hundred burn survivors who were purposely selected. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to analyze data. Results: Findings from the study indicate that burns from flames stood out as a major cause of burns. Physical discomfort/pain, anxiety, needing assistance in meeting self-care needs, financial and social limitations were identified as the major impact of the injury. Furthermore, participants perceived the existence of societal stigma. In addition, hope in God or a spiritual being as well as family support were the two key resources participants relied on to cope effectively. Conclusions: Surviving burn injury is associated with varied physical, social and psy-chological factors and survivors may need professional assistance to fully adjust after discharge.

  13. Study of nuclear fuel burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors approach theoretical treatment of isotopic composition changement for nuclear fuel in nuclear reactors. They show the difficulty of exhaustive treatment of burn-up problems and introduce the principal simplifying principles. Due to these principles they write and solve analytically the evolution equations of the concentration for the principal nuclides both in the case of fast and thermal reactors. Finally, they expose and comment the results obtained in the case of a power fast reactor. (author)

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of intravenously injected photosensitizer in rat burn models for efficient antibacterial photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2012-02-01

    For efficient photodynamic treatment of wound infection, a photosensitizer must be distributed in the whole infected tissue region. To ensure this, depth profiling of a photosensitizer is necessary in vivo. In this study, we applied photoacoustic (PA) imaging to visualize the depth profile of an intravenously injected photosensitizer in rat burn models. In burned tissue, pharmacokinetics is complicated; vascular occlusion takes place in the injured tissue, while vascular permeability increases due to thermal invasion. In this study, we first used Evans Blue (EB) as a test drug to examine the feasibility of photosensitizer dosimetry based on PA imaging. On the basis of the results, an actual photosensitizer, talaporfin sodium was used. An EB solution was intravenously injected into a rat deep dermal burn model. PA imaging was performed on the wound with 532 nm and 610 nm nanosecond light pulses for visualizing vasculatures (blood) and EB, respectively. Two hours after injection, the distribution of EB-originated signal spatially coincided well with that of blood-originated signal measured after injury, indicating that EB molecules leaked out from the blood vessels due to increased permeability. Afterwards, the distribution of EB signal was broadened in the depth direction due to diffusion. At 12 hours after injection, clear EB signals were observed even in the zone of stasis, demonstrating that the leaked EB molecules were delivered to the injured tissue layer. The level and time course of talaporfin sodium-originated signals were different compared with those of EB-originated signals, showing animal-dependent and/or drug-dependent permeabilization and diffusion in the tissue. Thus, photosensitizer dosimetry should be needed before every treatment to achieve desirable outcome of photodynamic treatment, for which PA imaging can be concluded to be valid and useful.

  15. Burn Depth Estimation Using Thermal Excitation and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Yee, M.L.

    1998-12-17

    Accurate estimation of the depth of partial-thickness burns and the early prediction of a need for surgical intervention are difficult. A non-invasive technique utilizing the difference in thermal relaxation time between burned and normal skin may be useful in this regard. In practice, a thermal camera would record the skin's response to heating or cooling by a small amount-roughly 5{degrees} Celsius for a short duration. The thermal stimulus would be provided by a heat lamp, hot or cold air, or other means. Processing of the thermal transients would reveal areas that returned to equilibrium at different rates, which should correspond to different burn depths. In deeper thickness burns, the outside layer of skin is further removed from the constant-temperature region maintained through blood flow. Deeper thickness areas should thus return to equilibrium more slowly than other areas. Since the technique only records changes in the skin's temperature, it is not sensitive to room temperature, the burn's location, or the state of the patient. Preliminary results are presented for analysis of a simulated burn, formed by applying a patch of biosynthetic wound dressing on top of normal skin tissue.

  16. E P I DEMIOLOGY OF PAEDIATRIC BURNS: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jangpreet Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burn injuries are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. These are the third most common injury causing death in children, following motor vehicle accidents and drowning accidents. AIM: To study the Epidemiological parameters for assessment of morbidity & mortality rate in pediatric burns and to form effective preventive strategy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was done at the Department of Surgery, PIMS, Jalandhar. Total 50 patients (n=50 up to age of 12 years, were included in the study retrospectively. Data regarding age, sex, demographic distribution, seasonal variation, Total body surface area (TBSA involved, type and place of burn injury, parent’s occupation, family size and mortality rate were noted and analysed. RESULT S: Total 50 patients (n =50 of which 32 were males and 18 females were included in the study. Mean age of burn injuries was 3.6 years. Scalds burns were the most common cause of burns followed by thermal burns. It involved mostly upper limbs (67%, anterio r trunk (56%, lower limbs (53%, face (4%, and posterior trunk including buttocks (16% . The time lapse from injury to presentation to hospital ranged from 1 hour to 3 weeks. Total body surface area burnt was ranged from 2 – 60%. Mean hospital duration was 12 . 4 days. Complications ranged from wound sepsis in 11 patients (22%, contractures of fingers in 3 patients ( 6 % and hypertrophic scarring in 8 patients (16% . After healing of wounds, patients were advised pressure garments and oil massage and night splint age regularly for six months. CONCLUSION: Children constitute a vulnerable group of burns. Most injuries occur in the home setting where effective control measures can be adopted. Advances have also made in resuscitation, intensive care, antimicrobi als, vascular access, nutritional support, and skin banking. Splintage, physiotherapy, massage and pressure garments also help in reducing the morbidity and overall long term burden over

  17. Stress disorder and PTSD after burn injuries: a prospective study of predictors of PTSD at Sina Burn Center, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi-Bazargani H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani1, Hemmat Maghsoudi2, Mohsen Soudmand-Niri3, Fatemeh Ranjbar4, Hossein Mashadi-Abdollahi51Neuroscience Research Center, Statistics and Epidemiology Department, School of Health and Nutrition, 2Department of Surgery, 3School of Psychology, 4Department of Psychiatry, 5National Public Health Management Centre, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: A burn injury can be a traumatic experience with tremendous social, physical, and psychological consequences. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and predictors of PTSD Checklist score initially and 3 months after injury in burns victims admitted to the Sina Burn Center in north-west Iran.Methods: This prospective study examined adult patients aged 16–65 years with unintentional burns. The PTSD Checklist was used to screen for PTSD.Results: Flame burns constituted 49.4% of all burns. Mean PTSD score was 23.8 ± 14.7 early in the hospitalization period and increased to 24.2 ± 14.3, 3 months after the burn injury. Twenty percent of victims 2 weeks into treatment had a positive PTSD screening test, and this figure increased to 31.5% after 3 months. The likelihood of developing a positive PTSD screening test increased significantly after 3 months (P < 0.01. Using multivariate regression analysis, factors independently predicting PTSD score were found to be age, gender, and percentage of total body surface area burned.Conclusion: PTSD was a problem in the population studied and should be managed appropriately after hospital admission due to burn injury. Male gender, younger age, and higher total body surface area burned may predict a higher PTSD score after burn injury. Keywords: post-traumatic stress disorder, burn injury, predictors, Iran

  18. Measurement of Solid Rocket Propellant Burning Rate Using X-ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Matthew D.

    The burning rate of solid propellants can be difficult to measure for unusual burning surface geometries, but X-ray imaging can be used to measure burning rate. The objectives of this work were to measure the baseline burning rate of an electrically-controlled solid propellant (ESP) formulation with real-time X-ray radiography and to determine the uncertainty of the measurements. Two edge detection algorithms were written to track the burning surface in X-ray videos. The edge detection algorithms were informed by intensity profiles of simulated 2-D X-ray images. With a 95% confidence level, the burning rates measured by the Projected-Slope Intersection algorithm in the two combustion experiments conducted were 0.0839 in/s +/-2.86% at an average pressure of 407 psi +/-3.6% and 0.0882 in/s +/-3.04% at 410 psi +/-3.9%. The uncertainty percentages were based on the statistics of a Monte Carlo analysis on burning rate.

  19. Multispectral and Photoplethysmography Optical Imaging Techniques Identify Important Tissue Characteristics in an Animal Model of Tangential Burn Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Jeffrey E; Li, Weizhi; Rodriguez-Vaqueiro, Yolanda; Squiers, John J; Mo, Weirong; Lu, Yang; Plant, Kevin D; Sellke, Eric; King, Darlene R; Fan, Wensheng; Martinez-Lorenzo, Jose A; DiMaio, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    Burn excision, a difficult technique owing to the training required to identify the extent and depth of injury, will benefit from a tool that can cue the surgeon as to where and how much to resect. We explored two rapid and noninvasive optical imaging techniques in their ability to identify burn tissue from the viable wound bed using an animal model of tangential burn excision. Photoplethysmography (PPG) imaging and multispectral imaging (MSI) were used to image the initial, intermediate, and final stages of burn excision of a deep partial-thickness burn. PPG imaging maps blood flow in the skin's microcirculation, and MSI collects the tissue reflectance spectrum in visible and infrared wavelengths of light to classify tissue based on a reference library. A porcine deep partial-thickness burn model was generated and serial tangential excision accomplished with an electric dermatome set to 1.0 mm depth. Excised eschar was stained with hematoxylin and eosin to determine the extent of burn remaining at each excision depth. We confirmed that the PPG imaging device showed significantly less blood flow where burn tissue was present, and the MSI method could delineate burn tissue in the wound bed from the viable wound bed. These results were confirmed independently by a histological analysis. We found these devices can identify the proper depth of excision, and their images could cue a surgeon as to the preparedness of the wound bed for grafting. These image outputs are expected to facilitate clinical judgment in the operating room. PMID:26594863

  20. Development of a Burn Escharotomy Assessment Tool: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur, Rebecca; Holmes, James H; Johnson, James E; Molnar, Joseph A; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injuries can require escharotomies which are urgent, infrequent, and relatively high-risk procedures necessary to preserve limb perfusion and sometimes ventilation. The American Burn Association Advanced Burn Life Support© course educates surgeons and emergency providers about escharotomy incisions but lacks a biomimetic trainer to demonstrate, practice, or provide assessment. The goal was to build an affordable biomimetic trainer with discrete points of failure and pilot a validation study. Fellowship-trained burn and plastic surgeons worked with special effect artists and anatomists to develop a biomimetic trainer with three discrete points of failure: median or ulnar nerve injury, fasciotomy, and failure to check distal pulse. Participants were divided between experienced and inexperienced, survey pre- and post-procedure on a biomimetic model while being timed. The trainer total cost per participant was less than $35. Eighteen participants were involved in the study. The inexperienced (0-1 prior escharotomies performed) had significantly more violations at the discrete points of failure relative to more experienced participants (P = .036). Face validity was assessed with 100% of participants agreement that the model appeared similar to real life and was valuable in their training. Given the advancements in biomimetic models and the need to train surgeons in how to perform infrequent, emergent surgical procedures, an escharotomy trainer is needed today. The authors developed an affordable model with a successful pilot study demonstrating discrimination between experienced and inexperienced surgeons. Additional research is needed to increase the reliability and assessment metrics. PMID:26594860

  1. MR imaging findings of high-voltage electrical burns in the upper extremities: correlation with angiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Ik Won; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Min, Seon Jung; Han, You Mi (Dept. of Radiology, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Suh, Kyung Jin (Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)), email: kyungjin.suh@gmail.com; Choi, Min Ho (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-02-15

    Background: A high-voltage electrical burn is often associated with deep muscle injuries. Hidden, undetected deep muscle injuries have a tendency for progressive tissue necrosis, and this can lead to major amputations or sepsis. MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and it may aid in differentiating the areas of viable deep muscle from the areas of non-viable deep muscle. Purpose: To describe the MR imaging findings of a high-voltage electrical burn in the upper extremity with emphasis on the usefulness of the gadolinium-enhanced MRI and to compare the MR imaging findings with angiography. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging studies of six patients with high-voltage electrical burns who underwent both MRI and angiography at the burn center of our hospital from January 2005 to December 2009. The imaging features were evaluated for the involved locations, the MR signal intensity of the affected muscles, the MR enhancement pattern, the involved arteries and the angiographic findings (classified as normal, sluggish flow, stenosis or occlusion) of the angiography of the upper extremity. We assessed the relationship between the MR imaging findings and the angiographic findings. Results: The signal intensities of affected muscles were isointense or of slightly high signal intensity as compared with the adjacent unaffected skeletal muscle on the T1-weighted MR images. Affected muscles showed heterogenous high signal intensity relative to the adjacent unaffected skeletal muscle on the T2- weighted images. The gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images showed diffuse inhomogeneous enhancement or peripheral rim enhancement of the affected muscles. The angiographic findings of the arterial injuries showed complete occlusion in three patients, severe stenosis in two patients and sluggish flow in one patient. Of these, the five patients with complete occlusion or severe stenosis on angiography showed non-perfused and non-viable areas of edematous muscle on

  2. Burning of electrical household appliances. An experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hietaniemi, J.; Mangs, J.; Hakkarainen, T. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland). Building Physics, Building Services and Fire Technology

    2001-03-01

    Burning characteristics of electrical household appliances of four different types, TV sets, washing machines, dishwashers and refrigerator-freezers, have been studied experimentally. Results obtained comprise rate of heat release, mass loss and generation of smoke and some chemical substances as well as the quantities derived from these data such as the effective heat of combustion. The experiments are comprehensively documented by written records of events and photographs. High intensities of burning were detected. The highest rates of heat release (RHR), up to 2000 kW, were found for refrigerator-freezers. The peak RHR values for the other apparatuses were: dishwashers 350-750 kW, washing machines 300-450 kW and TVs 250-300 kW. Generally, the development of the burning of the apparatuses towards full burning has two phases. The first phase involves low-RHR incipient burning and during the second phase RHR grows rapidly towards the peak values. TV set fires develop rapidly: the first phase lasts ca. 1,5-3 minutes and, after it, the peak RHR value may be reached within 1-1,5 minutes from the initiation of the rapid RHR growth. For washing machines the period of incipient burning was rather long, 10-20 minutes depending on the way the apparatus was ignited (ignition in the motor space or at the control panel). For the dishwashers the delay was 5-10 minutes. A similar delay was found also in three refrigerator-freezer experiments. In one refrigerator- freezer experiment, the delay time was clearly shorter, only 2-3 minutes. A computational analysis of the development of room fires originating from ignited electrical household appliances was conducted to study the significance of the measured burning characteristics. The RHR of refrigerator-freezers is so high that fires originating from these apparatuses probably lead to flashover. In the case of dishwasher fires, the likelihood of flashover is considerable. The probability of flashover TV set fires in relatively

  3. Methodology for the detection of land cover changes in time series of daily satellite images. Application to burned area detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Moreno-Ruiz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a methodology for detection of observable phenomena at pixel level over time series of daily satellite images, based on using a Bayesian classifier. This methodology has been applied successfully to detect burned areas in the North American boreal forests using the LTDR dataset. The LTDR dataset represents the longest time series of global daily satellite images with 0.05° (~5 km of spatial resolution. The proposed methodology has several stages: 1 pre-processing daily images to obtain composite images of n days; 2 building of space of statistical variables or attributes to consider; 3 designing an algorithm, by selecting and filtering the training cases; 4 obtaining probability maps related to the considered thematic classes; 5 post-processing to improve the results obtained by applying multiple techniques (filters, ranges, spatial coherence, etc.. The generated results are analyzed using accuracy metrics derived from the error matrix (commission and omission errors, percentage of estimation and using scattering plots against reference data (correlation coefficient and slope of the regression line. The quality of the results obtained improves, in terms of spatial and timing accuracy, to other burned area products that use images of higher spatial resolution (500 m and 1 km, but they are only available after year 2000 as MCD45A1 and BA GEOLAND-2: the total burned area estimation for the study region for the years 2001-2011 was 28.56 millions of ha according to reference data and 12.41, 138.43 and 19.41 millions of ha for the MCD45A1, BA GEOLAND-2 and BA-LTDR burned area products, respectively.

  4. Open questions in stellar helium burning studied with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcome of helium burning is the formation of the two elements, carbon and oxygen. The ratio of carbon to oxygen at the end of helium burning is crucial for understanding the final fate of a progenitor star and the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in Type II supernova. While an oxygen rich star is predicted to end up as a black hole, a carbon rich star leads to a neutron star. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) are used as standard candles for measuring cosmological distances with the use of an empirical light curve-luminosity stretching factor. It is essential to understand helium burning that creates the carbon/oxygen white dwarf and thus the initial stage of SNIa. Since the triple alpha-particle capture reaction, 8Be(α, γ)12C, the first burning stage in helium burning, is well understood, one must extract the cross section of the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction at the Gamow peak (300 keV) with high accuracy of approximately 10% or better. This goal has not been achieved, despite repeated strong statements that appeared in the literature. Constraints from the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16N were shown to not sufficiently restrict the p-wave cross section factor; e.g. low values can not be ruled out. Measurements at low energies, are thus mandatory for measuring the elusive cross section factor for the 12O(α, γ)16O reaction. We are constructing a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for use with high intensity photon beams extracted from the HIγS-TUNL facility at Duke University to study the 16O(γ, α)12C reaction, and thus the direct reaction at low energies, as low as 0.7 MeV. This work is in progress. (author)

  5. Acupuncture and burning mouth syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardella, Andrea; Lodi, Giovanni; Tarozzi, Marco; Varoni, Elena; Franchini, Roberto; Carrassi, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition most common in middle-aged and elderly women, with prevalence rates in the general population ranging from 0.5% to 5%. Defined by the International Headache Society as "an intraoral burning sensation for which no medical or dental cause can be found," BMS is considered a form of neuropathic pain. The management of BMS remains unsatisfactory. In this pilot study, we investigated the use of acupuncture in a small group of BMS patients. The study group, after 4 refusals, was composed of 10 BMS patients (9 females and 1 male; mean age, 65.2 years; range, from 48 to 80 years; mean duration of BMS, 2.6 years; SD ± 0.8 years). Oral pain/burning sensation (primary outcome) was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Health-related quality of life (secondary outcome) was measured using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Acupuncture treatment lasted 8 weeks and consisted of 20 sessions. Patients reported a mean reduction in pain of 0.99 points on the VAS (max 2.1-min 0.1), which, although slight, was statistically significant (Wilcoxon test P acupuncture treatment seemed better able cope with their oral symptoms. PMID:23336607

  6. Predictive Value of IL-8 for Sepsis and Severe Infections after Burn Injury - A Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Cox, Robert A.; Song, Juquan; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response induced by burn injury contributes to increased incidence of infections, sepsis, organ failure, and mortality. Thus, monitoring post-burn inflammation is of paramount importance but so far there are no reliable biomarkers available to monitor and/or predict infectious complications after burn. As IL-8 is a major mediator for inflammatory responses, the aim of our study was to determine whether IL-8 expression can be used to predict post-burn sepsis, infections, and m...

  7. Management of severe burn injuries with topical heparin: the first evidence-based study in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Agbenorku, Pius; Fugar, Setri; Akpaloo, Joseph; Hoyte-Williams, Paa E; Alhassan, Zainab; Agyei, Fareeda

    2013-01-01

    Conventional therapy for burns has always produced a nightmarish illness for patients. The lack of the ability to prevent contractures often produces dysfunctional limbs and the ugly scars resulting from severe burns are an ongoing reminder of this lengthy painful illness. This study is to determine the effectiveness of topical heparin in burns management among some patients at the Burns Intensive Care Unit (BICU) of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), Kumasi, Ghana. Patients for this ...

  8. Comparative Study Between Sodium Carboxymethyl-Cellulose Silver, Moist Exposed Burn Ointment, and Saline-Soaked Dressing for Treatment of Facial Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Hindy, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial burns vary from relatively minor insults to severe debilitating injuries. Sustaining a burn injury is often a psychological trauma for the victim and is especially menacing when the face and neck are involved. This study was carried out on 60 patients with superficial dermal burns to the face admitted to the Burn Unit of Tanta University Hospital, Egypt, from September 2007 to July 2008. The patients were allocated randomly to one of three groups, each of which was treated with one of ...

  9. Monitoring agricultural burning in the Mississippi River Valley region from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korontzi, Stefania; McCarty, Jessica; Justice, Christopher

    2008-09-01

    The 2003 active fire observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), on board NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, were analyzed to assess burning activity in the cropland areas of the Mississippi River Valley region. Agricultural burning was found to be an important contributor to fire activity in this region, accounting for approximately one-third of all burning. Agricultural fire activity showed two seasonal peaks: the first, smaller peak, occurring in June during the spring harvesting of wheat; and the second, bigger peak, in October during the fall harvesting of rice and soy. The seasonal signal in agricultural burning was predominantly evident in the early afternoon MODIS Aqua fire detections. A strong diurnal agricultural fire signal was prevalent during the fall harvesting months, as suggested by the substantially higher number (approximately 3.5 times) of fires detected by MODIS Aqua in the early afternoon, compared with those detected by MODIS Terra in the morning. No diurnal variations in agricultural fire activity were apparent during the springtime wheat-harvesting season. The seasonal and diurnal patterns in agricultural fire activity detected by MODIS are supported by known crop management practices in this region. MODIS data provide an important means to characterize and monitor agricultural fire dynamics and management practices. PMID:18817116

  10. Study of the Spatial Distribution of Burning Particles in a Pyrotechnic Flame Based on Particle Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen-Guang; Xu, Chungen; Xue, Rui

    2014-10-01

    The burning particles in the pyrotechnic flame play an important role in the ignition and spectral radiance of the pyrotechnic. We used particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high-speed camera (HSC) photography to investigate the 3D spatial pattern and velocity of the burning particles in the flame of pyrotechnics. The original images captured by the HSC were preprocessed through threshold selection, image bivalency, edge detection, and contour extraction and segmentation to obtain the particle coordinates and velocity. Consequently, the particle tracking model was established and the velocity and spatial distribution of the burning particles were obtained. A comparison of the flame flow field with particle image velocimetry demonstrated the typical characteristics of the two-phase flow of the pyrotechnic flame between burning particles and gas. Compared with the convergent gas flow field, the higher velocity burning particles had a discrete distribution in the "comet tail" shape region and showed the same direction of motion as the flame flow field, whereas the lower velocity burning particles had larger outlying regions and showed inconsistent directions of motion. The flow field of the burning particles was more chaotic than the flame flow field of the burning pyrotechnics.

  11. The Role of the Nurse in the Rehabilitation of Patients with Radical Changes in Body Image Due to Burn Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Aacovou, I.

    2005-01-01

    Burn injuries are among the most serious causes of radical changes in body image. The subject of body image and self-image is essential in rehabilitation, and the nurse must be aware of the issues related to these concepts and take them seriously into account in drafting out the nursing programme. This paper defines certain key words related to body image and discusses the social context of body image. Burn injuries are considered in relation to the way each of these affects the patient's bod...

  12. Alleged dowry death: a study of homicidal burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, Kusa Kumar; Mohanthy, Sachindananda

    2006-04-01

    Homicidal burning of married women in India is a major concern for the Government, law-enforcing authorities, the judiciary, the police and medico-legal experts all over the country who are associated with dowry disputes. Dowry death, a heinous crime, is gradually engulfing and polluting the entire society. Sections 304(B) and 498(A) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) have been introduced and Sections 174 Criminal Procedure Code (Cr PC) and 176 Cr PC have been modified but, instead of deterring dowry deaths, the occurrences are increasing day by day and the number of cases coming for post-mortem examination is rising. Both parties, that is, the parents and in-laws of the deceased, are becoming adept at manufacturing circumstantial evidence to serve their own interests. Therefore, to establish the truth and for the smooth administration of justice, reliable unbiased medical evidence has to be corroborated. This study presents retrospective research carried out in the tertiary care teaching hospital of MKCG Medical College, Berhampur, Eastern India, for a five-year period between January 1998 to December 2002. From a total of 58 burned wives, 32 (55.1%) were homicidal burns. These cases were analyzed in view of epidemiological and medico-legal aspects. The majority of the affected women (90.63%) were in the 18 to 26 years of age group. Death occurred within the first few years of marriage and most of them had no children. All the victims belonged to the Hindu religion and 62.5% of incidents occurred during the daytime. In 71.87% cases the incident occurred in rural areas. Eighty-three per cent of cases occurred in a joint family within the house. In most cases, kerosene was the accelerant and flame was the causative agent. In more than 68.75% of cases the total body surface area involved was more than 80%. Most victims died at the time of the incident, or within the subsequent 24 hours, due to hypovolumeic shock. The education status in 70.21% cases was either illiterate

  13. Protocol of study and pursuit of the radioinduced burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of localized overexposures based on local experience and international criteria is being carried out within the framework of a cooperation agreement between the Buenos Aires Burned Hospital and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority. This protocol was designed considering separately acute and chronic reactions, including the following aspects: patient reception: clinical findings, laboratory tests, photographic recording, and multidisciplinary evaluation; dose reconstruction: evaluation of the dose distribution by biophysical and biological procedures; extension and depth estimation: telethermography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, radioisotopic procedures, capillaroscopy and percutaneous oxymetry; therapeutic strategies: pain treatment, prevention of infections, systemic administration of pentoxiphyllin and alpha-tocopherol, local application of trolamine and antioxidants, prevention and treatment of radioinduced fibrosis. When it is indicated, surgical treatment includes partial or total excision followed by covering by graft or flap. The application of tissue-engineering techniques will be considered. Study of individual radiosensitivity: evaluation of apoptosis in peripheral lymphocytes and clonogenic assays in dermal fibroblasts 'in vitro' irradiated. (author)

  14. Radioisotopic studies on pulmonary function in experimental burn shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, W.; Barcikowski, S.; Maziarz, Z.; Zajgner, J.; Markiewicz, A. (Wojskowa Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland))

    1980-01-01

    Disturbances in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, which can initiate severe complications, often lead to many therapeutic failures in burn shock. Early recognition of respiratory disturbances is often required to improve results of treatment of burn shock. The authors investigated changes in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in napalm-burnt rabbits using /sup 133/Xe. Simultaneously, they determined effect of treatment with cytochrome C on pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in animals burnt with napalm. It was found that in napalm-burnt rabbits burn shock was accompanied by a significant deterioration in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. The most marked changes were observed one and two days after burn. It was also found a beneficial effect of treatment with cytochrome C on alveolar ventilation. The authors pointed out the usefulness of radioisotopic investigations of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in burn shock.

  15. Radioisotopic studies on pulmonary function in experimental burn shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disturbances in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, which can initiate severe complications, often lead to many therapeutic failures in burn shock. Early recognition of respiratory disturbances is often required to improve results of treatment of burn shock. The authors investigated changes in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in napalm-burnt rabbits using 133Xe. Simultaneously, they determined effect of treatment with cytochrome C on pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in animals burnt with napalm. It was found that in napalm-burnt rabbits burn shock was accompanied by a significant deterioration in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. The most marked changes were observed one and two days after burn. It was also found a beneficial effect of treatment with cytochrome C on alveolar ventilation. The authors pointed out the usefulness of radioisotopic investigations of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in burn shock. (author)

  16. A numerical study of Li-SF6 wick combustion - Forced and mixed convective burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaso, R. C.; Chen, L.-D.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to study Li-SF6 wick diffusion flames under mixed convective burning conditions at a pressure of 0.01 MPa. Both planar and cylindrical wicks are considered. The model is based on a conserved scalar approach. The objective of this study is to assess the effects of particular parameters on the burning rate and heat transfer. The flat-plate solution yields a fuel mass burning rate per unit surface area following the x exp -1/2 dependence of the classical similarity solution, where x is the streamwise distance. Cylindrical wick geometries yield enhanced burning rates over planar wicks. For the case of mixed convective burning, the burning rate results approach either the forced or natural convective burning limits as ambient streamwise velocity is changed. Critical Richardson numbers specifying these burning limits are determined for a given condition. Reducing gravity results in a lower burning rate because the influence of natural convection is diminished. Under reduced gravity of 1/1000 of the sea-level value, mixed convective burning nearly resembles forced convection.

  17. [Experimental study on early multiple organ failure after severe burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F M

    1992-03-01

    Forty-three male mongrel dogs (12.5 +/- 2.5 kg) were divided into normal control (n = 7), immediate infusion (n = 8), non-infusion (n = 13) and delayed infusion (n = 15) groups. A 50% TBSA third degree surface burn was produced by igniting 3% napalm for 30 seconds on the shaved back. Cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, renal and gastrointestinal functions were monitored following the thermal injury. The findings of these studies showed that mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, left ventricular work, right ventricular work, ADP/O ratio and ATP were all significantly decreased (P less than 0.05). However pulmonary artery wedge pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, systemic vascular resistance, P(A-a)O2, Beef, Cr, UN, ALT, LDH, TB, DB, and MDA were markedly increased (P less than 0.05). Severe shock occurred soon after burns. Thirteen dogs died within 12 hours in the non-infusion group. All the dogs were resuscitated when immediate infusion of lactic acid Ringers solution was given according to Parkland formula, and all of them tide over shock stage smoothly without obvious changes in visceral functions. However, dogs were not resuscitated when infusion was delayed 6 hours postburn. The changes in visceral were even more severe in this group than those in non-infusion group. These results demonstrated that delayed resuscitation was an important factor of MOF in the early postburn stage. The marked increase in MDA in the myocardiac, lung, liver, renal and gastrointestinal tissues indicated that lipoperoxidation by free oxygen radicals was closely related with visceral damages.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1596785

  18. A Retrospective Analysis of the Burn Injury Patients Records in the Emergency Department, an Epidemiologic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nilgün Aksoy; Senay Arli; Ozlem Yigit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Burns can be very destructive, and severely endanger the health and lives of humans. It maybe cause disability and even psychological trauma in individuals. . Such an event can also lead to economic burden on victim’s families and society. The aim of our study is to evaluate epidemiology and outcome of burn patients referring to emergency department. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study was conducted by evaluation of patients’ files and forensic reports of burned patients’ r...

  19. Shuffling strategy study of breeding-burning integrated fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The breeding-burning integrated fast reactor uses burning assemblies to generate thermal power, meanwhile, converts 238U into 239Pu in the fertile assemblies. With periodical shuffling of assemblies, the reactor can maintain criticality for decades of years. To maintain long-term stability of the core reactivity, the core layout and shuffling strategy should balance the burning and the breeding of the assemblies. The scattered core layout and shuffling strategy ensures fast breeding of the fertile assemblies, and keeps stable core power distribution in whole life of the reactor. Moreover, at the end of the reactor life, the discharge burnups of different fuel assemblies are close to each other, which are about 250300 GW · d/t. This is important for breeding-burning integrated fast reactor to achieve very efficient utilization of uranium resource without reprocessing. (authors)

  20. Multiframe, Single Line-of-Sight X-Ray Imager for Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Kevin L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-28

    The purpose of this LDRD project was to demonstrate high spatial and temporal resolution x-ray imaging using optical detectors, and in particular the VISAR and OHRV diagnostics on the OMEGA laser. The x-ray source being imaged was a backlighter capsule being imploded by 39 beams of the OMEGA laser. In particular this approach utilized a semiconductor with the side facing the backlighter capsule coated with a thin aluminum layer to allow x rays to pass through the metal layer and then get absorbed in the semiconductor. The other side of the semiconductor was AR coated to allow the VISAR or OHRV probe beam to sample the phase change of the semiconductor as the x rays were absorbed in the semiconductor. This technique is capable of acquiring sub-picosecond 2-D or 1-D x-ray images, detector spatial resolution of better than 10 um and the ability to operate in a high neutron flux environment expected on ignition shots with burning plasmas. In addition to demonstrating this technique on the OMEGA laser, several designs were made to improve the phase sensitivity, temporal resolution and number of frames over the existing diagnostics currently implemented on the OMEGA laser. These designs included both 2-d imaging diagnostics as well as improved 1-D imaging diagnostics which were streaked in time.

  1. Comparative study on effects of burn-blast combined injury and burn-firearm combined injury complicated with seawater immersion on vascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hong; LAI Xi-nan; GE Heng-jiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively study the effects and mechanisms of burn-blast combined injury and burn-firearm combined injury complicated with seawater immersion on vascular endothelial cells. Methods: A total of 40 healthy adult hybrid dogs of both sexes, weighing 12-15 kg, were used in this study. Randomly-selected 20 dogs were established as models of burn-blast combined injury (the burn-blast injury group) and the other 20 dogs as models of burn-firearm combined injury (the burn-firearm injury group). Then the wounds of all the dogs were immediately immersed in seawater for 4 hours, and then they were taken out from the seawater. Blood samples were withdrawn from the central vein of the dogs before injury, and at 4, 7, 10, 20, and 28 hours after injury to measure the circulating endothelial cells and the von Willebrand factor. Results: Circulating endothelial cells increased significantly at 4 hours after injury in all the dogs. But they reached peak at 7 hours after injury in the burn-blast injury group and at 28 hours after injury in the burn-firearm injury group. The changes of circulating endothelial cells in the burn-blast injury group were significantly different from those in the burn-firearm injury group at 4, 7, 20, and 28 hours after injury (P<0.01). The von Willebrand factor reached peak at 4 hours after injury in the burn-blast injury group and at 28 hours in the burn-firearm injury group. The changes of von Willebrand factor in the burn-blast injury group were significantly different from those in the burn-firearm injury group at 4, 20, and 28 hours after injury (P<0.01).Conclusions: In burn-blast injury combined with seawater immersion, the vascular endothelial cells changed most significantly at 4 hours or 7 hours after injury, while burn-firearm injury combined with seawater immersion have the same at 20 hours or 28 hours after injury.

  2. Psychophysiological Processing of Itch in Patients with Chronic Post-burn Itch: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laarhoven, Antionette I M; Ulrich, Dietmar J O; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H; van Loey, Nancy E E; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne; van der Wee, Nic J A; Evers, Andrea W M

    2016-06-15

    A substantial proportion of patients with burn injury develop chronic itch, which can severely affect their quality of life. As found in research on chronic pain, different psychophysiological processes may also play a role in chronic itch, of which central sensitization, conditioned modulation, and attentional processes have been studied most frequently. This study aimed to explore psychophysiological processes of chronic post-burn itch by comparing 15 patients with long-term itch due to burn injury with 15 matched healthy controls. Exploratory results indicated tendencies for higher itch sensitivity in patients than in controls, for mechanical stimuli and histamine, but not for electrical stimulation. Results further suggest that the efficacy of itch modulation by an itch- or pain-conditioning stimulus or directing attention towards itch stimuli do not differ between these patients and controls. Further elucidation of the processes underlying post-burn itch may improve the early identification and treatment of burn patients developing chronic itch. PMID:26694745

  3. Burns in diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Aghamohammadzadeh, Naser; Khalili, Nasim

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT AND AIMS: Diabetic burn patients comprise a significant population in burn centers. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic characteristics of diabetic burn patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective data were collected on 94 diabetic burn patients between March 20, 2000 and March 20, 2006. Of 3062 burns patients, 94 (3.1%) had diabetes; these patients were compared with 2968 nondiabetic patients with burns. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical...

  4. Vertical distribution of agriculture crop residue burning aerosol observed by space-borne lidar CALIOP - A case study over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A. K.; Shibata, T.

    2011-12-01

    Agriculture crop residue burning is one of the important sources of trace gas emissions and aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB). It is also one of the main causes for dense atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) formation over South Asian region. Present study deals with spatial and vertical variability of aerosol optical and microphysical properties during the crop residue burning season (October and November) over the IGB. MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) fire location data and MODIS AOD data confirms the crop residue burning activities over irrigated cropland of the IGB during October and November, 2009. Large values (> 0.7) of MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) backscatter (>0.006 km-1 sr-1 below 1.0 km altitude) are suggesting enhanced atmospheric pollution associated with agriculture crop residue burning. The increase in tropospheric columnar NO2 and surface CO concentration during October and November also emphasized the significant contribution of crop residue burning activities in enhanced anthropogenic pollution over the IGB. Vertical distribution of backscatter coefficients showed trapping of biomass (crop residues) burning aerosol within boundary layer. Spatial variation of aerosol backscatter and AOD showed large value above north-west part of IGB, major area of crop residue burning activities. The results of this study will be very useful in quantification of optical properties of atmospheric brown clouds and its effect on climate.

  5. Feasibility study of advanced fuel burning nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation has been conducted to determine both physics, engineering and economic aspects of fusion power reactors based on magnetic confinement and on burning advanced fuels (AFs). DT burning Tokamaks are taken as reference concept. We show that the attractive features of advanced fuels, in particular of neutronlean proton-based AFs, can be combined, in appropriately designed AF reactors (high beta), with power densities comparable to or even higher than those achievable in DT Tokamaks. Moreover we identify physical requirements which would assure Q values well above unity. As an example a semi-open confinement scheme is analyzed based on a self-consistent plasma calculation. We find that a mirror, even if only ''semi-open'' as a result of strong diamagnetism, can barely be expected to achieve high Q values. Therefore confinement schemes such as compact tori, multipole surmacs etc. may be required to burn AFs. We conclude that the economics of AF reactors, as determined by the nuclear boiler power density, may be superior to that of DT-rectors if low recirculating power fractions can be obtained by appropriate plasma tayloring (high fractional transfer of fusion power to ions required). A more detailed investigation is suggested for proton-based fuel cycles. (orig.)

  6. Efficacy of topical honey therapy against silver sulphadiazine treatment in burns: A biochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    Nagane, N. S.; Ganu, J. V.; Bhagwat, V. R.; Subramanium, M.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal injury is associated with biochemical changes. The present study was undertaken to investigate relation of oxidative free radical generation and related biochemical parameters in burn trauma. The specific aim was to compare the levels of serum lipid peroxide, Ceruloplasmin and Uric Acid in burn patients during treatment with Silver Sulfadiazine Cream and honey therapy. It is a single blind prospective controlled study involving comparison of biochemical changes after treatment with si...

  7. Albumin in Burn Shock Resuscitation: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Navickis, Roberta J.; Greenhalgh, David G; Wilkes, Mahlon M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical appraisal of outcomes after burn shock resuscitation with albumin has previously been restricted to small relatively old randomized trials, some with high risk of bias. Extensive recent data from nonrandomized studies assessing the use of albumin can potentially reduce bias and add precision. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of burn shock resuscitation with albumin on mortality and morbidity in adult patients. Randomized and nonrandomized controlled cli...

  8. Treatment of partial thickness burns with Zn-hyaluronan: lessons of a clinical pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Juhász, I.; Zoltán, P.; Erdei, I.

    2012-01-01

    A clinical investigation to determine the effectiveness of Zn-hyaluronan gel for the treatment of partial thickness burns was carried out. 60 patients were enrolled in the study with an average of 3% TBSA burn. Exudation lasted 3 days, no infectious complications were observed. By day 14 the wounds of 52 patients have healed, average complete healing time was 10,5 days. An overall 93,3% healing rate was achieved within the planned observation period. Reduction of spontaneous and movementrelat...

  9. Applications of visible near-infrared spectroscopy and imaging in burn injury assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Lorenzo; Sowa, Michael G.; Payette, Jeri R.; Hewko, Mark D.; Schattka, Bernhard J.; Matas, Anna; Mantsch, Henry H.

    2000-05-01

    The major objective of the project is to develop a noninvasive method to assess thermal burns. Currently, the diagnosis relies primarily upon visual assessment of the injury by a burn specialist and/or plastic surgeon. The diagnosis is based on the surface appearance of the wound to determine the type or depth of the burn. Near IR spectroscopic measurements of injured tissue provide an objective means of distinguishing between surface and subsurface changes related to the tissue injury. An acute porcine model is employed to investigate the potential of near IR spectroscopy to accurately distinguish between burns of varying severity in the early postburn period. Parallel factor analysis is used to investigate the spectral changes related to burns of varying severity. Burn injuries drastically alter the physical and optical properties of the tissue. Thermal destruction of cutaneous vasculature disrupts perfusion and oxygen delivery to the affected tissue. Tissue blood oxygenation decreases with increased severity of the burn. The result demonstrate that near IR spectroscopy may provide a new tool for objective clinical assessment of burn injuries.

  10. Preserving self-concept in the burn survivors: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burn injury is a devastating experience affecting all aspects of a person′s essence, including his/her identity and perception. These patients require complex cognitive efforts to redefine their identity to deal with difficult condition after burn injury and preserve self-concept. The experience of life after burn injury is generally a solitary one, closely related to the patients′ cultural and religious context. Therefore, this study was conducted aiming at investigating burn patients′ experiences regarding how to preserve self-concept in life after burn injury in Iran. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was carried out using qualitative content analysis and in-depth unstructured interviews with 17 surviving burn subjects. Results: During the qualitative content analysis process, the concept of "locating" as the essence of the participants′ experience was extracted as follows: (A self-exploration (exploring the changes in one′s life, (B others′ exploration (exploring the changes in the life of family members and the relationship between self and others, (C position evaluation (self-position analysis, and (D self-concept preservation. Conclusion: The present study has developed new understandings of mental experiences of burn patients′ self-concept by describing the concept of "self-locating." It helps us in classifying and understanding the concepts described in comprehensive theories developed in this area. They do this by focusing on what burn patients experience for choosing self-preservation strategies and having a meaningful life. The finding can be used as a conceptual framework for palliative care program in Iran.

  11. A study on hydrogen burn due to the operation of containment spray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bounding calculation for inflammable gas combustion due to the steam condensation by the operation of the containment spray system was performed. Sensitivity study was performed for two initiating events, station blackout and loss of coolant accident. The parameters for sensitivity study are the condition of cavity, wet or dry, and the timing of operation of the containment spray system. It is shown, based on MAAP4 analyses, that: for dry cavity, auto-ignition burn and hydrogen laden jet burn due to the high temperature in the reactor cavity consumes large amount of burnable gas in the containment and reduces the peak pressure at the global burn by flammability criteria; for wet cavity, large amount of hydrogen and carbon monoxide are generated after dryout of the reactor cavity, but burn is prohibited due to the low gas temperature in the high concentration of the steam. The late operation of the containment spray system condenses the steam rapidly, which results in the global burn at high concentration of burnable gas in the containment. The containment peak pressure from this burn is determined to be high enough to threaten the containment integrity significantly. (author). 3 refs., 3 tabs

  12. Long-Term Propranolol Use in Severely Burned Pediatric Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, David N.; Rodriguez, Noe A.; Diaz, Eva C.; Hegde, Sachin; Jennings, Kristofer; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Suri, Jaipreet S.; Lee, Jong O.; Williams, Felicia N.; Meyer, Walter; Suman, Oscar E.; Barrow, Robert E.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety and efficacy of propranolol given for 1 year on cardiac function, resting energy expenditure, and body composition in a prospective randomized single-center controlled study in pediatric patients with large burns. Summary Background Data Severe burns trigger a hypermetabolic response that persists for up to 2 years after burn. Propranolol given for 1 month post burn blunts this response. Whether propranolol administration for 1 year after injury provides a continued benefit is currently unclear. Methods One-hundred seventy nine pediatric patients with >30% total body surface area burns were randomized to receive control (n = 89) or 4 mg/kg/d propranolol (n = 90) for 12 months after burn. Changes in resting energy expenditure, cardiac function, and body composition were measured acutely at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postburn. Statistical analyses included techniques that adjust for non-normality, repeated measures, and regression analyses. P <0.05 was considered significant. Results Long-term propranolol treatment significantly reduced the percent of the predicted heart rate and percent of the predicted resting energy expenditure, decreased accumulation of central mass and central fat, prevented bone loss, and improved lean body mass accretion. There were very few adverse effects from the dose of propranolol used. Conclusions Propranolol treatment for 12 months, following thermal injury, ameliorates the hyperdynamic, hypermetabolic, hypercatabolic, and osteopenic responses in pediatric patients. This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00675714. PMID:22895351

  13. Natural forest fires and controlled burning - a study of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the literature was made to elucidate the history of forest fires in Sweden. Both the frequency of natural forest fires and the extent of controlled burning as a forest-management technique were examined. The literature revealed that natural forest fires occurred every 40 to 160 years, depending on the type of site and the climatic conditions. Natural forest fires are an unusual occurrence nowadays, mainly thanks to effective fire-fighting methods but also because of the reduction in the quantity of combustible materials left in the stands in modern forestry practice. The report describes the factors influencing the occurrence and frequency of forest fires and the impact these have on flora and fauna. Controlled burning has a long history of use as a method of site preparation prior to natural regeneration. Peak usage of the method occurred in the 1950s and 1960s, since when it has steadily declined. An account is given of the methods used for controlled burning. In parallel with the study, we conducted a questionnaire survey among forest enterprises to identify current interest in controlled burning. The techniques used and the costs involved are discussed. In addition to Sweden, we also looked at controlled burning in Canada, Finland and the USA. Finland is closest to Sweden when it comes to the history of controlled burning and the current interest in fire for conservation purposes. 103 refs, 18 figs

  14. Predictive Value of IL-8 for Sepsis and Severe Infections after Burn Injury - A Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Song, Juquan; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response induced by burn injury contributes to increased incidence of infections, sepsis, organ failure, and mortality. Thus, monitoring post-burn inflammation is of paramount importance but so far there are no reliable biomarkers available to monitor and/or predict infectious complications after burn. As IL-8 is a major mediator for inflammatory responses, the aim of our study was to determine whether IL-8 expression can be used to predict post-burn sepsis, infections, and mortality other outcomes post-burn. Plasma cytokines, acute phase proteins, constitutive proteins, and hormones were analyzed during the first 60 days post injury from 468 pediatric burn patients. Demographics and clinical outcome variables (length of stay, infection, sepsis, multiorgan failure (MOF), and mortality were recorded. A cut-off level for IL-8 was determined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Statistical significance is set at (p<0.05). ROC analysis identified a cut-off level of 234 pg/ml for IL-8 for survival. Patients were grouped according to their average IL-8 levels relative to this cut off and stratified into high (H) (n=133) and low (L) (n=335) groups. In the L group, regression analysis revealed a significant predictive value of IL-8 to percent of total body surface area (TBSA) burned and incidence of MOF (p<0.001). In the H group IL-8 levels were able to predict sepsis (p<0.002). In the H group, elevated IL-8 was associated with increased inflammatory and acute phase responses compared to the L group (p<0.05). High levels of IL-8 correlated with increased MOF, sepsis, and mortality. These data suggest that serum levels of IL-8 may be a valid biomarker for monitoring sepsis, infections, and mortality in burn patients. PMID:25514427

  15. Bacterial isolates from burn wound infections and their antibiograms: A eight-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Manjula

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection is an important cause of mortality in burns. Rapidly emerging nosocomial pathogens and the problem of multi-drug resistance necessitates periodic review of isolation patterns and antibiogram in the burn ward. Aim: Keeping this in mind, the present retrospective study from wounds of patients admitted to burns unit was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profile and the resistance pattern from the burn ward over a period of three years (June 2002 to May 2005 and was compared with the results obtained during the previous five years (June 1997-May 2002, to ascertain any change in the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: Bacterial isolates from 268 wound swabs taken from burn patients were identified by conventional biochemical methods and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed. Statistical comparison of bacterial isolates and their resistance pattern with previous five years data was done using c2 test. Results and Conclusions: During the period from 2002 to 2005 Pseudomonas species was the commonest pathogen isolated (51.5% followed by Acinetobacter species (14.28%, Staph. aureus (11.15%, Klebsiella species (9.23% and Proteus species (2.3%. When compared with the results of the previous five years i.e., 1997 to 2002, Pseudomonas species was still the commonest pathogen in the burns unit. However, the isolation of this organism and other gram-negative organisms had decreased in comparison to previous years. Newer drugs were found to be effective.

  16. Tissue expander, a modality in the treatment of burn induced deformities: A 6-year study of patients with burn deformities admitted to Plastic Surgery Department of Imam Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Vash. MR

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of tissue expander in the recent decade has revolutionized the plastic surgery. The tissue expansion technique is advantageous in body reconstruction because it makes it possible to resurface the defects resulting from excision of burn scars with neighboring skin similar in color and texture and superior to skin grafts or distant flaps. Treatment of burn alopecia was a major problem in the past, but with the application of tissue expander this deformity is treated. We have learned by experience that tissue expander should not be used in the limbs, because of the high risk of complications. The best locations for tissue expander are in order: Scalp, face, neck and trunk. The incidence of burn induced deformities in Iran is high. In this research, I analyze the use of TE in 130 patients with burn deformities. The variables studied were: Sex of patients (43.1% male, 56.9% female, age groups, level of education, occupation, the anatomical site of burn, extension of burn, volume of tissue expansion, the location of placing the TE and complications.

  17. A clinico-epidemiologic study of 892 patients with burn injuries at a tertiary care hospital in Punjab, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To analyze the causes, demographic and socio-cultural aspects, and the magnitude of burn injuries prospectively and to evaluate the outcome of treatment of patients admitted to burns ICU of tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods : A total of 892 burn patients admitted over a period of 6 years from January 2002 to December 2007 at tertiary care hospital in Punjab, India, were analyzed. Results : 54% patients were males. A majority of the patients, 704(79%, were in the age group of 15-45 years. Six hundred and thirty-four patients (72% sustained flame burns, while 17% and 7% sustained electrical and scald burns, respectively. A total of 470(53% patients sustained major two to three degree flame burns involving more than 45% of total body surface area (TBSA. The mortality rate was 40%, i.e. 357 patients died of burns and its related problems, in our study. Six hundred and thirty-nine patients (72% sustained burns in closed space of which 331 patients (52% sustained burns in kitchen. Seven hundred and seventy-nine patients sustained accidental burns. Burn victims were mainly Hindus and Sikhs. The mean hospital stay varied depending upon the percentage of burns. On an average, a patient with >45% TBSA burns received 15 whole blood transfusions. Split skin grafting was done in 416 patients. Most common complication encountered during their hospital stay was wound infection which was seen in 671 patients, followed by ARDS in 221 patients. The most common organisms causing wound infection were Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. Conclusion : Developing country like India need an aggressive public education program so that people become more literate about various etiological factors causing burns and means of preventing them. Also needed are burn care hospitals which are easily accessible and affordable.

  18. Study of Temperature Gradient in Burning of Alternative Engine Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Assad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an approximate method for calculation of the temperature at a final stage of fuel-air mixture burning in a closed vessel that is a combustion chamber of the internal combustion engine (ICE. The paper contains calculation of temperature values for various fuel-air mixtures, shows nature of temperature changes and presents analysis of combustion product temperature behaviour modification and analyzed the behaviour in accordance with an initial pressure in the chamber. The paper reveals the fact that a combustion temperature is increasing for all mixtures when an initial pressure in combustion chamber is increased. The hydrogen-air mixture has the highest combustion temperature among investigated mixtures and products of propane conversion have the lowest one.The Maxe-effect has been investigated in combustion of hydrogen-air mixture and design formulaes have been obtained. Calculation of temperature difference of the first and last portions of combustion products has been made with due account of the Maxe-effect.The proposed approximate method for calculation of temperatures indices in the various zones of combustion chamber in view of the Mach effect makes it possible to forecast thermodynamic nature of combustion process while using alternative engine fuels for internal combustion engine.

  19. Burn Depth Estimation Based on Infrared Imaging of Thermally Excited Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, F.M.; Hoswade, S.C.; Yee, M.L.

    1999-03-05

    Accurate estimation of the depth of partial-thickness burns and the early prediction of a need for surgical intervention are difficult. A non-invasive technique utilizing the difference in thermal relaxation time between burned and normal skin may be useful in this regard. In practice, a thermal camera would record the skin's response to heating or cooling by a small amount-roughly 5 C for a short duration. The thermal stimulus would be provided by a heat lamp, hot or cold air, or other means. Processing of the thermal transients would reveal areas that returned to equilibrium at different rates, which should correspond to different burn depths. In deeper thickness burns, the outside layer of skin is further removed from the constant-temperature region maintained through blood flow. Deeper thickness areas should thus return to equilibrium more slowly than other areas. Since the technique only records changes in the skin's temperature, it is not sensitive to room temperature, the burn's location, or the state of the patient. Preliminary results are presented for analysis of a simulated burn, formed by applying a patch of biosynthetic wound dressing on top of normal skin tissue.

  20. Viability of human composite tissue model for experimental study of burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Miao; Kruse, Stephan; Pitsch, Heinz; Pallua, Norbert; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies of burns are primarily performed with animal models that have important anatomical and physiological differences relative to human systems. The aim of this study was to develop a human experimental burn model using composite tissue obtained from bariatric surgery. We established a new protocol to maintain viable sections of human cutaneous and subcutaneous (sub/cutaneous) tissue in vitro. Under the conditions selected, multiparametric flow cytometry and histological analysis confirmed the viability and integrity of the human sub/cutaneous tissue for at least 5 days. Furthermore, we utilized a precision McKenna burner to inflict burns on the human tissue model under well-defined thermal conditions in vitro. Our data showed a localized, temporally restricted polarization of the resident macrophages in the subcutaneous human tissue in response to specific thermal forces. Therefore, our model provides a useful alternative to animal studies for further detailed investigations of human responses to injuries and treatments. PMID:27585227

  1. Burn Rate Studies of a Titanium-Based Ptrotechnic Smoke Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Rajendran

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A pyrotechnic smoke composition producing titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4 as one of the major reaciion products hasj been studied. The composition consists of titanium metal powder, hexachloroethae (C2CI6, potassium perchlorate (KCIO4 and titanium dioxide (TiO2/zinc oxide (ZnO. PyrotFcHnic aluminium was added. in small percentages to tailor the burn rate. The effect of percentage variation of KClO4. TiO21 ZnO. titanium and aluminium on the burn rate has beeninvestigated. While, the burn rate decreases as the percentage of TiO2/ZnO increases, it reaches a maximum as the percentage of KCIO4 is successively increased, but falls off on further increase. Thismaximum has been first fixbd by studying the tricomponent system containing no oxide. It corresponds td 25 per cent KClO4. Successive additions of C2Cl6 and ZnO in 1 :3 mol ratio or C2Cl6and TiO2 in 2:3 mol ratio lead to cooler compositions that burn smoothly without much flame and at lower temperatures. (Compositions containing less than 5 per cent titanium is difficult to ignite. Similarly, addition of excess titanium or small quantities of alljminium to the composition is found to increase the burn rate.

  2. A Retrospective Analysis of the Burn Injury Patients Records in the Emergency Department, an Epidemiologic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Aksoy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burns can be very destructive, and severely endanger the health and lives of humans. It maybe cause disability and even psychological trauma in individuals. . Such an event can also lead to economic burden on victim’s families and society. The aim of our study is to evaluate epidemiology and outcome of burn patients referring to emergency department. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study was conducted by evaluation of patients’ files and forensic reports of burned patients’ referred to the emergency department (ED of Akdeniz hospital, Turkey, 2008. Demographic data, the season, place, reason, anatomical sites, total body surface area, degrees, proceeding treatment, and admission time were recorded. Multinomial logistic regression was used to compare frequencies’ differences among single categorized variables. Stepwise logistic regression was applied to develop a predictive model for hospitalization. P<0.05 was defined as a significant level. Results: Two hundred thirty patients were enrolled (53.9% female. The mean of patients' ages was 25.3 ± 22.3 years. The most prevalence of burn were in the 0-6 age group and most of which was hot liquid scalding (71.3%. The most affected parts of the body were the left and right upper extremities. With increasing the severity of triage level (OR=2.2; 95% CI: 1.02-4.66; p=0.046, intentional burn (OR=4.7; 95% CI: 1.03-21.8; p=0.047, referring from other hospitals or clinics (OR=3.4; 95% CI: 1.7-6.6; p=0.001, and percentage of burn (OR=18.1; 95% CI: 5.42-62.6; p<0.001 were independent predictive factor for hospitalization. In addition, odds of hospitalization was lower in patients older than 15 years (OR=0.7; 95% CI: 0.5-0.91; p=0.035. Conclusion: This study revealed the most frequent burns are encountered in the age group of 0-6 years, percentage of <10%, second degree, upper extremities, indoor, and scalding from hot liquids. Increasing ESI severity, intentional burn, referring from

  3. Independent Predictive Factors of Hospitalization in a North-West Burn Center of Iran; an Epidemiologic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Shams Vahdati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A high grade burn is one of the most devastating injuries with several medical, social, economic, and psychological effects. These injuries are the most common cause of accidental deaths after traffic injuries in both the developed and developing countries. Therefore this research was aimed to determine demographic characteristics of patients with burn injury admitted to the emergency department and identify predictive factors of hospitalization. Methods: This is a cross sectional descriptive study, which is done in 20 March up to 20 September 2011 in emergency department of Sina Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. Patients’ information including demographic characteristic, cause of burn, place of accident, anatomical areas burned, grading and percent of burning and disposition were gathered and analyzed using SPSS version 18.0 statistical software. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis was used for recognition of independent predictive factors of hospitalization in burned patients. Results: One hundred and sixty patients were enrolled (54.4% female. The average age of those was 20.47±13.5 years. The prevalence of burn was significantly higher in ages under 20 years (p<0.001. Lower limb (37.5%, head and neck (21.25% and upper limb (17.5% were three frequent site of burn. The most common cause of burns was boiling water scalding (34.4%. Home related burn was significantly higher than other place (p<0.001. The most frequent percent of burn was <5% (46.25%. Finally 50 (31.25% cases hospitalized. Univariate analysis demonstrated that age under 20 years old (p=0.02 female gender (p=0.02, burning site (p=0.002, cause (p=0.005, place (p<0.001, grade (p<0.001, and percent (p<0.001 was related to disposition of patients. Stepwise multiple logistic regression showed female gender (OR=3.52; 95% CI: 1.57-7.88; p=0.002, work related burning (OR=1.78; 95% CI: 1.26-2.52; p=0.001, and burning over 5 percent (OR=2.15; 95% CI: 1.35-3.41; p=0.001 as

  4. Study on the thermal-hydraulic stability of high burn up STEP III fuel in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japanese BWR utilities have performed a joint study of the Thermal Hydraulic Stability of High Burn up STEP III Fuel. In this study, the parametric dependency of thermal hydraulic stability threshold was obtained. It was confirmed through experiments that the STEP III Fuel has sufficient stability characteristics. (author)

  5. A qualitative study of the background and in-hospital medicolegal response to female burn injuries in India

    OpenAIRE

    Daruwalla, N.; Belur, J.; Kumar, M.; Tiwari, V; Sarabahi, S.; Tilley, N.; Osrin, D

    2014-01-01

    Background Most burns happen in low- and middle-income countries. In India, deaths related to burns are more common in women than in men and occur against a complex background in which the cause – accidental or non-accidental, suicidal or homicidal – is often unclear. Our study aimed to understand the antecedents to burns and the problem of ascribing cause, the sequence of medicolegal events after a woman was admitted to hospital, and potential opportunities for improvement. Methods We conduc...

  6. The solvent-extractable organic compounds in the Indonesia biomass burning aerosols - characterization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, M.; Zheng, M.; Wang, F.; To, K. L.; Jaafar, A. B.; Tong, S. L.

    The large-scale air pollution episode due to the out-of-control biomass burning for agricultural purposes in Indonesia started in June 1997, has become a severe environmental problem for itself and the neighboring countries. The fire lasted for almost five months. Its impact on the health and ecology in the affected areas is expected to be substantial, costly and possibly long lasting. Air pollution Index as high as 839 has been reported in Malaysia. API is calculated based on the five pollutants: NO 2, SO 2, O 3, CO, and respirable suspended particulates (PM10). It ranges in value from 0 to 500. An index above 101 is considered to be unhealthy and a value over 201 is very unhealthy (Abidin and Shin, 1996). The solvent-extractable organic compounds from four total suspended particulate (TSP) high-volume samples collected in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Stations Pudu and SIRIM) were subjected to characterization - the abundance was determined and biomarkers were identified. Two of the samples were from early September when the fire was less intense, while the other two were from late September when Kuala Lumpur experienced very heavy smoke coverage which could be easily observed from NOAA/AVHRR satellite images. The samples contained mainly aliphatic hydrocarbons such as n-alkanes and triterpanes, alkanoic acids, alkanols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The difference between the early and late September samples was very significant. The total yield increased from 0.6 to 24.3 μg m -3 at Pudu and 1.9 to 20.1 μg m -3 at SIRIM, with increases in concentration in every class. The higher input of vascular plant wax components in the late September samples, when the fire was more intense, was characterized by the distribution patterns of the homologous series n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, and n-alkanols, e.g., lower U : R, higher >C 22/C 20/forest fire and the controlled experiments reported in the literature. Similar to the biomass burning in Amazonia (Abas et al

  7. A retrospective study of drug prescribing pattern in burns patients in a tertiary care rural hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palak Agrawal

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Females are more vulnerable to burn injuries. Polypharmacy was observed in prescriptions. Systemic antibiotic should be used with caution to prevent emergence of resistant microorganisms. Results of the present study indicate that some aspects of drug treatment need to be rationalized in order to achieve better patient care. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(6.000: 1446-1452

  8. Assessment of human burn scars with optical coherence tomography by imaging the attenuation coefficient of tissue after vascular masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijun; McLaughlin, Robert A; Liew, Yih Miin; Munro, Peter R T; Wood, Fiona M; Sampson, David D

    2014-02-01

    The formation of burn-scar tissue in human skin profoundly alters, among other things, the structure of the dermis. We present a method to characterize dermal scar tissue by the measurement of the near-infrared attenuation coefficient using optical coherence tomography (OCT). To generate accurate en face parametric images of attenuation, we found it critical to first identify (using speckle decorrelation) and mask the tissue vasculature from the three-dimensional OCT data. The resulting attenuation coefficients in the vasculature-masked regions of the dermis of human burn-scar patients are lower in hypertrophic (3.8±0.4  mm(-1)) and normotrophic (4.2±0.9  mm(-1)) scars than in contralateral or adjacent normal skin (6.3±0.5  mm(-1)). Our results suggest that the attenuation coefficient of vasculature-masked tissue could be used as an objective means to assess human burn scars. PMID:24192908

  9. The view of severely burned patients and healthcare professionals on the blind spots in the aftercare process: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Christiaens, Wendy; Van de Walle, Elke; Devresse, Sophie; Van Halewyck, Dries; Benahmed, Nadia; Paulus, Dominique; Van den Heede, Koen

    2015-01-01

    Background In most Western countries burn centres have been developed to provide acute and critical care for patients with severe burn injuries. Nowadays, those patients have a realistic chance of survival. However severe burn injuries do have a devastating effect on all aspects of a person’s life. Therefore a well-organized and specialized aftercare system is needed to enable burn patients to live with a major bodily change. The aim of this study is to identify the problems and unmet care ne...

  10. Analysis of factorial time-course microarrays with application to a clinical study of burn injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Baiyu; Xu, Weihong; Herndon, David; Tompkins, Ronald; Davis, Ronald; Xiao, Wenzhong; Wong, Wing Hung; Toner, Mehmet; Warren, H. Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A.; Rahme, Laurence; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Hayden, Douglas; Mason, Philip; Fagan, Shawn; Yu, Yong-Ming; Cobb, J. Perren; Remick, Daniel G.; Mannick, John A.; Lederer, James A.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; West, Michael A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Smith, Richard; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Storey, John; Mindrinos, Michael; Tibshirani, Rob; Lowry, Stephen; Calvano, Steven; Chaudry, Irshad; West, Michael A.; Cohen, Mitchell; Moore, Ernest E.; Johnson, Jeffrey; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Baker, Henry V.; Efron, Philip A.; Balis, Ulysses G.J.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Ochoa, Juan B.; Sperry, Jason L.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.; De, Asit K.; Bankey, Paul E.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Minei, Joseph P.; Arnoldo, Brett D.; Hunt, John L.; Horton, Jureta; Cobb, J. Perren; Brownstein, Bernard; Freeman, Bradley; Maier, Ronald V.; Nathens, Avery B.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Gibran, Nicole; Klein, Matthew; O’Keefe, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Time-course microarray experiments are capable of capturing dynamic gene expression profiles. It is important to study how these dynamic profiles depend on the multiple factors that characterize the experimental condition under which the time course is observed. Analytic methods are needed to simultaneously handle the time course and factorial structure in the data. We developed a method to evaluate factor effects by pooling information across the time course while accounting for multiple testing and nonnormality of the microarray data. The method effectively extracts gene-specific response features and models their dependency on the experimental factors. Both longitudinal and cross-sectional time-course data can be handled by our approach. The method was used to analyze the impact of age on the temporal gene response to burn injury in a large-scale clinical study. Our analysis reveals that 21% of the genes responsive to burn are age-specific, among which expressions of mitochondria and immunoglobulin genes are differentially perturbed in pediatric and adult patients by burn injury. These new findings in the body’s response to burn injury between children and adults support further investigations of therapeutic options targeting specific age groups. The methodology proposed here has been implemented in R package “TANOVA” and submitted to the Comprehensive R Archive Network at http://www.r-project.org/. It is also available for download at http://gluegrant1.stanford.edu/TANOVA/. PMID:20479259

  11. In vivo studies of antibacterial effect of human amniotic membrane use in treatment of burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study consist to put in evidence one of essential characteristic of amniotic membrane in occurrence the antibacterial effect. The article describes a study which compared the microbiological and clinical results of the application of freeze-dried gamma sterilized amniotic membrane with that of the conventional treatment(flamazine, greased gauze), in 100 patients with intermediate burns and deep burns with small surface, the bacterial population of various types of microorganisms was well controlled using quantitative bacterial culture techniques, immediately after accident, during treatment and at the last of treatment. The bacterial counts were significantly diminished mean of 10 4 UFC/cm2 to mean of 10 3 UFC/cm2, after 4 days in no infected burns and mean of 10 6 UFC/cm2 to mean of 10 3 UFC/cm2, after 5 days in infected burns, the same reduction was registered after 16 to 25 days with the conventional treatment. It is concluded that use of amniotic membrane control infection, minimize pain and promote wound healing

  12. Stress disorder and PTSD after burn injuries: a prospective study of predictors of PTSD at Sina Burn Center, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi-Bazargani H; Maghsoudi H; Soudmand-Niri M; Ranjbar F; Mashadi-Abdollahi H

    2011-01-01

    Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani1, Hemmat Maghsoudi2, Mohsen Soudmand-Niri3, Fatemeh Ranjbar4, Hossein Mashadi-Abdollahi51Neuroscience Research Center, Statistics and Epidemiology Department, School of Health and Nutrition, 2Department of Surgery, 3School of Psychology, 4Department of Psychiatry, 5National Public Health Management Centre, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: A burn injury can be a traumatic experience with tremendous social, physical, and psychological con...

  13. Design of a cross-sectional study on physical fitness and physical activity in children and adolescents after burn injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disseldorp Laurien M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burn injuries have a major impact on the patient’s physical and psychological functioning. The consequences can, especially in pediatric burns, persist long after the injury. A decrease in physical fitness seems logical as people survive burn injuries after an often extensive period of decreased activity and an increased demand of proteins leading to catabolism, especially of muscle mass. However, knowledge on the possibly affected levels of physical fitness in children and adolescents after burn injury is limited and pertains only to children with major burns. The current multidimensional study aims to determine the level of physical fitness, the level of physical activity, health-related quality of life and perceived fatigue in children after a burn injury. Furthermore, interrelations between those levels will be explored, as well as associations with burn characteristics. Methods/design Children and adolescents in the age range of 6 up to and including 18 years are invited to participate in this cross-sectional descriptive study if they have been admitted to one of the three Dutch burn centers between 6 months and 5 years ago with a burn injury involving at least 10% of the total body surface area and/or were hospitalized ≥ 6 weeks. Physical fitness assessments will take place in a mobile exercise lab. Quantitative measures of cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, body composition and flexibility will be obtained. Outcomes will be compared with Dutch reference values. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and fatigue will be assessed using accelerometry and age-specific questionnaires. Discussion The findings of the current study will contribute to a better understanding of the long-term consequences of burn injury in children and adolescents after burns. The results can guide rehabilitation to facilitate a timely and optimal physical recovery. Trial registration The study is registered in

  14. Application of spectral hole burning to the study of in vitro cellular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milanovich, Nebojsa

    1999-11-08

    Chapter 1 of this thesis describes the various stages of tumor development and a multitude of diagnostic techniques used to detect cancer. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the aspects of hole burning spectroscopy important for its application to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 3 gives general descriptions of cellular organelles, structures, and physical properties that can serve as possible markers for the differentiation of normal and cancerous cells. Also described in Chapter 3 are the principles of cryobiology important for low temperature spectroscopy of cells, characterization of MCF-10F (normal) and MCF-7 (cancer) cells lines which will serve as model systems, and cellular characteristics of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (APT), which was used as the test probe. Chapters 4 and 5 are previously published papers by the author pertaining to the results obtained from the application of hole burning to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 4 presents the first results obtained by spectral hole burning of cellular systems and Chapter 5 gives results for the differentiation of MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells stained with APT by an external applied electric (Stark) field. A general conclusion is presented in Chapter 6. Appendices A and B provide additional characterization of the cell/probe model systems. Appendix A describes the uptake and subcellular distribution of APT in MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells and Appendix B compares the hole burning characteristics of APT in cells when the cells are in suspension and when they are examined while adhering to a glass coverslip. Appendix C presents preliminary results for a novel probe molecule, referred to as a molecular thumbtack, designed by the authors for use in future hole burning applications to cellular systems.

  15. Optimization of burn referrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiband, Hanna K; Lundin, Kira; Alsbjørn, Bjarne;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Correct estimation of the severity of burns is important to obtain the right treatment of the patient and to avoid over- and undertriage. In this study we aimed to assess how often the guidelines for referral of burn injured patients are met at the national burn centre (NBC), Denmar...

  16. The impact of burn-up credit in criticality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays optimization goes with everything. So French engineering firms try to demonstrate that fuel transport casks and storage pools are able to receive assemblies with higher 235U initial enrichments. Fuel Burnup distribution contributes to demonstrate it. This instruction has to elaborate a way to take credit of burnup effects on criticality safety designs. The calculation codes used are CESAR 4.21-APOLLO 1-MORET III. The assembly studied (UO2) is irradiated in a French Pressurized Water Reactor like EDF nuclear power reactor: PWR 1300 MWe, 17 x 17 array. Its initial enrichment in 235U equals 4.5%. The studies exposed in this report have evaluated the effects of: i) the 15 fission products considered in Burnup Credit (95Mo, 99Tc, 101Ru, 103Rh, 109Ag, 133Cs, 143Nd, 145Nd, 147Sm, 149Sm, 150Sm, 151Sm, 152Sm, 153Eu, 155Gd), ii) the calculated abundances corrected or not by fixed factors, iii) the choice of one cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21, iu) the zone number elected in the axial burnup distribution zoning, u) the kind of cut applied on (regular/optimized). Two axial distribution profiles are studied: one with 44 GWd/t average burnup, the other with 20 GWd/t average burnup. The second one considers a shallow control rods insertion in the upper limit of the assembly. The results show a margin in reactivity about 0.045 with consideration of the 6 most absorbent fission products (103Rh, 133Cs, 143Nd, 149Sm, 152Sm, 155Gd), and about 0.06 for all Burnup Credit fission products whole. Those results have been calculated with an average burnup of 44 GWj/t. In a conservative approach, corrective factors must be apply on the abundance of some fission products. The cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21 (BBL 4) is sufficient and gives satisfactory results. The zoning of the assembly axial distribution burnup in 9 regular zones grants a satisfying calculation time/result precision compromise. (author)

  17. Is Real-Time Feedback of Burn-Specific Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Clinical Settings Practical and Useful? A Pilot Study Implementing the Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Colleen M; Lee, Austin F; Kazis, Lewis E; Shapiro, Gabriel D; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Goverman, Jeremy; Fagan, Shawn P; Wang, Chao; Kim, Julia; Sheridan, Robert L; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2016-01-01

    Long-term follow-up care of survivors after burn injuries can potentially be improved by the application of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). PROMs can inform clinical decision-making and foster communication between the patient and provider. There are no previous reports using real-time, burn-specific PROMs in clinical practice to track and benchmark burn recovery over time. This study examines the feasibility of a computerized, burn-specific PROM, the Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire (YABOQ), with real-time benchmarking feedback in a burn outpatient practice. The YABOQ was redesigned for formatting and presentation purposes using images and transcribed to a computerized format. The redesigned questionnaire was administered to young adult burn survivors (ages 19-30 years, 1-24 months from injury) via an ipad platform in the office before outpatient visits. A report including recovery curves benchmarked to a nonburned relatively healthy age-matched population and to patients with similar injuries was produced for the domains of physical function and social function limited by appearance. A copy of the domain reports as well as a complete copy of the patient's responses to all domain questions was provided for use during the clinical visit. Patients and clinicians completed satisfaction surveys at the conclusion of the visit. Free-text responses, included in the satisfaction surveys, were treated as qualitative data adding contextual information about the assessment of feasibility. Eleven patients and their providers completed the study for 12 clinical visits. All patients found the ipad survey and report "easy" or "very easy" to use. In nine instances, patients "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that it helped them communicate their situation to their doctor/nurse practitioner. Patients "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the report helped them understand their course of recovery in 10 visits. In 11 visits, the patients "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that

  18. The haematopoietic response to burning: studies in a splenectomized animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, S F; Vautrin, R; Katz, J

    1987-02-01

    Several haematopoietic changes occur following burning. These changes are important because they may effect a patient's ability to fight infection and to heal wounds. Studies of haematopoiesis in burned humans are difficult because of the complexity of these patients and because of the difficulty of collecting specimens. We therefore established a mouse model of these haematopoietic events; however, this model differed from the human situation as all three haematopoietic cell lines were being produced by the murine spleen. In this paper, we modified the model by removing the spleen and then repeating our previous studies. After splenectomy, granulocyte production, murine mortality and body weight did not change. Compared with the original model, the modified splenectomy model could not expand erythropoiesis. The result was greater anaemia. This model is, now, a closer simulation of the human situation and will prove useful in studies of haematopoiesis after thermal injury. PMID:3828854

  19. Recent lung imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide lung imaging procedures have been available for 11 years but only the perfusion examination has been used extensively and mainly for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (P.E.). Its ability to reveal localized ischemia makes it a valuable test of regional lung function as well as a useful diagnostic aid in P.E. Although it had been recognized for several years that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause lung perfusion defects which may simulate pulmonary embolism, relatively little use has been made of either the radioxenon or the radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging procedures until the last few years as a means of distinguishing P.E. from COPD. In this review emphasis is placed on our recent experience with both of these inhalation procedures in comparison with pulmonary function tests and roentgenography for the early detection of COPD in population studies. Equal emphasis is given to simultaneous aerosol ventilation-perfusion (V/P) imaging for a functional diagnosis of P.E. Two new developments in regional lung diffusion imaging, performed after the inhalation of radioactive gases and/or rapidly absorbed radioaerosols are described. The experimental basis for their potential clinical application in pulmonary embolism detection is presented

  20. Three-year Study of Effective Factors in Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Hospitalized Burn Patients in Ahvaz Taleghani Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipelzadeh MH

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Gastrointestinal bleeding can arise following various stressing conditions such as burns. Gastrointestinal bleeding has serious effect on the treatment process of burn patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding and to identify factors contributing to its occurrence in burn patientsSubjects and Methods: In this descriptive and retrospective research study, the population of the study included all patients admitted in the Ahvaz Taleghani burn center from the year 2008 to 2010 and 3901 medical records were reviewed. Data were collected by a checklist and analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Results: From a total of 3901 patients admitted during the three years period of study, 45 patients had gastrointestinal bleeding (1.15%. The average of burned surface area in these patients was 61%. Seventy seven percent of gastrointestinal bleeding had occurred in patients with burn over 50 percent, and there was direct correlation between the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding and the extent of burn. The age group of 15-30 years comprised 40.1% of our cases. The mortality among patients suffered from gastrointestinal bleeding was 71%. A significant relationship was found between burn in face and incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding (P<0.001. However, the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding among different sexes was not statistically significant.Conclusion: The results of this study show that the importance of timely diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding in burn patients. Therefore, doing preventive procedures such as medication and psychiatric interventions to reduce stress can decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in burn patients.Sci Med J 2011; 9(6:535-542

  1. Imaging: Do I Need an Imaging Study for My Headache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an imaging study for my headache? Print Email Imaging: Do I need an imaging study for my headache? ACHE Newsletter Sign up ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Imaging: Do I need an imaging study for my ...

  2. Histological and bacteriological studies of burn wounds treated with boiled potato peel dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, M H; Vartak, A M; Patil, A; Davies, J W

    1990-04-01

    Histological and clinical studies have been made on comparable burn wounds covered with either boiled potato peels affixed to gauze bandages or gauze dressings alone; both dressings were applied over a thin layer of 5 per cent silver sulphadiazine. Compared with treatment with plain gauze dressings, the application of the potato peel dressing reduced or eliminated dessication, permitted the survival of superficial skin cells and hastened epithelial regeneration. Bacteriological studies showed that the potato peels had no intrinsic antibacterial activity, the wounds beneath both dressings showing either no growth or, on most occasions, the same bacterial species. The easy availability of potato peels and gauze bandages on to which they can be affixed, the simplicity of the preparation of this dressing, the ease of sterilization and its low cost of production make this the dressing of choice for burn wounds in our developing country. PMID:2350410

  3. The ins and outs of Burns Bog: A water balance study

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Yue-Ching Obimin

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the influence of forest encroachment on the water balance of Burns Bog in Delta, British Columbia by determining the differences in the evapotranspiration and interception losses between a forested and non-forested (open) bog site. Throughfall in the forested bog site was 88% of the precipitation. During the growing season (June 15 – September 15, 2009), average evaporation in the open bog site, was 0.9 mm/day. The average evapotranspiration from the forested bog site was...

  4. High-Resolution Optical Studies on C-Phycocyanin via Photochemical Hole Burning

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, J; Scheer, Hugo; Zickendraht-Wendelstadt, Barbara; Haarer, D.

    1981-01-01

    We have shown that both the native C-phycocyanin and its corresponding free biline chromophore undergo reversible, low-temperature photochemistry. We attribute this photochemistry to reversible proton-transfer processes and utilize the observed photoreaction for photochemical hole burning (PHB). Using narrow-band PHB experiments, we have been able to perform high-resolution optical studies and show that the protein-chromophore assembly forms a very rigid structure. The results lead to the ...

  5. The role of xerostomia in burning mouth syndrome: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Alvarenga da Silva; José Tadeu Tesseroli de Siqueira; Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira; Silvia Regina Dowgan Tesseroli de Siqueira

    2014-01-01

    Objective : To assess the efficacy of anti-xerostomic topical medication (urea 10%) in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Method : Thirty-eight subjects diagnosed with BMS according to the International Association for the Study of Pain guidelines were randomized to either placebo (5% sodium carboxymethylcellulose, 0.15% methyl paraben, and 10% glycerol in distilled water qsp 100 g) or treatment (urea 10%) to be applied to the oral cavity 3-4 times per day for 3 months. The patient...

  6. High voltage electrical burn injuries in teenage children: case studies with similarities (an indian perspective)

    OpenAIRE

    Mathangi Ramakrishnan, K.; Babu, M.; Mathivanan,; B. Ramachandran; Balasubramanian, S.; Raghuram, K

    2013-01-01

    From 1992 to 2012, a total of 911 paediatric burns were admitted and treated at Kanchi Kamakoti Childs Trust Hospital Intensive Burn Care Unit, of these 28 children had suffered electrical injuries and burns. 7 teenagers suffered high voltage electrical burn injuries: 2 were involved in train accidents which caused fatal electrical injuries, and 5 had electrical burn injuries caused by similar types of accidents, requiring Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) care, repeated surgeries and ext...

  7. Studies on the Effects of RDX Particle Size on the Burning Rate of Gun Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G.S. Pillai

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available The ballistic properties of RDX-based propellants are highly dependent on the particle size of RDX used. The effect of RDX particle size on the burning rate and pressure exponent of the gun propellant was studied. Propellant formulation containing RDX to extent of 60 per cent in the composition was processed with varying particle size of RDX. Finished propellants in heptatubular and cord geometry were evaluated for ballistic aspects by closed vessel firing in a 700 cc vessel at a loading density of 0.18 g/cc. The data obtained clearly indicate that increase in particle size of RDX increases the burning rate as well as the pressure exponent.

  8. Effect of intense pulsed light on immature burn scars: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As intense pulsed light (IPL is widely used to treat cutaneous vascular malformations and also used as non-ablative skin rejunuvation to remodel the skin collagen. A study has been undertaken to gauze the effect of IPL on immature burn scars with regard to vascularity, pliability and height. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014, among patients with immature burn scars that healed conservatively within 2 months. Photographic evidence of appearance of scars and grading and rating was done with Vancouver Scar Scale parameters. Ratings were done for both case and control scar after the completion of four IPL treatment sessions and were compared. Results: Out of the 19 cases, vascularity, pliability and height improved significantly (P < 0.05 in 13, 14 and 11 scars respectively following IPL treatment. Conclusions: Intense pulsed light was well-tolerated by patients, caused good improvement in terms of vascularity, pliability, and height of immature burn scar.

  9. Antibacterial properties of tualang honey and its effect in burn wound management: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Nur-Azida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of honey as a natural product of Apis spp. for burn treatment has been widely applied for centuries. Tualang honey has been reported to have antibacterial properties against various microorganisms, including those from burn-related diagnoses, and is cheaper and easier to be absorbed by Aquacel dressing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential antibacterial properties of tualang honey dressing and to determine its effectiveness as a partial thickness burn wound dressing. Methods In order to quantitate the bioburden of the swabs, pour plates were performed to obtain the colony count (CFU/ml. Swabs obtained from burn wounds were streaked on blood agar and MacConkey agar for bacterial isolation and identification. Later, antibacterial activity of Aquacel-tualang honey, Aquacel-Manuka honey, Aquacel-Ag and Aquacel- plain dressings against bacteria isolated from patients were tested (in-vitro to see the effectiveness of those dressings by zone of inhibition assays. Results Seven organisms were isolated. Four types of Gram-negative bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp., and three Gram-positive bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (CONS and Streptococcus spp., were isolated. Total bacterial count decreased on day 6 and onwards. In the in-vitro antibacterial study, Aquacel-Ag and Aquacel-Manuka honey dressings gave better zone of inhibition for Gram positive bacteria compared to Aquacel-Tualang honey dressing. However, comparable results were obtained against Gram negative bacteria tested with Aquacel-Manuka honey and Aquacel-Tualang honey dressing. Conclusions Tualang honey has a bactericidal as well as bacteriostatic effect. It is useful as a dressing, as it is easier to apply and is less sticky compared to Manuka honey. However, for Gram positive bacteria, tualang honey is not as effective as usual care

  10. Study on burn-up credit and minor actinide in post-irradiation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accuracy of burnup calculation for actinide is very important as to the study of burn-up credit. For minor-actinides such as Am243 and Cm244, however, typical burnup calculation codes are not accurate enough. The accuracy for both nuclides was studied by using the SWAT code. The study showed that the C/E values of both nuclides could be improved at the same time by changing the cross section of Pu242. A study of burnup calculation related to the cross section of Pu242 should be performed to improve the accuracy for both nuclides. (author)

  11. [A pathologic study of adenohypophyseal growth hormone cells in the rabbit after severe burn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J

    1989-06-01

    The growth hormone(GH), produced by the growth hormone cell in pars distalis of the adenohypophysis, acts on the sugar, protein and fat metabolism in various degrees. After trauma, the GH has relations with the energy supply, the maintenance of nitrogen balance, the tissue repair and the body resistance. However, pathological study on the GH cell after burn injury is rare in the literature so far. The purpose of the present investigation is to take a dynamic observation on the ultrastructural changes of the rabbit GH cell after napalm burn within one week. 46 male rabbits were used and divided into two groups, napalm burn group (N = 36) and control group (N = 10). The former is inflicted with 3rd degree burn covering 30% TBSA. The animals of former group were sacrificed at 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 168 hours postburn respectively. Using the light and electron microscopy and stereological method, the results revealed that: (1) the synthesis activity in GH cell was enhanced, the process of secretion was rapid, and the rate of granule maturation was increased; (2) the nude GH granules were found both in the sinusoids and the endothelial cells; (3) the newly formed mitochondria may be originated from the Golgi complex, and the newly formed Golgi complex from the reutilization of the plasma membrane components; (4) some endothelial cells manifested degeneration, and the others showed in active condition; (5) under the light microscopy, the distribution of the lower tint-phil GH cells had its regional-characteristics. PMID:2509038

  12. A comparative study of the effect of different topical agents on burn wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katara Gunjan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Topical agents are used to treat burn wound infections. Aims and Objective: The present work was aimed to find out the in vitro efficacy of different topical agents against burn wound pathogens. Settings and Design: Randomly selected gram-positive (29 and gram-negative bacterial (119 isolates from burn wound cases admitted in burn unit of Choithram Hospital and Research Centre, Indore, were included in the in vitro activity testing for silver nitrate, silver sulphadiazine (SSD, chlorhexidine, cetrimide, nitrofuran, soframycin, betadine, benzalkonium chloride and honey by growth inhibition on agar medium. Materials and Methods: Multidrug-resistant isolates of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria were checked for different topical agents. 1% topical agent was mixed with Mueller-Hinton agar. Two microlitres of bacterial suspension adjusted to 0.5 McFarland turbidity standard was spread over the topical agent containing plates. The plates without the topical agent were used as control plates. The plates were incubated for 48 h at 37΀C. Results: SSD (148/148, silver nitrate (148/148 and chlorhexidine (148/148 showed excellent activity against all the pathogens. Neosporin had poor activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, (4/44 Proteus spp. (2/4 and group D streptococci (1/4. Betadine did not show activity against the bacterial isolates in the presence of organic matter. Honey did not exert any antimicrobial activity under the study conditions. Conclusion: SSD, silver nitrate and chlorhexidine have excellent activity against all the bacterial pathogens and could be used empirically, while identification of the infective agent is required for selecting the alternative topical agents such as nitrofuran, soframycin, and benzalkonium chloride.

  13. Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green : a prospective descriptive cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Steinvall, Ingrid; Fredrikson, Mats; Bak, Zoltan; Sjöberg, Folke

    2012-01-01

    Organ dysfunction and failure are important for burned patients as they increase morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has suggested that organ injuries are occurring earlier after burns, and are more common, than previously thought. In this study we have assessed the extent to which liver function, assessed by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG), is affected in patients with severe burns. This is a prospective, descriptive exploratory study at a national burn centr...

  14. Global modeling study of soluble organic nitrogen from open biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akinori; Lin, Guangxing; Penner, Joyce E.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) species from large fires may contribute to enrichment of nutrients in aquatic ecosystems. Here we use an atmospheric chemistry transport model to investigate the supply of soluble organic nitrogen (ON) from open biomass burning to the ocean. The model results show that the annual deposition rate of soluble ON to the oceans (14 Tg N yr-1) is increased globally by 13% with the increase being particularly notable over the tropical oceans downwind from the source regions. The estimated deposition of soluble ON due to biomass burning from the secondary formation (1.0 Tg N yr-1) is close to that from the primary sources (1.2 Tg N yr-1). We examine the secondary formation of particulate C-N compounds (i.e., imidazole, methyl imidazole, and N-containing oligomers) from the reactions of glyoxal (CHOCHO) and methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO) with ammonium (NH4+) in wet aerosols and upon cloud evaporation. These ON sources result in a significant contribution to the open ocean (1.3 Tg N yr-1), suggesting that atmospheric processing in aqueous-phase may have a large effect. We compare the soluble ON concentration in aerosols with and without open biomass burning as a case study in Singapore. The model results demonstrate that the soluble ON concentration in aerosols is episodically enriched during the fire events, compared to the case without smoke simulations. At the same time, the model results show that the daily soluble ON concentration can be also enhanced in the case without smoke simulations, compared to the monthly averages. These results may suggest that both the primary source strength of ON and the secondary formation rates of ON should be taken into consideration when using in-situ observations to constrain the calculated soluble ON burden due to biomass burning. More accurate quantification of the soluble ON burdens both with and without smoke sources is therefore needed to assess the effect of biomass burning on bioavailable

  15. Studying phase structure of burned ferrous manganese ores by method of nuclear gamma-resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shayakhmetov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the given article there are presented the results of studying the phase structure of burned ferrous manganese ores of Zhomart and Zapadny Kamys deposits of by the method of Mossbauer spectroscopy. There is established a variety of iron location forms in the studied materials and their quantitative content that allows to define the degree of completing regenerative processes at magnetizing roasting, and also the processes of formation of solid solutions (Fe1-XMX3O4 and stabilization of Fe1-XO from eutectoid disintegration at cooling.

  16. Study on the Agricultural Residues Burning and PM2.5 Change in China by Remote Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shuai; Wang, Xiufeng; Zhong, Guosheng; Sun, Zhongyi; Tani, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural residues are materials left over from the production of crops. The total amount of agricultural residues in China is about 660 million tons every year, while a large proportion of that is burnt directly on the croplands. Agricultural residues burning is a significant source of air pollution in developing countries including China. In this study, the MODIS MOD14A1 products were used to derive the daily fire spots of China. Then, the agricultural residues burning spots were obtained by extracting with the area of croplands which is from MODIS MCD12Q1 products. After vectorization of agricultural residues burning pixels and with the help of fishnet, the burning density distribution maps were eventually completed. According to the statistics, there were 71,237 pixels of agricultural residues burning in 2014. The pixels mainly focused on April, June and October, the number of which were 11,628, 10,912 and 20,965 respectively. The results show that the distribution of agricultural residues burning is closely connected with ploughing and harvesting activities and it is more severe in north China. The air quality data of 150 cities in China were also used to obtain the daily and monthly distribution maps of PM2.5 by Kriging interpolation method. The maps indicate that the PM2.5 is always higher in north China than that in south China. Comparing the results of agricultural residues burning points with the results of PM2.5, we found the agricultural residues burning can cause the PM2.5 increase, especially in June, the agricultural residues burning region was spatially and temporally consistent with the PM2.5 increase region in this month.

  17. Characterization of long-range transported Canadian biomass burning over Central Europe - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Silke; Geiss, Alexander; Heimerl, Katharina; Gasteiger, Josef; Freudenthaler, Volker; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Wiegner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are a major component of the Earth's atmosphere and have substantial impact on the Earth's radiation budget and on the hydrological cycle. Biomass burning smoke is one important component with respect of global climate warming as it is an important source of black carbon, which is a key player in atmospheric heating. As biomass burning smoke layers are often transported over long distances they cannot be considered as local events only but have a global effect. During transport the smoke particles are affected by aging and mixing processes. Thus their microphysical and optical properties change and, as a consequence their effect on the Earth's radiation budget. However, the influence of aging and mixing processes on the particle microphysical and optical properties is still only poorly understood. To improve our knowledge, studies of transport conditions together with measurements of the horizontal and vertical distribution the smoke layers as well as of their microphysical and optical properties are crucial. We present a case study of long-range transported Canadian biomass burning smoke to Central Europe in summer 2013. The smoke layer is characterized by multi-wavelength lidar measurements over Maisach and by continuous Ceilometer measurements over Munich, Germany. Multi-wavelength lidar measurements are an important tool for the characterization of aerosols, as they provide vertically resolved information of their optical properties which serve as input parameters for the determination of microphysical properties of the aerosol layers. Additionally, airborne in-situ measurements of size distribution and black carbon mass concentration onboard the DLR research aircraft Falcon are presented. The source regions and transport conditions are studied using a combination of satellite measurements and model simulations.

  18. Water First Aid Is Beneficial In Humans Post-Burn: Evidence from a Bi-National Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona M Wood

    Full Text Available Reported first aid application, frequency and practices around the world vary greatly. Based primarily on animal and observational studies, first aid after a burn injury is considered to be integral in reducing scar and infection, and the need for surgery. The current recommendation for optimum first aid after burn is water cooling for 20 minutes within three hours. However, compliance with this guideline is reported as poor to moderate at best and evidence exists to suggest that overcooling can be detrimental. This prospective cohort study of a bi-national burn patient registry examined data collected between 2009 and 2012. The aim of the study was to quantify the magnitude of effects of water cooling first aid after burn on indicators of burn severity in a large human cohort.The data for the analysis was provided by the Burn Registry of Australia and New Zealand (BRANZ. The application of first aid cooling prior to admission to a dedicated burn service, was analysed for its influence on four outcomes related to injury severity. The patient related outcomes were whether graft surgery occurred, and death while the health system (cost outcomes included total hospital length of stay and admission to ICU. Robust regression analysis using bootstrapped estimation adjusted using a propensity score was used to control for confounding and to estimate the strength of association with first aid. Dose-response relationships were examined to determine associations with duration of first aid. The influence of covariates on the impact of first aid was assessed.Cooling was provided before Burn Centre admission for 68% of patients, with at least twenty minutes duration for 46%. The results indicated a reduction in burn injury severity associated with first aid. Patients probability for graft surgery fell by 0.070 from 0.537 (13% reduction (p = 0.014. The probability for ICU admission fell by 0.084 from 0.175 (48% reduction (p<0.001 and hospital length of stay

  19. Burn Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Koray Aydemir; Mehmet Ali Taşkaynatan

    2011-01-01

    Burn injuries are important in terms of causing serious disability and threatening life. With the establishment of modern burn treatment units and advances in acute care management contributed to a reduced mortality rate over the last decades. As a result of improved outcome, more attention has to be given to a comprehensive burn rehabilitation program. Burn rehabilitation is a process that starts from day of admission and continues for months or sometimes years after the initial event. The t...

  20. Micronucleus frequency in children exposed to biomass burning in the Brazilian Legal Amazon region: a control case study

    OpenAIRE

    Sisenando Herbert; de Medeiros Silvia; Artaxo Paulo; Saldiva Paulo HN; de Souza Hacon Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Amazon represents an area of 61% of Brazilian territory and is undergoing major changes resulting from disorderly economic development, especially the advance of agribusiness. Composition of the atmosphere is controlled by several natural and anthropogenic processes, and emission from biomass burning is one with the major impact on human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxic potential of air pollutants generated by biomass burning through micronucleus...

  1. Burn injury, gender and cancer risk: population-based cohort study using data from Scotland and Western Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Duke, Janine M; Bauer, Jacqui; Fear, Mark W.; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M; Boyd, James

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of cancer and potential gender effects in persons hospitalised with burn injury. Design Population-based retrospective cohort study using record-linkage systems in Scotland and Western Australia. Participants Records of 37 890 and 23 450 persons admitted with a burn injury in Scotland and Western Australia, respectively, from 1983 to 2008. Deidentified extraction of all linked hospital morbidity records, mortality and cancer records were provided by the Infor...

  2. Spatio-Temporal Trends of Fire in Slash and Burn Agriculture Landscape: A Case Study from Nagaland, India

    OpenAIRE

    Padalia, H.; Mondal, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing incidences of fire from land conversion and residue burning in tropics is the major concern in global warming. Spatial and temporal monitoring of trends of fire incidences is, therefore, significant in order to determine contribution of carbon emissions from slash and burn agriculture. In this study, we analyzed time-series Terra / Aqua MODIS satellite hotspot products from 2001 to 2013 to derive intra- and inter-annual trends in fire incidences in Nagaland state, located ...

  3. Comparative study of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four distinct operating modes have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plant fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics and engineering which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles

  4. Response to topical clonazepam in patients with burning mouth syndrome: a clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez de Rivera Campillo, Ma Eugenia; López López, José; Chimenos Küstner, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a difficult disease for patients and clinicians. Moreover, there is not a general consensus on how to treat the disease. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate BMS patients' response to topical clonazepam treatment. A double blind study was performed. Among a total of 66 patients, 33 were treated with tablets of clonazepam and another 33 were treated with a placebo. Symptoms were evaluated after 1 month and 6 months of treatment and scored on an analog...

  5. Case study: The World is Burning (Krogerup Højskole), DK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Bernt Sørensen, Tore

    2007-01-01

    course The World is Burning, which is being the specific objective of an in-depth case study, is, to the authors? acknowledgement, a unique example of non formal learning activity aimed at rising political awareness among well-educated young adults in Denmark, which is worth special attention for several...... the course in question (28 August - 14 December 2006). Empirical data were collected through a combination of qualitative methods: participant observation (n. 9 sessions for a total of 36.5 hours), semi-structured interviews (n. 3 of 1 hour each) and focus groups interviews (n. 2 of 1 hour each). Most...

  6. Optimization studies for the prism alternative oxide core, and its response to the actinide burning strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PRISM advanced liquid metal reactor is designed by General Electric in a reference solution equipped by a metal fuelled core. An alternative oxide core is studied by General Electric and ENEA in the frame of a collaboration existing since 1989. This paper deals with the ENEA contribution on the oxide solution, aimed at the core optimization both from safety parameters and fuel cycle economy points of view. Moreover, synthetic information about ENEA evaluations about the minor actinide burning capability of the PRISM oxide core are given. (author)

  7. Study of the External Neutron Source Effect on TRU Burning in a Sub-critical Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Zafar Iqbal; Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    One of the drawback points of nuclear power is the production of highly radioactive and long lasting waste isotopes during power production. Therefore, most important design requirement of future nuclear option should have a potential to burn selectively long-lived fission products (LLFP) and long-lived minor actinides (LLMA). However, there is no way to burn them selectively in the reactor core. Practical method of waste transmutation should rely on selective separation of them from spent nuclear fuel of power plants. Under the proliferation concern, direct separation of trans-uranic isotopes (TRU) from pyro-reprocessing plant became a feasible option in our country. Even though social political agreement is not matured as well as technical feasibility, current study is done based on basic assumptions; TRU and LLFP is separated from spent fuel of nuclear power plants. The remaining neutrons (among the external 3%) very few in number (less than 1% in any case) being very energetic (above three MeV or so) do cause much more fissions per neutron than their counterparts but, because of their overall low population they do not have any significant and decisive influence in the overall reactor performance. Currently, entire study is limited to the source neutron energy of 20 MeV only. In future, it is expected to get reasonably plausible fixed source dependent difference in the TRU burning by using tabulated data for the neutrons of higher energy (up to 250 MeV at least). Secondly, a clearer picture is expected if the TRU loading was increased from the current value of 133 kg to few metric tons, as is the case in most of the existing reactors.

  8. A STUDY OF METALLO-BETA-LACTAMASE PRODUCING PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN BLOOD SAMPLES OF BURNED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyali

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Septicaemia is a life threatening complication of severely burned patients. Among many organisms invading blood stream Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known for its powerful antibiotic resistance mechanisms which increasingly limit the choices for treatment. Among many such resistance mechanisms it is the metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL which confers resistance to Carbapenem group of antibiotics, one of the final resorts to fight them. The present study was undertaken to detect MBL producing P. aeruginosa using phenotypic method from blood samples of burned patients as well as to know their drug sensitivity pattern. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For this purpose 67 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from blood samples of admitted burned patients were subjected to susceptibility testing to antipseudomonal drugs by disc diffusion test and those found to be Carbapenem resistant were subjected to Imipenem - EDTA combined disk synergy test for MBL detection. RESULT: Out of 67 isolates of P.aeruginosa, 19 (28.4% were found to be Carbapenem resistant and 11 (16.4% were MBL producers. A particularly important feature was that the MBL producers were highly resistant to the antibiotics tested than the non-producers. However all of them were susceptible to Colistin and Polymixin B. CONCLUSION: This study has made us to think that a constant vigil and careful selection of antibiotics are necessary to keep prevalence of MBL producing P.aeruginosa in check. The accurate identification and reporting of MBL producing P. aeruginosa will aid infection control practitioners in preventing the spread of these multidrug-resistant isolates

  9. Study of the External Neutron Source Effect on TRU Burning in a Sub-critical Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the drawback points of nuclear power is the production of highly radioactive and long lasting waste isotopes during power production. Therefore, most important design requirement of future nuclear option should have a potential to burn selectively long-lived fission products (LLFP) and long-lived minor actinides (LLMA). However, there is no way to burn them selectively in the reactor core. Practical method of waste transmutation should rely on selective separation of them from spent nuclear fuel of power plants. Under the proliferation concern, direct separation of trans-uranic isotopes (TRU) from pyro-reprocessing plant became a feasible option in our country. Even though social political agreement is not matured as well as technical feasibility, current study is done based on basic assumptions; TRU and LLFP is separated from spent fuel of nuclear power plants. The remaining neutrons (among the external 3%) very few in number (less than 1% in any case) being very energetic (above three MeV or so) do cause much more fissions per neutron than their counterparts but, because of their overall low population they do not have any significant and decisive influence in the overall reactor performance. Currently, entire study is limited to the source neutron energy of 20 MeV only. In future, it is expected to get reasonably plausible fixed source dependent difference in the TRU burning by using tabulated data for the neutrons of higher energy (up to 250 MeV at least). Secondly, a clearer picture is expected if the TRU loading was increased from the current value of 133 kg to few metric tons, as is the case in most of the existing reactors

  10. Pegase: safety studies - experimental study of burn-out risks in transient operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment out-of-pile experimental set up is proposed simulating the breakage of a pipe supplying the core of the reactor Pegase. The two fast phenomena, depressurization of the vessel and flow reversal, are reproduced. The aluminium heating channel has the same shape as that of the reactor channel but has twice the heat capacity. The starting conditions are V= 4.50 and 6 m/sec., TE = 50 and 60 degrees C and PE = 4 bars. The results show that the critical flux PHIC varies with the flow-rate from 45 to 60 W/cm2 in the case where there is no power reduction. For fluxes of 90 W/cm2 the results lead to the conclusion that the hot channel attains a state of burn-out after 0.1 sec. and that its temperature reaches 500 C in 0.8 sec. The hydrodynamic conditions in the channels after the accident involve periodic expulsion (0.2 to 0.5 sec.), characteristic of boiling at low pressure. A study of the steady state flow redistribution through a by-pass has given flux redistribution PHIR of 190 W/cm2 for a flow rate of 4.5 m/sec. at 50 and of 175 W/cm2 at 60 C. These values increase which has to be made between the critical flux PHIC during the periodic expulsion conditions and the flux redistribution PHIR during the steady state, has been shown. (author)

  11. Gallium and imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The indications for the use of 67Gallium imaging studies of the lungs are discussed. In spite of localization of 67Ga in a large variety of neoplastic and inflammatory tissues, there is only limited application of the lung study in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. The chest radiograph will continue to be the principal tool for evaluation of pulmonary diseases. The 67Ga-citrate scan serves as a study complementary to the chest radiograph, as it indicates the localization, extent and degree of activity of lung disease with greater accuracy than radiography. Gallium-67 scanning may be used in the evaluation of patients with lymphoreticular neoplasms, especially Hodgkin-disease and malignant lymphoma both during initial staging and in evaluation of the response to therapy. The 67Ga-citrate scan is useful in the pre-operative evaluation of patients with lung cancer. Hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy are accurately revealed. The lung study is non-invasive and complementary to mediastinoscopy by showing from which glands a biopsy might be taken. Unsuspected extrathoracic secondaries may be shown up, as well as pulmonary metastases from malignancies elsewhere, although the metastases must be at least 1,5 cm in size. The 67Ga lung scan is valuable in the evaluation of pulmonary infiltrates of suspicious infective etiology, the differentiation between pulmonary infection and pneumonia in selected cases, follow-up of sarcoid patients on corticosteroid therapy, evaluation of inflammatory activity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and the early detection of neo-plastic or inflammatory diseases before the chest radiograph reveals abnormality, e.g. in diffuse carcinomatosis or Pneumocystis carinii-infection. The sensitivity of tumors to radiation or chemotherapy may be shown

  12. An experimental and modeling study of burning velocities of possible future synthetic jet fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the development of viable alternative aviation fuels has attracted much interest, for several reasons, with reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and ensuring security of supply at affordable prices among them. In the present work, several alternative aviation fuels - existing and potential - are investigated by focusing on their heat release: Gas-to-Liquid (GtL: representing a Fischer-Tropsch Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (FT-SPK)), a fully synthetic jet fuel (FSJF: Coal-to-Liquid (CtL)), and blends of GtL with 20% 1-hexanol or 50% naphthenic cut, respectively. Burning velocities are measured at ambient pressures and at elevated preheat temperatures exploiting the cone-angle method; equivalence ratios are between about φ = 1.0 and φ = 1.4. The measured data are used for the validation of a detailed chemical reaction model consisting of 4642 reactions involving 1075 species developed by Dagaut et al. following the concept of a surrogate. The comparison between measured burning velocities and predicted laminar flame speeds shows reasonably good agreement with the model for the range of conditions considered in this study. The main features of the reaction model are also discussed, using sensitivity and rate of production analysis. Finally, the experimental data are compared with results obtained earlier for crude-oil kerosene. The findings support the potential of the investigated fuel mixtures to serve as alternative aviation fuels. -- Highlights: Several alternative aviation fuels are studied: a Gas-to-liquid (GtL), a fully synthetic jet fuel (CtL) and blends of GtL. ► Burning velocities are measured at ambient pressure and elevated preheat temperatures exploiting the cone-angle method. ► Measured data are used for the validation of a detailed chemical reaction model following the idea of a surrogate. ► Good agreement between measured burning velocities and predicted laminar flame speeds is achieved. ► The findings support the potential

  13. A case study on biomass burning aerosols: effects on aerosol optical properties and surface radiation levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arola

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2006, biomass burning aerosols from eastern Europe were transported extensively to Finland, and to other parts of northern Europe. They were observed as far as in the European Arctic. In the first part of this paper, temporal and spatial evolution and transport of these biomass burning aerosols are monitored with MODIS retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD imagery at visible wavelengths (0.55 μm. Comparison of MODIS and AERONET AOD is conducted at Tõravere, Estonia. Then trajectory analyses, as well as MODIS Fire Mapper products are used to better understand the type and origin of the air masses. During the studied four-week period AOD values ranged from near zero up to 1.2 at 0.55 μm and the linear correlation between MODIS and AERONET was very high (~0.97. Temporal variability observed within this four-week period was also rather well explained by the trajectory analysis in conjunction with the fire detections produced by the MODIS Rapid Response System. In the second part of our study, the surface measurements of global and UV radiation at Jokioinen, Finland are used to study the effect of this haze episode on the levels of surface radiation. We found reductions up to 35% in noon-time surface UV irradiance (at 340 nm as compared to typical aerosol conditions. For global (total solar radiation, the reduction was always smaller, in line with the expected wavelength dependence of the aerosol effect.

  14. Toxic shock syndrome toxin level in wound samples of hospitalized children with burn: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Javadinia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Toxic shock syndrome (TSS, a dangerous consequence of Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1 caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The early detection for infections of Staphylococcus aureus in burned children is very important, also the pre-vention for consequences of TSST-1. Fever is one of the most noticeable sign in burned children. On the other hand, fever is one of the important consequences of TSST-1 pro-duction. Methods: This study aimed to assess the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 level in the wound’s specimens of two groups febrile and afebrile in the hospitalized burned chil-dren in Motahari hospital Tehran, Iran in the year 2013. In this case-control study, 90 children who admitted to the burn unit, divided in two groups of 45 patients: febrile (cases group and afebrile (control group. All of burned children under went wound biopsy, and then all of wound’s specimens were tested by PCR for specific primer of toxin producing genome. Finally all of data collected and statistically analyzed. This data include group febrile and afebrile, demographic characteristics, percentage of burned surface severity and result of PCR. Results: The positive result for PCR test, production of TSST-1 in febrile burned chil-dren (cases group was 37.7% and in afebrile burned children (control group was 11.1% that this different was statistically significant (P=0.003. The mean and stan-dard deviation for percentage of burned surface (severity in samples with positive re-sult for PCR test was 30.9±16.93 and in samples with negative result for PCR test was 20.09±11.02 that this different was statistically significant (P=0.01. There was no dif-ference between positive PCR result and negative PCR result of age and sex. Conclusion: Direct association was approved between the production of TSST-1 and the occurrence of fever in burned children. Increased surface severity of burns also re-lated to the production of TSST-1. Further research is recommended.

  15. A STUDY ON ROLE OF VARIOUS TYPES OF TOPICAL OINTMENT AND ITS OUTCOME AMONG BURN PATIENTS : AN INTERESTING FOLLOW UP STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury causes major bulk of the surgical emergencies. Burn infection makes the burn wound complicated causes considerable mortality and morbidity. Timely and effective use of antimicrobial and topical dressings revolutionizes burn care by decreasing invasive wound infection. The administration of broad - spectrum antibiotics on routine basis is likely to en courage. The emergence of resistant organism therefore, timely and judicial use of antibiotics is essential for better result. MATERIAL AND METHOD S: The present study was carried out in 160 burns and scald admitted in surgical wards in Department of General Surgery, SGMH and S.S. Medical College, Rewa ( M. P. during period of one year. The cases are fully recorded and thoroughly studied with the aim of establishing the incidence, mode of burn and causes of burn, source of burn, clothing at timed incidence, time and place of incidence and detail clinical assessment. On admission resuscitation started with intravenous fluid, calculated according to the Parkland formula and prophylactic antibiotic giv en in all the patients after sampling for culture and sensitivity. Symptomatic and supportive treatment added as per need. RESULTS : Out of 160 patients, majority of the patient belong to 21 – 40 year 48.1%. Majority of patient ( 34.4% had total body surfac e burn area burnt between 21 - 40% and 12.5% patient had burnt area 61 - 80%. Maximum ( 50.0% complain of irritation was reported by the patients to whom Silver sulphadizine was applied while least ( 10% by the patients to whom nadoxin e was applied. CONCLUSION : The incident of invasive infection and overall mortality was significantly reduced after the introduction into clinical practice of topical burn wound anti - microbial agent, our study shows that the most effective topical antimicrobial agent in burn patie nt is Nadoxine.

  16. Burn Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Aydemir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are important in terms of causing serious disability and threatening life. With the establishment of modern burn treatment units and advances in acute care management contributed to a reduced mortality rate over the last decades. As a result of improved outcome, more attention has to be given to a comprehensive burn rehabilitation program. Burn rehabilitation is a process that starts from day of admission and continues for months or sometimes years after the initial event. The term ‘burn rehabilitation’ incorporates the physical, physiological and social aspects of care. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. Burn rehabilitation aims to prevent the possible complications, minimalize joint contractures and deformities, increase range of motion, control hypertrophic scarring, achieve the best possible functional capacity and to regain the patients vocational and recreational activities. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 70-7

  17. Burns and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, M

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of the first descriptive analytic study of a group of 183 burn patients, treated in the Burn Unit at the University Hospital of Cartagena, Colombia during the period since January 1985 until December 1990. There is presented experience with the selected group of 24 patients in whom the diagnosis of burn was associated with epilepsy. There is also analysed and described the gravity of the scars sequels, neurological disorders, the complication of the burn and an impact of this problem on the patient, his (her) family and the community. It is very important to report that there was found Neurocisticercosis in 66.6% of the group of burn patients with epilepsy, and it is probably the first risk factor of burn in this group. PMID:9212488

  18. The contributions of biomass burning to primary and secondary organics: A case study in Pearl River Delta (PRD), China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, BaoLin; Liu, Ying; Shao, Min; Lu, SiHua; Wang, Ming; Yuan, Bin; Gong, ZhaoHeng; He, LingYan; Zeng, LiMin; Hu, Min; Zhang, YuanHang

    2016-11-01

    Synchronized online measurements of gas- and particle- phase organics including non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) and submicron organic matters (OM) were conducted in November 2010 at Heshan, Guangdong provincial supersite, China. Several biomass burning events were identified by using acetonitrile as a tracer, and enhancement ratios (EnRs) of organics to carbon monoxide (CO) obtained from this work generally agree with those from rice straw burning in previous studies. The influences of biomass burning on NMHCs, OVOCs and OM were explored by comparing biomass burning impacted plumes (BB plumes) and non-biomass burning plumes (non-BB plumes). A photochemical age-based parameterization method was used to characterize primary emission and chemical behavior of those three organic groups. The emission ratios (EmRs) of NMHCs, OVOCs and OM to CO increased by 27-71%, 34-55% and 67% in BB plumes, respectively, in comparison with non-BB plumes. The estimated formation rate of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in BB plumes was found to be 24% faster than non-BB plumes. By applying the above emission ratios to the whole PRD, the annual emissions of VOCs and OM from open burning of crop residues would be 56.4 and 3.8Gg in 2010 in PRD, respectively. PMID:27371770

  19. Using satellite image-based maps to improve sugarcane straw burning emission estimates in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, D.; Longo, K.; Rudorff, B.; Aguiar, D.; Freitas, S. R.; Stockler, R.; Pereira, G.

    2014-12-01

    Since the last decade, the global demand for biofuel production has been increasing every year due to the growing need for energy supply security and mitigation of greenhouse gases (GHG). Currently, sugarcane ethanol is one of the most widely used biofuels and Brazil is already the world's largest sugarcane producer, devoting almost 50% of it to ethanol production. The state of São Paulo is the major sugarcane producer in this country, with a cultivated area of about 5.4 Mha in 2011. Approximately 2 million hectares were harvested annually from 2006 to 2011 with the pre-harvest straw burning practice, which emits trace gases and particulate material to the atmosphere. The assessment and monitoring of sugarcane burning impacts are fundamental in order to mitigate the negative impacts of pre-harvest burning and consolidate the environmental benefits of sugarcane ethanol. Although some official inventories created by the Brazilian government have indicated the prevalence of emissions from sugarcane straw burning in total agricultural residue emissions, specific information about emissions of gases and aerosols during pre-harvest burning of sugarcane is still scarce in Brazil. This study aimed to contribute to the improvement of estimates of emissions from sugarcane burning through the use of specific parameters for sugarcane straw burning and a method which has avoided underestimations resulting from the unique characteristics of this type of biomass fire. In this investigation, emissions of several air pollutants released by sugarcane burning during the harvest season were estimated through the integrated use of remote sensing based maps of sugarcane burned area and a numerical tool for the state of São Paulo from 2006 to 2011. Average estimated emissions (Gg/year) were 1,130 ± 152 for CO, 26 ± 4 for NOX, 16 ± 2 for CH4, 45 ± 6 for PM2.5, 120 ± 16 for PM10 and 154 ± 21 for NMHC (non-methane hydrocarbons). An intercomparison among annual emissions from this

  20. Cadáveres quemados: Estudio antropológico-forense Burned corpses: Forensic anthropological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Sánchez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available La acción del fuego sobre el cuerpo puede producir afectación de la piel determinando quemaduras de diversos grados o carbonización llegando a afectar al hueso, e incluso a calcinarlo. Cuando el grado de afectación es intenso deben aplicarse los protocolos de antropología forense, teniendo en cuenta las particularidades del caso. Presentamos cuatro casos estudiados en el Laboratorio de Antropología Forense de la Escuela de Medicina Legal de Madrid, en los que se han seguido técnicas diferentes a fin de poder establecer la identificación del cadáver y el diagnóstico de la muerte así como otras cuestiones de interés en la investigación antropológico forense.The action of fire on the body can affect the skin determining diverse degree of burns or may affect the bone, even cremate it. When the degree of burn is intense, protocols of forensic anthropology should be used, taking into account the details of each case. We present four cases studied in the Laboratory of Forensic Anthropology at the School of Legal Medicine in Madrid, in which different techniques have been used in order to establish the identification of the cadaver and the cause of death as well as other questions of interest in the forensic anthropological investigation.

  1. High voltage electrical burn injuries in teenage children: case studies with similarities (an indian perspective)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathangi Ramakrishnan, K.; Babu, M.; Mathivanan; Ramachandran, B.; Balasubramanian, S.; Raghuram, K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary From 1992 to 2012, a total of 911 paediatric burns were admitted and treated at Kanchi Kamakoti Childs Trust Hospital Intensive Burn Care Unit, of these 28 children had suffered electrical injuries and burns. 7 teenagers suffered high voltage electrical burn injuries: 2 were involved in train accidents which caused fatal electrical injuries, and 5 had electrical burn injuries caused by similar types of accidents, requiring Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) care, repeated surgeries and extensive rehabilitation. A common factor among these latter 5 patients was that they were injured by overhead high electrical voltage cables. Their management was labour intensive and highly costly. In this report, the type of accident, the electrical voltage that produced burns and the treatment details are elaborated. Findings included similarities in age and type of accident, and failure to implement safety procedures and apply standard norms of high voltage transmission feeder lines. PMID:24563637

  2. Biomass burning related ozone damage on vegetation over the Amazon forest: a model sensitivity study

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifico, F.; Folberth, G. A.; Sitch, S.; Haywood, J. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; F. F. Malavelle; P. Artaxo

    2015-01-01

    The HadGEM2 earth system climate model was used to assess the impact of biomass burning on surface ozone concentrations over the Amazon forest and its impact on vegetation, under present-day climate conditions. Here we consider biomass burning emissions from wildfires, deforestation fires, agricultural forest burning, and residential and commercial combustion. Simulated surface ozone concentration is evaluated against observations taken at two sites in the Brazilian Amazon f...

  3. Comparative study of plutonium burning in heavy and light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is interest in the U.S. and world-wide in reducing the burden on geological nuclear fuel disposal sites. In some disposal scenarios, the decay heat loading of the surrounding rock limits the commercial spent fuel capacity of the sites. In the long term (100 to 1,500 years), this decay heat is generated primarily by actinides, particularly 241Am and 241Pu. One possible approach to reducing this decay-heat burden would be to reprocess commercial spent nuclear fuel and use intermediate-tier thermal reactors to 'burn' these actinides and other transuranics (plutonium and higher actinides). The viability of this approach is dependent on the detailed changes in chemical and isotopic compositions of actinide-bearing fuels after irradiation in thermal reactor spectra. The intermediate-tier thermal burners could bridge the commercial water-cooled reactors and fast reactors required for ultimate consumption of the transuranics generated in the commercial reactors. This would reduce the number of such fast reactors required to complete the mission of burning transuranics. If thermal systems are to be used for the transmutation mission, it is likely that they would be similar to or are advanced versions of the systems currently used for power generation. In both the U.S. and Canada, light- and heavy-water-cooled thermal reactors are used for power generation in the commercial nuclear sector. About 103 pressurized- and boiling- light water reactors (PWRs and BRWs) are deployed in the U.S. nuclear industry while about 18 CANDU (heavy-water-cooled) reactors are used in the Canadian industry. There are substantial differences between light and heavy water-cooled reactors that might affect transmutation potential. These arise from differences in neutron balance of the reactors, in neutron energy spectra, in operational approaches (e.g., continuous refueling enhancing fuel burnup), and so on. A systematic study has been conducted to compare the transmutation potentials of

  4. A Case Study of Manjistadi Taila with Kadalipatra and Bactigauze for Local Application in the Management of Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantkumar V. Shekokar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicines have been used for many countries around the world including South East Asian countries for health care by the people in recent years, there has been a significant global upsurge in the use of traditional medicine because of various reasons including the fact that in spite of advance made in the health sector equitable care coverage availability, accessibility & affordability to conventional health care & services are quiet often beyond the reach of large section of people. Ayurvedic medicines got much desired boost for current & emerging challenges, it is crucial that Ayurvedic medicines are beneficial, must play their respective roles in promoting health & preventing or treating diseases. A Burn is an accidental as well as suicidal injury encountered by surgeon in day to day practice. Sushruta is pioneer of Indian surgery. He explained Dagdha (burn and its management in 12th Adhyaya of Sutrasthan. As the patient of Dagdha (Burn are increasing in the society due to today’s stressful & busy life style. The present study entitled “A Case Study of Manjistadi Taila with Kadalipatra and Bactigauze for Local Application in the Management of Burn”. Treatments prescribed in modern medicine like chlorhexidine acetate as bactigauze had proved their definite efficacy in the Burn management but they have some limitations like it can’t avoid eschar, hypertrophic scar, post burn contracture which harms as a cosmetically. So to overcome these deficiencies we can apply Manjisthadi Taila with Kadalipatra as local application in the 1st & 2nd degree burn. The present case study was conducted on 2 patients as far considered one is control group and other is experimental group. The clinical assessment was done on the basis of grading criteria with specific symptomology of Burn like Vedana (pain, Strava (secretion, Vranavarna (colour, Gandha (smell, eschar, discoloration, hypertrophic scar, and contracture. According to observations

  5. [Clinical and experimental study of burns treated locally with Chinese herbs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G D; Zhang, Y M; Xiong, X Y

    1991-12-01

    According to the multiple pharmacological functions of Chinese herbs for treating burns, the authors selected some traditional herbs to cure the burning wound, which had not only the function of improving the local microcirculation of the burned surface and their bactericidal action, but also the function of changing the bacterial growth milieu action. Coptis chinensis 40%, Herba Taraxaci 40%, Fructus Mume 10% and Salvia miltiorrhizae 10% were boiled, infiltrated and disinfected. The mixture thus made was called as Burn II, which were applied on the burned surface daily, 97.1% of 103 patients were cured. Through the experiment of 60 rabbits burned by irons, which were divided into 6 groups (n = 10 in each group) and each 2 groups infected respectively with Bacillus pyocyaneus, Bacillus Coli and Staphylococcus Aureus, took one of each infected group as control group. After 14 days, the infected burned surfaces which were applied with Burn II daily. The results showed that the effect of Burn II was not only significant, but also its usage was not highly restricted by the medical condition. PMID:1821339

  6. Fuel assembly assessment from CVD image analysis: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate commissioned a feasibility study of automatic assessment of fuel assemblies from images obtained with the digital Cerenkov viewing device currently in development. The goal is to assist the IAEA inspectors in evaluating the fuel since they typically have only a few seconds to inspect an assembly. We report results here in two main areas: Investigation of basic image processing and recognition techniques needed to enhance the images and find the assembly in the image; Study of the properties of the distributions of light from the assemblies to determine whether they provide unique signatures for different burn-up and cooling times for real fuel or indicate presence of non-fuel. 8 refs, 27 figs

  7. A Study of The Straw-burning problem And Reasonable Solutions to It

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢维奕

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses possible solutions to the problem of straw burning(the invention of new reapers,the support of straw-utilizing business and the promotion of necessary knowledge)through examining the current condition of,reasons for and effects of the burning of straw.

  8. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2002-06-27

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Q{sub y}-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophyll{sub a} (BChl{sub a}) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5. A version of the hole spectrum simulation program written by the candidate for the FMO complex study (Chapter 3) is included as an appendix. The references for each chapter are given at the end of each chapter.

  9. Crude oil burning mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, Linus Mattias Valdemar; Jomaas, Grunde

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve predictions for the burning efficiency and the residue composition of in-situ burning of crude oil, the burning mechanism of crude oil was studied in relation to the composition of its hydrocarbon mixture, before, during and after the burning. The surface temperature, flame...... height, mass loss rate and residues of three hydrocarbon liquids (n-octane, dodecane and hexadecane), two crude oils (DUC and REBCO) and one hydrocarbon liquid mixture of the aforementioned hydrocarbon liquids were studied using the Crude Oil Flammability Apparatus. The experimental results were compared...... to the predictions of four conceptual models that describe the burning mechanism of multicomponent fuels. Based on the comparisons, hydrocarbon liquids were found to be best described by the Equilibrium Flash Vaporization model, showing a constant gas composition and gasification rate. The...

  10. A New Metric for Quantifying Burn Severity: The Relativized Burn Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean A. Parks

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-inferred burn severity data have become increasingly popular over the last decade for management and research purposes. These data typically quantify spectral change between pre-and post-fire satellite images (usually Landsat. There is an active debate regarding which of the two main equations, the delta normalized burn ratio (dNBR and its relativized form (RdNBR, is most suitable for quantifying burn severity; each has its critics. In this study, we propose and evaluate a new Landsat-based burn severity metric, the relativized burn ratio (RBR, that provides an alternative to dNBR and RdNBR. For 18 fires in the western US, we compared the performance of RBR to both dNBR and RdNBR by evaluating the agreement of these metrics with field-based burn severity measurements. Specifically, we evaluated (1 the correspondence between each metric and a continuous measure of burn severity (the composite burn index and (2 the overall accuracy of each metric when classifying into discrete burn severity classes (i.e., unchanged, low, moderate, and high. Results indicate that RBR corresponds better to field-based measurements (average R2 among 18 fires = 0.786 than both dNBR (R2 = 0.761 and RdNBR (R2 = 0.766. Furthermore, the overall classification accuracy achieved with RBR (average among 18 fires = 70.5% was higher than both dNBR (68.4% and RdNBR (69.2%. Consequently, we recommend RBR as a robust alternative to both dNBR and RdNBR for measuring and classifying burn severity.

  11. One year prevalence of critically ill burn wound bacterial infections in surgical ICU in Egypt: Retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Results: The main finding of the current study described herein was the percent of isolates from burn wound (60%. The most common organism was pseudomonas (49%. Multidrug resistant gram negative organisms represent about 60% of the isolates. Pattern of antibiotic sensitivity was 84% for colistin, 39% for amikacin and 35% for imipenem. The mortalities in our study were 80%.

  12. Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Steinvall, Ingrid; Bak, Zoltan; Sjöberg, Folke

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, time course, and outcome of acute kidney injury after major burns and to evaluate the impact of possible predisposing factors ( age, gender, and depth and extent of injury) and the relation to other dysfunctioning organs and sepsis. Method: We performed an explorative cohort study on patients with a TBSA% (percentage burned of total body surface area) of 20% or more who were admitted to a national burn centre. Acute kidne...

  13. Burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Kamala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  14. Friction Burns: Epidemiology and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, A; Raibagkar, S.C.; Vora, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    This epidemiological study deals with 60 patients with friction burns between January 2004 and January 2006. The age group most affected was that between 21 and 30 years, with male predominance. Road traffic accidents were the commonest cause of friction burns (56 patients), and the lower limb was the most frequently affected part of the body. Patient management was performed according to the degree of the burn injury. It is suggested that most friction burn injuries are neglected on admissio...

  15. Burning Issue: Handling Household Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... take steps to avoid household burns. Never leave cooking food unattended on the stove. Set your water heater’s thermostat to 120 °F or lower to prevent scalding burns. And install smoke alarms on every floor of your home. Keep yourself and your family safe from unexpected ...

  16. Assessing land-use and carbon stock in slash-and-burn ecosystems in tropical mountain of Laos based on time-series satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoshio; Kiyono, Yoshiyuki; Asai, Hidetoshi; Ochiai, Yukihito; Qi, Jiaguo; Olioso, Albert; Shiraiwa, Tatsuhiko; Horie, Takeshi; Saito, Kazuki; Dounagsavanh, Linkham

    2010-08-01

    In the tropical mountains of Southeast Asia, slash-and-burn (S/B) agriculture is a widely practiced and important food production system. The ecosystem carbon stock in this land-use is linked not only to the carbon exchange with the atmosphere but also with food and resource security. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative information on the land-use and ecosystem carbon stock in the region as well as to infer the impacts of alternative land-use and ecosystem management scenarios on the carbon sequestration potential at a regional scale. The study area was selected in a typical slash-and-burn region in the northern part of Laos. The chrono-sequential changes of land-use such as the relative areas of community age and cropping (C) + fallow (F) patterns were derived from the analysis of time-series satellite images. The chrono-sequential analysis showed that a consistent increase of S/B area during the past three decades and a rapid increase after 1990. Approximately 37% of the whole area was with the community age of 1-5 years, whereas 10% for 6-10 years in 2004. The ecosystem carbon stock at a regional scale was estimated by synthesizing the land-use patterns and semi-empirical carbon stock model derived from in situ measurements where the community age was used as a clue to the linkage. The ecosystem carbon stock in the region was strongly affected by the land-use patterns; the temporal average of carbon stock in 1C + 10F cycles, for example, was greater by 33 MgC ha -1 compared to that in 1C + 2F land-use pattern. The amount of carbon lost from the regional ecosystems during 1990-2004 periods was estimated to be 42 MgC ha -1. The study approach proved to be useful especially in such regions with low data-availability and accessibility. This study revealed the dynamic change of land-use and ecosystem carbon stock in the tropical mountain of Laos as affected by land-use. Results suggest the significant potential of carbon sequestration through

  17. The risk of burn injury during long-term oxygen therapy: a 17-year longitudinal national study in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanash HA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hanan A Tanash,1 Fredrik Huss,2,3 Magnus Ekström41Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, 2Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery, Uppsala University, 3Burn Center, Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Uppsala, Uppsala, 4Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Respiratory Medicine & Allergology, Lund University, Lund, SwedenBackground: Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT improves the survival time in hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Despite warnings about potential dangers, a considerable number of patients continue to smoke while on LTOT. The incidence of burn injuries related to LTOT is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of burn injury requiring health care contact during LTOT.Methods: Prospective, population-based, consecutive cohort study of people starting LTOT from any cause between January 1, 1992 and December 31, 2009 in the Swedish National Register of Respiratory Failure (Swedevox.Results: In total, 12,497 patients (53% women were included. The mean (standard deviation age was 72±9 years. The main reasons for starting LTOT were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (75% and pulmonary fibrosis (15%. Only 269 (2% were active smokers when LTOT was initiated. The median follow-up time to event was 1.5 years (interquartile range, 0.55–3.1. In total, 17 patients had a diagnosed burn injury during 27,890 person-years of LTOT. The rate of burn injury was 61 (95% confidence interval, 36–98 per 100,000 person-years. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of burn injury between ever-smokers and never-smokers, or between men and women.Conclusion: The rate of burn injuries in patients on LTOT seems to be low in Sweden. The strict requirements in Sweden for smoking cessation before LTOT initiation may contribute to this finding.Keywords: respiratory failure, oxygen, fire

  18. Experimental studies of spent fuel burn-up in WWR-SM reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alikulov, Sh. A.; Baytelesov, S.A.; Boltaboev, A.F.; Kungurov, F.R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ulughbek township, 100214, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Menlove, H.O.; O’Connor, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Osmanov, B.S., E-mail: bari_osmanov@yahoo.com [Research Institute of Applied Physics, Vuzgorodok, 100174 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Salikhbaev, U.S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ulughbek township, 100214, Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Uranium burn-up measurement from {sup 137}Cs activity in spent reactor fuel. • Comparison to reference sample with known burn-up value (ratio method). • Cross-check of the approach with neutron-based measurement technique. - Abstract: The article reports the results of {sup 235}U burn-up measurements using {sup 137}Cs activity technique for 12 nuclear fuel assemblies of WWR-SM research reactor after 3-year cooling time. The discrepancy between the measured and the calculated burn-up values was about 3%. To increase the reliability of the data and for cross-check purposes, neutron measurement approach was also used. Average discrepancy between two methods was around 12%.

  19. Experimental studies of spent fuel burn-up in WWR-SM reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Uranium burn-up measurement from 137Cs activity in spent reactor fuel. • Comparison to reference sample with known burn-up value (ratio method). • Cross-check of the approach with neutron-based measurement technique. - Abstract: The article reports the results of 235U burn-up measurements using 137Cs activity technique for 12 nuclear fuel assemblies of WWR-SM research reactor after 3-year cooling time. The discrepancy between the measured and the calculated burn-up values was about 3%. To increase the reliability of the data and for cross-check purposes, neutron measurement approach was also used. Average discrepancy between two methods was around 12%

  20. The Attack on Psychosomatic Integrity: a Study of the Psychological Sequelae of Burn Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaleri, V.; Epifanio, M S; Benigno, A.; Conte, F.; Di Pasquale, A.

    2009-01-01

    Burns pathology is characterized not only by insidious damage to the patients' outward appearance but also by the equally painful emotional difficulties they encounter as they reorganize their identity and their personal history. This exploratory survey, combining research work with medical action, considers the cases of 41 outpatients who were hospitalized and subjected to skin grafting. The patients were recruited through the database of the Palermo Civic Hospital Plastic Surgery and Burns ...

  1. PLD-IDMS studies towards direct measurement of burn-up of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method based on Pulsed laser deposition followed by Isotope dilution mass spectrometric method is evaluated towards the possibility of direct measurement of burn up of nuclear fuel and also to find out spatial distribution of burn-up along the pellet. The wave length dependent results show larger error with 1064 nm, compared to 532 nm laser beam. Much less error is expected with shorter wave length and shorter pulse width laser beam. Further work is being carried out in this direction

  2. Experimental study of extremely severe combined radiation-burn injury in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty adult healthy dogs were equally divided into three groups: 1) Radiation injury group (RIG): whole body irradiated with 4 Gy of gamma rays; 2) Burn group (BG): inflicted with flash burn (8% TBSA III deg, 12% TBSA II deg burn); 3) Combined radiation-burn injury group (CRIG): exposed to both radiation and burn. All animals in RIG and CRIG died; the mean survival times were 11 and 8 days, respectively. Three dogs of BG died with survival time of 10 days.The main clinical manifestation and course of dogs in CRIG were similar to those in RIG. Since it was a combined injury, an addition effect was observed. The characteristics of combined effect was as follows: 1) The relationship between the radiation doses and combined effects of mortality and infection showed an S curve; 2) The incidence of sepsis in burn wound was high and it was the main portal of bacterial invasion; and 3) Negative nitrogen balance, gastrointestinal pathological changes, digestive and absorptive disturbances, and anorexia were observed after injury. Besides, the mechanism of lower rate of lymphocyte transformation is discussed

  3. A multi-refuge study to evaluate the effectiveness of growing-season and dormant-season burns to control cattail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Robert A.; Tangen, Brian A.; Laubhan, Murray K.; Lor, Socheata

    2012-01-01

    Proliferation of invasive cattails (for example, Typha x glauca, T. angustifolia) is a concern of wetland managers across the country, and numerous methods have been used to control the spatial extent and density of the plant. To date, however, no single method has proven widely or consistently effective at reducing the long-term growth and spread of these species. We performed a multi-refuge study to evaluate the relative effects of growing-season and dormant-season prescribed burns on cattail production and to gain insight on variables such as soil moisture, groundwater, and biomass that affect the efficacy of burning as a control method. Results indicate total cattail cover recovers to pre-burn levels within 1 year regardless of whether the controlled burn was implemented during the growing season or dormant season. Growing-season burns, however, did result in lower aboveground and belowground cattail biomass 1-year post-burn, whereas no significant change in biomass was detected for dormant-season burns. Study results support the premise that burns implemented during the growing season should have a greater effect on nutrient reserves and cattail re-growth. Results from this and other studies suggest long-term research that incorporates multiple management strategies will be required to evaluate the potential of prescribed burning as a method to control cattail.

  4. Imaging study on acupuncture points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, C. L.; Dang, R. S.; Ando, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Chen, H. S.; Ding, G. H.

    2009-09-01

    The topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using the synchrotron radiation based Dark Field Image (DFI) method. Four following acupuncture points were studied: Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Zusanli and Tianshu. We have found that at acupuncture point regions there exists the accumulation of micro-vessels. The images taken in the surrounding tissue out of the acupuncture points do not show such kind of structure. It is the first time to reveal directly the specific structure of acupuncture points by X-ray imaging.

  5. Imaging study on acupuncture points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using the synchrotron radiation based Dark Field Image (DFI) method. Four following acupuncture points were studied: Sanyinjiao, Neiguan, Zusanli and Tianshu. We have found that at acupuncture point regions there exists the accumulation of micro-vessels. The images taken in the surrounding tissue out of the acupuncture points do not show such kind of structure. It is the first time to reveal directly the specific structure of acupuncture points by X-ray imaging.

  6. Analgesia effect of a fixed nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture on burn dressing pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yuxiang Li; Lu Tang; Jianqiang Yu; Xiuying Dai; Wanfang Zhou; Wannian Zhang; Xiaoyan Hu; Shichu Xiao; Wen Ni; Xiuqiang Ma; Yinsheng Wu; Ming Yao; Guoxia Mu; Guangyi Wang; Wenjun Han

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Procedural burn pain is the most intense acute pain and most likely type of burn injury pain to be undertreated due to the physician’s fear of the adverse effect of analgesia and lack of anesthetist present. At our institution, in most of the cases, local burn detersion and debridement were performed at the ward level without any analgesics. This article describes a study designed to test the analgesia effect of a fixed nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture on burn dressing pain. M...

  7. Community archiving of imaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Steven L.; Roys, Steven R.; Munjal, Sunita

    1996-05-01

    The quantity of image data created in a large radiology practice has long been a challenge for available archiving technology. Traditional methods ofarchiving the large quantity of films generated in radiology have relied on warehousing in remote sites, with courier delivery of film files for historical comparisons. A digital community archive, accessible via a wide area network, represents a feasible solution to the problem of archiving digital images from a busy practice. In addition, it affords a physician caring for a patient access to imaging studies performed at a variety ofhealthcare institutions without the need to repeat studies. Security problems include both network security issues in the WAN environment and access control for patient, physician and imaging center. The key obstacle to developing a community archive is currently political. Reluctance to participate in a community archive can be reduced by appropriate design of the access mechanisms.

  8. Pegase: safety studies - experimental study of burn-out risks in transient operation; Pegase: etude de surete - etude experimentale des risques de burn out en regime transitoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernier, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    An experiment out-of-pile experimental set up is proposed simulating the breakage of a pipe supplying the core of the reactor Pegase. The two fast phenomena, depressurization of the vessel and flow reversal, are reproduced. The aluminium heating channel has the same shape as that of the reactor channel but has twice the heat capacity. The starting conditions are V= 4.50 and 6 m/sec., T{sub E} = 50 and 60 degrees C and P{sub E} = 4 bars. The results show that the critical flux PHI{sub C} varies with the flow-rate from 45 to 60 W/cm{sup 2} in the case where there is no power reduction. For fluxes of 90 W/cm{sup 2} the results lead to the conclusion that the hot channel attains a state of burn-out after 0.1 sec. and that its temperature reaches 500 C in 0.8 sec. The hydrodynamic conditions in the channels after the accident involve periodic expulsion (0.2 to 0.5 sec.), characteristic of boiling at low pressure. A study of the steady state flow redistribution through a by-pass has given flux redistribution PHI{sub R} of 190 W/cm{sup 2} for a flow rate of 4.5 m/sec. at 50 and of 175 W/cm{sup 2} at 60 C. These values increase which has to be made between the critical flux PHI{sub C} during the periodic expulsion conditions and the flux redistribution PHI{sub R} during the steady state, has been shown. (author) [French] On propose un schema experimental hors pile d'une rupture du tuyau alimentant le coeur du reacteur PEGASE. On reproduit les phenomenes rapides de depressurisation du caisson et d'inversion du debit dans le coeur. Le canal chauffant en aluminium a la meme geometrie que le canal du reacteur, mais une capacite calorifique double. Les conditions initiales sont V= 4.5 et 6 m/s, T{sub E} = 50 et 60 C et P{sub E} = 4 bars. Les resultats montrent que le flux critique PHI{sub C} evolue avec la vitesse de 45 a 60 60 W/cm{sup 2} dans le cas ou il n'y a pas reduction de puissance. Pour des flux de 90 W/cm{sup 2} l'interpretation des resultats

  9. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OralHealth > Topics > Burning Mouth Syndrome > Burning Mouth Syndrome Burning Mouth Syndrome Main Content Key Points Symptoms Diagnosis Primary and Secondary BMS Treatment Helpful Tips Key Points Burning mouth syndrome is burning pain in the mouth that may ...

  10. Collagen dressing versus conventional dressings in burn and chronic wounds: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Biological dressings like collagen are impermeable to bacteria, and create the most physiological interface between the wound surface and the environment. Collagen dressings have other advantages over conventional dressings in terms of ease of application and being natural, non-immunogenic, non-pyrogenic, hypo-allergenic, and pain-free. This study aims to compare the efficacy of collagen dressing in treating burn and chronic wounds with that of conventional dressing materials. Materials and Methods : The records of 120 patients with chronic wounds of varied aetiologies and with mean age 43.7 years were collected and analyzed. The patients had been treated either with collagen or other conventional dressing materials including silver sulfadiazine, nadifloxacin, povidone iodine, or honey (traditional dressing material. Patients with co-morbidities that could grossly affect the wound healing like uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, chronic liver or renal disease, or major nutritional deprivation were not included. For the purpose of comparison the patients were divided into two groups; ′Collagen group′ and ′Conventional group′, each having 60 patients. For assessment the wound characteristics (size, edge, floor, slough, granulation tissue, and wound swab or pus culture sensitivity results were recorded. With start of treatment, appearance of granulation tissue, completeness of healing, need for skin grafting, and patients′ satisfaction was noted for each patient in both groups. Results : With two weeks of treatment, 60% of the ′collagen group′ wounds and only 42% of the ′conventional group′ wounds were sterile (P=0.03. Healthy granulation tissue appeared earlier over collagen-dressed wounds than over conventionally treated wounds (P=0.03. After eight weeks, 52 (87% of ′collagen group′ wounds and 48 (80% of ′conventional group′ wounds were >75% healed (P=0.21. Eight patients in the ′collagen group′ and 12 in the

  11. The role of xerostomia in burning mouth syndrome: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Alvarenga da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To assess the efficacy of anti-xerostomic topical medication (urea 10% in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS. Method : Thirty-eight subjects diagnosed with BMS according to the International Association for the Study of Pain guidelines were randomized to either placebo (5% sodium carboxymethylcellulose, 0.15% methyl paraben, and 10% glycerol in distilled water qsp 100 g or treatment (urea 10% to be applied to the oral cavity 3-4 times per day for 3 months. The patients were evaluated before and after treatment with the following instruments: the EDOF-HC protocol (Orofacial Pain Clinic – Hospital das Clínicas, a xerostomia questionnaire, and quantitative sensory testing. Results : There were no differences in salivary flow or gustative, olfactory, or sensory thresholds (P>0.05. Fifteen (60% patients reported improvement with the treatments (P=0.336. Conclusion : In conclusion, there were no differences between groups, and both exhibited an association between reported improvement and salivation.

  12. Stellar Helium Burning Studied with an Optical Readout TPC (O-TPC) at HIγS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) operating with the gas mixture of CO2(80%) + N2(20%) at 100 torr with gamma beams from the HIγS facility of TUNL at Duke University were used to study the formation of carbon and oxygen during helium burning. Measurements were carried out with circularly polarized gamma-ray beams at energies: Eγ = 9.08, 9.38, 9.58, 9.78, 10.08, 10.38 and 10.68 MeV. We have begun the process of extracting complete angular distributions for the 16O(γ,α)12C reaction and the 12C(γ,3α) reaction (eventually with energy bins of approximately 100 keV) in order to determine the values of SE1, SE2 and the mixing phase φ12 of the 16O(γ, α)12C reaction. The rate of carbon formation at high temperatures (T > 3 GK) was suggested to increase due to contributions from a higher lying 2+ state. We have measured an angular distribution of (essentially) pure E2 transition at Eγ = 9.78 MeV of the 12C(γ, 3α) reaction, providing conclusive evidence for the elusive 2+2 state in 12C.

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia for Pediatric Burn Reconstructive Surgery: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Erik S; Martyn, Jeevendra A; Donelan, Mathias B; Perrone, Anthony; Firth, Paul G; Driscoll, Daniel N

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients face multiple reconstructive surgeries to reestablish function and aesthetics postburn injury. Often, the site of the harvested graft for these reconstructions is reported to be the most painful part of the procedure and a common reason for deferring these reconstructive procedures. This study in pediatric burn patients undergoing reconstructive procedures examined the analgesia response to local anesthetic infiltration versus either a single ultrasound-guided regional nerve block of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) or a fascia iliaca compartment block with catheter placement and continuous infusion. Nineteen patients were randomized to one of three groups (infiltration, single-shot nerve block, or compartment block with catheter) and received intraoperative analgesia intervention. Postoperatively, visual analog scale pain scores were recorded-for pain at the donor site-every 4 hours while awake-for 48 hours. This nonparametric data was analyzed using a two-way ANOVA, Friedman's test, and Kruskal-Wallis test, with significance determined at P ultrasound-guided block with continuous catheter may be beneficial. PMID:25412051

  14. Honey dressing versus silver sulfadiazene dressing for wound healing in burn patients: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpi Singh Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The aim was to evaluate the effect of honey dressing and silver sulfadiazene (SSD dressing on wound healing in burn patients. Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed the records of 108 patients (14-68 years of age, with first and second degree burns of less than 50% of the total body surface area admitted to our institution, over a period of 5 years (2004-2008. Fifty-one patients were treated with honey dressings and 57 with SSD. Time elapsed since burn, site, percentage, degree and depth of burns, results of culture sensitivity at various time intervals, duration of healing, formation of post-treatment hypertrophic scar, and/or contracture were recorded and analyzed. Results : The average duration of healing was 18.16 and 32.68 days for the honey and SSD group, respectively. Wounds of all patients reporting within 1 h of burns became sterile with the honey dressing in less than 7 days while there was none with SSD. All wounds treated with honey became sterile within 21 days while for SSD-treated wounds, this figure was 36.5%. A complete outcome was seen in 81% of all patients in the "honey group" while in only 37% patients in the "SSD group." Conclusion : Honey dressings make the wounds sterile in less time, enhance healing, and have a better outcome in terms of hypertropic scars and postburn contractures, as compared to SSD dressings.

  15. Epidemiology of severe burn injuries in a Tertiary Burn Centre in Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi-Barzelighi, H.; Alaghehbandan, R.; Motevallian, A.; Alinejad, F.; Soleimanzadeh-Moghadam, S.; Sattari, M.; A R Lari

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the epidemiological characteristics of hospitalized burn patients in a tertiary burn centre in Tehran, Iran. A hospital-based cross-sectional study of all hospitalized patients with burn injuries was conducted in Motahari Burn and Reconstruction Center in Tehran from August to December 2010. Medical records of all hospitalized burn patients were reviewed and pertinent information was captured. A total of 135 patients with severe burns requiring hospitalizat...

  16. Cognitive emotion regulation strategies and neuroticism in relation to depressive symptoms following burn injury: a longitudinal study with a 2-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loey, N.E.E.; Oggel, A.; Goemanne, A.S.; Braem, L.; Vanbrabant, L.; Geenen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining burns is considered a stressful life event that has the power to elicit depressive symptoms. This study aimed to identify predictors of depressive symptoms by investigating the role of demographic variables, the number of operations (burn severity), neuroticism, and cognitive emotion regu

  17. Study of Jaft Aqueous Extract and Silver Sulfadiazine on Burn Healing in Male Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nikrooze

    2013-05-01

    24 hours post-burn level 2 Silver sulfadiazine cream was treated for the first group and aqueous extract of oak at 1, 4, 7% were used for the second, third and fourth groups the control group was treated with physiology serum. After 30 and 60 days, mice were anesthetized and damaged skin tissues were removed and then transferred to 10% formalin. After histological processing and hematoxylin and eosin staning, the structure of the skin was examined by light microscopy. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Turkey. Results: Thickness of the epidermis, dermis, and the burns extract pairs, in groups of 1%, 4%, 7% in comparison to silver sulfadiazine showed a significant increase (P <0/05. Conclusion: It seemed that the 1% Sulfadiazine Cream compared with oak extract inhibited healing of the skin. Key words: Burn, Jaft (oak extract, silver sulfadiazine, rat

  18. Crude oil burning mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, L.M.V.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve predictions for the burning efficiency and the residue composition of in-situ burning of crude oil, the burning mechanism of crude oil was studied in relation to the composition of its hydrocarbon mixture, before, during and after the burning. The surface temperature, flame...... height, mass loss rate and residues of three hydrocarbon liquids (n-octane, dodecane and hexadecane), two crude oils (DUC and REBCO) and one hydrocarbon liquid mixture of the aforementioned hydrocarbon liquids were studied using the Crude Oil Flammability Apparatus. The experimental results were compared...... on the highest achievable oil slick temperature. Based on this mechanism, predictions can then be made depending on the hydrocarbon composition of the fuel and the measured surface temperature....

  19. Calcium and ER stress mediate hepatic apoptosis after burn injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Song, Juquan; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Cox, Robert A.; Barral, José M.; Herndon, David N.; Boehning, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A hallmark of the disease state following severe burn injury is decreased liver function, which results in gross metabolic derangements that compromise patient survival. The underlying mechanisms leading to hepatocyte dysfunction after burn are essentially unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the underlying mechanisms leading to hepatocyte dysfunction and apoptosis after burn. Rats were randomized to either control (no burn) or burn (60% total body surface area burn) and sacrificed at various time‐points. Liver was either perfused to isolate primary rat hepatocytes, which were used for in vitro calcium imaging, or liver was harvested and processed for immunohistology, transmission electron microscopy, mitochondrial isolation, mass spectroscopy or Western blotting to determine the hepatic response to burn injury in vivo. We found that thermal injury leads to severely depleted endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium stores and consequent elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations in primary hepatocytes in vitro. Burn‐induced ER calcium depletion caused depressed hepatocyte responsiveness to signalling molecules that regulate hepatic homeostasis, such as vasopressin and the purinergic agonist ATP. In vivo, thermal injury resulted in activation of the ER stress response and major alterations in mitochondrial structure and function – effects which may be mediated by increased calcium release by inositol 1,4,5‐trisphosphate receptors. Our results reveal that thermal injury leads to dramatic hepatic disturbances in calcium homeostasis and resultant ER stress leading to mitochondrial abnormalities contributing to hepatic dysfunction and apoptosis after burn injury. PMID:20141609

  20. Impact of crop field burning and mountains on heavy haze in the North China Plain: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xin; Tie, Xuexi; Cao, Junji; Huang, Rujin; Feng, Tian; Li, Nan; Zhao, Suyu; Tian, Jie; Li, Guohui; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    With the provincial statistical data and crop field burning (CFB) activities captured by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), we extracted a detailed CFB emission inventory in the North China Plain (NCP). The WRF-CHEM model was applied to investigate the impact of CFB on air pollution during the period from 6 to 12 October 2014, corresponding to a heavy haze incident with high concentrations of PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 µm). The WRF-CHEM model generally performed well in simulating the surface species concentrations of PM2.5, O3 and NO2 compared to the observations; in addition, it reasonably reproduced the observed temporal variations of wind speed, wind direction and planetary boundary layer height (PBLH). It was found that the CFB that occurred in southern NCP (SNCP) had a significant effect on PM2.5 concentrations locally, causing a maximum of 34 % PM2.5 increase. Under continuous southerly wind conditions, the CFB pollution plume went through a long-range transport to northern NCP (NNCP; with several mega cities, including Beijing, the capital city of China), where few CFBs occurred, resulting in a maximum of 32 % PM2.5 increase. As a result, the heavy haze in Beijing was enhanced by the CFB, which occurred in SNCP. Mountains also play significant roles in enhancing the PM2.5 pollution in NNCP through the blocking effect. The mountains blocked and redirected the airflows, causing the pollutant accumulations along the foothills of mountains. This study suggests that the prohibition of CFB should be strict not only in or around Beijing, but also on the ulterior crop growth areas of SNCP. PM2.5 emissions in SNCP should be significantly limited in order to reduce the occurrences of heavy haze events in the NNCP region.

  1. Progress toward development of a platform for studying burn in the presence of mix on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, T. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Cobble, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Obrey, K. A. D.; Hsu, S. C.; Shah, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Kline, J. L.; Grim, G. P.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Schmitt, M. J.; Kanzleiter, R. J.; Batha, S. H.

    2013-10-01

    Mix of shell material into ICF capsule fuel can degrade implosion performance through a number of mechanisms. One way is by dilution of the fusion fuel, which affects performance by an amount that is dependent on the degree of mix at the atomic level. Experiments are underway to quantify the mix of shell material into fuel using directly driven capsules on the National Ignition Facility. Deuterated plastic shells will be utilized with tritium fill so that the production of DT neutrons is indicative of mix at the atomic level. Neutron imaging will locate the burn region and spectroscopic imaging of the doped layers will reveal the location, temperature, and density of the shell material. Correlation of the two will be used to determine the degree of atomic mixing of the shell into the fuel and will be compared to models. This talk will review progress toward the development of an experimental platform to measure burn in the presence of measured mix. This work is supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  2. Epidemiology of burn injuries in South-Eastern Iran: A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the epidemiology of burn injuries in Zahedan, Southeastern Iran. Methods: A retrospective review of 730 medical records, of burnt patients, for a period of two years was done. Pre-designed data recording forms were used to collect data. The SPSS-15 was used to analyze data. Results: Overall, 713 medical records were analyzed: two-thirds (62.0%) were fire-related and one-third related to scalds (33.1%). Intentional self-harm injuries accounted for 14.3% of all admissions. A significant difference existed between patients' age or sex and the causes of burns (P<0.001). Burns more than 60% closely correlated with death rate and hospital stay (P<0.001). Conclusion: Lack of the necessary, socio-economic infrastructure, language and cultural barriers, low level of literacy, flammability of women's clothes and unsafe application/design of stove and heaters are likely to contribute to the high frequency of burn injuries in this area. (author)

  3. Recommendations on the use of prescribed burning practices in grassland conservation - An evidence-based study from Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóthmérész, Béla; Valkó, Orsolya; Török, Péter; Végvári, Zsolt; Deák, Balázs

    2015-04-01

    Fire as a natural disturbance has been present in most European grasslands. In parallel controlled use of burning was an important part of the traditional landscape management for millennia. It was used to reduce litter and suppress woody vegetation as well as to maintain open landscapes suitable for farming. Recently, human activities have a considerable impact on natural fire regimes through habitat fragmentation, cessation of traditional grassland management and climate change. Nowadays the majority of human-ignited fires are uncontrolled burnings and arson, which have serious negative impacts on human life, property and can be detrimental also from the nature conservation point of view. Despite fire was widely applied in the past and the considerable extension and frequency of current grassland fires, the impact of fire on the grassland biodiversity is still scarcely documented in Europe. The aim of our study was to gather practical knowledge and experiences from Hungary concerning the effects of fire on grasslands. To fulfil this aim we sent questionnaires to experts from Hungarian national park directorates to gather unpublished data and field observations concerning the effects of burning on grasslands. Based on the answers for the questionnaires fire regularly occur in almost every grassland types in Hungary. We found that effects of fire are habitat-specific. One hand uncontrolled burning and arson have serious detrimental impacts on many endangered species (ground-dwelling birds, such as Asio flammeus, Tringa totanus and Vanellus vanellus; or lizards, such as Ablepharus kitaibelii). On the other hand in several cases fire has a positive effect on the habitat structure and favours species of high nature conservation interest (plant species, such as Adonis volgensis, Chamaecytisus supinus and Pulsatilla grandis; butterflies, such as Euphydryas aurinia; bird species such as Circus aeruginosus and Larus cachinnans). Our results suggest that even uncontrolled

  4. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mros@lle.rochester.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C.; Pino, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, I-00161 Roma (Italy); Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D{sup 3}He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, N{sub K}) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (N{sub K} ∼ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  5. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D3He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ∼ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects

  6. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions using fusion burn imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Pino, J.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-06-01

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D3He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ˜ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  7. A Comparative Study of the Burn Wound Healing Properties of Saline-Soaked Dressing and Silver Sulfadiazine in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Monshizadeh, Siavash; Mesgari, Mehran

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further investigate that phenomenon and to explore the effect silver sulfadiazine on wound healing. Full-thickness burn wounds were created on the dorsum of Wistar albino rats under anesthesia. The wounds were treated with silver sulfadiazine and saline-soaked dressing for fourteen days, and then observed until healed. Wound surface area was measured each three days. Time to 50% and 90% healing was compared. No clinical infections occurred. Wound half-life and...

  8. Cooking fuel choices and garbage burning practices as determinants of birth weight: a cross-sectional study in Accra, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amegah Adeladza K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effect of indoor air pollution (IAP on birth weight remains largely unexplored but yet purported as the most important environmental exposure for pregnant women in developing countries due to the effects of second-hand smoke. We investigated the associations between the determinants of indoor air quality in households and birth weight. Methods A cross-sectional study of 592 mothers and their newborns using postnatal services at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital located in Accra, Ghana was conducted in 2010 to collect information on characteristics of indoor environment and other potential determinants of fetal growth. Birth weight was recorded from hospital records. Results Household cooking fuel choices and garbage burning practices were determinants of birth weight. Multivariate linear regression analysis adjusting for age, social class, marital status and gravidity of mothers, and sex of neonate resulted in a 243g (95% CI: 496, 11 and 178g (95% CI: 421, 65 reduction in birth weight for use of charcoal, and garbage burning respectively compared with use of LPG only. The estimated reductions in birth weight was not statistically significant. Applying the ordinal scale exposure parameter nonetheless revealed a significant exposure-response relationship between maternal exposures from charcoal use and garbage burning, and birth weight. Generalized linear models adjusting for confounders resulted in a 41% (risk ratio [RR] = 1.41; 95% CI: 0.62, 3.23 and 195% (RR=2.95; 95% CI: 1.10, 7.92 increase in the risk of low birth weight (LBW for use of charcoal, and garbage burning respectively compared with use of LPG only. A combination of charcoal use and household garbage burning during pregnancy on fetal growth resulted in a 429g (95% CI: 259, 599 reduction in birth weight and 316% (RR=4.16; 95% CI: 2.02, 8.59 excess risk of LBW. Sensitivity analysis performed by restricting the analysis to term births produced similar results

  9. Effects of aging on organic aerosol from open biomass burning smoke in aircraft and lab studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Cubison

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning (BB is a large source of primary and secondary organic aerosols (POA and SOA. This study addresses the physical and chemical evolution of BB organic aerosols. Firstly, the evolution and lifetime of BB POA and SOA signatures observed with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer are investigated, focusing on measurements at high-latitudes acquired during the 2008 NASA ARCTAS mission, in comparison to data from other field studies and from laboratory aging experiments. The parameter f60, the ratio of the integrated signal at m/z 60 to the total signal in the organic component mass spectrum, is used as a marker to study the rate of oxidation and fate of the BB POA. A background level of f60~0.3% ±0.06% for SOA-dominated ambient OA is shown to be an appropriate background level for this tracer. Using also f44 as a tracer for SOA and aged POA, a novel graphical method is presented to characterise the aging of BB plumes. Similar trends of decreasing f60 and increasing f44 with aging are observed in most field and lab studies. At least some very aged BB plumes retain a clear f60 signature. A statistically significant difference in f60 between highly-oxygenated OA of BB and non-BB origin is observed using this tracer, consistent with a substantial contribution of BBOA to the springtime Arctic aerosol burden in 2008. Secondly, a summary is presented of results on the net enhancement of OA with aging of BB plumes, which shows large variability. The estimates of net OA gain range from ΔOA/ΔCO(mass =−0.01 to ~0.07, with a mean ΔOA/POA ~25%. With these ratios and global inventories of BB CO and POA a global net OA source due to aging of BB plumes of ~9 Tg OA yr−1 is estimated, of the order of 5% of recent total OA source estimates. Further field data following BB plume advection should be a

  10. Effects of aging on organic aerosol from open biomass burning smoke in aircraft and laboratory studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Cubison

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning (BB is a large source of primary and secondary organic aerosols (POA and SOA. This study addresses the physical and chemical evolution of BB organic aerosols. Firstly, the evolution and lifetime of BB POA and SOA signatures observed with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer are investigated, focusing on measurements at high-latitudes acquired during the 2008 NASA ARCTAS mission, in comparison to data from other field studies and from laboratory aging experiments. The parameter f60, the ratio of the integrated signal at m/z 60 to the total signal in the organic component mass spectrum, is used as a marker to study the rate of oxidation and fate of the BB POA. A background level of f60~0.3% ± 0.06% for SOA-dominated ambient OA is shown to be an appropriate background level for this tracer. Using also f44 as a tracer for SOA and aged POA and a surrogate of organic O:C, a novel graphical method is presented to characterise the aging of BB plumes. Similar trends of decreasing f60 and increasing f44 with aging are observed in most field and lab studies. At least some very aged BB plumes retain a clear f60 signature. A statistically significant difference in f60 between highly-oxygenated OA of BB and non-BB origin is observed using this tracer, consistent with a substantial contribution of BBOA to the springtime Arctic aerosol burden in 2008. Secondly, a summary is presented of results on the net enhancement of OA with aging of BB plumes, which shows large variability. The estimates of net OA gain range from ΔOA/ΔCO(mass = −0.01 to ~0.05, with a mean ΔOA/POA ~19%. With these ratios and global inventories of BB CO and POA a global net OA source due to aging of BB plumes of ~8 ± 7 Tg OA yr−1 is estimated, of the order of 5 % of recent total OA source estimates. Further field data

  11. PREDICTIVE FACTORS OF DIFFICULT INTUBATION IN POST BURN NECK CONTRACTURE – A STUDY OF 30 CONSECUTIVE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The peri - operative management of post - burn contractures of the neck is a challenge not only to the surgeon but also the anaesthesiologist. A proper co - ordination between them is needed for providing a hassle - free patient care. This is a prospective study done on 30 consecutive patients of post burn contractures of the neck to compare the surgeon’s assessment of the type and pattern of post - burn contracture of the neck and the anaesthesiologist’s assessment of the airway. T he association of this with the peri - operative management of patients was also studied. The data analysed was type of contracture , mento - sternal distance , and preoperative grading of the airway. The method of securing intra - operative airway was documented . A direct co - relation was noted between the type of contracture with the Mallampatti grading of the airway and the sterno - mental distance. All type III contractures required release before intubation. In conclusion , it is advisable for the surgeon to be w ell - versed with the anaesthesiologist’s assessment of the airway and the anaesthesiologist to aware of the types of neck contracture in order to properly plan and execute the peri - operative management of these patients.

  12. [Estimating Biomass Burned Areas from Multispectral Dataset Detected by Multiple-Satellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Chen, Liang-fu; Li, Shen-shen; Tao, Jin-hua; Su, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning makes up an important part of both trace gases and particulate matter emissions, which can efficiently degrade air quality and reduce visibility, destabilize the global climate system at regional to global scales. Burned area is one of the primary parameters necessary to estimate emissions, and considered to be the largest source of error in the emission inventory. Satellite-based fire observations can offer a reliable source of fire occurrence data on regional and global scales, a variety of sensors have been used to detect and map fires in two general approaches: burn scar mapping and active fire detection. However, both of the two approaches have limitations. In this article, we explore the relationship between hotspot data and burned area for the Southeastern United States, where a significant amount of biomass burnings from both prescribed and wild fire took place. MODIS (Moderate resolution imaging spectrometer) data, which has high temporal-resolution, can be used to monitor ground biomass. burning in time and provided hot spot data in this study. However, pixel size of MODIS hot spot can't stand for the real ground burned area. Through analysis of the variation of vegetation band reflectance between pre- and post-burn, we extracted the burned area from Landsat-5 TM (Thematic Mapper) images by using the differential normalized burn ratio (dNBR) which is based on TM band4 (0.84 μm) and TM band 7(2.22 μm) data. We combined MODIS fire hot spot data and Landsat-5 TM burned scars data to build the burned area estimation model, results showed that the linear correlation coefficient is 0.63 and the relationships vary as a function of vegetation cover. Based on the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), we built burned area estimation model over different vegetation cover, and got effective burned area per fire pixel, values for forest, grassland, shrub, cropland and wetland are 0.69, 1.27, 0.86, 0.72 and 0.94 km2 respectively. We validated the

  13. Estimate of preliminary experiments to study the burn-up of gadolinium as a poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Proposed preliminary experiments to determine the burn-up of Gd2O3 as a poison in different reactors are discussed. Estimates are given of parameters such as the weight of the sample to be irradiated, irradiation and decay times, expected activity and photon spectrum. 1 g samples of natural UO2 with 8 % of Gd2O3, 3 days irradiation time and 30 days decay time are recommended

  14. Emissions generated by sugarcane burning promote genotoxicity in rural workers: a case study in Barretos, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Henrique C.S.; Carrijo, Marina Schmidt; Seidel, Ervald Henrique; Neto, Cristovam Scapulatempo; LONGATTO FILHO, ADHEMAR; CARVALHO, André Lopes; Reis, R M; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2013-01-01

    Background: To determine the possible genotoxic effect of exposure to the smoke generated by biomass burning on workers involved in manual sugar cane harvesting. Methods: The frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated buccal cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes was determined in sugarcane workers in the Barretos region of Brazil, during the harvest season and compared to a control population, comprised of administrative employees of Barretos Cancer Hospital. Results: The frequency of ...

  15. Computer decision support software safely improves glycemic control in the burn intensive care unit: a randomized controlled clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Elizabeth A.; Jones, John A.; Wolf, Steven E.; Wade, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The optimal method for glycemic control in the critically burned patient is unknown. The purpose of this randomized controlled study was to determine the safety and efficacy of computer decision support software (CDSS) to control serum glucose concentration in a burn intensive care unit. Methods Eighteen adult burn/trauma patients receiving continuous insulin infusion were initially randomized to receive glucose management via a traditional paper-based protocol (PP) or a computer protocol (CP) for 72 hours, then crossed over to the alternate method for an additional 72 hours. Results Time in target glucose range (80-110 mg/dl) was higher in the CP group (47 ± 17% versus 41 ± 16.6%; p ≤ 0.05); time over target range was not significantly reduced in the CP group (49 ± 17.8% versus 54 ± 17.1; p = 0.08); and no difference was noted in time under target range of 80 mg/dl (CP 4.5 ± 2.8, PP 4.8 ± 3.3%; p = 0.8), under 60 mg/dl (p = 0.7), and under 40 mg/dl (p = 1.0). Severe hypoglycemic events (< 40 mg/dl) did not differ from the CP group compared to historical controls for patients receiving no insulin (p = 0.6). More glucose measurements were performed in the CP group (p = 0.0003), and nursing staff compliance with CP recommendations was greater (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Glycemic control using CDSS is safe and effective for the critically burned patient. Time in target range improved without increase in hypoglycemic events. CDSS enhanced consistency in practice, providing standardization among nursing staff. PMID:21240001

  16. Epidemiological data, outcome, and costs of burn patients in Kermanshah

    OpenAIRE

    Karami Matin, B.; Karami Matin, R.; Ahmadi Joybari, T.; Ghahvehei, N.; M Haghi; M. Ahmadi; S. Rezaei

    2012-01-01

    Burn injuries in both developed and developing countries cause long-term disability, mortality, and socio-economic costs that are imposed on patients, families, and societies. This study was carried out to investigate the epidemiology, outcome, and cost of hospitalization of 388 burn patients admitted to the Imam Khomeini Hospital Burn Center in Kermanshah, Iran, between 21 March 2011 and 20 March 2012. The data about demographics, cause of burns, degree of burns, outcome of burns, burned bod...

  17. Accuracy of real time radiography burning rate measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniyi, Bisola

    The design of a solid propellant rocket motor requires the determination of a propellant's burning-rate and its dependency upon environmental parameters. The requirement that the burning-rate be physically measured, establishes the need for methods and equipment to obtain such data. A literature review reveals that no measurement has provided the desired burning rate accuracy. In the current study, flash x-ray modeling and digitized film-density data were employed to predict motor-port area to length ratio. The pre-fired port-areas and base burning rate were within 2.5% and 1.2% of their known values, respectively. To verify the accuracy of the method, a continuous x-ray and a solid propellant rocket motor model (Plexiglas cylinder) were used. The solid propellant motor model was translated laterally through a real-time radiography system at different speeds simulating different burning rates. X-ray images were captured and the burning-rate was then determined. The measured burning rate was within 1.65% of the known values.

  18. Vitamin C in Burn Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Julie A; Rowan, Matthew P; Driscoll, Ian R; Chung, Kevin K; Friedman, Bruce C

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory state after burn injury is characterized by an increase in capillary permeability that results in protein and fluid leakage into the interstitial space, increasing resuscitative requirements. Although the mechanisms underlying increased capillary permeability are complex, damage from reactive oxygen species plays a major role and has been successfully attenuated with antioxidant therapy in several disease processes. However, the utility of antioxidants in burn treatment remains unclear. Vitamin C is a promising antioxidant candidate that has been examined in burn resuscitation studies and shows efficacy in reducing the fluid requirements in the acute phase after burn injury. PMID:27600125

  19. Nutrition Support in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Aydoğan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn trauma causes serious metabolic derangements. Increased metabolic rate which is apart of a pathophysiologic characteristic of burn trauma results in protein-energy malnutrition. This situation causes impaired wound healing, muscle and fat tissue’s breakdown, growth retardation in children and infections. Nutrition support is vital in the treatment strategies of burn victims to prevent high mortal and disabling complications in this devastating trauma. Our aim in this study is to review management of nutrition in burn victims. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 74-83

  20. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Adler

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While extensive BB is not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS. The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m=1.53(±0.03+0.07i(±0.03, during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m=1.54(±0.01+0.04i(±0.01 compared to m=1.49(±0.01+0.02i(±0.01 of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  1. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-02-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03) + 0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01) + 0.04i(±0.01) compared to m = 1.49(±0.01) + 0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  2. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Adler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS. The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03 + 0.07i(±0.03, during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01 + 0.04i(±0.01 compared to m = 1.49(±0.01 + 0.02i(±0.01 of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  3. A Comparative Study of the Wound Healing Properties of Moist Exposed Burn Ointment (MEBO) and Silver Sulphadiazine

    OpenAIRE

    Jewo, P.I.; Fadeyibi, I.O.; Babalola, O.S.; L C Saalu; Benebo, A.S.; Izegbu, M.C.; Ashiru, O.A.

    2009-01-01

    Burns expose the deeper tissues of the skin or body to invasive microbes. Topical preparations for treating burn wounds, to be useful, should ideally have antibiotic power and promote healing. Silver compounds have been the mainstay of topical burn treatment for decades. However, most chemical substances retard wound healing. Several natural agents such as honey and moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO) are believed to protect wounds from infection and promote healing without causing any of the ...

  4. Exploratory study of burn time, duty factor, and fluence on ITER activation hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety analyses for the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) were based on the simplifying assumption that the activation of materials occurs continuously. Since the analyses showed a significant hazard, it is appropriate to examine how much hazard reduction might occur if this conservative assumption were relaxed. This report explores how much reduction might be gained by considering non-continuous operation, that is, by considering plasma burn time, duty factor, and integrated fluence. Other factors impacting activation hazards - material choice, flux, and size - are not considered here

  5. A neutronic feasibility study on the deep-burning of TRU in a commercial LWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the neutronic feasibility of deep burning of transuranics (TRU) nuclides in a commercial LWR reactor is investigated. New fuel assemblies having both TRU FCM (Fully Ceramic Micro-encapsulated) fuel pins and conventional UO2 pins are designed for 'deep burning' of the Transuranics without violating the safety-related parameters. In the FCM fuel pins, TRU TRISO particles and burnable poison BISO particle are distributed through a dense SiC matrix and formed into pellets and fuel pins. The combination of TRU FCM fuel pins and regular UO2 fuel pins are made into new fuel assemblies and loaded into the reload cores of the YongGwang unit 3 cycle 6 and its following cycles. The neutronic physics performance of the new fuel assemblies and the reload cores are analyzed in detail. The results show that the reload cores can be designed without significant changes in the safety-related parameters, and the equilibrium cycle core has self recycling capability for Transuranics and a high TRU destruction rate of ∼60%. (author)

  6. Clinical application of radioaerosol studies - pulmonary embolism, inhalation burns and glue-sniffers and COPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alveolar epithelium and the capillary endothelium together form the alveolar capillary membrane. Fluid exchange occurs across this membrane, and is dependent on intravascular and interstitial hydrostatic and oncotic pressures, and on permeability of this membrane. Damage to either the alveolar or capillary component can result in a high permeability pulmonary oedema, even though the alveolar epithelium forms an extremely tight membrane which is ten times less permeable than the capillary endothelium. Nuclear medicine methods can be used to observe changes in integrity of pulmonary capillary endothelium (with first pass dual-indicator dilution technique using successive injections of radiotracer), and of alveolar epithelium, and it is important that the damage should be detected before patients develop clinical pulmonary oedema so that intensive therapy can be instituted early. We have used 99mTc DTPA radioaerosol to measure alteration in pulmonary epithelial permeability and to image the distribution of ventilation in normal and some pathological states. In some clinical studies Tc-99m (tin) colloid radioaerosol has been used to obtain the ventilation images

  7. Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor levels in patients with burn injuries and inhalation trauma requiring mechanical ventilation: an observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Backes, Yara; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F; Tuip de Boer, Anita M; Hofstra, Jorrit Jan; Vlaar, Alexander PJ; Determann, Rogier M; Knape, Paul; David P Mackie; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has been proposed as a biologic marker of fibrinolysis and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value of systemic and pulmonary levels of suPAR in burn patients with inhalation trauma who need mechanical ventilation. Methods suPAR was measured in plasma and nondirected lung-lavage fluid of mechanically ventilated burn patients with inhalation trauma. The samples were obta...

  8. Tokamak burn cycle study: a data base for comparing long pulse and steady-state power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several distinct operating modes (conventional ohmic, noninductive steady state, internal transformer, etc.) have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics (current drive efficiency) and engineering (superior materials) which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles

  9. Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) for a Study of Oxygen Formation In Stellar Helium Burning

    OpenAIRE

    Gai, Moshe; Breskin, Amos; Chechik, Rachel; Dangendorf, Volker; Weller, Henry R.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing an Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) detector for the study of the 12C(a,g)16O reaction that determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen in helium burning. This ratio is crucial for understanding the final fate of a progenitor star and the nucleosynthesis of elements prior to a Type II supernova; an oxygen rich star is predicted to collapse to a black hole, and a carbon rich star to a neutron star. Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) are used as standard candles for measur...

  10. Psychiatric aspects of burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries and their subsequent treatment cause one of the most excruciating forms of pain imaginable. The psychological aspects of burn injury have been researched in different parts of the world, producing different outcomes. Studies have shown that greater levels of acute pain are associated with negative long-term psychological effects such as acute stress disorder, depression, suicidal ideation, and post-traumatic stress disorder for as long as 2 years after the initial burn injury. The concept of allostatic load is presented as a potential explanation for the relationship between acute pain and subsequent psychological outcomes. A biopsychosocial model is also presented as a means of obtaining better inpatient pain management and helping to mediate this relationship.

  11. Burning plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

  12. To Burn or not to Burn: Making the Burning of Chocolate Hills of Bohol, Philippines Carbon Neutral

    OpenAIRE

    Nathaniel T. Bantayan; Margaret M Calderon; Flocencia B. Pulhin; Canesio D. Predo; Rose Ann C. Baruga

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the current management regime of burning vis-à-vis burning with carbon offsets for the Chocolate Hills Natural Monument (CHNM) in Bohol, Philippines. The current scheme of burning to maintain the grass-covered (tree-less) and brown hills to sustain tourist arrivals is seen as environmentally unsound and inconsistent with existing environmental laws. The study estimated the carbon loss from burning and compared the carbon loss value with the tourism income ...

  13. Sensitivity of simulated tropospheric CO to subgrid physics parameterization: A case study of Indonesian biomass burning emissions in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Robert D.; Luo, Ming; Kim, Daehyun; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Worden, John

    2015-11-01

    Recent cumulus and turbulence parameterization changes to the NASA GISS ModelE2 have improved representation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation and low cloud distribution, but their effect on composition-related quantities is not known. In this study, we simulate the vertical transport of carbon monoxide (CO) from uncontrolled biomass burning in Indonesia in late 2006, during which uniquely high CO was detected in the upper troposphere. Two configurations of ModelE2, one without the changes (AR5) and one with the changes (AR5'), are used for an ensemble simulation of the transport of CO from the biomass burning. The simulation results are evaluated against new CO profiles retrieved jointly from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and the Microwave Limb Sounder. Modeled upper tropospheric CO using the AR5 physics was unrealistically high. The AR5' physics suppress deep convection that reaches near the tropopause, reducing vertical transport of CO to the upper troposphere and bringing the model into better agreement with satellite CO. In this regard, the most important changes were related to the strength of entrainment of environmental air into the convective column, the strength of re-evaporation above cloud base, and a negative plume buoyancy threshold based on density temperature. This study illustrates how individual, noncomposition model changes can lead to significantly different modeled composition, which in this case improved agreement with satellite retrievals. This study also illuminates the potential usefulness of CO satellite observations in constraining unobservable processes in general circulation models.

  14. Assessing land-use and carbon stock in slash-and-burn ecosystems in tropical mountain of Laos based on time-series satellite images

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Yoshio; Kiyono, Yoshiyuki; Asai, Hidetoshi; Ochiai, Yukihito; Qi, Jiaguo; Olioso, Albert; Shiraiwa, Tatsuhiko; HORIE,TAKESHI; Saito, Kazuki; Dounagsavanh, Linkham

    2010-01-01

    In the tropical mountains of Southeast Asia, slash-and-burn (S/B) agriculture is a widely practiced and important food production system. The ecosystem carbon stock in this land-use is linked not only to the carbon exchange with the atmosphere but also with food and resource security. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative information on the land-use and ecosystem carbon stock in the region as well as to infer the impacts of alternative land-use and ecosystem management scen...

  15. Excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthetic complexes and chlorophyll trefoils: hole-burning and single complex/trefoil spectroscopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryszard Jankowiak, Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, CBC Bldg., Manhattan KS, 66505; Phone: (785) 532-6785

    2012-09-12

    In this project we studied both natural photosynthetic antenna complexes and various artificial systems (e.g. chlorophyll (Chl) trefoils) using high resolution hole-burning (HB) spectroscopy and excitonic calculations. Results obtained provided more insight into the electronic (excitonic) structure, inhomogeneity, electron-phonon coupling strength, vibrational frequencies, and excitation energy (or electron) transfer (EET) processes in several antennas and reaction centers. For example, our recent work provided important constraints and parameters for more advanced excitonic calculations of CP43, CP47, and PSII core complexes. Improved theoretical description of HB spectra for various model systems offers new insight into the excitonic structure and composition of low-energy absorption traps in very several antenna protein complexes and reaction centers. We anticipate that better understanding of HB spectra obtained for various photosynthetic complexes and their simultaneous fits with other optical spectra (i.e. absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra) provides more insight into the underlying electronic structures of these important biological systems. Our recent progress provides a necessary framework for probing the electronic structure of these systems via Hole Burning Spectroscopy. For example, we have shown that the theoretical description of non-resonant holes is more restrictive (in terms of possible site energies) than those of absorption and emission spectra. We have demonstrated that simultaneous description of linear optical spectra along with HB spectra provides more realistic site energies. We have also developed new algorithms to describe both nonresonant and resonant hole-burn spectra using more advanced Redfield theory. Simultaneous description of various optical spectra for complex biological system, e.g. artificial antenna systems, FMO protein complexes, water soluble protein complexes, and various mutants of reaction centers

  16. Development of Animal Model for Studying Deep Second-Degree Thermal Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle dos Santos Tavares Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal lesions were produced in 12 male Wistar rats, positioning a massive aluminum bar 10 mm in diameter (51 g, preheated to 99°C ± 2°C/10 min. on the back of each animal for 15 sec. After 7, 14, 21, and 28 days, animals were euthanized. The edema intensity was mild, with no bubble and formation of a thick and dry crust from the 3rd day. The percentage of tissue shrinkage at 28 days was 66.67 ± 1.66%. There was no sign of infection, bleeding, or secretion. Within 28 days reepithelialization was incomplete, with fibroblastic proliferation and moderate fibrosis and presence of modeled dense collagen fibers. It is concluded that the model established is applicable in obtaining deep second-degree thermal burns in order to evaluate the healing action of therapeutic agents of topical use.

  17. Investigating the phenomenology of imagery following traumatic burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockerham, Elaine Sara; Çili, Soljana; Stopa, Lusia

    2016-06-01

    Intrusive images related to adverse experiences are an important feature of a number of psychological disorders and a hallmark symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Depression, anxiety, and PTSD are all common reactions following a burn injury. However, the nature of burn-related trauma memories and associated intrusions and their contribution to psychological disorders is not well understood. The aim of the study was to take a broad look at the nature of imagery experienced by people who have sustained a burn injury. Nineteen participants completed self-report questionnaires assessing depression, anxiety, and PTSD symptoms and were administered a semi-structured interview which explored the characteristics (vividness, sensory modalities, intrusions, emotion intensity) of imagery formed in relation to their burn injuries. Ongoing intrusive imagery was reported by over half the participants and there were significant correlations between frequency of intrusive images and posttraumatic symptoms, and between intensity of emotions associated with intrusive images and depression and posttraumatic symptoms. A thematic analysis of the memory narratives revealed four main themes: threat to self, view of the world, view of others, and positive psychological change. These results are discussed in relation to existing trauma theory and burn injury literature. Implications for clinical practice and recommendations for further research are proposed. PMID:27005586

  18. Study of development of non-destructive method for determining FGR from high burned PWR type fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental study was made to evaluate the FGR (Fission Product Gas Release) from high burned PWR type fuel rods by means of non-destructive method through measurement of the gamma activity of 85Kr isotope which was accumulated in the fuel top plenum. Experimental result shows that it is possible to know the amounts of FGR at fuel plenum by the equations given in the followings. FGR = 0.28C/Vf or FGR = 0.07C where, FGR (%) is the amounts of Xe and Kr released from UO2 fuel, C (counts/h) the radioactivity of 85Kr at plenum of the tested fuel rod and Vf (ml) the plenum volume of the tested fuel rod, respectively. The present study was made by using 14 x 14 PWR type fuel rods preirradiated up to the burn-up of 42.1 MWd/kgU, followed by the pulse irradiation at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The FGR of the tested segmented fuel rods were measured by puncturing and found to range from 0.6% to 12% according to the magnitude of the deposited energy given by pulse. Estimated experimental error bands against the above equations were within plus minus 30%. (author)

  19. Genotoxic potential generated by biomass burning in the Brazilian Legal Amazon by Tradescantia micronucleus bioassay: a toxicity assessment study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artaxo Paulo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Brazilian Amazon has suffered impacts from non-sustainable economic development, especially owing to the expansion of agricultural commodities into forest areas. The Tangará da Serra region, located in the southern of the Legal Amazon, is characterized by non-mechanized sugar cane production. In addition, it lies on the dispersion path of the pollution plume generated by biomass burning. The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic potential of the atmosphere in the Tangará da Serra region, using Tradescantia pallida as in situ bioindicator. Methods The study was conducted during the dry and rainy seasons, where the plants were exposed to two types of exposure, active and passive. Results The results showed that in all the sampling seasons, irrespective of exposure type, there was an increase in micronucleus frequency, compared to control and that it was statistically significant in the dry season. A strong and significant relationship was also observed between the increase in micronucleus incidence and the rise in fine particulate matter, and hospital morbidity from respiratory diseases in children. Conclusions Based on the results, we demonstrated that pollutants generated by biomass burning in the Brazilian Amazon can induce genetic damage in test plants that was more prominent during dry season, and correlated with the level of particulates and elevated respiratory morbidity.

  20. Prevention and control of coalfield fire technology: A case study in the Antaibao Open Pit Mine goaf burning area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Kai; Zhong Xiaoxing; Wang Deming; Shi Guoqing; Wang Yanming; Shao Zhenlu

    2012-01-01

    It is very difficult to clearly detect the location of a burning area in a coal mine since it is hidden underground.So we conducted research on the distribution of the burning area before controlling it.Firstly,the original drilling technique was used to analyze and determine the loose and scope of caving of burning area through field test,and then obtained the gases and the temperature data in this area were according to the borehole data.By analyzing these data,we found out that the location of burning area concentrated in the loose and caving area; and finally,the location and development of the burning area within the tested area were accurately determined.Based on this theory,we used the ground penetrating radar (GPR) to find out the loose and caving scale in the burning area during the control process of the burning area,and then located the fire-extinguishing boreholes within target which we used to control burning fire in the section.A mobile comprehensive fire prevention and extinguishing system based on the three-phase foam fire prevention and control technique was then adopted and conducted in the burning area which took only 9 months to extinguish the 227,000 m2 of burning area of 9# coal.This control technology and experience will provide a very important reference to the control of other coalfield fire and hillock fire in the future.

  1. In-situ burning of Orimulsion : small scale burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the feasibility of burning Orimulsion. In-situ burning has always been a viable method for cleaning oil spills on water because it can effectively reduce the amount of spilled oil and eliminate the need to collect, store, transport and dispose of recovered oil. Orimulsion, however, behaves very differently from conventional oil when it is spilled because of its composition of 70 per cent bitumen in 30 per cent water. In-situ burning of this surfactant-stablized oil-in-water emulsion has never been seriously considered because of the perception that Orimulsion could not be ignited, and if it could, ignition would not be sustained. In this study, burn tests were conducted on 3 scales in a Cleveland Open Cup apparatus of 5 cm, 10 cm and 50 cm diameters. Larger scale burns were conducted in specially built pans. All tests were conducted on salt water which caused the bitumen to separate from the water. The objective was to determine if sufficient vapours could be generated to ignite the Orimulsion. The study also measured if a sustained flame would result in successful combustion. Both objectives were successfully accomplished. Diesel fuel was used to ignite the Orimulsion in the specially designed pan for large scale combustion. Quantitative removal of Orimulsion was achieved in all cases, but in some burns it was necessary to re-ignite the Orimulsion. It was noted that when Orimulsion burns, some trapped water droplets in the bitumen explode with enough force to extinguish a small flame. This did not occur on large-scale burns. It was concluded that the potential for successful in-situ burning increases with size. It was determined that approximately 1 mm in thickness of diesel fuel is needed to ignite a burn. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  2. A Core design study on the fuel displacement options for an effective transition between breakeven and TRU burning fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A core design study to convert a breakeven core into a TRU burner is performed for a 600 MWe rated fast reactor. No change in the core and subassembly layouts is assumed, which only allows geometry variations within the fuel rods. Investigated alternatives are to use variable cladding thicknesses, smearing fraction adjustments and annular fuel rod concepts with a central liner of a variable diameter consisting of void, Zr, B4C, Al, W, etc. The variable cladding thickness concept could not be employed due to too high a clad inner wall temperature. A smearing fraction adjustment below a typical fraction of 75% leads to a moderate TRU burning and reduced sodium void worth, but to a relatively high burnup swing. Placing a central non-fuel rod with the fuel arranged in an annular ring affects the core performance and reactivity coefficients, depending on whether it is a moderator or an absorber. In general, candidate materials of high atomic numbers contribute to large positive sodium void worths, but enhanced negative expansion effects. Among the light elements, vanadium reveals a favourable performance with a comparable TRU burning and a reduced sodium void worth, suggesting this material can be regarded as a solid substitute for sodium. (authors)

  3. Total level and release of silver from a nanoparticles containing dressing used in burns care – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigo C.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available For centuries silver and its compounds have been in use to control infection and avoid septicaemia in the care of burns and chronic wounds. Renewed interest has resulted in a number of silver-based dressings exploiting nanotechnology that are now widely employed in burns centers. Despite extensive use, a systematic study of the chemical composition, release kinetics and biochemical action of these products has yet to be published. In this work we have characterized the morphology and elemental composition of a commercial dressings containing Ag by SEM-EDS. The silver content was determined by ICP-MS to be about 1.4 mg cm-2. Release kinetics in ultra pure water, physiological saline solution and human serum substitute were then deeply investigated. The highest release rates were found in serum substitute, with a maximum of 2.6 μg hr-1 cm-2. Our results show that the mean inhibitory concentrations are exceeded for most common pathogens in serum substitute and sterile water, while the presence of high Cllevels inactivates the dressings.

  4. Design of a cross-sectional study on physical fitness and physical activity in children and adolescents after burn injury

    OpenAIRE

    Disseldorp Laurien M; Mouton Leonora J; Takken Tim; van Brussel Marco; Beerthuizen Gerard IJM; Van der Woude Lucas HV; Nieuwenhuis Marianne K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Burn injuries have a major impact on the patient’s physical and psychological functioning. The consequences can, especially in pediatric burns, persist long after the injury. A decrease in physical fitness seems logical as people survive burn injuries after an often extensive period of decreased activity and an increased demand of proteins leading to catabolism, especially of muscle mass. However, knowledge on the possibly affected levels of physical fitness in children an...

  5. Design of a cross-sectional study on physical fitness and physical activity in children and adolescents after burn injury

    OpenAIRE

    Disseldorp, Laurien M.; Mouton, Leonora J.; Takken, Tim; van Brussel, Marco; Beerthuizen, Gerard I. J. M.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    2012-01-01

    Background: Burn injuries have a major impact on the patient's physical and psychological functioning. The consequences can, especially in pediatric burns, persist long after the injury. A decrease in physical fitness seems logical as people survive burn injuries after an often extensive period of decreased activity and an increased demand of proteins leading to catabolism, especially of muscle mass. However, knowledge on the possibly affected levels of physical fitness in children and adoles...

  6. Study on Digital Image Scrambling Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xue

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Encryption algorithm of traditional cryptology has strong safety, but the effect of encrypting images is not good. Digital image scrambling means that a digital image is transformed into a chaotic image which has no evident significance, but the operator can reconstruct the chaotic image into the original image by using the specific algorithm. Image scrambling encryption technology based on chaos theory makes use of chaotic signal to encrypt image data flow, which has the advantages of high safety, rapid encryption speed, large key space and good scrambling effect. The paper studies invalid-key and quasi invalid-key existed in chaotic sequence which is generated by Logistic map, and proposes image scrambling encryption algorithm based on mixed and chaotic sequence. The algorithm has a good robustness for the JPEG compression with the fixed coefficient, and a good fragileness for the illegal manipulation.

  7. Domination and Composition Structure Change at Hemic Peat Natural Regeneration Following Burning; A Case Study in Pelalawan, Riau Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAMBANG HERO SAHARJO

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is the burning of the world’s living and dead vegetation, including grasslands, forests and agricultural lands following the harvest for land clearing and land-use change. One of the important information needed following this biomass burning is how long the burnt forest or land can be recovered, and how worst the changing occurred. Repeated burning occurred at the same place trend to clean the vegetation which leads to have the land with lower number and quality of species left. The research objective is to understand the vegetation changing following peat fires in the sapric peat type at the land preparation using belong to the local community located in the Pelalawan district, Riau province, Indonesia during the dry season in the year 2001. Before burning, logging, slashing, drying and burning the site was dominated by Uncaria glabrata at seedling stage, Ficus sundaica at sapling stage, Ficus sundaica at pole stage and Stenochlaena palustris at understorey. After logging, slashing and followed by 4 weeks drying then continued by burning with high flame temperature range from 900-1100oC, it had been found that 3-months following burning the site was dominated by Uncaria glabrata at seedling stage and Nephrolepis flaccigera at understorey while 6-months following burning the site was dominated by Parastemon uruphyllus at seedling stage and Erechites valeriantifolia at understorey stage.

  8. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn wavelength (λB)-dependent nonphotochemical hole spectra are reported for the lowest energy Qy-absorption band of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) trimer complex from Prosthecochloris aestuarii. This band at 825 nm is contributed to by three states that stem from the lowest energy state of the subunit of the trimer. The spectra reveal unusually rich and quite sharp low energy satellite structure that consists of holes at 18, 24, 36, 48, 72, 120 and 165 cm-1 as measured relative to the resonant hole at λB. The possibility that some of these holes are due to correlated downward energy transfer from the two higher energy states that contribute to the 825 nm band could be rejected. Thus, the FMO complex is yet another example of a photosynthetic complex for which structural heterogeneity results in distributions for the values of the energy gaps between Qy-states. The results of theoretical simulations of the hole spectra are consistent with the above holes being due to intermolecular phonons and low energy intramolecular vibrations of the bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecule. The 36 cm-1 and higher energy modes are most likely due to the intramolecular BChl a modes. The simulations lead to the determination of the Huang-Rhys (S) factor for all modes

  9. Experimental and numerical studies of a lean-burn internally-staged combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Zhenbo; Lin Yuzhen; Li Lin; Zhang Chi

    2014-01-01

    A lean-burn internally-staged combustor for low emissions that can be used in civil avi-ation gas turbines is introduced in this paper. The main stage is designed and optimized in terms of fuel evaporation ratio, fuel/air pre-mixture uniformity, and particle residence time using commer-cial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. A single-module rectangular combustor is adopted in performance tests including lean ignition, lean blowout, combustion efficiency, emis-sions, and combustion oscillation using aviation kerosene. Furthermore, nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission is also predicted using CFD simulation to compare with test results. Under normal inlet temperature, this combustor can be ignited easily with normal and negative inlet pressures. The lean blowout fuel/air ratio (LBO FAR) at the idle condition is 0.0049. The fuel split proportions between the pilot and main stages are determined through balancing emissions, combustion efficiency, and combustion oscillation. Within the landing and take-off (LTO) cycle, this combustor enables 42%NOx reduction of the standard set by the 6th Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP/6) with high combustion efficiency. The maximum board-band pressure oscillations of inlet air and fuel are below 1%of total pressure during steady-state operations at the LTO cycle specific conditions.

  10. Experimental and numerical studies of a lean-burn internally-staged combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Zhenbo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A lean-burn internally-staged combustor for low emissions that can be used in civil aviation gas turbines is introduced in this paper. The main stage is designed and optimized in terms of fuel evaporation ratio, fuel/air pre-mixture uniformity, and particle residence time using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software. A single-module rectangular combustor is adopted in performance tests including lean ignition, lean blowout, combustion efficiency, emissions, and combustion oscillation using aviation kerosene. Furthermore, nitrogen oxides (NOx emission is also predicted using CFD simulation to compare with test results. Under normal inlet temperature, this combustor can be ignited easily with normal and negative inlet pressures. The lean blowout fuel/air ratio (LBO FAR at the idle condition is 0.0049. The fuel split proportions between the pilot and main stages are determined through balancing emissions, combustion efficiency, and combustion oscillation. Within the landing and take-off (LTO cycle, this combustor enables 42% NOx reduction of the standard set by the 6th Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP/6 with high combustion efficiency. The maximum board-band pressure oscillations of inlet air and fuel are below 1% of total pressure during steady-state operations at the LTO cycle specific conditions.

  11. The biomass burning aerosol influence on precipitation over the Central Amazon: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Gonçalves

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the aerosol influence on clouds and precipitation is an important key to reduce uncertainties in simulations of climate change scenarios with regards to deforestation fires. Here, we associate rainfall characteristics obtained by an S-Band radar in the Amazon with in situ measurements of biomass burning aerosols for the entire year of 2009. The most important results were obtained during the dry semester (July–December. The results indicate that the aerosol influence on precipitating systems is modulated by the atmospheric instability degree. For stable atmospheres, the higher the aerosol concentration, the lower the precipitation over the region. On the other hand, for unstable cases, higher concentrations of particulate material are associated with more precipitation, elevated presence of ice and larger rain cells, which suggests an association with long lived systems. The results presented were statistically significant. However, due to the limitation imposed by the dataset used, some important features such as wet scavenging and droplet size distribution need further clarification. Regional climate model simulations in addition with new field campaigns could aggregate information to the aerosol/precipitation relationship.

  12. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:27209717

  13. Calcium and ER Stress Mediate Hepatic Apoptosis after Burn Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Song, Juquan; Kulp, Gabriela A; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Cox, Robert A.; Barral, José M.; Herndon, David N; Boehning, Darren

    2009-01-01

    A hallmark of the disease state following severe burn injury is decreased liver function, which results in gross metabolic derangements that compromise patient survival. The underlying mechanisms leading to hepatocyte dysfunction post-burn are essentially unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the underlying mechanisms leading to hepatocyte dysfunction and apoptosis post-burn. Rats were randomized to either control (no burn) or burn (60% total body surface area burn) and sacri...

  14. Role of Antioxidants in the Treatment of Burn Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Jawad, F.H.; Sahib, A.S.; Al-Kaisy, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Burns are a major health problem worldwide, with high mortality and morbidity in addition to causing changes in the quality of life of burn patients. Utilizing antioxidant therapeutic strategies depending on new mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of burns-related "oxidative stress" may be considered a promising step in burns management. This study involved 180 burn patients of varying age and either sex and with varying burns percentages. The patients were subdivided into six groups (A, ...

  15. Validation of the Two Standard MODIS Satellite Burned-Area Products and an Empirically-Derived Merged Product in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Philemon Tsela; Konrad Wessels; Joel Botai; Sally Archibald; Derick Swanepoel; Karen Steenkamp; Philip Frost

    2014-01-01

    The 500-m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) burned area products, MCD45A1, MCD64A1, and a merged product were validated across six study sites in South Africa using independently-derived Landsat burned-area reference data during the fire season of 2007. The objectives of this study were to: (i) investigate the likelihood of the improved detection of small burns through an empirically-derived merged product; (ii) quantify the probability of detection by each product using ...

  16. Image Attributes: A Study of Scientific Diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskill, Jeff; Jorgensen, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Discusses advancements in imaging technology and increased user access to digital images, as well as efforts to develop adequate indexing and retrieval methods for image databases. Describes preliminary results of a study of undergraduates that explored the attributes naive subjects use to describe scientific diagrams. (Author/LRW)

  17. Effect of a combined continuous and intermittent transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain perception of burn patients evaluated by visual analog scale: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Ruvalcaba I

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Irma Pérez-Ruvalcaba,1 Viridiana Sánchez-Hernández,1 Arieh R Mercado-Sesma2,3 1Burn Unit, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente, Mexican Institute of Social Security, 2Health Sciences Department, Centro Universitario de Tonalá, University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico; 3Diabetes sin Complicaciones, Zapopan, Mexico Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation on the perception of pain in patients with burns of different types. Materials and methods: A pilot study was conducted in 14 patients (age 30.9±7.5 years with second- and third-degree burns of different types. The burn types included electrical, fire/flame, and chemical. All patients received continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation sessions three times per week for 4 weeks. Each session had a duration of 30 minutes. A pair of electrodes were placed around the burn. The primary efficacy endpoint was the perception of pain assessed by a visual analog scale at baseline and at the 30th day. Results: A significant reduction of pain perception was reported (8.0±1.7 vs 1.0±0.5; P=0.027 by all patients after electrical stimulation therapy. There were no reports of adverse events during the intervention period. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation could be a potential nonpharmacological therapeutic option for pain management in burn patients. Keywords: TENS, burn pain, pain management, electrotherapy

  18. A review of hydrofluoric acid burn management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Daniel; Thoma, Achilleas; Bailey, Kristy; Fish, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) causes a unique chemical burn. Much of the current treatment knowledge of HF burns is derived from case reports, small case series, animal studies and anecdotal evidence. The management can be challenging because clinical presentation and severity of these burns vary widely. Plastic surgeons managing burn patients must have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology, the range of severity in presentation and the current treatment options available for HF burns. The present article reviews the current understanding of the pathophysiology and systemic effects associated with severe HF burns. Furthermore, it distinguishes between minor and life-threatening HF burns and describes several of the basic techniques that are available to treat patients with HF burns. PMID:25114621

  19. Comparative study of Low-level laser therapy and microcurrent on the healing of skin burns in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pegado de Abreu Freitas

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated and compared the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT and microcurrent in the burn healing process in Wistar rats. We conducted a randomized controlled study with 30 rats divided into 3 groups (n = 10; control group (CG, laser group (LG and microcurrent group (MG. After thermal damage, 10 applications of 660 nm diode laser were performed in GL and 10 applications of 60 Hz microcurrent (160 μA in MG. The semi-quantitative histological analysis was done using scores (0–3, in sections stained by hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome. The results indicated a significant improvement in the fibroblasts proliferation, collagen fibers deposition, neoangiogenesis, and cutaneous appendages regeneration in MG and LG. When microcurrent and LLLT were compared, no difference was detected, except the regeneration and formation of new cutaneous appendages, observed in MG. Despite the similar effects, GM showed faster tissue repair with the formation of skin appendages.

  20. Image registration in gastric emptying studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuter, B.; Cooper, R.G. [Royal North Shore Hospital, Crows Nest, NSW (Australia). Dept of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-03-01

    Full text: We have previously shown that image registration, based upon a two-dimensional cross-correlation (CC) of logarithmic Laplacian images (LLI), corrected motion in biliary studies in up to 90% of cases with minimal artifact. We have now applied the same technique to gastric emptying studies (GES). GES were acquired on an LFOV gamma camera over a two-hour period as 20-26 pairs of anterior-posterior frames (30 second duration and 64 x 64 matrix) for both solid and liquid components. All images were manually registered so that the solid contents of the stomach lay within an operator-drawn ROI. The anterior images of the solid component for 30 randomly selected patients were subjected to further image registration using CC of LLI, CC of raw images (Rl) (a common approach to image registration) and CC of Laplacian images (Ll). All images were aligned to the third image of the study, on which an ROI was drawn to outline the stomach. The number of images in which stomach counts appeared outside this ROI were tallied, in the original and all re-registered studies. Maximum displacements in X/Y position between images of studies registered by the LLI and Rl methods were also computed to directly compare positional accuracy. Stomachs partially exceeded the limits of the ROI in 27, 9, 53 and 54 frames (total of 710) in the original, LLI, Rl and Ll studies respectively. There were 4, 1, 6 and 7 studies with misregistered stomachs on more than 2 frames. Frames in seven Rl studies differed from the LLI studies in X/Y position by 3 pixels or more. Cross-correlation using LLI was the only method which improved upon the original manual registration. The Rl and Ll methods increased the number of misregistered frames. We conclude that in gastric emptying studies, as in biliary studies, object tracking by CC of LLI is the method of choice for image registration.

  1. Effects of past burning frequency on plant species structure and composition in dry dipterocarp forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanthongchai, Dr.; Bauhus, Prof.; Goldammer, Prof.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic burning in dry dipterocarp forests (DDF) has become a common phenomenon throughout Thailand. It is feared that too frequent fires may affect vegetation structure and composition and thus impact on ecosystem productivity. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of prescribed fires on sites with different past burning regimes on vegetation structure and composition in the Huay Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary (HKK), Thailand. Fire frequency was determined from satellite images and ranged from frequent, infrequent, rare and unburned with fire occurrences of 7, 2, 1 and 0 out of the past 10 years, respectively. The pre-burn fuel loads, the overstorey and understorey vegetation structure and composition were determined to investigate the effects of the contrasting past burning regimes. The burning experiment was carried out, applying a three-strip head-fire burning technique. The vegetation structure and composition were sampled again one year after the fire to assess the fire impacts. Aboveground fine fuel loads increased with the length of fire-free interval. The woody plant structures of the frequently burned stand differed from those of the other less frequently burned stands. The species composition of the overstorey on the frequently burned site, in particular that of small sized trees (4.5-10 cm dbh), also differed significantly from that of the other sites. Whilst the ground vegetation including shrubs and herbs did not differ between the past burning regimes, frequent burning obviously promoted the proliferation of graminoid vegetation. There was no clear evidence showing that the prescribed fires affected the mortality of trees (dbh> 4.5 cm) on the sites of the different past burning regimes. The effects of prescribed burning on the understorey vegetation structures varied between the past burning regimes and the understorey vegetation type. Therefore, it is recommended that the DDF at HKK should be subjected to a prescribed fire frequency

  2. [Simulation Study of the Emission of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Sugar Alcohols from Biomass Burning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuai; Huang, Xin-yi; Wu, Shui-ping; Hu, Qing-hua; Chen, Xiao-qiu

    2015-10-01

    To measure the emission factors of PM2.5 and its associated PAHs and sugar alcohols, Chinese red pine stick and four crop straw including rice, wheat, corn and cotton were burned in a chamber. In addition, the kinetics of certain compounds were obtained through the irradiation of the glass filters with PM2.5 loading by 500 W mercury lamp. The emission factors of PM2.5 were ranged from (2.26 ± 0.60) g x kg(-1) (Chinese red pine stick) to (14.33 ± 5.26) g x kg(-1) (corn straw). Although the emission factors of the total 19 PAHs differed from (0.82 ± 0.21) mg x kg(-1) (Chinese red pine stick) to (11.14 ± 5.69) mg x kg(-1) (cotton straw), 4 ring PAHs showed predominance over other PAHs accounting for 51% - 71% except Chinese red pine in which retene was the predominant compound. The emission factors of 9 sugar alcohols were ranged from (52.34 ± 50.16) mg x kg(-1) (rice straw) to (238.81 ± 33.62) mg x kg(-1) (wheat straw) with levoglucosan accounting for 72% - 96% of the total sugar alcohols. Both the selected PAHs and levoglucosan associated with PM2.5 followed the first order kinetics. The photolysis kinetic coefficient of PAHs (ring number ≥ 4) was decreased with the increase of PAHs loading in filters. Two PAHs source characteristic ratios such as Flua/( Flua + Py) and IP/(IP + BgP) were relative stable during the irradiation. The photolysis kinetic coefficient of levoglucosan (0.004 5 min(-1)) was comparable to benzo[a]anthracene (0.004 1 - 0.005 0 min(-1)). PMID:26841587

  3. Green and ecofriendly synthesis of silver nanoparticles: Characterization, biocompatibility studies and gel formulation for treatment of infections in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Kiran; Dhamecha, Dinesh; Bhattacharya, Debdutta; Patil, Mrityunjaya

    2016-02-01

    The current study summarizes a unique green process for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by simple treatment of silver nitrate with aqueous extract of Ammania baccifera. Phytosynthesized AgNPs were characterized by various advanced analytical methods and studied for its use against infections associated with burns. Formation of AgNPs was observed by visual color change from colorless to dark brown and confirmed by UV-visible characteristic peak at 436 nm. Zeta potential, particle size and polydispersity index of nano-silver were found to be -33.1 ± 1.12, 112.6 ± 6.8 nm and 0.3 ± 0.06 respectively. XRD spectra revealed crystalline nature of AgNPs whereas TEM confirmed the presence of mixed morphology of AgNPs. The overall approach designated in the present research investigation for the synthesis of AgNPs is based on all 12 principles of green chemistry, in which no man-made chemical other than the silver nitrate was used. Synthesized nano-silver colloidal dispersion was initially tested for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) against a panel of organisms involved in infections associated with burns (Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA)). MIC and MBC were found to be in range of 0.992 to 7.93 and 7.93 to 31.75 μg/mL respectively. MBC was used for formulation of AgNP gel and tested for its efficacy using agar well diffusion method against PA, SA and MRSA. Comparative bactericidal efficacy of formulated gel (0.03% w/w) and marked formulation Silverex™ ionic (silver nitrate gel 0.2% w/w) showed equal zone of inhibition against all pathogenic bacteria. Formulated AgNP gel consisting of 95% lesser concentration of silver compared to marketed formulation was found to be equally effective against all organisms. Hence, the formulated AgNP gel could serve as a better alternative with least toxicity towards the treatment presently available for

  4. Spatio-Temporal Trends of Fire in Slash and Burn Agriculture Landscape: A Case Study from Nagaland, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalia, H.; Mondal, P. P.

    2014-11-01

    Increasing incidences of fire from land conversion and residue burning in tropics is the major concern in global warming. Spatial and temporal monitoring of trends of fire incidences is, therefore, significant in order to determine contribution of carbon emissions from slash and burn agriculture. In this study, we analyzed time-series Terra / Aqua MODIS satellite hotspot products from 2001 to 2013 to derive intra- and inter-annual trends in fire incidences in Nagaland state, located in the Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot. Time-series regression was applied to MODIS fire products at variable spatial scales in GIS. Significance of change in fire frequency at each grid level was tested using t statistic. Spatial clustering of higher or lower fire incidences across study area was determined using Getis-OrdGi statistic. Maximum fire incidences were encountered in moist mixed deciduous forests (46%) followed by secondary moist bamboo brakes (30%). In most parts of the study area fire incidences peaked during March while in warmer parts (e.g. Mon district dominated by indigenous people) fire activity starts as early as during November and peaks in January. Regression trend analysis captured noticeable areas with statistically significant positive (e.g. Mokokchung, Wokha, Mon, Tuensang and Kiphire districts) and negative (e.g. Kohima and north-western part of Mokokchung district) inter-annual fire frequency trends based on area-based aggregation of fire occurrences at different grid sizes. Localization of spatial clusters of high fire incidences was observed in Mokokchung, Wokha, Mon,Tuensang and Kiphire districts.

  5. Effect of a combined continuous and intermittent transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain perception of burn patients evaluated by visual analog scale: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ruvalcaba, Irma; Sánchez-Hernández, Viridiana; Mercado-Sesma, Arieh R

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess the effect of continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation on the perception of pain in patients with burns of different types. Materials and methods A pilot study was conducted in 14 patients (age 30.9±7.5 years) with second- and third-degree burns of different types. The burn types included electrical, fire/flame, and chemical. All patients received continuous and intermittent electrical transcutaneous nerve stimulation sessions three times per week for 4 weeks. Each session had a duration of 30 minutes. A pair of electrodes were placed around the burn. The primary efficacy endpoint was the perception of pain assessed by a visual analog scale at baseline and at the 30th day. Results A significant reduction of pain perception was reported (8.0±1.7 vs 1.0±0.5; P=0.027) by all patients after electrical stimulation therapy. There were no reports of adverse events during the intervention period. Conclusion Electrical stimulation could be a potential nonpharmacological therapeutic option for pain management in burn patients. PMID:26719723

  6. Study of Kinetics of Iron Minerals in Coal by 57Fe Moessbauer and FT-IR Spectroscopy During Natural Burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of burning of sulphur rich coal from Jaipur mine in North-Eastern India was carried out at a temperature of (675 ± 5) oC for different time intervals. 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy was applied to study the reaction products of iron compounds in each step of thermal treatment. The transformation of Szomolnokite (FeSO4.H2O) and Pyrite (FeS2) in the as received coal sample finally transformed to γ-Fe2O3 and α-Fe2O3. Other clay minerals produce some low spin silicate ash. Fourier Transmission Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy gives the ratio of several structural parameters such as Har/Hal and Har/Car. DTA analysis of the coal sample gives the exothermic reaction at different temperatures. TGA and TG analysis of the coal sample in an inert atmosphere shows the weight loss of the coal sample in different temperature ranges.

  7. Spectral Hole Burning via Kerr Nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anwar Ali; Abdul Jabar, M. S.; Jalaluddin, M.; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Iftikhar, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    Spectral hole burning is investigated in an optical medium in the presence of Doppler broadening and Kerr nonlinearity. The Kerr nonlinearity generates coherent hole burning in the absorption spectrum. The higher order Kerr nonlinearity enhances the typical lamb dip of the hole. Normal dispersion in the hole burning region while Steep anomalous dispersion between the two hole burning regions also enhances with higher order Kerr effect. A large phase shift creates large delay or advancement in the pulse propagation while no distortion is observed in the pulse. These results provide significant steps to improve optical memory, telecom devices, preservation of information and image quality. Supported by Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan

  8. Burn Injuries: Burn Depth, Physiopathology and Type of Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Kemalettin Koltka

    2011-01-01

    A significant burn injury is a serious and mortal event. The most important threat to life is hypovolemic shock with complex pathophysiologic mechanisms. Burn depth is classified as first, second, or third degree. Local inflammatory response results a vasodilatation and an increase in vascular permeability. A burn injury is a three dimensional ischemic wound. Zone of coagulation is the zone with maximum damage. Zone of stasis consists of damaged but viable tissues, the tissue is salvageable. ...

  9. Computational studies of the laminar burning velocity of a producer gas and air mixture under typical engine conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridhar, G.; Paul, P.J.; Mukunda, H.S.

    2005-03-15

    This paper discusses computational results concerning the laminar burning velocity of a biomass-derived producer gas and air mixture at pressures and temperatures typical of the unburned mixture in a reciprocating engine. The computations are based on solving conservation equations describing laminar one-dimensional, multicomponent, chemically reacting, and ideal gas mixtures that have been formulated by earlier researchers. Based on a number of calculations at varying initial pressures and temperatures, and equivalence ratios, an expression for estimating the laminar burning velocity with the recycled gas mass fraction has been obtained. Also, the effect of varying amounts of recycled gas on the burning velocity has been determined. These data on laminar burning velocities will be useful in predicting the burn rate in a spark ignition (SI) engine fuelled with a producer gas and air mixture. (Author)

  10. Pu vector sensitivity study for a Pu burning fast reactor. Pt. 2. Rod worth assessment and design optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was based on a 'pancake' type fast reactor core design of 600 MW(e), which had been optimized for Pu burning with a feed Pu vector appropriate to once-through irradiation of MOX fuel in a PWR. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of varying the Pu vector, examining various methods of offsetting the effects of such a change, and finally to produce fuel cycles optimized for the different qualities of Pu vector within the same basic design. In addition to the reference (once-through) Pu vector, two extreme Pu vectors were examined: high quality Pu from military stockpiles; low quality Pu corresponding to the equilibrium point of multiple recycling in a Pu burning fast reactor. Variations in Pu quality were overcome by changing the fuel inventory - replacing some of the fuel by diluent material, and altering the fuel pin size. Using absorber material (10B4C) as diluent improves the rod worth shutdown margin but degrades the Na void and Doppler safety parameters, a non-absorber diluent has the opposite effects, so a mix of the 2 material types was used to optimize the core characteristics. Of the non-absorber diluent materials examined, ZrH gave significantly better performance than all others; 11B4C was the second choice for non-absorber diluent, because of its compatibility with 10B4C absorber. It was not possible to accommodate the lower quality (multi-recycled) Pu vector without a significant increase in the fuel pin volume. It was not generally possible, especially with the increased fuel pin size, to achieve positive rod worth shutdown margins - this was overcome by increasing the number of control rods. For the higher quality Pu vectors to maintain ratings within limits, it was necessary to adopt hollow fuel pellets, or else to use the diluent material as an inert matrix in the fuel pellets. (J.P.N.)

  11. Imaging Studies of photodamage and self-healing in disperse orange 11 dye-doped PMMA

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Benjamin; Ramini, Shiva K.; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2011-01-01

    We report on optical imaging studies of self-healing after laser-induced photodamage in disperse orange 11 dye doped into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer. In particular, the high spatial-contrast image of the damage track made by a line focus pump laser allows the recovery rates to be measured as a function of burn dose using the relationship between transverse distance and pump intensity profile. The time evolution of the damaged population results in an intensity-independent time c...

  12. Microwave Imaging of Human Forearms: Pilot Study and Image Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Gilmore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a pilot study using a microwave tomography system in which we image the forearms of 5 adult male and female volunteers between the ages of 30 and 48. Microwave scattering data were collected at 0.8 to 1.2 GHz with 24 transmitting and receiving antennas located in a matching fluid of deionized water and table salt. Inversion of the microwave data was performed with a balanced version of the multiplicative-regularized contrast source inversion algorithm formulated using the finite-element method (FEM-CSI. T1-weighted MRI images of each volunteer’s forearm were also collected in the same plane as the microwave scattering experiment. Initial “blind” imaging results from the utilized inversion algorithm show that the image quality is dependent on the thickness of the arm’s peripheral adipose tissue layer; thicker layers of adipose tissue lead to poorer overall image quality. Due to the exible nature of the FEM-CSI algorithm used, prior information can be readily incorporated into the microwave imaging inversion process. We show that by introducing prior information into the FEM-CSI algorithm the internal anatomical features of all the arms are resolved, significantly improving the images. The prior information was estimated manually from the blind inversions using an ad hoc procedure.

  13. A Study of Algorithm of Forest Fire Burn Scar Detection Based on HJ Satellite Data%基于环境减灾小卫星数据的森林火灾迹地检测算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏然; 刘良明; 曹庭进; 周正

    2012-01-01

    森林火灾迹地是森林火灾的基本描述因子之一,是评估森林火灾严重程度的重要资料.本文基于环境减灾小卫星数据的特性,提出将GEMI指数作为火灾迹地检测指数;为了降低利用单幅影像进行火灾迹地检测时云污染现象对检测精度造成的影响,构建时序GEMI指数合成方法;并进一步提出适用于坏境减灾小卫星数据的基于时序合成GEMI影像的火灾迹地检测算法;最后,将算法应用于2009年4月发生在中国黑龙江的森林火灾,检测结果表明该算法能准确地反映出森林火灾过火区域.%Forest fire burn scar is one of the basic description factors of forest fire and important information to assess the intensity of forest fire. Based on the features of HJ satellite data,this paper proposed GEMI as the burn scar detection index. In order to reduce impact on detection accuracy which is caused by cloud contamination when using single image,a time series GEMI images synthesis method is constructed (applying to HJ satellite data, a burn scar detection algorithm based on the composed GEMI image has also been developed. Finally, a case study is carried out for the forest fire occurred in April 2003 in Hei-longjiang, China. The detection results shown that this algorithm can reflect the fire area accurately.

  14. Charge coupled device image sensor study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of a charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensors for use in spacecraft-borne imaging systems was conducted. The study resulted in design recommendations for two sensors, an approximately 500 times 500 element imaging device and a 1 times 190 element linear imaging device with a 190 times 121 buffer store. Emphasis was placed on the higher resolution, area-imaging sensor. The objectives of the proposed sensors are listed, results of the experiments are analyzed, and estimates of the device performance are presented. A summary of the major technical recommendations is included.

  15. Detecting post-fire burn severity and vegetation recovery using multitemporal remote sensing spectral indices and field-collected composite burn index data in a ponderosa pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Vogelmann, J.E.; Rollins, M.; Ohlen, D.; Key, C.H.; Yang, L.; Huang, C.; Shi, H.

    2011-01-01

    It is challenging to detect burn severity and vegetation recovery because of the relatively long time period required to capture the ecosystem characteristics. Multitemporal remote sensing data can providemultitemporal observations before, during and after a wildfire, and can improve the change detection accuracy. The goal of this study is to examine the correlations between multitemporal spectral indices and field-observed burn severity, and to provide a practical method to estimate burn severity and vegetation recovery. The study site is the Jasper Fire area in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota, that burned during August and September 2000. Six multitemporal Landsat images acquired from 2000 (pre-fire), 2001 (post-fire), 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2007 were used to assess burn severity. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), normalized burn ratio (NBR), integrated forest index (IFI) and the differences of these indices between the pre-fire and post-fire years were computed and analysed with 66 field-based composite burn index (CBI) plots collected in 2002. Results showed that differences of NDVI and differences of EVI between the pre-fire year and the first two years post-fire were highly correlated with the CBI scores. The correlations were low beyond the second year post-fire. Differences of NBR had good correlation with CBI scores in all study years. Differences of IFI had low correlation with CBI in the first year post-fire and had good correlation in later years. A CBI map of the burnt area was produced using regression tree models and the multitemporal images. The dynamics of four spectral indices from 2000 to 2007 indicated that both NBR and IFI are valuable for monitoring long-term vegetation recovery. The high burn severity areas had a much slower recovery than the moderate and low burn areas. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  16. Direct Imaging and Spectroscopy of a Candidate Companion Below/Near the Deuterium-Burning Limit In The Young Binary Star System, ROXs 42B

    CERN Document Server

    Currie, Thayne; Debes, John; Lafreniere, David; Itoh, Yoichi; Jayawardhana, Ray; Ratzka, Thorsten; Correia, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    We present near-infrared high-contrast imaging photometry and integral field spectroscopy of ROXs 42B, a binary M0 star member of the 1--3 Myr-old $\\rho$ Ophiuchus star-forming region from data collected over a 7 year span. Each data set reveals a faint companion (hereafter ROXs 42Bb) located $\\sim$ 1.16" ($r_{proj}$ $\\approx$ 150 $AU$) from the primaries. ROXs 42Bb's astrometry is inconsistent with a background star but consistent with a bound companion, possibly one with detected orbital motion. The most recent data set reveals a second candidate companion at $\\sim$ 0.5" of roughly equal brightness. ROXs 42Bb's $H$ and $K_{s}$ band photometry is similar to dusty/cloudy young late M/early L dwarfs with masses at or below the deuterium-burning limit. $K$-band VLT/SINFONI spectroscopy shows ROXs 42Bb to be a cool substellar object (M8--L0; $T_{eff}$ $\\approx$ 1800--2600 $K$), not a background dwarf star, with a spectral shape indicative of young, low surface gravity companions with masses at/below the deuteriu...

  17. Experimental Study of Fractal Image Compression Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan R. Dudhagara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Image compression applications have been increasing in recent years. Fractal compression is a lossy compression method for digital images, based on fractals. The method is best suited for textures and natural images, relying on the fact that parts of an image often resemble other parts of the same image. In this paper, a study on fractal-based image compression and fixed-size partitioning will be made, analyzed for performance and compared with a standard frequency domain based image compression standard, JPEG. Sample images will be used to perform compression and decompression. Performance metrics such as compression ratio, compression time and decompression time will be measured in JPEG cases. Also the phenomenon of resolution/scale independence will be studied and described with examples. Fractal algorithms convert these parts into mathematical data called "fractal codes" which are used to recreate the encoded image. Fractal encoding is a mathematical process used to encode bitmaps containing a real-world image as a set of mathematical data that describes the fractal properties of the image. Fractal encoding relies on the fact that all natural, and most artificial, objects contain redundant information in the form of similar, repeating patterns called fractals.

  18. Microparticles of Aloe vera/vitamin E/chitosan: microscopic, a nuclear imaging and an in vivo test analysis for burn treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gabriela Garrastazu; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph; Albernaz, Martha S; Canema, Daniel; Weismüller, Gilberto; Barros, Eduardo Bede; Magalhães, Luciana; Lima-Ribeiro, Maria Helena Madruga; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Guterres, Silvia S

    2014-02-01

    The use of drug-loaded nanoparticles and microparticles has been increasing, especially for cosmetic and drug delivery purposes. In this work, a new microparticle formulation was developed for use in the healing process of skin burns in a composition of Aloe vera/vitamin E/chitosan. In order to observe the morphological properties, Raman and atomic force microscopy evaluation were performed. The biodistribution studies were analyzed by using a nuclear methodology, labeling the microparticles with Technetium-99m and in vivo test was procedure to analyzed the cicatrization process. The results of AFM analysis show the formation and the adherence property of the microparticles. Raman analyses show the distribution of each component in the microparticle. The nuclear method used shows that the biodistribution of the microparticles remained in the skin. The in vivo cicatrization test showed that the poloxamer gel containing the microparticles make a better cicatrization in relation to the other formulations tested. PMID:24211657

  19. Sedation and Analgesia in Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Akıncı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is one of the most serious injuries that mankind may face. In addition to serious inflammation, excessive fluid loss, presence of hemodynamic instability due to intercurrent factors such as debridements, infections and organ failure, very different levels and intensities of pain, psychological problems such as traumatic stress disorder, depression, delirium at different levels that occur in patient with severe burn are the factors which make it difficult to provide the patient comfort. In addition to a mild to moderate level of baseline permanent pain in burn patients, which is due to tissue damage, there is procedural pain as well, which occurs by treatments such as grafting and dressings, that are severe, short-term burst style 'breakthrough' pain. Movement and tactile stimuli are also seen in burn injury as an effect to sensitize the peripheral and central nervous system. Even though many burn centers have established protocols to struggle with the pain, studies show that pain relief still inadequate in burn patients. Therefore, the treatment of burn pain and the prevention of possible emergence of future psychiatric problems suc as post-traumatic stress disorder, the sedative and anxiolytic agents should be used as a recommendation according to the needs and hemodynamic status of individual patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 26-30

  20. Terahertz spectroscopy for the assessment of burn injuries in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, M Hassan; Winebrenner, Dale P; Dickey, Trevor C; Chen, Antao; Klein, Matthew B; Mourad, Pierre D

    2013-07-01

    A diagnosis criterion is proposed for noninvasive grading of burn injuries using terahertz radiation. Experimental results are presented from in vivo terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of second- and third-degree wounds, which are obtained in a 72-hour animal study. During this period, the change in the spectroscopic response of the burned tissue is studied. It is shown that terahertz waves are sensitive not only to the postburn formation of interstitial edema, but also to the density of skin structures derived from image processing analysis of histological sections. Based on these preliminary results, it is suggested that the combination of these two effects, as probed by terahertz spectroscopy of the tissue, may ultimately be used to differentiate partial-thickness burns that will naturally heal from those that will require surgical intervention. PMID:23860943

  1. Hydrofluoric acid burns of the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulley, J P; Whiting, D W; Petitt, M G; Lauber, S E

    1983-06-01

    A case of hydrofluoric acid (HF) burns of the eye is reported and a review is presented of our investigation into the mechanism of HF toxicity in ocular tissues. A number of therapeutic procedures that have been successful in the treatment of HF skin burns were studied in the rabbit for use in the eye. Immediate single irrigation with water, normal saline or isotonic magnesium chloride solution is the most effective therapy for ocular HF burns. Extrapolation of other skin burn treatments to use in the eye is unacceptable due to the toxicity of these agents in normal eyes and the additive damage caused in burned eyes. PMID:6886845

  2. Preliminary design study of a board type radial fuel shuffling sodium cooled breed and burn reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A 1500MWt radial fuel shuffling sodium cooled breed and burn reactor core was designed. • The board type radial fuel shuffling strategy was applied and demonstrated. • Influences of the fuel height and core radius were investigated. - Abstract: In this paper, a preliminary board type radial fuel shuffling sodium cooled breed and burn reactor core is designed. In the current design, a number of breeding subassemblies are arranged in the center core to ensure enough breeding. A self-developed MCNP-ORIGEN coupled system with the ENDF/B-VI data library is applied to perform neutronics and burn-up calculations. For a 2.0 m radius and 2.5 m height core, the results demonstrate the feasibility of the board type radial fuel shuffling strategy. Breeding mainly occurs in the breeding subassemblies during the first 6 fuel cycles as they are moved to the burning/breeding region. The core will become asymptotically stable after about 24 years. The discharged burn-up of most subassemblies is about 15.0–30.0%. The influences of the core size on the major core parameters, such as initial keff, steady keff, maximum power density, peak burn-up and burn-up ratio between breeding and ignition subassemblies are calculated and investigated. The results indicate that the initial keff increases with fuel height and core radius and finally reaches stability; the steady keff increases with fuel height and core radius, then reaches peak value and finally decreases; the maximum power density, the peak burn-up and the burn-up ratio between breeding and ignition subassemblies decrease with the increase of fuel height and core radius; if core radius is less than 1.875 m, they increase sharply with the decrease of core radius

  3. Study of ignition, combustion, and production of harmful substances upon burning solid organic fuel at a test bench with a vortex chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdukov, A. P.; Chernetskiy, M. Yu.; Dekterev, A. A.; Anufriev, I. S.; Strizhak, P. A.; Greben'kov, P. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Results of investigation of furnace processes upon burning of pulverized fuel at a test bench with a power of 5 MW are presented. The test bench consists of two stages with tangential air and pulverized coal feed, and it is equipped by a vibrocentrifugal mill and a disintegrator. Such milling devices have an intensive mechanical impact on solid organic fuel, which, in a number of cases, increases the reactivity of ground material. The processes of ignition and stable combustion of a mixture of gas coal and sludge (wastes of concentration plant), as well as Ekibastus coal, ground in the disintegrator, were studied at the test bench. The results of experimental burning demonstrated that preliminary fuel grinding in the disintegrator provides autothermal combustion mode even for hardly inflammable organic fuels. Experimental combustion of biomass, wheat straw with different lignin content (18, 30, 60%) after grinding in the disintegrator, was performed at the test bench in order to determine the possibility of supporting stable autothermal burning. Stable biofuel combustion mode without lighting by highly reactive fuel was achieved in the experiments. The influence of the additive GTS-Powder (L.O.M. Leaders Co., Ltd., Republic of Korea) in the solid and liquid state on reducing sulfur oxide production upon burning Mugun coal was studied. The results of experimental combustion testify that, for an additive concentration from 1 to 15% of the total mass of the burned mixture, the maximum SO2 concentration reduction in ejected gases was not more than 18% with respect to the amount for the case of burning pure coal.

  4. Burn Injuries: Burn Depth, Physiopathology and Type of Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemalettin Koltka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A significant burn injury is a serious and mortal event. The most important threat to life is hypovolemic shock with complex pathophysiologic mechanisms. Burn depth is classified as first, second, or third degree. Local inflammatory response results a vasodilatation and an increase in vascular permeability. A burn injury is a three dimensional ischemic wound. Zone of coagulation is the zone with maximum damage. Zone of stasis consists of damaged but viable tissues, the tissue is salvageable. In zone of hyperemia tissue perfusion is increased. At the beginning, cardiac output falls and systemic vascular resistance increases; cardiac performance improves as hypovolemia is corrected with fluid resuscitation. While cardiac output increases systemic vascular resistance falls below normal values and a hypermetabolic state develops. Pulmonary vascular resistance increases immediately after thermal injury and this is more prolonged. To avoid secondary pulmonary complications, the smallest resuscitation volume of fluids that maintains adequate tissue perfusion should be given. Changes parallel to the cardiovascular response develop in other organ systems. The reasons of burn injury can be thermal, electrical, chemical or radiation. It is important to know the exact mechanism of burn injury because of different therapies for a specific cause. In this review information about burn depth, local and systemic responses to burn injury and major causes of burn injury are presented. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl:1-6

  5. The Application of Erosive Burning to Propellant Charge Interior Ballistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-lin

    2009-01-01

    Erosive burning is a common burning phenomenon of the gunpowder with inner holes. The actual combustion law of the gunpowder with inner holes can be changed by erosive burning. Pressure difference between the inner and the outer of hole caused by loading density variation of the propellant charge makes erosive burning occur at inner holes during in-bore burning. The effect of erosive burning on burning speed of the propellant is studied by using the effects of flow rate, heat transfer and erosion of the combustion gas in inner holes on burning rate. The mathematic model of erosive burning of the propellant is established. The effects of the factors such as loading density, inner hole size and grain length on erosive burning and interior ballistic performance are analyzed .The method to improve the bore pressure for small charge mass and small firing range by erosive burning is proposed.

  6. The Burning Saints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xygalatas, Dimitris

    The Anastenaria are Orthodox Christians in Northern Greece who observe a unique annual ritual cycle focused on two festivals, dedicated to Saint Constantine and Saint Helen. The festivals involve processions, music, dancing, animal sacrifices, and culminate in an electrifying fire-walking ritual....... Carrying the sacred icons of the saints, participants dance over hot coals as the saint moves them. The Burning Saints presents an analysis of these rituals and the psychology behind them. Based on long-term fieldwork, The Burning Saints traces the historical development and sociocultural context of the...... Greek fire-walking rituals. As a cognitive ethnography, the book aims to identify the social, psychological and neurobiological factors which may be involved and to explore the role of emotional and physiological arousal in the performance of such ritual. A study of participation, experience and meaning...

  7. Multi-spectral optical system to measure the depth of burns – diagnosis and documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenbeiß, Werner

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral 4 channel remission-spectroscope using integrated software was developed in order to measure the depth of burns in patients with severe burns injuries. This new assessment method was evaluated in a multi-center study. It was shown that the method is able to be used as a valuable tool to compare different treatment modalities leading to new aspects for quality assurance in burns patients. Hitherto, no other method was able to assess the depth of burns in an objective and reproducible manner yielding image documentation at the same time.The advantages of this new measure methods are that it is non-invasive, the fast image generation within 1.5 minutes and the ease of use even for inexperienced personnel.

  8. A STUDY ON ROLE OF VARIOUS TYPES OF TOPICAL OINTMENT AND ITS OUTCOME AMONG BURN PATIENTS : AN INTERESTING FOLLOW UP STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita; Kamlesh; Avinash; Singh,; Dhiraj

    2015-01-01

    Burn injury causes major bulk of the surgical emergencies. Burn infection makes the burn wound complicated causes considerable mortality and morbidity. Timely and effective use of antimicrobial and topical dressings revolutionizes burn care by decreasing invasive wound infection. The administration of broad - spectrum antibiotics on routine basis is likely to en courage. The emergence of resistant organism therefore, timely and judicial use of antibiotics is essenti...

  9. Theoretical and experimental study for possibility of nuclear burn wave initiation in Z-pinch due to M=0 instability development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of sausage type (m=0) instabilities in initially homogeneous plasma column leads to the appearance of dense plasma. Temperature of this plasma is substantially higher, than the average plasma temperature in the column. Therefore the reasonable idea might be the using of this high temperature areas for nuclear burn wave initiation. The study for possibility of this phenomenon is presented. (author)

  10. Antithrombin attenuates myocardial dysfunction and reverses systemic fluid accumulation following burn and smoke inhalation injury: a randomized, controlled, experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Rehberg, S; Yamamoto, Y; Bartha, E; Sousse, L.E. (Linda); Jonkam, C. (Collette); Zhu, Y; Traber, L.D. (Lillian); Cox, R. A.; Traber, D.L. (Daniel); Enkhbaatar, P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We hypothesized that maintaining physiological plasma levels of antithrombin attenuates myocardial dysfunction and inflammation as well as vascular leakage associated with burn and smoke inhalation injury. Therefore, the present prospective, randomized experiment was conducted using an established ovine model. Methods: Following 40% of total body surface area, third degree flame burn and 4 × 12 breaths of cold cotton smoke, chronically instrumented sheep were randomly assigned t...

  11. How Disabling Are Pediatric Burns? Functional Independence in Dutch Pediatric Patients with Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseldorp, Laurien M.; Niemeijer, Anuschka S.; Van Baar, Margriet E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.; Mouton, Leonora J.; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K.

    2013-01-01

    Although the attention for functional outcomes after burn injury has grown over the past decades, little is known about functional independence in performing activities of daily living in children after burn injury. Therefore, in this prospective cohort study functional independence was measured by burn care professionals with the WeeFIM[R]…

  12. Effects of agriculture crop residue burning on aerosol properties and long-range transport over northern India: A study using satellite data and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Safai, P. D.; Devara, P. C. S.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2016-09-01

    Agriculture crop residue burning in the tropics is a major source of the global atmospheric aerosols and monitoring their long-range transport is an important element in climate change studies. In this paper, we study the effects of agriculture crop residue burning on aerosol properties and long-range transport over northern India during a smoke event that occurred between 09 and 17 November 2013, with the help of satellite measurements and model simulation data. Satellite data observations on aerosol properties suggested transport of particles from agriculture crop residue burning in Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) over large regions. Additionally, ECMWF winds at 850 hPa have been used to trace the source, path and spatial extent of smoke events. Most of the smoke aerosols, during the study period, travel from a west-to-east pathway from the source-to-sink region. Furthermore, aerosol vertical profiles from CALIPSO show a layer of thick smoke extending from surface to an altitude of about 3 km. Smoke aerosols emitted from biomass burning activity from Punjab have been found to be a major contributor to the deterioration of local air quality over the NE Indian region due to their long range transport.

  13. Aetiology and Outcome of Elderly Burn Patients in Tabriz, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    H. Maghsoudi; Ghaffari, A

    2009-01-01

    Background. Geriatric patients, usually defined as being 65 years of age or over, now make up about 10% of the major burn population. Main aim. To conduct a prospective study of elderly burn patients, analysing the predictive value of age, gender, total body surface area (TBSA) burned, inhalation trauma, pre-morbid conditions, and mortality. Methods. A 10-year prospective study of burn victims hospitalized in a major burn centre in Iran was conducted to analyse the association between age, pe...

  14. Epidemiology of outpatient burns in Iran: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, H.; Motevalian, S.A.; M. Momeni

    2014-01-01

    Burn injury remains a serious and devastating issue faced by developing countries. It is also true, however, that the developed world still tackles many of the challenges caused by burns. In order to reduce this problem through preventive programs, the characteristics of this type of injury must be studied and well documented in each setting. Our study aims to show the epidemiology, demographic distribution and clinical outcomes of burns patients referred to Motahari Burn Hospital, the burn c...

  15. Modulation of inflammatory and catabolic responses in severely burned children by early burn wound excision in the first 24 hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Herndon, DN

    2003-01-01

    Hypothesis: Early burn wound excision modulates the hypermetabolic response in severe pediatric burn injuries. Design: Before-after trial. Setting: A 30-bed burn referral center in a private, university-affiliated hospital. Methods: We studied 35 severely burned children who were divided into 2 grou

  16. Mortality and Morbidity of Fireworks-Related Burns on the Annual Last Wednesday of the Year Festival (Charshanbeh Soori in Iran: An 11-Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mobayen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of firework-related injuries is costly for the patient, society, and government.Objectives: Evaluating effective factors yielding to such injuries may lead to better management of patients and decreased costs and morbidities.Patients and Materials: This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed on burn patients referred to Shahid Motahari Burns Hospital on Charshanbeh Soori day festival during the period extending from March 2000 to March 2011 (11 days in an 11-year period. Demographic data, causes of burn injury, severity, and affected body parts were recorded. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.Results: There were164 patients in the study with a mean age of 18.34 ± 9.31 years; 87% (145/164 were male. Homemade grenades were the most frequent cause of injury. Hand injury was reported in 56% (92/164 of the cases. Amputation was executed in 7 (4.3% cases, and 6 (3.7% patients died due to severe burn injuries and facial damage.Conclusions: Fireworks- related injuries during Charshanbeh Soori ceremony causes significant morbidities and damage to different body parts (especially upper limbs and face, and some of these injuries will lead to life time disabilities, amputations, and even death. As most of the injured patients are young teenagers and children, special consideration must be taken into account to prevent long term morbidities.

  17. Protocol of study and pursuit of the radioinduced burns; Protocolo de estudio y seguimiento de las quemaduras radioinducidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portas, Mercedes; Glustein, Daniel; Pomerane, Armando; Peragallo, Mabel; Guzman, Alejandra; Ciordia, Irma [Hospital de Quemados de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Comite de Radiopatologia; Genovese, Jorge [Laboratorio Craveri, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Ingenieria de Tejidos; Cymberknoh, Manuel [Centro de Investigaciones Mamarias, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Teletermografia; Dubner, Diana; Michelin, Severino; Perez, Maria del Rosario; Trano, Jose Luis Di; Gisone, Pablo [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Radiopatologia

    2001-07-01

    A study of localized overexposures based on local experience and international criteria is being carried out within the framework of a cooperation agreement between the Buenos Aires Burned Hospital and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority. This protocol was designed considering separately acute and chronic reactions, including the following aspects: patient reception: clinical findings, laboratory tests, photographic recording, and multidisciplinary evaluation; dose reconstruction: evaluation of the dose distribution by biophysical and biological procedures; extension and depth estimation: telethermography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, radioisotopic procedures, capillaroscopy and percutaneous oxymetry; therapeutic strategies: pain treatment, prevention of infections, systemic administration of pentoxiphyllin and alpha-tocopherol, local application of trolamine and antioxidants, prevention and treatment of radioinduced fibrosis. When it is indicated, surgical treatment includes partial or total excision followed by covering by graft or flap. The application of tissue-engineering techniques will be considered. Study of individual radiosensitivity: evaluation of apoptosis in peripheral lymphocytes and clonogenic assays in dermal fibroblasts 'in vitro' irradiated. (author)

  18. A case study on biomass burning aerosols: effects on solar UV irradiance, retrieval of aerosol single scattering albedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bagheri

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol optical depth (AOD from biomass burning aerosols from eastern Europe was measured in Trondheim, Norway (63.43° N , 10.43° E in May 2006. The event was observed as far as the Arctic. In the first part of this paper, the surface measurements of direct and global UV radiation (and retrieved AOD are used to simulate the data using a radiative transfer model. Measured and simulated data were used to study the effect of biomass aerosol on the levels of surface UV radiation. We found reductions of up to 31%, 15% and 2% in direct, global and diffuse surface UV irradiance (at 350 nm, SZA=50°±0.5° as compared to typical aerosol conditions. In the second part of our study, surface measurements of global and direct irradiance at five wavelength in UVB and UVA (305, 313, 320, 340 and 380 nm were coupled with a radiative transfer model to produce values of aerosol single scattering albedo, ω. The aerosol single scattering albedo for biomass aerosols is compared to ω for background aerosols. The values of ω for biomass aerosols were 0.76 at 305 nm, 0.75 at 313 nm, 0.79 at 320 nm, 0.72 at 340 nm and 0.80 at 380 nm.

  19. Comparison of efficacy of topical phenytoin with hypericin in second-degree burn wound healing: An experimental study in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Hamide; Gergerlioglu, Nursadan; Seringec, Nurten; Ozturk, Perihan; Bulbuloglu, Ertan; Karabay, Gulten

    2014-01-01

    Background This experiment was performed to compare the effects of Phenytoin (PHT) and Hypericin (HP) cream on healing of burn wounds in rats. Material/Methods Twenty rats were divided into 3 groups and second-degree burn wounds were created. The burn wounds in the first, second, and third groups were covered twice daily with PHT cream, HP cream, and saline (control), respectively. At the end of days 3, 7, 14, and 21, full-thickness skin biopsies were done for histopathologic and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Histopathologic evaluations at the 14th day showed that re-epithelialization scores were greater in the HP group than the PHT group, but on day 21, re-epithelialization scores were higher in the PHT group than the HP group. Collagen content on days 3 and 14 in the PHT group was found to be higher than in the HP group. Well-vascularized granulation tissue on day 7 in the PHT group was higher than in other groups. HP and PHT groups had a significant increase in VEGF and TGF-β expression in burn wound healing area compared to the control group on all days. Conclusions Topical application of HP can promote re-epithelialization in burn wounds to shorten the wound healing time for superficial burns. Phenytoin, on the other hand, contributes to healing by increasing vascularized granulation tissue and collagen synthesis through re-epithelialization. The increased VEGF and TGF-β expression following PHT and HP treatment strongly indicate that PHT and HP treatment promotes VEGF and TGF-β production and action in the burn wound area. PMID:24694757

  20. Impact of biomass burning on haze pollution in the Yangtze River delta, China: a case study in summer 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z.; Wang, S.; Fu, X.; Watson, J. G.; Jiang, J.; Fu, Q.; Chen, C.; Xu, B.; Yu, J.; Chow, J. C.; Hao, J.

    2014-05-01

    Open biomass burning is an important source of air pollution in China and globally. Joint observations of air pollution were conducted in five cities (Shanghai, Hangzhou, Ningbo, Suzhou and Nanjing) of the Yangtze River delta, and a heavy haze episode with visibility 2.9-9.8 km was observed from 28 May to 6 June 2011. The contribution of biomass burning was quantified using both ambient monitoring data and the WRF/CMAQ (Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ)) model simulation. It was found that the average and maximum daily PM2.5 concentrations during the episode were 82 and 144 μgm-3, respectively. Weather pattern analysis indicated that stagnation enhanced the accumulation of air pollutants, while the following precipitation event scavenged the pollution. Mixing depth during the stagnant period was 240-399 m. Estimation based on observation data and CMAQ model simulation indicated that biomass open burning contributed 37% of PM2.5, 70% of organic carbon and 61% of elemental carbon. Satellite-detected fire spots, back-trajectory analysis and air quality model simulation were integrated to identify the locations where the biomass was burned and the pollutants transport. The results suggested that the impact of biomass open burning is regional, due to the substantial inter-province transport of air pollutants. PM2.5 exposure level could be reduced 47% for the YRD region if complete biomass burning is forbidden and significant health benefit is expected. These findings could improve the understanding of heavy haze pollution, and suggest the need to ban open biomass burning during post-harvest seasons.

  1. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with long range transported biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-09-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m a.m.s.l. on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory (38°28'15'' N; 28°24'14'' W) is located ∼3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances, mainly from North America. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon and inorganic ion species. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 μg m-3; on average organic aerosol contributes the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol measurements were positively correlated (with an r2 ≥ 0.80) with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, aerosol light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) species extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. These aged WSOC compounds have an average O / C ratio of ∼0.45, which is relatively low compared to O / C ratios of other aged aerosol and might be the result of evaporation and increased fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in

  2. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with long range transported biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dzepina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m a.m.s.l. on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory (38°28'15'' N; 28°24'14'' W is located ∼3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances, mainly from North America. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon and inorganic ion species. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 μg m−3; on average organic aerosol contributes the majority of mass (57%, followed by sulfate (21% and nitrate (17%. Filter-collected aerosol measurements were positively correlated (with an r2 ≥ 0.80 with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, aerosol light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC species extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25 collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days. Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100–1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. These aged WSOC compounds have an average O / C ratio of ∼0.45, which is relatively low compared to O / C ratios of other aged aerosol and might be the result of evaporation and increased fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers

  3. Treating and Preventing Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Treating and Preventing Burns Page Content Article Body Burns ... home, out of children’s reach, and away from heat or ignition sources. Lower the temperature of your ...

  4. Burns and Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tap water burns most often occur in the bathroom and tend to be more severe and cover a larger portion of the body than other scald burns. 9 10 11 A survey found that only 8 percent of adults felt ...

  5. Comparative Study of Image Denoising Algorithms in Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Aarti Kumari; Gaurav Pushkarna

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a basic scheme for understanding the fundamentals of digital image processing and the image denising algorithm. There are three basic operation categorized on during image processing i.e. image rectification and restoration, enhancement and information extraction. Image denoising is the basic problem in digital image processing. The main task is to make the image free from Noise. Salt & pepper (Impulse) noise and the additive white Gaussian noise and blurredness are th...

  6. Comparative Study of Image Denoising Algorithms in Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Aarti; Gaurav Pushkarna

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a basic scheme for understanding the fundamentals of digital image processing and the image denising algorithm. There are three basic operation categorized on during image processing i.e. image rectification and restoration, enhancement and information extraction. Image denoising is the basic problem in digital image processing. The main task is to make the image free from Noise. Salt & pepper (Impulse) noise and the additive white Gaussian noise and blurrednes...

  7. A study on metallurgical properties of two zirconium alloys for high burn-up fuel tube applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructure development and mechanical properties after different thermomechanical processing treatment of two types of zirconium alloys, namely, the quaternary Zr-1 Nb-1 Sn-0.1 Fe and the binary Zr-1Nb has been studied. These alloys and their derivatives are finding increasing applications as fuel tube materials and have the potential for meeting the requirement of high burn up fuel. The different phase constituents and their morphological features such as shape, size distribution and the nature of precipitate phases and the extent of recrystallization which are expected to have strong effects on both short term mechanical behavior and long term performance during service have been found to be strongly dependent on thermomechanical processing parameters and annealing parameters. The extent of recrystallization has been found to be an important parameter in deciding the mechanical properties. Hot processing maps have identified optimum processing parameters for quaternary alloy and the strain rate-temperature domains corresponding to the occurrence of dynamic recovery and recrystallization processes. Microstructural features of hydrides formed in these alloys and the tensile properties of these alloys in different temperatures are also discussed. (author)

  8. Experimental Study on the Influence of Thermal Feedback on the Burning Behavior of Flexible Polyurethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Annemarie; Bwalya, Alex; Jomaas, Grunde

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to study the effect of thermal feedback on the flame spread rate and the heat release rate for a horizontally positioned slab of polyurethane under pre-flashover conditions. Two experiments were performed in a slightly modified ISO 9705 Room Corner Test...

  9. Burn size determines the inflammatory and hypermetabolic response

    OpenAIRE

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Norbury, William B.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Kulp, Gabriela A; Herndon, David N

    2007-01-01

    Background Increased burn size leads to increased mortality of burned patients. Whether mortality is due to inflammation, hypermetabolism or other pathophysiologic contributing factors is not entirely determined. The purpose of the present study was to determine in a large prospective clinical trial whether different burn sizes are associated with differences in inflammation, body composition, protein synthesis, or organ function. Methods Pediatric burned patients were divided into four burn ...

  10. Pediatric Burns in the Bedouin Population in Southern Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Arnon D; Gurfinkel, R.; Glezinger, R.; Kriger, Y.; Yancolevich, N.; Rosenberg, L

    2007-01-01

    Burn trauma is an important public health concern, with increased risk for burns in children. A cross-sectional study was performed to describe the epidemiological characteristics and risk factors for burns in hospitalized Bedouin children in Soroka University Medical Center during the years 2001–2002. In a population of 558 hospitalized burn-injured patients, 282 Bedouin children were identified. Two hundred and sixty five patients (94.0%) had burns involving less than 20% of the body surfac...

  11. Efficacy of a children’s procedural preparation and distraction device on healing in acute burn wound care procedures: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Nadia J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intense pain and anxiety triggered by burns and their associated wound care procedures are well established in the literature. Non-pharmacological intervention is a critical component of total pain management protocols and is used as an adjunct to pharmacological analgesia. An example is virtual reality, which has been used effectively to dampen pain intensity and unpleasantness. Possible links or causal relationships between pain/anxiety/stress and burn wound healing have previously not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to investigate these relationships, specifically by determining if a newly developed multi-modal procedural preparation and distraction device (Ditto™ used during acute burn wound care procedures will reduce the pain and anxiety of a child and increase the rate of re-epithelialization. Methods/design Children (4 to 12 years with acute burn injuries presenting for their first dressing change will be randomly assigned to either the (1 Control group (standard distraction or (2 Ditto™ intervention group (receiving Ditto™, procedural preparation and Ditto™ distraction. It is intended that a minimum of 29 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Repeated measures of pain intensity, anxiety, stress and healing will be taken at every dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialization. Further data collection will aid in determining patient satisfaction and cost effectiveness of the Ditto™ intervention, as well as its effect on speed of wound re-epithelialization. Discussion Results of this study will provide data on whether the disease process can be altered by reducing stress, pain and anxiety in the context of acute burn wounds. Trial registration ACTRN12611000913976

  12. Robust diffusion imaging framework for clinical studies

    CERN Document Server

    Maximov, Ivan I; Neuner, Irene; Shah, N Jon

    2015-01-01

    Clinical diffusion imaging requires short acquisition times and good image quality to permit its use in various medical applications. In turn, these demands require the development of a robust and efficient post-processing framework in order to guarantee useful and reliable results. However, multiple artefacts abound in in vivo measurements; from either subject such as cardiac pulsation, bulk head motion, respiratory motion and involuntary tics and tremor, or imaging hardware related problems, such as table vibrations, etc. These artefacts can severely degrade the resulting images and render diffusion analysis difficult or impossible. In order to overcome these problems, we developed a robust and efficient framework enabling the use of initially corrupted images from a clinical study. At the heart of this framework is an improved least trimmed squares diffusion tensor estimation algorithm that works well with severely degraded datasets with low signal-to-noise ratio. This approach has been compared with other...

  13. Study on Image Quality Improvement Methods for Underwater Imaging Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Underwater survey systems have numerous scientific or industrial applications in the fields of geology, biology, mining, and archeology. These application fields involve various tasks such as ecological studies, environmental damage assessment, and ancient prospection. During two decades, underwater imaging systems are mainly equipped by Underwater Vehicles (UV) for surveying in water or ocean. Challenges associated with obtaining visibility of objects have been difficult to overcome due to t...

  14. Analysis of factorial time-course microarrays with application to a clinical study of burn injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Baiyu; Xu, Weihong; Herndon, David; Tompkins, Ronald; Davis, Ronald; Xiao, Wenzhong; Wong, Wing Hung; Toner, Mehmet; Warren, H. Shaw; Schoenfeld, David A.; Rahme, Laurence; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Hayden, Douglas; Mason, Philip; Fagan, Shawn

    2010-01-01

    Time-course microarray experiments are capable of capturing dynamic gene expression profiles. It is important to study how these dynamic profiles depend on the multiple factors that characterize the experimental condition under which the time course is observed. Analytic methods are needed to simultaneously handle the time course and factorial structure in the data. We developed a method to evaluate factor effects by pooling information across the time course while accounting for multiple tes...

  15. Comparative Study of Image Denoising Algorithms in Digital Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Kumari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a basic scheme for understanding the fundamentals of digital image processing and the image denising algorithm. There are three basic operation categorized on during image processing i.e. image rectification and restoration, enhancement and information extraction. Image denoising is the basic problem in digital image processing. The main task is to make the image free from Noise. Salt & pepper (Impulse noise and the additive white Gaussian noise and blurredness are the types of noise that occur during transmission and capturing. For denoising the image there are some algorithms which denoise the image.

  16. First Aid: Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Burns KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Burns Print A A A Text Size Scald ... THIS TOPIC Kitchen: Household Safety Checklist Fireworks Safety First Aid: Sunburn Firesetting Fire Safety Burns Household Safety: Preventing ...

  17. Sexual Function Following Burn Injuries: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Atisha A; Corkill, Helen A; Goutos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Sexual function is a profound facet of the human personality. Burns due their sudden and devastating nature can have longstanding effects on intimate function by virtue of physical sequelae as well as alterations in body image and perceived desirability. A considerable number of patients encounter problems with intimate function in burns rehabilitation; nevertheless, the topic appears to be poorly addressed in specialist centers worldwide. Review of the literature suggests that a number of parameters can affect the quality of sexual life following burn injuries including age at the time of injury, location, and severity of the burn as well as coping mechanisms employed by the individual survivor. Addressing issues of intimacy relies on awareness, education, and a holistic approach on behalf of the multidisciplinary team members and, to this effect, recommendations are made on managing sexual function concerns in burns rehabilitation. PMID:25423439

  18. Comparative Study of Coal and Biomass Co-Combustion With Coal Burning Separately Through Emissions Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Siddique

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate eco-friendly methods to mitigate the problem of emissions from combustion of fossil fuel are highly demanded. The current study was focused on the effect of using coal & coal-biomass co-combustion on the gaseous emissions. Different biomass' were used along with coal. The coal used was lignite coal and the biomass' were tree waste, cow dung and banana tree leaves. Various ratios of coal and biomass were used to investigate the combustion behavior of coal-biomass blends and their emissions. The study revealed that the ratio of 80:20 of coal (lignite-cow dung and 100% banana tree leaves emits less emissions of CO, CO2, NOx and SO2 as compared to 100% coal. Maximum amount of CO emissions were 1510.5 ppm for banana tree waste and minimum amount obtained for lakhra coal and cow dung manure (70:30 of 684.667 ppm. Maximum percentage of SO2 (345.33 ppm was released from blend of lakhra coal and tree leaves (90:10 and minimum amount of SO2 present in samples is in lakhra coal-banana tree waste (80:20. The maximum amount of NO obtained for banana tree waste were 68 ppm whereas maximum amount of NOx was liberated from lakhra coal-tree leaves (60:40 and minimum amount from cow dung manure (30.83 ppm. The study concludes that utilization of biomass with coal could make remedial action against environment pollution.

  19. Study of thorium fuel cycles burning plutonium in the Module-HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of HTR module pebble bed reactor and thorium fuel cycles are discussed in this paper. In order to reduce plutonium stockpiles, the thorium fuel cycles are used for HTR module, and plutonium is used as fissile material. The equilibrium core is calculated and analysed for the case of the different heavy metal loading and enrichment. For the case of more than 11 g heavy metal per sphere has a negative temperature coefficient, and the maximum temperature of fuel elements under regular operation and loss of coolant accident is lower than 1500 deg. C. Therefore the feasibility of above scheme is studied. (author)

  20. Comparative Study of Coal and Biomass Co-Combustion With Coal Burning Separately Through Emissions Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Siddique; Suhail Ahmed Soomro; Aziza Aftab; Zahid Naeem Qaisrani; Abdul Sattar Jatoi; Asadullah; Ghulamullah Khan; Ehsanullah Kakar

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate eco-friendly methods to mitigate the problem of emissions from combustion of fossil fuel are highly demanded. The current study was focused on the effect of using coal & coal-biomass co-combustion on the gaseous emissions. Different biomass' were used along with coal. The coal used was lignite coal and the biomass' were tree waste, cow dung and banana tree leaves. Various ratios of coal and biomass were used to investigate the combustion behavior of coal-biomass blends and their ...

  1. Possible indicators for bio-mass burning in a small Swedish city as studied by energy dispersive fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selin Lindgren, Eva; Henriksson, Dag; Lundin, Magnus; Therning, Peter; Laursen, Jens; Pind, Niels

    2006-01-01

    biomass burning to particulate air pollution. In order to identify typical indicators for biomass burning, principle component analysis was performed on data on elemental contents and black carbon. Analysis suggests that the K/Zn ratio will be useful as an indicator for biomass incineration.......Biomass is increasingly used in energy plants of different size and sophistication in Sweden. Biomass is also available in Sweden owing to its large forest-covered areas. Incineration of biomass in an environmentally friendly manner is one of the key issues in Swedish policy for sustainable...... development. Hence there is ongoing research on the effects of biomass burning on the air quality in Swedish cities. The relative contributions of anthropogenic sources to pollution in the urban environment are usually difficult to evaluate owing to the complexity of the ambient aerosol. In order to...

  2. A quantitative, cross-sectional study of depression and self-esteem in teenage and young adult burn victims in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira Nicolosi, Júlia; Fernandes de Carvalho, Viviane; Llonch Sabatés, Ana

    2013-09-01

    Burns can have a negative physiological and emotional impact, particularly among teenage victims. To assess the presence of depression and level of self-esteem, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 63 teenage and young adult burn victims ages 12 to 20 years undergoing physical and psychological rehabilitation at the Outpatient Unit for Plastic Surgery and Burns at the Central Institute of the Clínicas Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Assessment instruments included Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE). Internal consistency within and between the two scales was established via Cronbach's-α coefficient. All variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and the statistical difference between means was compared using Student's t-test. The majority of participants were female (38, 60.3%) and unmarried (59, 93.7%) with a mean total body surface area (TBSA) burn of 23.84%. Most burns (58, 92.10%) were the result of accidents and were located on the trunk (47, 74.6%), head (43, 68%), arms (41, 65%), hands (38, 60%), neck (34, 54%), and forearm (29, 46%). Participants had received physical and psychological rehabilitation for an average of 124.74 months (SD 63.67) from a multidisciplinary team. The majority of participants (33, 52.4%) reported functional and aesthetic after-effects and appraised their scar as visible (51, 81.0%). BDI results showed low levels or absence of depression (mean = 7.63, SD 8.72; scale 0 = no depression to 63 = serious depression); the RSE showed adequate levels of self-esteem (mean = 8.41, SD 4.74; scale 0-30, where higher scores indicate worst levels of self-esteem). Burn location did not affect depression (BDI: P = 0.26) or self-esteem (RSE: P = 0.21). However, depression and self-esteem were more significant in participants who were not able to work and/or go to school than in those who were (BDI: P = 0.04 and self-esteem RSE: P = 0

  3. The impact of burn-up credit in criticality studies; Prise en compte du Credit Burn Up dans les calculs de criticite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reverdy, L

    1999-07-01

    Nowadays optimization goes with everything. So French engineering firms try to demonstrate that fuel transport casks and storage pools are able to receive assemblies with higher {sup 235}U initial enrichments. Fuel Burnup distribution contributes to demonstrate it. This instruction has to elaborate a way to take credit of burnup effects on criticality safety designs. The calculation codes used are CESAR 4.21-APOLLO 1-MORET III. The assembly studied (UO{sub 2}) is irradiated in a French Pressurized Water Reactor like EDF nuclear power reactor: PWR 1300 MWe, 17 x 17 array. Its initial enrichment in {sup 235}U equals 4.5%. The studies exposed in this report have evaluated the effects of: (i) the 15 fission products considered in Burnup Credit ({sup 95}Mo, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 101}Ru, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 143}Nd, {sup 145}Nd, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 153}Eu, {sup 155}Gd), (ii) the calculated abundances corrected or not by fixed factors, (iii) the choice of one cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21, (iv) the zone number elected in the axial burnup distribution zoning, (v) the kind of cut applied on (regular/optimized). Two axial distribution profiles are studied: one with 44 GWd/t average burnup, the other with 20 GWd/t average burnup. The second one considers a shallow control rods insertion in the upper limit of the assembly. The results show a margin in reactivity about 0.045 with consideration of the 6 most absorbent fission products ({sup 103}Rh, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 143}Nd, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 155}Gd), and about 0.06 for all Burnup Credit fission products whole. Those results have been calculated with an average burnup of 44 GWj/t. In a conservative approach, corrective factors must be apply on the abundance of some fission products. The cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21 (BBL 4) is sufficient and gives satisfactory results. The zoning of the assembly axial distribution burnup in 9

  4. Experimental study of the burned of nuclear fuel by the gamma spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate information on nuclear fuel burnup is of vital importance in reactor operation, fuel management and fuel-characteristics studies. Conventionally fuel management of the TRIGA III Reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) is done through the thermal balance method (management) of the power generated during reactor operation, since it is known that with 1.24 grams of 235U is possible to generate a power or 1 MW per day during the reactor operation. On the other hand, it is possible to calculate the operation time in days during a power of 1 MW with the help of the data registered in logs. With the information just mentioned one can calculate the quantity of 235U consumed in the fuel during a complete period of irradiation. In order to compare and prove that the burnup values, calculated through the thermal balance method, are correct, the ININ implemented, for the first time, the gamma-ray spectroscopy method as an experimental technique to calculate the burnup of several fuel elements. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a nondestructive method, so that the integrity of the fuel element is not affected which is of great importance. Since there is a direct relation between the activity of 137Cs contained in the fuel elements and a series of constants which are unique for the radioisotope and for the high resolution system, the problem just simplifies in measuring the 137Cs activities. Furthermore the 137Cs concentration equation was developed theoretically and I wrote a computer program (AMAVAL) in Fortran. The task of this program is to calculate the concentrations and the activity through the use of the equation just mentioned and the history of each fuel element. The purpose of this is to compare and validate the experimental activities with the theoretical ones for each fuel element. (Author)

  5. Regenerative Medicine: Novel Approach in Burn Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zare

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Context Burn wounds of the skin require a long period to healing, which very often is incomplete, with functional and esthetic consequences for the patients. Stem cells in the traumatized tissue represent the promoters of the healing process and are a primary focus for regenerative medicine, which aims to find and use the triggers for the activation of stem cells of sin tissue. Evidence Acquisition At present, tissue engineering, composite epithelial autografts, multipotent stem cells and combined gene delivery with stem cell therapy are the approaches used in regenerative medicine. Alongside, the development of 3D scaffolds or matrices is a promising adjunct, as studies investigate the multiple uses of these supports for wound repair. Results Application of cells to the burn wound could be performed, either by the bedside, as a non-invasive procedure, or in the operating room, with the use of a matrix, scaffold or dermal substitute. Cell spraying, although under use in clinical setting, is not yet supported by conclusive data. Magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging and positron emission tomography are currently used to assess the viability and location of stem cells, after transplantation. Conclusions Stem cell therapies in wound care may lessen the morbidities associated with wound healing. An ideal method for the effective administration of stem cells for burn patients has not yet been elucidated. Further comparison of the local and systemic effects in burn patients, associated with each route of stem cell delivery, needs to be performed.

  6. Display of nuclear medicine imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine imaging studies involve evaluation of a large amount of image data. Digital signal processing techniques have introduced processing algorithms that increase the information content of the display. Nuclear medicine imaging studies require interactive selection of suitable form of display and pre-display processing. Static imaging study requires pre-display processing to detect focal defects. Point operations (histogram modification) along with zoom and capability to display more than one image in one screen is essential. This album mode of display is also applicable to dynamic, MUGA and SPECT data. Isometric display or 3-D graph of the image data is helpful in some cases e.g. point spread function, flood field data. Cine display is used on a sequence of images e.g. dynamic, MUGA and SPECT imaging studies -to assess the spatial movement of tracer with time. Following methods are used at the investigator's discretion for inspection of the 3-D object. 1) Display of orthogonal projections, 2) Display of album of user selected coronal/ sagital/ transverse orthogonal slices, 3) Display of three orthogonal slices through user selected point, 4) Display of a set of orthogonal slices generated in the user-selected volume, 5) Generation and display of 3-D shaded surface. 6) Generation of volume data and display along with the 3-D shaded surface, 7) Side by side display orthogonal slices of two 3-D objects. Displaying a set of two-dimensional slices of a 3-D reconstructed object through shows all the defects but lacks the 3-D perspective. Display of shaded surface lacks the ability to show the embedded defects. Volume display -combining the 3-D surface and gray level volume data is perhaps the best form of display. This report describes these forms of display along with the theory. (author)

  7. Comparison of tokamak burn cycle options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental confirmation of noninductive current drive has spawned a number of suggestions as to how this technique can be used to extend the fusion burn period and improve the reactor prospects of tokamaks. Several distinct burn cycles, which employ various combinations of Ohmic and noninductive current generation, are possible, and we will study their relative costs and benefits for both a commerical reactor as well as an INTOR-class device. We begin with a review of the burn cycle options

  8. Epidemiology and Statistical Modeling in Burn Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi Bazargani, Homayoun

    2010-01-01

    An important issue in assessing the epidemiology of injuries, including burns, is the investigation of appropriate methodologies and statistical modeling techniques to study injuries in an efficient and trustworthy manner. The overall aim of this thesis is to analyze epidemiological patterns and assess the appropriateness of supervised statistical models to investigate burn risks and patterns. This thesis contains four papers: the first two concern descriptive epidemiology of burns in Arda...

  9. Burn wound coverage and burn wound closure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konigová, R.; Matoušková, Eva; Brož, L.

    2000. s. 9. [International Symposium and Course on Burns and Fire Desaster Management. Jerusalem Meeting /3./. 13.02.2000-16.02.2000, Jerusalem] R&D Projects: GA MZd IZ4368 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Burn healing plants in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Fahimi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Burns are known as one of the most common forms of injury with devastating consequences. Despite the discovery of several antiseptics, burn wound healing has still remained a challenge to modern medicine. Herbal products seem to possess moderate efficacy with no or less toxicity and are less expensive compared to synthetic drugs. Burn is a well-known disorder in Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM. Iranian physicians have divided burns into various types based on the cause and recommended treatment for each type. According to ITM references, herbal therapy was the major treatment prescribed by Iranian physicians for burns. In the present study, seven ancient Iranian medical texts were screened for the herbs with burn healing effects along with their applied dosage forms. The medicinal herbs were listed and scored based on the frequency of their repetition. Moreover, the best scientific name that was suitable for each plant as well as surveying modern studies about their biological effects has been carried out. In our investigation eighteen plants with seven topical application categories have been obtained as the most frequent herbs for burn healing in ITM. Modern studies have revealed that these plants have shown some biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects which might establish the relationship between the mentioned activities and burn wound healing property. This list can provide a suitable resource for future researches in the field of burn treatment.

  11. The Correlation Between the Burning Features, the Burning Agent and Motivation in Burn Victims Attending Shahid Motahari Hospital in Tehran During 2009: letter to Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Aghakhani M.D.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Burning is one of the commonest causes of death. Due to the high rate of death among burn victims epidemiological investigation of burning, burning agents and the relevant motivations can be of great preventive value.1 In this cross-sectional study all the hospitalized patients in Shahid Motahari Burn Hospital at Tehran city in the year 2009 were included in the study. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS (ver. 17 software. Out of the 1548 hospitalized patients for burn, 1134 (73.3% left hospital in good conditions, 47 (3% left in relatively good conditions, 289 (18.7% died and 78 (5% persons left the Hospital satisfactorily on their own volition. About two-thirds of the patients were men. The mean age of the burn victims was 27.9±18.3 years, 16% of them being 5 years old or younger. The highest percentage of burn area was 30% of the total body surface which was seen in 20 to 30-year old patients. 58.7% of burns had been caused by fire. 94% of the burns had happened accidentally, 5% by suicidal and 1% by homicidal acts. The highest percentage of burn was observed in patients in whom the burn agent was fire. Six (4% persons had first degree, 820 (53% persons had second degree and 722 (46.6% had third degree burns. In patients who had committed suicide third degree burns were higher than second degree burns (7.7% vs. 2%. 24.4% of women and 16.6% of men died due to the burns. The rate of death in patients less than 50 years of age was 18% but the figure increased to 24% in those above 50. A burn area less than or more than 10% was, respectively correlated with 2.1% and 22.1% of deaths. 34.8% of the patients with third degree burns and 4.6% of those with second and first degree burns died. 58.3% of the suicidal patient died due to the severity of the burns relative to 16.7% due to other causes. 89 (5.7% patients had respiratory tract burns and the death rate was 58.4% among these patients while the death rate was 16.2% in patients without

  12. Lattice image studies of ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattice imaging in electron microscopy was successfully applied to the study of ordering in alloys. The approach included computer simulation (Mg3Cd), study of atomic arrangements near ordered lattice defects (Ni4Mo), fringe changes during phase transformation, and identification of fringe periodicities in alloys quenched from above the critical ordering temperature. (U.S.)

  13. Biometric study using hyperspectral imaging during stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Sheela; Quoraishee, Shafik; Chan, Gabriel; Short, Kenneth R.

    2010-04-01

    To the casual observer, transient stress results in a variety of physiological changes that can be seen in the face. Although the conditions can be seen visibly, the conditions affect the emissivity and absorption properties of the skin, which imaging spectrometers, commonly referred to as Hyperspectral (HS) cameras, can quantify at every image pixel. The study reported on in this paper, using Hyperspectral cameras, provides a basis for continued study of HS imaging to eventually quantify biometric stress. This study was limited to the visible to near infrared (VNIR) spectral range. Signal processing tools and algorithms have been developed and are described for using HS face data from human subjects. The subjects were placed in psychologically stressful situations and the camera data were analyzed to detect stress through changes in dermal reflectance and emissivity. Results indicate that hyperspectral imaging may potentially serve as a non-invasive tool to measure changes in skin emissivity indicative of a stressful incident. Particular narrow spectral bands in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum seem especially important. Further studies need to be performed to determine the optimal spectral bands and to generalize the conclusions. The enormous information available in hyperspectral imaging needs further analysis and more spectral regions need to be exploited. Non-invasive stress detection is a prominent area of research with countless applications for both military and commercial use including border patrol, stand-off interrogation, access control, surveillance, and non-invasive and un-attended patient monitoring.

  14. Effects of biomass-burning-derived aerosols on precipitation and clouds in the Amazon Basin: a satellite-based empirical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Matsui, T.; Pielke, R. A.; Kummerow, C.

    2006-10-01

    Biomass burning in the Amazon provides strong input of aerosols into the atmosphere, with potential effects on precipitation, cloud properties, and radiative balance. However, few studies to date have systematically examined these effects at the scale of the Amazon Basin, over an entire burning season, using available data sets. We empirically study the relationships of aerosol optical depth (τa) versus rainfall and cloud properties measured from satellites over the entire Brazilian Amazon during the dry, biomass burning seasons (August-October) of 2000 and 2003. Elevated τa was associated with increased rainfall in both 2000 and 2003. With enhanced τa, cloud cover increased significantly, and cloud top temperature/pressure decreased, suggesting higher cloud tops. The cloud droplet effective radius (Re) exhibited minimal growth with cloud height under background levels of τa, while distinct increases in Re at cloud top temperatures below -10°C, indicative of ice formation, were observed with aerosol loading. Although empirical correlations do not unequivocally establish the causal link from aerosols, these results are consistent with previous observational and modeling studies that pointed to dynamical effects from aerosols that invigorate convection, leading to higher clouds, enhanced cloud cover, and stronger rainfall. We speculate that changes in precipitation and cloud properties associated with aerosol loading observed in this study could have important radiative and hydrological effects on the Amazonian climate system. The accelerated forest burning for agricultural land clearing and the resulting enhancements in aerosols and rainfall may even partially account for the observed positive trend in Amazonian precipitation over the past several decades.

  15. Sensitivity studies on the photolysis rates calculation in Amazonian atmospheric chemistry ? Part I: The impact of the direct radiative effect of biomass burning aerosol particles

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, L. M. M.; Longo, K. M.; S. R. Freitas; Tarasova, T.; Plana Fattori, A.; Nobre, C.; Gatti, L. V.

    2005-01-01

    International audience The impact of the direct radiative effect of the aerosol particles on the calculation of the photolysis rates and consequently on the atmospheric chemistry in regional smoke clouds due to biomass burning over the Amazon basin is addressed in this work. It explores a case study for 19 September 2002 at LBA-RACCI-SMOCC (The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment in Amazonia ? Radiation, Cloud, and Climate Interactions ? Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climat...

  16. The safety and efficacy of feracrylum as compared to silver sulfadiazine in the management of deep partial thickness burn: A clinical study report

    OpenAIRE

    Yefta Moenadjat; Rianto Setiabudy; Dalima A.W. Astrawinata; Saukani Gumay

    2008-01-01

    Instead of haemostatic effect, feracrylum provides antibacterial activity; wound improvement has been clinically proven. Feracrylum is a water soluble mixture of incomplete ferrous salt of polyacrylic acid containing 0.05 to 0.5% of iron in physiologic solution (0.85% solution of sodium chloride). A clinical study on safety and efficacy of feracrylum compared to silver sulfadiazine (SSD) was conducted in burn management, since with the widely use of SSD, the sulfadiazine’s disadvantages lead ...

  17. [Burning oral sensation: when is really BMS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadari, Fracesco; Garagiola, Umberto; Dzsida, Eszter; Azzi, Lorenzo; Kálmán, Fanni Sára

    2015-12-01

    The aims and purposes of this systematic review of the international literature are to discuss and clarify some considerations on Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS). Over the last 40 years, many researchers have addressed this disease clinically or experimentally. Thus, the etiology and pathogenesis of BMS remain unclear. We analyzed the etiopathogenesis of Burning Mouth Syndrome and of the burning oral sensation and currently, we could not find a consensus on the diagnosis and classification of BMS. Further studies are required to better understand the pathogenesis of BMS, and a "Gold Standard" classification is required because not every burning sensation in the mouth is BMS. PMID:26863819

  18. Advanced tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new reduced size ITER-RC superconducting tokamak concept is proposed with the goals of studying burn physics either in an inductively driven standard tokamak (ST) mode of operation, or in a quasi-steady state advanced tokamak (AT) mode sustained by non-inductive means. This is achieved by reducing the radiation shield thickness protecting the superconducting magnet by 0.34 m relative to ITER and limiting the burn mode of operation to pulse lengths as allowed by the TF coil warming up to the current sharing temperature. High gain (Q≅10) burn physics studies in a reversed shear equilibrium, sustained by RF and NB current drive techniques, may be obtained. (author)

  19. Functional MR imaging study of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a functional MR study of the shoulder performed with the positioning in which patients were about to complain of shoulder pain. A 0.064-T permanent MR system was used. The effectiveness of this study was evaluated in the diagnosis of rotator cuff impingement syndrome. Thirteen patients (11 males and two female) were examined prospectively. Three-dimensional Fourier transformation coronal images were obtained with patients' arms at the maximal abduction. They were compared with images obtained while patients' arms were at their sides, chiefly from the viewpoint of severity of impingement and intensity change of the supraspinatus muscle

  20. Imaging studies of pyriform sinus fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyriform sinus fistula (PSF) refers to a persistent embryologic third or fourth pharyngeal pouch, which typically presents as a congenital sinus tract that originates from the pyriform sinus. The sinus tract is often diagnosed by a barium study or direct endoscopic inspection. Utilization of advanced imaging studies, including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may aid in the diagnosis of this disease entity. To review the imaging findings of PSF and demonstrate the value of various cross-sectional imaging (US, CT, and MRI) in the diagnosis of PSF. PSF in five children was verified surgically. Preoperative barium esophagography, US, CT, and MRI were performed selectively in these patients. The clinical and imaging findings are reviewed retrospectively. Barium studies demonstrated the sinus tract in all five patients. US, CT, and MRI demonstrated an associated inflammatory process. By utilizing the trumpet maneuver, the presence of sinus tract was evident in two patients during US. The sinus tract is also demonstrated by CT in another patient. Although barium esophagography is advantageous in demonstration of the sinus tract in PSF, US and CT are also capable of showing the sinus tract. The extent of inflammatory process related to PSF is better delineated by US, CT, and MRI. (orig.)

  1. Study on rotating modulator imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Nuclear security and safety is becoming one of the most concerned topics around the world after Fukushima nuclear accident. Recent reports of IAEA show that the potential risks exist internationally and domestically. A good solution of promoting nuclear security and safety is to develop advanced nuclear radiation monitoring technologies including γ-ray imaging. Purpose: In order to improve the sensitivity of a γ-ray imaging system with little increase of system complexity and cost, rotating modulator (RM) imaging technique using non-position-sensitive detectors was first introduced in nuclear monitoring studies. Methods: Modulation pattern of RM system was deduced mathematically and its profile was calculated by a dedicated program written in Matlab. The system sensitivity was analyzed based on the profile. Detector outputs were produced by Monte Carlo simulation. The Noise-Compensating Algebraic Reconstruction (NCAR) algorithm was applied to the image reconstruct from simulated outputs. Results: A RM imaging system has a relative sensitivity of 62% compared with a coded aperture system when detector areas of the two systems are equal. On condition that the detector diameter is 3.8 cm and image distance is 80 cm, an angular resolution of 0.8° is achieved. Conclusion: Based on the simulating results, a RM system design suitable for vehicle and robotic platform is proposed. (authors)

  2. MORBIDITY AND SURVIVAL PROBABILITY IN BURN PATIENTS IN MODERN BURN CARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Pinto, Ruxandra; Kraft, Robert; Nathens, Avery B.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Klein, Matthew B.; Arnoldo, Brett D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Characterizing burn sizes that are associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity is critical because it would allow identifying patients who might derive the greatest benefit from individualized, experimental, or innovative therapies. Although scores have been established to predict mortality, few data addressing other outcomes exist. The objective of this study was to determine burn sizes that are associated with increased mortality and morbidity after burn. Design and Patients Burn patients were prospectively enrolled as part of the multicenter prospective cohort study, Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury Glue Grant, with the following inclusion criteria: 0–99 years of age, admission within 96 hours after injury, and >20% total body surface area burns requiring at least one surgical intervention. Setting Six major burn centers in North America. Measurements and Main Results Burn size cutoff values were determined for mortality, burn wound infection (at least two infections), sepsis (as defined by ABA sepsis criteria), pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and multiple organ failure (DENVER2 score >3) for both children (<16 years) and adults (16–65 years). Five-hundred seventy-three patients were enrolled, of which 226 patients were children. Twenty-three patients were older than 65 years and were excluded from the cutoff analysis. In children, the cutoff burn size for mortality, sepsis, infection, and multiple organ failure was approximately 60% total body surface area burned. In adults, the cutoff for these outcomes was lower, at approximately 40% total body surface area burned. Conclusions In the modern burn care setting, adults with over 40% total body surface area burned and children with over 60% total body surface area burned are at high risk for morbidity and mortality, even in highly specialized centers. PMID:25559438

  3. Studies of a deep burn fuel cycle for the incineration of military plutonium in the GT-MHR using the Monte-Carlo burnup code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deep burn fuel cycle for the incineration of military plutonium in the GT-MHR is studied using the Monte-Carlo burnup code. The irradiation is DF is so rich in fissile isotopes that the TF cannot guarantee a negative reactive feedback, and the presence of erbium as burnable poison is absolutely necessary for the reactivity safety reasons. At beginning of life (BOL) the fuel composed of DF, consisting of fresh military plutonium, after an irradiation period of three years the fuel is reprocessed into post driver fuel (PDF). The mass flow of the GT-MHR fuelled by military plutonium at the equilibrium of the fuel composition shows that 66% of 239Pu is burned in three years and 92% in six years. (authors)

  4. Focused feasibility study for surface soil at the main pits and pushout area, J-field toxic burning pits area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, T.; Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Butler, J. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). J-Field is located within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland. Since World War II, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning/open detonation. Portions of J-Field continue to be used for the detonation and disposal of unexploded ordnance (UXO) by open burning/open detonation under authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  5. A Study of Steganographic Image Security

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this dissertation, sereral key problems in the field of steganographic image security are mainly studied and discussed: (1) A novel kind of image cryptosystem is studied. The encrypted information of secret image is embedded into an ordinary image, which can be transmitted publicly, and it will not cause attention of illegal eavesdropper. The following results are achieved: (a) The image hiding algorithm and its improved algorithm based on wavelet transform and vector quantization are proposed, and both algorithms embed the secret image after taking full advantage of wavelet transform(WT) to compress it. (b) Introducing the CDMA concept in communication theory, a novel kind of image cryptosystem—image hiding cryptosystem of image division multiple access is proposed. We encrypt key information of several secret images and then hide them into an image, which is an ordinary image. After receivers get the image, each receiver can restore corresponding secret image independently. Compared with other image encryption algorithms, our new image hiding cryptosystem can compress secret image data efficiently. Moreover, the security and practicability of our system is better. (2) Digital watermarking is the most important branch of information hiding, which has been the hotspot of international academia. Digital watermarking has been proposed as a solution to the problem of copyright protection of multimedia documents in networked environments. In this field, the following results are achieved: (a) A new frequency information hiding and watermarking algorithm based on WT and Discrete Cosine Transform(DCT) is presented. After compressed by WT, the information of secret image is embedded into DCT domain. The algorithm has good imperceptibility and security and is robust against JPEG compressing and cropping. The algorithm can be used to embed watermark into images, and the watermark may be one 256-color picture or more and more than one secret image can be hidden into a

  6. Epoetin Alpha and Epoetin Zeta: A Comparative Study on Stimulation of Angiogenesis and Wound Repair in an Experimental Model of Burn Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Irrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep second-degree burns are characterized by delayed formation of granulation tissue and impaired angiogenesis. Erythropoietin (EPO is able to stimulate angiogenesis and mitosis, activating vascularization and cell cycle. The aim of our study was to investigate whether two biosimilar recombinant human erythropoietins, EPO-α and EPO-Z, may promote these processes in an experimental model of burn injury. A total of 84 mice were used and a scald burn was produced on the back after shaving, in 80°C water for 10 seconds. Mice were then randomized to receive EPO-α (400 units/kg/day/sc or EPO-Z (400 units/kg/day/sc or their vehicle (100 μL/day/sc 0.9% NaCl solution. After 12 days, both EPO-α and EPO-Z increased VEGF protein expression. EPO-α caused an increased cyclin D1/CDK6 and cyclin E/CDK2 expression compared with vehicle and EPO-Z (p<0.001. Our study showed that EPO-α and EPO-Z accelerated wound closure and angiogenesis; however EPO-α resulted more effectively in achieving complete skin regeneration. Our data suggest that EPO-α and EPO-Z are not biosimilars for the wound healing effects. The higher efficacy of EPO-α might be likely due to its different conformational structure leading to a more efficient cell proliferation and skin remodelling.

  7. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third...... with infected burn wound compared with the burn wound only group. The burn mouse model resembles the clinical situation and provides an opportunity to examine or develop new strategies like new antibiotics and immune therapy, in handling burn wound victims much....

  8. Clustering Approach Towards Image Segmentation: An Analytical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bora, Dibya Jyoti; Gupta, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Image processing is an important research area in computer vision. Image segmentation plays the vital rule in image processing research. There exist so many methods for image segmentation. Clustering is an unsupervised study. Clustering can also be used for image segmentation. In this paper, an in-depth study is done on different clustering techniques that can be used for image segmentation with their pros and cons. An experiment for color image segmentation based on clustering with K-Means a...

  9. Perineal Burns in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ameh AEmmanuel

    2004-01-01

    Perineal burns are not common in childhood but when they occur, they can produce severe complications. Conservative management by open wound care and topical agents is effective in most cases. However, in deep burns and when control of infection proves problematic, diverting colostomy may be necessary to control infection and achieve wound healing and graft take. Burns wound excision and skin grafting may be required in such cases. Contractures of various forms may develop and require plastic...

  10. A STUDY OF IGNITION, PROPAGATION OF BURN AND ACHIEVEMENT OF HIGH-GAIN IN INERTIAL FUSION TARGETS

    OpenAIRE

    Tahir, N.; Long, K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses different ignition models including the volume ignition and a central ignition model. A comparison is made between these two models which shows that the central ignition model is superior to the volume ignition model. It is also demonstrated with the help of computer simulations how one may achieve a central ignition configuration in a reactor-size inertial confinement fusion target. The problem of propagation of burn from the central hot zone into the surrounding cold fu...

  11. The risk of burn injury during long-term oxygen therapy: a 17-year longitudinal national study in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Tanash, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    Hanan A Tanash,1 Fredrik Huss,2,3 Magnus Ekström41Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, 2Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery, Uppsala University, 3Burn Center, Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Uppsala, Uppsala, 4Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Respiratory Medicine & Allergology, Lund University, Lund, SwedenBackg...

  12. The risk of burn injury during long-term oxygen therapy: a 17-year longitudinal national study in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Tanash HA; Huss F; Ekström M

    2015-01-01

    Hanan A Tanash,1 Fredrik Huss,2,3 Magnus Ekström41Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, 2Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery, Uppsala University, 3Burn Center, Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Uppsala, Uppsala, 4Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Respiratory Medicine & Allergology, Lund University, Lund, SwedenBackground: Long-term oxygen ...

  13. PIXE study on effects of coal burning in a coal-fired power station on atmospheric environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight-stage cascade impactors and high-volume samplers were used to collect air particulate matter (APM) at the vicinity of the coal-fired power station in Beijing. Average concentrations for 19 elements in the particles and the TSP (total suspended particles) mass were determined by PIXE analysis and weighing respectively. The effects of coal burning in the power station on the atmospheric environmental pollution are discussed. (orig.)

  14. A case study of aerosol scavenging in a biomass burning plume over eastern Canada during the 2011 BORTAS field experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, J. E.; J. R. Drummond; D. Griffin; J. R. Pierce; Waugh, D. L.; Palmer, P. I.; Parrington, M.; Lee, J. D.; Lewis, A. C.; A. R. Rickard; J. W. Taylor; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Walker, K A; L. Chisholm

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of a long-range smoke transport event recorded on 20-21 July 2011 over Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, during the Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites (BORTAS-B) campaign. Ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers and photometers detected air masses associated with large wild-land fires burning in eastern Manitoba and western Ontario.We investigate a plume with high trace gas amounts but...

  15. A case study of aerosol depletion in a biomass burning plume over Eastern Canada during the BORTAS field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Jonathan E.; Griffin, Debora; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Drummond, James R.; Waugh, David; Palmer, Paul; Chisholm, Lucy; Duck, Thomas J.; Lesins, Glen; Walker, Kaley A.; Hopper, Jason T.; Curry, Kevin R.; Sakamoto, Kimiko M.; Dan, Lin; Kliever, Jenny; O'Neill, Norm

    2013-04-01

    Wild fires started by lightning are a significant source of carbonaceous aerosols and trace gases to the atmosphere. Careful observations of biomass burning plumes are required to quantify the long range transport and chemical evolution of the outflow from these fires. During the summer of 2011 an international effort - the Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites (BORTAS) project - led by the University of Edinburgh, evaluated the chemistry and dynamics of Boreal biomass burning plumes through aircraft, satellite, and ground-based measurements. The Dalhousie Ground Station (DGS), located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, provided ground support to the BORTAS campaign. Two Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTSs) provided solar absorption measurements of trace gases while two photometers provided aerosol optical depths. On 20 July 2011 a plume of elevated carbon monoxide and other trace gases was detected by the FTS instruments at the DGS; however, particulate data gathered from the co-located sun photometer and the Dalhousie Raman Lidar system showed no enhancement of fine-mode aerosol for the initial 7 hours of the event. After that time, particulates increased in abundance and a peak aerosol optical depth of 2.3 was measured on 21 July. FLEXPART trajectory analyses suggest that this plume originated in fires that were burning in Northwestern Ontario and Eastern Manitoba from 17 to 19 July. Despite the sparse observing network in the region, there is ample evidence of a significant lofting event via the same meso-scale convective system that tempered the burning on the 19th. We will provide an overview of this event and present evidence that precipitation scavenging was the most likely mechanism for the observed aerosol/trace gas anomaly. Support for this this research was provided by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  16. Possible indicators for bio-mass burning in a small Swedish city as studied by EDXRF techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the major challenges in air pollution research is to make source apportionment from different sources of pollution. Examples of anthropogenic large sources of global impact are vehicle exhaust, oil and coal fired power and heat plants, industrial emissions and bio-mass burning. The relative contributions of these sources are usually difficult to evaluate due to the complexity of the ambient aerosol. XRS is one of the most reliable methods for giving information on elemental composition and elemental ratios of the aerosol particles. If this information is combined with data on other components in the polluted air there is a better chance of identifying the relative strengths of different pollution sources to the air quality in a specific location. In the present work XRS analysis has been performed on aerosol particles, PM2,5 and PM2,5-10 which were sampled in the centre of the small Swedish city of Vaexjoe, with the special aim to identify the possible contribution of bio-mass burning to the air pollution. In order to identify typical indicators for bio-mass burning principle component analysis was performed on data of elemental contents, black carbon and gaseous species in the aerosol

  17. Effect of burn-up on the radioactivation behavior of cladding hull materials studied using the ORIGEN-S code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of fuel burn-up on the radioactivation behavior of cladding hull materials was investigated using the ORIGEN-S code for various materials of Zircaloy-4, Zirlo, HANA-4, and HANA-6 and for various fuel burn-ups of 30, 45, 60, and 75 GWD/MTU. The Zircaloy-4 material is the only one that does not contain Nb as an alloy constituent, and it was revealed that 125Sb, 125mTe, and 55Fe are the major sources of radioactivity. On the other hand, 93mNb was identified as the most radioactive nuclide for the other materials although minor radioactive nuclides varied owing to their different initial constituents. The radioactivity of 94Nb was of particular focus owing to its acceptance limit against a Korean intermediate-/low-level waste repository. The radioactivation calculation results revealed that only Zircaloy-4 is acceptable for the Korean repository, while the other materials required at least 4,900 of Nb decontamination factor owing to the high radioactivity of 94Nb regardless of the fuel burn-up. A discussion was also made on the feasibility of Zr recovery methods (chlorination and electrorefining) for selective recovery of Zr so that it can be disposed of in the Korean repository. (author)

  18. Magnetic source imaging studies of dyslexia interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, Panagiotis G; Fletcher, Jack M; Denton, Carolyn; Sarkari, Shirin; Billingsley-Marshall, Rebecca; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2006-01-01

    Rapidly accumulating evidence from functional brain imaging studies indicates that developmental reading disability is associated with a functional disruption of the brain circuits that normally develop to support reading-related processes. This article briefly overviews recent advances in methods that capture the anatomical outline and temporal (dynamic) features of regional brain activation during performance of reading tasks. One of these methods, magnetoencephalography (MEG) or magnetic sources imaging (MSI) is described in more detail in the context of investigations of changes in spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity associated with improvement in reading skills in response to various types of educational interventions. PMID:16925476

  19. The protective effects of sildenafil in acute lung injury in a rat model of severe scald burn: A biochemical and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokakin, Ali Kagan; Deveci, Koksal; Kurt, Atilla; Karakus, Boran Cihat; Duger, Cevdet; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Topcu, Omer

    2013-09-01

    Severe burn induces biochemical mediators such as reactive oxygen species that leads to lipid peroxidation which may have a key role in formation of acute lung injury (ALI). Sildenafil is a selective and potent inhibitor of cyclic guanosine monophosphate specific phosphodiesterase-5. Sildenafil preserves alveolar growth, angiogenesis, reduces inflammation and airway reactivity. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different dosages of sildenafil in ALI due to severe scald burn in rats. Twenty-four rats were subjected to 30% total body surface area severe scald injury and were randomly divided into three equal groups as follow: control, 10 and 20mg/kg sildenafil groups. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), activities of glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), catalase (Cat), total oxidative stress (TOS), and total antioxidative capacity (TAC) were measured in both tissues and serums. Oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. A semi-quantitative scoring system was used for the evaluation of histopatological findings. Sildenafil increased Gpx, Cat, TAC and decreased MDA, TOS and OSI. Sildenafil decreased inflammation scores in lungs. Our results reveal that sildenafil is protective against scald burn related ALI by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation and the dosage of 10mg/kg could be apparently better than 20mg/kg. PMID:23313241

  20. Brain imaging studies of sleep disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain imaging studies of narcolepsy (NA)/cataplexy (CA), a typical sleep disorder, are summarized together with techniques of functional and structural imaging means. single photon emission CT (SPECT) is based on the distribution of tracers labeled by single photon emitters like 99mTc and 123I for seeing the blood flow and receptors. PET using positron emitters like 15O and 18F for blood flow and for glucose metabolism, respectively, is of higher resolution and more quantitative than SPECT. Functional MRI (fMRI) depicts the cerebral activity through signal difference by blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD) effect, and MR spectroscopy (MRS) depicts and quantifies biomaterials through the difference of their nuclear chemical shifts in the magnetic field. Morphologic imaging studies involve the measurement of the volume of the region of interest by comparison with the reference region such as the whole brain volume. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has changed to its more advanced surface-based analysis (SBA) of T1-enhanced image. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is based on the tissue water diffusion. Functional SPECT/PET studies have suggested the decrease of blood flow and metabolic activity in the hypothalamus (HT) and other related regions at the conscious resting state, and locally increased blood flow in cingulate gyrus (CG) and amygdaloid complex (AC) at affective CA/PA seizure. fMRI has suggested the hypoactivity of HT and hyperactivity of AC at the seizure. VBM-based studies have not given the consistent results, but DTI studies have suggested an important participation of AC at the seizure. (T.T.)

  1. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with a long-range transported biomass burning plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2015-05-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m above mean sea level on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory is located ~ 3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon, and inorganic ions. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 ± 0.7 μg m-3. On average, organic aerosol components represent the largest mass fraction of the total measured aerosol (60 ± 51%), followed by sulfate (23 ± 28%), nitrate (13 ± 10%), chloride (2 ± 3%), and elemental carbon (2 ± 2%). Water-soluble organic matter (WSOM) extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas had unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. FLEXPART retroplume analyses showed the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). These aged aerosol WSOM compounds had an average O/C ratio of ~ 0.45, which is relatively low compared to O/C ratios of other aged aerosol. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in the WSOM and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of phenolic species suggests

  2. Study on Digital Image Scrambling Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Xue

    2013-01-01

    Encryption algorithm of traditional cryptology has strong safety, but the effect of encrypting images is not good. Digital image scrambling means that a digital image is transformed into a chaotic image which has no evident significance, but the operator can reconstruct the chaotic image into the original image by using the specific algorithm. Image scrambling encryption technology based on chaos theory makes use of chaotic signal to encrypt image data flow, which has the advantages of high s...

  3. Burns and military clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  4. A study of the effects of changing burn-up and gap gaseous compound on the gap convection coefficient (in a hot fuel pin) in VVER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we worked on the result and process of calculation of the gap heat transfer coefficient for a hot fuel pin in accordance with burn-up changes in the VVER-1000 reactor at the Bushehr nuclear power plant (Iran). With regard to the fact that in calculating the fuel gap heat transfer coefficient, various parameters are effective and the need for designing a model is being felt, therefore, in this article we used Ross and Stoute gap model to study impacts of different effective parameters such as thermal expansion and gaseous fission products on the hgap change rate. Over time and with changes in fuel burn-up some gaseous fission products such as xenon, argon and krypton gases are released to the gas mixture in the gap, which originally contained helium. In this study, the composition of gaseous elements in the gap volume during different times of reactor operation was found using ORIGEN code. Considering that the thermal conduction of these gases is lower than that of helium, and by using the Ross and Stoute gap model, we find first that the changes in gaseous compounds in the gap reduce the values of gap thermal conductivity coefficient, but considering thermal expansion (due to burn-up alterations) of fuel and clad resulting in the reduction of gap thickness we find that the gap heat transfer coefficient will augment in a broad range of burn-up changes. These changes result in a higher rate of gap thickness reduction than the low rate of decrease of heat conduction coefficient of the gas in the gap during burn-up. Once these changes have been defined, we can proceed with the analysis of the results of calculations based on the Ross and Stoute model and compare the results obtained with the experimental results for a hot fuel pin as presented in the final safety analysis report of the VVER-1000 reactor at Bushehr. It is noteworthy that the results of accomplished calculations based on the Ross and Stoute model correspond well with the existing

  5. Analysis and Assessment of the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Burned Areas in the Amazon Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francielle da Silva Cardozo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial and temporal distribution of burned areas in Rondônia State, Brazil during the years 2000 to 2011 and evaluate the burned area maps. A Linear Spectral Mixture Model (LSMM was applied to MODIS surface reflectance images to originate the burned areas maps, which were validated with TM/Landsat 5 and ETM+/Landsat 7 images and field data acquired in August 2013. The validation presented a correlation ranging from 67% to 96% with an average value of 86%. The lower correlation values are related to the distinct spatial resolutions of the MODIS and TM/ETM+ sensors because small burn scars are not detected in MODIS images and higher spatial correlations are related to the presence of large fires, which are better identified in MODIS, increasing the accuracy of the mapping methodology. In addition, the 12-year burned area maps of Rondônia indicate that fires, as a general pattern, occur in areas that have already been converted to some land use, such as vegetal extraction, large animal livestock areas or diversified permanent crops. Furthermore, during the analyzed period, land use conversion associated with climatic events significantly influenced the occurrence of fire in Rondônia and amplified its impacts.

  6. In-situ burning of heavy oils and Orimulsion : mid-scale burns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.F.; Fieldhouse, B.; Brown, C.E.; Gamble, L. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Div]|[Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). River Road Environmental Technology Centre; Cooper, D. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    In-situ burning is considered to be a viable means to clean oil spills on water. In-situ burning, when performed under the right conditions, can reduce the volume of spilled oil and eliminate the need to collect, store, transport and dispose of the recovered oil. This paper presented the results of bench-scale in-situ burning tests in which Bunker C, Orimulsion and weathered bitumen were burned outdoors during the winter in burn pans of approximately 1 square metre. Each test was conducted on salt water which caused the separation of the bitumen from the water in the Orimulsion. Small amounts of diesel fuel was used to ignite the heavy oils. Quantitative removal of the fuels was achieved in all cases, but re-ignition was required for the Orimulsion. Maximum efficiency was in the order of 70 per cent. The residue was mostly asphaltenes and resins which cooled to a solid, glass like material that could be readily removed. The study showed that the type of oil burned influences the behaviour of the burns. Bunker C burned quite well and Orimulsion burned efficiently, but re-ignition was necessary. It was concluded that there is potential for burning heavy oils of several types in-situ. 6 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  7. Bacteremia in burned patients admitted to Sina Hospital, Tabriz, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Parviz Saleh; Hamid Noshad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in burn wards is infection, and it is the major reason of death in burn injuries. There are several reasons that make burn victims predisposed to infection. The current study aimed to investigate the role of different factors that have an effect on bacteremia occurrence in burn patients and factors which are relevant to mortality in these patients. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study conducted in a 1...

  8. Epidemiologic Characteristics of Occupational Burns in Yazd, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Seyyed Jalil Mirmohammadi; Amir Houshang Mehrparvar; Kazem Kazemeini; Mehrdad Mostaghaci

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Occupational burns are among the important causes of work-related fatalities and absenteeism. Epidemiologic assessment of these injuries is important to define high-risk jobs. We designed this study to evaluate the epidemiology of occupational burns in Yazd, an industrial province in Iran. Methods: This is a prospective study on work-related burns in a 1-year period (2008-2009). A questionnaire was completed for them about the characteristics of the burn injury. Results: Th...

  9. Validation of the Two Standard MODIS Satellite Burned-Area Products and an Empirically-Derived Merged Product in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon Tsela

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The 500-m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS burned area products, MCD45A1, MCD64A1, and a merged product were validated across six study sites in South Africa using independently-derived Landsat burned-area reference data during the fire season of 2007. The objectives of this study were to: (i investigate the likelihood of the improved detection of small burns through an empirically-derived merged product; (ii quantify the probability of detection by each product using sub-pixel burned area measures; and, (iii compare the mean percent concurrence of burned pixels between the standard products over a ten-year time series in each site. Results show that MCD45A1 presented higher detection probabilities (i.e., 3.0%–37.9% for small fractions ≤50%, whereas MCD64A1 appeared more reliable (i.e., 12.0%–89.2% in detecting large fractions >50% of a burned MODIS pixel, respectively. Overall, the merged product demonstrated improved detection of the burned area in all fractions. This paper also demonstrates that, on average, >50% of MODIS burned pixels temporally concur between the MCD45A1 and MCD64A1 products in each site. These findings have significant implications for fire monitoring in southern Africa and contribute toward the understanding of the range and of the sources of errors present in the MODIS burned area products.

  10. The CP43 Proximal Antenna Complex of Higher Plant Photosystem II Revisited: Modeling and Hole Burning Study. I

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, Nhan C.; Zazubovich, Valter; Reppert, Mike; Neupane, Bhanu; Picorel Castaño, Rafael; Seibert, Michael; Jankowiak, Ryszard J.

    2008-01-01

    The CP43 core antenna complex of photosystem II is known to possess two quasi-degenerate “red”-trap states (Jankowiak, R. et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 11805). It has been suggested recently ( Zazubovich, V.; Jankowiak, R. J. Lumin. 2007, 127, 245) that the site distribution functions of the red states (A and B) are uncorrelated and that narrow holes are burned in the subpopulations of chlorophylls (Chls) from states A and B that are the lowest-energy Chl in their complex and previously ...

  11. Imaging Studies of photodamage and self-healing in disperse orange 11 dye-doped PMMA

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Benjamin; Kuzyk, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    We report on optical imaging studies of self-healing after laser-induced photodamage in disperse orange 11 dye doped into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymer. In particular, the high spatial-contrast image of the damage track made by a line focus pump laser allows the recovery rates to be measured as a function of burn dose using the relationship between transverse distance and pump intensity profile. The time evolution of the damaged population results in an intensity-independent time constant of {\\tau} = 490\\pm23 min, in agreement with independent measurements of the time evolution of amplified spontaneous emission. Also observed is a damage threshold above which the material does not fully recover.

  12. A Systematic Review of the Evolution of Laser Doppler Techniques in Burn Depth Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manaf Khatib

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The introduction of laser Doppler (LD techniques to assess burn depth has revolutionized the treatment of burns of indeterminate depth. This paper will systematically review studies related to these two techniques and trace their evolution. At the same time we hope to highlight current controversies and areas where further research is necessary with regard to LD imaging (LDI techniques. Methods. A systematic search for relevant literature was carried out on PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. Key search terms included the following: “Laser Doppler imaging,” “laser Doppler flow,” and “burn depth.” Results. A total of 53 studies were identified. Twenty-six studies which met the inclusion/exclusion criteria were included in the review. Conclusions. The numerous advantages of LDI over those of LD flowmetry have resulted in the former technique superseding the latter one. Despite the presence of alternative burn depth assessment techniques, LDI remains the most favoured. Various newer LDI machines with increasingly sophisticated methods of assessing burn depth have been introduced throughout the years. However, factors such as cost effectiveness, scanning of topographically inconsistent areas of the body, and skewing of results due to tattoos, peripheral vascular disease, and anaemia continue to be sighted as obstacles to LDI which require further research.

  13. Crusted Scabies in the Burned Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jais Oliver; Alsbjørn, Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to describe a case of crusted scabies (CS) in a burned patient, which was primarily undiagnosed and led to a nosocomial outbreak in the burn unit; 2) to analyze and discuss the difficulties in diagnosing and treating this subset of patients with burn injury; and...... 3) to design a treatment strategy for future patients. Case analysis and literature review were performed. The index patient had undiagnosed crusted scabies (sive Scabies norvegica) with the ensuing mite hyperinfestation when admitted to the department with minor acute dermal burns. Conservative...... healing and autograft healing were impaired because of the condition. Successful treatment of the burns was only accomplished secondarily to scabicide treatment. An outbreak of scabies among staff members indirectly led to diagnosis. CS is ubiquitous, and diagnosis may be difficult. This is the first...

  14. Epidemiology and screening of intentional burns in children in a Dutch burn centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousema, Sara; Stas, Helene G; van de Merwe, Marjolijn H; Oen, Irma M M H; Baartmans, Martin G A; van Baar, Margriet E

    2016-09-01

    International estimates of the incidence of non-accidental burns (NAB) in children admitted to burn centres vary from 1% to 25%. Hardly any data about Dutch figures exist. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence, treatment and outcome of burns due to suspected child abuse in paediatric burns. We described the process of care and outcome, including the accuracy of the SPUTOVAMO screening tool and examined child, burn and treatment characteristics related to suspicions of child abuse or neglect. A retrospective study was conducted in children aged 0-17 years with a primary admission after burn injuries to the burn centre Rotterdam in the period 2009-2013. Data on patient, injury and treatment characteristics were collected, using the Dutch Burn Repository R3. In addition, medical records were reviewed. In 498 paediatric admissions, suspected child abuse or neglect was present in 43 children (9%). 442 screening questionnaires (89%) were completed. In 52 out of 442 questionnaires (12%) the completed SPUTOVAMO had one or more positive signs. Significant independent predictors for suspected child abuse were burns in the genital area or buttocks (OR=3.29; CI: 143-7.55) and a low socio-economic status (OR=2.52; 95%CI: 1.30-4.90). The incidence of suspected child abuse indicating generation of additional support in our population is comparable to studies with a similar design in other countries. PMID:27211360

  15. Self-burning versus self-cutting: patterns and implications of self-mutilation; a preliminary study of differences between self-cutting and self-burning in a Japanese juvenile detention center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Chiba, Yasuhiko; Asami, Takeshi; Iseki, Eizo; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to examine the differences in clinical features between self-cutters and self-burners, to clarify clinical implications of self-mutilating behaviors other than self-cutting. Subjects were 201 delinquent adolescents consecutively entering a Japanese juvenile detention center from February 2003 to March 2003. The subjects were assessed using a self-reporting questionnaire to evaluate self-mutilation, traumatic events, and problematic behaviors. Beck Depression Inventory-2 (BDI-2) and Adolescent Dissociative Experience Scale (A-DES) were also tested. Subjects were classified into four groups according to self-mutilating behaviors: non-self-cutting or -burning (NSCB), self-cutting (SC), self-burning (SB), and self-cutting and self-burning (SCB). The questionnaire answers and scores of the BDI-2 and A-DES were compared between the four groups. Of 201 subjects, 33 (16.4%) had cut their wrists or forearms at least once, and 72 of 201 (35.8%) had burned themselves at least once. The SC and SCB group had traumatic events, problematic behavior, and various types of self-mutilating behavior more frequently than the other two groups. The SCB group reported additional types of self-mutilating behavior more than the SC group. The SCB group also experienced multiple body customizations compared to the SC group, and exhibited higher scores on the BDI-2 and A-DES than the other three groups. The self-burning without self-cutting may have limited clinical implications. However, the self-burning with self-cutting may suggest depression and dissociation, as well as possible indication of self-mutilating behavior. PMID:15679542

  16. Hole burning study of cyanobacterial Photosystem II complexes differing in the content of small putative chlorophyll-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contribution presents low-temperature absorption, both broad-band and site-selective excited fluorescence, and persistent hole burning spectra of Photosystem II complexes from the Photosystem I-lacking strains of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 differing in the content of small putative chlorophyll-binding proteins (Scps). These proteins are homologous to light-harvesting complex of higher plants and may bind pigments. The excited state lifetimes of the complexes were determined from zero-phonon hole widths extrapolated to zero-burning dose. The area and spectral position of a phonon side-band with respect to the zero-phonon hole provided additional information concerning chlorophyll-protein coupling and the Stokes shift. Decrease of three absorption subbands at (670.0, 672.9, and 675.7 nm) in the Photosystem II isolated from the strain lacking ScpC and ScpD is in agreement with a hypothesis about the role of Scps in the chlorophyll binding. In addition, narrowing of the zero-phonon hole in Photosystem II without both Scps indicates slowering of the excitation energy transfer which may be explained by the absence of a protective excitation energy quenching related to the presence of Scps

  17. Phenomenological study of posttraumatic growth of severe burn patients%严重烧伤患者创伤后成长的现象学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚贵芹; 张爱华

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨严重烧伤患者创伤后成长的维度和促进因素。方法采用现象学研究方法,对本院接受治疗的严重烧伤康复期的患者,进行目的性抽样,抽取20例患者进行半结构式深度访谈。结果创伤后成长的促进因素包括:感情宣泄,社会比较,意义应对,自我效能;分析出PTG的3个结构维度:精神寄托,欣赏生活,苦难衍生。结论此次访谈收获的烧伤患者的创伤后成长维度和促进因素与其他研究具有共同点和不同之处。%Objective To explore the dimensions and positive influences of posttraumatic growth of severe burn patients.Methods Phenomenological method was used in the study. A depth interview was conducted on 20 severe burn patients who were treated in our hospital and recruited by purposive sampling method.Results The positive influences of posttraumatic growth included emotional catharsis, social comparison, meaning response and self-efficacy. The factors which contributed to posttraumatic growth were spiritual sustenance, enjoying life and derivative sufferings.Conclusion There are common points and differences between our study and other studies on the positive influences and dimensions of posttraumatic growth of severe burn patients.

  18. Burn injuries in eastern Zambia: impact of multidisciplinary teaching teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Dianna; Heard, Jason; Latenser, Barbara A; Quinn, Keely Y; van Bruggen, Jaap; Jovic, Goran

    2011-01-01

    The American Burn Association/Children's Burn Foundation (ABA/CBF) sponsors teams who offer burn education to healthcare providers in Zambia, a sub-Saharan country. The goals of this study are 1) to acquire burn-patient demographics for the Eastern Province, Zambia and 2) to assess the early impact of the ABA/CBF-sponsored burn teams. This is a retrospective chart review of burn patients admitted in one mission hospital in Katete, Zambia, July 2002 to June 2009. July 2002 to December 2006 = data before ABA/CBF burn teams and January 2007 to June 2009 = burn care data during/after burn outreach. There were 510 burn patients hospitalized, male:female ratio 1.2:1. Average age = 15.6 years, with 44% younger than 5 years. Average TBSA burned = 11% and mean fatal TBSA = 25%. Average hospital length of stay = 16.9 days survivors and 11.6 days nonsurvivors. Most common mechanisms of burn injuries: flame (52%) and scald (41%). Ninety-two patients (18%) died and 23 (4.5%) left against medical advice. There were 191 (37.4%) patients who underwent 410 surgical procedures (range 1-13/patient). There were 138 (33.7%) sloughectomies, 118 (28.7%) skin grafts, 39 (9.5%) amputations, and 115 (28.1%) other procedures. Changes noted in the 2007 to 2009 time period: more patients had burn diagrams (48.6 vs 27.6%, P set for a sub-Saharan region in Africa. There has been a statistically significant improvement in documentation of burn size as well as administration of analgesics, validating the efficacy of the ABA/CBF-sponsored burn teams. Continued contact with burn teams may lead to increased use of resuscitation fluids, topical antimicrobials, and more patients undergoing operative intervention, translating into improved burn patient outcomes. PMID:21131848

  19. CASE REPORT Playing Football Burns More Than Just Calories

    OpenAIRE

    Wain, Richard A. J.; Shah, Syed H. A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To highlight the case of a sports-related alkali burn due to a common household chemical and emphasize the importance of a detailed medical history in chemical burns patients. Methods: A single-patient case study is presented along with references from existing literature. Results: Alkaline burn injuries associated with sports have previously been described in the literature; however, this case demonstrates an unusual presentation of a chemical burn with a readily available househo...

  20. Optimizing advanced liquid metal reactors for burning actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the process to design an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) for burning the transuranic part of nuclear waste is discussed. The influence of design parameters on ALMR burner performance is studied and the results are incorporated in a design schedule for optimizing ALMRs for burning transuranics. This schedule is used to design a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR burner to burn as much as possible transurancis. The two designs burn equally well. (orig.)

  1. Exercise behaviors and barriers to exercise in adult burn survivors: A questionnaire survey

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Baldwin; Frank Li

    2013-01-01

    Exercise is a key component of burn rehabilitation across all phases of care. Supervised outpatient exercise programs have been shown to improve outcomes following burn injury. However, little is known about the exercise behaviors of burn survivors who do not undertake such programs. This study aimed to investigate self-reported exercise behaviors and barriers to exercise in adult burn survivors. A short questionnaire survey was conducted on adult burn survivors attending the ambulatory burns...

  2. Burn wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers weight loss in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Su Grace; Lehnhardt Marcus; Jacobsen Frank; Fan Ming H; Burkhard Olaf; Steinstraesser Lars; Daigeler Adrien; Steinau Hans U; Remick Daniel; Wang Stewart C

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite dramatic improvements in the management of burns, infection still remains a serious risk for the burn patient. The aim of this study was to shed light on the impact of acute burn injury with or without infection on cytokine profiles. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 21) were randomized into three groups: 1) burn only 2) burn and infection or 3) sham burn. Weight was monitored and blood was collected for cytokine ELISA, LPS quantification, and peripheral blood analy...

  3. Suicidal burn in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, R C; Burd, A

    2012-09-01

    The aim of our study is to review our experience in the management of patients who sustained burns associated with suicidal attempts over a 10-year period. In particular, we look into the outcome and incidence of self-harm/suicide after discharge among the survivors. Thirty-one patients with median age 36 years, ranging from 10 to 74, were included. Twenty-three (74%) were males and eight (26%) were females. Nearly three quarters (74%) of our patients had a known history of psychiatric illness: 11 had known history of substance abuse; 3 of them had drug-induced psychosis; 6 had schizophrenia; 5 had depression; 4 had personality disorders; 1 had pathological gambling and another one had adjustment disorder. Relationship problems and work/financial difficulties were the commonest reason for the suicidal attempts. Self-inflicted flame burn was the most frequent (39%; 12 patients) method of burning. Six patients (19%) died. The remaining 25 patients healed and were discharged. Seventeen patients required ICU care. The median length of stay in ICU was 7 days. The overall median length of stay was 35 days. The median follow up time for those survived is 63 months. Only 4 of these patients had further suicidal/parasuicidal attempts. Despite the high mortality, once these patients survived the initial injury, they are unlikely to commit suicide again. Thus, we believe that aggressive resuscitation should therefore be advocated for all suicidal burn patients. PMID:22360959

  4. Internet-based information and self-help program for parents of children with burns: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Josefin Sveen; Gerhard Andersson; Lisa Ekselius; Folke Sjöberg; Bo Buhrman; Mimmie Willebrand

    2015-01-01

    Background: A burn is one of the most traumatic and painful injuries a child can experience and it is also a very stressful experience for the parents. Given the great psychological distress and perceived lack of multi-professional support experienced by the parents, there is a need for support during in-hospital treatment as well as during recovery. The aim of the study is to develop and evaluate an internet-based information and self-help program for parents of children who have been hospit...

  5. Characterization of burn injuries using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, M. Hassan; Dickey, Trevor C.; Winebrenner, Dale P.; Chen, Antao; Mourad, Pierre D.

    2011-03-01

    The accuracy rates of the clinical assessment techniques used in grading burn injuries remain significantly low for partial thickness burns. In this paper, we present experimental results from terahertz characterization of 2nd and 3rd degree burn wounds induced on a rat model. Reflection measurements were obtained from the surface of both burned and normal skin using pulsed terahertz spectroscopy. Signal processing techniques are described for interpretation of the acquired terahertz waveform and differentiation of burn wounds. Furthermore, the progression of burn injuries is shown by comparison between acute characterization and 72-hours survival studies. While the water content of healthy and desiccated skin has been considered as a source of terahertz signal contrast, it is demonstrated that other biological effects such as formation of post-burn interstitial edema as well as the density of the discrete scattering structures in the skin (such as hair follicles, sweat glands, etc.) play a significant role in the terahertz response of the burn wounds.

  6. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans burn infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Wang, Yucheng; Murray, Clinton K.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Gu, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2015-05-01

    In this preclinical study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans infection in acutely burned mice. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to blue light inactivation were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocyte. In vitro serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure was performed to evaluate the potential development of resistance to blue light inactivation. A mouse model of acute thermal burn injury infected with the bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was developed. Blue light (415 nm) was delivered to mouse burns for decolonization of C. albicans. Bioluminescence imaging was used to monitor in real time the extent of fungal infection in mouse burns. Experimental results showed that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to blue light inactivation in vitro than human keratinocyte (P=0.0022). Serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure implied a tendency for the fungal susceptibility to blue light inactivation to decrease with the numbers of passages. Blue light reduced fungal burden by over 4-log10 (99.99%) in acute mouse burns infected with C. albicans in comparison to infected mouse burns without blue light therapy (P=0.015).

  7. Recent shift from forest to savanna burning in the Amazon Basin observed by satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numbers of fires detected on forest, savanna and transition lands during the 2002–10 biomass burning seasons in Amazonia are shown using fire count data and co-located land cover classifications from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The ratio of forest fires to savanna fires has varied substantially over the study period, with a maximum ratio of 0.65:1 in 2005 and a minimum ratio of 0.27:1 in 2009, with the four lowest years occurring in 2007–10. The burning during the droughts of 2007 and 2010 is attributed to a higher number of savanna fires relative to the drought of 2005. A decrease in the regional mean single scattering albedo of biomass burning aerosols, consistent with the shift from forest to savanna burning, is also shown. During the severe drought of 2010, forest fire detections were lower in many areas compared with 2005, even though the drought was more severe in 2010. This result suggests that improved fire management practices, including stricter burning regulations as well as lower deforestation burning, may have reduced forest fires in 2010 relative to 2005 in some areas of the Amazon Basin. (letter)

  8. Etiology of Burn Injuries Among 0-6 Aged Children in One University Hospital Burn Unit, Bursa, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neriman Akansel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background; Children whose verbal communications are not fully developed are the ones at risk for burn injuries. Causes of burn injuries vary among different age groups and scald injuries are the common cause of burn injuries among children. The majority of burns result from contact with thermal agents such as flame, hot surfaces, or hot liquids.Aim: The aim of this study was to determine etiologic factors of the burn injured children Methods: Data were collected for burn injured children treated in Uludag University Medical Hospital Burn Unit between January 2001 – December 2008. Patients’ demographic variables, etiology of burn injury, TBSA(total body surface area, degree of the burn injury, duration of hospitalization was detected from medical records of the hospitalized patients.Results: The mean age of the children was 2.5±1.5 (median=2. Although 4.6 % of burned patients were under one year of age, most of the children (67.8% were between 1-3 years. All of the patients were burned as a result of accident and house environment was the place where the burn incident occurred. Burn injuries occurredmostly during summer (29.9% and spring (28.7%. Scald injuries (75.3% were mostly seen burn injury types all among other burn injuries.Conclusions: Lack of supervision and observation are usually the most common causes of burn injuries in children. Statistical differences were found among age groups according to their burn etiology (p<0.05. An effect of TBSA on patient survival was statistically significant (p<0.000 and also statistically significant results were seen among age groups according to their TBSA’s (p<0.005.

  9. The safety and efficacy of feracrylum as compared to silver sulfadiazine in the management of deep partial thickness burn: A clinical study report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yefta Moenadjat

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Instead of haemostatic effect, feracrylum provides antibacterial activity; wound improvement has been clinically proven. Feracrylum is a water soluble mixture of incomplete ferrous salt of polyacrylic acid containing 0.05 to 0.5% of iron in physiologic solution (0.85% solution of sodium chloride. A clinical study on safety and efficacy of feracrylum compared to silver sulfadiazine (SSD was conducted in burn management, since with the widely use of SSD, the sulfadiazine’s disadvantages lead to wound healing impairment. In this open, randomized, controlled study, feracrylum and SSD were topically applied, each on different side of the burnt areas in parts of body for a treatment period of eleven days. Of eight enrolled patients, seven patients completed the study; one patient withdrew due to acute burn complication. On day 7th and 11th, the re-epithelialization in group receiving feracrylum increased as the raw surface area reduced. Mean percentages of epithelialization on both evaluation days in Feracrylum group were 70.53±24.298 and 81.71±28.922, respectively, which were higher than SSD group (66.15±25.080 and 64.64±74.684 respectively. Feracrylum was found to be safe and well tolerated. This study showed a clinical difference although it was not significant statistically. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 259-71Keywords: Feracrylum, silver sulfadiazine, wound management

  10. Biomass burning influences on atmospheric composition: A case study to assess the impact of aerosol data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keslake, Tim; Chipperfield, Martyn; Mann, Graham; Flemming, Johannes; Remy, Sam; Dhomse, Sandip; Morgan, Will

    2016-04-01

    The C-IFS (Composition Integrated Forecast System) developed under the MACC series of projects and to be continued under the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring System, provides global operational forecasts and re-analyses of atmospheric composition at high spatial resolution (T255, ~80km). Currently there are 2 aerosol schemes implemented within C-IFS, a mass-based scheme with externally mixed particle types and an aerosol microphysics scheme (GLOMAP-mode). The simpler mass-based scheme is the current operational system, also used in the existing system to assimilate satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for improved forecast capability. The microphysical GLOMAP scheme has now been implemented and evaluated in the latest C-IFS cycle alongside the mass-based scheme. The upgrade to the microphysical scheme provides for higher fidelity aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting for global variations in size distribution and mixing state, and additional aerosol properties such as cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. The new scheme will also provide increased aerosol information when used as lateral boundary conditions for regional air quality models. Here we present a series of experiments highlighting the influence and accuracy of the two different aerosol schemes and the impact of MODIS AOD assimilation. In particular, we focus on the influence of biomass burning emissions on aerosol properties in the Amazon, comparing to ground-based and aircraft observations from the 2012 SAMBBA campaign. Biomass burning can affect regional air quality, human health, regional weather and the local energy budget. Tropical biomass burning generates particles primarily composed of particulate organic matter (POM) and black carbon (BC), the local ratio of these two different constituents often determining the properties and subsequent impacts of the aerosol particles. Therefore, the model's ability to capture the concentrations of these two

  11. Predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months post-burn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chondronikola, Maria; Meyer, Walter J.; Sidossis, Labros S.; Ojeda, Sylvia; Huddleston, Joanna; Stevens, Pamela; Børsheim, Elisabet; Suman, Oscar E.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injury is a dramatic event with acute and chronic consequences including insulin resistance. However, factors associated with insulin resistance have not been previously investigated. Purpose To identify factors associated with long-term insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors. Methods The study sample consisted of 61 pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months after the burn injury, who underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. To assess insulin resistance, we calculated the area under the curve for glucose and insulin. The diagnostic criteria of the American Diabetes Association were used to define individuals with impaired glucose metabolism. Additional data collected include body composition, anthropometric measurements, burn characteristics and demographic information. The data were analyzed using multivariate linear regression analysis. Results Approximately 12% of the patients met the criteria for impaired glucose metabolism. After adjusting for possible confounders, burn size, age and percent body fat were associated with the area under the curve for glucose (p<0.05 for all). Time post-burn and lean mass were inversely associated with the area under the curve for glucose (p<0.05 for both). Similarly, older age predicted higher insulin area under the curve. Conclusion A significant proportion of pediatric injury survivors suffer from glucose abnormalities 24–36 months post-burn. Burn size, time post-burn, age, lean mass and adiposity are significant predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors. Clinical evaluation and screening for abnormal glucose metabolism should be emphasized in patients with large burns, older age and survivors with high body fat. PMID:24918945

  12. Comparative Study of Image Registration Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya S. Kothalkar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of image registration is to match two or more images captured at different times by different sensors or by different angles or from different viewpoints. Image registration has become a crucial step in most of the image processing tasks used in various areas. It is a key technology which is applied for computer vision, remote sensing, image processing, medical image analysis and other fields. Medical image registration is used to find a spatial transformation to match all the anatomical points and diagnostic points on the image. In general, the majority of registration methods consist of the following four steps: feature extraction, feature matching, transform modeling, and finally image resampling. The accuracy of a registration process is highly dependent to the feature extraction and matching methods. Cross Correlation is the basic statistical approach to image registration. It is used for template matching or pattern recognition. Template is considered as a sub-image from the reference image, and the image is considered as a sensed image. The objective is to establish the correspondence between the reference image and sensed image. It gives the measure of the degree of similarity between an image and template, which can be used for image registration. Normalized Cross Correlation (NCC method is improved by using Feature Based Method. Image are effectively represented by any of its feature such as edges, points, curves etc. and these features are effectively used for image registration. Images are applied with the filters to extract edges. Post that NCC is done to find the sharp point on NCC plot. This method restricts us with only monomodal images. For multimodal images we have used Mutual Information as a measure of similarity. A widely used measure is Mutual Information (MI. This method requires estimating joint histogram of the two images. Experiments are presented that demonstrate the approach. The technique is

  13. A case study on long-range transported aerosols of biomass burning: effects on aerosol optical properties and surface radiation levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arola

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2006, biomass burning aerosols from eastern Europe were transported extensively to Finland, and to other parts of northern Europe. They were observed as far as in the European Arctic. In the first part of this paper, temporal and spatial evolution and transport of these biomass burning aerosols are monitored with MODIS retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD imagery at visible wavelengths (0.55 μm. Comparison of MODIS and AERONET AOD is conducted at Tõravere, Estonia. Then trajectory analyses, as well as MODIS Fire Mapper products are used to better understand the type and origin of the air masses. During the studied four-week period AOD values ranged from near zero up to 1.2 at 0.55 μm and the linear correlation between MODIS and AERONET was very high (~0.97. Temporal variability observed within this four-week period was also rather well explained by the trajectory analysis in conjunction with the fire detections produced by the MODIS Rapid Response System. In the second part of our study, the surface measurements of global and UV radiation at Jokioinen, Finland are used to study the effect of this haze episode on the levels of surface radiation. We found reductions up to 35% in surface UV irradiance (at 340 nm as compared to typical aerosol conditions. For global (total solar radiation, the reduction was always smaller, in line with the expected wavelength dependence of the aerosol effect.

  14. Prescribed burning plan : Stillwater NWR : de Braga Burn Unit 67

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This 1991 Annual Prescribed Burning Plan for Stillwater NWR calls for all 67 acres of the de Braga burn unit to be burned. The objective of this burn is to remove...

  15. Fusion in the Era of Burning Plasma Studies: Workforce Planning for 2004 to 2014. Final report to FESA C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-03-29

    This report has been prepared in response to Dr. R. Orbach’s request of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) to “address the issue of workforce development in the U.S. fusion program.” The report addresses three key questions: what is the current status of the fusion science, technology, and engineering workforce; what is the workforce that will be needed and when it will be needed to ensure that the U.S. is an effective partner in ITER and to enable the U.S. to successfully carry out the fusion program; and, what can be done to ensure a qualified, diversified, and sufficiently large workforce and a pipeline to maintain that workforce? In addressing the charge, the Panel considers a workforce that allows for a vigorous national program of fusion energy research that includes participation in magnetic fusion (ITER) and inertial fusion (NIF) burning plasma experiments.

  16. Study of slagging in and blowout of P-59 boiler furnace screens during the burning of Moscow-area coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzenko, S.I.; Vasil' ev, V.V.; Serebryanikov, N.I.; Panchenko, V.F.; Meelak, Kh.O.; Khaikin, I.B.; Perevezentsev, V.P.

    1978-03-01

    The operation of the burners of the P-59 boilers at the Ryazan GRES, burning Moscow area brown coal, is characterized by intense slagging of the LRP screens, especially in the zone of maximum heat formation, causing a particularly severe screen cleaning problem. The thermal efficiency of screen cleaning by steam blowout using OM-0.35 devices is low even with intense use (every 2 hours), which is accompanied by dangerous steam-ash erosion of the tubes. Water blowout of the LRP (lower radiative part) of the P-59 boiler with four long-range M-3A devices is rather effective. Under conditions of intense formation of deposits on the screens of the lower radiative part of P-59 boilers they cannot be brought up to an operationally clean state using known cleaning methods.

  17. The CP43 proximal antenna complex of higher plant photosystem II revisited: modeling and hole burning study. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Nhan C; Zazubovich, Valter; Reppert, Mike; Neupane, Bhanu; Picorel, Rafael; Seibert, Michael; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2008-08-14

    The CP43 core antenna complex of photosystem II is known to possess two quasi-degenerate "red"-trap states (Jankowiak, R. et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 11805). It has been suggested recently (Zazubovich, V.; Jankowiak, R. J. Lumin. 2007, 127, 245) that the site distribution functions of the red states (A and B) are uncorrelated and that narrow holes are burned in the subpopulations of chlorophylls (Chls) from states A and B that are the lowest-energy Chl in their complex and previously thought not to transfer energy. This model of uncorrelated excitation energy transfer (EET) between the quasidegenerate bands is expanded by taking into account both electron-phonon and vibrational coupling. The model is applied to fit simultaneously absorption, emission, zero-phonon action, and transient hole burned (HB) spectra obtained for the CP43 complex with minimized contribution from aggregation. It is demonstrated that the above listed spectra can be well-fitted using the uncorrelated EET model, providing strong evidence for the existence of efficient energy transfer between the two lowest energy states, A and B (either from A to B or from B to A), in CP43. Possible candidate Chls for the low-energy A and B states are discussed, providing a link between CP43 structure and spectroscopy. Finally, we propose that persistent holes originate from regular NPHB accompanied by the redistribution of oscillator strength due to excitonic interactions, rather than photoconversion involving Chl-protein hydrogen bonding, as suggested before ( Hughes J. L. et al. Biochemistry 2006, 45, 12345 ). In the accompanying paper (Reppert, M.; Zazubovich, V.; Dang, N. C.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R. J. Phys. Chem. B 2008, 9934), it is demonstrated that the model discussed in this manuscript is consistent with excitonic calculations, which also provide very good fits to both transient and persistent HB spectra obtained under non-line-narrowing conditions. PMID:18642949

  18. Childhood burns in south eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoro Philemon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burns injuries are recognized as a major health problem worldwide. In children and, particularly, in our environment where poverty, ignorance and disease are still high, they constitute significant morbidity and mortality. Previous studies on this topic in parts of Nigeria either lumped adults and children together or were retrospective. We, therefore, prospectively studied the current trends in burns in children. Patients and Methods: This prospective study of burns spanned over a period of 18 months (June 2006-December 2007 at the Paediatric Surgery Units of the Imo State University Teaching Hospital, Orlu, and the Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, Imo State. Data were collected and analysed for age, sex, cause/type of burn, place of burn, presence or absence of adult/s, initial prehospital intervention, interval between injury and presentation, surface area and depth of burn and treatment and outcome. Results: Fifty-three patients were studied, 31 (58.4% were male and 22 (41.6% were female (M:F = 1.4:1. Patients mostly affected were aged 2 years and below. The most common cause of burns was hot water in 31 (58.5% patients. The vast majority of these injuries happened in a domestic environment (92.5% and in the presence of competent adult/s (88.7%. Outcome of treatment was good: there were two (3.8% deaths and 46 (86% patients had complete recovery. Conclusion: Burns is still a major health problem among children in south eastern Nigeria. Fortunately, outcome of appropriate treatment is good. However, we think that poor safety consciousness among parents is a major predisposing factor. Public enlightenment on measures to ensure safe home environment may be necessary to avoid or limit childhood burns.

  19. Automatic Web Image Categorization by Image Content:A case study with Web Document Images

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.Murugappan S; Abirami S; Mizpha Poorana Selvi S

    2010-01-01

    Crawling in Web images has become a challenging problem today due to its rising popularity. Among the most valuable Web assets, Categorizing images on the Web is quite difficult. This paper proposes a simple and effective method to separate the Document Images from the available web image sources. This system concentrates on Automatic Image categorization process over web images by employing a filtering technique to discriminate the document images, available in WWW. The strength of this tech...

  20. Seasonal, interannual, and long-term variabilities in biomass burning activity over South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, P; Naja, M; Kumar, R; Chandola, H C

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal, interannual, and long-term variations in biomass burning activity and related emissions are not well studied over South Asia. In this regard, active fire location retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Terra, and tropospheric column NO2 from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) are used to understand the effects of biomass burning on the tropospheric pollution loadings over South Asia during 2003-2013. Biomass burning emission estimates from Global Fire Emission Database (GFED) and Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) are also used to quantify uncertainties and regional discrepancies in the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and black carbon (BC) due to biomass burning in South Asia. In the Asian continent, the frequency of fire activity is highest over Southeast Asia, followed by South Asia and East Asia. The biomass burning activity in South Asia shows a distinct seasonal cycle that peaks during February-May with some differences among four (north, central, northeast, and south) regions in India. The annual biomass burning activity in north, central, and south regions shows an increasing tendency, particularly after 2008, while a decrease is seen in northeast region during 2003-2013. The increase in fire counts over the north and central regions contributes 24 % of the net enhancement in fire counts over South Asia. MODIS AOD and OMI tropospheric column NO2 retrievals are classified into high and low fire activity periods and show that biomass burning leads to significant enhancement in tropospheric pollution loading over both the cropland and forest regions. The enhancement is much higher (110-176 %) over the forest region compared to the cropland (34-62 %) region. Further efforts are required to understand the implications of biomass burning on the regional air quality and climate of South Asia. PMID:26503008

  1. A Burning Question

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN XINZHEN

    2010-01-01

    @@ As heaping piles of garbage grow in cities and communities across China,a divide has formed over two possible solutions to this smelly problem: Should excessive mounds of trash be burned,or should it be buried?

  2. Advances in burn treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lahoda, LU; Vogt, PM

    2006-01-01

    The German-speaking burn specialist, organized in the DAV (Deutsche Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Verbrennungsmedizin) held their yearly meeting in 2004 in Rottach-Egern, Bavaria. Participants from Switzerland, Germany and Austria found a high standing, very well organized and thorough program summoned by the host, Dr. Guido Graf Henckel von Donnersmarck, Munich. The topics consisted of reconstructive surgery, skin substitutes and replacement, advances in burn medicine over the last 10 years and bu...

  3. Burning mouth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Jimson; Rajesh, E.; R Jayasri Krupaa; M. Kasthuri

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a debilitating medical condition affecting nearly 1.3 million of Americans. Its common features include a burning painful sensation in the mouth, often associated with dysgeusia and xerostomia, despite normal salivation. Classically, symptoms are better in the morning, worsen during the day and typically subside at night. Its etiology is largely multifactorial, and associated medical conditions may include gastrointestinal, urogenital, psychiatric, neurologic and met...

  4. Factors affecting mortality in patients with burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Erbiş

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The increase in life quality and expectancy causes an increase in the elderly population. Improvements in burn treatment resulted in decreased mortality in children and young adults but in elderly patients burns are still an important trauma that should be handed differently than other age groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors effecting mortality in patients with burns over 45 years old. Methods: Fifty-eight patients over 45 years of age, who were treated in our burns unit in the last 3 years were included in our study. Their age, burn percentage and depth, coexisting diseases and mortality rates were examined retrospectively. Results: The average age of surviving patients was 57.4 years while it was 70 years for nonsurviving patients (p=0.002. The width of burn area was 21.1 % in surviving and 50 % in nonsurviving patients (p<0.01. The effect of additional coexistent diseases on mortality was significant (p=0.001. The most common reasons of mortality were sepsis and congestive heart failure. Conclusion: We found out that the age, percentage of burns and coexistent diseases had a negative effect on success of treatment and mortality. Mortality rates will decrease in these cases with careful follow-up and a multidisciplinary approach. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (3: 240-243

  5. Cubital tunnel syndrome caused by hypertrophic burn scarring: Sonographic envisage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alparslan Bayram Carli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In nerve entrapment syndromes, an electrodiagnostic study during physical examination would usually suffice to assess localization of injury. However, in daily clinical practice, sometimes it may be necessary to depict the insight; in other words to use an imaging tool. From this point of view, with its manifold advantages, ultrasound (US is superior to other imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. According to a study, US increased the sensitivity of electrodiagnostic studies from 78% to 98%. By presenting a patient with cubital tunnel syndrome caused by hypertrophic scarring, we wanted to highlight the complementary role of US in nerve entrapment syndromes in confirming the entrapment, as well as the usefulness of it in the follow-up period of burn patients. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(2.000: 44-46

  6. Automatic Web Image Categorization by Image Content:A case study with Web Document Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Murugappan. S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Crawling in Web images has become a challenging problem today due to its rising popularity. Among the most valuable Web assets, Categorizing images on the Web is quite difficult. This paper proposes a simple and effective method to separate the Document Images from the available web image sources. This system concentrates on Automatic Image categorization process over web images by employing a filtering technique to discriminate the document images, available in WWW. The strength of this technique lies in capturing the Image information by intensity and frequency histograms for discrimination of web document images.

  7. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: Phantom studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and C...

  8. The media glorifying burns: a hindrance to burn prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2003-01-01

    The media have a profound influence on the actions of children and adults. Burns and burn prevention tend to be ignored or even mocked. The purpose of this presentation is to reveal the callousness of the media in its dealings with burns and burn prevention. Printed materials with a relationship to burns, risk of burning, or disrespect for the consequences of burns were collected. The materials were tabulated into four categories: comics, advertisements (ads), articles that made light of burns, and television shows that portrayed behavior that would risk burn injury. Most burn-related materials were found in comics or advertisements. Several comics made light of high-risk behavior with flames, scald injury, contact injury, or burns. In addition, several advertisements showed people on fire or actions that could easily lead to burns. Several articles and televisions shows portrayed high-risk behavior that, in some instances, led to copycat injuries. Flames are frequently used to sell items that target adolescent boys or young men. The high incidence injuries that frequent this population parallel the high-risk behaviors portrayed by the media. The media portrays flames and high-risk behavior for burn injury as being cool, funny, and without consequence. The use of flames on clothing and recreational equipment (skateboards, hot rods) particularly targets the high-risk adolescent male. The burn community should make the media aware of the harm it causes with its callous depiction and glorification of burns. PMID:12792237

  9. Animal imaging studies of potential brain damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatley, S. J.; Vazquez, M. E.; Rice, O.

    To date, animal studies have not been able to predict the likelihood of problems in human neurological health due to HZE particle exposure during space missions outside the Earth's magnetosphere. In ongoing studies in mice, we have demonstrated that cocaine stimulated locomotor activity is reduced by a moderate dose (120 cGy) of 1 GeV 56Fe particles. We postulate that imaging experiments in animals may provide more sensitive and earlier indicators of damage due to HZE particles than behavioral tests. Since the small size of the mouse brain is not well suited to the spatial resolution offered by microPET, we are now repeating some of our studies in a rat model. We anticipate that this will enable us to identify imaging correlates of behavioral endpoints. A specific hypothesis of our studies is that changes in the metabolic rate for glucose in striatum of animals will be correlated with alterations in locomotor activity. We will also evaluate whether the neuroprotective drug L-deprenyl reduces the effect of radiation on locomotor activity. In addition, we will conduct microPET studies of brain monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B in rats before and at various times after irradiation with HZE particles. The hypothesis is that monoamine oxidase A, which is located in nerve terminals, will be unchanged or decreased after irradiation, while monoamine oxidase B, which is located in glial cells, will be increased after irradiation. Neurochemical effects that could be measured using PET could in principle be applied in astronauts, in terms of detecting and monitoring subtle neurological damage that might have occurred during long space missions. More speculative uses of PET are in screening candidates for prolonged space missions (for example, for adequate reserve in critical brain circuits) and in optimizing medications to treat impairments after missions.

  10. Characterization of residual coke during burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieck, C.L.; Jablonski, E.L.; Parera, J.M. (Inst. de Investigaciones in Catalisis y Petroquimica, Santiago del Estero 2654, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)); Frety, R. (Conventionne a l' Univ. Claude Bernard, Lyon I (France))

    1992-04-01

    In this paper coke remaining from the partial burning of coke deposited during the commercial re-forming of naphtha on a Pt-Re/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalyst is studied. Burning temperatures are 623-923 K, and the remaining coke is characterized by temperature-programmed oxidation, X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, IR, [sup 13]C CP-MAS NMR, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and chemical analysis. After coke is burned at 673 K, the residual coke shows the minimum value in the H/C ratio and the maximum in the thickness of the aromatic layers, degree of organization, C==O concentration, binding energy of C 1s, peak width, and g value. This agrees with the model of coke burning: at low temperatures, the burning is selective; the more hydrogenated and amorphous carbonaceous species are burnt first. At high temperatures, the burning is nonselective and all species are simultaneously burnt. Coke is partially oxidized during burning, and intermediate species with C==O and C--OH groups are formed.

  11. Burning characteristics of microcellular combustible objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-tao Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcellular combustible objects for application of combustible case, caseless ammunition or combustible detonator-holding tubes are fabricated through one-step foaming process, in which supercritical CO2 is used as foaming agent. The formulations consist of inert polymer binder and ultra fine RDX. For the inner porous structures of microcellular combustible objects, the cell sizes present a unimodal or bimodal distribution by adjusting the foaming conditions. Closed bomb test is to investigate the influence of both porous structure style and RDX content on burning behavior. The sample with bimodal distribution of cell sizes burns faster than that with unimodal distribution, and the concentration of RDX can influence the burning characteristics in a positive manner. In addition, the translation of laminar burning to convective burning is determined by burning rate versus pressure curves of samples at two different loading densities, and the resulting transition pressure is 30 MPa. Moreover, the samples with bigger sample size present higher burning rate, resulting in providing deeper convective depth. Dynamic vivacity of samples is also studied. The results show that the vivacity increases with RDX content and varies with inner structure.

  12. Burning characteristics of microcellular combustible objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-tao YANG; Yu-xiang LI; San-jiu YING

    2014-01-01

    Microcellular combustible objects for application of combustible case, caseless ammunition or combustible detonator-holding tubes are fabricated through one-step foaming process, in which supercritical CO2 is used as foaming agent. The formulations consist of inert polymer binder and ultra fine RDX. For the inner porous structures of microcellular combustible objects, the cell sizes present a unimodal or bimodal distribution by adjusting the foaming conditions. Closed bomb test is to investigate the influence of both porous structure style and RDX content on burning behavior. The sample with bimodal distribution of cell sizes burns faster than that with unimodal distribution, and the concentration of RDX can influence the burning characteristics in a positive manner. In addition, the translation of laminar burning to convective burning is determined by burning rate versus pressure curves of samples at two different loading densities, and the resulting transition pressure is 30 MPa. Moreover, the samples with bigger sample size present higher burning rate, resulting in providing deeper convective depth. Dynamic vivacity of samples is also studied. The results show that the vivacity increases with RDX content and varies with inner structure.

  13. Bacteriology of the burn wound at the Bai Jerbai Wadia Hospital for children, Mumbai, India-A 13-year study, Part I-Bacteriological profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Shankar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study which organisms were prevalent in our burn unit and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in brief. Method: Microbiological data of 1534 patients admitted to the burns unit of the Bai Jerbai Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai over a period of 13 years (1994-2006 was reviewed retrospectively. A total of 9333 swabs were cultured and antibiotic sensitivities to the isolated organisms determined. The age group of patients admitted to our facility ranged from one month to 15 years. Result: Klebsiella was the predominant organism in our set-up (33.91%, closely followed by Pseudomonas (31.84%. The antibiotic sensitivities of the isolated organisms are discussed in detail in the text. Conclusion: Every treatment facility has microorganisms unique to it and these change with time. It is therefore of paramount importance to have an in-depth knowledge of the resident organisms and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern so that infection-related morbidity and mortality are improved.

  14. Estudio de una muestra de pacientes con síndrome de boca ardiente Study of a sample of patients with burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ME Rodríguez de Rivera Campillo

    2007-06-01

    . It presents mainly in postmenopausal women, showing their discomfort during long periods. Burning mouth sensation can be accompanied by other sensitive alterations, like dryness or gustative changes. Objetives: To study a sample of BMS patients, describing the epidemiological factors, their diseases and drug consumption. Patients and methods: The sample was represented by 83 patients, consulting because their burning mouth sensation. All of them were accurately interrogated and examined and the data were registered in a protocol sheet. Results: 90.4% of patients were women and 9.6% were men. The mean of age was 64.9%. All the patients presented burning sensation on the tongue and 64% on the lips. The majority of the studied patients (76% presented an evolution of the symptoms during more than 12 months; only 6% presented this evolution during less than 6 months. 52 (63% of the 83 patients had psychological manifestations and more than the half of them consumed some psychoactive drug. Conclusions: Our sample of patients is comparable to those of other studies. BMS is more prevalent in postmenopausal women, presenting frequently anxiety and/or depression.

  15. Candidemia in major burns patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renau Escrig, Ana I; Salavert, Miguel; Vivó, Carmen; Cantón, Emilia; Pérez Del Caz, M Dolores; Pemán, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Major burn patients have characteristics that make them especially susceptible to candidemia, but few studies focused on this have been published. The objectives were to evaluate the epidemiological, microbiological and clinical aspects of candidemia in major burn patients, determining factors associated with a poorer prognosis and mortality. We conducted a retrospective observational study of candidemia between 1996 and 2012 in major burn patients admitted to the La Fe University Hospital, Valencia, Spain. The study included 36 episodes of candidemia in the same number of patients, 55.6% men, mean age 37.33 years and low associated comorbidity. The incidence of candidemia varied between 0.26 and 6.09 episodes/1000 days stay in the different years studied. Candida albicans was the most common species (61.1%) followed by Candida parapsilosis (27.8%). Candidemia by C. krusei, C. glabrata or C. tropicalis were all identified after 2004. Central vascular catheter (CVC) was established as a potential source of candidemia in 36.1%, followed by skin and soft tissues of thermal injury (22.2%) and urinary tract (8.3%). Fluconazole was used in 19 patients (52.7%) and its in vitro resistance rate was 13.9%. The overall mortality was 47.2%, and mortality related to candidemia was 30.6%. Factors associated with increased mortality were those related to severe infection and shock. CVC was the most usual focus of candidemia. Fluconazole was the most common antifungal drug administered. The management of candidemia in major burn patients is still a challenge. PMID:26931414

  16. Comparative Study of Image Enhancement Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Seema Rajput; PROF. S.R.SURALKAR

    2013-01-01

    Fingerprints are the oldest and most widely used form of biometric identification. The performance of any fingerprint recognizer highly depends on the fingerprint image quality. Different types of noises in the fingerprint images pose greater difficulty for recognizers. However, fingerprint images are rarely of perfect quality. They may be degraded and corrupted due to variations in skin and impressionconditions. Thus, image enhancement techniques are employed prior to minutiae extraction to ...

  17. Gram-Negative Bacterial Infection in Thigh Abscess Can Migrate to Distant Burn Depending on Burn Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Hamrahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains the major cause of death in patients with major burn injuries. In the present investigation we evaluated the interaction between burn injuries of varying severity and preexisting distant infection. We used Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis that were genetically engineered to be bioluminescent, which allowed for noninvasive, sequential optical imaging of the extent and severity of the infection. The bioluminescent bacteria migrated from subcutaneous abscesses in the leg to distant burn wounds on the back depending on the severity of the burn injury, and this migration led to increased mortality of the mice. Treatment with ciprofloxacin, injected either in the leg with the bacterial infection or into the burn eschar, prevented this colonization of the wound and decreased mortality. The present data suggest that burn wounds can readily become colonized by infections distant from the wound itself.

  18. Performance Study on Image Encryption Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Jolly

    2011-01-01

    Image applications have been increasing in recent years.Encryption is used to provide the security needed for image applications. In this paper, we classify various image encryption schemes and analyze them with respect to various parameters like tunability, visual degradation, compression friendliness,format compliance, encryption ratio, speed, and cryptographic security.

  19. Performance Study on Image Encryption Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Jolly Shah; Vikas Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Image applications have been increasing in recent years. Encryption is used to provide the security needed for image applications. In this paper, we classify various image encryption schemes and analyze them with respect to various parameters like tunability, visual degradation, compression friendliness, format compliance, encryption ratio, speed, and cryptographic security.

  20. New treatment strategies to reduce burn wound progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmauss, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: After a burn injury certain superficial partial-thickness burn wounds spontaneously progress into deep partial-thickness or full-thickness burn wounds. This poorly understood phenomenon is called burn wound progression. The aim of this study was to investigate whether treatment strategies using warm water (preservation of microcirculation on the one side and erythropoietin (EPO (molecule with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, vasodilatory and neoangiogenic properties can prevent, delay and/or reduce secondary burn wound progression in a rat model.Methods: We used a burn comb model in 63 rats, creating eight rectangular contact burns (2x1 cm each intercalated by unburned zones (2x0.5 cm prone to burn wound progression. In a first experimental set we treated burn wounds with locally applied warm (37°C or cold (17°C water for 20 minutes.In a second experimental set, animals were treated systemically with EPO at two different dosages of 500 and 2,500 IU/kg bodyweight (bw and initiated at 2 different time-points (45 minutes vs. 6 hours after burn injury. Evaluation of microcirculatory perfusion, interspace necrosis and burn depth was performed using respectively laser Doppler flowmetry, planimetry and histology. For statistical analysis the two-way ANOVA-test followed by an adequate post-hoc test (Bonferroni were used. Results: In untreated control animals a conversion from superficial to full-thickness burns was observed within 24 hours. Warm and cold water treatment significantly delayed burn depth progression, nevertheless after 4 days, burn depth was similar in all three groups. Warm water significantly reduced interspace necrosis compared to untreated controls and cold water with a significantly improved perfusion in the warm water group. Surface extension and particularly burn depth progression were significantly decreased by EPO only if administered at a dosage of bw and initiated 45 minutes after burn injury. EPO

  1. Children with burns referred for child abuse evaluation: Burn characteristics and co-existent injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Marie-Christin; Kemp, Alison; Maguire, Sabine; Nuttall, Diane; Feldman, Kenneth W; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Intentional burns represent a serious form of physical abuse that must be identified to protect children from further harm. This study is a retrospectively planned secondary analysis of the Examining Siblings To Recognize Abuse (ExSTRA) network data. Our objective was to describe the characteristics of burns injuries in children referred to Child Abuse Pediatricians (CAPs) in relation to the perceived likelihood of abuse. We furthermore compare the extent of diagnostic investigations undertaken in children referred to CAPs for burn injuries with those referred for other reasons. Within this dataset, 7% (215/2890) of children had burns. Children with burns were older than children with other injuries (median age 20 months vs. 10 months). Physical abuse was perceived as likely in 40.9% (88) and unlikely in 59.1% (127). Scalds accounted for 52.6% (113) and contact burns for 27.6% (60). Several characteristics of the history and burn injury were associated with a significantly higher perceived likelihood of abuse, including children with reported inflicted injury, absent or inadequate explanation, hot water as agent, immersion scald, a bilateral/symmetric burn pattern, total body surface area ≥10%, full thickness burns, and co-existent injuries. The rates of diagnostic testing were significantly lower in children with burns than other injuries, yet the yield of skeletal survey and hepatic transaminases testing were comparable between the two groups. This would imply that children referred to CAPs for burns warrant the same level of comprehensive investigations as those referred for other reasons. PMID:27088728

  2. D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (431-D and 431-1D) Corrective Measures Study/Focused Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Mason, J.T.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine alternatives which may be used to remediate the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (DBRP). An objective of this process is to provide decision makers adequate information to compare alternatives, select an appropriate remediation for the DBRP, and demonstrate the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements in the Record of Decision.

  3. Early diagnostics and treatment with acute burn sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmedov A.A.; Shakirov B.M.; Karabaev H.K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of the procalcitonin test used for early diagnosis of sepsis and to study the course and treatment of burn sepsis in patients with severe burns. Methods: Eighty patients in the Burn Department of Republican Scientific Centre of Emergency Medical Care, aged 17-75 years with burn injuries covering 30%-85% of the body surface, were enrolled in the study. Procalcitonin is marker of sepsis, procalcitonin > 2 ng/mL, sensitivity -89%, specific feature -94%. Results: The result showed that among septic patients with severe burns, rational use of intensive therapy for burn sepsis and septic shock in combination with parentrial ozonotherapy resulted in decreases of syndrome of poly organ insufficiency and lethal outcomes from 70%accordingly. The result allows the conclusion that the treatment examined leads to a significant increase in survival coefficient. Conclusions: This in turn confirms the efficacy of early necrectomy and auto dermoplasty of deep burn wounds in victims with sepsis.

  4. PET IMAGING STUDIES IN DRUG ABUSE RESEARCH.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Ding, Y.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J.

    2001-01-29

    . This will be followed by highlights of PET studies of the acute effects of the psychostimulant drugs cocaine and methylphenidate (ritalin) and studies of the chronic effects of cocaine and of tobacco smoke on the human brain. This chapter concludes with the description of a study which uses brain imaging coupled with a specific pharmacological challenge to address the age-old question of why some people who experiment with drugs become addicted while others do not.

  5. Antithrombin in the treatment of burn trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal-Vern, Areta; Orkin, Bruce A

    2016-02-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a natural anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties that has demonstrated value in sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and in burn and inhalation injury. With high doses, AT may decrease blood loss during eschar excision, reducing blood transfusion requirements. There are no human randomized, placebo-controlled studies, which have tested the true benefit of this agent in these conditions. Two main forms of AT are either plasma-derived AT (phAT) and recombinant AT (rhAT). Major ovine studies in burn and smoke inhalation injury have utilized rhAT. There have been no studies which have either translated the basic rhAT research in burn trauma, or determined the tolerance and pharmacokinetics of rhAT concentrate infusions in burn patients. Advantages of rhAT infusions are no risk of blood borne diseases and lower cost. However, the majority of human burn patient studies have been conducted utilizing phAT. Recent Japanese clinical trials have started using phAT in abdominal sepsis successfully. This review examines the properties of both phAT and rhAT, and analyzes studies in which they have been utilized. We believe that it is time to embark on a randomized placebo-controlled multi-center trial to establish the role of AT in both civilian and military patients with burn trauma. PMID:26855890

  6. Study of the fire behavior of high-energy lithium-ion batteries with full-scale burning test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Ping; Wang, QingSong; Huang, PeiFeng; Li, Ke; Sun, JinHua; Kong, DePeng; Chen, ChunHua

    2015-07-01

    A full-scale burning test is conducted to evaluate the safety of large-size and high-energy 50 Ah lithium-iron phosphate/graphite battery pack, which is composed of five 10 Ah single cells. The complex fire hazards associated with the combustion process of the battery are presented. The battery combustion behavior can be summarized into the following stages: battery expansion, jet flame, stable combustion, a second cycle of a jet flame followed by stable combustion, a third cycle of a jet flame followed by stable combustion, abatement and extinguishment. The multiple jets of flame indicate serious consequences for the battery and pose a challenge for battery safety. The battery ignites when the battery temperature reaches approximately 175-180 °C. This critical temperature is related to an internal short circuit of the battery, which results from the melting of the separator. The maximum temperature of the flame can reach 1500 °C. The heat release rate (HRR) varies based on the oxygen generated by the battery and the Joule effect of the internal short circuit. The HRR and heat of combustion can reach 49.4 kW and 18,195.1 kJ, respectively. The state of charge of the battery has a significant effect on the maximum HRR, the overall heat generation and the mass loss of the battery.

  7. A neutronic study on advanced sodium cooled fast reactor cores with thorium blankets for effective burning of transuranic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • SFR burner core configurations are explored and analyzed for effective use of thorium blankets. • Thorium blankets can significantly improve SFR burner core performances. • No recycling or partial recycling of Th blankets with multi-batches is very effective. - Abstract: In this paper, new design concepts of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) cores having thorium blanket are suggested for pursuing effective burning of TRU (transuranics) nuclides from LWR spent fuels and their neutronic performances are analyzed. Several core configurations having different arrangements of thorium blankets are explored to improve the core performances and safety-related parameters including sodium void worth which is one of main concerns on safety of SFR cores. Specifically, axial and radial thorium blankets are considered for two type cores. The first one is the typical annular type cores having two different fuel regions where axial thorium blankets are placed in the axially central regions while the second one is the single fuel region cores having central non-fuel region where the axial blanket and radial blankets are considered. Also, the effects of the recycling options and fuel management schemes of the used thorium blanket on the core performances are analyzed. The core performance analyses show that thorium blankets with no recycling option and multi-batch fuel management schemes are very effective to improve the core performances including burnup reactivity swing, sodium void worth and TRU consumption rate

  8. Study of Image Processing, Enhancement and Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhausaheb Shivajirao Shinde

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Digital image processing is a means by which the valuable information in observed raw image data can be revealed. A web-based image processing pipeline was created under the ambitious educational program Venus Transit 2004 (VT-2004. The active participants in the VT-2004 can apply the basic processing methods to the images obtained by their amateur telescopes and/or they can process an image observed at any observatory involved in the project. The processed result image is displayed immediately on the display. Above that all participants can follow the distance Sun-Venus centers computation performed at the professional observatory in the real time. There is a possibility to submit an image from their own observation into the database. It will be used for the distance Earth-Sun computation.

  9. Multianode photomultiplier tube studies for imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly efficient and position sensitive photon detection is essential in a variety of applications from particle identification in fundamental nuclear and particle physics research, to radionuclide imaging in healthcare. Due to their position sensitivity and high packing fraction, the Hamamatsu H8500 and H9500 multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) are promising candidates for such applications and have thus been studied through precision laser scans at several light intensities. This has revealed signal and crosstalk dependencies upon constructional features of the MAPMTs. Both MAPMTs feature a common last dynode output signal, which can be used for self-triggering. The strength and timing of this signal have been investigated for the H8500 MAPMT, yielding similar dependencies upon MAPMT construction and standard deviation time resolutions of 67.5 ps and 154.4 ps for 20 and single photoelectron signals respectively.

  10. Perivesical varices and portal hypertension: imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients with portal hypertension syndrome and Perivesical varices are studied retrospectively by means of imaging techniques including ultrasound, duplex Doppler, color Doppler, CT and angiography. All the patients presented portal thrombosis and thickening of the bladder wall. These collaterals either represent a shunting of hepato pedal flow or correspond to blood stasis associated with said syndrome. Ultrasound, whether involving duplex Doppler or color Doppler techniques, is highly useful to detect the presence of Perivesical varices which appear as tubular or rounded hypo echogenic areas in the bladder wall. Given the association of this entity with bladder wall thickening, it should be taken into account in any clinical situation involving said change, especially in patients with portal hypertension; moreover knowledge of its presence is of great importance when the possibility of creating shunts by means of interventional or surgical vascular procedures or other types of abdominal procedures are being considered because of the risk of bleeding. (Author)

  11. Treatment of Burning Mouth Syndrome With Amisulpride

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Cerdeira, Carmen; Sanchez-Blanco, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Background Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a frequently occurring disease characterized by a burning or painful sensation in the tongue and/or other oral sites without clinical mucosal abnormalities or lesions. Its etiopathology is unknown, although local, systemic, and psychological factors have been associated with BMS. The syndrome is multifactorial, and its management remains unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study was to obtain preliminary data regarding the efficacy and tolerability o...

  12. Increased mortality in hypernatremic burned patients

    OpenAIRE

    de Lange, Thomas; Mailänder, Peter; Stollwerck, Peter. L.; Stang, Felix H.; Siemers, Frank; Namdar, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In-hospital hypernatremia develops usually iatrogenically from inadequate or inappropriate fluid prescription. In severely burned patient an extensive initial fluid resuscitation is necessary for burn shock survival. After recovering of cellular integrity the circulating volume has to be normalized. Hereby extensive water and electrolyte shifts can provoke hypernatremia. Purpose: Is a hypernatremic state associated with increased mortality? Method: Retrospective study for the in...

  13. Increased mortality in hypernatremic burned patients

    OpenAIRE

    Namdar, T; Siemers, F; Stollwerck, PL; Stang, FH; Mailänder, P; de Lange, T

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In-hospital hypernatremia develops usually iatrogenically from inadequate or inappropriate fluid prescription. In severely burned patient an extensive initial fluid resuscitation is necessary for burn shock survival. After recovering of cellular integrity the circulating volume has to be normalized. Hereby extensive water and electrolyte shifts can provoke hypernatremia.Purpose: Is a hypernatremic state associated with increased mortality?Method: Retrospective study for the i...

  14. Optical coherence tomography angiography for longitudinal monitoring of vascular changes in human cutaneous burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijun; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Wood, Fiona M; Sampson, David D; McLaughlin, Robert A

    2016-09-01

    Assessment of vasculature is an important aspect of monitoring healing of cutaneous burn injuries. Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT) have enabled it to be used to perform high-resolution imaging of the cutaneous vasculature in vivo, with the potential to provide a superior alternative to the conventional assessment of scoring skin color. The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of OCT angiography for longitudinal monitoring of vasculature and identification of vascular features in human cutaneous burns. We integrate several OCT imaging protocols and image-processing techniques into a systematic method for longitudinal monitoring and automatic quantification. The demonstration of this method on a partial-thickness burn shows the accurate co-location of longitudinal scans; characteristic vascular features in different healing phases; and eventual decrease of the elevated vasculature area density and vessel diameter to normal levels. Such a method holds promise for longitudinal monitoring of vasculature in burn injures as well as in other cutaneous vascular pathologies and responses to treatment. PMID:27116945

  15. Radiation: Rational use of diagnostic imaging studies in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this paper are to recognize the biological effects of radiation; explain the action of ionizing radiation on the cell; list the main sources of ionizing radiation; to indicate imaging studies considering the danger of radiation; select the method of imaging saving radiation; rational use of imaging studies without repeating exams.

  16. Electrothermal Ring Burn

    OpenAIRE

    Yakup Çil; Hamza Yıldız; Özlem Karabudak Abuaf

    2012-01-01

    Low-voltage fountainheads such as car, tractor or motorcycle batteries are predisposed to produce large currents. Any metal object that comes into contact with these batteries may result in short-circuit. This may result in rapid and excessive heating of metal object and an electrothermal burn. Herein we presented a motorcycle driver who was 28-year-old man with electrothermal ring burn which was caused by metal chain that was used as a ring. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 106-7)

  17. Electrothermal Ring Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Çil

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Low-voltage fountainheads such as car, tractor or motorcycle batteries are predisposed to produce large currents. Any metal object that comes into contact with these batteries may result in short-circuit. This may result in rapid and excessive heating of metal object and an electrothermal burn. Herein we presented a motorcycle driver who was 28-year-old man with electrothermal ring burn which was caused by metal chain that was used as a ring. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 106-7

  18. Burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a complex disorder that is characterized by warm or burning sensation in the oral mucosa without changes on physical examination. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tip of the tongue, lateral borders, lips, hard and soft palate. This condition is probably of multi-factorial origin, often idiopathic, and its etiopathogensis is unknown. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms namely primary and secondary BMS. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach is required for better control of the symptoms. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms.

  19. Internet-based information and self-help program for parents of children with burns: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefin Sveen

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: We believe that this program will offer parents of children with burns information and support, decrease symptoms of stress, and that parents will perceive the program as useful. If the program is found to be beneficial, it could be implemented in burn care as it is accessible and cost-effective.

  20. Burn size determines the inflammatory and hypermetabolic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Norbury, William B; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Kulp, Gabriela A; Herndon, David N

    2007-01-01

    Background Increased burn size leads to increased mortality of burned patients. Whether mortality is due to inflammation, hypermetabolism or other pathophysiologic contributing factors is not entirely determined. The purpose of the present study was to determine in a large prospective clinical trial whether different burn sizes are associated with differences in inflammation, body composition, protein synthesis, or organ function. Methods Pediatric burned patients were divided into four burn size groups: 80% TBSA burn. Demographic and clinical data, hypermetabolism, the inflammatory response, body composition, the muscle protein net balance, serum and urine hormones and proteins, and cardiac function and changes in liver size were determined. Results One hundred and eighty-nine pediatric patients of similar age and gender distribution were included in the study (80% TBSA burn, n = 21). Patients with larger burns had more operations, a greater incidence of infections and sepsis, and higher mortality rates compared with the other groups (P 80% TBSA group, followed by the 60–79% TBSA burn group (P 80% burns lost the most body weight, lean body mass, muscle protein and bone mineral content (P < 0.05). The urine cortisol concentration was highest in the 80–99% and 60–79% TBSA burn groups, associated with significant myocardial depression and increased change in liver size (P < 0.05). The cytokine profile showed distinct differences in expression of IL-8, TNF, IL-6, IL-12p70, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (P < 0.05). Conclusion Morbidity and mortality in burned patients is burn size dependent, starts at a 60% TBSA burn and is due to an increased hypermetabolic and inflammatory reaction, along with impaired cardiac function. PMID:17716366

  1. On the relationship between cardboard burning in a sunshine recorder and the direct solar irradiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, A.; Calbó, J.; González, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Since the end of XIX century, the Campbell-Stokes recorder (CSR) has been the instrument used to measure the insolation (hours of sunshine during per day). Due to the large number of records that exist worldwide (some of them extending over more than 100 years), valuable climatic information can be extracted from them. There are various articles that relate the insolation with the cloudiness and the global solar irradiation (Angstrom-Prescott type formulas). Theoretically, the insolation is defined as the number of hours that direct solar irradiance (DSI) exceeds 120 W/m2, thus corresponding to the total length of the burning in the bands. The width of the burn has not been well studied, so the aim of this research is to relate this width, first with the DSI and then, with other variables. The research was carried out in Girona (NE Spain) for a period extending since February 2011. A CSR from Thies Clima and a pyrheliometer from Kipp&Zonen were used to measure insolation and the direct solar irradiance. Other meteorological variables were also stored for the study. For each band, we made two independent measurements of the width of the burn every 10 minutes: first, we measured directly the width of the perforated portion of the burn; second, we measured the width of the burn after applying a digital image process that increases the contrast of the burn. The burn in a band has a direct relationship with the DSI. Specifically, correlation coefficients of the perforation width and the burning width with DSI were 0.838 and 0.864 respectively. However, we found that there are times when despite of DSI is as high as 400 W/m2 (i.e. much greater than 120 W/m2), there is no burn in the band. Contrarily, sometimes a burn occurs with almost no DSI. Furthermore, a higher DSI does not always correspond to a wider burn of the band. Because of this, we consider that characteristics of band burns must also depend on other meteorological variables (temperature, humidity...). The

  2. An Epidemiologic Survey on Burns in Yazd from 2008 till 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Negar Delbari; Kazem Kazemeini; Mohammad Jalilmanesh; Amir Houshang Mehrparvar; Seyed Jalil Mirmohammadi; Mehrdad Mostaghaci

    2012-01-01

    Burns are injuries which may require long hospitalization and may result in important impairment and disability. Burn injuries are still common especially in developing countries. Assessment of the epidemiology of burns is very important for introduction of preventive methods. This study was conducted in Yazd to assess and describe the epidemiology of burns including its main causes, and its demographics. In a prospective study during a 1 year period, we assessed the epidemiology of burns in ...

  3. Soil moisture variation and dynamics across a wildfire burn boundary in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani; Kanarek, Michael R.

    2014-11-01

    A year after the most destructive wildfire in Texas (USA) history which occurred in and around Bastrop State Park, we established a 165 m-long study transect, bridging burned and unburned areas, to study post-wildfire soil moisture dynamics. Soil moisture content (θ) was monitored indirectly approximately monthly for half a year using a variety of methods with different measurement scales including: 2D electrical resistivity (ER) imaging and surface and vertical profiles using probes which measure soil dielectric properties. The burned section, where the majority of loblolly pine trees were killed, had higher θ and lower ER whereas the unburned end which is still populated by live pine trees had lower θ and higher ER. This pattern persisted from the ground surface and down to ∼2 m and through the study period even after a rainfall event which made the whole transect generally wetter but with the burned end showing a much stronger wetting response to the storm. The differences in θ cannot be explained by differences in soil texture with the burned end with sand soil and the unburned end with less permeable loamy sand. The differing results may be explained by loss of canopy cover and by reduced transpiration at the burned end where the dead roots may also potentially serve as macropores. Thus, after fires and until new vegetation cover has grown, the burned areas will store and transmit more water which could lead to increased groundwater recharge and promote the recovery or invasion of certain types of vegetation.

  4. Assessment of Electrosurgery Burns in Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Seyyed Mehdi; Moradi, Mohammad; Khalaj, Alireza; Pazouki, Alireza; Tamannaie, Zeinab; Ghanbari, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Monopolar surgery is applied mostly in major operations, while bipolar is used in delicate ones. Attention must be paid in electrosurgery application to avoid electrical burns. Objectives: We aimed to assess factors associated with electrosurgery burns in cardiac surgery operating rooms. Patients and Methods: This was a case-control study in which two groups of 150 patients undergoing cardiac surgery in Imam Khomeini Hospital were recruited. Several factors like gender, age, operation duration, smoking, diseases, infection, atopia, , immunosuppressive drugs use, hepatic cirrhosis, and pulmonary diseases were compared between the two groups. Patients were observed for 24 hours for development of any burn related to the operation. Data was analyzed using SPSS v.11.5, by Chi square and T-test. Results: Patients in the two groups were similar except for two factors. DM and pulmonary diseases which showed significant differences (P = 0.005 and P = 0.002 respectively). Seventy-five patients from controls and 35 from the study group developed burns, which was significant (P ˂ 0.0001). Conclusions: None of the factors were significantly related to developing burns. The differences between the two groups highlights the importance of systems modifications to lessen the incidence of burns. PMID:26839854

  5. Burn Safety Awareness on Playgrounds: Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Awareness on Playgrounds Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission CPSC wants ... of the risk of thermal burns from playground equipment. You may remember the metal slides of your ...

  6. Management of acute burns and burn shock resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faldmo, L; Kravitz, M

    1993-05-01

    Initial management of minor and moderate, uncomplicated burn injury focuses on wound management and patient comfort. Initial management of patients with major burn injury requires airway support, fluid resuscitation for burn shock, treatment for associated trauma and preexisting medical conditions, management of adynamic ileus, and initial wound treatment. Fluid resuscitation, based on assessment of the extent and depth of burn injury, requires administration of intravenous fluids using resuscitation formula guidelines for the initial 24 hours after injury. Inhalation injury complicates flame burns and increases morbidity and mortality. Electrical injury places patients at risk for cardiac arrest, metabolic acidosis, and myoglobinuria. Circumferential full-thickness burns to extremities compromise circulation and require escharotomy or fasciotomy. Circumferential torso burns compromise air exchange and cardiac return. Loss of skin function places patients at risk for hypothermia, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and systemic sepsis. The first 24 hours after burn injury require aggressive medical management to assure survival and minimize complications. PMID:8489882

  7. Study of Three-Dimensional Image Brightness Loss in Stereoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Cheng Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When viewing three-dimensional (3D images, whether in cinemas or on stereoscopic televisions, viewers experience the same problem of image brightness loss. This study aims to investigate image brightness loss in 3D displays, with the primary aim being to quantify the image brightness degradation in the 3D mode. A further aim is to determine the image brightness relationship to the corresponding two-dimensional (2D images in order to adjust the 3D-image brightness values. In addition, the photographic principle is used in this study to measure metering values by capturing 2D and 3D images on television screens. By analyzing these images with statistical product and service solutions (SPSS software, the image brightness values can be estimated using the statistical regression model, which can also indicate the impact of various environmental factors or hardware on the image brightness. In analysis of the experimental results, comparison of the image brightness between 2D and 3D images indicates 60.8% degradation in the 3D image brightness amplitude. The experimental values, from 52.4% to 69.2%, are within the 95% confidence interval

  8. Imaging studies in chronic low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging brings to difficult problems in chronic low back pain incomplete data showing that it will need a lot of time to find therapeutic solutions. Some comparisons are made between tomodensitometry, nuclear magnetic imaging, the disco-scanner, these technologies allow to find small lesions but the problem is complete when it is not possible to find anything with persistent pains. 125 refs

  9. Fat burn X: burning more than fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannabass, Kyle; Olsen, Kevin Robert

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of bilateral lower extremity cramping and dark urine. The patient was found to have a creatine phosphokinase (CPK) elevated of up to 2306 U/L, a serum uric acid of 9.7 mg/dL and 101 red blood cell's per high-powered field on urinalysis. On questioning, the patient endorsed daily exercise with free weights. There were no changes in his regular exercise and medication regimen, no muscle trauma, no recent drug use and no illness. The patient did mention using a new fat burner known as 'Fat Burn X', which he had begun taking 2 days prior to the onset of his muscle cramps. The patient was given normal saline intravenous fluid resuscitation for 48 h with resultant normalisation of his CPK and creatinine, and was discharged with primary care follow-up. PMID:26811412

  10. BURN SIZE AND SURVIVAL PROBABILITY IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS IN MODERN BURN CARE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M; Williams, Felicia N; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient survival following severe burn injury is largely determined by burn size. Modern developments in burn care have tremendously improved survival and outcomes. However, no large analysis on outcomes in pediatric burn patients with current treatment regimen exists. This study was designed to identify the burn size presently associated with significant increases in morbidity and mortality in pediatric burn patients. Methods Single center prospective observational cohort study utilizing the clinical data of severely burned pediatric patients admitted between 1998 and 2009. This study included 952 severely burned pediatric patients with burns over at least 30% of their total body surface area (TBSA). Patients were stratified by burn size in 10% increments, ranging from 30 to 100%, with a secondary assignment made according to the outcome of a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test, χ2 test, logistic regression and ROC analysis, as appropriate, with significance set at p<0.05. Findings All groups were comparable in age (age in years: 30–39: 6.1±5.1, 40–49: 7.1±5.2, 50–59: 7.6±5.1, 60–69: 7.2±5.1, 70–79: 8.3±5.9, 80–89: 8.4±5.6, 90–100: 9.6±5.4), and gender distribution (male: 30–39: 68%, 40–49: 64%, 50–59: 65%, 60–69: 59%, 70–79: 71%, 80–89: 62%, 90–100: 82%). Mortality (30–39: 3%, 40–49: 3%, 50–59: 7%, 60–69: 16%, 70–79: 22%, 80–89: 35%, 90–100: 55%), multi-organ failure (30–39: 6%, 40–49: 6%, 50–59: 12%, 60–69: 27%, 70–79: 29%, 80–89: 44%, 90–100: 45%), and sepsis (30–39: 2%, 40–49: 5%, 50–59: 6%, 60–69: 15%, 70–79: 13%, 80–89: 22%, 90–100: 26%), increased significantly (p<0.001) among the groups and at a threshold of 62% TBSA. Comparison of patients with burns larger than 62% with those smaller showed significant differences in inflammatory (Cytokines), acute phase (CRP) and hypermetabolic responses (REE

  11. Transdermal fluid loss in severely burned patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The skin protects against fluid and electrolyte loss. Burn injury does affect skin integrity and protection against fluid loss is lost. Thus, a systemic dehydration can be provoked by underestimation of fluid loss through burn wounds. Purpose: We wanted to quantify transdermal fluid loss in burn wounds. Method: Retrospective study. 40 patients admitted to a specialized burn unit were analyzed and separated in two groups without (Group A or with (Group B hypernatremia. Means of daily infusion-diuresis-ratio (IDR and the relationship to totally burned surface area (TBSA were analyzed. Results: In Group A 25 patients with a mean age of 47±18 years, a mean TBSA of 23±11%, and a mean abbreviated burned severity index (ABSI score of 6.9±2.1 were summarized. In Group B 15 patients with a mean age of 47±22 years, a mean TBSA of 30±13%, and a mean ABSI score of 8.1±1.7 were included. Statistical analysis of the period from day 3 to day 6 showed a significant higher daily IDR-amount in Group A (Group A vs. Group B: 786±1029 ml vs. –181±1021 ml; p<0.001 and for daily IDR-TBSA-ratio (Group A vs. Group B: 40±41 ml/% vs. –4±36 ml/%; p<0.001. Conclusions: There is a systemic relevant transdermal fluid loss in burn wounds after severe burn injury. Serum sodium concentration can be used to calculate need of fluid resuscitation for fluid maintenance. There is a need of an established fluid removal strategy to avoid water and electrolyte imbalances.

  12. Burning clean and green

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new style of oil burner has been developed for use on exploration platforms offshore. The design improves oil combustion through enhanced air induction, producing stable flames in the clean burn region which do not generate smoke and oil fallout. Successful tests have led to it now being ready for commercial exploitation. (UK)

  13. Accumulative eschar after burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fushun

    2016-02-01

    Eschar formation is a potential sequela of burn injuries. Definitive management may include escharectomy and eschar debridement. After eschar removal, the wound can be covered with a skin graft or reepithelialization. For prolonged refractory eschar on the fingertips, topical use of rb-bFGF after debridement can achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26862412

  14. Accumulative eschar after burn

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Fushun

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Eschar formation is a potential sequela of burn injuries. Definitive management may include escharectomy and eschar debridement. After eschar removal, the wound can be covered with a skin graft or reepithelialization. For prolonged refractory eschar on the fingertips, topical use of rb‐bFGF after debridement can achieve an optimal outcome.

  15. An assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, A D

    2008-06-01

    The resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.

  16. Determination of Teflon thickness with laser speckle. I. Potential for burn depth diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhwani, Ajay; Schomacker, Kevin T.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Nishioka, Norman S.

    1996-10-01

    A quantitative method for determining the depth of burn eschar would aid surgeons in determining whether to excise and subsequently graft a burn wound. We hypothesize that tissue viability could be assessed by an analysis of the spatial modulation of near-field laser speckle by flowing blood. A feasibility study of the technique was performed with two-layer tissue phantoms used to simulate a burn wound. A sheet of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was used to simulate nonperfused burn eschar, and tissue perfusion within deeper layers was represented by Brownian motion from a scattering solution. A low-power He-Ne laser was focused onto the target, and the resulting speckle image was captured with a CCD camera and stored on a computer for further processing. The diameter of the speckle pattern was found to be directly proportional to the thickness of the overlying layer. These data suggest that the thickness of PTFE can be determined to +/-100- mu m accuracy with 95% confidence and may be suitable for burn depth detection in vivo.

  17. A study of correlation technique on pyramid processed images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Sankar Kishore; K Veerabhadra Rao

    2000-02-01

    The pyramid algorithm is potentially a powerful tool for advanced television image processing and for pattern recognition. An attempt is made to design and develop both hardware and software for a system which performs decomposition and reconstruction of digitized images by implementing the Burt pyramid algorithm. In this work, an attempt is also made to study correlation performance on reconstructed images. That is, the reference image is taken from the original image and correlation is performed on expanded images of the same size. Similarly, correlation performance study is carried out on different pyramid- processed levels. In this paper results are presented in terms of RMS error between original and expanded images. Only still images are considered, and the hardware is designed around an i486 processor and software is developed in PL/M 86.

  18. Study on simulation of low light level images and photon images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Yu, Xin; Chen, Yi-nan

    2008-03-01

    This paper concentrates on images formation simulation under low light level condition (10 -6system entire noise and simulate a deblurred image intensified by photon imaging system recently constructed under low light level condition. The influence of scene luminance and photon imaging system optical errors on the simulation is introduced. Then the system entire noise is appended to low light level images by a novel noise analysis and generation method based on experimental study method. The second part of this paper deals with simulation of photon images. Because of randomicity of photon images, roulette wheel selection is utilized to confirm the grey level of stochastic signal photon image and noise photon image is generated by poissson stochastic process pixel by pixel. The final photon image is acquired by synthesizing the two images. The simulation presented in this paper provides an economical and convenient method to investigate the detection ability of photon imaging system and image reconstruction algorithm under low light level condition and photon limited condition.

  19. [Invasive yeast infections in severely burned patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renau, Ana Isabel; García-Vidal, Carolina; Salavert, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are few studies on candidaemia in the severely burned patient. These patients share the same risk factors for invasive fungal infections as other critically ill patients, but have certain characteristics that make them particularly susceptible. These include the loss of skin barrier due to extensive burns, fungal colonisation of the latter, and the use of hydrotherapy or other topical therapies (occasionally with antimicrobials). In addition, the increased survival rate achieved in recent decades in critically burned patients due to the advances in treatment has led to the increase of invasive Candida infections. This explains the growing interest in making an earlier and more accurate diagnosis, as well as more effective treatments to reduce morbidity and mortality of candidaemia in severe burned patients. A review is presented on all aspects of the burned patient, including the predisposition and risk factors for invasive candidiasis, pathogenesis of candidaemia, underlying immunodeficiency, local epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility, evolution and prognostic factors, as well as other non-Candida yeast infections. Finally, we include specific data on our local experience in the management of candidaemia in severe burned patients, which may serve to quantify the problem, place it in context, and offer a realistic perspective. PMID:27395025

  20. [The Nutrition Care of Severe Burn Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsiu

    2016-02-01

    In addition to recent advances in burn patient care techniques such as maintaining warm circumambient temperature, the early excision of wounds, and the use of closed dressing, providing nutrition support through early feeding has proven instrumental in greatly increasing the survival rate of burn patients. Severe burns complicated by many factors initiate tremendous physiological stress that leads to postburn hypermetabolism that includes enhanced tissue catabolism, the loss of muscle mass, and decreases in the body's reservoirs of protein and energy. These problems have become the focus of burn therapy. Treating severe burns aims not only to enhance survival rates but also to restore normal bodily functions as completely as possible. Recent research evaluating the application of anabolic agents and immune-enhance formula for severe burns therapy has generated significant controversy. Inadequate caloric intake is one of the main differences among the related studies, with the effect of many special nutrients such as bran acid amides not taken into consideration. Therefore, considering the sufficiency of caloric and protein intake is critical in assessing effectiveness. Only after patients receive adequate calories and protein may the effect of special nutrients such as glutamine and supplements be evaluated effectively. PMID:26813059

  1. Estudio clínico-epidemiológico sobre el síndrome de ardor bucal Clinical epidemiology study about the burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C López Carriches

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available En el síndrome de ardor bucal el paciente refiere un dolor crónico que no suele acompañarse de lesiones mucosas u otros signos clínicos. Aunque la lengua es la localización más importante, también afecta a los labios, el paladar y la mucosa yugal e incluso a la garganta y el suelo de la boca. Con el propósito de analizar los factores epidemiológicos y determinar si este síndrome se asocia con alguna alteración oral o sistémica se realizó un estudio sobre 25 pacientes con síndrome de ardor bucal que acudieron al servicio de Cirugía de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Se observó que tiene un componente psicógeno importantísimo presentando la mayoría de los pacientes unas características comunes y se puede afirmar que ciertos medicamentos como los antidepresivos influyen en este cuadro.In burning mouth syndrome, patient refers a chronic pain that is not usually accompanied by mucosal lesions or another clinic signs. Although tongue is the most important location, lips, palate, yugal mucosa even throat and mouth floor can be affected, too. On the purpose of analysing the epidemiological aspects and to decide if this syndrome is associated with oral or systemic alterations a study was carried out with 25 burning mouth syndrome patients that came to the Surgery Unit of School of Dentistry of University Complutense of Madrid. A very important psychological component has been observed and most of the patients presented quite common characteristic and it can be affirmed that certain medicines like antidepressive take influence in this syndrome.

  2. Back Bay Wilderness burning support

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a memorandum concerning prescribed burns between members of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife. It states that burning should be supported...

  3. Treatment of hydrofluoric acid burns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, B.; Winter, U.J.; Mahrle, G.; Steigleder, G.K.

    1986-01-31

    A chemical-plant worker sustained hydrofluoric acid burns during cleaning procedures. Intra-arterial perfusion and intralesional injections of calcium gluconate solution prevented progression of the burns into deeper tissue layers.

  4. [Treatment of hydrofluoric acid burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, B; Winter, U J; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1986-01-31

    A chemical-plant worker sustained hydrofluoric acid burns during cleaning procedures. Intra-arterial perfusion and intralesional injections of calcium gluconate solution prevented progression of the burns into deeper tissue layers. PMID:3943470

  5. [Burn injuries and mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmu, Raimo; Vuola, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Currently a large proportion of patients with severe burn injuries survive. This gives increasing challenges also for psychological recovery after the trauma. More than half of burn patients have mental disorders already before the burn injury but also patients who previously had no mental disorders may suffer from them. Some of the hospitalize burn patients have injuries due to suicidal attempts. Only a small proportion of burn patients receive appropriate psychiatric care although psychosocial interventions specifically planned for burn victims exist. More frequent screening of symtoms of mental disorders and psychiatric consultation, also after acute care in hospital, could lead to better management of post-burn psychiatric care as well as better management of the burn treatment and rehabilitation itself. PMID:27089616

  6. The Effect of Shiatsu Massage on Pain Reduction in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ardabili, Fatemeh Mohaddes; Purhajari, Soybeh; Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Haghani, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is a tragedy that follows multiple problems in a patient including pain, anxiety and lack of confidence into medical team. This study evaluated the effect of shiatsu massage on pain intensity of burn patients. METHODS A total of 120 burn patients from Motahhari Burn Hospital and of both genders were randomly divided into 4 groups of undergoing hand massage, leg massage, both hand and leg massages, and the control group. The effect of shiatsu massage in pain relief of burned pa...

  7. A digital image analyser for RIMS studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) is now playing a vital role in various areas of physics and chemistry. A digital image analyser for quantitative analysis of RIMS experiments has been developed

  8. Impact of prescribed burning on blanket peat hydrology

    OpenAIRE

    Holden, J; Palmer, SM; Johnston, K; Wearing, C.; Irvine, B; Brown, LE

    2015-01-01

    Fire is known to impact soil properties and hydrological flowpaths. However, the impact of prescribed vegetation burning on blanket peatland hydrology is poorly understood. We studied ten blanket peat headwater catchments. Five were subject to prescribed burning, while five were unburnt controls. Within the burnt catchments we studied plots where the last burn occurred ∼2 (B2), 4 (B4), 7 (B7) or greater than 10 years (B10+) prior to the start of measurements. These were compared with plots at...

  9. Hospital acquired diarrhea in a burn center of Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Faranak Alinejad; Mitra Barati; Mahbobe Satarzadeh Tabrisi; Mohsen Saberi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Incidence of hospital-acquired diarrhea has increased rapidly and burn patients are at high risk of getting it. Infection with C. difficile is the most common cause of antibiotic associated diarrhea. The aim of this study was to determine the baseline characteristics and clinical presentation of hospital-acquired diarrhea and compare C. difficile and non-C. difficile diarrhea in burn patients treated at a burn center.Materials and Methods: During a 1-year study all ...

  10. 1984–2010 trends in fire burn severity and area for the conterminous US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picotte, Joshua J.; Peterson, Birgit; Meier, Gretchen; Howard, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Burn severity products created by the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) project were used to analyse historical trends in burn severity. Using a severity metric calculated by modelling the cumulative distribution of differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) and Relativized dNBR (RdNBR) data, we examined burn area and burn severity of 4893 historical fires (1984–2010) distributed across the conterminous US (CONUS) and mapped by MTBS. Yearly mean burn severity values (weighted by area), maximum burn severity metric values, mean area of burn, maximum burn area and total burn area were evaluated within 27 US National Vegetation Classification macrogroups. Time series assessments of burned area and severity were performed using Mann–Kendall tests. Burned area and severity varied by vegetation classification, but most vegetation groups showed no detectable change during the 1984–2010 period. Of the 27 analysed vegetation groups, trend analysis revealed burned area increased in eight, and burn severity has increased in seven. This study suggests that burned area and severity, as measured by the severity metric based on dNBR or RdNBR, have not changed substantially for most vegetation groups evaluated within CONUS.

  11. Systemic Responses to Burn Injury

    OpenAIRE

    ÇAKIR, Barış; YEĞEN, Berrak Ç.

    2004-01-01

    The major causes of death in burn patients include multiple organ failure and infection. It is important for the clinician to understand the pathophysiology of burn injury and the effects it will have on the pharmacokinetics of a drug. The local and systemic inflammatory response to thermal injury is extremely complex, resulting in both local burn tissue damage and deleterious systemic effects on all other organ systems distant from the burn area itself. Thermal injury initiates systemic infl...

  12. Epidemiologic Study of Consciousness Disorder in Burn Sepsis Patients%烧伤脓毒症患者意识障碍的流行病学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙羽飞; 徐文举

    2013-01-01

    Objective To discuss the causes,clinical features,related risk factors and outcome of sepsis patients after burns with consciousness disorder. Methods A retrospective study including 157 burn sepsis patients from 2011 to 2012 was conducted in our department of burn and plastic surgery. The baseline data of patients the causes for consciousness disorder,vital signs,biochemical indicators,related risk factors and outcome were analyzed in the study. Results The incidence of consciousness disorder in burn sepsis patients was 39.5%. The causes and the percentages were septic associated encephalopathy (46.8%)、 hypoxemia (25.8%)、 hypernatremia (11.3%)、hyponatremia(4.8%)、metabolic acidosis(4.8%)、Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning(3.2%)、hypoglycemia(1.6%) and intracranial infection (1.6%). Conclusion The main causes for consciousness disorder in burn sepsis patients are septic associated encephalopathy and hypoxemia. Disorder of consciousness increases the mortality rate of burn sepsis patients,in addition , The mortality rate of septic associated encephalopathy was obviously higher than that of other causes.%目的探讨烧伤脓毒症患者合并意识障碍的原因、临床表现、相关危险因素及预后。方法回顾性分析我院烧伤整形科2011年01月~2012年12月收治的157例脓毒症患者的临床资料,分析其合并意识障碍的原因、临床表现、生化指标、相关危险因素及预后。结果烧伤脓毒症患者出现意识障碍的发生率为39.5%,原因和百分率分别为:SAE 29例(46.8%)、低氧血症16例(25.8%)、高钠血症7例(11.3%)、低钠血症3例(4.8%)、代谢性酸中毒3例(4.8%)、急性 CO中毒后迟发性脑病2例(3.2%)、低血糖1例(1.6%)、颅内感染1例(1.6%)。脓毒症合并意识障碍组与非意识障碍组在年龄、致伤原因、烧伤面积和深度上比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),意识障碍

  13. Terahertz pulsed imaging study of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagoz, Burcu; Altan, Hakan; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç

    2015-07-01

    Current diagnostic techniques in dentistry rely predominantly on X-rays to monitor dental caries. Terahertz Pulsed Imaging (TPI) has great potential for medical applications since it is a nondestructive imaging method. It does not cause any ionization hazard on biological samples due to low energy of THz radiation. Even though it is strongly absorbed by water which exhibits very unique chemical and physical properties that contribute to strong interaction with THz radiation, teeth can still be investigated in three dimensions. Recent investigations suggest that this method can be used in the early identification of dental diseases and imperfections in the tooth structure without the hazards of using techniques which rely on x-rays. We constructed a continuous wave (CW) and time-domain reflection mode raster scan THz imaging system that enables us to investigate various teeth samples in two or three dimensions. The samples comprised of either slices of individual tooth samples or rows of teeth embedded in wax, and the imaging was done by scanning the sample across the focus of the THz beam. 2D images were generated by acquiring the intensity of the THz radiation at each pixel, while 3D images were generated by collecting the amplitude of the reflected signal at each pixel. After analyzing the measurements in both the spatial and frequency domains, the results suggest that the THz pulse is sensitive to variations in the structure of the samples that suggest that this method can be useful in detecting the presence of caries.

  14. 'Body image is for girls': a qualitative study of boys' body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Duane A; Tiggemann, Marika

    2006-07-01

    Although a considerable and informative literature on boys' body image is beginning to emerge, this literature has been guided strongly by theorizing about female body image. The present study aimed to gain access to boys' own ideas and terminology regarding their body image. The participants (aged 14 to 16 years) said that they are satisfied with their appearance, but some conceded their physical appearance to be more important than they like to admit. Boys do not believe that the mass media influences their body image and said they do not talk about body image because it is a feminine or gay issue. PMID:16769736

  15. Early Detection of Heterotopic Ossification Using Near-Infrared Optical Imaging Reveals Dynamic Turnover and Progression of Mineralization Following Achilles Tenotomy and Burn Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Perosky, Joseph E.; Peterson, Jonathan R.; Eboda, Owulatobi N.; Morris, Michael D.; Stewart C. Wang; Levi, Benjamin; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the abnormal formation of bone in soft tissue. Current diagnostics have low sensitivity or specificity to incremental progression of mineralization, especially at early time points. Without accurate and reliable early diagnosis and intervention, HO progression often results in incapacitating conditions of limited range of motion, nerve entrapment, and pain. We hypothesized that non-invasive near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging can detect HO at early time points...

  16. Emissions from Open Burning: Evaluation Challenges at Different Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Emmons, L. K.; Raffuse, S. M.; Larkin, N. K.

    2011-12-01

    Open burning, whether wildland fires, prescribed burning, burning as part of agricultural practices, or even the burning of waste, emits significant amounts of trace gases and particulate matter to the atmosphere. These emissions can play an important role in local and regional air quality, global atmospheric chemistry, and climatic processes. Many valuable efforts have been put forth to estimate the emissions from open burning, ranging from event-specific and local scales, to regional and global scales. The results from these efforts are extremely valuable, since the inclusion of open burning events is essential to models that simulate air quality, chemistry, and climate. However, evaluation of these emission estimates remains a significant challenge and the uncertainty associated with the estimates is high. Burning emissions are episodic in nature, often occur on heterogeneous landscapes, and are variable throughout a day, a week, and even over months and seasons. The quantity and species of open burning emissions depend on the type of fuel burned, the condition of the fuel, and the way in which the fire burns. These characteristics add inherent difficulties for constraining open burning emissions. Additionally, the transport and transformation of open burning emissions in the atmosphere provides further challenges to their evaluation. This presentation will summarize some of the recent advances in open burning emission estimates, including emission estimates over various spatial and temporal scales that have been developed for various applications. Many efforts to evaluate the emissions, using measurements and models, have already been accomplished, providing information of success and challenges we still face. For example, recent studies using chemical transport models and observations from aircraft studies suggest that the carbon monoxide emissions predicted by the Fire INventory from NCAR in North America are too low. The results of the evaluations can be

  17. A Study Of Image Segmentation Algorithms For Different Types Of Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kant Singh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In computer vision, segmentation refers to the process of partitioning a digital image into multiple segments (sets of pixels, also known as superpixels.Image segmentation is typically used to locate objects and boundaries (lines, curves, etc. in images. More precisely, image segmentation is the process of assigning a label to every pixel in an image such that pixels with the same label share certain visual characteristics.The result of image segmentation is a set of segments that collectively cover the entire image, or a set of contours extracted from the image (see edge detection. Each of the pixels in a region are similar with respect to some characteristic or computed property, such as color, intensity, or texture.Due to the importance of image segmentation a number of algorithms have been proposed but based on the image that is inputted the algorithm should be chosen to get the best results. In this paper the author gives a study of the various algorithms that are available for color images,text and gray scale images.

  18. Adding attenuation corrected images in myocardial perfusion imaging reduces the need for a rest study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology and the Society of Nuclear Medicine conclude that incorporation of attenuation corrected (AC) images in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) will improve diagnostic accuracy. The aim was to investigate the value of adding AC stress-only images for the decision whether a rest study is necessary or not. 1,261 patients admitted to 99mTc MPS were studied. The stress studies were interpreted by two physicians who judged each study as “no rest study necessary” or “rest study necessary”, by evaluating NC stress-only and NC + AC stress-only images. When there was disagreement between the two physicians, a third physician evaluated the studies. Thus, agreement between 2 out of 3 physicians was evaluated. The physicians assessed 214 more NC + AC images than NC images as “no rest study necessary” (17% of the study population). The number of no-rest-study-required was significantly higher for NC + AC studies compared to NC studies (859 vs 645 cases (p < 0.0001). In the final report according to clinical routine, ischemia or infarction was reported in 23 patients, assessed as “no rest study necessary” (22 NC + AC cases; 8 NC cases), (no statistically significant difference). In 11 of these, the final report stated “suspected/possible ischemia or infarction in a small area”. Adding AC stress-only images to NC stress-only images reduce the number of unnecessary rest studies substantially

  19. Studying Satellite Image Quality Based on the Fusion Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Wassai, Firouz Abdullah; Al-Zaky, Ali A

    2011-01-01

    Various and different methods can be used to produce high-resolution multispectral images from high-resolution panchromatic image (PAN) and low-resolution multispectral images (MS), mostly on the pixel level. However, the jury is still out on the benefits of a fused image compared to its original images. There is also a lack of measures for assessing the objective quality of the spatial resolution for the fusion methods. Therefore, an objective quality of the spatial resolution assessment for fusion images is required. So, this study attempts to develop a new qualitative assessment to evaluate the spatial quality of the pan sharpened images by many spatial quality metrics. Also, this paper deals with a comparison of various image fusion techniques based on pixel and feature fusion techniques.

  20. Is proportion burned severely related to daily area burned?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ecological effects of forest fires burning with high severity are long-lived and have the greatest impact on vegetation successional trajectories, as compared to low-to-moderate severity fires. The primary drivers of high severity fire are unclear, but it has been hypothesized that wind-driven, large fire-growth days play a significant role, particularly on large fires in forested ecosystems. Here, we examined the relative proportion of classified burn severity for individual daily areas burned that occurred during 42 large forest fires in central Idaho and western Montana from 2005 to 2007 and 2011. Using infrared perimeter data for wildfires with five or more consecutive days of mapped perimeters, we delineated 2697 individual daily areas burned from which we calculated the proportions of each of three burn severity classes (high, moderate, and low) using the differenced normalized burn ratio as mapped for large fires by the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project. We found that the proportion of high burn severity was weakly correlated (Kendall τ = 0.299) with size of daily area burned (DAB). Burn severity was highly variable, even for the largest (95th percentile) in DAB, suggesting that other variables than fire extent influence the ecological effects of fires. We suggest that these results do not support the prioritization of large runs during fire rehabilitation efforts, since the underlying assumption in this prioritization is a positive relationship between severity and area burned in a day. (letters)

  1. Bacterial and fungal colonization of burn wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Lessa Soares de Macedo

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study of fungal and bacterial flora of burn wounds was carried out from February 2004 to February 2005 at the Burns Unit of Hospital Regional da Asa Norte, Brasília, Brazil. During the period of the study, 203 patients were treated at the Burns Unit. Wound swab cultures were assessed at weekly intervals for four weeks. Three hundred and fifty four sampling procedures (surface swabs were performed from the burn wounds. The study revealed that bacterial colonization reached 86.6% within the first week. Although the gram-negative organisms, as a group, were more predominant, Staphylococcus aureus (28.4% was the most prevalent organism in the first week. It was however surpassed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa form third week onwards. For S. aureus and P. aeruginosa vancomycin and polymyxin were found to be the most effective drugs. Most of the isolates showed high level resistance to antimicrobial agents. Fungi were found to colonize the burn wound late during the second week postburn, with a peak incidence during the third and fourth weeks. Species identification of fungi revealed that Candida tropicalis was the most predominant, followed by Candida parapsilosis. It is crucial for every burn institution to determine the specific pattern of burn wound microbial colonization, the time-related changes in the dominant flora, and the antimicrobial sensitivity profiles. This would enable early treatment of imminent septic episodes with proper empirical systemic antibiotics, without waiting for culture results, thus improving the overall infection-related morbidity and mortality.

  2. The application of FORMOSAT-2 high-temporal- and high-spatial resolution imagery for monitoring open straw burning and carbon emission detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Liu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rice is produced in more than 95 countries worldwide and is a staple food for over half of the world's population. Rice is also a major food crop of Taiwan. There are numerous rice crops planted on the western plains of Taiwan, and, after the harvest season, the left-over straw is often burned on-site. The air pollutants from the burning emissions include CO2, CO, CH4 and other suspended particles, most of these being the greenhouse gases which cause global climate change. In this study FORMOSAT-2 satellite images and ground-truth data from 2008 and 2009 are used to conduct supervised classification and calculate the extent of the straw burning areas. It was found that 10% of the paddies in the study area were burned after harvest during this 2-yr period. On this pro rata basis, we calculated the overall carbon emissions from the burning of the straw. The findings showed that these few farmers produced up to 34 000 tons of carbon emissions in 2008, and 40 000 tons in 2009. The study results indicate that remotely sensed images can be used to efficiently evaluate the important characteristics for carbon emission detection. It also provides quantitative results that are relevant to tracking sources of transport pollution, postharvest burning, and Asian dust in Taiwan.

  3. Burn Teams and Burn Centers: The Importance of a Comprehensive Team Approach to Burn Care

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M.; Mecott-Rivera, Gabriel A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Herndon, David N

    2009-01-01

    Advances in burn care have been colossal, but while extra work is needed, it is clear that the organized effort of burn teams can continue making improvements in survival rates and quality of life possible for patients. Burn patients are unique, representing the most severe model of trauma,33 and hence this necessitates treatment in the best facilities available for that endeavor. Burn centers have developed to meet these intricate needs but can only function productively and most efficiently...

  4. A simulation study on image reconstruction in magnetic particle imaging with field-free-line encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Kenya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present image reconstruction methods for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) with a field-free-line (FFL) encoding scheme and to propose the use of the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm for improving the image quality of MPI. The feasibility of these methods was investigated by computer simulations, in which the projection data were generated by summing up the Fourier harmonics obtained from the MPI signals based on the Langevin function. Images were reconstructed from the generated projection data using the filtered backprojection (FBP) method and the ML-EM algorithm. The effects of the gradient of selection magnetic field (SMF), the strength of drive magnetic field (DMF), the diameter of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and the number of projection data on the image quality of the reconstructed images were investigated. The spatial resolution of the reconstructed images became better with increasing gradient of SMF and with increasing diameter of MNPs u...

  5. Segmented images and 3D images for studying the anatomical structures in MRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sook; Chung, Min Suk; Cho, Jae Hyun

    2004-05-01

    For identifying the pathological findings in MRIs, the anatomical structures in MRIs should be identified in advance. For studying the anatomical structures in MRIs, an education al tool that includes the horizontal, coronal, sagittal MRIs of entire body, corresponding segmented images, 3D images, and browsing software is necessary. Such an educational tool, however, is hard to obtain. Therefore, in this research, such an educational tool which helps medical students and doctors study the anatomical structures in MRIs was made as follows. A healthy, young Korean male adult with standard body shape was selected. Six hundred thirteen horizontal MRIs of the entire body were scanned and inputted to the personal computer. Sixty anatomical structures in the horizontal MRIs were segmented to make horizontal segmented images. Coronal, sagittal MRIs and coronal, sagittal segmented images were made. 3D images of anatomical structures in the segmented images were reconstructed by surface rendering method. Browsing software of the MRIs, segmented images, and 3D images was composed. This educational tool that includes horizontal, coronal, sagittal MRIs of entire body, corresponding segmented images, 3D images, and browsing software is expected to help medical students and doctors study anatomical structures in MRIs.

  6. On the Burning of Plutonium Originating from Light Water Reactor Use in a Fast Molten Salt Reactor—A Neutron Physical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Merk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An efficient burning of the plutonium produced during light water reactor (LWR operation has the potential to significantly improve the sustainability indices of LWR operations. The work offers a comparison of the efficiency of Pu burning in different reactor configurations—a molten salt fast reactor, a LWR with mixed oxide (MOX fuel, and a sodium cooled fast reactor. The calculations are performed using the HELIOS 2 code. All results are evaluated against the plutonium burning efficiency determined in the Consommation Accrue de Plutonium dans les Réacteurs à Neutrons RApides (CAPRA project. The results are discussed with special view on the increased sustainability of LWR use in the case of successful avoidance of an accumulation of Pu which otherwise would have to be forwarded to a final disposal. A strategic discussion is given about the unavoidable plutonium production, the possibility to burn the plutonium to avoid a burden for the future generations which would have to be controlled.

  7. A Study of Factors involved in possible regeneration of Atlantic White Cedar in a recently burned area in the Great Dismal Swamp

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Historically white cedar has managed to regenerate without benefit of controlled burns and it seems that .most wild fires occur during the dry season. It was...

  8. Epidemiology of Pediatric Burn Injuries in Isfahan, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Rafii, Mohammad Hadi; Saberi, Hamid Reza; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad; Fakharian, Esmaeil; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Background Burns are major cause of death and disability worldwide, particularly in the developing countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and causes of burns in children under the age of 15 years in Isfahan province, Iran. Patients and Methods All children admitted to the burn center of Isfahan, the largest city in central Iran, between 2007 and 2009 were enrolled in this study. We analyzed the data on age, sex, location, cause and spread of the burn, durat...

  9. Imaging intracranial haemangiopericytomas: study of seven cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, M.; Sakai, H.; Onoue, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Abe, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-25-8 Nishi-Shinbashi, Minato-ku, 105-8461, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-03-01

    Imaging features of intracranial haemangiopericytomas are similar to those of meningiomas. Preoperative identification of these tumours is important because of their aggressive nature, high rate of local recurrence and propensity for late metastasis. We reviewed the CT, MRI and angiographic findings in seven pathologically proved haemangiopericytomas, to determine if imaging characteristics might distinguish them from meningiomas. None showed hyperostosis or tumour calcification. All showed marked enhancement. Five had prominent internal signal voids, suggesting feeding arteries. On angiography, one had only pial-cortical supply but six also had meningeal supply; all showed a persistent stain. Only one had multiple ''corkscrew'' feeding vessels. (orig.)

  10. Simulation study on radiative imaging of combustion flame in furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Radiative imaging of combustion flame in furnace of power plant plays an increasingly important role in combustion diagnosis. This paper presents a new method for calculating the radiative imaging of three-dimensional (3D) combustion flame based on Monte Carlo method and optical lens imaging. Numerical simulation case was used in this study. Radiative images were calculated and images obtained can not only present the energy distribution on the charge-coupled device (CCD) camera target plane but also reflect the energy distribution condition in the simulation furnace. Finally the relationships between volume elements and energy shares were also discussed.

  11. Burns and beauty nails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Richard E; Marcotte, Marie-Eve; Bégin, François

    2013-01-01

    A case involving a five-month-old girl brought to the emergency department with burns over her abdomen is described. The child was reported to have spilled two small bottles of beauty nail adhesive on her clothes while her mother was preparing dinner. After undressing the infant, the mother discovered several lesions on the child’s abdomen and quickly sought medical attention. Given the unusual circumstances of the presentation, the child was hospitalized for both treatment and supervision. The beauty nail adhesive contained cyanoacrylate. In addition to its well-appreciated adhesive capacity, cyanoacrylate, in the presence of cotton or other tissues, is known to produce an exothermic reaction that may cause burns. Cyanoacrylate-based products, due to their possible adverse effects, should be kept away from children as advised. Odd injuries should always raise concerns about the possibility of inflicted injury. PMID:24421671

  12. [Chemical and electrical burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Raymond

    2002-12-15

    Chemical burns are less frequent in routine practice, but could be very serious owing to the complexity and severity of their actions. Influx of casualty after a civil disaster (industrial explosion) or military (war or terrorism) is possible. The action of these agents could be prolonged and deep. In addition to the skin, respiratory lesions and general intoxication could be observed. The urgent local treatment rely essentially on prolonged washing. Prevention and adequate emergency care could limit the serious consequences of these accidents. Accidents (thermal burns or electrisations) due to high or low voltage electricity are frequent. The severity is linked with the affected skin but especially with internal lesions, muscular, neurological or cardiac lesions. All cases of electrisation need hospital care. Locally, the lesions are often deep with difficult surgical repairs and often require amputation. Aesthetic and functional sequela are therefore frequent. Secondary complications could appear several months after the accident: cataract, dysesthesia and hypotonia. PMID:12621941

  13. The use of ATSR active fire counts for estimating relative patterns of biomass burning- a study from the boreal forest region

    OpenAIRE

    Kasischke, Eric S; Hewson, J. H; B. J. Stocks; G. R. van der Werf; J. T. Randerson

    2003-01-01

    Satellite fire products have the potential to construct inter-annual time series of fire activity, but estimating area burned requires considering biases introduced by orbiting geometry, fire behavior, and the presence of clouds and smoke. Here we evaluated the performance of fire counts from the Advanced Thermal Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) for the boreal forest region using area burned information from other sources. We found ATSR detection rate varied between regions and different years, bei...

  14. Burns and beauty nails

    OpenAIRE

    Richard E. Bélanger; Marcotte, Marie-Eve; Bégin, François

    2013-01-01

    A case involving a five-month-old girl brought to the emergency department with burns over her abdomen is described. The child was reported to have spilled two small bottles of beauty nail adhesive on her clothes while her mother was preparing dinner. After undressing the infant, the mother discovered several lesions on the child’s abdomen and quickly sought medical attention. Given the unusual circumstances of the presentation, the child was hospitalized for both treatment and supervision. T...

  15. Burns: Treatment and Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Burns can cause extensive and devastating injuries of the head and neck. Prevention of the initial injury must always be a priority, but once an injury has occurred, then prevention of progression of the damage together with survival of the patient must be the immediate goals. The acute care will have a major influence on the subsequent scarring, reconstructive need, and long-term outcome. In the majority of cases, the reconstruction will involve restoration of form and function to the soft t...

  16. Gold standards for primary care of burn management

    OpenAIRE

    Fatih Zor; Nail Ersöz; Yalçın Külahçı; Emin Kapı; Mehmet Bozkurt

    2009-01-01

    Every year, about 2.5 million people are affected from burns in the world. In our country there is no reliable database related to this subject. There are ongoing studies about the epidemiology of burns in Turkey. After burn injury had represent many various complications, such as myocardial infarction, cardiac deficiency, acute hypertension, endocarditis, thromboembolism, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, respiratuar failure, renal failure, gastric ulcus, ileus, sepsis, coagulopathy and anemia. Su...

  17. Plasmid Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Isolated Bacteria From Burned Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Beige, Fahimeh; Baseri Salehi, Majid; Bahador, Nima; Mobasherzadeh, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, the treatment of burned patients is difficult because of the high frequency of infection with antibiotic resistance bacteria. Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the level of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria and its relation with the existence of plasmid. Materials and Methods: The samples were collected from two hundred twenty hospitalized burned patients in Isfahan burn hospital during a three-month period (March 2012 to June 2012). The samp...

  18. Enhancement of burn wounds healing by platelet dressing

    OpenAIRE

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Nezami, Nariman; Mirzajanzadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of platelet dressing in the treatment of burn wounds and compare its results with silver sulfadiazine dressing. Material and methods: Between 21 march 2011 to 21 September, 50 patients with burn injuries were selected by a randomized double-blind controlled trial. In order to eliminate the biological and personal variables among the various treated burn wounds, in the same patient, distal or proximal, lateral or medial p...

  19. Summer camps for children with burn injuries: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Gary R; Lobato, Debra

    2010-01-01

    The first summer camps for children with burn injuries started over 25 years ago, and as of 2008, there were 60 camps worldwide. This review examines the literature on summer pediatric burn camps. The authors describe common characteristics of burn camp structure, activities, and staffing and then examine the scientific evidence regarding the effect of burn camp programs on campers and camp staff volunteers. A search of Pubmed and Psychinfo databases from 1970 to 2008 for articles related to pediatric burn summer camps identified 17 articles, of which 13 fit the inclusion criteria. Existing literature consists primarily of qualitative studies, suggesting that burn camp can decrease camper isolation, improve self-esteem, and promote coping and social skills. Studies examining volunteer staff at burn camp have consistently found that there are both personal and professional benefits. Quantitative studies of self-esteem have yielded equivocal results. No studies have examined safety or the effect of burn camp on medical or rehabilitation outcomes. For the past 25 years, pediatric summer camps for children with burn injuries have played an important rehabilitation role and provided a strong community that benefits both campers and staff. Future research using more rigorous research methods and examining a broader range of outcomes (eg, safety and medical/rehabilitation outcomes) is recommended. PMID:20644489

  20. Ventilator associated pneumonia in major paediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Alan David; Deal, Cailin; Argent, Andrew Charles; Hudson, Donald Anthony; Rode, Heinz

    2014-09-01

    More than three-quarters of deaths related to major burns are a consequence of infection, which is frequently ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). A retrospective study was performed, over a five-year period, of ventilated children with major burns. 92 patients were included in the study; their mean age was 3.5 years and their mean total body surface area burn was 30%. 62% of the patients sustained flame burns, and 31% scalds. The mean ICU stay was 10.6 days (range 2-61 days) and the mean ventilation time was 8.4 days (range 2-45 days). There were 59 documented episodes of pneumonia in 52 patients with a rate of 30 infections per 1000 ventilator days. Length of ventilation and the presence of inhalational injury correlate with the incidence of VAP. 17.4% of the patients died (n=16); half of these deaths may be attributed directly to pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii and Staphylococcus aureus were the most prominent aetiological organisms. Broncho-alveolar lavage was found to be more specific and sensitive at identifying the organism than other methods. This study highlights the importance of implementing strictly enforced strategies for the prevention, detection and management of pneumonia in the presence of major burns. PMID:24468505

  1. Technology of straw burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the example of application of straw as fuel for a power plant with capacity of 1 MW, which is reconstructed from an old coal power plant. The article shows the advantages of straw as a source of energy, analyses the physical and chemical characteristics and temperature parameters, typical for straw. Moreover it indicates the specific circumstances of the straw burning processes. The paper focuses also on preparation and storing of straw for public use and in the energy sector. Comparing with fossil fuel, straw is a low-caloric natural source, whose energy value reached to 14-19 MJ/kg. This value depends partly on the kind of straw and its water or moisture content (MC). To the basic characteristics of energy aspects belong: - energy or heating value (HV) MJ/kg (in LPG it is MJ/ m3); - burning temperature; - melting point - temperature of ash; - weight kg/m3; - density; - Energy density MWh /m3; - Energy potential GJ/t; - Size-homogeneity of straw; - Water or Moisture Content (MC). The above mentioned characteristics have an influence on technical parameters of straw-burning boiler. These parameters define conditions process of straw preparation. (author)

  2. Olympus Imaging Fraud Scandal: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Dennis; Madrigal, Marion; Jackson, Maura

    2014-01-01

    This case examines the two decade long tobashi scheme by Olympus Imaging Executives to hide $1.7 billion in losses. In the 1980s, a soaring yen and falling dollar caused bottom line income problems for many Japanese companies. Some companies sought to offset the declining revenue with zaiteku, a form of speculative investment. While early…

  3. Behaviors study of image registration algorithms in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Study the behaviors of image registration algorithms, and analyze the elements which influence the performance of image registrations. Methods: Pre-known corresponding coordinates were appointed for reference image and moving image, and then the influence of region of interest (ROI) selection, transformation function initial parameters and coupled parameter spaces on registration results were studied with a software platform developed in home. Results: Region of interest selection had a manifest influence on registration performance. An improperly chosen ROI resulted in a bad registration. Transformation function initial parameters selection based on pre-known information could improve the accuracy of image registration. Coupled parameter spaces would enhance the dependence of image registration algorithm on ROI selection. Conclusions: It is necessary for clinic IGRT to obtain a ROI selection strategy (depending on specific commercial software) correlated to tumor sites. Three suggestions for image registration technique developers are automatic selection of the initial parameters of transformation function based on pre-known information, developing specific image registration algorithm for specific image feature, and assembling real-time image registration algorithms according to tumor sites selected by software user. (authors)

  4. How are the temporary workers? Quality of life and burn-out in a call center temporary employment in Italy: a pilot observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mannocci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES. The aim of this study was to quantify the level of health related quality of life and burnout in a call centers sample of precarious workers. METHODS. An observational study was carried out in Italy. A self-reported anonymous questionnaire was administered to temporary workers in order to estimate burn-out and quality of life levels. RESULTS. 227 questionnaires were collected. 78% of the sample was female and the mean age was 35.48 years (SD = 9.91. Among the participants, 40% were smokers, 42% regularly drinkers, 65% changed the body weight (more than 5 kg, in 1 year. The mental component score (MCS was significantly better in subject that have a regularly life style, for example in those no change their body weight (p = 0.001, sleep more than 7 hours (p = 0.018 and followed a diet (p = 0.035. The DP (depersonalization is significant higher in former smokers (p = 0.031, in underweight subjects (p = 0.025 and in the group that have a precarious employment of over 2 years (p = 0.013. CONCLUSIONS. This investigation shows that in this particular category of atypical workers depressive symptoms and quality of life were lower than the general population. It is important to underline that the interpretation of the results is limited partly by the observational character of the study.

  5. In situ oil burning in the marshland environment : soil temperatures resulting from crude oil and diesel fuel burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unique challenge associated with oil spill cleanups in sensitive marsh environments was discussed. Mechanical recovery of crude or refined hydrocarbons in wetlands may cause more damage to the marsh than the oil itself. This study evaluated whether in situ burning of oiled marshlands would provide a less damaging alternative than mechanical recovery. This was done through a series of 6 crude oil and 5 diesel fuel burns conducted in a test tank to examine the impact of intentional burning of oil spilled in a wetlands environment. There are several factors which may influence how well such an environment would recover from an in situ oil burn, such as plant species, fuel type and load, water level, soil type, and burn duration. This paper focused on soil, air and water temperatures, as well as total heat fluxes that resulted when 3 plant species were exposed to full-scale in situ burns that were created by burning diesel fuel and crude oil. The soil temperatures were monitored during the test burn at three different soil/water elevations for 700 second burn exposures. A total of 184 plant sods were harvested from marshlands in southern Louisiana and were subjected to the burning fuel. They were instrumental in characterizing the thermal and chemical stress that occur during an in-situ burn. The plants were inserted into the test tanks at various water and soil depths. The results indicated that diesel fuel and crude oil burns produced similar soil temperature profiles at each of three plant sod elevations. Although in-situ burning did not appear to remediate oil that had penetrated into the soil, it did effectively remove floating oil from the water surface, thereby preventing it from potentially contaminating adjacent habitats and penetrating the soil when the water recedes. The regrowth and recovery of the plants will be described in a separate report. 25 refs., 7 tabs., 15 figs

  6. Prospective Image Registration for Automated Scan Prescription of Follow-up Knee Images in Quantitative Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein, Janet; Schooler, Joseph; Crane, Jason C; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-01-01

    Consistent scan prescription for MRI of the knee is very important for accurate comparison of images in a longitudinal study. However, consistent scan region selection is difficult due the complexity of the knee joint. We propose a novel method for registering knee images using a mutual information registration algorithm to align images in a baseline and follow-up exam. The output of the registration algorithm, three translations and three Euler angles, is then used to redefine the region to ...

  7. Time-gated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated Raman scattering: Studies on image contrast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Divakar Rao; H S Patel; B Jain; P K Gupta

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we report the development of experimental set-up for timegated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated Raman scattering. Our studies on the contrast of time-gated images show that for a given optical thickness, the image contrast is better for sample with lower scattering coefficient and higher physical thickness, and that the contrast improves with decreasing value of anisotropy parameters of the scatterers. These results are consistent with time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. River ecosystem response to prescribed vegetation burning on Blanket Peatland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee E Brown

    Full Text Available Catchment-scale land-use change is recognised as a major threat to aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem functioning globally. In the UK uplands rotational vegetation burning is practised widely to boost production of recreational game birds, and while some recent studies have suggested burning can alter river water quality there has been minimal attention paid to effects on aquatic biota. We studied ten rivers across the north of England between March 2010 and October 2011, five of which drained burned catchments and five from unburned catchments. There were significant effects of burning, season and their interaction on river macroinvertebrate communities, with rivers draining burned catchments having significantly lower taxonomic richness and Simpson's diversity. ANOSIM revealed a significant effect of burning on macroinvertebrate community composition, with typically reduced Ephemeroptera abundance and diversity and greater abundance of Chironomidae and Nemouridae. Grazer and collector-gatherer feeding groups were also significantly less abundant in rivers draining burned catchments. These biotic changes were associated with lower pH and higher Si, Mn, Fe and Al in burned systems. Vegetation burning on peatland therefore has effects beyond the terrestrial part of the system where the management intervention is being practiced. Similar responses of river macroinvertebrate communities have been observed in peatlands disturbed by forestry activity across northern Europe. Finally we found river ecosystem changes similar to those observed in studies of wild and prescribed forest fires across North America and South Africa, illustrating some potentially generic effects of fire on aquatic ecosystems.

  9. River ecosystem response to prescribed vegetation burning on Blanket Peatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee E; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Palmer, Sheila M; Aspray, Katie L; Holden, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Catchment-scale land-use change is recognised as a major threat to aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem functioning globally. In the UK uplands rotational vegetation burning is practised widely to boost production of recreational game birds, and while some recent studies have suggested burning can alter river water quality there has been minimal attention paid to effects on aquatic biota. We studied ten rivers across the north of England between March 2010 and October 2011, five of which drained burned catchments and five from unburned catchments. There were significant effects of burning, season and their interaction on river macroinvertebrate communities, with rivers draining burned catchments having significantly lower taxonomic richness and Simpson's diversity. ANOSIM revealed a significant effect of burning on macroinvertebrate community composition, with typically reduced Ephemeroptera abundance and diversity and greater abundance of Chironomidae and Nemouridae. Grazer and collector-gatherer feeding groups were also significantly less abundant in rivers draining burned catchments. These biotic changes were associated with lower pH and higher Si, Mn, Fe and Al in burned systems. Vegetation burning on peatland therefore has effects beyond the terrestrial part of the system where the management intervention is being practiced. Similar responses of river macroinvertebrate communities have been observed in peatlands disturbed by forestry activity across northern Europe. Finally we found river ecosystem changes similar to those observed in studies of wild and prescribed forest fires across North America and South Africa, illustrating some potentially generic effects of fire on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24278367

  10. Study of scattering in bi-dimensional neutron radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of neutron scattering frequently causes distortions in neutron radiographic images and, thus, reduces the quality. In this project, a type of filter, comprised of cadmium (a neutron absorber), was used in the form of a grid to correct this effect. This device generated image data in the discrete shadow bands of the absorber, components relative to neutron scattering on the test object and surroundings. Scattering image data processing, together with the original neutron radiographic image, resulted in a corrected image with improved edge delineation and, thus, greater definition in the neutron radiographic image of the test object. The objective of this study is to propose a theoretical/experimental methodology that is capable of eliminating the components relative to neutron scattering in neutron radiographic images, coming from the material that composes the test object and the materials that compose the surrounding area. (author)

  11. Study of non-classical light imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-classical light that generates through the optical parametric down-conversion process by using an optical parametric oscillator is introduced, and the imaging system based on the light is built. The characteristics of the light and the spatial resolution of the image are studied. The light irradiates directly on the object plate, producing a mass of signal photons, then the signal photons are collected by the charge-coupled device. The output electrical signal is collected by a high-speed data collection card and processed with software. Finally, the object image is acquired, and its revised image is obtained by image processing. The results indicate that the resolution of the image based on the non-classical infrared light is 1.43 times that of infrared coherent light. The non-classical light can be widely used for high-resolution imaging, spectrum analysis, and micro-biological sample detection.

  12. [Inherit enterprising spirit of burn discipline and meet the new challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y H

    2016-01-01

    Burn is a common trauma in peace time and war. Burn care was not designated as a specific discipline but a subspecialty of general surgery in China until the 1950s. In 1958, along with the development of metallurgical industry in China, the number of burn patients was increased remarkably, followed by establishment of modern burn departments. A steel worker sustaining a burn injury with size of 89% total burn surface area (TBSA) and full-thickness wound size of 23% TBSA was successfully cured by burn experts of Shanghai Guangci Hospital (renamed Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to the School of Medicine of Shanghai Jiao Tong University). This was considered as a miracle in the history of burn treatment in the world. Thenceforth a number of burn patients with size over 80% TBSA were saved in Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing, Xi'an, and other cities. However, with rapid advances in burn treatment, it was soon recognized that one should fully grasp the science of the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. To fulfill these demands, specialists devoted themselves to the study of basic problems, and they made significant and valuable contributions to the knowledge concerning basic problems in burn injury, followed by significant improvements in burn care. In the meantime, Chinese Burn Association and Chinese Journal of Burns were inaugurated. An overall strategy for treatment of severe burn patients with Chinese characteristics was established. However, it is also important to inherit traditional ideologies, namely"morality, diligence, excellence, and creativity". PMID:27426063

  13. The Birmingham Burn Centre archive: A photographic history of post-war burn care in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwicke, Joseph; Kohlhardt, Angus; Moiemen, Naiem

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Research Council Burns and Industrial Injuries Unit at the Birmingham Accident Hospital pioneered civilian burn care and research in the United Kingdom during the post-war years. A photographic archive has been discovered that documents this period from 1945 to 1975. The aim of this project was to sort, digitize and archive the images in a secure format for future reference. The photographs detail the management of burns patients, from injury causation and surgical intervention, to nursing care, rehabilitation and long-term follow-up. A total of 2650 images files were collected from over 600 patients. Many novel surgical, nursing, dressing and rehabilitation strategies are documented and discussed. We have chosen to report part of the archive under the sections of (1) aseptic and antimicrobial burn care; (2) burn excision and wound closure; (3) rehabilitation, reconstruction and long-term outcomes; (4) accident prevention; and (5) response to a major burns incident. The Birmingham collection gives us a valuable insight into the approach to civilian burn care in the post-war years, and we present a case from the archive to the modern day, the longest clinical photographic follow-up to date. PMID:25749201

  14. Southeast Asian Summer Burning: A Micro Pulse Lidar Network Study of Aerosol Particle Physical Properties near Fires in Borneo and Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolli, S.; Welton, E. J.; Holben, B. N.; Campbell, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    In August and September 2012, as part of the continuing Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) project, three autonomous elastic-scattering 355 nm lidars were deployed by the NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) to Sumatra and Borneo, measuring the vertical profile of aerosol particle scattering during peak burning season. In coordination with the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a regional characterization of aerosol particle physical properties and distribution was performed. In addition to a permanent regional network site at Singapore, the three temporary sites established for this research include Jambi (Sumatra, Indonesia), Kuching (northwest Borneo, Malaysia) and Palangkaraya (south-central Borneo, Indonesia). In this paper, we discuss the mission and instruments, and introduce data products available to the community through the MPLNET online website. We further describe initial results of the study, including a contrast of mean vertical scattering profiles versus those observed near active fire sources at Jambi and Palangkaraya, and resolve longer-range particle evolution at receptor sites, like Kuching, that are most commonly 1-2 days downwind of larger fire complexes.

  15. Evolution of bacterial flora in burn wounds: key role of environmental disinfection in control of infection

    OpenAIRE

    Taneja, Neelam; Chari, PS; Singh, Malkit; Singh, Gagandeep; Biswal, Manisha; Sharma, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial flora in burn patients undergoes change over period of time and is dependent upon many factors. Study of burn flora is not only helpful in locating entry of multidrug resistant bacterial strains into the unit’s usual flora but also in determining current antibiotic susceptibilities. Since no studies are available from India that have studied sequential emergence of different microorganisms in burn wound, present study was carried out to study evolution of bacterial flora in burn wou...

  16. Biomass burning fuel consumption dynamics in the tropics and subtropics assessed from satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andela, Niels; van der Werf, Guido R.; Kaiser, Johannes W.; van Leeuwen, Thijs T.; Wooster, Martin J.; Lehmann, Caroline E. R.

    2016-06-01

    Landscape fires occur on a large scale in (sub)tropical savannas and grasslands, affecting ecosystem dynamics, regional air quality and concentrations of atmospheric trace gasses. Fuel consumption per unit of area burned is an important but poorly constrained parameter in fire emission modelling. We combined satellite-derived burned area with fire radiative power (FRP) data to derive fuel consumption estimates for land cover types with low tree cover in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Australia. We developed a new approach to estimate fuel consumption, based on FRP data from the polar-orbiting Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the geostationary Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) in combination with MODIS burned-area estimates. The fuel consumption estimates based on the geostationary and polar-orbiting instruments showed good agreement in terms of spatial patterns. We used field measurements of fuel consumption to constrain our results, but the large variation in fuel consumption in both space and time complicated this comparison and absolute fuel consumption estimates remained more uncertain. Spatial patterns in fuel consumption could be partly explained by vegetation productivity and fire return periods. In South America, most fires occurred in savannas with relatively long fire return periods, resulting in comparatively high fuel consumption as opposed to the more frequently burning savannas in Sub-Saharan Africa. Strikingly, we found the infrequently burning interior of Australia to have higher fuel consumption than the more productive but frequently burning savannas in northern Australia. Vegetation type also played an important role in explaining the distribution of fuel consumption, by affecting both fuel build-up rates and fire return periods. Hummock grasslands, which were responsible for a large share of Australian biomass burning, showed larger fuel build-up rates than equally productive grasslands in

  17. ALGORITHM FOR POST-BURN BACTERIAL SEPSIS DIAGNOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Guzenko, B. V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with extensive deep burns the most severe of all infectious and inflammatory complications is sepsis which causes high death rate.The purpose of our work was to develop the algorithm of bacterial sepsis diagnosis in patients with severe burn disease.Materials and methods. The study involved 140 burned patients divided into two groups: Group 1 – 78 patients who underwent necrectomy within 3-7 days after the burn, Group 2  (control) – 62 patients with necrectomy perfor...

  18. Nuclear Image Analysis Study of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Meeja; Baek, Taehwa; Baek, Jongho; Son, Hyunjin; Kang, Dongwook; Kim, Jooheon; Lee, Hyekyung

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a subjective disagreement about nuclear chromatin in the field of pathology. Objective values of red, green, and blue (RGB) light intensities for nuclear chromatin can be obtained through a quantitative analysis using digital images. Methods We examined 10 cases of well differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the rectum, small cell lung carcinomas, and moderately differentiated squamous cell lung carcinomas respectively. For each case, we selected 30 representative cells a...

  19. Nuclear fuel burn-up economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period 1981-1985, for the needs of Utility Organization, Beograd, and with the support of the Scientific Council of SR Srbija, work has been performed on the study entitled 'Nuclear Fuel Burn-up Economy'. The forst [phase, completed during the year 1983 comprised: comparative analysis of commercial NPP from the standpoint of nuclear fuel requirements; development of methods for fuel burn-up analysis; specification of elements concerning the nuclear fuel for the tender documentation. The present paper gives the short description of the purpose, content and results achieved in the up-to-now work on the study. (author)

  20. Analysis of medical expenditure and socio-economic status in patients with ocular chemical burns in East China: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Qihua

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little has been known regarding the relationship between ocular chemical injury and victims’ medical expenditure, income loss and socio-economic status changes. So we conduct this retrospective cross-sectional study in patients with ocular chemical burns in East China. Methods Fifty-six patients were enrolled and required to complete a self-report questionnaire consisting of the following contents: entire expenditure on medical treatment; the victims’ personal and household per capita income, and income loss caused by the injury; and the changes of socioeconomic status as well. Results The median expense of medical treatment was CNY 40,000 (approximately US$5,900. The medical expenditure rose significantly with increased injury severity, prolonged hospital stay, and increased frequency of surgery. More than half victims (51.8 %, 29/56 paid all or the majority of medical expense by themselves. The expense of only 5 victims was mainly paid by medical insurance, accounting for less than ten percent (8.9 %, 5/56. The victims’ personal and household per capita income both decreased significantly after the injury, with the median reduction being CNY 24,000 and CNY 7,800 (approximately US$3600 and US$1200 per year respectively. The reduction amplitude of personal and household per capita income rose with increased injury severity and prolonged time of care required. The injury caused emotional depression or anxiety in 76.8 % (43/56 victims, and the relationship with their relatives got worse in 51.9 % (29/56 patients. Moreover, only 21.4 % (12/56 patients felt that the whole society gave them care and concern after the injury, whereas 46.4 % (26/56 and 28.6 % (16/56 felt indifference or discrimination from society as a whole (X2 = 16.916, P = 0.028. Conclusions The medical expense was a huge economic burden to most victims of ocular chemical burns, and personal and household per capita income of the