WorldWideScience

Sample records for burkholderia sp strain

  1. Burkholderia latens sp. nov., Burkholderia diffusa sp. nov., Burkholderia arboris sp. nov., Burkholderia seminalis sp. nov. and Burkholderia metallica sp. nov., novel species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlaere, Elke; Lipuma, John J; Baldwin, Adam; Henry, Deborah; De Brandt, Evie; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Speert, David; Dowson, Chris; Vandamme, Peter

    2008-07-01

    The taxonomic position of five recA gene clusters of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) isolates was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The levels of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequence similarity, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data and the intermediate DNA-DNA binding values demonstrated that these five clusters represented five novel species within the Bcc. Biochemical identification of these species is difficult, as is the case for most Bcc species. However, identification of these novel species can be accomplished through recA gene sequence analysis, MLST and BOX-PCR profiling and by recA RFLP analysis. For diagnostic laboratories, recA gene sequence analysis offers the best combination of accuracy and simplicity. Based on these results, we propose five novel Bcc species, Burkholderia latens sp. nov. (type strain FIRENZE 3(T) =LMG 24064(T) =CCUG 54555(T)), Burkholderia diffusa sp. nov. (type strain AU1075(T) =LMG 24065(T) =CCUG 54558(T)), Burkholderia arboris sp. nov. (type strain ES0263A(T) =LMG 24066(T) =CCUG 54561(T)), Burkholderia seminalis sp. nov. (type strain AU0475(T) =LMG 24067(T) =CCUG 54564(T)) and Burkholderia metallica sp. nov. (type strain AU0553(T) =LMG 24068(T) =CCUG 54567(T)). In the present study, we also demonstrate that Burkholderia ubonensis should be considered a member of the Bcc.

  2. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; Van Berkum, Peter; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, Tbk; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Howieson, John; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida collected at the Angico plantation, Mandiyu, Uruguay, in December 2006. A survey of symbionts of P. rigida in Uruguay demonstrated that this species is nodulated predominantly by Burkholderia microsymbionts. Moreover, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 is a highly efficient nitrogen fixing symbiont with this host. Currently, the only other sequenced isolate to fix with this host is Cupriavidus sp. UYPR2.512. Therefore, Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413 was selected for sequencing on the basis of its environmental and agricultural relevance to issues in global carbon cycling, alternative energy production, and biogeochemical importance, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain UYPR1.413, together with sequence and annotation. The 10,373,764 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 336 scaffolds of 342 contigs, contains 9759 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes.

  3. Burkholderia humi sp. nov., Burkholderia choica sp. nov., Burkholderia telluris sp. nov., Burkholderia terrestris sp. nov. and Burkholderia udeis sp. nov.: Burkholderia glathei-like bacteria from soil and rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Peter; De Brandt, Evie; Houf, Kurt; Salles, Joana Falcão; Dirk van Elsas, Jan; Spilker, Theodore; Lipuma, John J

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of partial gyrB gene sequences revealed six taxa in a group of 17 Burkholderia glathei-like isolates which were further examined by (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridizations, determination of the DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and an analysis of cell and colony morphology and more than 180 biochemical characteristics. The results demonstrated that one taxon consisting of three human clinical isolates represented Burkholderia zhejiangensis, a recently described methyl-parathion-degrading bacterium isolated from a wastewater-treatment system in China. The remaining taxa represented five novel species isolated from soil or rhizosphere soil samples, and could be distinguished by both genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. We therefore propose to formally classify these bacteria as Burkholderia humi sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22934(T) = CCUG 63059(T)), Burkholderia choica sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22940(T) = CCUG 63063(T)), Burkholderia telluris sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22936(T) = CCUG 63060(T)), Burkholderia udeis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27134(T) = CCUG 63061(T)) and Burkholderia terrestris sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22937(T) = CCUG 63062(T)).

  4. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, Tbk; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Nieuwoudtville, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. This plant persists in infertile, acidic and deep sandy soils, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176, which represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua, together with sequence and annotation. The 9,065,247 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 13 scaffolds of 65 contigs, contains 8369 protein-coding genes and 128 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal (Project ID 882).

  5. Burkholderia humisilvae sp. nov., Burkholderia solisilvae sp. nov. and Burkholderia rhizosphaerae sp. nov., isolated from forest soil and rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Chan; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2015-09-01

    Strains Y-12(T) and Y-47(T) were isolated from mountain forest soil and strain WR43(T) was isolated from rhizosphere soil, at Daejeon, Korea. The three strains grew at 10-55 °C (optimal growth at 28-30 °C), at pH 3.0-8.0 (optimal growth at pH 6.0) and in the presence of 0-4.0% (w/v) NaCl, growing optimally in the absence of added NaCl. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the three strains were found to belong to the genus Burkholderia, showing the closest phylogenetic similarity to Burkholderia diazotrophica JPY461(T) (97.2-97.7%); the similarity between the three sequences ranged from 98.3 to 98.7%. Additionally, the three strains formed a distinct group in phylogenetic trees based on the housekeeping genes recA and gyrB. The predominant ubiquinone was Q-8, the major fatty acids were C16 : 0 and C17  : 0 cyclo and the DNA G+C content of the novel isolates was 61.6-64.4 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness among the three strains and the type strains of the closest species of the genus Burkholderia was less than 50%. On the basis of 16S rRNA, recA and gyrB gene sequence similarities, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, the three strains represent three novel species within the genus Burkholderia, for which the names Burkholderia humisilvae sp. nov. (type strain Y-12(T)= KACC 17601(T) = NBRC 109933(T) = NCAIM B 02543(T)), Burkholderia solisilvae sp. nov. (type strain Y-47(T) = KACC 17602(T)= NBRC 109934(T) = NCAIM B 02539(T)) and Burkholderia rhizosphaerae sp. nov. (type strain WR43(T) = KACC 17603(T) = NBRC 109935(T) = NCAIM B 02541(T)) are proposed.

  6. Burkholderia cordobensis sp. nov., from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Walter O; Peeters, Charlotte; Cnockaert, Margo; Snauwaert, Cindy; Wall, Luis G; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Two Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from agricultural soils in Córdoba province in central Argentina. Their 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that they belong to the genus Burkholderia, with Burkholderia zhejiangensis as most closely related formally named species; this relationship was confirmed through comparative gyrB sequence analysis. Whole-cell fatty acid analysis supported their assignment to the genus Burkholderia. Burkholderia sp. strain YI23, for which a whole-genome sequence is available, represents the same taxon, as demonstrated by its highly similar 16S rRNA (100% similarity) and gyrB (99.1-99.7%) gene sequences. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and physiological and biochemical characterization further substantiated the genotypic and phenotypic distinctiveness of the Argentinian soil isolates, for which the name Burkholderia cordobensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain MMP81(T) ( = LMG 27620(T) = CCUG 64368(T)) as the type strain. © 2014 IUMS.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain PAMC28687, a potential octopine-utilizing bacterium isolated from Antarctica lichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, So-Ra; Yu, Sang-Cheol; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Oh, Tae-Jin

    2016-05-20

    We report the complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. PAMC28687, which was isolated from the Antarctica lichen Useea sp., for better understanding of its catabolic traits in utilizing octopine as a source of carbon/nitrogen between Burkholderia and lichen. The genome consists of three circular chromosomes with five circular plasmids for the total 6,881,273bp sized genome with a G+C content of 58.14%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Antimicrobial-Producing Burkholderia sp. Strains, MSh1 and MSh2, Isolated from Malaysian Tropical Peat Swamp Forest Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Yoong Kit; Gan, Han Ming; Yule, Catherine M.; Lee, Sui Mae

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequences of two antimicrobial-producing isolates, Burkholderia sp. strains MSh1 and MSh2, which were isolated from tropical peat swamp forest soil. Putative genes related to different antimicrobial production have been annotated in both genome sequences. PMID:25301661

  9. Transcriptional responses of the bacterium Burkholderia terrae BS001 to the fungal host Lyophyllum sp strain Karsten under soil-mimicking conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ul Haq, Irshad; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    In this study, the mycosphere isolate Burkholderia terrae BS001 was confronted with the soil fungus Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten on soil extract agar plates in order to examine its transcriptional responses over time. At the initial stages of the experiment (T1-day 3; T2-day 5), contact between

  10. Burkholderia monticola sp. nov., isolated from mountain soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Inwoo; Seo, Boram; Lee, Imchang; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik

    2015-02-01

    An ivory/yellow, Gram-stain-negative, short-rod-shaped, aerobic bacterial strain, designated JC2948(T), was isolated from a soil sample taken from Gwanak Mountain, Republic of Korea. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain JC2948(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia. The test strain showed highest sequence similarities to Burkholderia tropica LMG 22274(T) (97.6 %), Burkholderia acidipaludis NBRC 101816(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia tuberum LMG 21444(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia sprentiae LMG 27175(T) (97.4 %), Burkholderia terricola LMG 20594(T) (97.3 %) and Burkholderia diazotrophica LMG 26031(T) (97.1 %). Based on average nucleotide identity (ANI) values, the new isolate represents a novel genomic species as it shows less than 90 % ANI values with other closely related species. Also, other phylosiological and biochemical comparisons allowed the phenotypic differentiation of strain JC2948(T) from other members of the genus Burkholderia. Therefore, we suggest that this strain should be classified as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Burkholderia. The name Burkholderia monticola sp. nov. (type strain, JC2948(T) = JCM 19904(T) = KACC 17924(T)) is proposed. © 2015 IUMS.

  11. Burkholderia humisilvae sp. nov., Burkholderia solisilvae sp. nov. and Burkholderia rhizosphaerae sp. nov., isolated from forest soil and rhizosphere soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jae-Chan; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2015-01-01

    .... On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the three strains were found to belong to the genus Burkholderia, showing the closest phylogenetic similarity to Burkholderia diazotrophica JPY461(T) (97.2-97.7...

  12. Burkholderia megalochromosomata sp. nov., isolated from grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Inwoo; Seo, Boram; Lee, Imchang; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik

    2015-03-01

    A Gram-stain negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, obligate aerobic bacterial strain, JC2949(T), was isolated from grassland soil in Gwanak Mountain, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA sequences, indicated that strain JC2949(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, showing highest sequence similarities with Burkholderia grimmiae R27(T) (98.8 %), Burkholderia cordobensis LMG 27620(T) (98.6 %), Burkholderia jiangsuensis MP-1T(T) (98.6 %), Burkholderia zhejiangensis OP-1(T) (98.5 %), Burkholderia humi LMG 22934(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia terrestris LMG 22937(T) (97.3 %), Burkholderia telluris LMG 22936(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia glathei ATCC 29195(T) (97.0 %). The major fatty acids of strain JC2949(T) were C18 : 1ω7c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. Its predominant polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unknown amino phospholipid. The dominant isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone Q-8. The pairwise average nucleotide identity values between strain JC2949(T) and the genomes of 30 other species of the genus Burkholderia ranged from 73.4-90.4 %, indicating that the isolate is a novel genomic species within this genus. Based on phenotypic and chemotaxonomic comparisons, it is clear that strain JC2949(T) represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia. We propose the name for this novel species to be Burkholderia megalochromosomata sp. nov. The type strain is JC2949(T) ( = KACC 17925(T) = JCM 19905(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  13. Burkholderia rhynchosiae sp. nov., isolated from Rhynchosia ferulifolia root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Cnockaert, Margo; Ardley, Julie K; Trengove, Robert D; Garau, Giovanni; Howieson, John G; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Two strains of Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from root nodules of the South African legume Rhynchosia ferulifolia and authenticated on this host. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, strains WSM3930 and WSM3937(T) belonged to the genus Burkholderia, with the highest degree of sequence similarity to Burkholderia terricola (98.84 %). Additionally, the housekeeping genes gyrB and recA were analysed since 16S rRNA gene sequences are highly similar between closely related species of the genus Burkholderia. The results obtained for both housekeeping genes, gyrB and recA, showed the highest degree of sequence similarity of the novel strains towards Burkholderia caledonica LMG 19076(T) (94.2 % and 94.5 %, respectively). Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles and respiratory quinone data supported the assignment of strains WSM3930 and WSM3937(T) to the genus Burkholderia. DNA-DNA hybridizations, and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strains WSM3930 and WSM3937(T) from the most closely related species of the genus Burkholderia with validly published names. We conclude, therefore, that these strains represent a novel species for which the name Burkholderia rhynchosiae sp. nov. is proposed, with strain WSM3937(T) ( = LMG 27174(T) = HAMBI 3354(T)) as the type strain.

  14. Multiphasic characterization of a plant growth promoting bacterial strain, Burkholderia sp, 7016 and its effect on tomato growth in the field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Miao[1; ZHOU Jian-jiao[1; WANG En-tao[2; CHEN Qian[1; XU Jing[1; SUN Jian-guana[1

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at searching for plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), a bacterium strain coded as 7016 was isolated from soybean rhizosphere and was characterized in the present study. It was identified as Burkholderia sp. based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, as well as phenotypic and biochemical characterizations. This bacterium presented nitrogenase activity, 1-aminocyclopropane-l-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity and phosphate solubilizing ability; inhibited the growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Gibberella zeae and Verticillium dahliae; and produced small quantities of indole acetic acid (IAA). In green house experiments, significant increases in shoot height and weight, root length and weight, and stem diameter were observed on tomato plants in 30 d after inoculation with strain 7016. Result of 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE showed that 7016 survived in the rhizosphere of tomato seedlings. In the field experiments, Burkholderia sp. 7016 enhanced the tomato yield and significantly promoted activities of soil urease, phosphatase, sucrase, and catalase. All these results demonstrated Burkholderia sp. 7016 as a valuable PGPR and a candidate of biofertilizer.

  15. Burkholderia dilworthii sp. nov., isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Cnockaert, Margo; Ardley, Julie K; Van Wyk, Ben-Erik; Vandamme, Peter A; Howieson, John G

    2014-04-01

    Three strains of Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules and authenticated on this host. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, they were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia, with the representative strain WSM3556(T) being most closely related to Burkholderia caledonica LMG 23644(T) (98.70 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Burkholderia rhynchosiae WSM3937(T) (98.50 %). Additionally, these strains formed a distinct group in phylogenetic trees of the housekeeping genes gyrB and recA. Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles and analysis of respiratory quinones, supported the assignment of our strains to the genus Burkholderia. Results of DNA-DNA hybridizations, MALDI-TOF MS analysis and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of our strains from their nearest neighbour species. Therefore, these strains represent a novel species, for which the name Burkholderia dilworthii sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain WSM3556(T) ( = LMG 27173(T) = HAMBI 3353(T)).

  16. Burkholderia sprentiae sp. nov., isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Cnockaert, Margo; Ardley, Julie K; Maker, Garth; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John G; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Seven Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules and authenticated on this host. Based on the 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, they were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia, with the representative strain WSM5005(T) being most closely related to Burkholderia tuberum (98.08 % sequence similarity). Additionally, these strains formed a distinct group in phylogenetic trees based on the housekeeping genes gyrB and recA. Chemotaxonomic data including fatty acid profiles and analysis of respiratory quinones supported the assignment of the strains to the genus Burkholderia. Results of DNA-DNA hybridizations, and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of our strains from the closest species of the genus Burkholderia with a validly published name. Therefore, these strains represent a novel species for which the name Burkholderia sprentiae sp. nov. (type strain WSM5005(T) = LMG 27175(T) = HAMBI 3357(T)) is proposed.

  17. The Role of Hydrophobicity and Surface Receptors at Hyphae of Lyophyllum sp. Strain Karsten in the Interaction with Burkholderia terrae BS001 – Implications for Interactions in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Taissa; Nazir, Rashid; Rozental, Sonia; dos Santos, Giulia M. P.; Calixto, Renata O. R.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana; Wick, Lukas Y.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The soil bacterium Burkholderia terrae strain BS001 can interact with varying soil fungi, using mechanisms that range from the utilization of carbon/energy sources such as glycerol to the ability to reach novel territories in soil via co-migration with growing fungal mycelia. Here, we investigate the intrinsic properties of the B. terrae BS001 interaction with the basidiomycetous soil fungus Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. In some experiments, the ascomycetous Trichoderma asperellum 302 was also used. The hyphae of Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten were largely hydrophilic on water-containing media versus hydrophobic when aerial, as evidenced by contact angle analyses (CA). Co-migration of B. terrae strain BS001 cells with the hyphae of the two fungi occurred preferentially along the - presumably hydrophilic - soil-dwelling hyphae, whereas aerial hyphae did not allow efficient migration, due to reduced thickness of their surrounding mucous films. Moreover, the cell numbers over the length of the hyphae in soil showed an uneven distribution, i.e., the CFU numbers increased from minima at the inoculation point to maximal numbers in the middle of the extended hyphae, then decreasing toward the terminal side. Microscopic analyses of the strain BS001 associations with the Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten hyphae in the microcosms confirmed the presence of B. terrae BS001 cells on the mucous matter that was present at the hyphal surfaces of the fungi used. Cell agglomerates were found to accumulate at defined sites on the hyphal surfaces, which were coined ‘fungal-interactive’ hot spots. Evidence was further obtained for the contention that receptors for a physical bacterium-fungus interaction occur at the Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten hyphal surface, in which the specific glycosphingolipid ceramide monohexoside (CMH) plays an important role. Thus, bacterial adherence may be mediated by heterogeneously distributed fungal-specific receptors, implying the CMH moieties. This

  18. Genes involved in degradation of para-nitrophenol are differentially arranged in form of non-contiguous gene clusters in Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Vikram

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of para-Nitrophenol (PNP proceeds via two distinct pathways, having 1,2,3-benzenetriol (BT and hydroquinone (HQ as their respective terminal aromatic intermediates. Genes involved in these pathways have already been studied in different PNP degrading bacteria. Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 degrades PNP via both the pathways. Earlier, we have sequenced and analyzed a ~41 kb fragment from the genomic library of strain SJ98. This DNA fragment was found to harbor all the lower pathway genes; however, genes responsible for the initial transformation of PNP could not be identified within this fragment. Now, we have sequenced and annotated the whole genome of strain SJ98 and found two ORFs (viz., pnpA and pnpB showing maximum identity at amino acid level with p-nitrophenol 4-monooxygenase (PnpM and p-benzoquinone reductase (BqR. Unlike the other PNP gene clusters reported earlier in different bacteria, these two ORFs in SJ98 genome are physically separated from the other genes of PNP degradation pathway. In order to ascertain the identity of ORFs pnpA and pnpB, we have performed in-vitro assays using recombinant proteins heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. Purified PnpA was found to be a functional PnpM and transformed PNP into benzoquinone (BQ, while PnpB was found to be a functional BqR which catalyzed the transformation of BQ into hydroquinone (HQ. Noticeably, PnpM from strain SJ98 could also transform a number of PNP analogues. Based on the above observations, we propose that the genes for PNP degradation in strain SJ98 are arranged differentially in form of non-contiguous gene clusters. This is the first report for such arrangement for gene clusters involved in PNP degradation. Therefore, we propose that PNP degradation in strain SJ98 could be an important model system for further studies on differential evolution of PNP degradation functions.

  19. Kinetics of transesterification of olive oil with methanol catalyzed by immobilized lipase derived from an isolated Burkholderia sp. strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dang-Thuan; Lin, Yi-Jan; Chen, Ching-Lung; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-10-01

    This work was carried out to investigate the acyl migration phenomena which has been considered as the factor having significant impact on kinetics of transesterification of oils catalyzed by a Burkholderia lipase with 1,3-regioselectivity. Transesterification of olive oil with methanol catalyzed by the immobilized lipase produces various intermediates, including 1-monoglyceride, 2-monoglyceride, 1,2-diglyceride, and 1,3-diglyceride. Migration kinetics of fatty acid groups from sn-2 of 2-monoglyceride and 1,2-diglyceride to 1-monoglyceride and 1,3-diglyceride were investigated for the temperature range of 25-65°C. The kinetics of transesterification of olive oil with methanol involving acyl migration in the presence of water was also systematically studied at 25, 40, and 65°C. Increasing temperature could increase the acyl migration rate. The overall biodiesel conversion was improved from 73.4% (at 25°C) to 90.0% and 92.4% when conducting at 40 and 65°C, respectively. Thermodynamics aspects of equilibrium state of the immobilized lipase-catalyzed transesterification were also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Burkholderia susongensis sp. nov., a mineral-weathering bacterium isolated from weathered rock surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jia-Yu; Zang, Sheng-Gang; Sheng, Xia-Fang; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    A novel type of mineral-weathering bacterium was isolated from the weathered surface of rock (mica schist) collected from Susong (Anhui, China). Cells of strain L226(T) were Gram-stain-negative. The strain grew optimally at 30 °C, with 1 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7.0 in trypticase soy broth. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, strain L226(T) was shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia and the closest phylogenetic relatives were Burkholderia sprentiae WSM5005(T) (98.3 %), Burkholderia acidipaludis NBRC 101816(T) (98.2 %), Burkholderia tuberum STM678(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia diazotrophica JPY461(T) (97.1 %). The DNA G+C content was 63.5 mol% and the respiratory quinone was Q-8. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo and C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c. The polar lipid profile of strain L226(T) consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, unknown lipids and unidentified aminophospholipids. Based on the low level of DNA-DNA relatedness (ranging from 25.8 % to 34.4 %) to the tested type strains of species of the genus Burkholderia and unique phenotypic characteristics, it is suggested that strain L226(T) represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia susongensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is L226(T) ( = CCTCC AB2014142(T) = JCM 30231(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  1. Genome-centric evaluation of Burkholderia sp. strain SRS-W-2-2016 resistant to high concentrations of uranium and nickel isolated from the Savannah River Site (SRS, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Pathak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Savannah River Site (SRS, an approximately 800-km2 former nuclear weapons production facility located near Aiken, SC remains co-contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. To gain a better understanding on microbially-mediated bioremediation mechanisms, several bacterial strains resistant to high concentrations of Uranium (U and Nickel (Ni were isolated from the Steeds Pond soils located within the SRS site. One of the isolated strains, designated as strain SRS-W-2-2016, grew robustly on both U and Ni. To fully understand the arsenal of metabolic functions possessed by this strain, a draft whole genome sequence (WGS was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. Genome-centric evaluation revealed the isolate to belong to the Burkholderia genus with close affiliation to B. xenovorans LB400, an aggressive polychlorinated biphenyl-degrader. At a coverage of 90×, the genome of strain SRS-W-2-2016 consisted of 8,035,584 bases with a total number of 7071 putative genes assembling into 191 contigs with an N50 contig length of 134,675 bases. Several gene homologues coding for resistance to heavy metals/radionuclides were identified in strain SRS-W-2-2016, such as a suite of outer membrane efflux pump proteins similar to nickel/cobalt transporter regulators, peptide/nickel transport substrate and ATP-binding proteins, permease proteins, and a high-affinity nickel-transport protein. Also noteworthy were two separate gene fragments in strain SRS-W-2-2016 homologous to the spoT gene; recently correlated with bacterial tolerance to U. Additionally, a plethora of oxygenase genes were also identified in the isolate, potentially involved in the breakdown of organic compounds facilitating the strain's successful colonization and survival in the SRS co-contaminated soils. The WGS project of Burkholderia sp. strain SRS-W-2-2016 is available at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession #MSDV00000000.

  2. Genome-centric evaluation of Burkholderia sp. strain SRS-W-2-2016 resistant to high concentrations of uranium and nickel isolated from the Savannah River Site (SRS), USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Stothard, Paul; Green, Stefan; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Jaswal, Rajneesh; Seaman, John

    2017-06-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS), an approximately 800-km2 former nuclear weapons production facility located near Aiken, SC remains co-contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. To gain a better understanding on microbially-mediated bioremediation mechanisms, several bacterial strains resistant to high concentrations of Uranium (U) and Nickel (Ni) were isolated from the Steeds Pond soils located within the SRS site. One of the isolated strains, designated as strain SRS-W-2-2016, grew robustly on both U and Ni. To fully understand the arsenal of metabolic functions possessed by this strain, a draft whole genome sequence (WGS) was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. Genome-centric evaluation revealed the isolate to belong to the Burkholderia genus with close affiliation to B. xenovorans LB400, an aggressive polychlorinated biphenyl-degrader. At a coverage of 90 ×, the genome of strain SRS-W-2-2016 consisted of 8,035,584 bases with a total number of 7071 putative genes assembling into 191 contigs with an N50 contig length of 134,675 bases. Several gene homologues coding for resistance to heavy metals/radionuclides were identified in strain SRS-W-2-2016, such as a suite of outer membrane efflux pump proteins similar to nickel/cobalt transporter regulators, peptide/nickel transport substrate and ATP-binding proteins, permease proteins, and a high-affinity nickel-transport protein. Also noteworthy were two separate gene fragments in strain SRS-W-2-2016 homologous to the spoT gene; recently correlated with bacterial tolerance to U. Additionally, a plethora of oxygenase genes were also identified in the isolate, potentially involved in the breakdown of organic compounds facilitating the strain's successful colonization and survival in the SRS co-contaminated soils. The WGS project of Burkholderia sp. strain SRS-W-2-2016 is available at DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession #MSDV00000000.

  3. Burkholderia ginsengiterrae sp. nov. and Burkholderia panaciterrae sp. nov., antagonistic bacteria against root rot pathogen Cylindrocarpon destructans, isolated from ginseng soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farh, Mohamed El-Agamy; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Van An, Hoang; Sukweenadhi, Johan; Singh, Priyanka; Huq, Md Amdadul; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T), isolated from rhizosphere of ginseng, were rod-shaped, Gram-reaction-negative, strictly aerobic, catalase positive and oxidase negative. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain DCY85(T) as well as DCY85-1(T) belonged to the genus Burkholderia and were closely related to Burkholderia fungorum KACC 12023(T) (98.1 and 98.0 % similarity, respectively). The major polar lipids of strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The major fatty acids of both strains are C16:0, C18:1 ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω6c and/or C16:1 ω7c). The predominant isoprenoid quinone of each strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) was ubiquinone (Q-8) and the G+C content of their genomic DNA was 66.0 and 59.4 mol%, respectively, which fulfill the characteristic range of the genus Burkholderia. The polyamine content of both DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) was putrescine. Although both DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) have highly similar 16S rRNA and identical RecA and gyrB sequences, they show differences in phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics. DNA-DNA hybridization results proved the consideration of both strains as two different species. Based on the results from our polyphasic characterization, strain DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) are considered novel Burkholderia species for which the name Burkholderia ginsengiterrae sp. nov and Burkholderia panaciterrae sp. nov are, respectively, proposed. An emended description of those strains is also proposed. DCY85(T) and DCY85-1(T) showed antagonistic activity against the common root rot pathogen of ginseng, Cylindrocarpon destructans. The proposed type strains are DCY85(T) (KCTC 42054(T) = JCM 19888(T)) and DCY85-1(T) (KCTC 42055(T) = JCM 19889(T)).

  4. Burkholderia stagnalis sp. nov. and Burkholderia territorii sp. nov., two novel Burkholderia cepacia complex species from environmental and human sources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Smet, Birgit; Mayo, Mark; Peeters, Charlotte; Zlosnik, James E A; Spilker, Theodore; Hird, Trevor J; LiPuma, John J; Kidd, Timothy J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Ginther, Jennifer L; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Bell, Scott C; Jacobs, Jan A; Currie, Bart J; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nine Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were isolated during environmental surveys for the ecological niche of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the aetiological agent of melioidosis, in the Northern Territory of Australia...

  5. Taxon K, a complex within the Burkholderia cepacia complex, comprises at least two novel species, Burkholderia contaminans sp. nov. and Burkholderia lata sp. nov

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanlaere, Elke; Baldwin, Adam; Gevers, Dirk; Henry, Deborah; De Brandt, Evie; LiPuma, John J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Speert, David P; Dowson, Chris; Vandamme, Peter

    2009-01-01

    ... (also known as group K) within the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). For this purpose, a representative set of strains was examined by a traditional polyphasic taxonomic approach, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST...

  6. Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov., a nitrogen fixing species isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) with the ability to effectively nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Salazar-Salazar, Corelly; Méndez, Rafael Díaz; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hirsch, Ann M; Vásquez-Murrieta, María Soledad; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina

    2013-12-01

    During a survey of Burkholderia species with potential use in agrobiotechnology, a group of 12 strains was isolated from the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of tomato plants growing in Mexico (Nepantla, Mexico State). A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strains are related to Burkholderia kururiensis and Burkholderia mimosarum (97.4 and 97.1 %, respectively). However, they induced effective nitrogen-fixing nodules on roots of Phaseolus vulgaris. Based on polyphasic taxonomy, the group of strains represents a novel species for which the name Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov. is proposed. The type species is TNe-841(T) (= LMG 26416(T) = CIP 110324(T)).

  7. Burkholderia sp. induces functional nodules on the South African invasive legume Dipogon lignosus (Phaseoleae) in New Zealand soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wendy Y Y; Ridgway, Hayley J; James, Trevor K; James, Euan K; Chen, Wen-Ming; Sprent, Janet I; Young, J Peter W; Andrews, Mitchell

    2014-10-01

    The South African invasive legume Dipogon lignosus (Phaseoleae) produces nodules with both determinate and indeterminate characteristics in New Zealand (NZ) soils. Ten bacterial isolates produced functional nodules on D. lignosus. The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences identified one isolate as Bradyrhizobium sp., one isolate as Rhizobium sp. and eight isolates as Burkholderia sp. The Bradyrhizobium sp. and Rhizobium sp. 16S rRNA sequences were identical to those of strains previously isolated from crop plants and may have originated from inocula used on crops. Both 16S rRNA and DNA recombinase A (recA) gene sequences placed the eight Burkholderia isolates separate from previously described Burkholderia rhizobial species. However, the isolates showed a very close relationship to Burkholderia rhizobial strains isolated from South African plants with respect to their nitrogenase iron protein (nifH), N-acyltransferase nodulation protein A (nodA) and N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase nodulation protein C (nodC) gene sequences. Gene sequences and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR and repetitive element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) banding patterns indicated that the eight Burkholderia isolates separated into five clones of one strain and three of another. One strain was tested and shown to produce functional nodules on a range of South African plants previously reported to be nodulated by Burkholderia tuberum STM678(T) which was isolated from the Cape Region. Thus, evidence is strong that the Burkholderia strains isolated here originated in South Africa and were somehow transported with the plants from their native habitat to NZ. It is possible that the strains are of a new species capable of nodulating legumes.

  8. Phylogenomic Study of Burkholderia glathei-like Organisms, Proposal of 13 Novel Burkholderia Species and Emended Descriptions of Burkholderia sordidicola, Burkholderia zhejiangensis, and Burkholderia grimmiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Charlotte; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Verheyde, Bart; De Brandt, Evie; Cooper, Vaughn S.; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Partial gyrB gene sequence analysis of 17 isolates from human and environmental sources revealed 13 clusters of strains and identified them as Burkholderia glathei clade (BGC) bacteria. The taxonomic status of these clusters was examined by whole-genome sequence analysis, determination of the G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and biochemical characterization. The whole-genome sequence-based phylogeny was assessed using the Genome Blast Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) method and an extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach. The results demonstrated that these 17 BGC isolates represented 13 novel Burkholderia species that could be distinguished by both genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. BGC strains exhibited a broad metabolic versatility and developed beneficial, symbiotic, and pathogenic interactions with different hosts. Our data also confirmed that there is no phylogenetic subdivision in the genus Burkholderia that distinguishes beneficial from pathogenic strains. We therefore propose to formally classify the 13 novel BGC Burkholderia species as Burkholderia arvi sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29317T = CCUG 68412T), Burkholderia hypogeia sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29322T = CCUG 68407T), Burkholderia ptereochthonis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29326T = CCUG 68403T), Burkholderia glebae sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29325T = CCUG 68404T), Burkholderia pedi sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29323T = CCUG 68406T), Burkholderia arationis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29324T = CCUG 68405T), Burkholderia fortuita sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29320T = CCUG 68409T), Burkholderia temeraria sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29319T = CCUG 68410T), Burkholderia calidae sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29321T = CCUG 68408T), Burkholderia concitans sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29315T = CCUG 68414T), Burkholderia turbans sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29316T = CCUG 68413T), Burkholderia catudaia sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29318T = CCUG 68411T) and Burkholderia peredens sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29314T = CCUG

  9. Burkholderia novacaledonica sp. nov. and B. ultramafica sp. nov. isolated from roots of Costularia spp. pioneer plants of ultramafic soils in New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guentas, Linda; Gensous, Simon; Cavaloc, Yvon; Ducousso, Marc; Amir, Hamid; De Georges de Ledenon, Benjamin; Moulin, Lionel; Jourand, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of eleven rhizospheric bacterial strains belonging to the genus Burkholderia and isolated from roots of Costularia (Cyperaceae), tropical herbaceous pioneer plants growing on ultramafic soils in New Caledonia, was investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The genetic analyses (16S rRNA genes, gyrB, recA, nreB and cnr) confirmed that all strains are Burkholderia and cluster into two separated groups. The DNA hybridization results showed low relatedness values to the closest relatives Burkholderia species. The phenotypic analyses confirmed that the two groups of strains could be differentiated from each other and from other known Burkholderia species. This polyphasic study revealed that these two groups of strains represent each a novel species of Burkholderia, for which the names Burkholderia novacaledonica sp. nov. (type strain STM10272(T)=LMG28615(T)=CIP110887(T)) and B. ultramafica sp. nov. (type strain STM10279(T)=LMG28614(T)=CIP110886(T)) are proposed, respectively. These strains of Burkholderia presented specific ecological traits such as the tolerance to the extreme edaphic constraints of ultramafic soils: they grew at pH between 4 and 8 and tolerate the strong unbalanced Ca/Mg ratio (1/19) and the high concentrations of heavy metals i.e. Co, Cr, Mn and Ni. Noteworthy B. ultramafica tolerated nickel until 10mM and B. novacaledonica up to 5mM. The presence of the nickel (nreB) and cobalt/nickel (cnr) resistance determinants encoding for protein involved in metal tolerance was found in all strains of both groups. Moreover, most of the strains were able to produce plant growth promoting molecules (ACC, IAA, NH3 and siderophores). Such ecological traits suggest that these new species of Burkholderia might be environmentally adaptable plant-associated bacteria and beneficial to plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Burkholderia humi sp nov., Burkholderia choica sp nov., Burkholderia telluris sp nov., Burkholderia terrestris sp nov and Burkholderia udeis sp nov. : Burkholderia glathei-like bacteria from soil and rhizosphere soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandamme, Peter; De Brandt, Evie; Houf, Kurt; Salles, Joana Falcao; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of partial gyrB gene sequences revealed six taxa in a group of 17 Burkholderia glathei-like isolates which were further examined by (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridizations, determination of the DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and

  11. Burkholderia aspalathi sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of the South African legume Aspalathus abietina Thunb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavengere, Natasha R; Ellis, Allan G; Le Roux, Johannes J

    2014-06-01

    During a study to investigate the diversity of rhizobia associated with native legumes in South Africa's Cape Floristic Region, a Gram-negative bacterium designated VG1C(T) was isolated from the root nodules of Aspalathus abietina Thunb. Based on phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA genes, VG1C(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, with the highest degree of sequence similarity to the type strain of Burkholderia sediminicola (98.5% and 98%, respectively). The DNA G+C content of strain VG1C(T) was 60.1 mol%, and DNA-DNA relatedness values to the type strain of closely related species were found to be substantially lower than 70%. As evidenced by results of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic tests provided here, we conclude that isolate VG1C(T) represents a novel rhizosphere-associated species in the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia aspalathi sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain VG1C(T) ( = DSM 27239(T) = LMG 27731(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  12. Biodegradation of PAHs by Burkholderia sp. VITRSB1 Isolated from Marine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Revathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs pollution to the environment is a major threat to the living organisms, and hence the degradation of these PAHs is necessary. Studies on PAHs degrading bacteria have focussed on terrestrial microbes and the potential of marine derived microbes is undermined. Herein we report the isolation and characterization of PAHs degrading Burkholderia sp. from lagoon sediments collected at the Southern coast of India. The strain was Gram negative, rod-shaped, motile, and ∼2–5 μm in length. Based on the phylogenetic data the strain was identified as Burkholderia and designated as VITRSB1. Initial PAHs degradation ability of the strain was assessed using basal salt medium supplemented with diesel, kerosene, toluene, aniline, naphthalene, and phenol. The strain was found to be effectively degrading kerosene, diesel, toluene, and aniline even at higher concentration (1%. However, naphthalene and aniline were degraded only at lower concentration (0.1% and phenol, camphor, and DAP inhibited the growth of the strain. Furthermore, the degraded end products of the PAHs were determined using FTIR. Notably, none of the end products were found to be toxic to the biosphere. Our results indicate that the isolated Burkholderia sp. could be a prospective candidate for the effective degradation of selective PAHs.

  13. Burkholderia insulsa sp. nov., a facultatively chemolithotrophic bacterium isolated from an arsenic-rich shallow marine hydrothermal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Antje; Islam, Shaer; Savalia, Pratixa; Amend, Jan P

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment cultures inoculated with hydrothermally influenced nearshore sediment from Papua New Guinea led to the isolation of an arsenic-tolerant, acidophilic, facultatively aerobic bacterial strain designated PNG-April(T). Cells of this strain were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, motile and did not form spores. Strain PNG-April(T) grew at temperatures between 4 °C and 40 °C (optimum 30-37 °C), at pH 3.5 to 8.3 (optimum pH 5-6) and in the presence of up to 2.7% NaCl (optimum 0-1.0%). Both arsenate and arsenite were tolerated up to concentrations of at least 0.5 mM. Metabolism in strain PNG-April(T) was strictly respiratory. Heterotrophic growth occurred with O2 or nitrate as electron acceptors, and aerobic lithoautotrophic growth was observed with thiosulfate or nitrite as electron donors. The novel isolate was capable of N2-fixation. The respiratory quinones were Q-8 and Q-7. Phylogenetically, strain PNG-April(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia and shares the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strains of Burkholderia fungorum (99.8%), Burkholderia phytofirmans (98.8%), Burkholderia caledonica (98.4%) and Burkholderia sediminicola (98.4%). Differences from these related species in several physiological characteristics (lipid composition, carbohydrate utilization, enzyme profiles) and DNA-DNA hybridization suggested the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which we propose the name Burkholderia insulsa sp. nov. The type strain is PNG-April(T) ( = DSM 28142(T) = LMG 28183(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  14. Burkholderia jiangsuensis sp. nov., a methyl parathion degrading bacterium, isolated from methyl parathion contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu-Yun; Li, Chun-Xiu; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Lai, Qi-Liang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-09-01

    species of the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia jiangsuensis sp. nov. is proposed, the type strain is MP-1(T) (LMG 27927(T) = MCCC 1K00250(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  15. Functional Characterization of a Novel Member of the Amidohydrolase 2 Protein Family, 2-Hydroxy-1-Naphthoic Acid Nonoxidative Decarboxylase from Burkholderia sp. Strain BC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal Chowdhury, Piyali; Basu, Soumik; Dutta, Arindam; Dutta, Tapan K

    2016-06-15

    The gene encoding a nonoxidative decarboxylase capable of catalyzing the transformation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid (2H1NA) to 2-naphthol was identified, recombinantly expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The putative gene sequence of the decarboxylase (hndA) encodes a 316-amino-acid protein (HndA) with a predicted molecular mass of 34 kDa. HndA exhibited high identity with uncharacterized amidohydrolase 2 proteins of various Burkholderia species, whereas it showed a modest 27% identity with γ-resorcylate decarboxylase, a well-characterized nonoxidative decarboxylase belonging to the amidohydrolase superfamily. Biochemically characterized HndA demonstrated strict substrate specificity toward 2H1NA, whereas inhibition studies with HndA indicated the presence of zinc as the transition metal center, as confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A three-dimensional structural model of HndA, followed by docking analysis, identified the conserved metal-coordinating and substrate-binding residues, while their importance in catalysis was validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Microbial nonoxidative decarboxylases play a crucial role in the metabolism of a large array of carboxy aromatic chemicals released into the environment from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources. Among these, hydroxynaphthoic acids are usually encountered as pathway intermediates in the bacterial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present study reveals biochemical and molecular characterization of a 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid nonoxidative decarboxylase involved in an alternative metabolic pathway which can be classified as a member of the small repertoire of nonoxidative decarboxylases belonging to the amidohydrolase 2 family of proteins. The strict substrate specificity and sequence uniqueness make it a novel member of the metallo-dependent hydrolase superfamily. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Bioformulation of Burkholderia sp. MSSP with a multispecies consortium for growth promotion of Cajanus cajan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Piyush; Maheshwari, D K

    2007-02-01

    The present work was undertaken to formulate an effective bioformulation using Burkholderia sp. strain MSSP, a known plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium. MSSP was tagged with the reporter gene of green fluorescent protein (gfp) to monitor its population in cost-effective solid carriers, including sugarcane-bagasse, sawdust, cocoa peat, rice husk, wheat bran, charcoal, and rock phosphate, and paneer-whey as liquid carrier. Physical and chemical properties of different low-cost carrier materials were studied. The viability of the green fluorescent tagged variant of MSSP was estimated in different sterile carrier materials. Whey and wheat bran proved to be efficient carrier materials for the bioformulation. Sawdust, rock phosphate, rice husk, and cocoa peat were average, while charcoal and sugarcane-bagasse proved to be inferior carriers. The viability of strain MSSP was also assessed in wheat bran and whey-based consortium, having three other bacterial strains, namely Sinorhizobium meliloti PP3, Rhizobium leguminosarum Pcc, and Bacillus sp. strain B1. Presence of other plant-growth-promoting bacteria did not have any detrimental effect on the viability of MSSP. Efficiency of the wheat-bran-based multispecies consortium was studied on the growth of pigeonpea in field conditions. A considerable increase in plant biomass, nodule number and weight, and number of pods was recorded as compared with individual trials and with the control.

  17. Burkholderia humptydooensis sp. nov., A Burkholderia thailandensis-Like Species and the Fifth Member of the pseudomallei Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    2012). The type strain, MSMB43T, has been previously referred to as B. 312 Page 14 of 23 thailandensis-like species in multiple studies (Currie...closely related species were used to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships. 339 Genomes from this study in bold and assembly numbers in...The In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibility of Malaysian 379 Isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei. Int J Microbiol, 2013, 121845. 380 BARNES, J. L

  18. Burkholderia dipogonis sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Dipogon lignosus in New Zealand and Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Shih-Yi; Chen, Ming-Hui; Liu, Wendy Y Y; Andrews, Mitchell; James, Euan K; Ardley, Julie K; De Meyer, Sofie E; James, Trevor K; Howieson, John G; Coutinho, Bruna G; Chen, Wen-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Seven strains, ICMP 19430T, ICMP 19429, ICMP 19431, WSM4637, WSM4638, WSM4639 and WSM4640, were isolated from nitrogen-fixing nodules on roots of the invasive South African legume Dipogon lignosus (subfamily Papilionoideae, tribe Phaseoleae) in New Zealand and Western Australia, and their taxonomic positions were investigated by using a polyphasic approach. All seven strains grew at 10-37 °C (optimum, 25-30 °C), at pH 4.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 6.0-7.0) and with 0-2 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum growth in the absence of NaCl). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strains showed 99.0-99.5 % sequence similarity to the closest type strain, Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJNT, and 98.4-99.7 % sequence similarity to Burkholderia caledonica LMG 19076T. The predominant fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c (21.0 % of the total fatty acids in strain ICMP 19430T), C16 : 0 (19.1 %), C17 : 0 cyclo (18.9 %), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c; 10.7 %) and C19 : 0 cyclov ω8c (7.5 %). The polar lipid profile consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and several uncharacterized aminophospholipids and phospholipids. The major isoprenoid quinone was Q-8 and the DNA G+C content of strain ICMP 19430T was 63.2 mol%. The DNA–DNA relatedness of the novel strains with respect to the closest neighbouring members of the genus Burkholderia was 55 % or less. On the basis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequence similarities and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data,these strains represent a novel symbiotic species in the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia dipogonis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain ICMP 19430T (=LMG28415T=HAMBI 3637T).

  19. Burkholderia paludis sp. nov., an Antibiotic-Siderophore Producing Novel Burkholderia cepacia Complex Species, Isolated from Malaysian Tropical Peat Swamp Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kuan Shion; Aw, Yoong Kit; Lee, Learn Han; Yule, Catherine M; Cheow, Yuen Lin; Lee, Sui Mae

    2016-01-01

    A novel Gram negative rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain MSh1T, was isolated from Southeast Pahang tropical peat swamp forest soil in Malaysia and characterized using a polyphasic taxonomy approach. The predominant cellular fatty acids (>10.0%) were C16:0 (31.7%), C17:0 cyclo (26.6%), and C19:0 cyclo ω8c (16.1%). The polar lipids detected were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diphosphatidylglycerol. The predominant ubiquinone was Q-8. This revealed that strain MSh1T belongs to the genus Burkholderia. The type strain MSh1T can be differentiated from other Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), average nucleotide identity (ANI) and biochemical tests. DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain MSh1T and closely related type strains were below the 70% threshold value. Based on this polyphasic study of MSh1T, it can be concluded that this strain represents a novel species within the Bcc, for which the name Burkholderia paludis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MSh1T (= DSM 100703T = MCCC 1K01245T). The dichloromethane extract of MSh1T exhibited antimicrobial activity against four Gram positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, E. faecalis ATCC 700802, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC 700699) and a Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922). Further purification work has led to the isolation of Compound 1, pyochelin. Pyochelin demonstrated antimicrobial activity against four S. aureus strains and three E. faecalis strains with MIC-values of 3.13 μg/ml and 6.26 μg/ml, respectively. SEM analysis showed that the cellular morphology of E. faecalis ATCC 700802 was not affected by pyochelin; suggesting that it might target the intracellular components. Pyochelin, a siderophore with antimicrobial activity might be useful in treating bacterial infections caused by S. aureus and E. faecalis, however further work has to

  20. Characterization of in vitro phenotypes of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei strains potentially associated with persistent infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhards, R C; Cote, C K; Amemiya, K; Waag, D M; Klimko, C P; Worsham, P L; Welkos, S L

    2017-03-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) and Burkholderia mallei (Bm), the agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively, are Tier 1 biothreats. They infect humans and animals, causing disease ranging from acute and fatal to protracted and chronic. Chronic infections are especially challenging to treat, and the identification of in vitro phenotypic markers which signal progression from acute to persistent infection would be extremely valuable. First, a phenotyping strategy was developed employing colony morphotyping, chemical sensitivity testing, macrophage infection, and lipopolysaccharide fingerprint analyses to distinguish Burkholderia strains. Then mouse spleen isolates collected 3-180 days after infection were characterized phenotypically. Isolates from long-term infections often exhibited increased colony morphology differences and altered patterns of antimicrobial sensitivity and macrophage infection. Some of the Bp and Bm persistent infection isolates clearly displayed enhanced virulence in mice. Future studies will evaluate the potential role and significance of these phenotypic markers in signaling the establishment of a chronic infection.

  1. Burkholderia metalliresistens sp. nov., a multiple metal-resistant and phosphate-solubilising species isolated from heavy metal-polluted soil in Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun Kang; Ding, Yong Zhen; Feng, Ren Wei; Wang, Rui Gang; Xu, Ying Ming; Chen, Chun; Wei, Xiu Li; Chen, Wei Min

    2015-06-01

    A metal-resistant and phosphate-solubilising bacterium, designated as strain D414(T), was isolated from heavy metal (Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn)-polluted paddy soils at the surrounding area of Dabao Mountain Mine in Southeast China. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of heavy metals for strain D414(T) were 2000 mg L(-1) (Cd), 800 mg L(-1) (Pb), 150 mg L(-1) (Cu) and 2500 mg L(-1) (Zn). The strain possessed plant growth-promoting properties, such as 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate assimilation, indole production and phosphate solubilisation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the isolate is a member of the genus Burkholderia where strain D414(T) formed a distinct phyletic line with validly described Burkholderia species. Strain D414(T) is closely related to Burkholderia tropica DSM 15359(T), B. bannensis NBRC E25(T) and B. unamae DSM 17197(T), with 98.5, 98.3 and 98.3 % sequence similarities, respectively. Furthermore, less than 34 % DNA-DNA relatedness was detected between strain D414(T) and the type strains of the phylogenetically closest species of Burkholderia. The dominant fatty acids of strain D414(T) were C14:0, C16:0, C17:0 cyclo and C18:1 ω7c. The DNA G+C content was 62.3 ± 0.5 mol%. On the basis of genotypic, phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain D414(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Burkholderia metalliresistens sp. nov. is proposed, with D414(T) (=CICC 10561(T) = DSM 26823(T)) as the type strain.

  2. Enhanced bioconversion of ethylene glycol to glycolic acid by a newly isolated Burkholderia sp. EG13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoxin; Ma, Zhengfei; Yang, Limin; Ma, Jiangquan

    2014-10-01

    Burkholderia sp. EG13 with high ethylene glycol-oxidizing activity was isolated from soil, which could be used for the synthesis of glycolic acid from the oxidation of ethylene glycol. Using the resting cells of Burkholderia sp. EG13 as biocatalysts, the optimum reaction temperature and pH were 30 °C and 6.0, respectively. After 24 h of biotransformation, the yield of glycolic acid from 200 mM ethylene glycol was 98.8 %. Furthermore, an integrated bioprocess for the production of glycolic acid which involved in situ product removal (ISPR) was investigated. Using fed-batch method with ISPR, a total of 793 mM glycolic acid has been accumulated in the reaction mixture after the 4th feed.

  3. Occidiofungin is an important component responsible for the antifungal activity of Burkholderia pyrrocinia strain Lyc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X Q; Liu, A X; Guerrero, A; Liu, J; Yu, X Q; Deng, P; Ma, L; Baird, S M; Smith, L; Li, X D; Lu, S E

    2016-03-01

    To identify the taxonomy of tobacco rhizosphere-isolated strain Lyc2 and investigate the mechanisms of the antifungal activities, focusing on antimicrobials gene clusters identification and function analysis. Multilocus sequence typing and 16S rRNA analyses indicated that strain Lyc2 belongs to Burkholderia pyrrocinia. Bioassay results indicated strain Lyc2 showed significant antifungal activities against a broad range of plant and animal fungal pathogens and control efficacy on seedling damping off disease of cotton. A 55·2-kb gene cluster which was homologous to ocf gene clusters in Burkholderia contaminans MS14 was confirmed to be responsible for antifungal activities by random mutagenesis; HPLC was used to verify the production of antifungal compounds. Multiple antibiotic and secondary metabolized biosynthesis gene clusters predicated by antiSMASH revealed the broad spectrum of antimicrobials activities of the strain. Our results revealed the mechanisms of antifungal activities of strain Lyc2 and expand our knowledge about production of occidiofungin in the bacteria Burkholderia. Understanding the mechanisms of antifungal activities of strain Lyc2 has contributed to discovery of new antibiotics and expand our knowledge of production of occidiofungin in the bacteria Burkholderia. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Comparative Genomics of Burkholderia singularis sp. nov., a Low G+C Content, Free-Living Bacterium That Defies Taxonomic Dissection of the Genus Burkholderia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Peter; Peeters, Charlotte; De Smet, Birgit; Price, Erin P.; Sarovich, Derek S.; Henry, Deborah A.; Hird, Trevor J.; Zlosnik, James E. A.; Mayo, Mark; Warner, Jeffrey; Baker, Anthony; Currie, Bart J.; Carlier, Aurélien

    2017-01-01

    Four Burkholderia pseudomallei-like isolates of human clinical origin were examined by a polyphasic taxonomic approach that included comparative whole genome analyses. The results demonstrated that these isolates represent a rare and unusual, novel Burkholderia species for which we propose the name B. singularis. The type strain is LMG 28154T (=CCUG 65685T). Its genome sequence has an average mol% G+C content of 64.34%, which is considerably lower than that of other Burkholderia species. The reduced G+C content of strain LMG 28154T was characterized by a genome wide AT bias that was not due to reduced GC-biased gene conversion or reductive genome evolution, but might have been caused by an altered DNA base excision repair pathway. B. singularis can be differentiated from other Burkholderia species by multilocus sequence analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and a distinctive biochemical profile that includes the absence of nitrate reduction, a mucoid appearance on Columbia sheep blood agar, and a slowly positive oxidase reaction. Comparisons with publicly available whole genome sequences demonstrated that strain TSV85, an Australian water isolate, also represents the same species and therefore, to date, B. singularis has been recovered from human or environmental samples on three continents. PMID:28932212

  5. Rhizonin A from Burkholderia sp. KCTC11096 and Its Growth Promoting Role in Lettuce Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Mo Kang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We isolated and identified a gibberellin-producing Burkholderia sp. KCTC 11096 from agricultural field soils. The culture filtrate of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR significantly increased the germination and growth of lettuce and Chinese cabbage seeds. The ethyl acetate extract of the PGPR culture showed significantly higher rate of lettuce seed germination and growth as compared to the distilled water treated control. The ethyl acetate fraction of the Burkholderia sp. was subjected to bioassay-guided isolation and we obtained for the first time from a Burkholderia sp. the plant growth promoting compound rhizonin A (1, which was characterized through NMR and MS techniques. Application of various concentrations of 1 significantly promoted the lettuce seed germination as compared to control.

  6. Gentamicin Delivery to Burkholderia cepacia Group IIIa Strains via Membrane Vesicles from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Nick D.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    2003-01-01

    When Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is treated with gentamicin, it releases membrane vesicles containing gentamicin (g-MVs) and peptidoglycan hydrolase, which makes the MVs bactericidal. We evaluate the ability of g-MVs to deliver gentamicin past the intrinsic permeability barrier of group IIIa Burkholderia cepacia and show that strain CEP0248 with low resistance to gentamicin is killed but the highly resistant strain C5424 is not. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that gentamicin was delivered...

  7. Identification of a Putative P-Transporter Operon in the Genome of a Burkholderia Strain Living inside the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Gigaspora margarita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lozano, J. M.; Bonfante, P.

    1999-01-01

    This article reports the identification of a putative P-transporter operon in the genome of a Burkholderia sp. living in the cytoplasm of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita. Its presence suggests that Burkholderia sp. has the potential for P uptake from this environment. This finding raises new questions concerning the importance of intracellular bacteria for mycorrhizal symbiosis. PMID:10383982

  8. Optimization of Lipase Production by Burkholderia sp. Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiow-Ling Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize the extracellular lipase production by Burkholderia sp. HL-10. Preliminary tests showed that olive oil, tryptone and Tween-80 exhibited significant effects on the lipase production. The optimum concentrations of these three components were determined using a faced-centered central composite design (FCCCD. The analysis of variance revealed that the established model was significant (p < 0.01. The optimized medium containing 0.65% olive oil (v/v, 2.42% tryptone (w/v and 0.15% Tween-80 (v/v resulted in a maximum activity of 122.3 U/mL, about three fold higher than that in basal medium. Approximately 99% of validity of the predicted value was achieved.

  9. Involvement of the efflux pumps in chloramphenicol selected strains of Burkholderia thailandensis: proteomic and mechanistic evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice V Biot

    Full Text Available Burkholderia is a bacterial genus comprising several pathogenic species, including two species highly pathogenic for humans, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. B. thailandensis is a weakly pathogenic species closely related to both B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. It is used as a study model. These bacteria are able to exhibit multiple resistance mechanisms towards various families of antibiotics. By sequentially plating B. thailandensis wild type strains on chloramphenicol we obtained several resistant variants. This chloramphenicol-induced resistance was associated with resistance against structurally unrelated antibiotics including quinolones and tetracyclines. We functionally and proteomically demonstrate that this multidrug resistance phenotype, identified in chloramphenicol-resistant variants, is associated with the overexpression of two different efflux pumps. These efflux pumps are able to expel antibiotics from several families, including chloramphenicol, quinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim and some β-lactams, and present a partial susceptibility to efflux pump inhibitors. It is thus possible that Burkholderia species can develop such adaptive resistance mechanisms in response to antibiotic pressure resulting in emergence of multidrug resistant strains. Antibiotics known to easily induce overexpression of these efflux pumps should be used with discernment in the treatment of Burkholderia infections.

  10. Identification and cloning of four riboswitches from Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyati-Othman, Noor; Fatah, Ahmad Luqman Abdul; Piji, Mohd Al Akmarul Fizree Bin Md; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Raih, Mohd Firdaus

    2015-09-01

    Structured RNAs referred as riboswitches have been predicted to be present in the genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243. Four of the riboswitches were identified and analyzed through BLASTN, Rfam search and multiple sequence alignment. The RNA aptamers belong to the following riboswitch classifications: glycine riboswitch, cobalamin riboswitch, S-adenosyl-(L)-homocysteine (SAH) riboswitch and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch. The conserved nucleotides for each aptamer were identified and were marked on the secondary structure generated by RNAfold. These riboswitches were successfully amplified and cloned for further study.

  11. Cell-bound lipases from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002: gene sequence analysis, expression, enzymatic characterization, and 3D structural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhengyu; Lin, Hong; Shi, Shaolei; Mu, Xiangduo; Liu, Yanru; Huang, Jianzhong

    2016-05-03

    The whole-cell lipase from Burkholderia cepacia has been used as a biocatalyst in organic synthesis. However, there is no report in the literature on the component or the gene sequence of the cell-bound lipase from this species. Qualitative analysis of the cell-bound lipase would help to illuminate the regulation mechanism of gene expression and further improve the yield of the cell-bound lipase by gene engineering. Three predictive cell-bound lipases, lipA, lipC21 and lipC24, from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 were cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both LipA and LipC24 displayed the lipase activity. LipC24 was a novel mesophilic enzyme and displayed preference for medium-chain-length acyl groups (C10-C14). The 3D structural model of LipC24 revealed the open Y-type active site. LipA displayed 96 % amino acid sequence identity with the known extracellular lipase. lipA-inactivation and lipC24-inactivation decreased the total cell-bound lipase activity of Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 by 42 % and 14 %, respectively. The cell-bound lipase activity from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 originated from a multi-enzyme mixture with LipA as the main component. LipC24 was a novel lipase and displayed different enzymatic characteristics and structural model with LipA. Besides LipA and LipC24, other type of the cell-bound lipases (or esterases) should exist.

  12. Bioremediation of refinery wastewater using immobilised Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp and their transconjugants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi T. Ajao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available When oil spill occurs, it poses serious toxic hazards to all forms of life. Mixed culture of Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp isolated from refinery sludge using selective enrichment technique was used for bioremediation of refinery wastewater in a laboratoryscale bioreactor. Physicochemical parameters of both raw and treated water were as determined and compared with Federal Environ - mental Protection Agency (FEPA-limit, Abuja, Nigeria to asses the efficiency of the bioremediation process. Each of the bacterium was screened for the presence of plasmid DNA and for the involvement or otherwise of plasmid in the bioremediation of wastewater. The immobilised cells showed percentage decrease in chemical oxygen demand (97%, biochemical oxygen demand (94%, phenol (98%, total petroleum hydrocarbon (79%, oil and grease (90% of the refinery waste water after 20 days of treatment while their transconjugants showed the multiplicative effect by achieving the same percentage after 10 days of treatment. Therefore, the findings revealed that bioaugmentation of wastewater using transmissible catabolic plasmid will enhance efficiency of the bioremediation by spreading the plasmid among indigenous microbial community either through horizontal gene transfer or transformation.

  13. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Mott, Tiffany M; Muruato, Laura A; Sbrana, Elena; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. An objective approach for Burkholderia pseudomallei strain selection as challenge material for medical countermeasures efficacy testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher E. Van Zandt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a rare disease of biodefense concern with high mortality and extreme difficulty in treatment. No human vaccines are available that protect against B. pseudomallei infection, and with the current limitations of antibiotic treatment, the development of new preventative and therapeutic interventions is crucial. Although clinical trials could be used to test the efficacy of new medical countermeasures (MCMs, the high mortality rates associated with melioidosis raises significant ethical issues concerning treating individuals with new compounds with unknown efficacies. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA has formulated a set of guidelines for the licensure of new MCMs to treat diseases in which it would be unethical to test the efficacy of these drugs in humans. The FDA Animal Rule 21 CFR 314 calls for consistent, well-characterized B. pseudomallei strains to be used as challenge material in animal models. In order to facilitate the efficacy testing of new MCMs for melioidosis using animal models, we intend to develop a well-characterized panel of strains for use. This panel will comprise of strains that were isolated from human cases, have a low passage history, are virulent in animal models, and are well characterized phenotypically and genotypically. We have reviewed published and unpublished data on various B. pseudomallei strains to establish an objective method for selecting the strains to be included in the panel of B. pseudomallei strains with attention to five categories: animal infection models, genetic characterization, clinical and passage history, and availability of the strain to the research community. We identified 109 strains with data in at least one of the five categories, scored each strain based on the gathered data and identified 6 strains as candidate for a B. pseudomallei strain panel.

  15. [GENOTYPING OF THE BURKHOLDERIA MALLEI STRAINS BASED ON DIFFERENT REGION ANALYSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondareva, O S; Savchenko, S S; Tkachenko, G A; Ledeneva, M L; Lemasova, L V; Antonov, V A

    2016-01-01

    Development of the genotyping methods of glanders agent is urgent due to its high pathogenicity, lack of effective preventive measures and threat of the use of Burkholderia mallei as a biological weapon. In this work we proposed a scheme for the typing of the B. mallei strains based on different region analysis (DFR). The choice of variable loci differentially presented in various strains of glanders agents was performed by analyzing annotated whole-genome sequences of the B. mallei strains. Primers and fluorescence probes were designed for 9 selected loci. The amplification conditions for different regions were optimized in two variants: with electrophoretic detection and hybridization-fluorescence detection in the strip format. The possibility of applying the DFR analysis to genetic characterization of strains was assessed in 14 B. mallei strains. The genetic profiles of the studied B. mallei strains revealed that the developed DFR-typing scheme was characterized by high discrimination power (Hunter-Gaston index value was 0.92), reproducibility, rapidity, easy interpretation, and applicability for epidemiological surveillance of glanders.

  16. Rapid emergence of a ceftazidime-resistant Burkholderia multivorans strain in a cystic fibrosis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokell, Joshua R; Gharaibeh, Raad Z; Steck, Todd R

    2013-12-01

    Burkholderia multivorans poses a serious health threat to cystic fibrosis patients due to innate resistance to multiple antibiotics and acquisition of resistance to a range of antibiotics due to the frequent use of antibiotics to treat chronic infections. Monitoring antibiotic susceptibility is crucial to managing patient care. We identified the rapid emergence of a ceftazidime-resistant strain in a single patient within four days during a hospitalization for treatment of an exacerbation. B. multivorans was isolated from expectorated sputum samples using Burkholderia cepacia selective agar. A macrodilution assay was performed on all isolates to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of ceftazidime. Approximately 4000 colonies were scored to identify the percent of ceftazidime-resistant colonies. Extracted DNA was used to determine the total bacterial counts and abundance of B. multivorans using quantitative PCR. An increase from no detectable B. multivorans ceftazidime-resistant colonies to over 75% of all colonies tested occurred within a four-day period. The resistant population remained dominant in 6 of the 8 samples in the following 17 months of the study. qPCR revealed an association between change in the percent of resistant colonies and abundance of B. multivorans, but not of total bacteria. No association was found between the acquisition of resistance to ceftazidime and other antibiotics commonly used to treat B. multivorans infections. The rapid emergence of a ceftazidime-resistant by B. multivorans strain occurred during a hospitalization while under selective pressure of antibiotics. The resistant strain maintained dominance in the B. multivorans population which resulted in an overall decline in a patient health and treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2013 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by Lynisibacillus sp. strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... thermoplastic produced from renewable bioresources and is hence attracting attention as a plastic material for use in the environment and medical fields. In the present study, the Lynisibacillus sp. strain UEA-20.171 was selected for production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) in bioreactor. The accumulation of polymer in ...

  18. [Characterization of genotypes for Burkholderia cepacia complex strains isolated from patients in hospitals of Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, A L; Chernukha, M Yu; Shaginyan, I A; Kunda, M S; Avetisyan, L R; Orlova, A A; Lunin, V G; Avakyan, L V; Kapranov, N I; Amelina, E L; Chuchalin, A G; Gintsburg A L

    2013-01-01

    88 cultures of microorganisms referred to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) during initial identification were analyzed by multilocus sequencing (Multilocus Sequence Typing, MLST). 13 genotypes (sequence type, ST) were detected, 9 of them (708, 709, 710, 711, 712, 714, 727, 728, 729) were identified for the first time. Two new alleles for the gene trpB (357, 358), one of the genes atpD (306) and gltB (352) were detected and registered. It was found that strains of 2 genotypes (711, 712) belong to the species B. multivorans, 1 (ST102) - B. contaminans, 1 (ST51) - B. stabilis, 1 (ST729) - B. vietnamiensis. Most strains of the sample, representing 8 genotypes (208, 241, 728, 727, 708, 709, 710, 714), belong to the species B. cenocepacia. Identified genotypes differ in the global spread of the world: 4 genotype (51, 102, 208, 241) have intercontinental distribution, 1 (712) - intra. It is shown that strains causing nosocomial infections, in most cases refer to genotypes 728 and 708. Epidemiologically significant in respect of patients with cystic fibrosis should recognize genotype 709, detected in strains isolated from patients in seven federal districts (FD) of Russia. The Bcc strains of genotypes 241 (B. cenocepacia) and 729 (B. vietnamiensis) were isolated from the patients of the Far Eastern FD. They are not typical for other FD Russia. The possibility of concomitant infection in cystic fibrosis patient with two genotypes 709 - epidemiologically significant and 708 - nosocomial, was indicated. The long-termpersistence of a single genotype strain in the organism of patients with cystic fibrosis was demonstrated as for Bcc species B. cenocepacia (ST 709), so for B. multivorans (ST712). The possibility of transferring the strain Bcc, typical for nosocomial environment to patient with cystic fibrosis at surgery was observed.

  19. Comparing in vitro and in vivo virulence phenotypes of Burkholderia pseudomallei type G strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Eric R G; Kilgore, Paul B; Mott, Tiffany M; Pradenas, Gonzalo A; Torres, Alfredo G

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bpm) is a saprophytic rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. This disease has previously been described as endemic in areas such as northern Australia and Southeast Asia, but, more recently, a better understanding of the epidemiology of melioidosis indicated that the disease is distributed worldwide, including regions of the Americas and Africa. A 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) typing system has been developed for Bpm and has revealed that ITS types C, E, and hybrid CE are mainly associated with Australia and Southeast Asia while type G strains are more associated with cases of melioidosis in the Western Hemisphere. The purpose of the current study was to determine the in vitro and in vivo virulence profiles of the understudied Bpm type G strains Ca2009, Ca2013a, Mx2013, and 724644 and compared such phenotypes to the commonly studied Bpm type C strain K96243. We evaluated virulence by measuring invasion/uptake and survival of these Bpm strains in murine respiratory epithelial LA-4 cells and alveolar macrophage MH-S cells using different multiplicity of infections (MOIs of 1 and 10). We also calculated the lethal dose 50 values (LD50) in BALB/c mice that were inoculated intranasally with either Ca2009, Ca2013a, or Mx2013. Overall, the virulence and lethality phenotypes of Bpm type G strains were similar to the Bpm type C strain K96243. Additional comparative analyses between the Bpm ITS types may lead to a better understanding of the contribution of the ITS type to the epidemiology and ecology of Bpm strains.

  20. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Yeop Lee

    Full Text Available Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs, including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX, as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX.

  1. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Yeop; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Yi, Yoon-Sun; Kim, Jonghyun; Chung, Young-Ho; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX), as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX.

  2. HemX is required for production of 2-ketogluconate, the predominant organic anion required for inorganic phosphate solubilization by Burkholderia sp. Ha185.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pei-Chun Lisa; Condron, Leo; O'Callaghan, Maureen; Hurst, Mark R H

    2015-12-01

    The bacterium Burkholderia sp. Ha185 readily solubilizes inorganic phosphate by releasing the low molecular weight organic anion, 2-ketogluconate. Using random transposon mutagenesis and in silico analysis, a mutation that caused almost complete abolition of phosphate solubilization was located within hemX, which is part of the hem operon. Burkholderia sp. Ha185 HemX is a multidomain protein, predicted to encode a bifunctional uroporphyrinogen-III synthetase/uroporphyrin-III C-methyltransferase, which has not previously been implicated in phosphate solubilization. Complementation of hemX restored the ability of the mutant to solubilize phosphate in both plate and liquid cultures. Based on a combination of organic-anion profiling, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in silico analyses, hemX was confirmed to be solely responsible for hydroxyapatite solubilization in Burkholderia sp. Ha185. It is proposed that the biosynthesis of a yet to be determined redox cofactor by HemX is the main pathway for generating 2-ketogluconate via a haem-dependent gluconate 2-dehydrogenase in Burkholderia sp. Ha185. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Genetic Diversity and Multihost Pathogenicity of Clinical and Environmental Strains of Burkholderia cenocepacia ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springman, A. Cody; Jacobs, Janette L.; Somvanshi, Vishal S.; Sundin, George W.; Mulks, Martha H.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Viswanathan, Poorna; Gray, R. Lucas; LiPuma, John J.; Ciche, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of 54 clinical and agricultural isolates of Burkholderia cenocepacia was analyzed for genetic relatedness by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pathogenicity by using onion and nematode infection models, antifungal activity, and the distribution of three marker genes associated with virulence. The majority of clinical isolates were obtained from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Michigan, and the agricultural isolates were predominantly from Michigan onion fields. MLST analysis resolved 23 distinct sequence types (STs), 11 of which were novel. Twenty-six of 27 clinical isolates from Michigan were genotyped as ST-40, previously identified as the Midwest B. cenocepacia lineage. In contrast, the 12 agricultural isolates represented eight STs, including ST-122, that were identical to clinical isolates of the PHDC lineage. In general, pathogenicity to onions and the presence of the pehA endopolygalacturonase gene were detected only in one cluster of related strains consisting of agricultural isolates and the PHDC lineage. Surprisingly, these strains were highly pathogenic in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infection model, killing nematodes faster than the CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 on slow-kill medium. The other strains displayed a wide range of pathogenicity to C. elegans, notably the Midwest clonal lineage which displayed high, moderate, and low virulence. Most strains displayed moderate antifungal activity, although strains with high and low activities were also detected. We conclude that pathogenicity to multiple hosts may be a key factor contributing to the potential of B. cenocepacia to opportunistically infect humans both by increasing the prevalence of the organism in the environment, thereby increasing exposure to vulnerable hosts, and by the selection of virulence factors that function in multiple hosts. PMID:19542323

  4. Biodegradation of thiocyanate by a novel strain of Burkholderia phytofirmans from soil contaminated by gold mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, H P; Mu, A; Moreau, J W

    2013-10-01

    A novel B. phytofirmans strain with the capacity to degrade thiocyanate was isolated from pH approximately 6·5 soil contaminated by effluent from gold mine tailings. This Burkholderia strain uses thiocyanate as its sole nitrogen source and can grow on acetate as a sole carbon source in a minimal medium. While biodegradation of thiocyanate has been reported to occur within alkaline environments (e.g. soda lakes and wastewater from coking plants), this work presents the first observation of thiocyanate degradation by Burkholderia at pH remediation strategies for thiocyanate contamination in nonalkaline soils and waters impacted by gold-mining activities. This work describes thiocyanate biodegradation by a novel Burkholderia phytofirmans strain isolated from circumneutral pH gold mining-contaminated soils. Previous reports of bacterial thiocyanate degradation have mainly focused on alkaline environments or culturing conditions (pH ≥ 9). Because cyanidation is used globally in gold mining, with thiocyanate as the major contaminant, our results will interest those working on biotechnological approaches to gold mine waste remediation. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. DNA microarray-based detection and identification of Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoock, Gernot; Ehricht, Ralf; Melzer, Falk; Rassbach, Astrid; Scholz, Holger C; Neubauer, Heinrich; Sachse, Konrad; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; Saqib, Muhammad; Elschner, Mandy

    2009-01-01

    We developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray assay based on genetic markers for the accurate identification and differentiation of Burkholderia (B.) mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei, the agents of glanders and melioidosis, respectively. These two agents were clearly identified using at least 4 independent genetic markers including 16S rRNA gene, fliC, motB and also by novel species-specific target genes, identified by in silico sequence analysis. Specific hybridization signal profiles allowed the detection and differentiation of up to 10 further Burkholderia spp., including the closely related species Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia-like agents, such as Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Burkholderia gladioli, which are often associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The assay was developed using the easy-to-handle and economical ArrayTube (AT) platform. A representative strain panel comprising 44 B. mallei, 32 B. pseudomallei isolates, and various Burkholderia type strains were examined to validate the test. Assay specificity was determined by examination of 40 non-Burkholderia strains.

  6. Interplay between Three RND Efflux Pumps in Doxycycline-Selected Strains of Burkholderia thailandensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biot, Fabrice Vincent; Lopez, Mélanie Monique; Poyot, Thomas; Neulat-Ripoll, Fabienne; Lignon, Sabrina; Caclard, Arnaud; Thibault, François Michel; Peinnequin, Andre; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Valade, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background Efflux systems are involved in multidrug resistance in most Gram-negative non-fermentative bacteria. We have chosen Burkholderia thailandensis to dissect the development of multidrug resistance phenotypes under antibiotic pressure. Methodology/Principal Findings We used doxycycline selection to obtain several resistant B. thailandensis variants. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of a large panel of structurally unrelated antibiotics were determined ± the efflux pump inhibitor phenylalanine-arginine ß-naphthylamide (PAßN). Membrane proteins were identified by proteomic method and the expressions of major efflux pumps in the doxycycline selected variants were compared to those of the parental strains by a quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Doxycycline selected variants showed a multidrug resistance in two major levels corresponding to the overproduction of two efflux pumps depending on its concentration: AmrAB-OprA and BpeEF-OprC. The study of two mutants, each lacking one of these pumps, indicated that a third pump, BpeAB-OprB, could substitute for the defective pump. Surprisingly, we observed antagonistic effects between PAßN and aminoglycosides or some ß-lactams. PAßN induced the overexpression of AmrAB-OprA and BpeAB-OprB pump genes, generating this unexpected effect. Conclusions/Significance These results may account for the weak activity of PAßN in some Gram-negative species. We clearly demonstrated two antagonistic effects of this molecule on bacterial cells: the blocking of antibiotic efflux and an increase in efflux pump gene expression. Thus, doxycycline is a very efficient RND efflux pump inducer and PAßN may promote the production of some efflux pumps. These results should be taken into account when considering antibiotic treatments and in future studies on efflux pump inhibitors. PMID:24386333

  7. φX216, a P2-like bacteriophage with broad Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei strain infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitko, Brian H; Cox, Christopher R; DeShazer, David; Johnson, Shannon L; Voorhees, Kent J; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2012-12-07

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are closely related Category B Select Agents of bioterrorism and the causative agents of the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Rapid phage-based diagnostic tools would greatly benefit early recognition and treatment of these diseases. There is extensive strain-to-strain variation in B. pseudomallei genome content due in part to the presence or absence of integrated prophages. Several phages have previously been isolated from B. pseudomallei lysogens, for example φK96243, φ1026b and φ52237. We have isolated a P2-like bacteriophage, φX216, which infects 78% of all B. pseudomallei strains tested. φX216 also infects B. mallei, but not other Burkholderia species, including the closely related B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. The nature of the φX216 host receptor remains unclear but evidence indicates that in B. mallei φX216 uses lipopolysaccharide O-antigen but a different receptor in B. pseudomallei. The 37,637 bp genome of φX216 encodes 47 predicted open reading frames and shares 99.8% pairwise identity and an identical strain host range with bacteriophage φ52237. Closely related P2-like prophages appear to be widely distributed among B. pseudomallei strains but both φX216 and φ52237 readily infect prophage carrying strains. The broad strain infectivity and high specificity for B. pseudomallei and B. mallei indicate that φX216 will provide a good platform for the development of phage-based diagnostics for these bacteria.

  8. φX216, a P2-like bacteriophage with broad Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei strain infectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvitko Brian H

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are closely related Category B Select Agents of bioterrorism and the causative agents of the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Rapid phage-based diagnostic tools would greatly benefit early recognition and treatment of these diseases. There is extensive strain-to-strain variation in B. pseudomallei genome content due in part to the presence or absence of integrated prophages. Several phages have previously been isolated from B. pseudomallei lysogens, for example φK96243, φ1026b and φ52237. Results We have isolated a P2-like bacteriophage, φX216, which infects 78% of all B. pseudomallei strains tested. φX216 also infects B. mallei, but not other Burkholderia species, including the closely related B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. The nature of the φX216 host receptor remains unclear but evidence indicates that in B. mallei φX216 uses lipopolysaccharide O-antigen but a different receptor in B. pseudomallei. The 37,637 bp genome of φX216 encodes 47 predicted open reading frames and shares 99.8% pairwise identity and an identical strain host range with bacteriophage φ52237. Closely related P2-like prophages appear to be widely distributed among B. pseudomallei strains but both φX216 and φ52237 readily infect prophage carrying strains. Conclusions The broad strain infectivity and high specificity for B. pseudomallei and B. mallei indicate that φX216 will provide a good platform for the development of phage-based diagnostics for these bacteria.

  9. Mancha bacteriana em Ruscus sp. causada por Burkholderia andropogonis no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Irene M.G; Beriam, Luís O.S; Sannazzaro, Ana M; Rodrigues Neto, Júlio

    2009-01-01

    Em abril de 2008 foram recebidas folhas de Ruscus sp. originárias de plantios localizados na região de Santo Antonio de Posse SP com sintomas de manchas arredondadas, com 5 a 8 mm de diâmetro, de coloração marrom escura, com centro necrótico e circundadas por halo clorótico. Dos isolamentos realizados, foram obtidas colônias bacterianas de cor creme, de crescimento lento, com células Gram-negativas, oxidativas e não fluorescentes. Inoculações artificiais em Ruscus sp. reproduziram os sintomas...

  10. Optimization of olive oil hydrolysis process using immobilized Lipase from Burkholderia cepacia sp. in Polyurethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Ligianara Dewes Nyari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to achieve the best conditions for the  olive oil hydrolysis process at optimal pH and temperature using Burkholderia cepacia lipase immobilized in situ in rigid polyurethane support. The influences of the temperature (13.85 to 56.5ºC and pH (4.18 to 9.82 were evaluated by a central composite rotational experimental design 22. The operational stability and storage conditions were also studied. The olive oil hydrolysis process was optimized in pH 7.0, at 40°C and 15 min of reaction, with 66 and 93 U g-1 of hydrolysis activity in free and immobilized lipase, respectively, with > 700% yield. The immobilized remained stable for up to 40 days of storage at temperatures of 60oC, and for 100 days from 4 to 25°C. The operational stability of the immobilized was 6 continuous cycles. In this way, immobilization showed to be a promising alternative for its application in olive oil hydrolysis, having storage stability and reuse capability.

  11. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia - nodulating Burkholderia dilworthii strain WSM3556(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia dilworthii strain WSM3556(T) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected near Grotto Bay Nature Reserve, in the Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2004. This plant persists in infertile and deep sandy soils with acidic pH, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. WSM3556(T) thus represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua for which we describe the general features, together with genome sequence and annotation. The 7,679,067 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 140 scaffolds of 141 contigs, contains 7,059 protein-coding genes and 64 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  12. [Xylanase activity of phytopathogenic and endophytic strains of Ceratocystis sp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurchenko, I M; Sokolova, O V; Iur'ieva, O M

    2010-01-01

    A comparative analysis of xylanase activity of 36 phytopathogenic and endophytic Ceratocystis sp. strains was conducted. The rate of their linear growth on the medium with xylan was studied. The rate of linear growth of phytopathogenic strains was 0.003-0.004 mm/h that was almost 70 times less than in endophytic ones. There were no correlation between levels of xylanase activity of studied strains and rates of their linear growth. Xylanase activity ofendophytic Ceratocystis sp. strains varied from complete absence to high level. Phytopathogenic strains possessed only high xylanase activity; maximum values of their xylanase activity zones were three times more than in endophytic strains. The differences in xylanase activity were observed on the strain level. The xylanase activity of 24% endophytic and 64% phytopathogenic strains became higher with increasing of cultivation period. The clear dependence of xylanase activity on the species and organs of host plants was not demonstrated. It was shown that the xylanase activity level of phytopathogenic Ceratocystis sp. strains was too much higher than in such phytopathogens as Fusarium poae, F. oxysporum and Alternaria alternata strains. The conclusion was made that the studied endophytic Ceratocystis sp. strains can be related to latent pathogens, which are able to cause the diseases of host plants in conditions favorable for them.

  13. Fed-Batch Synthesis of Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate) and Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate-co-4-Hydroxybutyrate) from Sucrose and 4-Hydroxybutyrate Precursors by Burkholderia sacchari Strain DSM 17165

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Miguel Miranda de Sousa; Koller, Martin; Puppi, Dario; Morelli, Andrea; Chiellini, Federica; Braunegg, Gerhart

    2017-01-01

    Based on direct sucrose conversion, the bacterium Burkholderia sacchari is an excellent producer of the microbial homopolyester poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). Restrictions of the strain?s wild type in metabolizing structurally related 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) precursors towards 3HV-containing polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolyester calls for alternatives. We demonstrate the highly productive biosynthesis of PHA copolyesters consisting of 3-hydroxybuytrate (3HB) and 4-hydroxybutyrate (4HB) monom...

  14. Genome sequencing and annotation of Serratia sp. strain TEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lephoto, Tiisetso E; Gray, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    We present the annotation of the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KP711410). This organism was isolated from entomopathogenic nematode Oscheius sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KM492926) collected from grassland soil and has a genome size of 5,000,541 bp and 542 subsystems. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number LDEG00000000.

  15. Environmental Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain Enhances Fitness by Serial Passages during Long-Term Chronic Airways Infection in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Bragonzi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, and has also been isolated from natural environments. In previous work, we explored the virulence and pathogenic potential of environmental B. cenocepacia strains and demonstrated that they do not differ from clinical strains in some pathogenic traits. Here, we investigated the ability of the environmental B. cenocepacia Mex1 strain, isolated from the maize rhizosphere, to persist and increase its virulence after serial passages in a mouse model of chronic infection. B. cenocepacia Mex1 strain, belonging to the recA lineage IIIA, was embedded in agar beads and challenged into the lung of C57Bl/6 mice. The mice were sacrificed after 28 days from infection and their lungs were tested for bacterial loads. Agar beads containing the pool of B. cenocepacia colonies from the four sequential passages were used to infect the mice. The environmental B. cenocepacia strain showed a low incidence of chronic infection after the first passage; after the second, third and fourth passages in mice, its ability to establish chronic infection increased significantly and progressively up to 100%. Colonial morphology analysis and genetic profiling of the Mex1-derived clones recovered after the fourth passage from infected mice revealed that they were indistinguishable from the challenged strain both at phenotypic and genetic level. By testing the virulence of single clones in the Galleria mellonella infection model, we found that two Mex1-derived clones significantly increased their pathogenicity compared to the parental Mex1 strain and behaved similarly to the clinical and epidemic B. cenocepacia LMG16656T. Our findings suggest that serial passages of the environmental B. cenocepacia Mex1 strain in mice resulted in an increased ability to determine chronic lung infection and the appearance of clonal variants with increased virulence in non-vertebrate hosts.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Burkholderia rinojensis sp. nov., a Non-Burkholderia cepacia Complex Soil Bacterium with Insecticidal and Miticidal Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Lorena E.; Koivunen, Marja; Yang, April; Flor-Weiler, Lina; Marrone, Pamela G.

    2013-01-01

    Isolate A396, a bacterium isolated from a Japanese soil sample demonstrated strong insecticidal and miticidal activities in laboratory bioassays. The isolate was characterized through biochemical methods, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis, sequencing of 16S rRNA, multilocus sequence typing and analysis, and DNA-DNA hybridization. FAME analysis matched A396 to Burkholderia cenocepacia, but this result was not confirmed by 16S rRNA or DNA-DNA hybridization. 16S rRNA sequencing indicated closest matches with B. glumae and B. plantarii. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with B. plantarii, B. glumae, B. multivorans, and B. cenocepacia confirmed the low genetic similarity (11.5 to 37.4%) with known members of the genus. PCR-based screening showed that A396 lacks markers associated with members of the B. cepacia complex. Bioassay results indicated two mechanisms of action: through ingestion and contact. The isolate effectively controlled beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua; BAW) and two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae; TSSM). In diet overlay bioassays with BAW, 1% to 4% (vol/vol) dilution of the whole-cell broth caused 97% to 100% mortality 4 days postexposure, and leaf disc treatment bioassays attained 75% ± 22% mortality 3 days postexposure. Contact bioassays led to 50% larval mortality, as well as discoloration, stunting, and failure to molt. TSSM mortality reached 93% in treated leaf discs. Activity was maintained in cell-free supernatants and after heat treatment (60°C for 2 h), indicating that a secondary metabolite or excreted thermostable enzyme might be responsible for the activity. Based on these results, we describe the novel species Burkholderia rinojensis, a good candidate for the development of a biocontrol product against insect and mite pests. PMID:24096416

  17. The tomato rhizosphere, an environment rich in nitrogen-fixing Burkholderia species with capabilities of interest for agriculture and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Onofre-Lemus, Janette; Estrada-de Los Santos, Paulina; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes

    2007-08-01

    Burkholderia strains are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. Unfortunately, most of these strains belong to species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) involved in human infections, hampering potential applications. Novel diazotrophic Burkholderia species, phylogenetically distant from the Bcc species, have been discovered recently, but their environmental distribution and relevant features for agro-biotechnological applications are little known. In this work, the occurrence of N2-fixing Burkholderia species in the rhizospheres and rhizoplanes of tomato plants field grown in Mexico was assessed. The results revealed a high level of diversity of diazotrophic Burkholderia species, including B. unamae, B. xenovorans, B. tropica, and two other unknown species, one of them phylogenetically closely related to B. kururiensis. These N2-fixing Burkholderia species exhibited activities involved in bioremediation, plant growth promotion, or biological control in vitro. Remarkably, B. unamae and B. kururiensis grew with aromatic compounds (phenol and benzene) as carbon sources, and the presence of aromatic oxygenase genes was confirmed in both species. The rhizospheric and endophyte nature of B. unamae and its ability to degrade aromatic compounds suggest that it could be used in rhizoremediation and for improvement of phytoremediation. B. kururiensis and other Burkholderia sp. strains grew with toluene. B. unamae and B. xenovorans exhibited ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) deaminase activity, and the occurrence of acdS genes encoding ACC deaminase was confirmed. Mineral phosphate solubilization through organic acid production appears to be the mechanism used by most diazotrophic Burkholderia species, but in B. tropica, there presumably exists an additional unknown mechanism. Most of the diazotrophic Burkholderia species produced hydroxamate-type siderophores. Certainly, the N2-fixing Burkholderia species associated with plants have great

  18. Characterization of methyl parathion degradation by a Burkholderia zhejiangensis strain, CEIB S4-3, isolated from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoca-Ursino, Elida C; Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Dantán-González, Edgar; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ortiz-Hernández, Ma Laura

    2017-12-01

    Through the use of an enrichment technique, we isolated from the agricultural soils of Morelos in central México a strain of Burkholderia zhejiangensis identified as CEIB S4-3, it's could use the pesticide methyl parathion (MP) as the only source of carbon and degrade completely p-nitrophenol (PNP). For more efficient MP and PNP degradation by the CEIB S4-3 strain, the absence of an extra carbon source, a large inoculum and an MP concentration up to 50 mg/l are required. Sequence and annotation analysis of the draft genome, showed presence of mpd functional gene, which was expressed and its activity on the MP was confirmed. Additionally, the genes coding for enzymes in the benzoquinone pathway (conducted by Gram-negative bacteria) and the benzenotriol pathway (conducted by Gram-positive bacteria) were found, which was corroborated by identification of intermediary metabolites by HPLC. Thus, we propose that B. zhejiangensis CEIB S4-3 uses both degradation pathways.

  19. In vitro activities of amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, ceftazidime, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole against biofilm of Brazilian strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Moreira, Camila Alencar; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Neto, Manoel Paiva de Araújo; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Rodrigues, Terezinha de Jesus Santos; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed at investigating the in vitro activities of amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, ceftazidime, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole against Burkholderia pseudomallei in planktonic and biofilm forms, through broth microdilution and resazurin-based viability staining, respectively. In planktonic growth, the strains were susceptible to the drugs, while in biofilm growth, significantly higher antimicrobial concentrations were required, especially for ceftazidime and imipenem, surpassing the resistance breakpoints. These results highlight the importance of the routine evaluation of biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility.

  20. Characterization of clinically-attenuated Burkholderia mallei by whole genome sequencing: candidate strain for exclusion from Select Agent lists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Schutzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia mallei is an understudied biothreat agent responsible for glanders which can be lethal in humans and animals. Research with this pathogen has been hampered in part by constraints of Select Agent regulations for safety reasons. Whole genomic sequencing (WGS is an apt approach to characterize newly discovered or poorly understood microbial pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed WGS on a strain of B. mallei, SAVP1, previously pathogenic, that was experimentally infected in 6 equids (4 ponies, 1 mule, 1 donkey, natural hosts, for purposes of producing antibodies. Multiple high inocula were used in some cases. Unexpectedly SAVP1 appeared to be avirulent in the ponies and mule, and attenuated in the donkey, but induced antibodies. We determined the genome sequence of SAVP1 and compared it to a strain that was virulent in horses and a human. In comparison, this phenotypic avirulent SAVP1 strain was missing multiple genes including all the animal type III secretory system (T3SS complex of genes demonstrated to be essential for virulence in mice and hamster models. The loss of these genes in the SAVP1 strain appears to be the consequence of a multiple gene deletion across insertion sequence (IS elements in the B. mallei genome. Therefore, the strain by itself is unlikely to revert naturally to its virulent phenotype. There were other genes present in one strain and not the other and vice-versa. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The discovery that this strain of B. mallei was both avirulent in the natural host ponies, and did not possess T3SS associated genes may be fortuitous to advance biodefense research. The deleted virulence-essential T3SS is not likely to be re-acquired naturally. These findings may provide a basis for exclusion of SAVP1 from the Select Agent regulation or at least discussion of what else would be required for exclusion. This exclusion could accelerate research by investigators not possessing BSL-3

  1. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Tiffany M; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4) CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  2. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M Mott

    Full Text Available In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001 deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis.Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001.Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia Chow; Guang Nong; Franz J. St. John; John D. Rice; Ellen Dickstein; Olga Chertkov; David Bruce; Chris Detter; Thomas Brettin; James Han; Tanja Woyke; Sam Pitluck; Matt Nolan; Amrita Pati; Joel Martin; Alex Copeland; Miriam L. Land; Lynne Goodwin; Jeffrey B. Jones; Lonnie O. Ingram; Keelnathan T. Shanmugam; James F. Preston

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by...

  4. Ocurrence of the antibiotic producing bacterium Burkholderia sp. in colonies of the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Adão Valmir; Dillon, Rod J; Dillon, Viv M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Samuels, Richard I

    2004-10-15

    Fungus garden material from recently established Atta sexdens rubropilosa colonies (6-12 months old) was sampled to detect antibiotic producing microorganisms that inhibited the growth of pathogens of insects and of the fungus gardens but did not affect their mutualistic fungus. A bacterium with activity against the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana was isolated from 56% of the gardens tested (n=57) and identified from its biochemical profile and from 16S and 23S ribosomal DNA sequences as a member of the genus Burkholderia. The ant-associated Burkholderia isolates secreted a potent, anti-fungal agent that inhibited germination of conidia of the entomopathogenic fungi B. bassiana, Metarhizium anisopliae, of the saprophytic Verticillium lecanii, and also of a specialist fungus garden Escovopsis weberi. Growth of the ant's mutualist fungus was unaffected.

  5. Natural transformation of Thermotoga sp. strain RQ7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongmei; Xu, Hui; Puranik, Rutika; Xu, Zhaohui

    2014-05-10

    Thermotoga species are organisms of enormous interest from a biotechnological as well as evolutionary point of view. Genetic modifications of Thermotoga spp. are often desired in order to fully release their multifarious potentials. Effective transformation of recombinant DNA into these bacteria constitutes a critical step of such efforts. This study aims to establish natural competency in Thermotoga spp. and to provide a convenient method to transform these organisms. Foreign DNA was found to be relatively stable in the supernatant of a Thermotoga culture for up to 6 hours. Adding donor DNA to T. sp. strain RQ7 at its early exponential growth phase (OD600 0.18 ~ 0.20) resulted in direct acquisition of the DNA by the cells. Both T. neapolitana chromosomal DNA and Thermotoga-E. coli shuttle vectors effectively transformed T. sp. strain RQ7, rendering the cells resistance to kanamycin. The kan gene carried by the shuttle vector pDH10 was detected by PCR from the plasmid extract of the transformants, and the amplicons were verified by restriction digestions. A procedure for natural transformation of Thermotoga spp. was established and optimized. With the optimized method, T. sp. strain RQ7 sustained a transformation frequency in the order of 10⁻⁷ with both genomic and plasmid DNA. T. sp. strain RQ7 cells are naturally transformable during their early exponential phase. They acquire DNA from both closely and distantly related species. Both chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA serve as suitable substrates for transformation. Our findings lend a convenient technical tool for the genetic engineering of Thermotoga spp.

  6. Nutritional Requirements of Methanosarcina sp. Strain TM-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Patti A.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    1985-01-01

    Methanosarcina sp. strain TM-1, an acetotrophic, thermophilic methanogen isolated from an anaerobic sludge digestor, was originally reported to require an anaerobic sludge supernatant for growth. It was found that the sludge supernatant could be replaced with yeast extract (1 g/liter), 6 mM bicarbonate-30% CO2, and trace metals, with a doubling time on methanol of 14 h. For growth on either methanol or acetate, yeast extract could be replaced with CaCl2 · 2H2O (13.6 μM minimum) and the vitamin p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA, ca. 3 nM minimum), with a doubling time on methanol of 8 to 9 h. Filter-sterilized folic acid at 0.3 μM could not replace PABA. The antimetabolite sulfanilamide (20 mM) inhibited growth of and methanogenesis by Methanosarcina sp. strain TM-1, and this inhibition was reversed by the addition of 0.3 μM PABA. When a defined medium buffered with 20 mM N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid was used, it was shown that Methanosarcina sp. strain TM-1 required 6 mM bicarbonate-30% CO2 for optimal growth and methanogenesis from methanol. Cells growing on acetate were less dependent on bicarbonate-CO2. When we used a defined medium in which the only organic compounds present were methanol or acetate, nitrilotriacetic acid (0.2 mM), and PABA, it was possible to limit batch cultures of Methanosarcina sp. strain TM-1 for nitrogen at NH4+ concentrations at or below 2.0 mM, in marked contrast with Methanosarcina barkeri 227, which fixes dinitrogen when grown under NH4+ limitation. PMID:16346841

  7. The complete genome of Burkholderia phenoliruptrix strain BR3459a, a symbiont of Mimosa flocculosa: highlighting the coexistence of symbiotic and pathogenic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuleta, Luiz Fernando Goda; Cunha, Claúdio de Oliveira; de Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; Ciapina, Luciane Prioli; Souza, Rangel Celso; Mercante, Fábio Martins; de Faria, Sergio Miana; Baldani, José Ivo; Straliotto, Rosangela; Hungria, Mariangela; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2014-06-28

    Burkholderia species play an important ecological role related to xenobiosis, the promotion of plant growth, the biocontrol of agricultural diseases, and symbiotic and non-symbiotic biological nitrogen fixation. Here, we highlight our study as providing the first complete genome of a symbiotic strain of B. phenoliruptrix, BR3459a (=CLA1), which was originally isolated in Brazil from nodules of Mimosa flocculosa and is effective in fixing nitrogen in association with this leguminous species. Genomic comparisons with other pathogenic and non-pathogenic Burkholderia strains grouped B. phenoliruptrix BR3459a with plant-associated beneficial and environmental species, although it shares a high percentage of its gene repertoire with species of the B. cepacia complex (Bcc) and "pseudomallei" group. The genomic analyses showed that the bce genes involved in exopolysaccharide production are clustered together in the same genomic region, constituting part of the Group III cluster of non-pathogenic bacteria. Regarding environmental stresses, we highlight genes that might be relevant in responses to osmotic, heat, cold and general stresses. Furthermore, a number of particularly interesting genes involved in the machinery of the T1SS, T2SS, T3SS, T4ASS and T6SS secretion systems were identified. The xenobiotic properties of strain BR3459a were also investigated, and some enzymes involved in the degradation of styrene, nitrotoluene, dioxin, chlorocyclohexane, chlorobenzene and caprolactam were identified. The genomic analyses also revealed a large number of antibiotic-related genes, the most important of which were correlated with streptomycin and novobiocin. The symbiotic plasmid showed high sequence identity with the symbiotic plasmid of B. phymatum. Additionally, comparative analysis of 545 housekeeping genes among pathogenic and non-pathogenic Burkholderia species strongly supports the definition of a new genus for the second branch, which would include BR3459a. The analyses

  8. Growth promotion and colonization of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum cv. Alamo by bacterial endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seonhwa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Switchgrass is one of the most promising bioenergy crop candidates for the US. It gives relatively high biomass yield and can grow on marginal lands. However, its yields vary from year to year and from location to location. Thus it is imperative to develop a low input and sustainable switchgrass feedstock production system. One of the most feasible ways to increase biomass yields is to harness benefits of microbial endophytes. Results We demonstrate that one of the most studied plant growth promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, and greenhouse conditions. In several in vitro experiments, the average fresh weight of PsJN-inoculated plants was approximately 50% higher than non-inoculated plants. When one-month-old seedlings were grown in a growth chamber for 30 days, the PsJN-inoculated Alamo plants had significantly higher shoot and root biomass compared to controls. Biomass yield (dry weight averaged from five experiments was 54.1% higher in the inoculated treatment compared to non-inoculated control. Similar results were obtained in greenhouse experiments with transplants grown in 4-gallon pots for two months. The inoculated plants exhibited more early tillers and persistent growth vigor with 48.6% higher biomass than controls. We also found that PsJN could significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub-optimal conditions. However, PsJN-mediated growth promotion in switchgrass is genotype specific. Conclusions Our results show B. phytofirmans strain PsJN significantly promotes growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under different conditions, especially in the early growth stages leading to enhanced production of tillers. This phenomenon may benefit switchgrass establishment in the first year. Moreover, PsJN significantly stimulated growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under sub

  9. Metalaxyl Degradation by Mucorales Strains Gongronella sp. and Rhizopus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosário Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the degradation of metalaxyl was investigated in the presence of two Mucorales strains, previously isolated from soil subjected to repeated treatments with this fungicide and selected after enrichment technique. Fungal strains were characterised by a polyphasic approach using phylogenetic analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS gene region, phenotypic characterisation by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS spectral analysis, and growth kinetics experiments. The strains were identified as Gongronella sp. and Rhizopus oryzae. The fungal growth kinetics in liquid cultures containing metalaxyl fits with Haldane model. Under laboratory conditions, the ability of Gongronella sp. and R. oryzae cultures to degrade metalaxyl was evaluated in liquid cultures and soil experiments. Both species were able to: (a use metalaxyl as the main carbon and energy source; and (b degrade metalaxyl in polluted soils, with rates around 1.0 mg kg−1 d−1. This suggests these strains could degrade metalaxyl in soils contaminated with this fungicide.

  10. Characterization of plant-growth-promoting effects and concurrent promotion of heavy metal accumulation in the tissues of the plants grown in the polluted soil by Burkholderia strain LD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gui-Hai; Tian, Hui-Hui; Liu, Hai-Ying; Fan, Xian-Wei; Liang, Yu; Li, You-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Plant-growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria especially with the resistance to multiple heavy metals are helpful to phytoremediation. Further development of PGP bacteria is very necessary because of the extreme diversity of plants, soils, and heavy metal pollution. A Burkholderia sp. strain, numbered LD-11, was isolated, which showed resistances to multiple heavy metals and antibiotics. It can produce indole-3-acetic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase and siderophores. Inoculation with the LD-11 improved germination of seeds of the investigated vegetable plants in the presence of Cu, promoted elongation of roots and hypocotyledonary axes, enhanced the dry weights of the plants grown in the soils polluted with Cu and/or Pb, and increased activity of the soil urease and the rhizobacteria diversity. Inoculation with the LD-11 significantly enhanced Cu and/or Pb accumulation especially in the roots of the plants grown in the polluted soils. Notably, LD-11 could produce siderophores in the presence of Cu. Conclusively, the PGP effects and concurrent heavy metal accumulation in the plant tissues results from combined effects of the above-mentioned multiple factors. Cu is an important element that represses production of the siderophore by the bacteria. Phytoremediation by synergistic use of the investigated plants and the bacterial strain LD-11 is a phytoextraction process.

  11. [Formation of huntite by Lysinibacillus sp. GW-2 strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinglong; Li, Fuchun; Zhang, Chonghong; Li, Xuelin

    2015-05-04

    We studied the formation of carbonate minerals induced by microorganism to explore the possibility of mineral capture. Culture experiments of carbonate precipitation were done using B4 medium with 6:1 molar ration of Mg/Ca for 50 days. The same medium without inoculation was used as the control. During the cultivation, bacterial density, precipitate quantities, pH and conductivity of the medium, calciumand magnesium concentration were determined. The morphologies of precipitated carbonates were observed using scanning electron microscopy, and mineral species of carbonate were determined by X-ray diffraction. The main results were: (1) In the inoculation process of the Lysinibacillus sp. (GW-2 strain), we found that precipitate quantities were gradually increased with time, while precipitate was not collected in the aseptic experiments; (2) There were significant positive correlations between bacterial density and average precipitation rate (r = 0. 67, P carbonate minerals by Lysinibacillus sp. formed according to following trend: amorphous calcium carbonate --> Huntite --> High-Mg calcite. The main conclusions were: (1) Lysinibacillus sp. (GW-2 strain) might induce the formation of carbonate minerals precipitation; (2) The bacterial density directly affected the precipitation of carbonate minerals, whereas pH value indirectly controlled the precipitation of carbonate minerals; (3) Decreased of conductivity, calcium and magnesium concentration of the medium could indirectly indicate the occurrence of carbonate precipitate; (4) Huntite might be formed through ageing of amorphous calcium carbonate, whereas high-Mg calcite might be formed through demagnesium of the huntite.

  12. Selection of nitrogen-fixing deficient Burkholderia vietnamiensis strains by cystic fibrosis patients: involvement of nif gene deletions and auxotrophic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Aymeric; Monnez, Claire; Estrada de Los Santos, Paulina; Segonds, Christine; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Lipuma, John J; Chabanon, Gerard; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2007-05-01

    Burkholderia vietnamiensis is the third most prevalent species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Its ability at fixing nitrogen makes it one of the main Bcc species showing strong filiations with environmental reservoirs. In this study, 83% (29 over 35) of the B. vietnamiensis CF isolates and 100% of the environmental ones (over 29) were found expressing the dinitrogenase complex (encoded by the nif cluster) which is essential in N(2) fixation. Among the deficient strains, two were found growing with ammonium chloride suggesting that they were defective in N(2) fixation, and four with amino acids supplements suggesting that they were harbouring auxotrophic mutations. To get insights about the genetic events that led to the emergence of the N(2)-fixing defective strains, a genetic analysis of B. vietnamiensis nitrogen-fixing property was undertaken. A 40-kb-long nif cluster and nif regulatory genes were identified within the B. vietnamiensis strain G4 genome sequence, and analysed. Transposon mutagenesis and nifH genetic marker exchanges showed the nif cluster and several other genes like gltB (encoding a subunit of the glutamate synthase) to play a key role in B. vietnamiensis ability at growing in nitrogen-free media. nif cluster DNA probings of restricted genomic DNA blots showed a full deletion of the nif cluster for one of the N(2)-fixing defective strain while the other one showed a genetic organization similar to the one of the G4 strain. For 17% of B. vietnamiensis clinical strains, CF lungs appeared to have favoured the selection of mutations or deletions leading to N(2)-fixing deficiencies.

  13. Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov., a black-pigment-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Christopher A; Saunders, Lauren P; Schisler, David A; Leathers, Timothy D; Naeem, Naveed; Cohan, Frederick M; Rooney, Alejandro P

    2016-08-01

    Two isolates of a Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium were identified during a survey of the Bacillus diversity of the Agriculture Research Service Culture Collection. These strains were originally isolated from soil and have a phenotype of producing a dark pigment on tryptic soy agar. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that these strains were related most closely to Bacillus subtilis subsp. inaquosorum (99.7 % similarity) and Bacillus axarquiensis (99.7 %). In phenotypic characterization, the novel strains were found to grow between 17 and 50 °C and can tolerate up to 9 % (w/v) NaCl. Furthermore, the strains grew in media of pH 5.5-10 (optimal growth at pH 7.0-8.0). The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0 (34.8 %) and iso-C15 : 0 (21.9 %). The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. A draft genome of both strains was completed. The DNA G+C content was 43.8 mol%. A phylogenomic analysis on the core genome of these two new strains and all members of the Bacillus subtilis group revealed these two strains formed a distinct monophyletic clade with the nearest neighbour Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. DNA-DNA relatedness studies using in silico DNA-DNA hybridizations showed the two strains were conspecific (93.8 %), while values with all other species (Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain NRRL B-41091T (=CCUG 68786T).

  14. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; St. John, Franz J.; Rice, John D.; Dickstein, Ellen; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Pati, Amrita; Martin, Joel; Copeland, Alex; Land, Miriam L.; Goodwin, Lynne; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T.; Preston, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of β-1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources. PMID:22675593

  15. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Virginia [University of Florida; Nong, Guang [University of Florida; St. John, Franz J. [US Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; Dickstein, Ellen [University of Florida; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Jones, Jeffrey B. [University of Florida; Ingram, Lonnie O. [University of Florida; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T. [University of Florida; Preston, James F. [University of Florida

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of -1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources.

  16. Detection and differentiation of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, May-Ann; Wang, Dongling; Yap, Eu Hian

    2005-03-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis may be differentiated from closely related species of Burkholderia mallei that causes glanders and non-pathogenic species of Burkholderia thailandensis by multiplex PCR. The multiplex PCR consists of primers that flank a 10-bp repetitive element in B. pseudomallei and B. mallei amplifying PCR fragment of varying sizes between 400-700 bp, a unique sequence in B. thailandensis amplifying a PCR fragment of 308 bp and the metalloprotease gene amplifying a PCR fragment of 245 bp in B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis. The multiplex PCR not only can differentiate the three Burkholderia species but can also be used for epidemiological typing of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei strains.

  17. Genomic analysis of three sponge-associated Arthrobacter Antarctic strains, inhibiting the growth of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria by synthesizing volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, Valerio; Maida, Isabel; Fondi, Marco; Perrin, Elena; Papaleo, Maria Cristiana; Bosi, Emanuele; de Pascale, Donatella; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Michaud, Luigi; Lo Giudice, Angelina; Fani, Renato

    2014-01-01

    In this work we analyzed the ability of three Arthrobacter strains (namely TB23, TB26 and CAL618), which were isolated from the Antarctic sponges Haliclonissa verrucosa and Lyssodendrix nobilis, to specifically inhibit the growth of a panel of 40 Burkholderia cepacia complex strains, representing a major cause of infections in patients that are affected by Cystic Fibrosis. The inhibitory activity was due to the synthesis of antimicrobial compounds, very likely volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and was partially dependent on the growth media that were used for Antarctic strains growth. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that two of them (i.e. CAL 618 and TB23) were very close and very likely belonged to the same Arthrobacter species, whereas the strain TB26 was placed in a distant branch. The genome of the strains TB26 and CAL618 was also sequenced and compared with that of the strain TB23. The analysis revealed that TB23 and CAL618 shared more genomic properties (GC content, genome size, number of genes) than with TB26. Since the three strains exhibited very similar inhibition pattern vs Bcc strains, it is quite possible that genes involved in the biosynthesis of antimicrobial compounds very likely belong to the core genome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. A new diphenyl ether from Phoma sp. strain, SHZK-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, M J; Fang, H; Li, W J; Huang, D M; Wu, Z; Zhao, Y F

    2012-01-01

    A new diphenyl ether methyl 2-(2-formyl-3-hydroxy-5-methylphenoxy)-5-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoate (3), together with four known compounds, asterric acid (1), methyl asterrate (2), 9(Z),12(Z)-nonadecadienoic acid (4) and orsellinic acid (5), were isolated from the Phoma sp. strain SHZK-2, which was isolated from a polluted environment in southern China. The structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic methods. Cytotoxicities of compounds against HEPG2 cell and Raji cell lines were preliminarily evaluated by the MTT method.

  19. Salpingitis in geese associated with Mycoplasma sp. strain 1220.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos-Kovács, Mihály; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Czifra, György; Stipkovits, László

    2009-06-01

    An outbreak of disease in a White Rhine laying goose flock was characterized by increased water uptake, increased mortality, production of eggs with abnormal shells, a 25% drop in egg production and 40% embryo mortality. Affected dead or sacrificed birds had sero-fibrinogranulocytic peritonitis and salpingitis, infiltration of the lamina propria in the uterus and heterophil granulocytes in the isthmus and magnum of the oviduct. Mycoplasmas, mainly identified as Mycoplasma sp. strain 1220, were isolated from the airsac, liver, ovary, magnum and peritoneum of some affected geese. Strain 1220 was originally isolated from a Hungarian gander with phallus inflammation and, according to detailed biochemical and serological examinations, it is expected to represent a new avian species within the genus Mycoplasma.

  20. Kinetics of Acetate Utilization by Two Thermophilic Acetotrophic Methanogens: Methanosarcina sp. Strain CALS-1 and Methanothrix sp. Strain CALS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, H; Zinder, S H

    1989-02-01

    The kinetics of acetate utilization were examined for washed concentrated cell suspensions of two thermophilic acetotrophic methanogens isolated from a 58 degrees C anaerobic digestor. Progress curves for acetate utilization by cells of Methanosarcina sp. strain CALS-1 showed that the utilization rate was concentration independent (zero order) above concentrations near 3 mM and that acetate utilization ceased when a threshold concentration near 1 mM was reached. Acetate utilization by cells of Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1 was concentration independent down to 0.1 to 0.2 mM, and threshold values of 12 to 21 muM were observed. Typical utilization rates in the concentration-independent stage were 210 and 130 nmol min mg of protein for the methanosarcina and the methanothrix, respectively. These results are in agreement with a general model in which high acetate concentrations favor Methanosarcina spp., while low concentrations favor Methanothrix spp. However, acetate utilization by these two strains did not follow simple Michaelis-Menton kinetics.

  1. Biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) in wastewater using Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Muhammad [Department of Chemical Engineering, American University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industries. Hexavalent chromium is particularly worrying because of its toxic influence on human health. In this paper, biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) present in wastewater has been studied using two different bacterial strains; Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. A chemostat (with and without recycle of cells) with 10 L liquid culture volume was used to study the substrate and the biomass cell concentrations with time. Also, the degree of substrate conversion was studied by the varying the dilution rate as an independent parameter. The dilution rate (ratio of feed flow rate to the culture volume) was varied by varying the feed volumetric rate from 110-170 mL/h for inlet hexavalent chromium concentrations of 70 mg/dm3. The results show that a chemostat with recycle gives a better performance in terms of substrate conversion than a chemostat without a recycle. Moreover, the degree of substrate conversion decreases as the dilution rate is increased. Also, Bacillus sp. was found to give higher conversions compared to pseudomonas sp.

  2. Ethylene production with engineered Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veetil, Vinod Puthan; Angermayr, S Andreas; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2017-02-23

    Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology of cyanobacteria offer a promising sustainable alternative approach for fossil-based ethylene production, by using sunlight via oxygenic photosynthesis, to convert carbon dioxide directly into ethylene. Towards this, both well-studied cyanobacteria, i.e., Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, have been engineered to produce ethylene by introducing the ethylene-forming enzyme (Efe) from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola PK2 (the Kudzu strain), which catalyzes the conversion of the ubiquitous tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate into ethylene. This study focuses on Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 and shows stable ethylene production through the integration of a codon-optimized version of the efe gene under control of the Ptrc promoter and the core Shine-Dalgarno sequence (5'-AGGAGG-3') as the ribosome-binding site (RBS), at the slr0168 neutral site. We have increased ethylene production twofold by RBS screening and further investigated improving ethylene production from a single gene copy of efe, using multiple tandem promoters and by putting our best construct on an RSF1010-based broad-host-self-replicating plasmid, which has a higher copy number than the genome. Moreover, to raise the intracellular amounts of the key Efe substrate, 2-oxoglutarate, from which ethylene is formed, we constructed a glycogen-synthesis knockout mutant (ΔglgC) and introduced the ethylene biosynthetic pathway in it. Under nitrogen limiting conditions, the glycogen knockout strain has increased intracellular 2-oxoglutarate levels; however, surprisingly, ethylene production was lower in this strain than in the wild-type background. Making use of different RBS sequences, production of ethylene ranging over a 20-fold difference has been achieved. However, a further increase of production through multiple tandem promoters and a broad-host plasmid was not achieved speculating that the transcription strength and

  3. In vitro study of biological activity of four strains of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola and identification of their bioactive metabolites using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem S. Elshafie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out to study in vitro antibacterial activity of 4 strains of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola (Bga against G+ve Bacillus megaterium and G−ve Escherichia coli, haemolytic activity against the cell membrane of erythrocytes, the production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes and finally, the pathogenicity against Agaricus bisporus flesh blocks. Chemical structure of bioactive substances of the most bioactive strain (ICMP 11096 was established using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS. All the studied Bga strains inhibited the growth of the two tested bacteria although some growing substrates negatively influenced the antimicrobial substance production. The same Bga strains showed highly haemolytic activity and were able to produce 3 hydrolytic enzymes, i.e. chitinase, glucanase and protease. In pathogenicity assays, the considered Bga strains resulted virulent for A. bisporus. The GC–MS for compounds from Bga ICMP 11096 were compatible with the structure of two bioactive fatty acids identified as methyl stearate and ethanol 2-butoxy phosphate with mass spectrum m/e 298 and 398, respectively.

  4. Pyrene degradation by Mycobacterium sp. strain KR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmann, K; Noll, H P; Steinberg, C E; Kettrup, A A

    1998-06-01

    A Mycobacterium sp., strain KR2 which was able to utilise pyrene as sole source of carbon and energy was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil originating from the area of a former gaswork plant. The isolate metabolised up to 60% of the pyrene added (0.5 mg/mL) within 8 days at 20 degrees C. Cis-4,5-pyrene dihydrodiol, 4,5-phenanthrene dicarboxylic acid, 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, 2-carboxybenzaldehyde, phthalic acid, and protocatechuic acid were identified as degradation products. Based on these findings a degradation pathway for pyrene is suggested which is in good accordance with the data published so far on bacterial pyrene metabolism.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Burkholderia terrae Strain BS001, Which Interacts with Fungal Surface Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazir, Rashid; Hansen, Martin A.; Sorensen, Soren

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia terrae BS001 is a soil bacterium which was originally isolated from the mycosphere of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria proxima. It exhibits a range of fungus-interacting traits which reveal its propensity to actively interact at fungal interfaces. Here, we present the approximately...... 11.5-Mb (G+C content, 61.52 draft genome sequence of B. terrae BS001 with the aim of providing insight into the genomic basis of its ecological success in fungus-affected soil settings....

  6. Members of the genus Burkholderia: good and bad guys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Leo; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the 1990s several biocontrol agents on that contained Burkholderia strains were registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). After risk assessment these products were withdrawn from the market and a moratorium was placed on the registration of Burkholderia-containing products, as these strains may pose a risk to human health. However, over the past few years the number of novel Burkholderia species that exhibit plant-beneficial properties and are normally not isolated from infected patients has increased tremendously. In this commentary we wish to summarize recent efforts that aim at discerning pathogenic from beneficial Burkholderia strains. PMID:27303639

  7. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Micromonospora sp. Strain HK10, Isolated from Kaziranga National Park, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Madhumita; Das, Dhrubajyoti; Borah, Chiranjeeta; Deka Boruah, Hari Prasanna; Bora, Tarun Chandra

    2016-01-01

    We report the 6.92-Mbp genome sequence of Micromonospora sp. HK10, isolated from soil samples collected from Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India. The full genome of strain Micromonospora sp. strain HK10 consists of 6,911,179 bp with 73.39% GC content, 6,196 protein-coding genes, and 86 RNAs. PMID:27516496

  9. Genome Sequence of the Acidophilic Bacterium Acidocella sp. Strain MX-AZ02

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E.; Garrett, Roger A.; Amils, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Acidocella sp. strain MX-AZ02, an acidophilic and heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium isolated from a geothermal lake in western Mexico.......Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Acidocella sp. strain MX-AZ02, an acidophilic and heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium isolated from a geothermal lake in western Mexico....

  10. The roles of the shikimate pathway genes, aroA and aroB, in virulence, growth and UV tolerance of Burkholderia glumae strain 411gr-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Hari Sharan; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Burkholderia glumae is the major causal agent of bacterial panicle blight of rice, which is a growing disease problem for rice growers worldwide. In our previous study, some B. glumae strains showed pigmentation phenotypes producing at least two (yellow-green and purple) pigment compounds in casein-peptone-glucose agar medium. The B. glumae strains LSUPB114 and LSUPB116 are pigment-deficient mutant derivatives of the virulent and pigment-proficient strain 411gr-6, having mini-Tn5gus insertions in aroA encoding 3-phosphoshikimate 1-carboxyvinyltransferase and aroB encoding 3-dehydroquinate synthase, respectively. Both enzymes are known to be involved in the shikimate pathway, which leads to the synthesis of aromatic amino acids. Here, we demonstrate that aroA and aroB are required for normal virulence in rice and onion, growth in M9 minimal medium and tolerance to UV light, but are dispensable for the production of the phytotoxin toxoflavin. These results suggest that the shikimate pathway is involved in bacterial pathogenesis by B. glumae without a significant role in the production of toxoflavin, a major virulence factor of this pathogen. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  11. Identification and nitrogen regulation of the cyanase gene from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942.

    OpenAIRE

    Harano, Y; Suzuki, I; Maeda, S; Kaneko, T.; Tabata, S.; Omata, T

    1997-01-01

    An open reading frame (slr0899) on the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 encodes a polypeptide of 149 amino acid residues, the sequence of which is 40% identical to that of cyanase from Escherichia coli. Introduction into a cyanase-deficient E. coli strain of a plasmid-borne slr0899 resulted in expression of low but significant activity of cyanase. Targeted interruption of a homolog of slr0899 from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942, encoding a protein 77% identical to that encoded b...

  12. Substrate range of benzylsuccinate synthase from Azoarcus sp. strain T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, H R; Spormann, A M

    1999-09-01

    Benzylsuccinate synthase, which catalyzes the anaerobic addition of the methyl carbon of toluene to fumarate, has recently been reported in several denitrifying and sulfate-reducing, toluene-degrading bacteria. In substrate range studies with partially purified benzylsuccinate synthase from denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain T, benzylsuccinate analogs were observed as a result of fumarate addition to the following toluene surrogates: xylenes, monofluorotoluenes, benzaldehyde, and 1-methyl-1-cyclohexene (but not 4-methyl-l-cyclohexene or methylcyclohexane). Benzylsuccinate was also observed as a result of toluene addition to maleate, but no products were observed from assays with toluene and either crotonate or trans-glutaconate. Toluene-maleate addition, like toluene-fumarate addition, resulted in highly stereospecific formation of the (+)-benzylsuccinic acid enantiomer [(R)-2-benzyl-3-carboxypropionic acid]. The previously reported finding that the methyl H atom abstracted from toluene is retained in the succinyl moiety of benzylsuccinate was found to apply to several toluene surrogates. The implications of these observations for the mechanism of benzylsuccinate synthase will be discussed.

  13. Dichloromethane dehalogenase of Hyphomicrobium sp. strain DM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler-Staub, D; Leisinger, T

    1985-01-01

    Dichloromethane dehalogenase, a highly inducible glutathione-dependent enzyme catalyzing the conversion of dichloromethane into formaldehyde and inorganic chloride, was purified fivefold with 60% yield from Hyphomicrobium sp. strain DM2. The electrophoretically homogeneous purified enzyme exhibited a specific activity of 17.3 mkat/kg of protein. Its pH optimum was 8.5. The enzyme was stable at -20 degrees C for at least 6 months. A subunit molecular weight of 33,000 was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration of native dichloromethane dehalogenase yielded a molecular weight of 195,000. Subunit cross-linking with dimethyl suberimidate confirmed the hexameric tertiary structure of the enzyme. Dichloromethane dehalogenase was highly specific for dihalomethanes. Its apparent Km values were 30 microM for CH2Cl2, 15 microM for CH2BrCl, 13 microM for CH2Br2, 5 microM for CH2I2, and 320 microM for glutathione. Several chlorinated aliphatic compounds inhibited the dichloromethane dehalogenase activity of the pure enzyme. The Ki values of the competitive inhibitors 1,2-dichloroethane and 1-chloropropane were 3 and 56 microM, respectively. Images PMID:3988708

  14. Volcanic Soils as Sources of Novel CO-OxidizingParaburkholderiaandBurkholderia:Paraburkholderia hiiakaesp. nov.,Paraburkholderia metrosiderisp. nov.,Paraburkholderia paradisisp. nov.,Paraburkholderia peleaesp. nov., andBurkholderia alpinasp. nov. a Member of theBurkholderia cepaciaComplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn F; King, Gary M

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that members of the Burkholderiales were important in the succession of aerobic, molybdenum-dependent CO oxidizing-bacteria on volcanic soils. During these studies, four isolates were obtained from Kilauea Volcano (Hawai'i, USA); one strain was isolated from Pico de Orizaba (Mexico) during a separate study. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, the Pico de Orizaba isolate and the isolates from Kilauea Volcano were provisionally assigned to the genera Burkholderia and Paraburkholderia , respectively. Each of the isolates possessed a form I coxL gene that encoded the catalytic subunit of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH); none of the most closely related type strains possessed coxL or oxidized CO. Genome sequences for Paraburkholderia type strains facilitated an analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities and average nucleotide identities (ANI). ANI did not exceed 95% (the recommended cutoff for species differentiation) for any of the pairwise comparisons among 27 reference strains related to the new isolates. However, since the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity among this set of reference strains was 98.93%, DNA-DNA hybridizations (DDH) were performed for two isolates whose 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with their nearest phylogenetic neighbors were 98.96 and 99.11%. In both cases DDH values were <16%. Based on multiple variables, four of the isolates represent novel species within the Paraburkholderia : Paraburkholderia hiiakae sp. nov. (type strain I2 T = DSM 28029 T = LMG 27952 T ); Paraburkholderia paradisi sp. nov. (type strain WA T = DSM 28027 T = LMG 27949 T ); Paraburkholderia peleae sp. nov. (type strain PP52-1 T = DSM 28028 T = LMG 27950 T ); and Paraburkholderia metrosideri sp. nov. (type strain DNBP6-1 T = DSM 28030 T = LMG 28140 T ). The remaining isolate represents the first CO-oxidizing member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex: Burkholderia alpina sp. nov. (type strain PO-04-17-38 T = DSM 28031 T

  15. Genome Sequence of the Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium Hyphomicrobium sp. Strain GJ21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bringel, Françoise; Postema, Christiaan P; Mangenot, Sophie; Bibi-Triki, Sabrina; Chaignaud, Pauline; Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; Gruffaz, Christelle; Hermon, Louis; Louhichi, Yousra; Maucourt, Bruno; Muller, Emilie E L; Nadalig, Thierry; Lajus, Aurélie; Rouy, Zoé; Médigue, Claudine; Barbe, Valérie; Janssen, Dick B; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    The genome sequence of Hyphomicrobium sp. strain GJ21, isolated in the Netherlands from samples of environments contaminated with halogenated pollutants and capable of using dichloromethane as its sole carbon and energy source, was determined.

  16. An assessment of adaptive and antagonistic properties of Trichoderma sp. strains in vegetable waste composts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolna-Maruwka Agnieszka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment consisted in monitoring the count of moulds and three selected Trichoderma sp. isolates (T1 - Trichoderma atroviride, T2 - Trichoderma harzianum, T3 - Trichoderma harzianum in vegetable (onion and tomato waste composted with additives (straw, pig manure. Additionally, the aim of the study was to determine the type of interaction occurring between autochthonous fungi isolated from composts after the end of the thermophilic phase and Trichoderma sp. strains applied in the experiment. Number of microorganisms was determined by the plate method, next the identification was confirmed. The rating scale developed by Mańka was used to determine the type of interactions occurring between microorganisms. The greatest count of moulds in onion waste composts was noted in the object which had simultaneously been inoculated with two strains T1 - T. atroviride and T3 - T. harzianum. The greatest count of moulds was noted in the tomato waste composts inoculated with T2 - T. harzianum strain. Microscope identification revealed that Penicillum sp., Rhizopus sp., Alternaria sp. and Mucor sp. strains were predominant in onion waste composts. In tomato waste composts Penicillium was the predominant genus, followed by Rhizopus. The test of antagonism revealed the inhibitory effect of Trichoderma isolates on most autochthonous strains of moulds. Tomato waste composts proved to be better substrates for the growth and development of Trichoderma sp. isolates. The results of the study show that vegetable waste can be used in agriculture as carriers of antagonistic microorganisms.

  17. The complete genome of Burkholderia phenoliruptrix strain BR3459a, a symbiont of Mimosa flocculosa: highlighting the coexistence of symbiotic and pathogenic genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zuleta, Luiz Fernando Goda; Cunha, Claúdio de Oliveira; de Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; Ciapina, Luciane Prioli; Souza, Rangel Celso; Mercante, Fábio Martins; de Faria, Sergio Miana; Baldani, José Ivo; Straliotto, Rosangela; Hungria, Mariangela; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia species play an important ecological role related to xenobiosis, the promotion of plant growth, the biocontrol of agricultural diseases, and symbiotic and non-symbiotic biological nitrogen fixation...

  18. Phenotypic Characterization of a Novel Virulence-Factor Deletion Strain of Burkholderia mallei That Provides Partial Protection against Inhalational Glanders in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel A; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Amemiya, Kei; Chua, Jennifer; Cote, Christopher K; Toothman, Ronald G; Dankmeyer, Jennifer L; Klimko, Christopher P; Wilhelmsen, Catherine L; Raymond, Jolynn W; Zavaljevski, Nela; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei (Bm) is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes in Bm, including BMAA0553, BMAA0728 (tssN), and BMAA1865. In the present study, we used recombinant allelic exchange to construct deletion mutants of BMAA0553 and tssN (ΔBMAA0553 and ΔTssN, respectively) and showed that both deletions completely abrogated virulence at doses of >100 times the LD50 of the wild-type Bm strain. Analysis of ΔBMAA0553- and ΔTssN-infected mice showed starkly reduced bacterial dissemination relative to wild-type Bm, and subsequent in vitro experiments characterized pathogenic phenotypes with respect to intracellular growth, macrophage uptake and phagosomal escape, actin-based motility, and multinucleated giant cell formation. Based on observed in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, we explored the use of ΔTssN as a candidate live-attenuated vaccine. Mice immunized with aerosolized ΔTssN showed a 21-day survival rate of 67% after a high-dose aerosol challenge with the wild-type Bm ATCC 23344 strain, compared to a 0% survival rate for unvaccinated mice. However, analysis of histopathology and bacterial burden showed that while the surviving vaccinated mice were protected from acute infection, Bm was still able to establish a chronic infection. Vaccinated mice showed a modest IgG response, suggesting a limited potential of ΔTssN as a vaccine candidate, but also showed prolonged elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, underscoring the role of cellular and innate immunity in mitigating acute infection in inhalational glanders.

  19. Phenotypic characterization of a novel virulence-factor deletion strain of Burkholderia mallei that provides partial protection against inhalational glanders in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel A. Bozue

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei (Bm is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes in Bm, including BMAA0553, BMAA0728 (tssN, and BMAA1865. In the present study, we used recombinant allelic exchange to construct deletion mutants of BMAA0553 and tssN (ΔBMAA0553 and ΔTssN, respectively and showed that both deletions completely abrogated virulence at doses of >100 times the LD50 of the wild-type Bm strain. Analysis of ΔBMAA0553- and ΔTssN-infected mice showed starkly reduced bacterial dissemination relative to wild-type Bm, and subsequent in vitro experiments characterized pathogenic phenotypes with respect to intracellular growth, macrophage uptake and phagosomal escape, actin-based motility, and multinucleated giant cell formation. Based on observed in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, we explored the use of ΔTssN as a candidate live-attenuated vaccine. Mice immunized with aerosolized ΔTssN showed a 21-day survival rate of 67% after a high-dose aerosol challenge with the wild-type Bm ATCC 23344 strain, compared to a 0% survival rate for unvaccinated mice. However, analysis of histopathology and bacterial burden showed that while the surviving vaccinated mice were protected from acute infection, Bm was still able to establish a chronic infection. Vaccinated mice showed a modest IgG response, suggesting a limited potential of ΔTssN as a vaccine candidate, but also showed prolonged elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, underscoring the role of cellular and innate immunity in mitigating acute infection in inhalational glanders.

  20. Draft Genomes for Eight Burkholderia mallei Isolates from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daligault, H E; Johnson, S L; Davenport, K W; Minogue, T D; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Coyne, S R; Frey, K G; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Lo, C-C; Munk, C; Wolcott, M J; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Rosenzweig, C N; Scholz, M B; Chain, P S

    2016-01-07

    Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, is a Gram-negative, nonmotile, facultative intracellular pathogen. Although glanders has been eradicated from many parts of the world, the threat of B. mallei being used as a weapon is very real. Here we present draft genome assemblies of 8 Burkholderia mallei strains that were isolated in Turkey. Copyright © 2016 Daligault et al.

  1. The Tomato Rhizosphere, an Environment Rich in Nitrogen-Fixing Burkholderia Species with Capabilities of Interest for Agriculture and Bioremediation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Onofre-Lemus, Janette; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia strains are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. Unfortunately, most of these strains belong to species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) involved in human infections, hampering potential applications. Novel diazotrophic Burkholderia species, phylogenetically distant from the Bcc species, have been discovered recently, but their environmental distribution and relevant features for agro-biotechnological applications are little known. In this work, the oc...

  2. Natural Burkholderia mallei infection in Dromedary, Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernery, Ulrich; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Marina; Al-Salloom, Fajer; Johnson, Bobby; Kinne, Joerg; Jose, Shanti; Jose, Sherry; Tappendorf, Britta; Hornstra, Heidie; Scholz, Holger C

    2011-07-01

    We confirm a natural infection of dromedaries with glanders. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of a Burkholderia mallei strain isolated from a diseased dromedary in Bahrain revealed close genetic proximity to strain Dubai 7, which caused an outbreak of glanders in horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004.

  3. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies to strains of Dickeya sp. that cause bacterial heart rot of pineapple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Gabriel D; Kaneshiro, Wendy S; Luu, Van; Berestecky, John M; Alvarez, Anne M

    2010-10-01

    During a severe outbreak of bacterial heart rot that occurred in pineapple plantations on Oahu, Hawaii, in 2003 and years following, 43 bacterial strains were isolated from diseased plants or irrigation water and identified as Erwinia chrysanthemi (now Dickeya sp.) by phenotypic, molecular, and pathogenicity assays. Rep-PCR fingerprint patterns grouped strains from pineapple plants and irrigation water into five genotypes (A-E) that differed from representatives of other Dickeya species, Pectobacterium carotovorum and other enteric saprophytes isolated from pineapple. Monoclonal antibodies produced following immunization of mice with virulent type C Dickeya sp. showed only two specificities. MAb Pine-1 (2D11G1, IgG1 with kappa light chain) reacted to all 43 pineapple/water strains and some reference strains (D. dianthicola, D. chrysanthemi, D. paradisiaca, some D. dadantii, and uncharacterized Dickeya sp.) but did not react to reference strains of D. dieffenbachiae, D. zeae, or one of the two Malaysian pineapple strains. MAb Pine-2 (2A7F2, IgG3 with kappa light chain) reacted to all type B, C, and D strains but not to any A or E strains or any reference strains except Dickeya sp. isolated from Malaysian pineapple. Pathogenicity tests showed that type C strains were more aggressive than type A strains when inoculated during cool months. Therefore, MAb Pine-2 distinguishes the more virulent type C strains from less virulent type A pineapple strains and type E water strains. MAbs with these two specificities enable development of rapid diagnostic tests that will distinguish the systemic heart rot pathogen from opportunistic bacteria associated with rotted tissues. Use of the two MAbs in field assays also permits the monitoring of a known subpopulation and provides additional decision tools for disease containment and management practices.

  4. Genome sequence of Janthinobacterium sp. strain PAMC 25724, isolated from alpine glacier cryoconite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Shin, Seung Chul; Hong, Soon Gyu; Lee, Yung Mi; Lee, Hyoungseok; Lee, Jungeun; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Hyun

    2012-04-01

    The draft genome of Janthinobacterium sp. strain PAMC 25724, which is a violacein-producing psychrotolerant bacterium, was determined. The strain was isolated from glacier cryoconite of the Alps mountain permafrost region. The sequence will allow identification and characterization of the genetic determination of its cold-adaptive properties.

  5. Diazinon degradation by a novel strain Ralstonia sp. DI-3 and X-ray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diazinon is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide often detected in the environment. A highly effectivediazinon-degrading Ralstonia sp. strain DI-3 was isolated from agricultural soil. Strain DI-3 can utilize dimethoateas its sole carbon source for growth and degrade an initial concentration of 100 mg·L^{−1} diazinon to ...

  6. A New Alkali-Thermostable Azoreductase from Bacillus sp. Strain SF

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Jurgen; A. Kandelbauer; Erlacher, Angelika; Paulo, Artur Cavaco; Gübitz, Georg M.

    2004-01-01

    A screening for dye-decolorizing alkali-thermophilic microorganisms resulted in a Bacillus sp. strain isolated out of the wastewater drain of a textile finishing company. An NADH-dependent azoreductase of this strain, Bacillus sp. strain SF, was found to be responsible for the decolorization of azo dyes. This enzyme was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange and affinity chromatography and had a molecular mass of 61.6 kDa and an isoelectric point at pH ...

  7. Degradation of 4-fluorophenol by Arthrobacter sp strain IF1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, Maria Isabel M.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Janssen, Dick B.

    A Gram-positive bacterial strain capable of aerobic biodegradation of 4-fluorophenol (4-FP) as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment from soil samples collected near an industrial site. The organism, designated strain IF1, was identified as a member of the genus

  8. Test of aerobic TCE degradation by willows (Salix viminalis) and willows inoculated with TCE-cometabolizing strains of Burkholderia cepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lauge Peter Westergaard; Broholm, Mette Martina; Gosewinkel, Ulrich Bay

    2017-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread soil and groundwater pollutant and clean-up is often problematic and expensive. Phytoremediation may be a cost-effective solution at some sites. This study investigates TCE degradation by willows (S. viminalis) and willows inoculated with three strains of B...

  9. Marine diatom, Navicula sp. strain JPCC DA0580 and marine green alga, Chlorella sp. strain NKG400014 as potential sources for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Sato, Reiko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-05-01

    Marine diatom, strain JPCC DA0580, and marine green microalga strain NKG400014 were selected as high neutral lipid-producers from marine microalgal culture collection toward biodiesel production. These strains were tentatively identified as Navicula sp. and Chlorella sp., respectively, by 18S rDNA analysis. Growth and lipid accumulation conditions of both strains were analyzed by changing nutrient concentrations in growth media and initial illuminance intensity. The highest productivity of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) reached to 154 mg/L/week for NKG400014 and 185 mg/L/week for JPCC DA0580. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis indicates that FAME fraction from NKG400014 mainly contained 9-12-15-octadecatrienoate (C18:3) and that from JPCC DA0580 mainly contained methyl palmitate (C16:0) and methyl palmitoleate (C16:1). Furthermore, calorimetric analysis revealed that the energy content of strain was 4,233 +/- 55 kcal/kg (i.e., 15.9 +/- 0.2 MJ/kg) for NKG400014 and 6,423 +/- 139 kcal/mg (i.e., 26.9 +/- 0.6 MJ/kg) for JPCC DA0580, respectively. The value from JPCC DA0580 was equivalent to that of coal. The strains NKG400014 and JPCC DA0580 will become a promising resource that can grow as dominant species in the open ocean toward production of both liquid and solid biofuels.

  10. A Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PR reductively dechlorinates both 1,1,1-trichloroethane and chloroform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chang; Zhao, Siyan; He, Jianzhong

    2014-11-01

    1,1,1-Trichloroethane (TCA) and chloroform are two notorious groundwater pollutants. Here we report the isolation and characterization of Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PR that rapidly dechlorinates both compounds. In pyruvate-amended medium, strain PR reductively dechlorinates ∼ 1.0 mM TCA completely to monochloroethane within 15 days. Under the same conditions, strain PR dechlorinates ∼ 1.2 mM chloroform to predominantly dichloromethane (∼ 1.14 mM) and trace amount of monochloromethane (∼ 0.06 mM) within 10 days. Strain PR shares 96.7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with its closest relative - Desulfitobacterium metallireducens strain 853-15; however, it distinguishes itself from known Desulfitobacterium strains by its inability of utilizing several of their commonly shared substrates such as lactate, thiosulfate and sulfite. A reductive dehalogenase gene (ctrA) in strain PR was identified to be responsible for dechlorination of both TCA and chloroform, showing a maximum expression level of 5.95 ∼ 6.25 copies of transcripts cell(-1) . CtrA shares 94% amino acid sequence identity with CfrA in Dehalobacter sp. strain CF50 and DcrA in Dehalobacter sp. strain DCA. Interestingly, strain PR could tolerate high aqueous concentrations (up to 0.45 mM) of trichloroethene, another groundwater pollutant that often coexists with TCA/chloroform. As the first chloroform-respiring and the second TCA-respiring isolate that has been identified, Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PR may prove useful in remediation of halogenated alkanes with trihalomethyl (-CX₃) groups. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Genomic analysis of novel phytopathogenic Georgenia sp. strain SUB25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pooja P; Rakhashiya, Purvi M; Thaker, Vrinda S

    2015-09-01

    A Gram positive bacterium, Georgenia sp. SUB25 was isolated from infected leaves of Solanum lycopersicum L. in Rajkot (22.30°N, 70.78°E), Gujarat, India. We sequenced and analyzed Georgenia sp. SUB25 that is novel plant pathogen using next generation sequencing platform and assembly yielded contigs representing a size of 4.84 Mb with 81 tRNAs and 88 rRNAs. The whole genome sequencing has been deposited in DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number JNFL00000000. This genome sequence contains Type II secretion system genes, which involved in pathogenicity mechanism that may help to understand plant microbial interaction.

  12. Clear distinction between Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei using fluorescent motB primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoock, Gernot; Elschner, Mandy; Sprague, Lisa D

    2015-03-07

    A frame-shift mutation in the flagellum motor gene motB coding for the chemotaxis MotB protein of Burkholderia mallei has been utilized to design a conventional duplex PCR assay with fluorescent labelled primers. Species specificity was tested with a panel of 13 Burkholderia type strains. A total of 41 B. mallei field strains, 36 B. pseudomallei field strains, and 1 B. thailandensis field strain from different geographic regions were tested and correctly identified. Testing of 55 non-Burkholderia bacterial species revealed 100% specificity of the assay. The minimum detection limit was 1 pg DNA or 160 GE for B. mallei and 130 GE for B. pseudomallei, respectively. This assay enables the clear distinction between B. mallei and B. pseudomallei/B. thailandensis.

  13. [Isolation, identification and characterization of a microcystin-degrading bacterium Paucibacter sp. strain CH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Di-Jie; Chen, Xiao-Guo; Xiang, Hui-Yi; Ouyang, Liao; Yang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    A bacterium capable of degrading microcystin (MC), strain CH, was isolated from the sediment of Lake Chaohu, China. Strain CH was tentatively identified as Paucibacter sp. based on the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Paucibacter sp. strain CH can use microcystin LR (MCLR) as the sole carbon and energy sources, and 11.6 microg x mL(-1) of MCLR was degraded to below the detection limit within 10 hours with the first-order reaction rate constant of 0.242 h(-1). The optimum temperature and initial pH for MC degradation were 25-30 degrees C and pH 6-9, respectively. A novel intermediate product containing the Adda residue was detected during the degradation of MCLR, which is different from those produced by strain ACM-3962, and Adda was recognized as the final product of the degradation process. Furthermore, no homologue to any of the four genes, mlrA, mlrB, mlrC and mlrD previously associated with the degradation of MCLR by strain ACM-3962 was found in strain CH. These findings suggest that Paucibacter sp. strain CH mighe degrade MC through a different pathway from that of strain ACM-3962.

  14. Streptomyces sp. strain PGPA39 alleviates salt stress and promotes growth of 'Micro Tom' tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyandi, S A; Damodharan, K; Yang, S H; Suh, J W

    2014-09-01

    To identify an actinobacterial strain that can promote growth and alleviate salinity stress in tomato plants. Actinobacteria were isolated from agricultural soil and screened for ACC deaminase activity, production of indole acetic acid (IAA), solubilization of tricalcium phosphate and sodium chloride (NaCl) salinity tolerance. Among the several strains tested, one strain designated PGPA39 exhibited higher IAA production, and phosphate solubilization in addition to ACC deaminase activity, and tolerance to 1 mol l(-1) NaCl. Strain PGPA39 was identified as a Streptomyces strain based on 16S rDNA sequence and designated Streptomyces sp. strain PGPA39. It promoted the growth of Arabidopsis seedlings in vitro as evidenced by a significant increase in plant biomass and number of lateral roots. Salinity stress-alleviating activity of PGPA39 was evaluated using 'Micro Tom' tomato plants with 180 mmol l(-1) NaCl stress under gnotobiotic condition. A significant increase in plant biomass and chlorophyll content and a reduction in leaf proline content were observed in PGPA39-inoculated tomato plants under salt stress compared with control and salt-stressed noninoculated plants. Streptomyces sp. strain PGPA39 alleviated salt stress and promoted the growth of tomato plants. This study shows the potential of Streptomyces sp. strain PGPA39 in alleviating salinity stress in tomato plants and could be utilized for stress alleviation in crop plants under field conditions. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Antitrypanosomally Active Sponge-Associated Bacterium Actinokineospora sp. Strain EG49

    KAUST Repository

    Harjes, Janno

    2014-03-06

    The marine sponge-associated bacterium Actinokineospora sp. strain EG49 produces the antitrypanosomal angucycline-like compound actinosporin A. The draft genome of Actinokineospora sp. EG49 has a size of 7.5 megabases and a GC content of 72.8% and contains 6,629 protein-coding sequences (CDS). antiSMASH predicted 996 genes residing in 36 secondary metabolite gene clusters.

  16. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma sp. 1220 strains isolated from geese in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Gr?zner, D?nes; Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Sulyok, Kinga M.; R?nai, Zsuzsanna; Hrivn?k, Veronika; Turcs?nyi, Ibolya; J?nosi, Szil?rd; Gyuranecz, Mikl?s

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma sp. 1220 can induce inflammation primarily in the genital and respiratory tracts of waterfowl, leading to serious economic losses. Adequate housing and appropriate antibiotic treatment are promoted in the control of the disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility to thirteen different antibiotics and an antibiotic combination of thirty-eight M. sp. 1220 strains isolated from geese and a duck in several parts of Hungary, Central Euro...

  17. Phylogenomic Study of Burkholderia glathei-like Organisms, Proposal of 13 Novel Burkholderia Species and Emended Descriptions of Burkholderia sordidicola, Burkholderia zhejiangensis, and Burkholderia grimmiae

    OpenAIRE

    Peeters, Charlotte; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Verheyde, Bart; De Brandt, Evie; Vaughn S Cooper; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Partial gyrB gene sequence analysis of 17 isolates from human and environmental sources revealed 13 clusters of strains and identified them as Burkholderia glathei Glade (BGC) bacteria. The taxonomic status of these clusters was examined by whole-genome sequence analysis, determination of the G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and biochemical characterization. The whole-genome sequence-based phylogeny was assessed using the Genome Blast Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) method and an extende...

  18. Methyl Red Decolorization Efficiency of a Korea Strain of Aspergillus sp. Immobilized into Different Polymeric Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Blaghen, Mohamed; Lee, Kang-Min

    2017-07-01

      Intensive research studies have revealed that fungal decolorization of dye wastewater is a promising replacement for the current process of dye wastewater decolorization. The authors isolated an Aspergillus sp. from the effluent of a textile industry area in Korea and assessed the effects of a variety of operational parameters on the decolorization of methyl red (MR) by this strain of Aspergillus sp. This Aspergillus sp. was then immobilized by entrapment in several polymeric matrices and the effects of operational conditions on MR decolorization were investigated again. The optimal decolorization activity of this Aspergillus sp. was observed in 1% glucose at a temperature of 37 °C and pH of 6.0. Furthermore, stable decolorization efficiency was observed when fungal biomass was immobilized into alginate gel during repeated batch experiment. These results suggest that the Aspergillus sp. isolated in Korea could be used to treat industrial wastewaters containing MR dye.

  19. Dynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate utilization andantibiotic susceptibility of strain Pseudomonas sp. ATCC19151

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovčić B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas sp. ATCC19151 harbors a gene encoding a putative alkylsulfatase (sdsA. Here we report a growth ability of this strain in minimal media containing 0.5, 0.75, and 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate as the sole carbon source. The most prominent growth was detected for the minimal medium with 0.5% SDS, so this concentration of SDS was used to monitor Pseudomonas sp. ATCC19151 SDS biodegradation dynamics. Bacterial growth coincided with the disappearance of SDS. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested as well. Pseudomonas sp. ATCC19151 was resistant to six out of nine tested antibiotics, including ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, tobramycin, nalidixic acid, and gentamycin.

  20. [The taxonomic study of the strain Bacillus sp. UCM B-7404--phytopathogenic fungae antagonist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, D A; Klochko, V V; Zelena, L B; Reva, O M; Dragovoz, I V; Avdeeva, L V

    2015-01-01

    The polyphasic taxonomic analysis of strain Bacillus sp. UCM B-7404 active against phytopathogenic fungi and producing extracellular phytohormones, lytic enzymes and lipopeptide antifungal compounds has been carried out. The basic cell wall fatty acids presented by branched iso- and anteiso- C15:0 and C17:0 acids, contained 65-77% of the average pool. Phylogenetic assay of 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics proved the attachment of strain Bacillus sp. UCM B-7404 to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum.

  1. methoxyethanol by a new bacterium isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    at room temperature by using a Clark - Type electrode Model 10 Ranke Brothers, Birmingham,. Great Britain) ... strain VB was determined with Clarke-Type electrode. Briefly, 3ml of 50mM phosphate buffer. (pH 7.2) was ... Aerobic transformation of 2 – methoxyethanol and hypothetical pathways intermediates: Studies of the.

  2. Bacillus nakamurai sp. nov., a black pigment producing strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two isolates of a Gram-positive, strictly aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium were identified during a survey of the Bacillus diversity of the Agriculture Research Service Culture Collection. These strains were originally isolated from soil and have a phenotype of producing a da...

  3. Improved Eco-Friendly Recombinant Anabaena sp. Strain PCC7120 with Enhanced Nitrogen Biofertilizer Potential▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena strains are native to tropical paddy fields and contribute to the carbon and nitrogen economy of such soils. Genetic engineering was employed to improve the nitrogen biofertilizer potential of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120. Constitutive enhanced expression of an additional integrated copy of the hetR gene from a light-inducible promoter elevated HetR protein expression and enhanced functional heterocyst frequency in the recombinant strain. The recombinant strain displayed consistently higher nitrogenase activity than the wild-type strain and appeared to be in homeostasis with compatible modulation of photosynthesis and respiration. The enhanced combined nitrogen availability from the recombinant strain positively catered to the nitrogen demand of rice seedlings in short-term hydroponic experiments and supported better growth. The engineered strain is stable, eco-friendly, and useful for environmental application as nitrogen biofertilizer in paddy fields. PMID:21057013

  4. Improved eco-friendly recombinant Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 with enhanced nitrogen biofertilizer potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena strains are native to tropical paddy fields and contribute to the carbon and nitrogen economy of such soils. Genetic engineering was employed to improve the nitrogen biofertilizer potential of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120. Constitutive enhanced expression of an additional integrated copy of the hetR gene from a light-inducible promoter elevated HetR protein expression and enhanced functional heterocyst frequency in the recombinant strain. The recombinant strain displayed consistently higher nitrogenase activity than the wild-type strain and appeared to be in homeostasis with compatible modulation of photosynthesis and respiration. The enhanced combined nitrogen availability from the recombinant strain positively catered to the nitrogen demand of rice seedlings in short-term hydroponic experiments and supported better growth. The engineered strain is stable, eco-friendly, and useful for environmental application as nitrogen biofertilizer in paddy fields.

  5. Identification and nitrogen regulation of the cyanase gene from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harano, Y; Suzuki, I; Maeda, S; Kaneko, T; Tabata, S; Omata, T

    1997-09-01

    An open reading frame (slr0899) on the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 encodes a polypeptide of 149 amino acid residues, the sequence of which is 40% identical to that of cyanase from Escherichia coli. Introduction into a cyanase-deficient E. coli strain of a plasmid-borne slr0899 resulted in expression of low but significant activity of cyanase. Targeted interruption of a homolog of slr0899 from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942, encoding a protein 77% identical to that encoded by slr0899, resulted in loss of cellular cyanase activity. These results indicated that slr0899 and its homolog in the strain PCC 7942 represent the cyanobacterial cyanase gene (designated cynS). While cynS of strain PCC 6803 is tightly clustered with the four putative molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis genes located downstream, cynS of strain PCC 7942 was found to be tightly clustered with the two genes located upstream, which encode proteins similar to the subunits of the cyanobacterial nitrate-nitrite transporter. In both strains, cynS was transcribed as a part of a large transcription unit and the transcription was negatively regulated by ammonium. Cyanase activity was low in ammonium-grown cells and was induced 7- to 13-fold by inhibition of ammonium fixation or by transfer of the cells to ammonium-free media. These findings indicated that cyanase is an ammonium-repressible enzyme in cyanobacteria, the expression of which is regulated at the level of transcription. Similar to other ammonium-repressible genes in cyanobacteria, expression of cynS required NtcA, a global nitrogen regulator of cyanobacteria.

  6. Alkaloids from an algicolous strain of Talaromyces sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibin; Li, Fang; Ji, Naiyun

    2016-03-01

    Compounds isolated and identified in a culture of the alga-endophytic fungus Talaromyces sp. cf-16 included two naturally occurring alkaloids, 2-[( S)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1a) and 2-[( R)-hydroxy(phenyl)methyl]-3-methylquinazolin-4(3H)-one ( 1b), that were identified for the first time. In addition, seven known compounds ( 2- 8) were obtained from the culture. Following chiral column chromatography, compounds 1a and 1b were identified as enantiomers by spectroscopic analyses and quantum chemical calculations. Bioassay results showed that 5 was more toxic to brine shrimp than the other compounds, and that 3- 6 could inhibit Staphylococcus aureus.

  7. Development of a multiplex PCR assay for rapid identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Seng Fook; Tay, Sun Tee; Sermswan, Rasana; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Chua, Kek Heng; Puthucheary, Savithri D

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a multiplex PCR assay for rapid identification and differentiation of cultures for Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia cepacia complex. The assay is valuable for use in clinical and veterinary laboratories, and in a deployable laboratory during outbreaks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Degradation of 4-fluorophenol by Arthrobacter sp. strain IF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria Isabel M.; Marchesi, Julian R.

    2008-01-01

    A Gram-positive bacterial strain capable of aerobic biodegradation of 4-fluorophenol (4-FP) as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment from soil samples collected near an industrial site. The organism, designated strain IF1, was identified as a member of the genus Arthrobacter on the basis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis. Arthrobacter strain IF1 was able to mineralize 4-FP up to concentrations of 5 mM in batch culture. Stoichiometric release of fluoride ions was observed, suggesting that there is no formation of halogenated dead-end products during 4-FP metabolism. The degradative pathway of 4-FP was investigated using enzyme assays and identification of intermediates by gas chromatography (GC), GC–mass spectrometry (MS), high-performance liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography–MS. Cell-free extracts of 4-FP-grown cells contained no activity for catechol 1,2-dioxygenase or catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, which indicates that the pathway does not proceed through a catechol intermediate. Cells grown on 4-FP oxidized 4-FP, hydroquinone, and hydroxyquinol but not 4-fluorocatechol. During 4-FP metabolism, hydroquinone accumulated as a product. Hydroquinone could be converted to hydroxyquinol, which was further transformed into maleylacetic acid and β-ketoadipic acid. These results indicate that the biodegradation of 4-FP starts with a 4-FP monooxygenase reaction that yields benzoquinone, which is reduced to hydroquinone and further metabolized via the β-ketoadipic acid pathway. PMID:18228015

  9. Comparison of two multimetal resistant bacterial strains: Enterobacter sp. YSU and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ORO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Andrew; Vinayak, Anubhav; Benton, Cherise; Esbenshade, Aaron; Heinselman, Carlisle; Frankland, Daniel; Kulkarni, Samatha; Kurtanich, Adrienne; Caguiat, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    The Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, TN, which manufactured nuclear weapons during World War II and the Cold War, contaminated East Fork Poplar Creek with heavy metals. The multimetal resistant bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Oak Ridge strain O2 (S. maltophilia O2), was isolated from East Fork Poplar Creek. Sequence analysis of 16s rDNA suggested that our working strain of S. maltophilia O2 was a strain of Enterobacter. Phylogenetic tree analysis and biochemical tests confirmed that it belonged to an Enterobacter species. This new strain was named Enterobacter sp. YSU. Using a modified R3A growth medium, R3A-Tris, the Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Au(III), Cr(VI), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV) MICs for a confirmed strain of S. maltophilia O2 were 0.24, 0.33, 5, 5, 0.25, 7, 0.03, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, compared to 0.07, 0.24, 0.8, 3, 0.05, 0.4, 0.08, 14, and 40 mM, respectively, for Enterobacter sp. YSU. Although S. maltophilia O2 was generally more metal resistant than Enterobacter sp. YSU, in comparison to Escherichia coli strain HB101, Enterobacter sp. YSU was resistant to Hg(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Au(III), Ag(I), As(III), and Se(IV). By studying metal resistances in these two strains, it may be possible to understand what makes one microorganism more metal resistant than another microorganism. This work also provided benchmark MICs that can be used to evaluate the metal resistance properties of other bacterial isolates from East Fork Poplar Creek and other metal contaminated sites.

  10. Premethylation of Foreign DNA Improves Integrative Transformation Efficiency in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bo; Yu, Jianping; Zhang, Weiwen; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2015-01-01

    Restriction digestion of foreign DNA is one of the key biological barriers against genetic transformation in microorganisms. To establish a high-efficiency transformation protocol in the model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (Synechocystis 6803), we investigated the effects of premethylation of foreign DNA on the integrative transformation of this strain. In this study, two type II methyltransferase-encoding genes, i.e., sll0729 (gene M) and slr0214 (gene C), were cloned fro...

  11. Reduction of Photoautotrophic Productivity in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 by Phycobilisome Antenna Truncation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Lawrence E.; Liberton, Michelle; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2012-06-15

    ABSTRACT

    Truncation of the algal light-harvesting antenna is expected to enhance photosynthetic productivity. The wild type and three mutant strains ofSynechocystissp. strain 6803 with a progressively smaller phycobilisome antenna were examined under different light and CO2conditions. Surprisingly, such antenna truncation resulted in decreased whole-culture productivity for this cyanobacterium.

  12. CD4+ T cell epitopes of FliC conserved between strains of Burkholderia: implications for vaccines against melioidosis and cepacia complex in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musson, Julie A; Reynolds, Catherine J; Rinchai, Darawan; Nithichanon, Arnone; Khaenam, Prasong; Favry, Emmanuel; Spink, Natasha; Chu, Karen K Y; De Soyza, Anthony; Bancroft, Gregory J; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M; Robinson, John H

    2014-12-15

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis characterized by pneumonia and fatal septicemia and prevalent in Southeast Asia. Related Burkholderia species are strong risk factors of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). The B. pseudomallei flagellar protein FliC is strongly seroreactive and vaccination protects challenged mice. We assessed B. pseudomallei FliC peptide binding affinity to multiple HLA class II alleles and then assessed CD4 T cell immunity in HLA class II transgenic mice and in seropositive individuals in Thailand. T cell hybridomas were generated to investigate cross-reactivity between B. pseudomallei and the related Burkholderia species associated with Cepacia Complex CF. B. pseudomallei FliC contained several peptide sequences with ability to bind multiple HLA class II alleles. Several peptides were shown to encompass strong CD4 T cell epitopes in B. pseudomallei-exposed individuals and in HLA transgenic mice. In particular, the p38 epitope is robustly recognized by CD4 T cells of seropositive donors across diverse HLA haplotypes. T cell hybridomas against an immunogenic B. pseudomallei FliC epitope also cross-reacted with orthologous FliC sequences from Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia, important pathogens in CF. Epitopes within FliC were accessible for processing and presentation from live or heat-killed bacteria, demonstrating that flagellin enters the HLA class II Ag presentation pathway during infection of macrophages with B. cenocepacia. Collectively, the data support the possibility of incorporating FliC T cell epitopes into vaccination programs targeting both at-risk individuals in B. pseudomallei endemic regions as well as CF patients. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda5]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp3,ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda5]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis. PMID:15466511

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Hoeflea sp. Strain BAL378, a Potential Producer of Bioactive Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Riemann, Lasse; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Some phytoplankton-associated marine bacteria produce bioactive compounds. Members of the genus Hoeflea may be examples of such bacteria; however, data describing their metabolisms are scarce. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Hoeflea sp. strain BAL378, a putative producer...... of bacteriocins, polyketides, and auxins, as demonstrated by genome mining....

  15. Complete genome sequence of the acetylene-fermenting Pelobacter sp. strain SFB93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, John M.; Baesman, Shaun; Fierst, Janna L.; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Dunlap, Darren S.; Akob, Denise M.

    2017-01-01

    Acetylene fermentation is a rare metabolism that was previously reported as being unique to Pelobacter acetylenicus. Here, we report the genome sequence of Pelobacter sp. strain SFB93, an acetylene-fermenting bacterium isolated from sediments collected in San Francisco Bay, CA.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Hoeflea sp. Strain BAL378, a Potential Producer of Bioactive Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Riemann, Lasse; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Some phytoplankton-associated marine bacteria produce bioactive compounds. Members of the genus Hoeflea may be examples of such bacteria; however, data describing their metabolisms are scarce. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Hoeflea sp. strain BAL378, a putative producer of bacterioc...

  17. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production. PMID:26089422

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of a Kale (Brassica oleracea L.) Root Endophyte, Pseudomonas sp. Strain C9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugraud, Aurelie; Young, Sandra; Gerard, Emily; O'Callaghan, Maureen; Wakelin, Steven

    2017-04-13

    Pseudomonas sp. strain C9 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium isolated from the root tissue of Brassica oleracea L. grown in soil from Marlborough, New Zealand. Its draft genome of 6,350,161 bp contains genes associated with plant growth promotion and biological control. Copyright © 2017 Laugraud et al.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by the white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotterman, M.

    1998-01-01

    Outline of this thesis
    In this thesis the conditions for optimal PAH oxidation by the white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 were evaluated. In Chapter 2, culture conditions like aeration and cosubstrate concentrations,

  20. Genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25886, isolated from alpine glacial cryoconite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Chul; Kim, Su Jin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Ahn, Do Hwan; Lee, Yung Mi; Lee, Hyoungseok; Lee, Jungeun; Park, Hyun

    2012-04-01

    Pseudomonas spp. have shown characteristics of efficiently metabolizing environmental pollutants and also producing exopolysaccharides known as biofilms. Here we present the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25886, which was isolated from glacier cryoconite in the Alps mountain permafrost region and which may provide further insight into biodegradative and/or biofilm-producing mechanisms in a cold environment.

  1. Genome Sequence of the Dichloromethane-Degrading Bacterium Hyphomicrobium sp. Strain GJ21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringel, Françoise; Postema, Christiaan P; Mangenot, Sophie; Bibi-Triki, Sabrina; Chaignaud, Pauline; Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; Gruffaz, Christelle; Hermon, Louis; Louhichi, Yousra; Maucourt, Bruno; Muller, Emilie E L; Nadalig, Thierry; Lajus, Aurélie; Rouy, Zoé; Médigue, Claudine; Barbe, Valérie; Janssen, Dick B; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2017-07-27

    The genome sequence of Hyphomicrobium sp. strain GJ21, isolated in the Netherlands from samples of environments contaminated with halogenated pollutants and capable of using dichloromethane as its sole carbon and energy source, was determined. Copyright © 2017 Bringel et al.

  2. Genome Sequence of the Electrogenic Petroleum-Degrading Thalassospira sp. Strain HJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, Larisa; Garushyants, Sofya K; Briliute, Justina; Simpson, David J W; Cohen, Michael F; Goryanin, Igor

    2015-05-14

    We present the draft genome of the petroleum-degrading Thalassospira sp. strain HJ, isolated from tidal marine sediment. Knowledge of this genomic information will inform studies on electrogenesis and means to degrade environmental organic contaminants, including compounds found in petroleum. Copyright © 2015 Kiseleva et al.

  3. OXIDATION OF BIPHENYL BY A MULTICOMPONENT ENZYME SYSTEM FROM PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. This organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of bipheny...

  4. Purification and Characterization of Haloalcohol Dehalogenase from Arthrobacter sp. Strain AD2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, Arjen J.; Reuvekamp, Peter T.W.; Janssen, Dick B.

    An enzyme capable of dehalogenating vicinal haloalcohols to their corresponding epoxides was purified from the 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol-utilizing bacterium Arthrobacter sp. strain AD2. The inducible haloalcohol dehalogenase converted 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol, 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol,

  5. Enhanced production of dimethyl phthalate-degrading strain Bacillus sp. QD14 by optimizing fermentation medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixian Mo

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: In this work, the key factors affected by the fermentation of DMP-degrading strain Bacillus sp. QD14 were optimized by PBD, SAM and BBD (RSM; the yield was increased by 57,11% in the conditions in our study. We propose that the conditions optimized in the study can be applied to the fermentation for commercialization production.

  6. Effect of salt stress on the physiology of Frankia sp strain CcI6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... *Corresponding author (Email, louis.tisa@unh.edu). Actinorhizal plants are able to overcome saline soils and reclaim land. Frankia sp strain .... Giri B, Kapoor R and Mukerji KG 2003 Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and salinity on growth, biomass, and mineral nutrition of Acacia auriculiformis. Biol.

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Kosmotoga sp. Strain DU53 and Kosmotoga arenicorallina S304.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Stephen M J; Charchuk, Rhianna; Nesbø, Camilla L

    2016-06-16

    Here, we announce the draft genome sequences of two thermophilic Thermotogae bacteria: Kosmotoga sp. strain DU53, isolated from a continental oil reservoir, and Kosmotoga arenicorallina, isolated from hydrothermal sediments. The sequences will provide further insight into evolution of the Kosmotogales. Copyright © 2016 Pollo et al.

  8. A Novel Caffeine Dehydrogenase in Pseudomonas sp. Strain CBB1 Oxidizes Caffeine to Trimethyluric Acid▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chi Li; Kale, Yogesh; Gopishetty, Sridhar; Louie, Tai Man; Subramanian, Mani

    2008-01-01

    A unique heterotrimeric caffeine dehydrogenase was purified from Pseudomonas sp. strain CBB1. This enzyme oxidized caffeine to trimethyluric acid stoichiometrically and hydrolytically, without producing hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme was not NAD(P)+ dependent; coenzyme Q0 was the preferred electron acceptor. The enzyme was specific for caffeine and theobromine and showed no activity with xanthine. PMID:17981969

  9. Genome Sequence of Amycolatopsis sp Strain ATCC 39116, a Plant Biomass-Degrading Actinomycete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Jennifer R. [Brown University; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Sello, Jason K. [Brown University

    2012-01-01

    We announce the availability of a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of Amycolatopsis sp. strain 39116, one of few bacterial species that are known to consume the lignin component of plant biomass. This genome sequence will further ongoing efforts to use microorganisms for the conversion of plant biomass into fuels and high-value chemicals.

  10. An effective lipid-producing fungal sp. strain DGB1 and its use for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among 30 fungal isolates screened for lipid production using Nile-red staining assay, an isolate designated DGB1 was recorded as the highest lipid producer with lipid content up to 40% (w/w). Based on morphological, biochemical and molecular analysis, DGB1 was identified as fungal sp. strain DGB1. Under the optimized ...

  11. Naturally Transformable Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1 Belongs to the Newly Described Species Acinetobacter baylyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaneechoutte, Mario; Young, David M.; Ornston, L. Nicholas; De Baere, Thierry; Nemec, Alexandr; Van Der Reijden, Tanny; Carr, Emma; Tjernberg, Ingela; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2006-01-01

    Genotypic and phenotypic analyses were carried out to clarify the taxonomic position of the naturally transformable Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. Transfer tDNA-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and selective restriction fragment amplification (amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis) indicate that strain ADP1 and a second transformable strain, designated 93A2, are members of the newly described species Acinetobacter baylyi. Transformation assays demonstrate that the A. baylyi type strain B2T and two other originally identified members of the species (C5 and A7) also have the ability to undergo natural transformation at high frequencies, confirming that these five strains belong to a separate species of the genus Acinetobacter, characterized by the high transformability of its strains that have been cultured thus far. PMID:16391138

  12. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. © 2013 The Authors. Microbiology Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Transcription and Regulation of the Bidirectional Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Oliveira, Paulo; Lindblad, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120) possesses an uptake hydrogenase and a bidirectional enzyme, the latter being capable of catalyzing both H2 production and evolution. The completely sequenced genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 reveals that the five structural genes encoding the bidirectional hydrogenase (hoxEFUYH) are separated in two clusters at a distance of approximately 8.8 kb. The transcription of the hox genes was examined under nitrogen-fixing conditions, and the results demonstrate that the cluster containing hoxE and hoxF can be transcribed as one polycistronic unit together with the open reading frame alr0750. The second cluster, containing hoxU, hoxY, and hoxH, is transcribed together with alr0763 and alr0765, located between the hox genes. Moreover, alr0760 and alr0761 form an additional larger operon. Nevertheless, Northern blot hybridizations revealed a rather complex transcription pattern in which the different hox genes are expressed differently. Transcriptional start points (TSPs) were identified 66 and 57 bp upstream from the start codon of alr0750 and hoxU, respectively. The transcriptions of the two clusters containing the hox genes are both induced under anaerobic conditions concomitantly with the induction of a higher level of hydrogenase activity. An additional TSP, within the annotated alr0760, 244 bp downstream from the suggested translation start codon, was identified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified LexA from Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 demonstrated specific interactions between the transcriptional regulator and both hox promoter regions. However, when LexA from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was used, the purified protein interacted only with the promoter region of the alr0750-hoxE-hoxF operon. A search of the whole Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 genome demonstrated the presence of 216 putative LexA binding sites in total, including recA and rec

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Microbispora sp. Strain ATCC-PTA-5024, Producing the Lantibiotic NAI-107

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosio, M.; Gallo, G.; Pozzi, R.

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Microbispora sp. strain ATCC-PTA-5024, a soil isolate that produces NAI-107, a new lantibiotic with the potential to treat life-threatening infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. The draft genome of strain Microbispora sp. ATCC-PTA...

  15. Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, a halophilic bacterium producing acetone, butanol, and ethanol under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hamid; Azarbaijani, Reza; Parsa Yeganeh, Laleh; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Abolhassan; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2016-01-04

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Nesterenkonia sp. strain F, which was isolated from Aran-Bidgol Lake (Iran), has the ability to produce acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) as well as acetic and butyric acids under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This result is the first report of ABE production with a wild microorganism from a family other than Clostridia and also the first halophilic species shown to produce butanol under aerobic cultivation. The cultivation of Nesterenkonia sp. strain F under anaerobic conditions with 50 g/l of glucose for 72 h resulted in the production of 105 mg/l of butanol, 122 mg/l of acetone, 0.2 g/l of acetic acid, and 2.5 g/l of butyric acid. Furthermore, the strain was cultivated on media with different glucose concentrations (20, 50, and 80 g/l) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Through fermentation with a 50 g/l initial glucose concentration under aerobic conditions, 66 mg/l of butanol, 125 mg/l of acetone, 291 mg/l of ethanol, 5.9 g/l of acetic acid, and 1.2 g/l of butyric acid were produced. The enzymes pertaining to the fermentation pathway in the strain were compared with the enzymes of Clostridium spp., and the metabolic pathway of fermentation used by Nesterenkonia sp. strain F was investigated.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a high-efficiency erythromycin A-degrading Ochrobactrum sp. strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Qiu, Lina; Gong, Aijun; Yuan, Xiaotao

    2017-01-30

    In this work, Erythromycin A(EA)- degrading bacteria was isolated from the contaminated soil obtained from a pharmaceutical factory in China. The isolate designated as strain WX-J1 was identified as Ochrobactrum sp. by sequence analysis of its 16S rDNA gene. It can grow in a medium containing EA as the sole source of carbon and its optimal growth pH and temperature were 6.5 and 32°C, respectively. Under these conditions, when the initial Erythromycin A concentration was 100mg·L-1, 97% of Erythromycin A has been degraded. HPLC-MS analyses indicated that Erythromycin A degradation produced intermediates contained the following three substances: 3-depyranosyloxy erythromycin A, 7,12-dyhydroxy-6-deoxyerythronolide B, 6-deoxyerythronolide B and propionaldehyde. Since Erythromycin A-degrading Ochrobactrum sp. strain rapidly degraded Erythromycin A, this strain might be useful for bioremediation purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptomes of Frankia sp. strain CcI3 in growth transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bickhart Derek M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frankia sp. strains are actinobacteria that form N2-fixing root nodules on angiosperms. Several reference genome sequences are available enabling transcriptome studies in Frankia sp. Genomes from Frankia sp. strains differ markedly in size, a consequence proposed to be associated with a high number of indigenous transposases, more than 200 of which are found in Frankia sp. strain CcI3 used in this study. Because Frankia exhibits a high degree of cell heterogeneity as a consequence of its mycelial growth pattern, its transcriptome is likely to be quite sensitive to culture age. This study focuses on the behavior of the Frankia sp. strain CcI3 transcriptome as a function of nitrogen source and culture age. Results To study global transcription in Frankia sp. CcI3 grown under different conditions, complete transcriptomes were determined using high throughput RNA deep sequencing. Samples varied by time (five days vs. three days and by culture conditions (NH4+ added vs. N2 fixing. Assembly of millions of reads revealed more diversity of gene expression between five-day and three-day old cultures than between three day old cultures differing in nitrogen sources. Heat map analysis organized genes into groups that were expressed or repressed under the various conditions compared to median expression values. Twenty-one SNPs common to all three transcriptome samples were detected indicating culture heterogeneity in this slow-growing organism. Significantly higher expression of transposase ORFs was found in the five-day and N2-fixing cultures, suggesting that N starvation and culture aging provide conditions for on-going genome modification. Transposases have previously been proposed to participate in the creating the large number of gene duplication or deletion in host strains. Subsequent RT-qPCR experiments confirmed predicted elevated transposase expression levels indicated by the mRNA-seq data. Conclusions The overall pattern of

  18. A novel nicotine catabolic plasmid pMH1 in Pseudomonas sp. strain HF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meizhen; Yang, Guiqin; Min, Hang; Lv, Zhenmei

    2009-03-01

    Attempts were made to acquire a plasmid-loss mutant via various methods (spontaneous mutation, SDS, and mitomycin C), among which the method involving mitomycin C (10 microg/mL) has been proven successful. Concomitant with the loss of the plasmid in Pseudomonas sp. strain HF-1, the cured derivative was identified as having a nicotine-negative (Nic-) phenotype, named mutant strain 6-13 (Nic-). After plasmids were transferred from strain HF-1 (named plasmid pMH1) to the mutant strain 6-13, the mutant strain acquired nicotine-degrading ability, called 6-13 transformant (Nic+). There were no differences in growth or nicotine-degrading efficiency between strain HF-1 (wild-type strain) and strain 6-13 transformant. After pMH1 was transferred to Escherichia coli strain Top10 (Nic-), a distant relative of Pseudomonas, it also gained nicotine-degrading ability, showing the highest nicotine degradation efficiency at pH 7.0, the optimal pH for growth of E. coli. The hsp gene, which encodes 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine hydroxylase, is involved in nicotine degradation in Pseudomonas putida strain S16 and was present in pMH1 but not in pAO1, the well-known nicotine degradation plasmid in Arthrobacter nicotinovorans. It was demonstrated that plasmid pMH1 is a novel nicotine-degrading plasmid.

  19. Draft genome sequence of Thermoanaerobacterium sp. strain PSU-2 isolated from thermophilic hydrogen producing reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O-Thong, Sompong; Khongkliang, Peerawat; Mamimin, Chonticha; Singkhala, Apinya; Prasertsan, Poonsuk; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2017-06-01

    Thermoanaerobacterium sp. strain PSU-2 was isolated from thermophilic hydrogen producing reactor and subjected to draft genome sequencing on 454 pyrosequencing and annotated on RAST. The draft genome sequence of strain PSU-2 contains 2,552,497 bases with an estimated G + C content of 35.2%, 2555 CDS, 8 rRNAs and 57 tRNAs. The strain had a number of genes responsible for carbohydrates metabolic, amino acids and derivatives, and protein metabolism of 17.7%, 14.39% and 9.81%, respectively. Strain PSU-2 also had gene responsible for hydrogen biosynthesis as well as the genes related to Ni-Fe hydrogenase. Comparative genomic analysis indicates strain PSU-2 shares about 94% genome sequence similarity with Thermoanaerobacterium xylanolyticum LX-11. The nucleotide sequence of this draft genome was deposited into DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession MSQD00000000.

  20. Mycobacterium eburneum sp. nov., a non-chromogenic, fast-growing strain isolated from sputum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouioui, Imen; Carro, Lorena; Teramoto, Kanae; Igual, José M; Jando, Marlen; Del Carmen Montero-Calasanz, Maria; Sutcliffe, Iain; Sangal, Vartul; Goodfellow, Michael; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2017-09-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to establish the taxonomic position of a non-chromogenic, rapidly growing Mycobacterium strain that had been isolated from sputum. The strain, CECT 8775T, has chemotaxonomic and cultural properties consistent with its classification in the genus Mycobacterium and was distinguished from the type strains of closely related mycobacterial species, notably from Mycobacterium paraense DSM 46749T, its nearest phylogenetic neighbour, based on 16S rRNA, hsp65 and rpoB gene sequence data. These organisms were also distinguished by a broad range of chemotaxonomic and phenotypic features and by a digital DNA-DNA relatedness value of 22.8 %. Consequently, the strain is considered to represent a novel species of Mycobacterium for which the name Mycobacterium eburneum sp. nov is proposed; the type strain is X82T (CECT 8775T=DSM 44358T).

  1. Biodegradation of nicotine by a novel Strain Shinella sp. HZN1 isolated from activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong J; Ma, Yun; Qiu, Guo J; Wu, Fei L; Chen, Sheng L

    2011-01-01

    The nicotine-degrading bacterium HZN1 was isolated from activated sludge and identified as Shinella sp. based on its physiological characteristics and analysis of 16S rDNA gene. Strain HZN1 is capable of using nicotine as the sole carbon source in the mineral salts medium. The optimum temperature and pH for strain HZN1 growth and nicotine degradation were 30°C and 7.0, respectively. It could degrade approximately 100 % of 0.5 g L(-1) of nicotine within 9 h. Three intermediate metabolites were produced by the strain HZN1 and identified as cotinine, myosmine and nicotyrine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This is the first report of nicotine-degrading strain from the genus of Shinella. The results showed that strain HZN1 could be potentially employed in bioremediation of nicotine. Our findings would provide a new insight into the biodegradation of nicotine.

  2. Strategy for improving extracellular lipolytic activities by a novel thermotolerant Staphylococcus sp. strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif Slim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular bacterial lipases received much attention for their substrate specificity and their ability to function under extreme environments (pH, temperature.... Many staphylococci produced lipases which were released into the culture medium. Reports of extracellular thermostable lipases from Staphylococcus sp. and active in alkaline conditions are not previously described. Results This study focused on novel strategies to increase extracellular lipolytic enzyme production by a novel Staphylococcus sp. strain ESW. The microorganism needed neutral or alkaline pH values between 7.0 and 12.0 for growth. For pH values outside this range, cell growth seemed to be significantly inhibited. Staphylococcus sp. culture was able to grow within a wide temperature range (from 30 to 55°C. The presence of oils in the culture medium leaded to improvements in cells growth and lipolytic enzyme activity. On the other hand, although chemical surfactants leaded to an almost complete inhibition of growth and lipolytic enzyme production, their addition along the culture could affect the location of the enzyme. In addition, our results showed that this novel Staphylococcus sp. strain produced biosurfactants simultaneously with lipolytic activity, when soapstock (The main co-product of the vegetable oil refining industry, was used as the sole carbon source. Conclusion A simultaneous biosurfactant and extracellular lipolytic enzymes produced bacterial strain with potential application in soap stock treatment

  3. First Draft Genome for a Burkholderia mallei Isolate Originating from a Glanderous Mule from Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Girault, G.; Woudstra, C.; Martin, B.; Vorimore, F.; Lucia de Assis Santana, V.; Fach, P.; Madani, N.; Laroucau, K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia mallei is the etiological agent of glanders. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei strain 16-2438_BM#8 that was isolated from a mule found dead in Pernambuco, northeast Brazil. It is the first available genomic sequence from a strain isolated on the American continent.

  4. First Draft Genome for a Burkholderia mallei Isolate Originating from a Glanderous Mule from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, G; Woudstra, C; Martin, B; Vorimore, F; Lucia de Assis Santana, V; Fach, P; Madani, N; Laroucau, K

    2017-07-13

    Burkholderia mallei is the etiological agent of glanders. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei strain 16-2438_BM#8 that was isolated from a mule found dead in Pernambuco, northeast Brazil. It is the first available genomic sequence from a strain isolated on the American continent. Copyright © 2017 Girault et al.

  5. Transmission dynamics of Bartonella sp. strain OE 1-1 in Sundevall's jirds (Meriones crassus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morick, Danny; Krasnov, Boris R; Khokhlova, Irina S; Gottlieb, Yuval; Harrus, Shimon

    2013-02-01

    A high prevalence of Bartonella infection is found in many natural systems; however, the transmission dynamics leading to observations of these infections is not fully understood. The capability of Xenopsylla ramesis fleas to serve as competent vectors of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 (a strain closely related to the zoonotic Bartonella elizabethae) to Meriones crassus jirds was investigated. Naïve X. ramesis fleas were placed for 72 h on naïve jirds or jirds that were either experimentally or naturally infected with Bartonella sp. strain OE 1-1, after which they were placed on naïve jirds. Postfeeding, 69 to 100% of the fleas collected from each Bartonella-positive jird contained Bartonella DNA, and all naïve jirds became positive for Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 after infestation with the infected fleas. In addition, maternal transmission of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 in jirds was tested by mating 5 Bartonella-positive and 5 naïve female jirds with 10 naïve male jirds in the absence of fleas. Fifteen offspring were delivered by each group. Cultures of blood drawn from all offspring on days 35 and 47 postdelivery were found to be negative for Bartonella. A single spleen sample from the offspring of a Bartonella-positive mother was found molecularly positive for Bartonella sp. OE 1-1. This study demonstrates that X. ramesis fleas are competent vectors of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 to M. crassus jirds and indicates that maternal transmission is probably not the major transmission route from female jirds to their offspring. We suggest that the dynamics of Bartonella sp. OE 1-1 in the M. crassus jird population in nature is mostly dependent on its vectors.

  6. Pathogenesis of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Joseph C; Johnson, Nathan H

    2009-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and mallei are biological agents of military significance. There has been significant research in recent years to develop medical countermeasures for these organisms. This review summarizes work which details aspects of the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and mallei and discusses key scientific questions and directions for future research.

  7. Draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sordidicola S170, a potential plant growth promoter isolated from coniferous forest soil in the Czech Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lladó, Salvador; Xu, Zhuofei; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia species are key players in the accumulation of carbon from cellulose decomposition in coniferous forest ecosystems. We report here the draft genome of Burkholderia sordidicola strain S170, containing features associated with known genes involved in plant growth promotion, the biologi......Burkholderia species are key players in the accumulation of carbon from cellulose decomposition in coniferous forest ecosystems. We report here the draft genome of Burkholderia sordidicola strain S170, containing features associated with known genes involved in plant growth promotion...

  8. Identification of an Enzyme System for Daidzein-to-Equol Conversion in Slackia sp. Strain NATTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Kaoru; Nomoto, Koji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    An Escherichia coli library comprising 8,424 strains incorporating gene fragments of the equol-producing bacterium Slackia sp. strain NATTS was constructed and screened for E. coli strains having daidzein- and dihydrodaidzein (DHD)- metabolizing activity. We obtained 3 clones that functioned to convert daidzein to DHD and 2 clones that converted DHD to equol. We then sequenced the gene fragments inserted into plasmids contained by these 5 clones. All of the gene fragments were contiguous, encoding three open reading frames (ORF-1, -2, and -3). Analysis of E. coli strains containing an expression vector incorporating one of the orf-1, -2, or -3 genes revealed that (i) the protein encoded by orf-1 was involved in the conversion of cis/trans-tetrahydrodaidzein (cis/trans-THD) to equol, (ii) the protein encoded by orf-2 was involved in the conversion of DHD to cis/trans-THD, and (iii) the protein encoded by orf-3 was involved in the conversion of daidzein to DHD. ORF-1 had a primary amino acid structure similar to that of succinate dehydrogenase. ORF-2 was presumed to be an enzyme belonging to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. ORF-3 was predicted to have 42% identity to the daidzein reductase of Lactococcus strain 20-92 and belonged to the NADH:flavin oxidoreductase family. These findings showed that the daidzein-to-equol conversion reaction in the Slackia sp. NATTS strain proceeds by the action of these three enzymes. PMID:22179235

  9. Production of proteasome inhibitor syringolin A by the endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, Alexey; Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. EFEKTIVITAS Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 STRAIN LOKAL DALAM BUAH KELAPA TERHADAP LARVA Anopheles sp dan Culex sp di KAMPUNG LAUT KABUPATEN CILACAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blondine Ch. P

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Bacillus thuringiensis serotipe H-14 strain lokal adalah bakteri patogen bersifat target spesifiknya larva nyamuk, aman bagi mamalia dan lingkungan. Penelitian bertujuan menentukan efektivitas B. thuringiensis H-14 strain lokal yang dikembangbiakkan dalam buah kelapa untuk pengendalian larva Anopheles sp dan Culex sp. Rancangan eksperimental semu, terdiri dari kelompok perlakuan dan kontrol. Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 strain lokal dikembangbiakan dalam10 buah kelapa umur 6–8 bulan, dengan berat kira-kira 1 kg, telah berisi air kelapa sekitar 400-500 ml/buah kelapa yang diperoleh dari Desa Klaces, Kampung Laut, Kabupaten Cilacap. Diinkubasi selama 14 hari pada temperatur kamar dan ditebarkan di 6 kolam yang menjadi habitat perkembangbiakan larva nyamuk dengan luas berkisar 3–100 m2.Hasil yang diperoleh menunjukkan efektivitas B. thuringiensis H-14 strain lokal terhadap larva Anopheles sp dan Culex sp selama 1 hari sesudah penebaran kematian larva berturut-turut sebesar 80–100% dan 79,31–100%. Sedangkan pada hari ke-14 sebesar 69,30–76,71% dan 67,69–86,04%. Buah kelapa dapat digunakan sebagai media lokal alternatif untuk pengembangbiakan B. thuringiensis H-14 strain lokal Kata kunci: B. thuringiensis H-14,  strain  lokal, buah kelapa, pengendalian larva Abstract Bacillus thuringiensis serotype H-14 local strain is pathogenic bacteria which specific  target to mosquito larvae. It is safe for mammals and enviroment. The aims of this study was to determine the effectivity of B. thuringiensis H-14 local strain which culturing in thecoconut wates against Anopheles sp and Culex sp mosquito larvae. This research is quasi experiment which consist of treated  and control groups. Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 local strain was cultured in 10 coconuts with 6–8 months age with weight around 1 kg that contained were approximately 400-500 ml/coconut were taken from Klaces village, Kampung Laut. After that the coconuts incubated for 14

  11. Strain identification and quorum sensing inhibition characterization of marine-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hong; Zhou, Jin; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Yu, Shenchen; Chen, Lu; Jin, Hui; Cai, Zhonghua

    2017-03-01

    A novel strategy for combating pathogens is through the ongoing development and use of anti-quorum sensing (QS) treatments such as therapeutic bacteria or their anti-QS substances. Relatively little is known about the bacteria that inhabit the open ocean and of their potential anti-pathogenic attributes; thus, in an initiative to identify these types of therapeutic bacteria, planktonic microbes from the North Atlantic Ocean were collected, isolated, cultured and screened for anti-QS activity. Screening analysis identified one such strain, Rhizobium sp. NAO1. Extracts of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 were identified via ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. They were shown to contain N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based QS analogues (in particular, the N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-AHL) analogue) and could disrupt biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. QS inhibition was confirmed using confocal scanning laser microscopy and growth curves, and it was shown to occur in a dose-dependent manner without affecting bacterial growth. Secondary metabolites of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 inhibited PAO1 pathogenicity by downregulating AHL-mediated virulence factors such as elastase activity and siderophore production. Furthermore, as a result of biofilm structure damage, the secondary metabolite products of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 significantly increased the sensitivity of PAO1 to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results demonstrated that Rhizobium sp. strain NAO1 has the ability to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm architecture, in addition to attenuating P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factor production and pathogenicity. Therefore, the newly identified ocean-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1 has the potential to serve as a QS inhibitor and may be a new microbial resource for drug development.

  12. Quantitative proteomic analysis of ibuprofen-degrading Patulibacter sp. strain I11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Barbara; Kjeldal, Henrik; Lolas, Ihab Bishara Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Ibuprofen is the third most consumed pharmaceutical drug in the world. Several isolates have been shown to degrade ibuprofen, but very little is known about the biochemistry of this process. This study investigates the degradation of ibuprofen by Patulibacter sp. strain I11 by quantitative...... proteomics using a metabolic labelling strategy. The whole genome of Patulibacter sp. strain I11 was sequenced to provide a species-specific protein platform for optimal protein identification. The bacterial proteomes of actively ibuprofen-degrading cells and cells grown in the absence of ibuprofen...... was identified and quantified by gel based shotgun-proteomics. In total 251 unique proteins were quantitated using this approach. Biological process and pathway analysis indicated a number of proteins that were up-regulated in response to active degradation of ibuprofen, some of them are known to be involved...

  13. Dominant colonization and inheritance of Methylobacterium sp. strain OR01 on perilla plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masayuki; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Iguchi, Hiroyuki; Tani, Akio; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs (PPFMs) are major inhabitants of the phyllosphere. In a preceding study, we found that perilla plants harbor a dominant population of PPFMs on their leaves and seeds, and that the closest relative of PPFMs (Methylobacterium sp. strain OR01 as representative strain) isolated from red perilla seeds was M. fujisawaense DSM5686(T). In the present study, the specific interaction between red perilla and Methylobacterium species was investigated. All the PPFMs isolated from red perilla seeds harvested in the Ohara area of Kyoto, Japan in 2009, 2010, and 2011 and the PPFMs isolated from red perilla leaves planted at four geographically different places in Japan had 16S rRNA sequences identical to that of strain OR01. Direct transmission of PPFMs from seeds to leaves and the competitiveness of strain OR01 were confirmed. This report is the first step toward understanding the species-level specificity of the interaction between perilla plants and Methylobacterium species.

  14. Characterization of Methylobacterium strains isolated from the phyllosphere and description of Methylobacterium longum sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knief, Claudia; Dengler, Vanina; Bodelier, Paul L E; Vorholt, Julia A

    2012-01-01

    Methylobacterium strains are abundantly found in the phyllosphere of plants. Morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomical properties of 12 previously isolated strains were analyzed in order to obtain a more detailed overview of the characteristics of phyllosphere colonizing Methylobacterium strains. All strains showed the typical properties of the genus Methylobacterium, including pink pigmentation, facultative methylotrophy, a fatty acid profile dominated by C18:1 ω7c, and a high G+C content of 65 mol % or more. However, some strains showed only weak growth on methanol and pigmentation varied from pale pink to red. Strains grew best under mesophilic, neutrophilic conditions and low salt (≤1%) concentrations, but variation was seen with respect to the temperature and pH range under which growth occurred. Likewise, differences were seen with respect to carbon source utilization. Some strains were versatile and utilized diverse organic acids, amino acids and sugars, while others could only metabolize a restricted number of organic acids. The strains that were most distinct from existing type strains based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis were selected for DNA-DNA hybridization experiments to analyze whether they are sufficiently different at the genomic level from existing type strains to justify their classification as new species. This resulted in the delineation of strain 440 and its description as Methylobacterium longum sp. nov. strain 440 (=DSM 23933(T) = CECT 7806(T)). A main characteristic of this species is the formation of relatively long rods compared to other Methylobacterium species.

  15. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei O-antigen serotypes in near-neighbor species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Joshua K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and a CDC category B select agent with no available effective vaccine. Previous immunizations in mice have utilized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a potential vaccine target because it is known as one of the most important antigenic epitopes in B. pseudomallei. Complicating this strategy are the four different B. pseudomallei LPS O-antigen types: A, B, B2, and rough. Sero-crossreactivity is common among O-antigens of Burkholderia species. Here, we identified the presence of multiple B. pseudomallei O-antigen types and sero-crossreactivity in its near-neighbor species. Results PCR screening of O-antigen biosynthesis genes, phenotypic characterization using SDS-PAGE, and immunoblot analysis showed that majority of B. mallei and B. thailandensis strains contained the typical O-antigen type A. In contrast, most of B. ubonensis and B. thailandensis-like strains expressed the atypical O-antigen types B and B2, respectively. Most B. oklahomensis strains expressed a distinct and non-seroreactive O-antigen type, except strain E0147 which expressed O-antigen type A. O-antigen type B2 was also detected in B. thailandensis 82172, B. ubonensis MSMB108, and Burkholderia sp. MSMB175. Interestingly, B. thailandensis-like MSMB43 contained a novel serotype B positive O-antigen. Conclusions This study expands the number of species which express B. pseudomallei O-antigen types. Further work is required to elucidate the full structures and how closely these are to the B. pseudomallei O-antigens, which will ultimately determine the efficacy of the near-neighbor B serotypes for vaccine development.

  16. Biodegradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti N. Tallur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid pesticide cypermethrin is a environmental pollutant because of its widespread use, toxicity and persistence. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an cost-effective method for their detoxification. We have investigated the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 in various matrices such as, polyurethane foam (PUF, polyacrylamide, sodium alginate and agar. The optimum temperature and pH for the degradation of cypermethrin by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. were found to be 30 °C and 7.0, respectively. The rate of degradation of 10 and 20 mM of cypermethrin by freely suspended cells were compared with that of immobilized cells in batches and semi-continuous with shaken cultures. PUF-immobilized cells showed higher degradation of cypermethrin (10 mM and 20 mM than freely suspended cells and cells immobilized in other matrices. The PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain CPN 1 were retain their degradation capacity. Thus, they can be reused for more than 32 cycles, without losing their degradation capacity. Hence, the PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. could potentially be used in the bioremediation of cypermethrin contaminated water.

  17. Three New Compounds from the Marine Fungal Strain Aspergillus sp. AF119

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaosong Liu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Three new compounds , namely barceloneic lactone B (1 and barceloneic acid C (2 and 5’ -hydroxychlorflavonin ( 3 , together with one known compound chlorflavonin ( 4 , were isolated from the marine fungal strain Aspergillus sp. AF119. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses including 1D- and 2D NMR experiments, and HR Q-TOF mass spectrometry. The antifungal activities against Candida albicans of these compounds were evaluated.

  18. Large-scale bioreactor production of the herbicide-degrading Aminobacter sp. strain MSH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Knudsen, Berith Elkær; Frkova, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    The Aminobacter sp. strain MSH1 has potential for pesticide bioremediation because it degrades the herbicide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM). Production of the BAM-degrading bacterium using aerobic bioreactor fermentation was investigated. A mineral salt medium limited for carbon and with ......, large-scale production of herbicide-degrading Aminobacter was possible, bringing the use of this bacterium in bioaugmentation field remediation closer to reality....

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by the white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55

    OpenAIRE

    Kotterman, M.

    1998-01-01

    Outline of this thesis
    In this thesis the conditions for optimal PAH oxidation by the white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 were evaluated. In Chapter 2, culture conditions like aeration and cosubstrate concentrations, which influenced the oxidation of the PAH compound anthracene and the ligninolytic indicator dye Poly R-478 by the white rot fungus, were studied. Two parameters were identified as the most important P...

  20. Identification of salt-tolerant Sinorhizobium sp. strain BL3 membrane proteins based on proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Tittabutr, Panlada; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2010-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 is a salt-tolerant strain that can fix atmospheric nitrogen in symbiosis with leguminous host plants under salt-stress conditions. Since cell membranes are the first barrier to environmental change, it is interesting to explore the membrane proteins within this protective ba......-line SCX fractionation coupled to nanoLC-MS/MS. These techniques would be useful for further comparative analysis of membrane proteins that function in the response to environmental stress....

  1. Cell Surface-Associated Proteins in the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Hidehisa; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Ohomori, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    The cell surface senses environmental changes first and transfers signals into the cell. To understand the response to environmental changes, it is necessary to analyze cell surface components, particularly cell surface-associated proteins. We therefore investigated cell surface-associated proteins from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The cell surface-associated proteins extracted by an acidic buffer were resolved by SDS-PAGE. Eighteen proteins were identified fro...

  2. Biochemical Characterization and Structural Basis of Reactivity and Regioselectivity Differences between Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia glumae 1,6-Didesmethyltoxoflavin N-Methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Michael K; Almabruk, Khaled H; Ealick, Steven E; Begley, Tadhg P; Philmus, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Burkholderia glumae converts the guanine base of guanosine triphosphate into an azapteridine and methylates both the pyrimidine and triazine rings to make toxoflavin. Strains of Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei have a gene cluster encoding seven putative biosynthetic enzymes that resembles the toxoflavin gene cluster. Four of the enzymes are similar in sequence to BgToxBCDE, which have been proposed to make 1,6-didesmethyltoxoflavin (1,6-DDMT). One of the remaining enzymes, BthII1283 in B. thailandensis E264, is a predicted S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent N-methyltransferase that shows a low level of sequence identity to BgToxA, which sequentially methylates N6 and N1 of 1,6-DDMT to form toxoflavin. Here we show that, unlike BgToxA, BthII1283 catalyzes a single methyl transfer to N1 of 1,6-DDMT in vitro. In addition, we investigated the differences in reactivity and regioselectivity by determining crystal structures of BthII1283 with bound S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) or 1,6-DDMT and SAH. BthII1283 contains a class I methyltransferase fold and three unique extensions used for 1,6-DDMT recognition. The active site structure suggests that 1,6-DDMT is bound in a reduced form. The plane of the azapteridine ring system is orthogonal to its orientation in BgToxA. In BthII1283, the modeled SAM methyl group is directed toward the p orbital of N1, whereas in BgToxA, it is first directed toward an sp(2) orbital of N6 and then toward an sp(2) orbital of N1 after planar rotation of the azapteridine ring system. Furthermore, in BthII1283, N1 is hydrogen bonded to a histidine residue whereas BgToxA does not supply an obvious basic residue for either N6 or N1 methylation.

  3. Mining host-pathogen protein interactions to characterize Burkholderia mallei infectivity mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna Memišević; Nela Zavaljevski; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Keehwan Kwon; Rembert Pieper; David DeShazer; Jaques Reifman; Anders Wallqvist

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pathogenicity relies on protein virulence factors to control and promote bacterial internalization, survival, and replication within eukaryotic host cells. We recently used yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening to identify a small set of novel Burkholderia proteins that were shown to attenuate disease progression in an aerosol infection animal model using the virulent Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 strain. Here, we performed an extended analysis of primarily nine B. mallei virulence f...

  4. A new alkali-thermostable azoreductase from Bacillus sp. strain SF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Jürgen; Kandelbauer, Andreas; Erlacher, Angelika; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Gübitz, Georg M

    2004-02-01

    A screening for dye-decolorizing alkali-thermophilic microorganisms resulted in a Bacillus sp. strain isolated out of the wastewater drain of a textile finishing company. An NADH-dependent azoreductase of this strain, Bacillus sp. strain SF, was found to be responsible for the decolorization of azo dyes. This enzyme was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange and affinity chromatography and had a molecular mass of 61.6 kDa and an isoelectric point at pH 5.3. The pH optimum of the azoreductase depended on the substrate and was within the range of pHs 8 to 9, while the temperature maximum was reached at 80 degrees C. Decolorization only took place in the absence of oxygen and was enhanced by FAD, which was not consumed during the reaction. A 26% similarity of this azoreductase to chaperonin Cpn60 from a Bacillus sp. was found by peptide mass mapping experiments. Substrate specificities of the azoreductase were studied by using synthesized model substrates based on di-sodium-(R)-benzyl-azo-2,7-dihydroxy-3,6-disulfonyl-naphthaline. Those dyes with NO2 substituents, especially in the ortho position, were degraded fastest, while analogues with a methyl substitution showed the lowest degradation rates.

  5. Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Co-Metabolism with a Pseudomonas sp. Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Co-metabolic bioremediation is supposed to be an impressive and promising approach in the elimination technology of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE, which was found to be a common pollutant worldwide in the ground or underground water in recent years. In this paper, bacterial strain DZ13 (which can co-metabolically degrade MTBE was isolated and named as Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 based on the result of 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Strain DZ13 could grow on n-alkanes (C5-C8, accompanied with the co-metabolic degradation of MTBE. Diverse n-alkanes with different carbon number showed a significant influence on the degradation rate of MTBE and accumulation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA. When Pseudomonas sp. DZ13 co-metabolically degraded MTBE with n-pentane as the growth substrate, a higher MTBE-degrading rate (Vmax = 38.1 nmol/min/mgprotein, Ks = 6.8 mmol/L and lower TBA-accumulation was observed. In the continuous degradation experiment, the removal efficiency of MTBE by Pseudomonas sp. Strain DZ13 did not show an obvious decrease after five times of continuous addition.

  6. Plant growth-promoting Burkholderia species isolated from annual ryegrass in Portuguese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, N; Dourado, A C; Kruz, S; Alves, P I L; Delgado-Rodríguez, A I; Pais, I; Semedo, J; Scotti-Campos, P; Sánchez, C; Borges, N; Carvalho, G; Barreto Crespo, M T; Fareleira, P

    2016-03-01

    To search for culturable Burkholderia species associated with annual ryegrass in soils from natural pastures in Portugal, with plant growth-promoting effects. Annual ryegrass seedlings were used to trap Burkholderia from two different soils in laboratory conditions. A combined approach using genomic fingerprinting and sequencing of 16S rRNA and recA genes resulted in the identification of Burkholderia strains belonging to the species Burkholderia graminis, Burkholderia fungorum and the Burkholderia cepacia complex. Most strains were able to solubilize mineral phosphate and to synthesize indole acetic acid; some of them could produce siderophores and antagonize the phytopathogenic oomycete, Phytophthora cinnamomi. A strain (G2Bd5) of B. graminis was selected for gnotobiotic plant inoculation experiments. The main effects were the stimulation of root growth and enhancement of leaf lipid synthesis and turnover. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser microscopy evidenced that strain G2Bd5 is a rhizospheric and endophytic colonizer of annual ryegrass. This work revealed that annual ryegrass can naturally associate with members of the genus Burkholderia. A novel plant growth promoting strain of B. graminis was obtained. The novel strain belongs to the plant-associated Burkholderia cluster and is a promising candidate for exploitation as plant inoculant in field conditions. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Structural analysis of capsular polysaccharides expressed by Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Christian; Burtnick, Mary N; Wang, Zhirui; Azadi, Parastoo; Brett, Paul J

    2012-02-15

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) were isolated from O-polysaccharide deficient strains of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei using a modified hot phenol/water extraction procedure. Glycosyl composition, methylation, MALDI-TOF MS analyses as well as (1)H NMR spectroscopy including COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, HMBC and HSQC experiments identified the presence of two distinct CPS antigens in the samples exhibiting the following structures: This study confirms the ability of B. mallei to express a 6-deoxy-heptan CPS and represents the first report of a mannan CPS being expressed by these bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Phenotypic Characterization of a Novel Virulence-Factor Deletion Strain of Burkholderia mallei that Provides Partial Protection against Inhalational Glanders in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    Life Technology, Waltham, MA), 1mM sodium pyruvate, 0.1mM non-essential amino acids , and 50µM 2- mercaptoethanol], and splenocytes were suspended in...and 0.2% fish skin gelatin (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) for 2 h. Cells were subsequently incubated with rabbit anti- Burkholderia antibody (1:1000) (D... acid , and the amount of bound antibody was determined colorimetrically at 450 nm with a reference filter of 570 nm. Results are reported as the

  9. Multiplex qPCR for reliable detection and differentiation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janse Ingmar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are two closely related species of highly virulent bacteria that can be difficult to detect. Pathogenic Burkholderia are endemic in many regions worldwide and cases of infection, sometimes brought by travelers from unsuspected regions, also occur elsewhere. Rapid, sensitive methods for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are urgently needed in the interests of patient treatment and epidemiological surveillance. Methods Signature sequences for sensitive, specific detection of pathogenic Burkholderia based on published genomes were identified and a qPCR assay was designed and validated. Results A single-reaction quadruplex qPCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Burkholderia, which includes a marker for internal control of DNA extraction and amplification, was developed. The assay permits differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains, and probit analysis showed a very low detection limit. Use of a multicopy signature sequence permits detection of less than 1 genome equivalent per reaction. Conclusions The new assay permits rapid detection of pathogenic Burkholderia and combines enhanced sensitivity, species differentiation, and inclusion of an internal control for both DNA extraction and PCR amplification.

  10. Multiplex qPCR for reliable detection and differentiation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse, Ingmar; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Hendriks, Amber C A; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2013-02-14

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are two closely related species of highly virulent bacteria that can be difficult to detect. Pathogenic Burkholderia are endemic in many regions worldwide and cases of infection, sometimes brought by travelers from unsuspected regions, also occur elsewhere. Rapid, sensitive methods for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are urgently needed in the interests of patient treatment and epidemiological surveillance. Signature sequences for sensitive, specific detection of pathogenic Burkholderia based on published genomes were identified and a qPCR assay was designed and validated. A single-reaction quadruplex qPCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Burkholderia, which includes a marker for internal control of DNA extraction and amplification, was developed. The assay permits differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains, and probit analysis showed a very low detection limit. Use of a multicopy signature sequence permits detection of less than 1 genome equivalent per reaction. The new assay permits rapid detection of pathogenic Burkholderia and combines enhanced sensitivity, species differentiation, and inclusion of an internal control for both DNA extraction and PCR amplification.

  11. Identification, purification and characterization of laterosporulin, a novel bacteriocin produced by Brevibacillus sp. strain GI-9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides that are produced by bacteria as a defense mechanism in complex environments. Identification and characterization of novel bacteriocins in novel strains of bacteria is one of the important fields in bacteriology. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: The strain GI-9 was identified as Brevibacillus sp. by 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacteriocin produced by strain GI-9, namely, laterosporulin was purified from supernatant of the culture grown under optimal conditions using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The bacteriocin was active against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MALDI-TOF experiments determined the precise molecular mass of the peptide to be of 5.6 kDa and N-terminal sequencing of the thermo-stable peptide revealed low similarity with existing antimicrobial peptides. The putative open reading frame (ORF encoding laterosporulin and its surrounding genomic region was fished out from the draft genome sequence of GI-9. Sequence analysis of the putative bacteriocin gene did not show significant similarity to any reported bacteriocin producing genes in database. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a bacteriocin producing strain GI-9, belonging to the genus Brevibacillus sp. Biochemical and genomic characterization of laterosporulin suggests it as a novel bacteriocin with broad spectrum antibacterial activity.

  12. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 - an effective microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. growing in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Leila; De Meyer, Sofie E; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. WSM1743 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of an Indigofera sp. growing 20 km north of Carnarvon in Australia. It is slow growing, tolerates up to 1 % NaCl and is capable of growth at 37 °C. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 8,341,956 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 163 scaffolds and 167 contigs, contains 7908 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes and was sequenced as part of the Root Nodule Bacteria chapter of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. [Isolation and identification of Sulfobacillus sp. strains and their application in pyrite bioleaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tangjian; Zhong, Shuiping; Chen, Chaoran; Peng, Cheng; Jiang, Chengying

    2013-12-04

    The work aimed to isolate and culture the acidophilic and moderately thermophilic microorganisms for leaching the sulfide ore. We enriched and incubated iron- or sulfur-oxidizing strains from muddy water of acuric hot spring utilizing ferrous irons or elemental sulfur as substrates. Then, we identified the strains by their morphological, physiological, biochemical properties and phylogenetic positions, and estimated their bioleaching potential according to their oxidation rate of pyrite. Two acidophilic, aerobic and facultative heterotrophic bacterial strains, Costa C and Costa E, were isolated from the samples of sulfuric hot springs of Costa Rica. Cells of the two strains were gram-positive, spore-forming and rod-shaped [(0.4 - 0.6) microm x (2.5 - 4.0) microm and (0.4 - 0.7) microm x (2.4 - 4.9) microm, respectively]. Strain Costa C grew at a temperature range of 30 degrees C - 55 degrees C and a pH range of 1.2 - 5.0, optimally at 50 degrees C and 2.8. Strain Costa E grew at a temperature range of 30 degrees C - 55 degrees C and at a pH range of 1.4 - 5.0, optimally at 40 degrees C and 2.8. Two strains could autotrophically grow on inorganic substrates such as ferrous irons, element sulfur and K2 S4 O6 and also could utilize organic substrates like yeast extract for heterotrophic growth. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences alignment demonstrated that the highest similarity between strain Costa C, Costa E and other species of the genus Sulfobacillus was above 99%. Based on morphological, physiological and biochemical analysis, Costa C and Costa E can be affiliated to the genus Sulfobacillus, for which the names Sulfobacillus sp. strain Costa C and Sulfobacillus sp. strain Costa E were proposed. Both strains could oxidize pyrite, and the oxidation rates arrived 63.0 mg/L x d and 56.8 mg/L x d, respectively.

  14. Coregulation of the cyclic lipopeptides orfamide and sessilin in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olorunleke, Feyisara E; Kieu, Nam P; De Waele, Evelien; Timmerman, Marc; Ongena, Marc; Höfte, Monica

    2017-01-01

    ... ), which are often flanked by LuxR‐type transcriptional regulators. Pseudomonas sp. CMR 12a, an effective biocontrol strain, produces two different classes of CLP s namely sessilins and orfamides...

  15. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Closely Related Bacteria, Actinomyces sp. Strain Chiba101 and Actinomyces denticolens DSM 20671T

    OpenAIRE

    Kanesaki, Yu; Ishige, Taichiro; Sekigawa, Yuriko; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Torii, Yasushi; YOKOYAMA, Eiji; Ishiwata, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Moriyuki; Tamura, Tomohiko; Azuma, Ryozo; Murakami, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actinomyces sp. strain Chiba101, isolated from an arthritic leg joint of a pig raised in Japan, is a bacterium closely related to Actinomyces denticolens. Here, we deciphered the complete genome sequence of Actinomyces sp. Chiba101 and the high-quality draft genome sequence of A.?denticolens DSM 20671T.

  16. Draft genome sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. strain TG-20, a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from the basal ice of Taylor Glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Koh, Hye Yeon; Lee, Sung Gu; Doyle, Shawn; Christner, Brent C; Kim, Hak Jun

    2012-12-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. strain TG-20, which is 4.12 Mb in size and consists of 4,071 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA genes. The genome sequence of Paenisporosarcina sp. TG-20 may provide useful information about molecular adaptations that enhance survival in icy subsurface environments.

  17. Rickettsia sp. Strain NOD Infecting Ticks ( Amblyomma nodosum) in an Endemic Area of Spotted Fever in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerbeck, Leonardo; Vizzoni, Vinicius F; de Oliveira, Stefan V; Cavalcante, Robson; Coelho, Gerlene C B; Duarte, Naylê F H; Amorim, Marinete; Gazêta, Gilberto S

    2017-12-20

    Amblyomma nodosum ticks were collected from one collared anteater ( Tamandua tetradactyla) in the Caatinga biome, Brazil. From one sample, we isolated a Rickettsia sp. that was phylogenetically close to Rickettsia sp. strain NOD, with 99.9, 100.0, and 99.8% identity for gltA, htrA, and ompA genes, respectively.

  18. Screening of bacterial strains for pectinolytic activity: characterization of the polygalacturonase produced by Bacillus sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Márcia M.C.N.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sixty eight bacterial strains, isolated from soil and samples of vegetable in decomposition, were screened for the use of citrus pectin as the sole carbon source. 102 were positive for pectinase depolymerization in assay plates as evidenced by clear hydrolization halos. Among them, 30% presented considerable pectinolytic activity. The cultivation of these strains by submerged and semi-solid fermentation for polygalacturonase production indicated that five strains of Bacillus sp produced high quantities of the enzyme. The physico-chemical characteristics, such as optimum pH of 6.0 - 7.0, optimum temperatures between 45oC and 55oC, stability at temperatures above 40oC and in neutral and alkaline pH, were determined.

  19. High-quality genome sequence and description of Bacillus ndiopicus strain FF3T sp. nov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I. Lo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strain FF3T was isolated from the skin-flora of a 39-year-old healthy Senegalese man. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry did not allow any identification. This strain exhibited a 16S rRNA sequence similarity of 96.8% with Bacillus massiliensis, the phylogenetically closest species with standing nomenclature. Using a polyphasic study made of phenotypic and genomic analyses, strain FF3T was Gram-positive, aeroanaerobic and rod shaped and exhibited a genome of 4 068 720 bp with a G+C content of 37.03% that coded 3982 protein-coding and 67 RNA genes (including four rRNA operons. On the basis of these data, we propose the creation of Bacillus ndiopicus sp. nov.

  20. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Diaminobutyricimonas massiliensis strain FF2T sp. nov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.I. Lo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strain FF2T was isolated from the blood sample of a 35 year-old febrile Senegalese male, in Dielmo, Senegal. This strain exhibited a 97.47% 16S rRNA sequence identity with Diaminobutyricimonas aerilata. The score from MALDI-TOF-MS does not allow any identification. Using a polyphasic study made of phenotypic and genomic analyses, strain FF2T was Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, and exhibited a genome of 3,227,513 bp (1 chromosome but no plasmid with a G+C content of 70.13% that coded 3,091 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes. On the basis of these data, we propose the creation of Diaminobutyricimonas massiliensis sp. nov.

  1. Identification and Characterization of an Archaeal Kojibiose Catabolic Pathway in the Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Holden, James F.; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2014-01-01

    A unique gene cluster responsible for kojibiose utilization was identified in the genome of Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04. The proteins it encodes hydrolyze kojibiose, a disaccharide product of glucose caramelization, and form glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) in two steps. Heterologous expression of the kojibiose-related enzymes in Escherichia coli revealed that two genes, Py04_1502 and Py04_1503, encode kojibiose phosphorylase (designated PsKP, for Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 kojibiose phosphorylase) a...

  2. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    OpenAIRE

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant micr...

  3. Nodulation of Lupinus albus by strains of Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Martha E; Willems, Anne; Abril, Adriana; Planchuelo, Ana-María; Rivas, Raúl; Ludeña, Dolores; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2005-03-01

    The nodulation of legumes has for more than a century been considered an exclusive capacity of a group of microorganisms commonly known as rhizobia and belonging to the alpha-Proteobacteria. However, in the last 3 years four nonrhizobial species, belonging to alpha and beta subclasses of the Proteobacteria, have been described as legume-nodulating bacteria. In the present study, two fast-growing strains, LUP21 and LUP23, were isolated from nodules of Lupinus honoratus. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates belong to the genus Ochrobactrum. The strains were able to reinfect Lupinus plants. A plasmid profile analysis showed the presence of three plasmids. The nodD and nifH genes were located on these plasmids, and their sequences were obtained. These sequences showed a close resemblance to the nodD and nifH genes of rhizobial species, suggesting that the nodD and nifH genes carried by strain LUP21T were acquired by horizontal gene transfer. A polyphasic study including phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and molecular features of the strains isolated in this study showed that they belong to a new species of the genus Ochrobactrum for which we propose the name Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov. Strain LUP21T (LMG 20667T) is the type strain.

  4. Nodulation of Lupinus albus by Strains of Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Martha E.; Willems, Anne; Abril, Adriana; Planchuelo, Ana-María; Rivas, Raúl; Ludeña, Dolores; Mateos, Pedro F.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2005-01-01

    The nodulation of legumes has for more than a century been considered an exclusive capacity of a group of microorganisms commonly known as rhizobia and belonging to the α-Proteobacteria. However, in the last 3 years four nonrhizobial species, belonging to α and β subclasses of the Proteobacteria, have been described as legume-nodulating bacteria. In the present study, two fast-growing strains, LUP21 and LUP23, were isolated from nodules of Lupinus honoratus. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates belong to the genus Ochrobactrum. The strains were able to reinfect Lupinus plants. A plasmid profile analysis showed the presence of three plasmids. The nodD and nifH genes were located on these plasmids, and their sequences were obtained. These sequences showed a close resemblance to the nodD and nifH genes of rhizobial species, suggesting that the nodD and nifH genes carried by strain LUP21T were acquired by horizontal gene transfer. A polyphasic study including phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and molecular features of the strains isolated in this study showed that they belong to a new species of the genus Ochrobactrum for which we propose the name Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov. Strain LUP21T (LMG 20667T) is the type strain. PMID:15746334

  5. Relationship between antigenicity and pathogenicity for Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei revealed by a large panel of mouse MAbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nianxiang; Tsai, Shien; Feng, Shaw-Huey; Newsome, Tamara; Kim, Hyung-Yong; Li, Bingjie; Zhang, Shimin; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2008-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are two closely related gram-negative bacterial species classified by the CDC as category B biowarfare agents. To develop monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that can recognize as many different strains and/or clinical isolates of these two pathogens as possible, we immunized mice with heat-killed bacterial whole cells and membrane preparations from multiple strains and/or clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. More than 100 different hybridoma clones that produced MAbs strongly reacting to B. pseudomallei and/or B. mallei have been developed. These MAbs were categorized into eight different groups according to their reaction specificity against different species of Burkholderia bacteria as well as the different nature of target antigens (LPS, capsule polysaccharides, proteins, and glycoproteins) on the bacteria they recognized. Characterization of this large panel of MAbs has demonstrated an interesting pattern of various antigenic epitopes shared by the different species of Burkholderia bacteria. More importantly, this study has revealed a pathogenicity-linked antigen epitope(s) on capsule-like polysaccharides found only in the pathogenic species of Burkholderia bacteria and a Burkholderia-specific antigen epitope(s) that did not exist in other gram-negative bacterial species. Our MAbs should prove to be highly valuable in the development of detection, diagnosis, and therapeutic applications against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei infections.

  6. Draft genome sequence of Paenibacillus algorifonticola sp. nov., an antimicrobial-producing strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Zhu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus algorifonticola sp. nov. is isolated from a cold spring sample from Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (China, a novel strain that can produce antimicrobial substance against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, including Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Here we report a 7.60-Mb assembly of its genome sequence and other useful information, including the coding sequences (CDSs responsible for the biosynthesis of antibacterial factors, anaerobic respiration and several immune-associated reactions. Also, prospective studies on P. algorifonticola sp. nov. in the cold spring might offer a potential source for the discovery of bioactive compounds with medical value. The data repository is deposited on the website http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/LAQO00000000 and the accession number is LAQO00000000.

  7. Antifungal properties of Foeniculum vulgare, Carum carvi and Eucalyptus sp. essential oils against Candida albicans strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrobonja Jelica M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic plants are among the most important sources of biologically active secondary metabolites, with high antimicrobal potential. This study was carried out to examine in vitro antifungal activity of Foeniculum vulgare (Apiaceae, Carum carvi (Apiaceae and Eucalyptus sp.(Myrtaceae essential oils against three Candida albicans strains of different origin (laboratory-CAL, human pulmonary-CAH and ATCC10231-CAR. The essential oils were screened on C. albicans using disc and well-diffusion and microdilution method, and compared to Nystatine and Fluconazole as standard anti-mycotics. The activity of tested oils was expressed by inhibition zone diameter (mm, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC (mg/ml. The results indicated that studied essential oils show antifungal activity against all three isolates of C. albicans. It was observed that each oil exhibits different degree of antifungal activity depending on the oil concentration applied as well as on analyzed strain of C. albicans. Carum carvi demonstrated the strongest antifungal effect to all tested strains, showing the lowest MIC values (0.03mg/ml for CAL, 0.06mg/ml for CAH, and 0.11mg/ml for CAR, respectively. Eucalyptus sp. exhibited the lowest antifungal activity, with MIC values ranging from 0.11 mg/ml for CAL to 0.45 mg/ml for both CAH and CAR. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172058

  8. Novel Acetone Metabolism in a Propane-Utilizing Bacterium, Gordonia sp. Strain TY-5▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Tetsuya; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    In the propane-utilizing bacterium Gordonia sp. strain TY-5, propane was shown to be oxidized to 2-propanol and then further oxidized to acetone. In this study, the subsequent metabolism of acetone was studied. Acetone-induced proteins were found in extracts of cells induced by acetone, and a gene cluster designated acmAB was cloned on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of acetone-induced proteins. The acmA and acmB genes encode a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) and esterase, respectively. The BVMO encoded by acmA was purified from acetone-induced cells of Gordonia sp. strain TY-5 and characterized. The BVMO exhibited NADPH-dependent oxidation activity for linear ketones (C3 to C10) and cyclic ketones (C4 to C8). Escherichia coli expressing the acmA gene oxidized acetone to methyl acetate, and E. coli expressing the acmB gene hydrolyzed methyl acetate. Northern blot analyses revealed that polycistronic transcription of the acmAB gene cluster was induced by propane, 2-propanol, and acetone. These results indicate that the acmAB gene products play an important role in the metabolism of acetone derived from propane oxidation and clarify the propane metabolism pathway of strain TY-5 (propane → 2-propanol → acetone → methyl acetate → acetic acid + methanol). This paper provides the first evidence for BVMO-dependent acetone metabolism. PMID:17071761

  9. Effects of nano bamboo charcoal on PAHs-degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Bojia; Tao, Xueqin; Huang, Ting; Lu, Guining; Zhou, Zhili; Guo, Chuling; Dang, Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Nano bamboo charcoal (NBC) has been commonly used in the production of textiles, plastics, paint, etc. However, little is known regarding their effects towards the microorganisms. The effects of NBC on phenanthrene degrading strain Sphingomonas sp. GY2B were investigated in the present study. Results showed that the addition of NBC could improve the phenanthrene removal by Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, with removal efficiencies increased by 10.29-18.56% in comparison to the control at 24h, and phenanthrene was almost completely removed at 48h. With the presence of low dose of NBC (20 and 50mgL(-1)), strain GY2B displayed a better growth at 6h, suggesting that NBC was beneficial to the growth of GY2B and thus resulting in the quick removal of phenanthrene from water. However, the growth of strain GY2B in high dose of NBC (200mgL(-1)) was inhibited at 6h, and the inhibition could be attenuated and eliminated after 12h. NBC-effected phenanthrene solubility experiment suggested that NBC makes a negligible contribution to the solubilization of phenanthrene in water. Results of electronic microscopy analysis (SEM and TEM) indicated NBC may interact with the cell membrane, causing the enhanced membrane permeability and then NBC adsorbed on the membrane would enter into the cells. The findings of this work would provide important information for the future usage and long-term environmental risk assessment of NBC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Type Strain Sediminibacterium salmoneum NJ-44T and Sediminibacterium sp. C3, a Novel Strain Isolated from Activated Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Ayarza, Joaquín M.; Figuerola, Eva Lucia Margarita; Erijman, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Sediminibacterium comprises species present in diverse natural and engineered environments. Here, we report for the first time the genome sequences of the type strain Sediminibacterium salmoneum NJ-44T (NBRC 103935) and the strain Sedi- minibacterium sp. strain C3 (BNM541), isolated from activated sludge, a valuable model for the study of substrate-dependent autoaggregation. Fil: Ayarza, Joaquín M.. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Investig...

  11. Bacillus mesophilum sp. nov., strain IITR-54T, a novel 4-chlorobiphenyl dechlorinating bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Natesan; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Bajaj, Abhay; Kumar, Rajendran Mathan; Kaur, Gurwinder; Kaur, Navjot; Bala, Monu; Kumar, Anand; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2014-07-01

    The taxonomic position of a Gram-positive, endospore-forming bacterium isolated from soil sample collected from an industrial site was analyzed by a polyphasic approach. The strain designated as IITR-54T matched most of the phenotypic and chemical characteristics of the genus Bacillus and represents a novel species. It was found to biodegrade 4-chlorobiphenyl through dechlorination and was isolated through enrichment procedure from an aged polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil. Both resting cell assay and growth under aerobic liquid conditions using 4-chlorobiphenyl as sole source of carbon along with 0.01% yeast extract, formation of chloride ions was measured. 16S rRNA (1,489 bases) nucleotide sequence of isolated strain was compared with those of closely related Bacillus type strains and confirmed that the strain belongs to the genus Bacillus. Strain IITR-54T differs from all other species of Bacillus by at least 2.1% at the 16S rRNA level, and the moderately related species are Bacillus oceanisediminis (97.9%) followed by Bacillus infantis (97.7%), Bacillus firmus (97.4%), Bacillus drentensis (97.3%), Bacillus circulans (97.2%), Bacillus soli (97.1%), Bacillus horneckiae (97.1%), Bacillus pocheonensis (97.1%) and Bacillus bataviensis (97.1%), respectively. The cell wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and the major isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. Major fatty acids are iso-C15:0 (32.4%) and anteiso-C15:0 (27.4%). Predominant polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed the genotypic and phenotypic distinctiveness of strain IITR-54T with its phylogenetic relatives and suggest that the strain IITR-54T should be recognized as a novel species, for which the name Bacillus mesophilum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IITR-54T (=MTCC 11060T=JCM 19208T).

  12. Increased Neurotropic Threat from Burkholderia pseudomallei Strains with a B. mallei-like Variation in the bimA Motility Gene, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jodie L; Fane, Anne; Sarovich, Derek S; Price, Erin P; Rush, Catherine M; Govan, Brenda L; Parker, Elizabeth; Mayo, Mark; Currie, Bart J; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2017-05-01

    Neurologic melioidosis is a serious, potentially fatal form of Burkholderia pseudomallei infection. Recently, we reported that a subset of clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei from Australia have heightened virulence and potential for dissemination to the central nervous system. In this study, we demonstrate that this subset has a B. mallei-like sequence variation of the actin-based motility gene, bimA. Compared with B. pseudomallei isolates having typical bimA alleles, isolates that contain the B. mallei-like variation demonstrate increased persistence in phagocytic cells and increased virulence with rapid systemic dissemination and replication within multiple tissues, including the brain and spinal cord, in an experimental model. These findings highlight the implications of bimA variation on disease progression of B. pseudomallei infection and have considerable clinical and public health implications with respect to the degree of neurotropic threat posed to human health.

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma sp. 1220 strains isolated from geese in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grózner, Dénes; Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Sulyok, Kinga M; Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Hrivnák, Veronika; Turcsányi, Ibolya; Jánosi, Szilárd; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2016-08-19

    Mycoplasma sp. 1220 can induce inflammation primarily in the genital and respiratory tracts of waterfowl, leading to serious economic losses. Adequate housing and appropriate antibiotic treatment are promoted in the control of the disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility to thirteen different antibiotics and an antibiotic combination of thirty-eight M. sp. 1220 strains isolated from geese and a duck in several parts of Hungary, Central Europe between 2011 and 2015. High MIC50 values were observed in the cases of tilmicosin (>64 μg/ml), oxytetracycline (64 μg/ml), norfloxacin (>10 μg/ml) and difloxacin (10 μg/ml). The examined strains yielded the same MIC50 values with spectinomycin, tylosin and florfenicol (8 μg/ml), while enrofloxacin (MIC50 5 μg/ml), doxycycline (MIC50 5 μg/ml), lincomycin (MIC50 4 μg/ml) and lincomycin-spectinomycin (1:2) combination (MIC50 4 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of the bacteria with lower concentrations. Tylvalosin (MIC50 0.5 μg/ml) and two pleuromutilins (tiamulin MIC50 0.625 μg/ml; valnemulin MIC50 ≤ 0.039 μg/ml) were found to be the most effective drugs against M. sp. 1220. However, strains with elevated MIC values were detected for all applied antibiotics. Valnemulin, tiamulin and tylvalosin were found to be the most effective antibiotics in the study. Increasing resistance was observed in the cases of several antibiotics. The results highlight the importance of testing Mycoplasma species for antibiotic susceptibility before therapy.

  14. Degradation of ethyl mercaptan and its major intermediate diethyl disulfide by Pseudomonas sp. strain WL2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangqian; Wu, Chao; Liu, Nan; Li, Sujing; Li, Wei; Chen, Jianmeng; Chen, Dongzhi

    2015-04-01

    A Pseudomonas sp. strain WL2 that is able to efficiently metabolize ethyl mercaptan (EM) into diethyl disulfide (DEDS) through enzymatic oxidation was isolated from the activated sludge of a pharmaceutical wastewater plant. One hundred percent removal of 113.5 mg L(-1) EM and 110.3 mg L(-1) DEDS were obtained within 14 and 32 h, respectively. A putative EM degradation pathway that involved the catabolism via DEDS was proposed, which indicated DEDS were further mineralized into carbon dioxide (CO2), bacterial cells, and sulfate (SO4 (2-)) through the transformation of element sulfur and ethyl aldehyde. Degradation kinetics for EM and DEDS with different initial concentrations by strain WL2 were evaluated using Haldane-Andrews model with maximum specific degradation rates of 3.13 and 1.33 g g(-1) h(-1), respectively, and maximum degradation rate constants of 0.522 and 0.175 h(-1) using pseudo-first-order kinetic model were obtained. Results obtained that aerobic degradation of EM by strain WL2 was more efficient than those from previous studies. Substrate range studies of strain WL2 demonstrated its ability to degrade several mercaptans, disulfides, aldehydes, and methanol. All the results obtained highlight the potential of strain WL2 for the use in the biodegradation of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs).

  15. Production and characterization of L-fucose dehydrogenase from newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. strain SA-134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Takashi; Morita, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms producing L-fucose dehydrogenase were screened from soil samples, and one of the isolated bacterial strains SA-134 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. by 16S rDNA gene analysis. The strain grew well utilizing L-fucose as a sole source of carbon, but all other monosaccharides tested such as D-glucose and D-arabinose did not support the growth of the strain in the absence of L-fucose. D-Arabinose inhibited the growth even in the culture medium containing L-fucose. Although the strain grew on some organic acids and amino acids such as citric acid and L-alanine as sole sources of carbon, the enzyme was produced only in the presence of L-fucose. The fucose dehydrogenase was purified to apparently homogeneity from the strain, and the native enzyme was a monomer of 25 kD. L-Fucose and D-arabinose were good substrates for the enzyme, but L-galactose was a poor substrate. The enzyme acted on both NAD(+) and NADP(+) in the similar manner.

  16. Biodegradation of nitroglycerin in porous media and potential for bioaugmentation with Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, Johana; Hughes, Joseph B

    2013-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is a toxic explosive found as a contaminant of soil and groundwater. Several microbial strains are capable of partially reducing the NG molecule to dinitro or mononitroesters. Recently, a strain capable of growing on NG as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen (Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1) was isolated from contaminated soil. Despite the widespread presence of microbial strains capable of transforming NG in contaminated soils and sediments, the extent of NG biodegradation at contaminated sites is still unknown. In this study column experiments were conducted to investigate the extent of microbial degradation of NG in saturated porous media, specifically after bioaugmentation with JBH1. Initial experiments using sterile, low sorptivity sand, showed mineralization of NG after bioaugmentation with JBH1 in the absence of sources of carbon and nitrogen other than NG. Results could be modeled using a first order degradation rate of 0.14d(-1). Further experiments conducted using contaminated soil with high organic carbon content (highly sorptive) resulted in column effluents that did not contain NG although high dinitroester concentrations were observed. Bioaugmentation with JBH1 in sediments containing strains capable of partial transformation of NG resulted in complete mineralization of NG and faster degradation rates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Biofilm Production by Salmonella sp. Strains Isolated from Frozen Poultry Carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Sereno

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance and the biofilm-producing ability of Salmonella sp. strains isolated from frozen poultry carcasses. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by the disk-diffusion method. Biofilm-producing ability was determined in 96-well polystyrene microplates stained with crystal violet at 1%. Out of the 22 strains tested, all were multiresistant, that is, resistant to more than three antimicrobial classes, and 72.7% were able to form biofilms. The highest resistance rates obtained were against sulfonamides, tetracycline, and quinolones. On the other hand, 100% of the strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol. According to the rate of biofilm formation, 3 (13.6% and 13 (59.1% strains were classified as moderate and weak biofilm-producers, respectively, and 27.3% did not form biofilms. Biofilms increase the tolerance of microorganisms to stress, reducing their sensitivity to disinfectants and antimicrobials; favor equipment corrosion; and act as substrates for the adhesion of bacteria with lower biofilm-producing capacity. The results of the present study stress the importance of cleaning procedures in food processing plants and highlight the public health risks related to the emergence of multiresistant strains.

  18. Draft genome sequence of type strain HBR26(T) and description of Rhizobium aethiopicum sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aserse, Aregu Amsalu; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Whitman, William B; Lindström, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Rhizobium aethiopicum sp. nov. is a newly proposed species within the genus Rhizobium. This species includes six rhizobial strains; which were isolated from root nodules of the legume plant Phaseolus vulgaris growing in soils of Ethiopia. The species fixes nitrogen effectively in symbiosis with the host plant P. vulgaris, and is composed of aerobic, Gram-negative staining, rod-shaped bacteria. The genome of type strain HBR26(T) of R. aethiopicum sp. nov. was one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as a part of the DOE JGI 2014 Genomic Encyclopedia project designed for soil and plant-associated and newly described type strains. The genome sequence is arranged in 62 scaffolds and consists of 6,557,588 bp length, with a 61% G + C content and 6221 protein-coding and 86 RNAs genes. The genome of HBR26(T) contains repABC genes (plasmid replication genes) homologous to the genes found in five different Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) plasmids, suggesting that HBR26(T) may have five additional replicons other than the chromosome. In the genome of HBR26(T), the nodulation genes nodB, nodC, nodS, nodI, nodJ and nodD are located in the same module, and organized in a similar way as nod genes found in the genome of other known common bean-nodulating rhizobial species. nodA gene is found in a different scaffold, but it is also very similar to nodA genes of other bean-nodulating rhizobial strains. Though HBR26(T) is distinct on the phylogenetic tree and based on ANI analysis (the highest value 90.2% ANI with CFN42(T)) from other bean-nodulating species, these nod genes and most nitrogen-fixing genes found in the genome of HBR26(T) share high identity with the corresponding genes of known bean-nodulating rhizobial species (96-100% identity). This suggests that symbiotic genes might be shared between bean-nodulating rhizobia through horizontal gene transfer. R. aethiopicum sp. nov. was grouped into the genus Rhizobium but was distinct from all recognized species of that genus by

  19. Genome sequence of Methylobacterium sp. strain GXF4, a xylem-associated bacterium isolated from Vitis vinifera L. grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Han Ming; Chew, Teong Han; Hudson, André O; Savka, Michael A

    2012-09-01

    Methylobacterium sp. strain GXF4 is an isolate from grapevine. Here we present the sequence, assembly, and annotation of its genome, which may shed light on its role as a grapevine xylem inhabitant. To our knowledge, this is the first genome announcement of a plant xylem-associated strain of the genus Methylobacterium.

  20. [Carotenogenesis of five strains of the algae Dunaliella sp. (Chlorophyceae) isolated from Venezuelan hypersaline lagoons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Miguel; Lodeiros, César; Gómez, Olga; Lemus, Nathalie; Núñez, Paulino; Romero, Lolymar; Vásquez, Aléikar; Rosales, Néstor

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated discontinuous cultures (Algal medium at 0.5 mM of NaNO3, and 27% NaCI) of five strains of Dunaliella sp. isolated from Venezuelan hypersaline lagoons (Araya, Coche, Peonia, Cumaraguas. and Boca Chica) and one strain from a reference collection (Dunaliella salina, LB1644). Cultures were maintained to 25+/-1 degrees C, with constant aeration, photoperiod 12:12, and two light intensities (195 and 390 microE.m(-2).s(-1)) during 30 days. Cell count was recorded on a daily basis using a Neubaüer camera. Totals of chlorophyll a and carotenoids were measured at the end of the experiment. The largest cellular densities were measured during the smallest light intensities. The strain with the largest cellular density was isolated from Boca Chica (8 xl0(6) and 2.5 xl0(6) cel.ml(-1) a 390 and 195microE.m(-2).s(-1), respectively). The increment of light intensity produced a significant reduction of growth rates in all strains. Totals of carotenoids by volume were as large as 390 microE.m(-2).s(-1). Strains LB 1644, from Coche and Araya were those that produced the largest amount of carotenoids (38.4; 32.8 and 21.0 microg.ml(-1), respectively). Differences total carotenoids by cell between treatments were significant. The largest concentration was 390 microE.m(-2).s(-1). The strains LB 1644 and Coche produced the highest values of carotenes (137.14 and 106.06 pg.cel(-1), respectively). Differences in the relation carotenoid:chlorophyll a between the strains at various light intensities was significant. Strains LB1644 presented the largest value of the relation carotenoids:chlorophyll a (20:1) at 195 microE.m(-2).s(-1). No significant differences were detected in the strain Coche (15:1). All the other strains showed relations lower than one. Our results suggest that the strains of Coche and Araya show potential to be used in the biotechnology of carotenoids production.

  1. Legionella clemsonensis sp. nov.: a green fluorescing Legionella strain from a patient with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Allison; Painter, Joseph; Hassler, Hayley; Richards, Vincent P; Bruce, Terri; Morrison, Shatavia; Brown, Ellen; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A; Lucas, Claressa; McNealy, Tamara L

    2016-10-01

    A novel Legionella species was identified based on sequencing, cellular fatty acid analysis, biochemical reactions, and biofilm characterization. Strain D5610 was originally isolated from the bronchial wash of a patient in Ohio, USA. The bacteria were gram-negative, rod-shaped, and exhibited green fluorescence under long wave UV light. Phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid composition revealed a distinct separation within the genus. The strain grows between 26-45°C and forms biofilms equivalent to L. pneumophila Philadelphia 1. These characteristics suggest that this isolate is a novel Legionella species, for which the name Legionella clemsonensis sp nov. is proposed. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Development of mouse hybridomas for production of monoclonal antibodies specific to Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shaw-Huey; Tsai, Shien; Rodriguez, Jose; Newsome, Tamara; Emanuel, Peter; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2006-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are designated category B biothreat agents on the "select agents" list established by the NIH and CDC. Development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that could effectively differentiate these two closely related species of bacteria and other non-pathogenic Burkholderia bacteria is urgently needed. Splenocytes from mice immunized with various antigen preparations from either B. mallei (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC] 23344) or B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) were used for production of hybridomas. Using a three-step cross-screening protocol, a total of 10 hybridomas were selected that produced MAbs which specifically recognized B. mallei 23344 but did not bind B. pseudomallei, Pseudomonas aeruginasa, or any of the other nine Burkholderia species tested. All 10 MAbs targeted to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules of B. mallei and reacted strongly with 12 out of 15 different strains of B. mallei tested. A total of 14 hybridomas that produced MAbs reacting with B. pseudomallei 23343, but not with B. mallei, P. aeruginasa, or any other nine non-pathogenic Burkholderia species were also selected. All 14 MAbs appeared to react with a proteinase K-sensitive 200-kDa band by immunoblotting analysis. Surprisingly, these 14 MAbs that were raised against the ATCC 23343 strain failed to react to any of the other 13 different strains of B. pseudomallei examined. In conclusion, our B. mallei-specific MAbs can effectively recognize 80% of the different B. mallei strains tested, and all the B. pseudomallei-specific MAbs appeared to react with a unique antigen present only in the ATCC 23343 strain, but not in any other strains of B. pseudomallei tested.

  3. Antagonistic activities of some Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from resident infant gastrointestinal microbiota on Gram-negative enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcaru, Cristina; Alexandru, Ionela; Podgoreanu, Paulina; Cristea, Violeta Corina; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Lazar, Veronica

    2016-06-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota contributes to the consolidation of the anti-infectious barrier against enteric pathogens. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of Bifidobacterium sp. strains, recently isolated from infant gastrointestinal microbiota on the in vitro growth and virulence features expression of enteropathogenic bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity of twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains isolated from human feces was examined in vitro against a wide range of Gram negative pathogenic strains isolated from 30 infant patients (3 days to 5 years old) with diarrhea. Both potential probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium ruminantium) and enteropathogenic strains (EPEC, EIEC, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella sp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were identified by MALDI-TOF and confirmed serologically when needed. The bactericidal activity, growth curve, adherence to the cellular HEp-2 substratum and production of soluble virulence factors have been assessed in the presence of different Bifidobacterium sp. cultures and fractions (whole culture and free-cell supernatants). Among the twelve Bifidobacterium sp. strains, the largest spectrum of antimicrobial activity against 9 of the 18 enteropathogenic strains was revealed for a B. breve strain recently isolated from infant intestinal feces. The whole culture and free-cell supernatant of B. breve culture decreased the multiplication rate, shortened the log phase and the total duration of the growth curve, with an earlier entrance in the decline phase and inhibited the adherence capacity to a cellular substratum and the swimming/swarming motility too. These results indicate the significant probiotic potential of the B. breve strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of burkholderia species by multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina; Vinuesa, Pablo; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Hirsch, Ann M; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús

    2013-07-01

    Burkholderia comprises more than 60 species of environmental, clinical, and agro-biotechnological relevance. Previous phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA, gyrB, rpoB, and acdS gene sequences as well as genome sequence comparisons of different Burkholderia species have revealed two major species clusters. In this study, we undertook a multilocus sequence analysis of 77 type and reference strains of Burkholderia using atpD, gltB, lepA, and recA genes in combination with the 16S rRNA gene sequence and employed maximum likelihood and neighbor-joining criteria to test this further. The phylogenetic analysis revealed, with high supporting values, distinct lineages within the genus Burkholderia. The two large groups were named A and B, whereas the B. rhizoxinica/B. endofungorum, and B. andropogonis groups consisted of two and one species, respectively. The group A encompasses several plant-associated and saprophytic bacterial species. The group B comprises the B. cepacia complex (opportunistic human pathogens), the B. pseudomallei subgroup, which includes both human and animal pathogens, and an assemblage of plant pathogenic species. The distinct lineages present in Burkholderia suggest that each group might represent a different genus. However, it will be necessary to analyze the full set of Burkholderia species and explore whether enough phenotypic features exist among the different clusters to propose that these groups should be considered separate genera.

  5. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for rapid identification and differentiation of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei from each other, Burkholderia thailandensis and several members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D; March, J K; Bills, T M; Holt, B C; Wilson, C E; Lowe, W; Tolley, H D; Lee, M L; Robison, R A

    2013-11-01

    To develop a simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the detection and differentiation of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei from each other, Burkholderia thailandensis and several members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex. Biomarkers were generated by one-step thermochemolysis (TCM) and analysed using a GC-MS system. Fragments of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate [poly(3HBA-co-3HVA)] produced by TCM were useful biomarkers. Several cellular fatty acid methyl esters were important in differentiating the various Burkholderia species. A statistical discrimination algorithm was constructed using a combination of biomarkers. The identities of four B. pseudomallei strains, four B. mallei strains and one strain of each near neighbour were confirmed in a statistically designed test using the algorithm. The detection limit for this method was found to be approximately 4000 cells. The method is fast, accurate and easy to use. The algorithm is robust against different growth conditions (medium and temperature). This assay may prove beneficial in a clinical diagnostic setting, where the rapid identification of B. pseudomallei is essential to effective treatment. This method could also be easily employed after a biological attack to confirm the presence of either B. pseudomallei or B. mallei. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Antibacterial activity of wild Xylaria sp. strain R005 (Ascomycetes) against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Veluchamy; Arivudainambi, U; Thalavaipandian, Annamalai; Karunakaran, Chandran; Rajendran, Ayyappan

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing need for new and effective antibiotic agents due to the recent emergence of life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In the present study, the antimicrobial potential of mushroom was investigated against multidrug-resistant bacterial strains. The mushroom was identified as Xylaria sp. strain R005 based on the morphological characteristics and confirmed by 18S ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons. The crude ethyl acetate extracts of culture filtrate and fruiting bodies of Xylaria sp. showed significant antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains (1-10) and P. aeruginosa strains (1-8). The minimum inhibitory concentration of the ethyl acetate extracts of culture filtrate and fruiting bodies ranged from 225 µg/mL to 625 µg/mL, and 120 µg/mL to 625 µg/mL, respectively, against clinical strains of S. aurues and P. aeruginosa. The synergistic action of extracts of Xylaria sp. with vancomycin and ciprofloxacin was observed against S. aureus strain 6 and P. aeruginosa strain 3, respectively. The fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) of culture filtrate extract with vancomycin and ciprofloxacin were 0.5 and 0.18, respectively. The FICI of fruiting body extract with vancomycin and ciprofloxacin were 0.5 and 0.375, respectively. These results clearly indicate that the metabolites of culture filtrate and fruiting bodies of Xylaria sp. are the potential source for production of new antimicrobial compounds.

  7. Serological characterization of the core region of lipopolysaccharides of rough Proteus sp. strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palusiak, Agata; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2009-01-01

    Both smooth and rough Proteus sp. strains can be found. The latter are characterized by their lack of an O-polysaccharide chain in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule, which makes them suitable for obtaining anti-core sera. Using this kind of material enables identifying fragments of the Proteus LPS core region that might be involved in cross-reactions. To date only a few similar epitopes have been established for the genus Proteus. Polyclonal rabbit antisera directed against three rough strains of Proteus sp. were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a set of LPSs. The reactivity of the selected cross-reactive and homologous systems was checked by the Western blot technique and by a passive immunohemolysis assay preceded by the absorption of each antiserum with appropriate cross-reactive and homologous alkalized LPSs. On the basis of the ELISA results, 19 cross-reactive antigens were selected among which both smooth and rough LPS forms were found. All the observed reactions involved the core region of the LPS. Using the antisera absorbed with the appropriate LPSs allowed identification of four groups of antigens with serologically identical core regions. Comparing the results of the serological studies with the known chemical structures of the core regions of the LPSs used enabled the identification of a few core oligosaccharide fragments probably involved in the observed cross-reactions. All were located in the most distal part of LPS core region, which made them more easily recognized by specific antibodies.

  8. Plasmid Localization and Organization of Melamine Degradation Genes in Rhodococcus sp. Strain Mel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Anthony G.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain Mel was isolated from soil by enrichment and grew in minimal medium with melamine as the sole N source with a doubling time of 3.5 h. Stoichiometry studies showed that all six nitrogen atoms of melamine were assimilated. The genome was sequenced by Roche 454 pyrosequencing to 13× coverage, and a 22.3-kb DNA region was found to contain a homolog to the melamine deaminase gene trzA. Mutagenesis studies showed that the cyanuric acid hydrolase and biuret hydrolase genes were clustered together on a different 17.9-kb contig. Curing and gene transfer studies indicated that 4 of 6 genes required for the complete degradation of melamine were located on an ∼265-kb self-transmissible linear plasmid (pMel2), but this plasmid was not required for ammeline deamination. The Rhodococcus sp. strain Mel melamine metabolic pathway genes were located in at least three noncontiguous regions of the genome, and the plasmid-borne genes encoding enzymes for melamine metabolism were likely recently acquired. PMID:22210223

  9. Novel alginate lyases from marine bacterium Alteromonas sp. strain H-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawabe, T; Ohtsuka, M; Ezura, Y

    1997-10-28

    A bacterium Alteromonas sp. strain H-4 isolated from Laminaria fronds produced extra- and intra-cellular alginate lyases and utilized alginate as its sole carbon source. An extracellular alginate lyase was purified from the culture supernatant of the strain and its substrate specificity was characterized. The estimated molecular mass of the enzyme was 32 kDa and the isoelectric point was 4.7. Both polyM and polyG block degrading activities were observed using the substrate-containing gel overlay technique after isoelectric focusing of the enzyme. By analyzing the reaction products from the polyM block, polyG block, MG random block and intact alginate, three major peaks containing unsaturated tri-uronide through octa-uronide were detected for each substrate. The results indicate that the enzyme of Alteromonas sp. H-4 can degrade both polyM and polyG blocks with a K(m) in mg/mL 20-times higher for the polyM block.

  10. Rapid Aggregation of Biofuel-Producing Algae by the Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s. PMID:23892750

  11. Crystallization of the extracellular rubber oxygenase RoxA from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Maren [Abteilung Molekulare Strukturbiologie, Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Braaz, Reinhard; Jendrossek, Dieter [Institut für Mikrobiologie, Universität Stuttgart, Allmandring 31, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Einsle, Oliver, E-mail: oeinsle@uni-goettingen.de [Abteilung Molekulare Strukturbiologie, Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2008-02-01

    The extracellular rubber-degrading enzyme rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y has been crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to high resolution. Rubber oxygenase A (RoxA) from Xanthomonas sp. strain 35Y is an extracellular dioxygenase that is capable of cleaving the double bonds of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) into short-chain isoprene units with 12-oxo-4,8-dimethyl-trideca-4,8-diene-1-al (ODTD) as the major cleavage product. Crystals of the dihaem c-type cytochrome RoxA were grown by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. RoxA crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.4, b = 97.1, c = 101.1 Å, β = 98.39°, resulting in two monomers per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a limiting resolution of 1.8 Å. Despite a protein weight of 74.1 kDa and only two iron sites per monomer, phasing was successfully carried out by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  12. Genomic Analysis of Bacillus sp. Strain B25, a Biocontrol Agent of Maize Pathogen Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douriet-Gámez, Nadia R; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio E; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Blom, Jochen; Calderón-Vázquez, Carlos L

    2018-03-01

    Bacillus sp. B25 is an effective biocontrol agent against the maize pathogenic fungus Fusarium verticillioides (Fv). Previous in vitro assays have shown that B25 has protease, glucanase, and chitinase activities and siderophores production; however, specific mechanisms by which B25 controls Fv are still unknown. To determine the genetic traits involved in biocontrol, B25 genome was sequenced and analyzed. B25 genome is composed of 5,113,413 bp and 5251 coding genes. A multilocus phylogenetic analysis (MLPA) suggests that B25 is closely related to the Bacillus cereus group and a high percentage (70-75%) of the genetic information is conserved between B25 and related strains, which include most of the genes associated to fungal antagonism. Some of these genes are shared with some biocontrol agents of the Bacillus genus and less with Pseudomonas and Serratia strains. We performed a genomic comparison between B25 and five Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas and Serratia strains. B25 contains genes involved in a wide variety of antagonistic mechanisms including chitinases, glycoside hydrolases, siderophores, antibiotics, and biofilm production that could be implicated in root colonization. Also, 24 genomic islands and 3 CRISPR sequences were identified in the B25 genome. This is the first comparative genome analysis between strains belonging to the B. cereus group and biocontrol agents of phytopathogenic fungi. These results are the starting point for further studies on B25 gene expression during its interaction with Fv.

  13. Biodecolorization of textile azo dye using Bacillus sp. strain CH12 isolated from alkaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadie, Awoke; Tizazu, Samson; Melese, Meseretu; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Xia, Siqing

    2017-09-01

    Textile azo dye decolorizing bacteria were isolated from alkaline Lakes Abaya and Chamo using Reactive Red 239 (RR239) dye. Through subsequent screening process, strain CH12 was selected to investigate the effects of nutrient supplement, DO, pH, temperature, dye concentration and types on decolorization. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain CH12 was identified as Bacillus sp. Decolorization efficiencies were significantly enhanced with carbon (≥98%) and organic nitrogen (∼100%) supplements. Complete decolorization was also observed under anoxic and anaerobic conditions, and at the temperature of 30 °C and the pH of 10. However, the azo dye decolorization efficiency of strain CH12 was significantly reduced when NaNO3 (1-8%) was supplemented or under aerobic culturing condition (≤6%), indicating that RR239 was less preferred electron acceptor. Overall, strain CH12 can be a promising candidate for decolorization applications due to its potential to effectively decolorize higher RR239 concentrations (50-250 mg/L) and six additional dyes.

  14. Biodecolorization of textile azo dye using Bacillus sp. strain CH12 isolated from alkaline lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awoke Guadie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Textile azo dye decolorizing bacteria were isolated from alkaline Lakes Abaya and Chamo using Reactive Red 239 (RR239 dye. Through subsequent screening process, strain CH12 was selected to investigate the effects of nutrient supplement, DO, pH, temperature, dye concentration and types on decolorization. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain CH12 was identified as Bacillus sp. Decolorization efficiencies were significantly enhanced with carbon (≥98% and organic nitrogen (∼100% supplements. Complete decolorization was also observed under anoxic and anaerobic conditions, and at the temperature of 30 °C and the pH of 10. However, the azo dye decolorization efficiency of strain CH12 was significantly reduced when NaNO3 (1–8% was supplemented or under aerobic culturing condition (≤6%, indicating that RR239 was less preferred electron acceptor. Overall, strain CH12 can be a promising candidate for decolorization applications due to its potential to effectively decolorize higher RR239 concentrations (50−250 mg/L and six additional dyes.

  15. Isolation and characterization of Rhizobium sp. strain YS-1r that degrades lignin in plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C A; Couger, M B; Prabhakaran, M; Ramachandriya, K D; Canaan, P; Fathepure, B Z

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate novel lignin-degrading organisms. Several pure cultures of bacteria that degrade lignin were isolated from bacterial consortia developed from decaying biomass. Among the isolates, Rhizobium sp. strain YS-1r (closest relative of Rhizobium petrolearium strain SL-1) was explored for its lignin-degrading ability. Microcosm studies showed that strain YS-1r was able to degrade a variety of lignin monomers, dimers and also native lignin in switchgrass and alfalfa. The isolate demonstrated lignin peroxidase (LiP) activity when grown on alkali lignin, p-anisoin, switchgrass or alfalfa, and only negligible activity was measured in glucose-grown cells suggesting inducible nature of the LiP activity. Analysis of the strain YS-1r genome revealed the presence of a variety of genes that code for various lignin-oxidizing, H 2 O 2 -producing as well as polysaccharide-hydrolysing enzymes. This study shows both the genomic and physiological capability of bacteria in the genus Rhizobium to metabolize lignin and lignin-like compounds. This is the first detailed report on the lignocellulose-degrading ability of a Rhizobium species and thus this study expands the role of alpha-proteobacteria in the degradation of lignin. The organism's ability to degrade lignin is significant since Rhizobia are widespread in soil, water and plant rhizospheres and some fix atmospheric nitrogen and also have the ability to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Biodegradation of triazine herbicide metribuzin by the strain Bacillus sp. N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Yubin; Hou, Zhiguang; Wu, Xian; Gao, Henan; Sun, Fengjie; Pan, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    By enrichment culturing of soil contaminated with metribuzin, a highly efficient metribuzin degrading bacterium, Bacillus sp. N1, was isolated. This strain grows using metribuzin at 5.0% (v/v) as the sole nitrogen source in a liquid medium. Optimal metribuzin degradation occurred at a temperature of 30ºC and at pH 7.0. With an initial concentration of 20 mg L(-1), the degradation rate was 73.5% in 120 h. If the initial concentrations were higher than 50 mg L(-1), the biodegradation rates decreased as the metribuzin concentrations increased. When the concentration was 100 mg L(-1), the degradation rate was only 45%. Degradation followed the pesticide degradation kinetic equation at initial concentrations between 5 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1). When the metribuzin contaminated soil was mixed with strain N1 (with the concentration of metribuzin being 20 mg L(-1) and the inoculation rate of 10(11) g(-1) dry soil), the degradation rate of the metribuzin was 66.4% in 30 days, while the degradation rate of metribuzin was only 19.4% in the control soil without the strain N1. These results indicate that the strain N1 can significantly increase the degradation rate of metribuzin in contaminated soil.

  17. Vertical transmission explains the specific Burkholderia pattern in Sphagnum mosses at multi-geographic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragina, Anastasia; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Berg, Christian; Berg, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia is known for its versatile interactions with its hosts that can range from beneficial to pathogenic. A plant-beneficial-environmental (PBE) Burkholderia cluster was recently separated from the pathogen cluster, yet still little is known about burkholderial diversity, distribution, colonization, and transmission patterns on plants. In our study, we applied a combination of high-throughput molecular and microscopic methods to examine the aforementioned factors for Burkholderia communities associated with Sphagnum mosses – model plants for long-term associations – in Austrian and Russian bogs. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons libraries revealed that most of the Burkholderia are part of the PBE group, but a minor fraction was closely related to B. glathei and B. andropogonis from the pathogen cluster. Notably, Burkholderia showed highly similar composition patterns for each moss species independent of the geographic region, and Burkholderia-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization of Sphagnum gametophytes exhibited similar colonization patterns in different Sphagnum species at multi-geographic scales. To explain these patterns, we compared the compositions of the surrounding water, gametophyte-, and sporophyte-associated microbiome at genus level and discovered that Burkholderia were present in the Sphagnum sporophyte and gametophyte, but were absent in the flark water. Therefore, Burkholderia is a part of the core microbiome transmitted from the moss sporophyte to the gametophyte. This suggests a vertical transmission of Burkholderia strains, and thus underlines their importance for the plants themselves. PMID:24391630

  18. An ancient but promiscuous host–symbiont association between Burkholderia gut symbionts and their heteropteran hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2011-01-01

    Here, we investigated 124 stinkbug species representing 20 families and 5 superfamilies for their Burkholderia gut symbionts, of which 39 species representing 6 families of the superfamilies Lygaeoidea and Coreoidea were Burkholderia-positive. Diagnostic PCR surveys revealed high frequencies of Burkholderia infection in natural populations of the stinkbugs, and substantial absence of vertical transmission of Burkholderia infection to their eggs. In situ hybridization confirmed localization of the Burkholderia in their midgut crypts. In the lygaeoid and coreoid stinkbugs, development of midgut crypts in their alimentary tract was coincident with the Burkholderia infection, suggesting that the specialized morphological configuration is pivotal for establishment and maintenance of the symbiotic association. The Burkholderia symbionts were easily isolated as pure culture on standard microbiological media, indicating the ability of the gut symbionts to survive outside the host insects. Molecular phylogenetic analysis showed that the gut symbionts of the lygaeoid and coreoid stinkbugs belong to a β-proteobacterial clade together with Burkholderia isolates from soil environments and Burkholderia species that induce plant galls. On the phylogeny, the stinkbug-associated, environmental and gall-forming Burkholderia strains did not form coherent groups, indicating host–symbiont promiscuity among these stinkbugs. Symbiont culturing revealed that slightly different Burkholderia genotypes often coexist in the same insects, which is also suggestive of host–symbiont promiscuity. All these results strongly suggest an ancient but promiscuous host–symbiont relationship between the lygaeoid/coreoid stinkbugs and the Burkholderia gut symbionts. Possible mechanisms as to how the environmentally transmitted promiscuous symbiotic association has been stably maintained in the evolutionary course are discussed. PMID:20882057

  19. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Brent Peyton; Viamajala, Sridhar; Robin Gerlach; William Apel; Rajesh Sani; Alice Dohnalkova; Thomas Borch

    2011-02-01

    Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis showed U precipitates containing nearly equal fractions of U(IV) and U(VI), whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI). Mass balance calculations for U and P corroborate these observations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR42TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids. The U(VI)-phosphate precipitates, confirmed by EDS as containing U and P in equimolar concentrations, had nanometer sized lath structure. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, U reduction became the dominant removal mechanism, in contrast to primarily phosphate-mediated precipitation observed in the absence of AQDS. Uranium immobilization by abiotic precipitation or microbial reduction has been extensively reported; however, present work suggests that strain ES6 can remove U(VI) from solution simultaneously through precipitation with phosphate ligands and microbial reduction, depending on the environmental conditions. Cellulomonadaceae are environmentally relevant subsurface bacteria and here, for the first time, t 52 he presence of multiple U

  20. Complete genome sequence of Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554, an ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae-Jin; Han, So-Ra; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, Augustine Yonghwi

    2016-06-10

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, red-pink in color, and UV radiation-resistant bacterium Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 was isolated from Usnea sp., an Antarctic lichen, and belongs to the class of Cytophagia and the phylum of Bacteroidetes. The complete genome of Hymenobacter sp. PAMC26554 consists of one chromosome (5,244,843bp) with two plasmids (199,990bp and 6421bp). The genomic sequence indicates that Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 possesses several genes involved in the nucleotide excision repair pathway that protects damaged DNA. This complete genome information will help us to understand its adaptation and novel survival strategy in the Antarctic extreme cold environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between oviposition, virulence gene expression and parasitism success in Cotesia typhae nov. sp. parasitoid strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, R; Chantre, C; Capdevielle-Dulac, C; Bodet, M; Mougel, F; Calatayud, P A; Dupas, S; Huguet, E; Jeannette, R; Obonyo, J; Odorico, C; Silvain, J F; Le Ru, B; Kaiser, L

    2017-12-01

    Studying mechanisms that drive host adaptation in parasitoids is crucial for the efficient use of parasitoids in biocontrol programs. Cotesia typhae nov. sp. (Fernández-Triana) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a newly described parasitoid of the Mediterranean corn borer Sesamia nonagrioides (Lefebvre) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Braconidae are known for their domesticated bracovirus, which is injected with eggs in the host larva to overcome its resistance. In this context, we compared reproductive success traits of four Kenyan strains of C. typhae on a French and a Kenyan populations of its host. Differences were found between the four strains and the two most contrasted ones were studied more thoroughly on the French host population. Parasitoid offspring size was correlated with parasitism success and the expression of bracovirus virulence genes (CrV1 and Cystatin) in the host larva after parasitism. Hybrids between these two parasitoid strains showed phenotype and gene expression profiles similar to the most successful parental strain, suggesting the involvement of dominant alleles in the reproductive traits. Ovary dissections revealed that the most successful strain injected more eggs in a single host larva than the less successful one, despite an equal initial ovocyte number in ovaries. It can be expected that the amount of viral particles increase with the number of eggs injected. The ability to bypass the resistance of the allopatric host may in consequence be related to the oviposition behaviour (eggs allocation). The influence of the number of injected eggs on parasitism success and on virulence gene expression was evaluated by oviposition interruption experiments.

  2. CrdR function in a curdlan-producing Agrobacterium sp. ATCC31749 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Liping; Zhao, Lamei; Lin, Chun; Liu, Zhengjie; Mao, Zichao

    2015-02-10

    Agrobacterium sp. ATCC31749 is an efficient curdlan producer at low pH and under nitrogen starvation. The helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulatory protein (crdR) essential for curdlan production has been analyzed, but whether crdR directly acts to cause expression of the curdlan biosynthesis operon (crdASC) is uncertain. To elucidate the molecular function of crdR in curdlan biosynthesis, we constructed a crdR knockout mutant along with pBQcrdR and pBQNcrdR vectors with crdR expression driven by a T5 promoter and crdR native promoter, respectively. Also, we constructed a pAG with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene driven by a curdlan biosynthetic operon promoter (crdP) to measure the effects of crdR expression on curdlan biosynthesis. Compared with wild-type (WT) strain biomass production, the biomass of the crdR knockout mutant was not significantly different in either exponential or stationary phases of growth. Mutant cells were non-capsulated and planktonic and produced significantly less curdlan. WT cells were curdlan-capsulated and aggregated in the stationery phase. pBQcrdR transformed to the WT strain had a 38% greater curdlan yield and pBQcrdR and pBQNcrdR transformed to the crdR mutant strain recovered 18% and 105% curdlan titers of the WT ATCC31749 strain, respectively. Consistent with its function of promoting curdlan biosynthesis, curdlan biosynthetic operon promoter (crdP) controlled GFP expression caused the transgenic strain to have higher GFP relative fluorescence in the WT strain, and no color change was observed with low GFP relative fluorescence in the crdR mutant strain as evidenced by fluorescent microscopy and spectrometric assay. q-RT-PCR revealed that crdR expression in the stationary phase was greater than in the exponential phase, and crdR overexpression in the WT strain increased crdA, crdS, and crdC expression. We also confirmed that purified crdR protein can specifically bind to the crd operon promoter region, and we inferred

  3. Antimicrobial activities of Rhizobium sp. strains against Pseudomonas savastanoi, the agent responsible for the olive knot disease in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourad, K.; Fadhila, K.; Chahinez, M.; Merien, R.; Philippe, L. de; Abdelkader, B.

    2009-07-01

    In the present investigation, six Rhizobium strains isolated from Algerian soil were checked for their antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas savastanoi, the agent responsible for olive knot disease. Rhizobium sp. ORN 24 and ORN 83 were found to produce antimicrobial activities against Pseudomonas savastanoi. The antimicrobial activity produced by Rhizobium sp. ORN24 was precipitable with ammonium sulfate, between 1,000 and 10,000 KDa molecular weight, heat resistant but sensitive to proteases and detergents. These characteristics suggest the bacteriocin nature of the antimicrobial substance produced by Rhizobium sp. ORN24, named rhizobiocin 24. In contrast, the antimicrobial activity produced by Rhizobium sp. ORN83 was not precipitable with ammonium sulfate; it was smaller than 1,000 KDa molecular weight, heat labile, and protease and detergent resistant. These characteristics could indicate the relationship between the antimicrobial substance produced by Rhizobium sp. ORN 83 and the small bacteriocins described in other rhizobia. (Author) 51 refs.

  4. Growth and cesium uptake responses of Phytolacca americana Linn. and Amaranthus cruentus L. grown on cesium contaminated soil to elevated CO{sub 2} or inoculation with a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia sp. D54, or in combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shirong, E-mail: tangshir@hotmail.com [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Key Laboratory of Production Environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Liao, Shangqiang; Guo, Junkang; Song, Zhengguo; Wang, Ruigang [Centre for Research in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Remediation, Agro-Environmental Protection Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin 300191 (China); Key Laboratory of Production Environment and Agro-product Safety of Ministry of Agriculture, Tianjin (China); Zhou, Xiaomin [Plant Science Department, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, 21111 Lakeshore Road, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada H9X 3V9 (Canada)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly promoted growth of P. americana, and A. cruentus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total tissue Cs in plants was significantly increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two plants had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation can be explored for CO{sub 2}- and microbe-assisted phytoextraction technology. - Abstract: Growth and cesium uptake responses of plants to elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation, alone or in combination, can be explored for clean-up of contaminated soils, and this induced phytoextraction may be better than the natural process. The present study used open-top chambers to investigate combined effects of Burkholderia sp. D54 inoculation and elevated CO{sub 2} (860 {mu}L L{sup -1}) on growth and Cs uptake by Phytolacca americana and Amaranthus cruentus grown on soil spiked with various levels of Cs (0-1000 mg kg{sup -1}). Elevated CO{sub 2} and bacterial inoculation, alone or in combination, significantly increased biomass production with increased magnitude, ranging from 22% to 139% for P. americana, and 14% to 254% for A. cruentus. Total tissue Cs in both plants was significantly greater for bacterial inoculation treatment singly, and combined treatments of bacterial inoculation and elevated CO{sub 2} than for the control treatment in most cases. Regardless of CO{sub 2} concentrations and bacterial inoculation, A. cruentus had higher tissue Cs concentration, Cs transfer factors and concentration ratios than P. americana, but they had slightly different contents of antioxidant enzymes. It is concluded that combined effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and microbial inoculation with

  5. Characterization of Klebsiella sp. strain S1: a bacterial producer of secoisolariciresinol through biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Jie; Zhu, Songling; Yang, Dong-Hui; Zhao, Dan-Dan; Li, Jia-Jing; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Secoisolariciresinol (SECO) is a lignan of potential therapeutic value for diseases such as cancer, but its use has been limited by the lack of ideal production methods, even though its precursors are abundant in plants, such as flaxseeds. Here, we report the characterization of a bacterial strain, S1, isolated from the human intestinal flora, which could produce secoisolariciresinol by biotransformation of precursors in defatted flaxseeds. This bacterium was a Gram-negative and facultatively anaerobic straight rod without capsules. Biochemical assays showed that it was negative for production of oxidase, lysine decarboxylase, ornithine decarboxylase, arginine dihydrolase, and β-glucolase. The G + C content of genomic DNA was 57.37 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis by 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences demonstrated S1's close relatedness to Klebsiella. No homologues were found for wzb or wzc (capsular genes), which may explain why Klebsiella sp. strain S1 does not have the capsule and was isolated from a healthy human individual. Based on the percentages of homologous genes with identical nucleotide sequences between the bacteria in comparison, we found that clear-cut genetic boundaries had been formed between S1 and any other Klebsiella strains compared, dividing them into distinct phylogenetic lineages. This work demonstrates that the intestinal Klebsiella, well known as important opportunistic pathogens prevalent in potentially fatal nosocomial infections, may contain lineages that are particularly beneficial to the human health.

  6. Reduction of Fe(III)EDTA by Klebsiella sp. strain FD-3 in NOx scrubber solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zuoming; Jing, Guohua; Zheng, Xiangjiao

    2013-03-01

    Biological reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) is a key step in nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal by the integrated chemical absorption-biological reduction method, which determines the concentration of Fe(II) in the scrubbing liquid. A new Fe(III)EDTA reduction strain, named as FD-3, was isolated from mixed cultures used in the integrated NOx removal process and identified as Klebsiella sp. by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The reduction abilities of FD-3 and the influence of nitrogen-containing compounds (Fe(II)EDTA-NO, NO3(-) and NO2(-)) and sulfur-containing compounds (SO4(2-), SO3(2-)) on the Fe(III)EDTA reduction were investigated. The results indicated that strain FD-3 could reduce Fe(III)EDTA efficiently. NO3(-), NO2(-) and Fe(II)EDTA-NO inhibit the reduction of Fe(III)EDTA and could also serve as electron acceptor for strain FD-3. SO3(2-) inhibited Fe(III)EDTA reduction while SO4(2-) had no obviously effect on Fe(III)EDTA reduction. The relationship between cell growth and Fe(III)EDTA reduction could be described by the models based on Logistic equation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcription of the extended hyp-operon in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agervald, Åsa; Stensjö, Karin; Holmqvist, Marie; Lindblad, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background The maturation of hydrogenases into active enzymes is a complex process and e.g. a correctly assembled active site requires the involvement of at least seven proteins, encoded by hypABCDEF and a hydrogenase specific protease, encoded either by hupW or hoxW. The N2-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 may contain both an uptake and a bidirectional hydrogenase. The present study addresses the presence and expression of hyp-genes in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. Results RT-PCRs demonstrated that the six hyp-genes together with one ORF may be transcribed as a single operon. Transcriptional start points (TSPs) were identified 280 bp upstream from hypF and 445 bp upstream of hypC, respectively, demonstrating the existence of several transcripts. In addition, five upstream ORFs located in between hupSL, encoding the small and large subunits of the uptake hydrogenase, and the hyp-operon, and two downstream ORFs from the hyp-genes were shown to be part of the same transcript unit. A third TSP was identified 45 bp upstream of asr0689, the first of five ORFs in this operon. The ORFs are annotated as encoding unknown proteins, with the exception of alr0692 which is identified as a NifU-like protein. Orthologues of the four ORFs asr0689-alr0692, with a highly conserved genomic arrangement positioned between hupSL, and the hyp genes are found in several other N2-fixing cyanobacteria, but are absent in non N2-fixing cyanobacteria with only the bidirectional hydrogenase. Short conserved sequences were found in six intergenic regions of the extended hyp-operon, appearing between 11 and 79 times in the genome. Conclusion This study demonstrated that five ORFs upstream of the hyp-gene cluster are co-transcribed with the hyp-genes, and identified three TSPs in the extended hyp-gene cluster in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. This may indicate a function related to the assembly of a functional uptake hydrogenase, hypothetically in the assembly of the small subunit of

  8. Transcription of the extended hyp-operon in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindblad Peter

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maturation of hydrogenases into active enzymes is a complex process and e.g. a correctly assembled active site requires the involvement of at least seven proteins, encoded by hypABCDEF and a hydrogenase specific protease, encoded either by hupW or hoxW. The N2-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 may contain both an uptake and a bidirectional hydrogenase. The present study addresses the presence and expression of hyp-genes in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. Results RT-PCRs demonstrated that the six hyp-genes together with one ORF may be transcribed as a single operon. Transcriptional start points (TSPs were identified 280 bp upstream from hypF and 445 bp upstream of hypC, respectively, demonstrating the existence of several transcripts. In addition, five upstream ORFs located in between hupSL, encoding the small and large subunits of the uptake hydrogenase, and the hyp-operon, and two downstream ORFs from the hyp-genes were shown to be part of the same transcript unit. A third TSP was identified 45 bp upstream of asr0689, the first of five ORFs in this operon. The ORFs are annotated as encoding unknown proteins, with the exception of alr0692 which is identified as a NifU-like protein. Orthologues of the four ORFs asr0689-alr0692, with a highly conserved genomic arrangement positioned between hupSL, and the hyp genes are found in several other N2-fixing cyanobacteria, but are absent in non N2-fixing cyanobacteria with only the bidirectional hydrogenase. Short conserved sequences were found in six intergenic regions of the extended hyp-operon, appearing between 11 and 79 times in the genome. Conclusion This study demonstrated that five ORFs upstream of the hyp-gene cluster are co-transcribed with the hyp-genes, and identified three TSPs in the extended hyp-gene cluster in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. This may indicate a function related to the assembly of a functional uptake hydrogenase, hypothetically in the

  9. Targeted Gene Disruption of the Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro Biosynthetic Pathway in Streptomyces sp. US24 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Sioud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously isolated a new actinomycete strain from Tunisian soil called Streptomyces sp. US24, and have shown that it produces two bioactive molecules including a Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro diketopiperazine (DKP. To identify the structural genes responsible for the synthesis of this DKP derivative, a PCR amplification (696 bp was carried out using the Streptomyces sp. US24 genomic DNA as template and two degenerate oligonucleotides designed by analogy with genes encoding peptide synthetases (NRPS. The detection of DKP derivative biosynthetic pathway of the Streptomyces sp. US24 strain was then achieved by gene disruption via homologous recombination using a suicide vector derived from the conjugative plasmid pSET152 and containing the PCR product. Chromatography analysis, biological tests and spectroscopic studies of supernatant cultures of the wild-type Streptomyces sp. US24 strain and three mutants obtained by this gene targeting disruption approach showed that the amplified DNA fragment is required for Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro biosynthesis in Streptomyces sp. US24 strain. This DKP derivative seems to be produced either directly via a nonribosomal pathway or as a side product in the course of nonribosomal synthesis of a longer peptide.

  10. Isolation and Characterization of an Atypical Metschnikowia sp. Strain from the Skin Scraping of a Dermatitis Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Ismail, Rokiah; Kwan, Zhenli; Yew, Su Mei; Yeo, Siok Koon; Chan, Chai Ling; Toh, Yue Fen; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2016-01-01

    A yeast-like organism was isolated from the skin scraping sample of a stasis dermatitis patient in the Mycology Unit Department of Medical Microbiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The isolate produced no pigment and was not identifiable using chromogenic agar and API 20C AUX. The fungus was identified as Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034, which is close to that of Metschnikowia drosophilae based on ITS- and D1/D2 domain-based phylogenetic analysis. However, the physiology of the strain was not associated to M. drosophilae. This pathogen exhibited low sensitivity to all tested azoles, echinocandins, 5-flucytosine and amphotericin B. This study provided insight into Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 phenotype profiles using a Biolog phenotypic microarray (PM). The isolate utilized 373 nutrients of 760 nutrient sources and could adapt to a broad range of osmotic and pH environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of Metschnikowia non-pulcherrima sp. from skin scraping, revealing this rare yeast species as a potential human pathogen that may be misidentified as Candida sp. using conventional methods. Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 can survive in flexible and diverse environments with a generalist lifestyle.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of an Atypical Metschnikowia sp. Strain from the Skin Scraping of a Dermatitis Patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Sian Kuan

    Full Text Available A yeast-like organism was isolated from the skin scraping sample of a stasis dermatitis patient in the Mycology Unit Department of Medical Microbiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The isolate produced no pigment and was not identifiable using chromogenic agar and API 20C AUX. The fungus was identified as Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034, which is close to that of Metschnikowia drosophilae based on ITS- and D1/D2 domain-based phylogenetic analysis. However, the physiology of the strain was not associated to M. drosophilae. This pathogen exhibited low sensitivity to all tested azoles, echinocandins, 5-flucytosine and amphotericin B. This study provided insight into Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 phenotype profiles using a Biolog phenotypic microarray (PM. The isolate utilized 373 nutrients of 760 nutrient sources and could adapt to a broad range of osmotic and pH environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of Metschnikowia non-pulcherrima sp. from skin scraping, revealing this rare yeast species as a potential human pathogen that may be misidentified as Candida sp. using conventional methods. Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034 can survive in flexible and diverse environments with a generalist lifestyle.

  12. Rhizosphere colonization and arsenic translocation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by arsenate reducing Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalca, Lucia; Corsini, Anna; Bachate, Sachin Prabhakar; Andreoni, Vincenza

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, six arsenic-resistant strains previously isolated were tested for their plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, in order to choose one model strain as an inoculum for sunflower plants in pot experiments. The aim was to investigate the effect of arsenic-resistant strain on sunflower growth and on arsenic uptake from arsenic contaminated soil. Based on plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L was chosen as an inoculum. Beside the ability to reduce arsenate to arsenite via an Ars operon, the strain exhibited 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity and it was also able to produce siderophore and indole acetic acid. Pot experiments were conducted with an agricultural soil contaminated with arsenic (214 mg kg⁻¹). A real time PCR method was set up based on the quantification of ACR3(2) type of arsenite efflux pump carried by Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L, in order to monitor presence and colonisation of the strain in the bulk and rhizospheric soil. As a result of strain inoculation, arsenic uptake by plants was increased by 53 %, whereas ACR3(2) gene copy number in rhizospheric soil was 100 times higher in inoculated than in control pots, indicating the colonisation of strain. The results indicated that the presence of arsenate reducing strains in the rhizosphere of sunflower influences arsenic mobilization and promotes arsenic uptake by plant.

  13. DBSecSys 2.0: a database of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei secretion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Memi?evi?, Vesna; Kumar, Kamal; Zavaljevski, Nela; DeShazer, David; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    Background Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are the causative agents of glanders and melioidosis, respectively, diseases with high morbidity and mortality rates. B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are closely related genetically; B. mallei evolved from an ancestral strain of B. pseudomallei by genome reduction and adaptation to an obligate intracellular lifestyle. Although these two bacteria cause different diseases, they share multiple virulence factors, including bacterial secretion syste...

  14. BIOAUGMENTATION WITH BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA PR1301 FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot field study was conducted at the Moffett Federal Airfield, Mountain View, California, to determine whether effective in-situ aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of TCE could be accomplished through bioaugmentation with a genetically modified strain of Burkholderia cepacia ...

  15. Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain F1, a potential source for glycoside hydrolases isolated from Brazilian soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rodrigues de Melo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Here, we show the draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. F1, a strain isolated from soil with great potential for secretion of hydrolytic enzymes used to deconstruct cellulosic biomass. The draft genome assembly of Streptomyces sp. strain F1 has 69 contigs with a total genome size of 8,142,296 bp and G + C 72.65%. Preliminary genome analysis identified 175 proteins as Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes, being 85 glycoside hydrolases organized in 33 distinct families. This draft genome information provides new insights on the key genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes involved in biomass deconstruction employed by soil bacteria.

  16. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Parapiptadenia rigida-nodulating Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; Van Berkum, Peter; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, Tbk; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia N; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Howieson, John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Parapiptadenia rigida grown in soils from a native forest of Uruguay. Here we describe the features of Cupriavidus sp. strain UYPR2.512, together with sequence and annotation. The 7,858,949 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 365 scaffolds of 369 contigs, contains 7,411 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  17. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus saerimneri 30a (Formerly Lactobacillus sp. Strain 30a), a Reference Lactic Acid Bacterium Strain Producing Biogenic Amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, Andrea; Trip, Hein; Campbell-Sills, Hugo; Bouchez, Olivier; Sherman, David; Lolkema, Juke S.; Lucas, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus sp. strain 30a (Lactobacillus saerimneri) produces the biogenic amines histamine, putrescine, and cadaverine by decarboxylating their amino acid precursors. We report its draft genome sequence (1,634,278 bases, 42.6% G+C content) and the principal findings from its annotation, which

  18. Degradation of terephthalic acid by a newly isolated strain of Arthrobacter sp.0574

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Mei Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Terephthalic acid is an important industrial chemical but its production typically generates 3–10 tons of wastewater, which is a significant source of pollution. Although recent research has shown that terephthalic acid can be degraded by physical and chemical methods, these methods are complex and expensive. Microbial degradation of terephthalic acid is a popular alternative because it is environmentally friendly. We isolated a Gram-positive strain capable of growing aerobically on terephthalic acid as the sole carbon and energy source. It was identified as Arthrobacter sp. by 16S rDNA sequencing and its physiological and biochemical characteristics. For terephthalic acid degradation, the optimal temperature of the resting cells was 30 °C, optimal shaking speed was 150 rpm, the most suitable pH was 7.0, and the ability to degrade terephthalic acid was inhibited by concentrations of terephthalic acid above 10 g/L.

  19. Draft genome sequence of phenol degrading Acinetobacter sp. Strain V2, isolated from oil contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Lin, Johnson

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain V2 isolated from the oil contaminated soil collected from ENGEN, Amanzimtoti, South Africa. Degradation of phenolic compounds such as phenol, toluene, aniline etc. at 400ppm in 24h and oil degrading capability makes this organism an efficient multifunctional bioremediator. Genome sequencing of Acinetobacter spp. V2 was carried out on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform (performed by the Beijing Genomics Institute [BGI], Shenzhen, China). The data obtained revealed 643 contigs with genome size of 4.0 Mb and G+C content of 38.59%. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Biochemical characterisation of lipase from a new strain of Bacillus sp. ITP-001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Murillo P. Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipases are characterised mainly by catalytic versatility and application in different industrial segments. The aim of this study was to biochemically characterise a lipase from a new strain of Bacillus sp. ITP-001. The isoelectric point and molecular mass were 3.12 and 54 kDa, respectively. The optima lipase activity was 276 U g-1 at pH 7.0 and a temperature of 80 ºC, showing greater stability at pH 5.0 and 37 ºC. Enzymatic activity was stimulated by various ions and pyridine, and inhibited by Cu+ and ethanol. The values of Km and v max were 105.26 mmol and 0.116 mmol min-1 g-1, respectively determined by the Eadie-Scatchard method.

  1. Fluoranthene metabolism in Mycobacterium sp. strain KR20: identity of pathway intermediates during degradation and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmann, K; Hertkorn, N; Kettrup, A A

    2001-10-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain KR20, which was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil of a former gaswork plant site, metabolized about 60% of the fluoranthene added (0.5 mg ml(-1)) to batch cultures in mineral salts medium within 10 d at 20 degrees C. It thereby increased its cell number about 30-fold and produced at least seven metabolites. Five metabolites, namely cis-2,3-fluoranthene dihydrodiol, Z-9-carboxymethylene-fluorene-1-carboxylic acid, cis-1,9a-dihydroxy-1-hydro-fluorene-9-one-8-carboxylic acid, 4-hydroxybenzochromene-6-one-7-carboxylic acid and benzene-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid, could be identified by NMR and MS spectroscopic techniques and ascribed to an alternative fluoranthene degradation pathway. Besides fluoranthene, the isolate could not use any of the PAHs tested as a sole source of carbon and energy.

  2. Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. isolated from alpine glaciers and reclassification of Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-12 as the type strain of Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, David; Udovičić, Matije; Frey, Beat; Lapanje, Aleš; Zhang, De-Chao; Margesin, Rosa; Sievers, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Psychrophilic bacterial strains were isolated from alpine glaciers in Switzerland and characterized taxonomically. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of partial 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, three of those strains, strain 79 ( = CCOS 247), strain 4/58 ( = CCOS 250) and strain 4/56 ( = CCOS 258) clustered together with strain Cr9-12T and separately from the type strains Glaciimonas immobilis Cr9-30T and Glaciimonas singularis LMG 27070T. Strain Cr9-12T has been previously described as a strain of G. immobilis. The three newly isolated strains were compared phenotypically with strain Cr9-12T and with the type strains of the species G. immobilis and G. singularis. Cr9-12T and the three novel strains from an alpine glacier in Switzerland were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped and psychrophilic and showed good growth throughout a temperature range of 1-20 °C and characteristically oxidized d-mannitol, l-fucose and bromosuccinic acid. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain Cr9-12T and the three novel strains were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH), C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c. The respiratory quinone of these strains was ubiquinone 8 (UQ-8). The genomic DNA G+C content of Cr9-12T was 49.2 mol%. The combined data from phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA relatedness studies strongly support the reclassification of strain Cr9-12T as representing a novel species. This strain and the isolates 79 ( = CCOS 247), 4/58 ( = CCOS 250) and 4/56 ( = CCOS 258) are representatives of a novel species of the genus Glaciimonas, for which the name Glaciimonas alpina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Glaciimonas alpina is Cr9-12T ( = CCOS 761T = DSM 22814T).

  3. Structural relationship of the lipid A acyl groups to activation of murine Toll-like receptor 4 by lipopolysaccharides from pathogenic strains of Burkholderia mallei, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill V Korneev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is required for activation of innate immunity upon recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Gram-negative bacteria. The ability of TLR4 to respond to a particular LPS species is important since insufficient activation may not prevent bacterial growth while excessive immune reaction may lead to immunopathology associated with sepsis. Here we investigated the biological activity of LPS from Burkholderia mallei that causes glanders, and from the two well-known opportunistic pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (causative agents of nosocomial infections. For each bacterial strain, R-form LPS preparations were purified by hydrophobic chromatography and the chemical structure of lipid A, an LPS structural component, was elucidated by HR-MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The biological activity of LPS samples was evaluated by their ability to induce production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF, by bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM. Our results demonstrate direct correlation between the biological activity of LPS from these pathogenic bacteria and the extent of their lipid A acylation.

  4. Biomass production and nutrients removal by a new microalgae strain Desmodesmus sp. in anaerobic digestion wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fang; Liu, Ying; Hao, Rui; Li, Gang; Zhou, Yuguang; Dong, Renjie

    2014-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion wastewater (ADW), which contains large amount of nitrogen and phosphorus, particularly high concentration of ammonium, might lead to severely environmental pollution. A new unicellular green microalgae species from a wetland at the Olympic Forest Park, Beijing, China was screened based on its growth rates and nutrients removal capability under ADW. Results of 18s rDNA and ITS1 analysis indicated that this strain have a close relationship with Desmodesmus sp., named as EJ9-6. Desmodesmus sp. EJ9-6 could remove 100% NH4-N (68.691mg/L), TP (4.565mg/L) and PO4-P (4.053mg/L), and 75.50% TN (84.236mg/L) at 10.0% ADW, which the highest biomass production was 0.412g/L after 14d cultivation. Maximum nutrients removal was observed at 10.0% ADW with daily removal rates of TN, NH4-N, TP and PO4-P at 4.542, 5.284, 0.326 and 0.290mg/L/d, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. IMMOBILIZATION OF GLUCOSE OXIDASE ENZYME FROM Penicillium sp-3 LOCAL STRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahyar Ahmad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOD enzyme from Penicillium sp-3 local strain has been carried out using ionotropically entrapping method in  Ca-alginate membrane coupled with Na-polyacrilate. The entrapment of the enzyme in diffusion membrane occur spontaneously by cross-linking between Na-alginate/Na-polyacrilate and CaCl2. The GOD enzyme immobilized by addition of 1 % Na-polyacrilate has the highest encapsulation efficiency, that is 87.13 % with the smallest percentage of diffusion, i.e. 23.37% and the relative activity of 50%. The GOD immobilized enzyme had good stability at the pH range 4 - 7 during 30 minutes of storage and was stable at a temperature of 20 oC. The activity of the GOD enzyme after being utilized continuously for 5 times only decrease up to 47,06 % compared to that in the initial utilization.   Keywords: immobilization, glucose oxidase, Penicillium sp-3, calcium alginate, sodium  polyacrilate.

  6. Taxonomic study of Marinomonas strains isolated from the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, with descriptions of Marinomonas balearica sp. nov. and Marinomonas pollencensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Elena; Marco-Noales, Ester; Gómez, Daniel; Lucas-Elío, Patricia; Ordax, Mónica; Garcías-Bonet, Neus; Duarte, Carlos M; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Novel aerobic, Gram-negative bacteria with DNA G+C contents below 50 mol% were isolated from the culturable microbiota associated with the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that they belong to the genus Marinomonas. Strain IVIA-Po-186 is a strain of the species Marinomonas mediterranea, showing 99.77 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strain, MMB-1(T), and sharing all phenotypic characteristics studied. This is the first description of this species forming part of the microbiota of a marine plant. A second strain, designated IVIA-Po-101(T), was closely related to M. mediterranea based on phylogenetic studies. However, it differed in characteristics such as melanin synthesis and tyrosinase, laccase and antimicrobial activities. In addition, strain IVIA-Po-101(T) was auxotrophic and unable to use acetate. IVIA-Po-101(T) shared 97.86 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with M. mediterranea MMB-1(T), but the level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the two strains was only 10.3 %. On the basis of these data, strain IVIA-Po-101(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Marinomonas, for which the name Marinomonas balearica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IVIA-Po-101(T) (=CECT 7378(T) =NCIMB 14432(T)). A third novel strain, IVIA-Po-185(T), was phylogenetically distant from all recognized Marinomonas species. It shared the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (97.4 %) with the type strain of Marinomonas pontica, but the level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the two strains was only 14.5 %. A differential chemotaxonomic marker of this strain in the genus Marinomonas is the presence of the fatty acid C(17 : 0) cyclo. Strain IVIA-Po-185(T) is thus considered to represent a second novel species of the genus, for which the name Marinomonas pollencensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IVIA-Po-185(T) (=CECT 7375(T) =NCIMB 14435(T)). An emended description of the genus Marinomonas

  7. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 transcriptome: acclimation to temperature, salinity, oxidative stress and mixotrophic growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C

  8. Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 Transcriptome: Acclimation to Temperature, Salinity, Oxidative Stress, and Mixotrophic Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high-light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities, and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C-source is present.

  9. Genome sequence of three Psychrobacter sp. strains with potential applications in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Aide; Romalde, Jesús L

    2017-06-01

    To date, the genus Psychrobacter consists of 37 recognized species isolated from different sources, however they are more frequently found in cold and other non-polar environments of low water activity. Some strains belonging to the genus have shown different enzymatic activities with potential applications in bioremediation or food industry. In the present study, the whole genome sequences of three Psychrobacter-like strains (C 20.9, Cmf 22.2 and Rd 27.2) isolated from reared clams in Galicia (Spain) are described. The sequenced genomes resulted in an assembly size of 3,143,782 bp for C 20.9 isolate, 3,168,467 bp for Cmf 22.2 isolate and 3,028,386 bp for Rd 27.2 isolate. Among the identified coding sequences of the genomes, mercury detoxification and biogeochemistry genes were found, as well as genes related to heavy metals and antibiotic resistance. Also virulence-related features were identified such as the siderophore vibrioferrin or an aerobactin-like siderophore. The phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene suggested that these strains may represent novel species of the Psychrobacter genus. The genome sequences of the Psychrobacter sp. strains have been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession numbers MRYA00000000 (Cmf 22.2), MRYB00000000 (Rd 27.2) and MRYC00000000 (C 20.9), and the sequences could be found at the site https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA353858.

  10. Genome sequence of three Psychrobacter sp. strains with potential applications in bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aide Lasa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To date, the genus Psychrobacter consists of 37 recognized species isolated from different sources, however they are more frequently found in cold and other non-polar environments of low water activity. Some strains belonging to the genus have shown different enzymatic activities with potential applications in bioremediation or food industry. In the present study, the whole genome sequences of three Psychrobacter-like strains (C 20.9, Cmf 22.2 and Rd 27.2 isolated from reared clams in Galicia (Spain are described. The sequenced genomes resulted in an assembly size of 3,143,782 bp for C 20.9 isolate, 3,168,467 bp for Cmf 22.2 isolate and 3,028,386 bp for Rd 27.2 isolate. Among the identified coding sequences of the genomes, mercury detoxification and biogeochemistry genes were found, as well as genes related to heavy metals and antibiotic resistance. Also virulence-related features were identified such as the siderophore vibrioferrin or an aerobactin-like siderophore. The phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene suggested that these strains may represent novel species of the Psychrobacter genus. The genome sequences of the Psychrobacter sp. strains have been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession numbers MRYA00000000 (Cmf 22.2, MRYB00000000 (Rd 27.2 and MRYC00000000 (C 20.9, and the sequences could be found at the site https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/PRJNA353858.

  11. sp

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vihar

    adopted as the first line drug. SP has few untoward effects if used carefully in therapeutic doses. Nausea, vomiting, generalized body weakness; diarrhea, skin rashes and hematological reactions are some of the associated side effects. The drug can cause severe skin reactions such as Steven Johnson's syndrome. This.

  12. Complete genome sequence of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. NIES-3756, a potentially useful strain for phytochrome-based bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Yuu; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Katayama, Mitsunori; Misawa, Naomi; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Shimura, Yohei; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kawachi, Masanobu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Eki, Toshihiko; Kanesaki, Yu

    2016-01-20

    To explore the diverse photoreceptors of cyanobacteria, we isolated Nostoc sp. strain NIES-3756 from soil at Mimomi-Park, Chiba, Japan, and determined its complete genome sequence. The Genome consists of one chromosome and two plasmids (total 6,987,571 bp containing no gaps). The NIES-3756 strain carries 7 phytochrome and 12 cyanobacteriochrome genes, which will facilitate the studies of phytochrome-based bioengineering. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Intracellular excision and reintegration dynamics of the ICEclc genomic island of Pseudomonas knackmussii sp. strain B13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchilo, Vladimir; Czechowska, Kamila; Pradervand, Nicolas; Minoia, Marco; Miyazaki, Ryo; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2009-06-01

    Genomic islands are DNA elements acquired by horizontal gene transfer that are common to a large number of bacterial genomes, which can contribute specific adaptive functions, e.g. virulence, metabolic capacities or antibiotic resistances. Some genomic islands are still self-transferable and display an intricate life-style, reminiscent of both bacteriophages and conjugative plasmids. Here we studied the dynamical process of genomic island excision and intracellular reintegration using the integrative and conjugative element ICEclc from Pseudomonas knackmussii B13 as model. By using self-transfer of ICEclc from strain B13 to Pseudomonas putida and Cupriavidus necator as recipients, we show that ICEclc can target a number of different tRNA(Gly) genes in a bacterial genome, but only those which carry the GCC anticodon. Two conditional traps were designed for ICEclc based on the attR sequence, and we could show that ICEclc will insert with different frequencies in such traps producing brightly fluorescent cells. Starting from clonal primary transconjugants we demonstrate that ICEclc is excising and reintegrating at detectable frequencies, even in the absence of recipient. Recombination site analysis provided evidence to explain the characteristics of a larger number of genomic island insertions observed in a variety of strains, including Bordetella petri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia.

  14. Taxonomy of haemolytic and/or proteolytic strains of the genus Acinetobacter with the proposal of Acinetobacter courvalinii sp. nov. (genomic species 14 sensu Bouvet & Jeanjean), Acinetobacter dispersus sp. nov. (genomic species 17), Acinetobacter modestus sp. nov., Acinetobacter proteolyticus sp. nov. and Acinetobacter vivianii sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Alexandr; Radolfova-Krizova, Lenka; Maixnerova, Martina; Vrestiakova, Eliska; Jezek, Petr; Sedo, Ondrej

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 40 haemolytic and/or proteolytic strains of the genus Acinetobacter which were previously classified into five putative species termed as genomic species 14BJ (n=9), genomic species 17 (n=9), taxon 18 (n=7), taxon 19 (n=6) and taxon 20 (n=9). The strains were recovered mostly from human clinical specimens or soil and water ecosystems and were highly diverse in geographical origin and time of isolation. Comparative analysis of the rpoB and gyrB gene sequences of all strains, and the whole-genome sequences of selected strains, showed that these putative species formed five respective, well-supported clusters within a distinct clade of the genus Acinetobacter which typically, although not exclusively, encompasses strains with strong haemolytic activity. The whole-genome-based average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values supported the species status of each of these clusters. Moreover, the distinctness and coherence of the clusters were supported by whole-cell profiling based on MALDI-TOF MS. Congruent with these findings were the results of metabolic and physiological testing. We conclude that the five putative taxa represent respective novel species, for which the names Acinetobacter courvalinii sp. nov. (type strain ANC 3623T=CCUG 67960T=CIP 110480T=CCM 8635T), Acinetobacter dispersus sp. nov. (type strain ANC 4105T=CCUG 67961T=CIP 110500T=CCM 8636T), Acinetobacter modestus sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 236T=CCUG 67964T=CIP 110444T=CCM 8639T), Acinetobacter proteolyticus sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 809T=CCUG 67965T=CIP 110482T = CCM 8640T) and Acinetobacter vivianii sp. nov. (type strain NIPH 2168T=CCUG 67967T=CIP 110483T=CCM 8642T) are proposed.

  15. Characterization of Burkholderia cepacia genomovar I as a potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Burkholderia cepacia genomovar I as a potential biocontrol agent of Ganoderma boninense in oil palm. ... to the species level based on Biolog® Identification System, and to carry out DNA fingerprinting for strain differentiation as well as differentiate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic human forms.

  16. Communication systems in the genus Burkholderia: global regulators and targets for novel antipathogenic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Pamela A; Malott, Rebecca J; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo

    2007-10-01

    The genus Burkholderia not only contains the primary pathogens Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei but also several species that have emerged as opportunistic pathogens in persons suffering from cystic fibrosis or chronic granulomatous disease and immunocompromised individuals. Burkholderia species utilize quorum-sensing (QS) systems that rely on N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules to express virulence factors and other functions in a population-density-dependent manner. Most Burkholderia species employ the CepIR QS system, which relies on N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone. However, some strains harbour multiple QS systems and produce numerous AHLs. QS systems have been demonstrated to be essential for full virulence in various infection models and, thus, these regulatory systems represent attractive targets for the development of novel therapeutics.

  17. Ageing of atrazine in manure amended soils assessed by bioavailability to Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Bælum, Jacob; Strobel, Bjarne W.

    2014-01-01

    Animal manure is applied to agricultural land in areas of high livestock production. In the present study, we evaluated ageing of atrazine in two topsoils with and without addition of manure and in one subsoil. Ageing was assessed as the bioavailability of atrazine to the atrazine mineralizing ba......-treated and untreated soil. The present study illustrates that not simply the organic carbon content influences adsorption and ageing of atrazine in soil but the origin and composition of organic matter plays an important role....... bacteria Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Throughout an ageing period of 90 days bioavailability was investigated at days 1, 10, 32, 60 and 90, where ~108 cells g−1 of the ADP strain was inoculated to the 14C-atrazine exposed soil and 14CO2 was collected over 7 days as a measure of mineralized atrazine. Even...... though the bioavailable residue decreased in all of the three soils as time proceeded, we found that ageing occurred faster in the topsoils rich in organic carbon than in subsoil. For one topsoil rich in organic carbon content, Simmelkær, we observed a higher degree of ageing when treated with manure...

  18. Premethylation of foreign DNA improves integrative transformation efficiency in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Yu, Jianping; Zhang, Weiwen; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2015-12-01

    Restriction digestion of foreign DNA is one of the key biological barriers against genetic transformation in microorganisms. To establish a high-efficiency transformation protocol in the model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (Synechocystis 6803), we investigated the effects of premethylation of foreign DNA on the integrative transformation of this strain. In this study, two type II methyltransferase-encoding genes, i.e., sll0729 (gene M) and slr0214 (gene C), were cloned from the chromosome of Synechocystis 6803 and expressed in Escherichia coli harboring an integration plasmid. After premethylation treatment in E. coli, the integration plasmid was extracted and used for transformation of Synechocystis 6803. The results showed that although expression of methyltransferase M had little impact on the transformation of Synechocystis 6803, expression of methyltransferase C resulted in 11- to 161-fold-higher efficiency in the subsequent integrative transformation of Synechocystis 6803. Effective expression of methyltransferase C, which could be achieved by optimizing the 5' untranslated region, was critical to efficient premethylation of the donor DNA and thus high transformation efficiency in Synechocystis 6803. Since premethylating foreign DNA prior to transforming Synechocystis avoids changing the host genetic background, the study thus provides an improved method for high-efficiency integrative transformation of Synechocystis 6803. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Enhancement of the potential to utilize octopine in the nonfluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain 92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, S.S.; Boivin, R.; Dion, P. (Univ. Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-08-01

    The nonfluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain 92 requires the presence of a supplementary carbon source for growth on octopine, whereas the spontaneous mutant RB100 has acquired the capacity to utilize this opine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Insertional mutagenesis of RB100 with transposon Tn5 generated mutants which were unable to grow on octopine and others which grew slowly on this substrate. Both types of mutants yielded revertants that had regained the ability to utilize octopine. Some of the revertants had lost the transposon, whereas in others the transposon was retained but with rearrangements of the insertion site. Genes of octopine catabolism from strain 92 were cloned on a cosmid vector to generate pK3. The clone pK3 conferred the ability to utilize octopine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source on the host Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Although they conferred an equivalent growth phenotype, the mutant genes carried by RB100 and the cloned genes on pK3 differed in their regulation. Utilization of ({sup 14}C)octopine was inducible by octopine in RB100 and was constitutive in KT2440(pK3).

  20. Identifying and sequencing a Mycobacterium sp. strain F4 as a potential bioremediation agent for quinclorac.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Li

    Full Text Available Quinclorac is a widely used herbicide in rice filed. Unfortunately, quinclorac residues are phytotoxic to many crops/vegetables. The degradation of quinclorac in nature is very slow. On the other hand, degradation of quinclorac using bacteria can be an effective and efficient method to reduce its contamination. In this study, we isolated a quinclorac bioremediation bacterium strain F4 from quinclorac contaminated soils. Based on morphological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, we identified strain F4 as Mycobacterium sp. We investigated the effects of temperature, pH, inoculation size and initial quinclorac concentration on growth and degrading efficiency of F4 and determined the optimal quinclorac degrading condition of F4. Under optimal degrading conditions, F4 degraded 97.38% of quinclorac from an initial concentration of 50 mg/L in seven days. Our indoor pot experiment demonstrated that the degradation products were non-phytotoxic to tobacco. After analyzing the quinclorac degradation products of F4, we proposed that F4 could employ two pathways to degrade quinclorac: one is through methylation, the other is through dechlorination. Furthermore, we reconstructed the whole genome of F4 through single molecular sequencing and de novo assembly. We identified 77 methyltransferases and eight dehalogenases in the F4 genome to support our hypothesized degradation path.

  1. Anilofos tolerance and its mineralization by the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PUPCCC 64.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D P Singh

    Full Text Available This study deals with anilofos tolerance and its mineralization by the common rice field cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PUPCCC 64. The organism tolerated anilofos up to 25 mg L(-1. The herbicide caused inhibitory effects on photosynthetic pigments of the test organism in a dose-dependent manner. The organism exhibited 60, 89, 96, 85 and 79% decrease in chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and phycoerythrin, respectively, in 20 mg L(-1 anilofos on day six. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase increased by 1.04 to 1.80 times over control cultures in presence of 20 mg L(-1 anilofos. Glutathione content decreased by 26% while proline content was unaffected by 20 mg L(-1 anilofos. The test organism showed intracellular uptake and metabolized the herbicide. Uptake of herbicide by test organism was fast during initial six hours followed by slow uptake until 120 hours. The organism exhibited maximum anilofos removal at 100 mg protein L(-1, pH 8.0 and 30°C. Its growth in phosphate deficient basal medium in the presence of anilofos (2.5 mg L(-1 indicated that herbicide was used by the strain PUPCCC 64 as a source of phosphate.

  2. Unique ultrastructure in the elementary body of Chlamydia sp. strain TWAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, E Y; Kuo, C C; Grayston, J T

    1987-08-01

    The ultrastructure of two prototype strains (TW-183 and AR-39) of Chlamydia sp. strain TWAR was described. The TWAR elementary body (EB) demonstrated a unique morphology and structure distinct from those of other chlamydial organisms. It was pleomorphic but typically pear shaped. The average size was 0.38 micron, with a long axis of 0.44 micron, a short axis of 0.31 micron, and a ratio of the long to the short axes of 1.42. The cytoplasmic mass was round, with an average diameter of 0.24 micron. There was a large periplasmic space. Small, round electron-dense bodies (0.05 micron in diameter), which were attached to the cytoplasm by a stringlike structure, were seen in the periplasmic space. These features are in contrast to those of other chlamydiae, which are typically round with a narrow or barely discernible periplasmic space. The TWAR reticulate body (RB) was morphologically and structurally similar to those of other Chlamydia species, having an average diameter of 0.51 micron and being circular in shape. The ultrastructural observations of the intracellular growth of TWAR in HeLa cells revealed that TWAR underwent the same developmental cycle as do other chlamydiae, i.e., transformation of EB to RB, multiplication by binary fission, and maturation by transformation of RB to EB via the intermediate-form stage.

  3. Burkholderia species associated with legumes of Chiapas, Mexico, exhibit stress tolerance and growth in aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León-Martínez, José A; Yañez-Ocampo, Gustavo; Wong-Villarreal, Arnoldo

    2017-08-29

    Leguminous plants have received special interest for the diversity of β-proteobacteria in their nodules and are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. In this study, 15 bacterial strains were isolated from the nodules of the following legumes: Indigofera thibaudiana, Mimosa diplotricha, Mimosa albida, Mimosa pigra, and Mimosa pudica, collected in 9 areas of Chiapas, Mexico. The strains were grouped into four profiles of genomic fingerprints through BOX-PCR and identified based on their morphology, API 20NE biochemical tests, sequencing of the 16S rRNA, nifH and nodC genes as bacteria of the Burkholderia genus, genetically related to Burkholderia phenoliruptrix, Burkholderia phymatum, Burkholderia sabiae, and Burkholderia tuberum. The Burkholderia strains were grown under stress conditions with 4% NaCl, 45°C, and benzene presence at 0.1% as the sole carbon source. This is the first report on the isolation of these nodulating species of the Burkholderia genus in legumes in Mexico. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple Mechanisms of Uranium Immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Peyton, Brent M.; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gerlach, Robin; Apel, William; Sani, Rajesh K.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Borch, Thomas

    2011-02-24

    Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non-growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy showed that U in the solid phase was present primarily as a non-uraninite U(IV) phase, whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI)-phosphate. In both bicarbonate and PIPES buffer, net release of cellular phosphate was measured to be lower than that observed in U-free controls suggesting simultaneous precipitation of U and PO3-4 . In PIPES, U(VI) phosphates formed a significant portion of U precipitates and mass balance estimates of U and P along with XAFS data corroborate this hypothesis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of samples from PIPES treatments indeed showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids with nanometer sized lath structures that contained U and P. In bicarbonate, however, more phosphate was removed than required to stoichiometrically balance the U(VI)/U(IV) fraction determined by XAFS, suggesting that U(IV) precipitated together with phosphate in this system. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, the dominant removal mechanism in both buffers was reduction to a non-uraninite U(IV) phase. Uranium

  5. Multiple mechanisms of uranium immobilization by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Boyanov, Maxim I; Peyton, Brent M; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gerlach, Robin; Apel, William A; Sani, Rajesh K; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kemner, Kenneth M; Borch, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Removal of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solution was studied using a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe, Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6, under anaerobic, non-growth conditions in bicarbonate and PIPES buffers. Inorganic phosphate was released by cells during the experiments providing ligands for formation of insoluble U(VI) phosphates. Phosphate release was most probably the result of anaerobic hydrolysis of intracellular polyphosphates accumulated by ES6 during aerobic growth. Microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) was also observed. However, the relative magnitudes of U(VI) removal by abiotic (phosphate-based) precipitation and microbial reduction depended on the buffer chemistry. In bicarbonate buffer, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy showed that U in the solid phase was present primarily as a non-uraninite U(IV) phase, whereas in PIPES buffer, U precipitates consisted primarily of U(VI)-phosphate. In both bicarbonate and PIPES buffer, net release of cellular phosphate was measured to be lower than that observed in U-free controls suggesting simultaneous precipitation of U and PO₄³⁻. In PIPES, U(VI) phosphates formed a significant portion of U precipitates and mass balance estimates of U and P along with XAFS data corroborate this hypothesis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of samples from PIPES treatments indeed showed both extracellular and intracellular accumulation of U solids with nanometer sized lath structures that contained U and P. In bicarbonate, however, more phosphate was removed than required to stoichiometrically balance the U(VI)/U(IV) fraction determined by XAFS, suggesting that U(IV) precipitated together with phosphate in this system. When anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), a known electron shuttle, was added to the experimental reactors, the dominant removal mechanism in both buffers was reduction to a non-uraninite U(IV) phase. Uranium

  6. Molecular cloning of the gene which encodes beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from a marine bacterium, Alteromonas sp. strain O-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujibo, H; Fujimoto, K; Tanno, H; Miyamoto, K; Kimura, Y; Imada, C; Okami, Y; Inamori, Y

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the periplasmic beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase (GlcNAcase B) from a marine Alteromonas sp. strain, O-7, was cloned and sequenced. The protein sequence of GlcNAcase B revealed a highly significant homology with Vibrio GlcNAcase and alpha- and beta-chains of human beta-hexosaminidase. PMID:7574618

  7. Molecular cloning of the gene which encodes beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase from a marine bacterium, Alteromonas sp. strain O-7.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsujibo, H; Fujimoto, K; Tanno, H; Miyamoto, K.; Kimura, Y.; Imada, C; Okami, Y; Inamori, Y

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the periplasmic beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase (GlcNAcase B) from a marine Alteromonas sp. strain, O-7, was cloned and sequenced. The protein sequence of GlcNAcase B revealed a highly significant homology with Vibrio GlcNAcase and alpha- and beta-chains of human beta-hexosaminidase.

  8. Preliminary Study and Improve the Production of Metabolites with Antifungal Activity by A Bacillus Sp Strain IBA 33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonieta Gordillo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites, isolated from decaying lemon fruits, were evaluated for the control of pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi (Penicillium digitatum, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium expansum, Aspergillus clavatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium moniliforme. These metabolites were recovered from Landy medium (LM without aminoacids. In order to optimize metabolites production the LM was modified by adding different concentrations and sources of amino acids and carbohydrates at different culture conditions.Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites efficacy to control fungi were evaluated with in vitro and in vivo assays. A. flavus growth inhibition was 52% with the metabolites of Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 recovered from LM (MBLM in vitro assays. MBLM supplemented with 0.5% glutamic acid, inhibited the growth of P. digitatum, G. candidum, A. clavatus, A. niger and F. moniliforme by 65%, 88.44%, 84%, 34% and 92% respectively. The highest inhibition of P. expansum was 45% with MBLM supplemented with 0.5% aspartic acid. Similar results were obtained in vivo assays. These results showed that Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites specificity against fungi depended on the composition of the LM.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Salinarchaeum sp. Strain HArcht-Bsk1T, Isolated from Hypersaline Lake Baskunchak, Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominova, I.N.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Kublanov, I.V.; Patrushev, M.V.; Toshchakova, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a novel halophilic archaeon, Salinarchaeum sp. strain HArcht-Bsk1T, was determined using next-generation sequencing. The genome comprises a 3,255,260-bp circular chromosome with a G+C content of 66.7%. Automatic annotation of the genome revealed a single rRNA operon,

  10. Cutinase-Like Enzyme from the Yeast Cryptococcus sp. Strain S-2 Hydrolyzes Polylactic Acid and Other Biodegradable Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Kazuo; Kamini, Numbi Ramudu; Ikeda, Hiroko; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2005-01-01

    A purified lipase from the yeast Cryptococcus sp. strain S-2 exhibited remote homology to proteins belonging to the cutinase family rather than to lipases. This enzyme could effectively degrade the high-molecular-weight compound polylactic acid, as well as other biodegradable plastics, including polybutylene succinate, poly (ɛ-caprolactone), and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). PMID:16269800

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Chryseobacterium sp. Strain GSE06, a Biocontrol Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Cucumber (Cucumis sativus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Ju; Park, Byeong Hyeok; Park, Hongjae

    2016-01-01

    Chryseobacterium sp. strain GSE06 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium against the destructive soilborne oomycete Phytophthora capsici, which causes Phytophthora blight of pepper. Here, we present its draft genome sequence, which contains genes related to biocontrol traits, such as colonization, antimicrobial activity, plant growth promotion, and abiotic or biotic stress adaptation. PMID:27313310

  12. Physicochemical Parameters for Growth of the Sea Ice Bacteria Glaciecola punicea ACAM 611T and Gelidibacter sp. Strain IC158

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, D. S.; Greenhill, A. R.; Shadbolt, C. T.; Ross, T.; McMeekin, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    The water activity and pH ranges for growth of Glaciecola punicea (a psychrophile) were extended when this organism was grown at suboptimal rather than optimal temperatures. No such extension was observed for Gelidibacter sp. strain IC158 (a psychrotolerant bacterium) at analogous temperatures. Salinity and pH may be primary physicochemical parameters controlling bacterial community development in sea ice. PMID:10427082

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of MCPA-Degrading Sphingomonas sp. Strain ERG5, Isolated from a Groundwater Aquifer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Kot, Witold; Sørensen, Sebastian R

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain ERG5 was isolated from a bacterial community, originating from a groundwater aquifer polluted with low pesticide concentrations. This bacterium degrades 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in a wide spectrum of concentrations and has been shown to function in bioaug...... in bioaugmented sand filters. Genes associated with MCPA degradation are situated on a putative conjugative plasmid....

  14. Preliminary Study and Improve the Production of Metabolites with Antifungal Activity by A Bacillus Sp Strain IBA 33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonieta Gordillo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites, isolated from decaying lemon fruits, were evaluated for the control of pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi (Penicillium digitatum, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium expansum, Aspergillus clavatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium moniliforme. These metabolites were recovered from Landy medium (LM without aminoacids. In order to optimize metabolites production the LM was modified by adding different concentrations and sources of amino acids and carbohydrates at different culture conditions. Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites efficacy to control fungi were evaluated with in vitro and in vivo assays. A. flavus growth inhibition was 52% with the metabolites of Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 recovered from LM (MBLM in vitro assays. MBLM supplemented with 0.5% glutamic acid, inhibited the growth of P. digitatum, G. candidum, A. clavatus, A. niger and F. moniliforme by 65%, 88.44%, 84%, 34% and 92% respectively. The highest inhibition of P. expansum was 45% with MBLM supplemented with 0.5% aspartic acid. Similar results were obtained in vivo assays. These results showed that Bacillus sp strain IBA 33 metabolites specificity against fungi depended on the composition of the LM.

  15. A 1,3-1,4-β-glucan utilization regulon in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia Chow; Young Sik Kim; Mun Su Rhee; Neha Sawhney; Franz J. St. John; Guang Nong; John D. Rice; James F. Preston

    2016-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 (Paenibacillus JDR-2) secretes a multimodular cell-associated glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) endoxylanase (XynA10A1) that catalyzes the depolymerization of methylglucuronoxylan (MeGXn) and rapidly assimilates the products of depolymerization....

  16. Growth of Arthrobacter sp. Strain JBH1 on Nitroglycerin as the Sole Source of Carbon and Nitrogen ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, Johana; Spain, Jim C.; Hughes, Joseph B.

    2010-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 was isolated from nitroglycerin-contaminated soil by selective enrichment. Detection of transient intermediates and simultaneous adaptation studies with potential intermediates indicated that the degradation pathway involves the conversion of nitroglycerin to glycerol via 1,2-dinitroglycerin and 1-mononitroglycerin, with concomitant release of nitrite. Glycerol then serves as the source of carbon and energy. PMID:20061454

  17. Growth of Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 on nitroglycerin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, Johana; Spain, Jim C; Hughes, Joseph B

    2010-03-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 was isolated from nitroglycerin-contaminated soil by selective enrichment. Detection of transient intermediates and simultaneous adaptation studies with potential intermediates indicated that the degradation pathway involves the conversion of nitroglycerin to glycerol via 1,2-dinitroglycerin and 1-mononitroglycerin, with concomitant release of nitrite. Glycerol then serves as the source of carbon and energy.

  18. Alginate-Dependent Gene Expression Mechanism in Sphingomonas sp. Strain A1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Chie; Takase, Ryuichi; Momma, Keiko; Maruyama, Yukie; Murata, Kousaku

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain A1, a Gram-negative bacterium, directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm through a periplasmic alginate-binding protein-dependent ATP-binding cassette transporter. The polysaccharide is degraded to monosaccharides via the formation of oligosaccharides by endo- and exotype alginate lyases. The strain A1 proteins for alginate uptake and degradation are encoded in both strands of a genetic cluster in the bacterial genome and inducibly expressed in the presence of alginate. Here we show the function of the alginate-dependent transcription factor AlgO and its mode of action on the genetic cluster and alginate oligosaccharides. A putative gene within the genetic cluster seems to encode a transcription factor-like protein (AlgO). Mutant strain A1 (ΔAlgO mutant) cells with a disrupted algO gene constitutively produced alginate-related proteins. DNA microarray analysis indicated that wild-type cells inducibly transcribed the genetic cluster only in the presence of alginate, while ΔAlgO mutant cells constitutively expressed the genetic cluster. A gel mobility shift assay showed that AlgO binds to the specific intergenic region between algO and algS (algO-algS). Binding of AlgO to the algO-algS intergenic region diminished with increasing alginate oligosaccharides. These results demonstrated a novel alginate-dependent gene expression mechanism. In the absence of alginate, AlgO binds to the algO-algS intergenic region and represses the expression of both strands of the genetic cluster, while in the presence of alginate, AlgO dissociates from the algO-algS intergenic region via binding to alginate oligosaccharides produced through the lyase reaction and subsequently initiates transcription of the genetic cluster. This is the first report on the mechanism by which alginate regulates the expression of the gene cluster. PMID:24816607

  19. Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase production by new Bacillus sp. strains isolated from brazilian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menocci, Vivian; Goulart, Antonio José; Adalberto, Paulo Roberto; Tavano, Olga Luisa; Marques, Daniela Parreira; Contiero, Jonas; Monti, Rubens

    2008-01-01

    Three strains of Bacillus sp. (BACRP, BACNC-1 and BACAR) were isolated from soil adhered to cassava husk. CGTase specific activity for the three isolated strains was higher when cultivated at 40°C. Potato starch, cassava starch, maltodextrin and glucose were used as carbon source and growth temperatures varied from 25 to 55°C. The three isolates presented higher CGTase specific activity when cultivated with potato starch at 40°C. Isolated BACRP and BACAR presented specific activity of 4.0×10–3 and 2.2×10–3 U/mg prot at pH 7.0, respectively, when cultivated in mediums added with NaCl 2%; at pH 10,0 their activities were of 3.4×10–3 and 3.0×10–3 U/mg prot, respectively, in the same concentration of NaCl. On the other hand, the isolated BACNC-1 presented activity specific of 2.4×10–3 U/mg prot when cultivated at pH 7.0 added of NaCl 1%, and at pH 10.0 the specific activity was of 3.4×10–3 U/mg prot without NaCl addition. This work also showed the presence of cyclodextrins formed during fermentation process and that precipitation with acetone or lyophilization followed by dialysis was efficient at removing CDs (cyclodextrins), thus, eliminating interference in the activity assays. The enzyme produced by the BACAR strain was partially purified and β-CD was liberated as a reaction product. PMID:24031289

  20. Geobacter lovleyi sp. nov. Strain SZ, a Novel Metal-Reducing and Tetrachloroethene-Dechlorinating Bacterium†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Youlboong; Fletcher, Kelly E.; Ritalahti, Kirsti M.; Apkarian, Robert P.; Ramos-Hernández, Natalia; Sanford, Robert A.; Mesbah, Noha M.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2006-01-01

    A bacterial isolate, designated strain SZ, was obtained from noncontaminated creek sediment microcosms based on its ability to derive energy from acetate oxidation coupled to tetrachloroethene (PCE)-to-cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) dechlorination (i.e., chlororespiration). Hydrogen and pyruvate served as alternate electron donors for strain SZ, and the range of electron acceptors included (reduced products are given in brackets) PCE and trichloroethene [cis-DCE], nitrate [ammonium], fumarate [succinate], Fe(III) [Fe(II)], malate [succinate], Mn(IV) [Mn(II)], U(VI) [U(IV)], and elemental sulfur [sulfide]. PCE and soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) were reduced at rates of 56.5 and 164 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1, respectively, with acetate as the electron donor. Alternate electron acceptors, such as U(VI) and nitrate, did not inhibit PCE dechlorination and were consumed concomitantly. With PCE, Fe(III) (as ferric citrate), and nitrate as electron acceptors, H2 was consumed to threshold concentrations of 0.08 ± 0.03 nM, 0.16 ± 0.07 nM, and 0.5 ± 0.06 nM, respectively, and acetate was consumed to 3.0 ± 2.1 nM, 1.2 ± 0.5 nM, and 3.6 ± 0.25 nM, respectively. Apparently, electron acceptor-specific acetate consumption threshold concentrations exist, suggesting that similar to the hydrogen threshold model, the measurement of acetate threshold concentrations offers an additional diagnostic tool to delineate terminal electron-accepting processes in anaerobic subsurface environments. Genetic and phenotypic analyses classify strain SZ as the type strain of the new species, Geobacter lovleyi sp. nov., with Geobacter (formerly Trichlorobacter) thiogenes as the closest relative. Furthermore, the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from PCE-dechlorinating consortia and chloroethene-contaminated subsurface environments suggests that Geobacter lovleyi belongs to a distinct, dechlorinating clade within the metal-reducing Geobacter group. Substrate versatility

  1. Geobacter lovleyi sp. nov. strain SZ, a novel metal-reducing and tetrachloroethene-dechlorinating bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Youlboong; Fletcher, Kelly E; Ritalahti, Kirsti M; Apkarian, Robert P; Ramos-Hernández, Natalia; Sanford, Robert A; Mesbah, Noha M; Löffler, Frank E

    2006-04-01

    A bacterial isolate, designated strain SZ, was obtained from noncontaminated creek sediment microcosms based on its ability to derive energy from acetate oxidation coupled to tetrachloroethene (PCE)-to-cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) dechlorination (i.e., chlororespiration). Hydrogen and pyruvate served as alternate electron donors for strain SZ, and the range of electron acceptors included (reduced products are given in brackets) PCE and trichloroethene [cis-DCE], nitrate [ammonium], fumarate [succinate], Fe(III) [Fe(II)], malate [succinate], Mn(IV) [Mn(II)], U(VI) [U(IV)], and elemental sulfur [sulfide]. PCE and soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) were reduced at rates of 56.5 and 164 nmol min(-1) mg of protein(-1), respectively, with acetate as the electron donor. Alternate electron acceptors, such as U(VI) and nitrate, did not inhibit PCE dechlorination and were consumed concomitantly. With PCE, Fe(III) (as ferric citrate), and nitrate as electron acceptors, H(2) was consumed to threshold concentrations of 0.08 +/- 0.03 nM, 0.16 +/- 0.07 nM, and 0.5 +/- 0.06 nM, respectively, and acetate was consumed to 3.0 +/- 2.1 nM, 1.2 +/- 0.5 nM, and 3.6 +/- 0.25 nM, respectively. Apparently, electron acceptor-specific acetate consumption threshold concentrations exist, suggesting that similar to the hydrogen threshold model, the measurement of acetate threshold concentrations offers an additional diagnostic tool to delineate terminal electron-accepting processes in anaerobic subsurface environments. Genetic and phenotypic analyses classify strain SZ as the type strain of the new species, Geobacter lovleyi sp. nov., with Geobacter (formerly Trichlorobacter) thiogenes as the closest relative. Furthermore, the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from PCE-dechlorinating consortia and chloroethene-contaminated subsurface environments suggests that Geobacter lovleyi belongs to a distinct, dechlorinating clade within the metal-reducing Geobacter group. Substrate

  2. Burkholderia species infections in patients with cystic fibrosis in British Columbia, Canada. 30 years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlosnik, James E A; Zhou, Guohai; Brant, Rollin; Henry, Deborah A; Hird, Trevor J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Chilvers, Mark A; Wilcox, Pearce; Speert, David P

    2015-01-01

    We have been collecting Burkholderia species bacteria from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) for the last 30 years. During this time, our understanding of their multispecies taxonomy and infection control has evolved substantially. To evaluate the long-term (30 year) epidemiology and clinical outcome of Burkholderia infection in CF, and fully define the risks associated with infection by each species. Isolates from Burkholderia-positive patients (n=107) were speciated and typed annually for each infected patient. Microbiological and clinical data were evaluated by thorough review of patient charts, and statistical analyses performed to define significant epidemiological factors. Before 1995, the majority of new Burkholderia infections were caused by epidemic clones of Burkholderia cenocepacia. After implementation of new infection control measures in 1995, Burkholderia multivorans became the most prevalent species. Survival analysis showed that patients with CF infected with B. cenocepacia had a significantly worse outcome than those with B. multivorans, and a novel finding was that, after Burkholderia infection, the prognosis for females was significantly worse than for males. B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia have been the predominant Burkholderia species infecting people with CF in Vancouver. The implementation of infection control measures were successful in preventing new acquisition of epidemic strains of B. cenocepacia, leaving nonclonal B. multivorans as the most prevalent species. Historically, survival after infection with B. cenocepacia has been significantly worse than B. multivorans infection, and, of new significance, we show that females tend toward worse clinical outcomes.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a Burkholderia mallei Isolate Originating from a Glanderous Horse from the Kingdom of Bahrain

    OpenAIRE

    Elschner, Mandy C; Thomas, Prasad; Melzer, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a zoonotic agent causing glanders, a notifiable disease in equines. During the past decades glanders emerged, and the Kingdom of Bahrain reported outbreaks to the World Organization of Animal Health in 2010 and 2011. This paper presents the complete genome sequence of the Burkholderia mallei strain 11RR2811 Bahrain1.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Burkholderia mallei Isolate Originating from a Glanderous Horse from the Kingdom of Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschner, Mandy C; Thomas, Prasad; Melzer, Falk

    2016-12-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a zoonotic agent causing glanders, a notifiable disease in equines. During the past decades glanders emerged, and the Kingdom of Bahrain reported outbreaks to the World Organization of Animal Health in 2010 and 2011. This paper presents the complete genome sequence of the Burkholderia mallei strain 11RR2811 Bahrain1. Copyright © 2016 Elschner et al.

  5. Unusual distribution of Burkholderia cepacia complex species in Danish cystic fibrosis clinics may stem from restricted transmission between patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Fenger, Mette G

    2010-01-01

    Forty-four of 48 Burkholderia cepacia complex strains cultured from Danish cystic fibrosis patients were Burkholderia multivorans, a distribution of species that has not been reported before. Although cases of cross infections were demonstrated, no major epidemic clone was found. The species...

  6. Effects of nitrogen and carbon sources on the production of inulinase from strain Bacillus sp. SG113

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrailov Simeon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the carbon and nitrogen substrates on the growth of Bacillus sp. SG113 strain were studied. The use of organic nitrogen sources (peptone, beef extract, yeast extract, casein leads to rapid cellular growth and the best results for the Bacillus strain were obtained with casein hydrolysate. From the inorganic nitrogen sources studied, the (NH4 2SO4 proved to be the best nitrogen source. Casein hydrolysate and (NH4 2SO4 stimulated the invertase synthesis. In the presence of Jerusalem artichoke, onion and garlic extracts as carbon sources the strain synthesized from 6 to 10 times more inulinase.

  7. Selection of a new Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain for the biological control of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo PUOPOLO

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent pseudomonads possess several physiological characteristics exploitable for the biological control of phytopathogenic fungi. A group of 11 pseudomonads able to inhibit tomato pathogenic fungi in vitro were identified using the Biolog test and the phylogenetic analysis of recA. Strain M71 of Pseudomonas chlororaphis was selected as a new potential biocontrol agent. This strain drastically reduced Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici pathogenicity on tomato plantlets in seed assays and greenhouse trials. Moreover, the strain produced several important secondary metabolites, including proteases, siderophores and antibiotics. The presence of a region involved in phenazine production and the biosynthesis of N-acyl homoserine lactones were also assessed.

  8. Identification of sesquiterpene synthases from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Sean A; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Hoye, Thomas R; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2008-09-01

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of natural products and are known to produce terpenoids. These bacteria are the major source of the musty-smelling terpenes geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, which are found in many natural water supplies; however, no terpene synthases have been characterized from these organisms to date. Here, we describe the characterization of three sesquiterpene synthases identified in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (terpene synthase NS1) and Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 (terpene synthases NP1 and NP2). The second terpene synthase in N. punctiforme (NP2) is homologous to fusion-type sesquiterpene synthases from Streptomyces spp. shown to produce geosmin via an intermediate germacradienol. The enzymes were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and their terpene products were structurally identified as germacrene A (from NS1), the eudesmadiene 8a-epi-alpha-selinene (from NP1), and germacradienol (from NP2). The product of NP1, 8a-epi-alpha-selinene, so far has been isolated only from termites, in which it functions as a defense compound. Terpene synthases NP1 and NS1 are part of an apparent minicluster that includes a P450 and a putative hybrid two-component protein located downstream of the terpene synthases. Coexpression of P450 genes with their adjacent located terpene synthase genes in E. coli demonstrates that the P450 from Nostoc sp. can be functionally expressed in E. coli when coexpressed with a ferredoxin gene and a ferredoxin reductase gene from Nostoc and that the enzyme oxygenates the NS1 terpene product germacrene A. This represents to the best of our knowledge the first example of functional expression of a cyanobacterial P450 in E. coli.

  9. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Mimosa asperata - nodulating Cupriavidus sp. strain AMP6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Parker, Matthew; Van Berkum, Peter; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T B K; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain AMP6 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Mimosa asperata collected in Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, in 2005. Mimosa asperata is the only legume described so far to exclusively associates with Cupriavidus symbionts. Moreover, strain AMP6 represents an early-diverging lineage within the symbiotic Cupriavidus group and has the capacity to develop an effective nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with three other species of Mimosa. Therefore, the genome of Cupriavidus sp. strain AMP6 enables comparative analyses of symbiotic trait evolution in this genus and here we describe the general features, together with sequence and annotation. The 7,579,563 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 260 scaffolds of 262 contigs, contains 7,033 protein-coding genes and 97 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  10. Dinitrogenase-Driven Photobiological Hydrogen Production Combats Oxidative Stress in Cyanothece sp. Strain ATCC 51142

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Charania, Moiz A.; Hill, Eric A.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Wright, Aaron T.; Nojiri, H.

    2016-10-14

    ABSTRACT

    Photobiologically synthesized hydrogen (H2) gas is carbon neutral to produce and clean to combust, making it an ideal biofuel.Cyanothecesp. strain ATCC 51142 is a cyanobacterium capable of performing simultaneous oxygenic photosynthesis and H2production, a highly perplexing phenomenon because H2evolving enzymes are O2sensitive. We employed a system-levelin vivochemoproteomic profiling approach to explore the cellular dynamics of protein thiol redox and how thiol redox mediates the function of the dinitrogenase NifHDK, an enzyme complex capable of aerobic hydrogenase activity. We found that NifHDK responds to intracellular redox conditions and may act as an emergency electron valve to prevent harmful reactive oxygen species formation in concert with other cell strategies for maintaining redox homeostasis. These results provide new insight into cellular redox dynamics useful for advancing photolytic bioenergy technology and reveal a new understanding for the biological function of NifHDK.

    IMPORTANCEHere, we demonstrate that high levels of hydrogen synthesis can be induced as a protection mechanism against oxidative stress via the dinitrogenase enzyme complex inCyanothecesp. strain ATCC 51142. This is a previously unknown feature of cyanobacterial dinitrogenase, and we anticipate that it may represent a strategy to exploit cyanobacteria for efficient and scalable hydrogen production. We utilized a chemoproteomic approach to capture thein situdynamics of reductant partitioning within the cell, revealing proteins and reactive thiols that may be involved in redox sensing and signaling. Additionally, this method is widely applicable across biological systems to achieve a greater understanding of how cells

  11. Growth, biomass, and chlorophyll-a and carotenoid content of Nannochloropsis sp. strain BJ17 under different light intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Fakhri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT  Nannochloropsis sp. has been identified as sources of live feed and pigment in aquaculture. To increase the production, the optimal environmental conditions for microalgae are required. Light intensity is one of the important factors that significantly affects the biomass and pigment of microalgae. The study aimed to determine the effect of light intensity (1,500; 3,000; and 4,500 lux on growth, biomass production, chlorophyll-a, and carotenoid content of Nannochloropsis sp. strain BJ17. The results showed that different light intensities significantly affected the growth, biomass, chlorophyll-a and carotenoid contents of Nannochloropsis sp. strain BJ17. Increasing light intensity resulted in the increase of the growth rate, biomass, chlorophyll-a, and carotenoid contents of Nannochloropsis sp. strain BJ17. The cell achieved the highest specific growth rate of 1.729 %/day and the cell concentration of 43.333×106 cell/mL at a light intensity of 4,500 lux. The highest chlorophyll-a and carotenoid concentrations of algae were obtained at 4,500 lux (8.304 μg/mL and 3.892 μg/mL, respectively. This study suggested that increasing light intensity led to the increase in the growth, biomass, chlorophyll-a, and carotenoid content of Nannochloropsis sp. strain BJ17. Keywords: carotenoid, chlorophyll, biomass, growth rate, light intensity  ABSTRAK  Nannochloropsis sp. diketahui sebagai sumber pakan alami dan pigmen pada budidaya perikanan. Budidaya pada kondisi lingkungan yang optimal diperlukan untuk meningkatkan produksi mikroalga. Intensitas cahaya merupakan salah satu faktor esensial yang secara signifikan mempengaruhi biomassa dan pigmen mikroalga. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menentukan pengaruh intensitas cahaya yang berbeda (1.500, 3.000, and 4.500 lux terhadap pertumbuhan, produksi biomassa, klorofil-a, dan karotenoid Nannochloropsis sp. strain BJ17. Hasil menunjukkan bahwa intensitas cahaya yang berbeda berpengaruh secara

  12. Characterization of 17 strains belonging to the Mycobacterium simiae complex and description of Mycobacterium paraense sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco da Costa, Ana R; Fedrizzi, Tarcisio; Lopes, Maria L; Pecorari, Monica; Oliveira da Costa, Wana L; Giacobazzi, Elisabetta; da Costa Bahia, Jeann R; De Sanctis, Veronica; Batista Lima, Karla V; Bertorelli, Roberto; Grottola, Antonella; Fabio, Anna; Mariottini, Alessandro; Ferretti, Pamela; Di Leva, Francesca; Fregni Serpini, Giulia; Tagliazucchi, Sara; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Jousson, Olivier; Segata, Nicola; Tortoli, Enrico

    2015-02-01

    Fourteen mycobacterial strains isolated from pulmonary samples of independent patients in the state of Pará (Brazil), and three strains isolated in Italy, were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Thorough genetic investigation, including whole-genome sequencing, demonstrated that the strains belong to the M. simiae complex, being most closely related to Mycobacterium interjectum. For 14 of the strains, evidence emerged supporting their inclusion in a previously unreported species of the genus Mycobacterium, for which the name Mycobacterium paraense sp. nov. is proposed (type strain, IEC26(T) = DSM 46749(T) = CCUG 66121(T)). The novel species is characterized by slow growth, unpigmented or pale yellow scotochromogenic colonies, and a HPLC mycolic acid profile different from other known mycobacteria. In different genetic regions, high sequence microheterogeneity was detected. © 2015 IUMS.

  13. Cloning of a Novel Arylamidase Gene from Paracoccus sp. Strain FLN-7 That Hydrolyzes Amide Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Yin, Jin-Gang; Hang, Bao-Jian; Cai, Shu; Li, Shun-Peng

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial isolate Paracoccus sp. strain FLN-7 hydrolyzes amide pesticides such as diflubenzuron, propanil, chlorpropham, and dimethoate through amide bond cleavage. A gene, ampA, encoding a novel arylamidase that catalyzes the amide bond cleavage in the amide pesticides was cloned from the strain. ampA contains a 1,395-bp open reading frame that encodes a 465-amino-acid protein. AmpA was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and homogenously purified using Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. AmpA is a homodimer with an isoelectric point of 5.4. AmpA displays maximum enzymatic activity at 40°C and a pH of between 7.5 and 8.0, and it is very stable at pHs ranging from 5.5 to 10.0 and at temperatures up to 50°C. AmpA efficiently hydrolyzes a variety of secondary amine compounds such as propanil, 4-acetaminophenol, propham, chlorpropham, dimethoate, and omethoate. The most suitable substrate is propanil, with Km and kcat values of 29.5 μM and 49.2 s−1, respectively. The benzoylurea insecticides (diflubenzuron and hexaflumuron) are also hydrolyzed but at low efficiencies. No cofactor is needed for the hydrolysis activity. AmpA shares low identities with reported arylamidases (less than 23%), forms a distinct lineage from closely related arylamidases in the phylogenetic tree, and has different biochemical characteristics and catalytic kinetics with related arylamidases. The results in the present study suggest that AmpA is a good candidate for the study of the mechanism for amide pesticide hydrolysis, genetic engineering of amide herbicide-resistant crops, and bioremediation of amide pesticide-contaminated environments. PMID:22544249

  14. Detection of diazotrophy in the acetylene-fermenting anaerobe Pelobacter sp. strain SFB93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, Denise M.; Baesman, Shaun; Sutton, John M.; Fierst, Janna L.; Mumford, Adam; Shrestha, Yesha; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Bennett, Stacy; Dunlap, Darren S.; Haase, Karl B.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2017-01-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) is a trace constituent of the present Earth's oxidizing atmosphere, reflecting a mixture of terrestrial and marine emissions from anthropogenic, biomass-burning, and unidentified biogenic sources. Fermentation of acetylene was serendipitously discovered during C2H2 block assays of N2O reductase, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on C2H2 via acetylene hydratase (AH). AH is a W-containing, catabolic, low-redox-potential enzyme that, unlike nitrogenase (N2ase), is specific for acetylene. Acetylene fermentation is a rare metabolic process that is well characterized only in P. acetylenicus DSM3246 and DSM3247 and Pelobacter sp. strain SFB93. To better understand the genetic controls for AH activity, we sequenced the genomes of the three acetylene-fermenting Pelobacter strains. Genome assembly and annotation produced three novel genomes containing gene sequences for AH, with two copies being present in SFB93. In addition, gene sequences for all five compulsory genes for iron-molybdenum N2ase were also present in the three genomes, indicating the cooccurrence of two acetylene transformation pathways. Nitrogen fixation growth assays showed that DSM3426 could ferment acetylene in the absence of ammonium, but no ethylene was produced. However, SFB93 degraded acetylene and, in the absence of ammonium, produced ethylene, indicating an active N2ase. Diazotrophic growth was observed under N2 but not in experimental controls incubated under argon. SFB93 exhibits acetylene fermentation and nitrogen fixation, the only known biochemical mechanisms for acetylene transformation. Our results indicate complex interactions between N2ase and AH and suggest novel evolutionary pathways for these relic enzymes from early Earth to modern days.

  15. PERFORMA FOTOSINTESIS Kappaphycus sp. (strain Sumba) YANG DIUKUR BERDASARKAN EVOLUSI OKSIGEN TERLARUT PADA BEBERAPA TINGKAT SUHU DAN CAHAYA

    OpenAIRE

    Lideman Lideman; Asda Laining

    2015-01-01

    Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh suhu dan cahaya terhadap laju fotosintesis Kappaphycus sp. (strain Sumba) yang diukur berdasarkan perubahan oksigen terlarut. Pengukuran laju fotosintesis Kappaphycus sp. pertama-tama dilakukan pada suhu 20oC, 24oC, 28oC, dan 32oC pada tingkat cahaya 353 μmol photons m-2 s-1 untuk mendapatkan kurva fotosintesis versus suhu (kurva P-T). Selanjutnya, pengukuran laju fotosintesis dilakukan pada suhu 20oC, 24oC, dan 28oC dengan intensitas cahaya ...

  16. Cloning and characterization of two xyloglucanases from Paenibacillus sp. strain KM21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Katsuro; Nakai, Tomonori; Kameda, Yoshiro; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Yasushi

    2005-12-01

    Two xyloglucan-specific endo-beta-1,4-glucanases (xyloglucanases [XEGs]), XEG5 and XEG74, with molecular masses of 40 kDa and 105 kDa, respectively, were isolated from the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus sp. strain KM21, which degrades tamarind seed xyloglucan. The genes encoding these XEGs were cloned and sequenced. Based on their amino acid sequences, the catalytic domains of XEG5 and XEG74 were classified in the glycoside hydrolase families 5 and 74, respectively. XEG5 is the first xyloglucanase belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 5. XEG5 lacks a carbohydrate-binding module, while XEG74 has an X2 module and a family 3 type carbohydrate-binding module at its C terminus. The two XEGs were expressed in Escherichia coli, and recombinant forms of the enzymes were purified and characterized. Both XEGs had endoglucanase active only toward xyloglucan and not toward Avicel, carboxymethylcellulose, barley beta-1,3/1,4-glucan, or xylan. XEG5 is a typical endo-type enzyme that randomly cleaves the xyloglucan main chain, while XEG74 has dual endo- and exo-mode activities or processive endo-mode activity. XEG5 digested the xyloglucan oligosaccharide XXXGXXXG to produce XXXG, whereas XEG74 digestion of XXXGXXXG resulted in XXX, XXXG, and GXXXG, suggesting that this enzyme cleaves the glycosidic bond of unbranched Glc residues. Analyses using various oligosaccharide structures revealed that unique structures of xyloglucan oligosaccharides can be prepared with XEG74.

  17. Toluene and ethylbenzene oxidation by purified naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K; Gibson, D T

    1996-01-01

    Purified naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 oxidized toluene to benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde by reactions involving benzylic monooxygenation and dioxygen-dependent alcohol oxidation, respectively. Xylene and nitrotoluene isomers were also oxidized to substituted benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde derivatives. NDO oxidized ethylbenzene sequentially through (S)-1-phenethyl alcohol (77% enantiomeric excess) and acetophenone to 2-hydroxyacetophenone. In addition, NDO also oxidized ethylbenzene through styrene to (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol (74% enantiomeric excess) by reactions involving desaturation and dihydroxylation, respectively. Isotope experiments with 18O2, H2 18O, and D2O suggest that 1-phenethyl alcohol is oxidized to acetophenone by a minor reaction involving desaturation followed by tautomerization. The major reaction in the conversion of 1-phenethyl alcohol and benzyl alcohol to acetophenone and benzaldehyde, respectively, probably involves monohydroxylation to form a gem-diol intermediate which stereospecifically loses the incoming hydroxyl group to leave the carbonyl product. These results are compared with similar reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P-450. PMID:8795196

  18. A debranching enzyme IsoM of Corallococcus sp. strain EGB with potential in starch processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhoukun; Ji, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Ye, Xianfeng; Wang, Ting; Luo, Xue; Huang, Yan; Cao, Hui; Cui, Zhongli; Kong, Yi

    2017-12-01

    Interest in use of resistant starch and maltooligosaccharides as functional foods and biopreservatives has grown in recent years. In this research, a novel debranching enzyme IsoM from Corallococcus sp. strain EGB was identified and expressed in P. pastoris GS115. Sequence alignments showed that IsoM was typical isoamylase with the specific activity up to 70,600U/mg, which belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH 13). Enzymatic reaction pattern demonstrated that IsoM has high debranching efficiency against α-1,6-glycosidic bond of branched starch, and exhibited no activity towards α-1,4-glycosidic bond. The potential application of IsoM in starch processing was determined. IsoM was a potential candidate for the production of RS (70.9%) from raw starch, which was comparable with the commercial pullulanase (Promozyme(®)D2). IsoM also improved the maltohexaose yield in combination with maltohexaose-producing α-amylase AmyM (KM114206), the maltohexaose yield was improved by 63.3% compared with 21.9% improvement of Promozyme(®)D2. The results of RS production and combination with other amylases suggesting that IsoM is a potential candidate for the efficient conversion of starch. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Anti-Parasitic Compounds from Streptomyces sp. Strains Isolated from Mediterranean Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidrun Moll

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycetes are prolific producers of pharmacologically important compounds accounting for about 70% of the naturally derived antibiotics that are currently in clinical use. In this study, we report on the isolation of Streptomyces sp. strains from Mediterranean sponges, on their secondary metabolite production and on their screening for anti-infective activities. Bioassay-guided isolation and purification yielded three previously known compounds namely, cyclic depsipeptide valinomycin, indolocarbazole alkaloid staurosporine and butenolide. This is the first report of the isolation of valinomycin from a marine source. These compounds exhibited novel anti-parasitic activities specifically against Leishmania major (valinomycin IC50 < 0.11 µM; staurosporine IC50 5.30 µM and Trypanosoma brucei brucei (valinomycin IC50 0.0032 µM; staurosporine IC50 0.022 µM; butenolide IC50 31.77 µM. These results underscore the potential of marine actinomycetes to produce bioactive compounds as well as the re-evaluation of previously known compounds for novel anti-infective activities.

  20. Trehalose promotes Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL colonization in activated sludge under tetrahydrofuran (THF) stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhixing; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Haixia; Lv, Zhenmei

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the role of compatible solutes in changing the microbial community structure in bioaugmentation systems. In this study, we investigated the influence of trehalose as a biostimulant on the microbial community in tetrahydrofuran (THF)-treated wastewater bioaugmentation systems with Rhodococcus sp. YYL. Functional gene profile changes were used to study the variation in the microbial community. Soluble di-iron monooxygenases (SDIMO), particularly group-5 SDIMOs (i.e., tetrahydrofuran and propane monooxygenases), play a significant role in the initiation of the ring cleavage of tetrahydrofuran. Group-5 SDIMOs genes are enriched upon trehalose addition, and exogenous tetrahydrofuran monooxygenase (thmA) genes can successfully colonize bioaugmentation systems. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) have a significant role in catalyzing the region- and stereospecific oxidation of non-activated hydrocarbons, and THF was reported to inhibit P450s in the environment. The CYP153 family was chosen as a representative P450 to study the inhibitory effects of THF. The results demonstrated that CYP153 family genes exhibited significant changes upon THF treatment and that trehalose helped maintain a rich diversity and high abundance of CYP153 family genes. Biostimulation with trehalose could alleviate the negative effects of THF stress on microbial diversity in bioaugmentation systems. Our results indicated that trehalose as a compatible solute plays a significant role for environmental strains under extreme conditions.

  1. Enzymatic saccharification of seaweeds into fermentable sugars by xylanase from marine Bacillus sp. strain BT21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Pankaj; Khandeparker, Rakhee; Amberkar, Ujwala; Khodse, Vishwas

    2017-10-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of seaweed biomass was studied using xylanase produced from marine bacteria Bacillus sp. strain BT21 through solid-state fermentation of wheat bran. Three types of seaweeds, Ahnfeltia plicata, Padina tetrastromatica and Ulva lactuca, were selected as representatives of red, brown, and green seaweeds, respectively. Seaweed biomass was pretreated with hot water. The efficiency of pretreated biomass to release reducing sugar by the action of xylanase as well as the type of monosaccharide released during enzyme saccharification of seaweed biomass was studied. It was seen that pretreated biomass of seaweed A. plicata, U. lactuca, and P. tetrastroma, at 121 °C for 45 min, followed by incubation with 50 IU xylanase released reducing sugars of 233 ± 5.3, 100 ± 6.1 and 73.3 ± 4.1 µg/mg of seaweed biomass, respectively. Gas chromatography analysis illustrated the release of xylose, glucose, and mannose during the treatment process. Hot water pre-treatment process enhanced enzymatic conversion of biomass into sugars. This study revealed the important role of xylanase in saccharification of seaweed, a promising feedstock for third-generation bioethanol production.

  2. Cyanobacterial photosynthesis under sulfidic conditions: insights from the isolate Leptolyngbya sp. strain hensonii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Klatt, Judith M; de Beer, Dirk; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2018-01-01

    We report the isolation of a pinnacle-forming cyanobacterium isolated from a microbial mat covering the sediment surface at Little Salt Spring—a flooded sinkhole in Florida with a perennially microoxic and sulfidic water column. The draft genome of the isolate encodes all of the enzymatic machinery necessary for both oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, as well as genes for methylating hopanoids at the C-2 position. The physiological response of the isolate to H2S is complex: (i) no induction time is necessary for anoxygenic photosynthesis; (ii) rates of anoxygenic photosynthesis are regulated by both H2S and irradiance; (iii) O2 production is inhibited by H2S concentrations as low as 1 μM and the recovery rate of oxygenic photosynthesis is dependent on irradiance; (iv) under the optimal light conditions for oxygenic photosynthesis, rates of anoxygenic photosynthesis are nearly double those of oxygenic photosynthesis. We hypothesize that the specific adaptation mechanisms of the isolate to H2S emerged from a close spatial interaction with sulfate-reducing bacteria. The new isolate, Leptolyngbya sp. strain hensonii, is not closely related to other well-characterized Cyanobacteria that can perform anoxygenic photosynthesis, which further highlights the need to characterize the diversity and biogeography of metabolically versatile Cyanobacteria. The isolate will be an ideal model organism for exploring the adaptation of Cyanobacteria to sulfidic conditions. PMID:29328062

  3. Trehalose promotes Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL colonization in activated sludge under tetrahydrofuran (THF stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixing eHe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have focused on the role of compatible solutes in changing the microbial community structure in bioaugmentation systems. In this study, we investigated the influence of trehalose as a biostimulant on the microbial community in THF-treated wastewater bioaugmentation systems with Rhodococcus sp. YYL. Functional gene profile changes were used to study the variation in the microbial community. Soluble di-iron monooxygenases (SDIMO, particularly group-5 SDIMOs (i.e., tetrahydrofuran and propane monooxygenases, play a significant role in the initiation of the ring cleavage of tetrahydrofuran. Group-5 SDIMOs genes are enriched upon trehalose addition, and exogenous tetrahydrofuran monooxygenase (thmA genes can successfully colonize bioaugmentation systems. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s have a significant role in catalyzing the region- and stereospecific oxidation of non-activated hydrocarbons, and THF was reported to inhibit P450s in the environment. The CYP153 family was chosen as a representative P450 to study the inhibitory effects of THF. The results demonstrated that CYP153 family genes exhibited significant changes upon THF treatment and that trehalose helped maintain a rich diversity and high abundance of CYP153 family genes. Biostimulation with trehalose could alleviate the negative effects of THF stress on microbial diversity in bioaugmentation systems. Our results indicated that trehalose as a compatible solute plays a significant role for environmental strains under extreme conditions.

  4. p-Aminoacetophenonic Acids Produced by a Mangrove Endophyte Streptomyces sp. (strain HK10552

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Wang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Four new p-aminoacetophenonic acids, named (2E-11-(4′-aminophenyl-5,9-dihydroxy-4,6,8-trimethyl-11-oxo-undec-2-enoic acid (1, 9-(4′-aminophenyl-3,7-dihydroxy-2,4,6-trimethyl-9-oxo-nonoic acid(2, (2E-11-(4′-aminophenyl-5,9-O-cyclo-4,6,8-trimethyl-11-oxo-undec-2-enoic acid (3 and 9-(4′-aminophenyl-3,7-O-cyclo-2,4,6-trimethyl-9-oxo-nonoic acid(4, were isolated from an endophyte Streptomyces sp. (strain HK10552 of the mangrove plant Aegiceras corniculatum. The structures of 1–4 were elucidated by using spectroscopic analyses. The relative stereoconfigurations of compounds 3 and 4 were determined by NOESY experiments. In the bioassay test, 1–4 showed no cytotoxicity against the Hela cell lines. Compound 4 also showed no inhibitory bioactivity on HCV protease and SecA ATPase and wasn’t active against VSVG/HIV-luc pseudotyping virus.

  5. Toluene and ethylbenzene oxidation by purified naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K; Gibson, D T

    1996-09-01

    Purified naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 oxidized toluene to benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde by reactions involving benzylic monooxygenation and dioxygen-dependent alcohol oxidation, respectively. Xylene and nitrotoluene isomers were also oxidized to substituted benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde derivatives. NDO oxidized ethylbenzene sequentially through (S)-1-phenethyl alcohol (77% enantiomeric excess) and acetophenone to 2-hydroxyacetophenone. In addition, NDO also oxidized ethylbenzene through styrene to (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol (74% enantiomeric excess) by reactions involving desaturation and dihydroxylation, respectively. Isotope experiments with 18O2, H2 18O, and D2O suggest that 1-phenethyl alcohol is oxidized to acetophenone by a minor reaction involving desaturation followed by tautomerization. The major reaction in the conversion of 1-phenethyl alcohol and benzyl alcohol to acetophenone and benzaldehyde, respectively, probably involves monohydroxylation to form a gem-diol intermediate which stereospecifically loses the incoming hydroxyl group to leave the carbonyl product. These results are compared with similar reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P-450.

  6. Optimization of trehalose production by a novel strain Brevibacterium sp. SY361.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Rui; Gu, Guanbin; Fang, Hongying

    2008-10-01

    Trehalose production by a novel strain of Brevibacterium sp. SY361 was optimized in submerged fermentation. Different chemical and physical parameters such as carbon and nitrogen sources, inoculum level, initial pH, incubation temperature, aeration and time-course of fermentation, were studied in order to increase trehalose productivity. An optimal production medium containing 3% (w/v) glucose, 0.9% (v/v) corn steep liquor, 0.5% (w/v) KH(2)PO(4) and 0.4% (w/v) MgSO(4).7 H(2)O was found suitable for trehalose production. An optimal volume of medium in a 500 ml flask was 80 ml. The optimal levels of other parameters were 4.0% (v/v) of inoculum, initial pH of 6.0, incubation temperature of 28-32 degrees C and time-course of 60 h. Optimized parameters gave a maximum trehalose of 12.2 mg/ml with a conversion rate of 58.4%. (c) 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Mechanism of biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3, a psychrotrophic bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, M.; Fukunaga, N.; Sasaki, S. (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    Biosynthesis of palmitic, palmitoleic, and cis-vaccenic acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3 was investigated with in vitro and in vivo systems. (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid was aerobically converted to palmitoleate and cis-vaccenate, and the radioactivities on their carboxyl carbons were 100 and 43%, respectively, of the total radioactivity in the fatty acids. Palmitoyl coenzyme A desaturase activity was found in the membrane fraction. (1-{sup 14}C)stearic acid was converted to octadecenoate and C16 fatty acids. The octadecenoate contained oleate and cis-vaccenate, but only oleate was produced in the presence of cerulenin. (1-{sup 14}C)lauric acid was aerobically converted to palmitate, palmitoleate, and cis-vaccenate. Under anaerobic conditions, palmitate (62%), palmitoleate (4%), and cis-vaccenate (34%) were produced from (1-{sup 14}C)acetic acid, while they amounted to 48, 39, and 14%, respectively, under aerobic conditions. In these incorporation experiments, 3 to 19% of the added radioactivity was detected in released {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, indicating that part of the added fatty acids were oxidatively decomposed. Partially purified fatty acid synthetase produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with chain lengths of C10 to C18. These results indicated that both aerobic and anaerobic mechanisms for the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid are operating in this bacterium.

  8. Improvement of Fish Sauce Quality by Strain CMC5-3-1: A Novel Species of Staphylococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomsil, Natteewan; Rodtong, Sureelak; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 isolated from fermented fish sauce at 3 to 7 mo, respectively, showed different characteristics on protein hydrolysis and volatile formation. These Gram-positive cocci were able to grow in up to 15% NaCl with the optimum at 0.5% to 5% NaCl in tryptic soy broth. Based on ribosomal 16S rRNA gene sequences, Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 showed 99.0% similarity to that of Staphylococcus piscifermentans JCM 6057(T) , but DNA-DNA relatedness was Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 740.5 mM, which was higher than that inoculated by the strain CMS5-7-5 (662.14 mM, P Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 showed the highest content of total glutamic acid (P Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 2-methypropanal, contributing to the desirable dark chocolate note. Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 could be applied as a starter culture to improve the umami and aroma of fish sauce. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Imidacloprid-Degrading Mycobacterium sp. Strain MK6 from an Egyptian Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Mahrous M; Trigo, Carmen; Koskinen, William C; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-05-20

    Thus far, only a small number and types of bacteria with limited ability in degrading imidacloprid have been reported. Also, genes regulating imidacloprid (IMDA) degradation have yet to be discovered. To study this in more detail, an enrichment technique was used to isolate consortia and pure cultures of IMDA-degrading bacteria. Through this approach, we successfully isolated a novel bacterium capable of completely degrading IMDA as a sole nitrogen source. The bacterium was subsequently identified as Mycobacterium sp. strain MK6 by sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA gene (Genbank accession number KR052814 ). BLASTn searches indicated that 16S rRNA gene from Mycobacterium sp. strain MK6 was 99% identical to several Mycobacterium spp. Mycobacterium sp. strain MK6 transformed 99.7% added IMDA (150 μg mL(-1)) in <2 weeks (t1/2 = 1.6 days) to 6-chloronicotinic acid (6-CNA) as its major metabolite. Although the isolated strain and mixed bacterial consortia were able to degrade IMDA, they failed to grow further on 6-CNA, indicating a lack of IMDA mineralization to carbon dioxide. Small amounts of the desnitro-olefin and desnitro-degradates of IMDA were observed during the incubation but did not accumulate in culture medium.

  10. Tributyl phosphate biodegradation to butanol and phosphate and utilization by a novel bacterial isolate, Sphingobium sp. strain RSMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangu, Shyam Sunder; Muralidharan, Bindu; Tripathi, S C; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-03-01

    A Sphingobium sp. strain isolated from radioactive solid waste management site (RSMS) completely degraded 7.98 g/L of tributyl phosphate (TBP) from TBP containing suspensions in 3 days. It also completely degraded 20 mM dibutyl phosphate (DBP) within 2 days. The strain tolerated high levels of TBP and showed excellent stability with respect to TBP degradation over several repeated subcultures. On solid minimal media or Luria Bertani media supplemented with TBP, the RSMS strain showed a clear zone of TBP degradation around the colony. Gas chromatography and spectrophotometry analyses identified DBP as the intermediate and butanol and phosphate as the products of TBP biodegradation. The RSMS strain utilized both TBP and DBP as the sole source of carbon and phosphorous for its growth. The butanol released was completely utilized by the strain as a carbon source thereby leaving no toxic residue in the medium. Degradation of TBP or DBP was found to be suppressed by high concentration of glucose which also inhibited TBP or DBP dependent growth. The results highlight the potential of Sphingobium sp. strain RSMS for bioremediation of TBP and for further molecular investigation.

  11. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of an Alachlor and Endosulfan Degrading Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 Isolated from Ochlockonee River, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Ewida, Ayman Y I; Stothard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We recently isolated Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 from Ochlockonee River, Florida and demonstrated potent biodegradative activity against two commonly used pesticides- alachlor [(2-chloro-2`,6`-diethylphenyl-N (methoxymethyl)acetanilide)] and endosulfan [(6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9methano-2,3,4-benzo(e)di-oxathiepin-3-oxide], respectively. To further identify the repertoire of metabolic functions possessed by strain 2385, a draft genome sequence was obtained, assembled, annotated and analyzed. The genome sequence of Micrococcus sp. strain 2385 consisted of 1,460,461,440 bases which assembled into 175 contigs with an N50 contig length of 50,109 bases and a coverage of 600x. The genome size of this strain was estimated at 2,431,226 base pairs with a G+C content of 72.8 and a total number of 2,268 putative genes. RAST annotated a total of 340 subsystems in the genome of strain 2385 along with the presence of 2,177 coding sequences. A genome wide survey indicated that that strain 2385 harbors a plethora of genes to degrade other pollutants including caprolactam, PAHs (such as naphthalene), styrene, toluene and several chloroaromatic compounds.

  12. Detection of Diazotrophy in the Acetylene-Fermenting Anaerobe Pelobacter sp. Strain SFB93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akob, Denise M; Baesman, Shaun M; Sutton, John M; Fierst, Janna L; Mumford, Adam C; Shrestha, Yesha; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T; Bennett, Stacy; Dunlap, Darren S; Haase, Karl B; Oremland, Ronald S

    2017-09-01

    Acetylene (C2H2) is a trace constituent of the present Earth's oxidizing atmosphere, reflecting a mixture of terrestrial and marine emissions from anthropogenic, biomass-burning, and unidentified biogenic sources. Fermentation of acetylene was serendipitously discovered during C2H2 block assays of N2O reductase, and Pelobacter acetylenicus was shown to grow on C2H2 via acetylene hydratase (AH). AH is a W-containing, catabolic, low-redox-potential enzyme that, unlike nitrogenase (N2ase), is specific for acetylene. Acetylene fermentation is a rare metabolic process that is well characterized only in P. acetylenicus DSM3246 and DSM3247 and Pelobacter sp. strain SFB93. To better understand the genetic controls for AH activity, we sequenced the genomes of the three acetylene-fermenting Pelobacter strains. Genome assembly and annotation produced three novel genomes containing gene sequences for AH, with two copies being present in SFB93. In addition, gene sequences for all five compulsory genes for iron-molybdenum N2ase were also present in the three genomes, indicating the cooccurrence of two acetylene transformation pathways. Nitrogen fixation growth assays showed that DSM3426 could ferment acetylene in the absence of ammonium, but no ethylene was produced. However, SFB93 degraded acetylene and, in the absence of ammonium, produced ethylene, indicating an active N2ase. Diazotrophic growth was observed under N2 but not in experimental controls incubated under argon. SFB93 exhibits acetylene fermentation and nitrogen fixation, the only known biochemical mechanisms for acetylene transformation. Our results indicate complex interactions between N2ase and AH and suggest novel evolutionary pathways for these relic enzymes from early Earth to modern days.IMPORTANCE Here we show that a single Pelobacter strain can grow via acetylene fermentation and carry out nitrogen fixation, using the only two enzymes known to transform acetylene. These findings provide new insights into

  13. Beta Glucan Production from Two Strains of Agrobacterium sp in Medium Containing of Molases and Uracil Combine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUSMIATI

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Production of β-glucan by Agrobacterium sp is influenced by the composition of nutrition in the fermentation media. Molases has been used successfully by others in the fermentation media of S. cerevisiae to increase the yield of -glucan, and similarly, uracil has been used in the fermentation media of Agrobacterium sp to increase the yield of -glucan. Investigations to increase the yield of -glucan by two strains of Agrobacterium sp, i.e. A1.5 (reference and B4.4 (local strain, have been carried out by addition of various combination of molases and uracil into fermentation media, i.e. 5%(v/v molase-0,05%(b/v uracil; 5% molase-0,025% uracil; 10% molase-0,05% uracil; and 10% molase-0,025% uracil. The β-1,3-glucan and β-1,2-glucan fractions were separated by extraction method. Beta-glucan concentration was determined as the glucose monomer using the phenol-sulphate spectrophotometric method at 490 nm. The protein content was determined by a modified Lowry-spectrophotometric method at 750 nm. The results showed that all combination of molases and uracil in the fermentation media of Agrobacterium sp A1.5 and B4.4 strains have increased both the dry-weight yield of β-glucan (crude and the β¬glucan content, with the highest was in a medium containing 10% molases-0,025% uracil combination. In the above medium, the A1.5 strain produced the highest β-glucan (7,5% with the lowest protein content ( 8,4% in the β-1,3-glucan fraction, while the β-glucan content in the β-1,2-glucan fraction were all lower than in the control media, while the protein content were all higher than in the control media. In the above media, the B4.4 strain produced the highest β-glucan, 7,2% in the β-1,3-glucan fraction, and 13,1% in β-1,2-glucan fraction, while the lowest protein content ( 8,4% was in the β-1,3-glucan fraction. In conclusion, fermentation media of Agrobacterium sp A1.5 strain or B4.4 strain containing molase and uracil combination have increased both

  14. Efflux pump-mediated drug resistance in Burkholderia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podnecky, Nicole L.; Rhodes, Katherine A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2015-01-01

    Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA, and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance. PMID:25926825

  15. A Tn5051-like mer-containing transposon identified in a heavy metal tolerant strain Achromobacter sp. AO22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhave Mrinal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achromobacter sp. AO22 (formerly Alcaligenes sp. AO22, a bacterial strain isolated from a lead-contaminated industrial site in Australia, was previously found to be resistant to moderate to high levels of mercury, copper and other heavy metals. However, the nature and location of the genetic basis for mercuric ion resistance in this strain, had not been previously identified. Findings Achromobacter sp. AO22 contains a functional mer operon with all four essential genes (merRTPA and shows >99% DNA sequence identity to that of Tn501. The mer operon was present on a transposon, designated TnAO22, captured by introducing a broad-host-range IncP plasmid into Achromobacter sp. AO22 and subsequently transferring it to E. coli recipients. The transposition frequency of TnAO22 was 10-2 to 10-3 per target plasmid transferred. Analysis of TnAO22 sequence revealed it belonged to the Tn21 subgroup of the Tn3 superfamily of transposons, with the transposition module having >99% identity with Tn5051 of a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a water sample in New York. Conclusion TnAO22 is thus a new variant of Tn5051 of the Tn3 superfamily and the transposon and its associated mercury resistance system are among the few such systems reported in a soil bacterium. Achromobacter sp. AO22 can thus be exploited for applications such as in situ mercury bioremediation of contaminated sites, or the mobile unit and mer operon could be mobilized to other bacteria for similar purposes.

  16. A Tn5051-like mer-containing transposon identified in a heavy metal tolerant strain Achromobacter sp. AO22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shee Ping; Davis, Belinda; Palombo, Enzo A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2009-03-07

    Achromobacter sp. AO22 (formerly Alcaligenes sp. AO22), a bacterial strain isolated from a lead-contaminated industrial site in Australia, was previously found to be resistant to moderate to high levels of mercury, copper and other heavy metals. However, the nature and location of the genetic basis for mercuric ion resistance in this strain, had not been previously identified. Achromobacter sp. AO22 contains a functional mer operon with all four essential genes (merRTPA) and shows >99% DNA sequence identity to that of Tn501. The mer operon was present on a transposon, designated TnAO22, captured by introducing a broad-host-range IncP plasmid into Achromobacter sp. AO22 and subsequently transferring it to E. coli recipients. The transposition frequency of TnAO22 was 10-2 to 10-3 per target plasmid transferred. Analysis of TnAO22 sequence revealed it belonged to the Tn21 subgroup of the Tn3 superfamily of transposons, with the transposition module having >99% identity with Tn5051 of a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a water sample in New York. TnAO22 is thus a new variant of Tn5051 of the Tn3 superfamily and the transposon and its associated mercury resistance system are among the few such systems reported in a soil bacterium. Achromobacter sp. AO22 can thus be exploited for applications such as in situ mercury bioremediation of contaminated sites, or the mobile unit and mer operon could be mobilized to other bacteria for similar purposes.

  17. Exploring the HME and HAE1 efflux systems in the genus Burkholderia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Burkholderia includes a variety of species with opportunistic human pathogenic strains, whose increasing global resistance to antibiotics has become a public health problem. In this context a major role could be played by multidrug efflux pumps belonging to Resistance Nodulation Cell-Division (RND) family, which allow bacterial cells to extrude a wide range of different substrates, including antibiotics. This study aims to i) identify rnd genes in the 21 available completely sequenced Burkholderia genomes, ii) analyze their phylogenetic distribution, iii) define the putative function(s) that RND proteins perform within the Burkholderia genus and iv) try tracing the evolutionary history of some of these genes in Burkholderia. Results BLAST analysis of the 21 Burkholderia sequenced genomes, using experimentally characterized ceoB sequence (one of the RND family counterpart in the genus Burkholderia) as probe, allowed the assembly of a dataset comprising 254 putative RND proteins. An extensive phylogenetic analysis revealed the occurrence of several independent events of gene loss and duplication across the different lineages of the genus Burkholderia, leading to notable differences in the number of paralogs between different genomes. A putative substrate [antibiotics (HAE1 proteins)/heavy-metal (HME proteins)] was also assigned to the majority of these proteins. No correlation was found between the ecological niche and the lifestyle of Burkholderia strains and the number/type of efflux pumps they possessed, while a relation can be found with genome size and taxonomy. Remarkably, we observed that only HAE1 proteins are mainly responsible for the different number of proteins observed in strains of the same species. Data concerning both the distribution and the phylogenetic analysis of the HAE1 and HME in the Burkholderia genus allowed depicting a likely evolutionary model accounting for the evolution and spreading of HME and HAE1 systems in the

  18. Exploring the HME and HAE1 efflux systems in the genus Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasca Maria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Burkholderia includes a variety of species with opportunistic human pathogenic strains, whose increasing global resistance to antibiotics has become a public health problem. In this context a major role could be played by multidrug efflux pumps belonging to Resistance Nodulation Cell-Division (RND family, which allow bacterial cells to extrude a wide range of different substrates, including antibiotics. This study aims to i identify rnd genes in the 21 available completely sequenced Burkholderia genomes, ii analyze their phylogenetic distribution, iii define the putative function(s that RND proteins perform within the Burkholderia genus and iv try tracing the evolutionary history of some of these genes in Burkholderia. Results BLAST analysis of the 21 Burkholderia sequenced genomes, using experimentally characterized ceoB sequence (one of the RND family counterpart in the genus Burkholderia as probe, allowed the assembly of a dataset comprising 254 putative RND proteins. An extensive phylogenetic analysis revealed the occurrence of several independent events of gene loss and duplication across the different lineages of the genus Burkholderia, leading to notable differences in the number of paralogs between different genomes. A putative substrate [antibiotics (HAE1 proteins/heavy-metal (HME proteins] was also assigned to the majority of these proteins. No correlation was found between the ecological niche and the lifestyle of Burkholderia strains and the number/type of efflux pumps they possessed, while a relation can be found with genome size and taxonomy. Remarkably, we observed that only HAE1 proteins are mainly responsible for the different number of proteins observed in strains of the same species. Data concerning both the distribution and the phylogenetic analysis of the HAE1 and HME in the Burkholderia genus allowed depicting a likely evolutionary model accounting for the evolution and spreading of HME and HAE

  19. Exploring the HME and HAE1 efflux systems in the genus Burkholderia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Elena; Fondi, Marco; Papaleo, Maria Cristiana; Maida, Isabel; Buroni, Silvia; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Fani, Renato

    2010-06-03

    The genus Burkholderia includes a variety of species with opportunistic human pathogenic strains, whose increasing global resistance to antibiotics has become a public health problem. In this context a major role could be played by multidrug efflux pumps belonging to Resistance Nodulation Cell-Division (RND) family, which allow bacterial cells to extrude a wide range of different substrates, including antibiotics. This study aims to i) identify rnd genes in the 21 available completely sequenced Burkholderia genomes, ii) analyze their phylogenetic distribution, iii) define the putative function(s) that RND proteins perform within the Burkholderia genus and iv) try tracing the evolutionary history of some of these genes in Burkholderia. BLAST analysis of the 21 Burkholderia sequenced genomes, using experimentally characterized ceoB sequence (one of the RND family counterpart in the genus Burkholderia) as probe, allowed the assembly of a dataset comprising 254 putative RND proteins. An extensive phylogenetic analysis revealed the occurrence of several independent events of gene loss and duplication across the different lineages of the genus Burkholderia, leading to notable differences in the number of paralogs between different genomes. A putative substrate [antibiotics (HAE1 proteins)/heavy-metal (HME proteins)] was also assigned to the majority of these proteins. No correlation was found between the ecological niche and the lifestyle of Burkholderia strains and the number/type of efflux pumps they possessed, while a relation can be found with genome size and taxonomy. Remarkably, we observed that only HAE1 proteins are mainly responsible for the different number of proteins observed in strains of the same species. Data concerning both the distribution and the phylogenetic analysis of the HAE1 and HME in the Burkholderia genus allowed depicting a likely evolutionary model accounting for the evolution and spreading of HME and HAE1 systems in the Burkholderia genus. A

  20. Extension of Sphingobium sp. BHC-A to a 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid mineralizing strain by metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Feng; Chen, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liao, Xuewei; Jiao, Yiying; Hong, Qing; Zhang, Longjiang; Wu, Jun

    2013-07-20

    The gene cassette encoding for TftAB and TftCD proteins was integrated into the 16srDNA gene of the γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) mineralizing strain Sphingobium sp. BHC-A by homologous recombination. The recombinant γ-HCH mineralizing strain may degrade 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid at a rate of 250nmol mg [protein](-1)h(-1), and the generated intermediate 2,5-dichlorohydroquinone may be further mineralized through γ-HCH downstream degradation pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphate solubilization and chromium (VI) remediation potential of Klebsiella sp. strain CPSB4 isolated from the chromium contaminated agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratishtha; Kumar, Vipin; Usmani, Zeba; Rani, Rupa; Chandra, Avantika

    2018-02-01

    In this study, an effort was made to identify an efficient phosphate solubilizing bacterial strain from chromium contaminated agricultural soils. Based on the formation of a solubilized halo around the colonies on Pikovskaya's agar amended with chromium (VI), 10 strains were initially screened out. Out of 10, strain CPSB4, which showed significantly high solubilization zone at different chromium concentrations, was selected for further study. The strain CPSB4 showed significant plant growth promotion traits with chromium (VI) stress under in-vitro conditions in broth. The plant growth promotion activities of the strain decreased regularly, but were not completely lost with the increase in concentration of chromium up to 200 mg L(-1). On subjected to FT-IR analysis, the presence of the functional group, indicating the organic acid aiding in phosphate solubilization was identified. At an optimal temperature of 30 (°)C and pH 7.0, the strain showed around 93% chromium (VI) reduction under in-vitro conditions in broth study. In soil condition, the maximum chromium (VI) reduction obtained was 95% under in-vitro conditions. The strain CPSB4 was identified as Klebsiella sp. on the basis of morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This study shows that the diverse role of the bacterial strain CPSB4 would be useful in the chromium contaminated soil as a good bioremediation and plant growth promoting agent as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Final classification of Bisgaard taxon 9 as Actinobacillus arthritidis sp nov and recognition of a novel genomospecies for equine strains of Actinobacillus lignieresii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik; Bisgaard, Magne; Angen, Øystein

    2002-01-01

    binding level. Actinobacillus arthritidis sp. nov. is proposed for 12 strains of the (-)D-sorbitol-positive group. Actinobacillus genomospecies 2 is suggested for the six strains of the (-)D-sorbitol-negative group. Phenotypically, strains of A. arthritidis and Actinobacillus genomospecies 2 differ...

  3. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  4. Influence of carbon sources and electron shuttles on ferric iron reduction by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Robin; Field, Erin K; Viamajala, Sridhar; Peyton, Brent M; Apel, William A; Cunningham, Al B

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  5. Reclassification of rhizosphere bacteria including strains causing corky root of lettuce and proposal of Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov., Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Isolde M; Jochimsen, Kenneth N; De Vos, Paul; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2014-04-01

    The genus Rhizorhapis gen. nov. (to replace the illegitimate genus name Rhizomonas) is proposed for strains of Gram-negative bacteria causing corky root of lettuce, a widespread and important lettuce disease worldwide. Only one species of the genus Rhizomonas was described, Rhizomonas suberifaciens, which was subsequently reclassified as Sphingomonas suberifaciens based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the presence of sphingoglycolipid in the cell envelope. However, the genus Sphingomonas is so diverse that further reclassification was deemed necessary. Twenty new Rhizorhapis gen. nov.- and Sphingomonas-like isolates were obtained from lettuce or sow thistle roots, or from soil using lettuce seedlings as bait. These and previously reported isolates were characterized in a polyphasic study including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA-DNA hybridization, DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid composition, morphology, substrate oxidation, temperature and pH sensitivity, and pathogenicity to lettuce. The isolates causing lettuce corky root belonged to the genera Rhizorhapis gen. nov., Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis and Rhizorhabdus gen. nov. More specifically, we propose to reclassify Rhizomonas suberifaciens as Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain, CA1(T) = LMG 17323(T) = ATCC 49355(T)), and also propose the novel species Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov. with the type strains NL9(T) ( = LMG 12560(T) = ATCC 51296(T)), WI4(T) ( = LMG 11032(T) = ATCC 51292(T)) and SP1(T) ( = LMG 12581(T) = ATCC 51289(T)), respectively. Several strains isolated from lettuce roots belonged to the genus Sphingomonas, but none of them were pathogenic.

  6. Construction of new synthetic biology tools for the control of gene expression in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zess, Erin K; Begemann, Matthew B; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-02-01

    Predictive control of gene expression is an essential tool for developing synthetic biological systems. The current toolbox for controlling gene expression in cyanobacteria is a barrier to more in-depth genetic analysis and manipulation. Towards relieving this bottleneck, this work describes the use of synthetic biology to construct an anhydrotetracycline-based induction system and adapt a trans-acting small RNA (sRNA) system for use in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. An anhydrotetracycline-inducible promoter was developed to maximize intrinsic strength and dynamic range. The resulting construct, PEZtet , exhibited tight repression and a maximum 32-fold induction upon addition of anhydrotetracycline. Additionally, a sRNA system based on the Escherichia coli IS10 RNA-IN/OUT regulator was adapted for use in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. This system exhibited 70% attenuation of target gene expression, providing a demonstration of the use of sRNAs for differential gene expression in cyanobacteria. These systems were combined to produce an inducible sRNA system, which demonstrated 59% attenuation of target gene expression. Lastly, the role of Hfq, a critical component of sRNA systems in E. coli, was investigated. Genetic studies showed that the Hfq homolog in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 did not impact repression by the engineered sRNA system. In summary, this work describes new synthetic biology tools that can be applied to physiological studies, metabolic engineering, or sRNA platforms in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Identification of Sesquiterpene Synthases from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Agger, Sean A.; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Hoye, Thomas R.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of natural products and are known to produce terpenoids. These bacteria are the major source of the musty-smelling terpenes geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, which are found in many natural water supplies; however, no terpene synthases have been characterized from these organisms to date. Here, we describe the characterization of three sesquiterpene synthases identified in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (terpene synthase NS1) and Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 (terpene...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Donghicola sp. Strain KarMa, a Model Organism for Monomethylamine-Degrading Nonmethylotrophic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecher, Karsten; Suleiman, Marcel; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Philipp, Bodo; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2017-02-16

    The C1-compound monomethylamine can serve as a nitrogen, carbon, and energy source for heterotrophic bacteria. The marine alphaproteobacterium Donghicola sp. strain KarMa can use monomethylamine as a source only for nitrogen and not for carbon. Its draft genome sequence is presented here and reveals putative gene clusters for the methylamine dehydrogenase and the N-methylglutamate pathways for monomethylamine metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Zecher et al.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Cellulomonas sp. Strain B6 Isolated from Subtropical Forest Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinni, Florencia; Murua, Yanina; Ghio, Silvina; Talia, Paola; Rivarola, Máximo

    2016-01-01

    Cellulomonas sp. strain B6 was isolated from a subtropical forest soil sample and presented (hemi)cellulose-degrading activity. We report here its draft genome sequence, with an estimated genome size of 4 Mb, a G+C content of 75.1%, and 3,443 predicted protein-coding sequences, 92 of which are glycosyl hydrolases involved in polysaccharide degradation. PMID:27563050

  10. Isolation and Characterization of an Atypical Metschnikowia sp. Strain from the Skin Scraping of a Dermatitis Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Ismail, Rokiah; Kwan, Zhenli; Yew, Su Mei; Yeo, Siok Koon; Chan, Chai Ling; Toh, Yue Fen; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2016-01-01

    A yeast-like organism was isolated from the skin scraping sample of a stasis dermatitis patient in the Mycology Unit Department of Medical Microbiology, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The isolate produced no pigment and was not identifiable using chromogenic agar and API 20C AUX. The fungus was identified as Metschnikowia sp. strain UM 1034, which is close to that of Metschnikowia drosophilae based on ITS- and D1/D2 domain-based phylogenetic analysis. However...

  11. Complete genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10, a psychrotolerant biofertilizer that could promote plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See-Too, Wah Seng; Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Convey, Peter; Pearce, David A; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok Gan

    2016-03-20

    Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10 (=DSM 101070) is a psychrotolerant bacterium which was isolated from Lagoon Island, Antarctica. Analysis of its complete genome sequence indicates its possible role as a plant-growth promoting bacterium, including nitrogen-fixing ability and indole acetic acid (IAA)-producing trait, with additional suggestion of plant disease prevention attributes via hydrogen cyanide production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Sulfide-Oxidizing, Autotrophic Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium, Chloroflexus sp. Strain MS-G (Chloroflexi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Vera; Hamilton, Trinity L; Tomsho, Lynn P; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E; Schuster, Stephan C; Ward, David M; Bryant, Donald A

    2014-09-04

    The draft genome sequence of the thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus sp. strain MS-G (Chloroflexi), isolated from Mushroom Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA) was sequenced and comprises 4,784,183 bp in 251 contigs. The draft genome is predicted to encode 4,059 protein coding genes, 49 tRNA encoding genes, and 3 rRNA operons. Copyright © 2014 Thiel et al.

  13. Effect of inoculation with the endophyte Clavibacter sp. strain Enf12 on chilling tolerance in Chorispora bungeana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuo; Huang, Cong-Lin; Sheng, Hong-Mei; Song, Chun-Li; Li, Ya-Bo; An, Li-Zhe

    2011-02-01

    Endophytic bacteria have been shown to increase resistance against biotic stress and tolerance to abiotic stress in many plants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of an endophytic bacterium, Clavibacter sp. strain Enf12, in regenerated plantlets of Chorispora bungeana subjected to chilling stress (0°C). Aerial biomass and physiological markers for chilling stress, such as electrolyte leakage, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, proline content and activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), guaiacol peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11), were assessed. We demonstrated that Clavibacter sp. strain Enf12 was capable of colonizing internal tissues of regenerated plantlets of C. bungeana and maintained stable population densities under both normal (20°C) and chilling (0°C) conditions. Inoculation enhanced plantlet growth under both conditions and significantly attenuated the chilling-induced electrolyte leakage, lipid peroxidation and ROS accumulation. The endophyte significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes and proline content in C. bungeana plantlets under chilling stress. These findings suggest that Clavibacter sp. strain Enf12 inoculation stimulates the growth of C. bungeana plantlets and improves their tolerance to chilling stress through enhancing the antioxidant defense system.

  14. Degradation of Perennial Ryegrass Leaf and Stem Cell Walls by the Anaerobic Fungus Neocallimastix sp. Strain CS3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijtsma, L; Tan, B

    1996-04-01

    The degradation of cell walls isolated from stems and leaves of perennial ryegrass by the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix sp. strain CS3b was studied in a defined medium. The combined cellulose and hemicellulose fraction represented 53.1 (wt/wt) and 63.3% (wt/wt) of the dry weight of control grass leaf and stem cell walls, respectively. In both leaf and stem cell walls, glucose was the major neutral monosaccharide, followed by xylose, arabinose, and galactose. After 2 days of fermentation with Neocallimastix sp. strain CS3b, treated cell walls contained smaller amounts of neutral sugars compared with those of undigested cell walls. These results were more evident for glucose, xylose, and arabinose than for galactose. Furthermore, the sugar content of leaf cell walls decreased before a decline in the sugar content of stem cell walls was observed. Data from formate and hydrogen production indicated that the growth of Neocallimastix sp. strain CS3b was completed in 4 days in the culture system used. During this period, the fungus liberated about 95% of the fermentable sugars in untreated material. On a percentage basis, no significant differences were found in final extent of degradation of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. Galactose, however, was degraded to a lesser extent.

  15. Methane oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction under hypoxia by the Gammaproteobacterium Methylomonas denitrificans, sp. nov. type strain FJG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kits, K Dimitri; Klotz, Martin G; Stein, Lisa Y

    2015-09-01

    Obligate methanotrophs belonging to the Phyla Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia require oxygen for respiration and methane oxidation; nevertheless, aerobic methanotrophs are abundant and active in low oxygen environments. While genomes of some aerobic methanotrophs encode putative nitrogen oxide reductases, it is not understood whether these metabolic modules are used for NOx detoxification, denitrification or other purposes. Here we demonstrate using microsensor measurements that a gammaproteobacterial methanotroph Methylomonas denitrificans sp. nov. strain FJG1(T) couples methane oxidation to nitrate reduction under oxygen limitation, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. Illumina RNA-Seq data revealed differential expression of genes encoding a denitrification pathway previously unknown to methanotrophs as well as the pxmABC operon in M. denitrificans sp. nov. strain FJG1(T) in response to hypoxia. Physiological and transcriptome data indicate that genetic inventory encoding the denitrification pathway is upregulated only upon availability of nitrate under oxygen limitation. In addition, quantitation of ATP levels demonstrates that the denitrification pathway employs inventory such as nitrate reductase NarGH serving M. denitrificans sp. nov. strain FJG1(T) to conserve energy during oxygen limitation. This study unravelled an unexpected metabolic flexibility of aerobic methanotrophs, thereby assigning these bacteria a new role at the metabolic intersection of the carbon and nitrogen cycles. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Highly thermostable xylanase production from a thermophilic Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1 utilizing lignocellulosic biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya eBhalla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractEfficient enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars requires a complete repertoire of biomass deconstruction enzymes. Hemicellulases play an important role in hydrolyzing hemicellulose component of lignocellulose to xylo-oligosaccharides and xylose. Thermostable xylanases have been a focus of attention as industrially important enzymes due to their long shelf life at high temperatures. Geobacillus sp. strain WSUCF1 produced thermostable xylanase activity (crude xylanase cocktail when grown on xylan or various inexpensive untreated and pretreated lignocellulosic biomasses such as prairie cord grass and corn stover. The optimum pH and temperature for the crude xylanase cocktail were 6.5 and 70ºC, respectively. The WSUCF1 crude xylanase was found to be highly thermostable with half-lives of 18 and 12 days at 60 and 70ºC, respectively. At 70ºC, rates of xylan hydrolysis were also found to be better with the WSUCF1 secretome than those with commercial enzymes, i.e., for WSUCF1 crude xylanase, CellicHTec2, and AccelleraseXY, the percent xylan conversions were 68.9, 49.4, and 28.92, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, WSUCF1 crude xylanase cocktail is among the most thermostable xylanases produced by thermophilic Geobacillus spp. and other thermophilic microbes (optimum growth temperature ≤70ºC. High thermostability, activity over wide range of temperatures, and better xylan hydrolysis than commercial enzymes make WSUCF1 crude xylanase suitable for thermophilic lignocellulose bioconversion processes.

  17. Interactions of Plutonium with Pseudomonas sp. Strain EPS-1W and Its Extracellular Polymeric Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Mark A; Jiao, Yongqin; Dai, Zurong; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B

    2016-12-15

    Safe and effective nuclear waste disposal, as well as accidental radionuclide releases, necessitates our understanding of the fate of radionuclides in the environment, including their interaction with microorganisms. We examined the sorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) to Pseudomonas sp. strain EPS-1W, an aerobic bacterium isolated from plutonium (Pu)-contaminated groundwater collected in the United States at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in Nevada. We compared Pu sorption to cells with and without bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Wild-type cells with intact EPS sorbed Pu(V) more effectively than cells with EPS removed. In contrast, cells with and without EPS showed the same sorption affinity for Pu(IV). In vitro experiments with extracted EPS revealed rapid reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV). Transmission electron microscopy indicated that 2- to 3-nm nanocrystalline Pu(IV)O2 formed on cells equilibrated with high concentrations of Pu(IV) but not Pu(V). Thus, EPS, while facilitating Pu(V) reduction, inhibit the formation of nanocrystalline Pu(IV) precipitates. Our results indicate that EPS are an effective reductant for Pu(V) and sorbent for Pu(IV) and may impact Pu redox cycling and mobility in the environment. Additionally, the resulting Pu morphology associated with EPS will depend on the concentration and initial Pu oxidation state. While our results are not directly applicable to the Pu transport situation at the NNSS, the results suggest that, in general, stationary microorganisms and biofilms will tend to limit the migration of Pu and provide an important Pu retardation mechanism in the environment. In a broader sense, our results, along with a growing body of literature, highlight the important role of microorganisms as producers of redox-active organic ligands and therefore as modulators of radionuclide redox transformations and complexation in the subsurface. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Comparative characterization of two distinct hydrogenases from Anabaena sp. strain 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchins, J P; Burris, R H

    1981-04-01

    Two distinct hydrogenases, hereafter referred to as "uptake" and "reversible" hydrogenase, were extracted from Anabaena sp. strain 7120 and partially purified. The properties of the two enzymes were compared in cell-free extracts. Uptake hydrogenase was largely particulate, and although membrane bound, it could catalyze an oxyhydrogen reaction. Particulate and solubilized uptake hydrogenase could catalyze H2 uptake with a variety of artificial electron acceptors which had midpoint potentials above 0 mV. Reversible hydrogenase was soluble, could donate electrons rapidly to electron acceptors of both positive and negative midpoint potential, and could evolve H2 rapidly when provided with reduced methyl viologen. Uptake hydrogenase was irreversibly inactivated by O2, whereas reversible hydrogenase was reversibly inactivated and could be reactivated by exposure to dithionite or H2. Reversible hydrogenase was stable to heating at 70 degrees C, but uptake hydrogenase was inactivated with a half-life of 12 min at this temperature. Uptake hydrogenase was eluted from Sephadex G-200 in a single peak of molecular weight 56,000, whereas reversible hydrogenase was eluted in two peaks with molecular weights of 165,000 and 113,000. CO was competitive with H2 for each enzyme; the Ki's for CO were 0.0095 atm for reversible hydrogenase and 0.039 atm for uptake hydrogenase. The pH optima for H2 evolution and H2 uptake by reversible hydrogenase were 6 and 9, respectively. Uptake hydrogenase existed in two forms with pH optima of 6 and 8.5. Both enzymes had very low Km's for H2, and neither was inhibited by C2H2.

  19. Isolation of a bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. from centrate wastewater and study of its cooperation with algae in nutrients removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Lu, Qian; Wang, Qin; Liu, Wen; Wei, Qian; Ren, Hongyan; Ming, Caibing; Min, Min; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2017-07-01

    Algae were able to grow healthy on bacteria-containing centrate wastewater in a pilot-scale bioreactor. The batch experiment indicated that the co-cultivation of algae and wastewater-borne bacteria improved the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand and total phosphorus in centrate wastewater to 93.01% and 98.78%, respectively. A strain of beneficial aerobic bacteria, Acinetobacter sp., was isolated and its biochemical characteristics were explored. Synergistic cooperation was observed in the growth of algae and Acinetobacter sp. Removal efficiencies of some nutrients were improved significantly by the co-cultivation of algae and Acinetobacter sp. After treatment, residual nutrients in centrate wastewater reached the permissible discharge limit. The cooperation between algae and Acinetobacter sp. was in part attributed to the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the algae and bacteria. This synergetic relationship between algae and Acinetobacter sp. provided a promising way to treat the wastewater by improving the nutrients removal and biomass production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Co-production of polyhydroxyalkanoates and carotenoids through bioconversion of glycerol by Paracoccus sp. strain LL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prasun; Jun, Hang-Bae; Kim, Beom Soo

    2018-02-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) have emerged as a potential alternative to synthetic plastics, although its large-scale production is limited by the expenditure incurred in feed materials. Co-production of various valuable bioproducts along with PHA has been proposed to alleviate the overall production cost. Here, high-yield co-production of PHA and carotenoids was achieved in single step fermentation by Paracoccus sp. LL1. The halophilic bacterial strain could metabolize a wide range of substrates including methanol, lactose, galactose, glycerol, fructose, mannitol, etc. Under batch fermentation using mineral media supplemented with 2% glycerol, Paracoccus sp. LL1 synthesized 3.77gL-1 PHA with concomitant production of 3.6mgL-1 of carotenoids after 96h. An enhancement of 2.2-folds in total dry cell weight (DCW) was achieved through cell retention culture of Paracoccus sp. LL1, resulting in a maximum DCW (24.2gL-1) containing PHA (39.3%, ww-1) with concomitant enhancement in the production of total carotenoids. Paracoccus sp. LL1 could convert glycerol into carotenoids and PHA to a level of 7.14mgL-1 and 9.52gL-1, respectively. It is the first report showing value addition in PHA production process through co-production of high value carotenoids by Paracoccus sp. using glycerol as substrate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pré-seleção de estirpes de Rhizobium sp. para amendoim Preliminary selection of peanut Rhizobium sp. strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Roberto Giardini

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Um ensaio foi conduzido em casa de vegetação, com solução nutritiva isenta de N, com o objetivo de selecionar estirpes de Rhizobium eficientes fixadoras de N2, quando associadas com amendoim (Arachis hypogaea L. cultivar Tatu. Foram testadas 35 estirpes de Rhizobium sp., isoladas de quinze diferentes espécies de leguminosas tropicais, e incluído um tratamento de inoculação com solo previamente cultivado com amendoim. Das 35 estirpes testadas, doze formaram nódulos e, entre essas, sete foram eficientes fixadoras de nitrogênio. Das doze estirpes que nodularam, sete foram isoladas de leguminosas da tribo Hedysareae (à qual pertence o género Arachis e, destas, apenas quatro foram eficientes fixadoras de nitrogênio. O peso e o número de nódulos não se mostraram como critérios adequados para avaliação da eficiência.An experiment was carried out in Leonard jars, in the greenhouse, with nitrogen-free nutrient solution to test the efficiency of 35 strains of rhizobia isolated from 15 species of tropical legumes. Twelve of the tested strains were capable of nodule formation in peanut. Seven of those strains were isolated from the trible Hedysareae, which includes the genus Arachis. Only four of the rhizobia strains with inducing nodulation were effective. Dry weight and number of nodules were not good criteria for evaluating effectiveness.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Rhizobium sp. strains against Pseudomonas savastanoi, the agent responsible for the olive knot disease in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, six Rhizobium strains isolated from Algerian soil were checked for their antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas savastanoi, the agent responsible for olive knot disease. Rhizobium sp. ORN 24 and ORN 83 were found to produce antimicrobial activities against Pseudomonas savastanoi. The antimicrobial activity produced by Rhizobium sp. ORN24 was precipitable with ammonium sulfate, between 1,000 and 10,000 KDa molecular weight, heat resistant but sensitive to proteases and detergents. These characteristics suggest the bacteriocin nature of the antimicrobial substance produced by Rhizobium sp. ORN24, named rhizobiocin 24. In contrast, the antimicrobial activity produced by Rhizobium sp. ORN83 was not precipitable with ammonium sulfate; it was smaller than 1,000 KDa molecular weight, heat labile, and protease and detergent resistant. These characteristics could indicate the relationship between the antimicrobial substance produced by Rhizobium sp. ORN 83 and the “small” bacteriocins described in other rhizobia.

    En la presente investigación, seis cepas de Rhizobium aisladas de suelos argelinos fueron estudiadas para conocer su actividad antimicrobiana contra Pseudomonas savastanoi, el agente causante de la tuberculosis del olivo. Rhizobium sp. ORN 24 y ORN 83 produjeron actividad antimicrobiana contra Pseudomonas savastanoi. La actividad antimicrobiana producida por Rhizobium sp. ORN 24 precipitó con sulfato amónico, tuvo un peso molecular entre 1000 y 10000 KDa, fue resistente al calor pero sensible a proteasas y detergentes. Estas características sugieren que la sustancia antimicrobial producida por Rhizobium sp. ORN 24 es la bacteriocina natural conocida como rizobiocina 24. Por el contrario, la actividad antimicrobiana producida por Rhizobium sp. ORN83 no fue precipitable con sulfato amónico, y tuvo un peso molecular menor de 1000 KDa, fue lábil al calor y resistente a detergentes y proteasas. Estas

  3. Marinomonas polaris sp. nov., a psychrohalotolerant strain isolated from coastal sea water off the subantarctic Kerguelen islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratima; Chaturvedi, Preeti; Pradhan, Suman; Delille, Daniel; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2006-02-01

    Two aerobic, psychrohalotolerant, motile bacterial isolates, CK13T and CK16, isolated from sea-water samples collected off the subantarctic Kerguelen island, were characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence data, the strains were 99.6% similar and exhibited 93-97% similarity with the seven recognized species of Marinomonas. The most closely related species were Marinomonas pontica and Marinomonas primoryensis, with 97 and 96 % similarity at the 16S rRNA gene sequence level, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain CK13T and M. pontica and M. primoryensis were only 58 and 40%, respectively. The major fatty acids present in strain CK13T were iso-C(16:0), C(16:0), C(16:1)omega7c and C(18:1)omega7c. The DNA G+C content of strain CK13T was 41.2 mol%. Phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol were identified as the predominant phospholipids. All the above characteristics support the affiliation of strain CK13T to the genus Marinomonas. Phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic and genotypic distinctiveness confirmed that strains CK13T and CK16 are members of a novel species of the genus Marinomonas, for which the name Marinomonas polaris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CK13T (=MTCC 6645T=DSM 16579T=JCM 12522T).

  4. Comparative genome analysis of rice-pathogenic Burkholderia provides insight into capacity to adapt to different environments and hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young-Su; Lim, Jae Yun; Park, Jungwook; Kim, Sunyoung; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Cheong, Hoon; Kim, Sang-Mok; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu

    2015-05-06

    In addition to human and animal diseases, bacteria of the genus Burkholderia can cause plant diseases. The representative species of rice-pathogenic Burkholderia are Burkholderia glumae, B. gladioli, and B. plantarii, which primarily cause grain rot, sheath rot, and seedling blight, respectively, resulting in severe reductions in rice production. Though Burkholderia rice pathogens cause problems in rice-growing countries, comprehensive studies of these rice-pathogenic species aiming to control Burkholderia-mediated diseases are only in the early stages. We first sequenced the complete genome of B. plantarii ATCC 43733T. Second, we conducted comparative analysis of the newly sequenced B. plantarii ATCC 43733T genome with eleven complete or draft genomes of B. glumae and B. gladioli strains. Furthermore, we compared the genome of three rice Burkholderia pathogens with those of other Burkholderia species such as those found in environmental habitats and those known as animal/human pathogens. These B. glumae, B. gladioli, and B. plantarii strains have unique genes involved in toxoflavin or tropolone toxin production and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-mediated bacterial immune system. Although the genome of B. plantarii ATCC 43733T has many common features with those of B. glumae and B. gladioli, this B. plantarii strain has several unique features, including quorum sensing and CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) systems. The complete genome sequence of B. plantarii ATCC 43733T and publicly available genomes of B. glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3 enabled comprehensive comparative genome analyses among three rice-pathogenic Burkholderia species responsible for tissue rotting and seedling blight. Our results suggest that B. glumae has evolved rapidly, or has undergone rapid genome rearrangements or deletions, in response to the hosts. It also, clarifies the unique features of rice pathogenic Burkholderia species relative to other

  5. Characterization of a cypermethrin-degrading Methylobacterium sp. strain A-1 and molecular cloning of its carboxylesterase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelmann, Corinna; Weber, Joachim; Heinzel-Wieland, Regina; Kemme, Michael

    2015-11-01

    A novel mesophilic bacterial strain, designated A-1, was isolated from microbially contaminated biopolymer microcapsules. The bacterium was able to withstand and grow in liquid cultures supplemented with the pyrethroid cypermethrin in concentrations up to 400 mg L(-1) . Furthermore, strain A-1 could use cypermethrin as sole carbon source and could degrade >50% of it in 12 h. Based on phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence, the strain A-1 was identified as Methylobacterium sp., which is the first reported cypermethrin degrader of methylotrophic bacteria. A role for esterase activity in cypermethrin biodegradation was presumed. Therefore, the carboxylesterase gene mse1 was amplified from the Methylobacterium sp. strain A-1 genome and the resulting 1 kb amplicon cloned into E. coli. Sequence analysis of the mse1-DNA insert revealed an open reading frame of 633 bp encoding for a putative carboxylesterase of 210 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 22 kDa. The amino acid sequence of the deduced enzyme MsE1 with the catalytic triad Ser106 , Asp156 , and His187 was found to be similar to that of α/β-hydrolase fold proteins. The active site Ser106 residue is located in the consensus pentapeptide motif Gly-X-Ser-X-Gly that is typical of esterases. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Draft genome sequence of two Shingopyxis sp. strains H107 and H115 isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distriburion system simulator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Draft genome sequence of two Shingopyxis sp. strains H107 and H115 isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distriburion system simulator. This dataset is...

  7. Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis Gene uppP Is Required for Burkholderia Colonization of the Stinkbug Gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Ho Jin; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Kitagawa, Wataru; Nikoh, Naruo

    2013-01-01

    To establish a host-bacterium symbiotic association, a number of factors involved in symbiosis must operate in a coordinated manner. In insects, bacterial factors for symbiosis have been poorly characterized at the molecular and biochemical levels, since many symbionts have not yet been cultured or are as yet genetically intractable. Recently, the symbiotic association between a stinkbug, Riptortus pedestris, and its beneficial gut bacterium, Burkholderia sp., has emerged as a promising experimental model system, providing opportunities to study insect symbiosis using genetically manipulated symbiotic bacteria. Here, in search of bacterial symbiotic factors, we targeted cell wall components of the Burkholderia symbiont by disruption of uppP gene, which encodes undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase involved in biosynthesis of various bacterial cell wall components. Under culture conditions, the ΔuppP mutant showed higher susceptibility to lysozyme than the wild-type strain, indicating impaired integrity of peptidoglycan of the mutant. When administered to the host insect, the ΔuppP mutant failed to establish normal symbiotic association: the bacterial cells reached to the symbiotic midgut but neither proliferated nor persisted there. Transformation of the ΔuppP mutant with uppP-encoding plasmid complemented these phenotypic defects: lysozyme susceptibility in vitro was restored, and normal infection and proliferation in the midgut symbiotic organ were observed in vivo. The ΔuppP mutant also exhibited susceptibility to hypotonic, hypertonic, and centrifugal stresses. These results suggest that peptidoglycan cell wall integrity is a stress resistance factor relevant to the successful colonization of the stinkbug midgut by Burkholderia symbiont. PMID:23747704

  8. Genome Sequence of Thermotoga sp Strain RQ2, a Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Geothermally Heated Region of the Seafloor near Ribeira Quente, the Azores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swithers, Kristen S [University of Connecticut, Storrs; DiPippo, Jonathan L [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pennacchio, Len [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Stetter, Karl O [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Nelson, Karen E [J. Craig Venter Institute; Gogarten, Peter [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Noll, Kenneth M [University of Connecticut, Storrs

    2011-01-01

    Thermotoga sp. strain RQ2 is probably a strain of Thermotoga maritima. Its complete genome sequence allows for an examination of the extent and consequences of gene flow within Thermotoga species and strains. Thermotoga sp. RQ2 differs from T. maritima in its genes involved in myo-inositol metabolism. Its genome also encodes an apparent fructose phosphotransferase system (PTS) sugar transporter. This operon is also found in Thermotoga naphthophila strain RKU-10 but no other Thermotogales. These are the first reported PTS transporters in the Thermotogales.

  9. Plant-associated symbiotic Burkholderia species lack hallmark strategies required in mammalian pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Annette A; Agapakis, Christina M; Fong, Stephanie; Yerrapragada, Shailaja; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina; Yang, Paul; Song, Nannie; Kano, Stephanie; Caballero-Mellado, Jésus; de Faria, Sergio M; Dakora, Felix D; Weinstock, George; Hirsch, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia is a diverse and dynamic genus, containing pathogenic species as well as species that form complex interactions with plants. Pathogenic strains, such as B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, can cause serious disease in mammals, while other Burkholderia strains are opportunistic pathogens, infecting humans or animals with a compromised immune system. Although some of the opportunistic Burkholderia pathogens are known to promote plant growth and even fix nitrogen, the risk of infection to infants, the elderly, and people who are immunocompromised has not only resulted in a restriction on their use, but has also limited the application of non-pathogenic, symbiotic species, several of which nodulate legume roots or have positive effects on plant growth. However, recent phylogenetic analyses have demonstrated that Burkholderia species separate into distinct lineages, suggesting the possibility for safe use of certain symbiotic species in agricultural contexts. A number of environmental strains that promote plant growth or degrade xenobiotics are also included in the symbiotic lineage. Many of these species have the potential to enhance agriculture in areas where fertilizers are not readily available and may serve in the future as inocula for crops growing in soils impacted by climate change. Here we address the pathogenic potential of several of the symbiotic Burkholderia strains using bioinformatics and functional tests. A series of infection experiments using Caenorhabditis elegans and HeLa cells, as well as genomic characterization of pathogenic loci, show that the risk of opportunistic infection by symbiotic strains such as B. tuberum is extremely low.

  10. Plant-associated symbiotic Burkholderia species lack hallmark strategies required in mammalian pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette A Angus

    Full Text Available Burkholderia is a diverse and dynamic genus, containing pathogenic species as well as species that form complex interactions with plants. Pathogenic strains, such as B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, can cause serious disease in mammals, while other Burkholderia strains are opportunistic pathogens, infecting humans or animals with a compromised immune system. Although some of the opportunistic Burkholderia pathogens are known to promote plant growth and even fix nitrogen, the risk of infection to infants, the elderly, and people who are immunocompromised has not only resulted in a restriction on their use, but has also limited the application of non-pathogenic, symbiotic species, several of which nodulate legume roots or have positive effects on plant growth. However, recent phylogenetic analyses have demonstrated that Burkholderia species separate into distinct lineages, suggesting the possibility for safe use of certain symbiotic species in agricultural contexts. A number of environmental strains that promote plant growth or degrade xenobiotics are also included in the symbiotic lineage. Many of these species have the potential to enhance agriculture in areas where fertilizers are not readily available and may serve in the future as inocula for crops growing in soils impacted by climate change. Here we address the pathogenic potential of several of the symbiotic Burkholderia strains using bioinformatics and functional tests. A series of infection experiments using Caenorhabditis elegans and HeLa cells, as well as genomic characterization of pathogenic loci, show that the risk of opportunistic infection by symbiotic strains such as B. tuberum is extremely low.

  11. Genetic and phenotypic diversity in Burkholderia: contributions by prophage and phage-like elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ricky L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia species exhibit enormous phenotypic diversity, ranging from the nonpathogenic, soil- and water-inhabiting Burkholderia thailandensis to the virulent, host-adapted mammalian pathogen B. mallei. Genomic diversity is evident within Burkholderia species as well. Individual isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, for example, carry a variety of strain-specific genomic islands (GIs, including putative pathogenicity and metabolic islands, prophage-like islands, and prophages. These GIs may provide some strains with a competitive advantage in the environment and/or in the host relative to other strains. Results Here we present the results of analysis of 37 prophages, putative prophages, and prophage-like elements from six different Burkholderia species. Five of these were spontaneously induced to form bacteriophage particles from B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis strains and were isolated and fully sequenced; 24 were computationally predicted in sequenced Burkholderia genomes; and eight are previously characterized prophages or prophage-like elements. The results reveal numerous differences in both genome structure and gene content among elements derived from different species as well as from strains within species, due in part to the incorporation of additional DNA, or 'morons' into the prophage genomes. Implications for pathogenicity are also discussed. Lastly, RNAseq analysis of gene expression showed that many of the genes in ϕ1026b that appear to contribute to phage and lysogen fitness were expressed independently of the phage structural and replication genes. Conclusions This study provides the first estimate of the relative contribution of prophages to the vast phenotypic diversity found among the Burkholderiae.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF A BOSEA SP. STRAIN SF5 (MTCC 10045 ISOLATED FROM COMPOST SOIL CAPABLE OF PRODUCING CELLULASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangrila Sadhu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A cellulase producing bacterium, designated SF5 was isolated from compost soil. The strain was identified as Bosea sp. based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and phenotypic characters including detail carbon sources utilization pattern. The effect of various carbohydrates such as Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (CMC avicel, starch, maltose, sucrose, glucose, fructose and lactose (as carbon source on cellulase production revealed that 0.75% CMC (with 8 days incubation was optimum. Among the various nitrogen sources, 0.15% NH4Cl gave optimal production of cellulase. The optimal conditions for the production of cellulase by strain SF5 were determined to be at 37 ºC temperature and at pH 7.0. The strain is also capable of producing xylanase and may have biotechnological potential.

  13. Competition between Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. thailandensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamdee, Wikanda; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Reamtong, Onrapak; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Salje, Jeanne; Low, David A; Peacock, Sharon J; Chantratita, Narisara

    2015-03-03

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis, an often fatal disease in tropical countries. Burkholderia thailandensis is a non-virulent but closely related species. Both species are soil saprophytes but are almost never isolated together. We identified two mechanisms by which B. pseudomallei affects the growth of B. thailandensis. First, we found that six different isolates of B. pseudomallei inhibited the growth of B. thailandensis on LB agar plates. Second, our results indicated that 55% of isolated strains of B. pseudomallei produced a secreted compound that inhibited the motility but not the viability of B. thailandensis. Analysis showed that the active compound was a pH-sensitive and heat-labile compound, likely a protein, which may affect flagella processing or facilitate their degradation. Analysis of bacterial sequence types (STs) demonstrated an association between this and motility inhibition. The active compound was produced from B. pseudomallei during the stationary growth phase. Taken together, our results indicate that B. pseudomallei inhibits both the growth and motility of its close relative B. thailandensis. The latter phenomenon appears to occur via a previously unreported mechanism involving flagellar processing or degradation.

  14. Construction and evaluation of plasmid vectors optimized for constitutive and regulated gene expression in Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebre, Matthew D; Valvano, Miguel A

    2002-12-01

    Genetic studies with Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates are hampered by the limited availability of cloning vectors and by the inherent resistance of these isolates to the most common antibiotics used for genetic selection. Also, some of the promoters widely employed for gene expression in Escherichia coli are inefficient in B. cepacia. In this study, we have utilized the backbone of the vector pME6000, a derivative of the pBBR1 plasmid that was originally isolated from Bordetella bronchiseptica, to construct a set of vectors useful for gene expression in B. cepacia. These vectors contain either the constitutive promoter of the S7 ribosomal protein gene from Burkholderia sp. strain LB400 or the arabinose-inducible P(BAD) promoter from E. coli. Promoter sequences were placed immediately upstream of multiple cloning sites in combination with the minimal sequence of pME6000 required for plasmid maintenance and mobilization. The functionality of both vectors was assessed by cloning the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (e-gfp) and determining the levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein expression and fluorescence emission for a variety of clinical and environmental isolates of the B. cepacia complex. We also demonstrate that B. cepacia carrying these constructs can readily be detected intracellularly by fluorescence microscopy following the infection of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

  15. Molecular insights into Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyov, Edouard E; Brett, Paul J; DeShazer, David

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are closely related gram-negative bacteria that can cause serious diseases in humans and animals. This review summarizes the current and rapidly expanding knowledge on the specific virulence factors employed by these pathogens and their roles in the pathogenesis of melioidosis and glanders. In particular, the contributions of recently identified virulence factors are described in the context of the intracellular lifestyle of these pathogens. Throughout this review, unique and shared virulence features of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are discussed.

  16. Genus-wide acid tolerance accounts for the biogeographical distribution of soil Burkholderia populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Frey, Beat; Fierer, Noah; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-06-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia are highly versatile with respect to their ecological niches and lifestyles, ranging from nodulating tropical plants to causing melioidosis and fatal infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Despite the clinical importance and agronomical relevance of Burkholderia species, information about the factors influencing their occurrence, abundance and diversity in the environment is scarce. Recent findings have demonstrated that pH is the main predictor of soil bacterial diversity and community structure, with the highest diversity observed in neutral pH soils. As many Burkholderia species have been isolated from low pH environments, we hypothesized that acid tolerance may be a general feature of this genus, and pH a good predictor of their occurrence in soils. Using a combination of environmental surveys at trans-continental and local scales, as well as in vitro assays, we show that, unlike most bacteria, Burkholderia species have a competitive advantage in acidic soils, but are outcompeted in alkaline soils. Physiological assays and diversity analysis based on 16S rRNA clone libraries demonstrate that pH tolerance is a general phenotypic trait of the genus Burkholderia. Our results provide a basis for building a predictive understanding of the biogeographical patterns exhibited by Burkholderia sp. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Organization of nif gene cluster in Frankia sp. EuIK1 strain, a symbiont of Elaeagnus umbellata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang Jae; Kim, Ho Bang; Kim, Jitae; Kim, Won Jin; Lee, Hyoungseok; An, Chung Sun

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 20.5-kb genomic region harboring nif genes was determined and analyzed. The fragment was obtained from Frankia sp. EuIK1 strain, an indigenous symbiont of Elaeagnus umbellata. A total of 20 ORFs including 12 nif genes were identified and subjected to comparative analysis with the genome sequences of 3 Frankia strains representing diverse host plant specificities. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences showed highest levels of identity with orthologous genes from an Elaeagnus-infecting strain. The gene organization patterns around the nif gene clusters were well conserved among all 4 Frankia strains. However, characteristic features appeared in the location of the nifV gene for each Frankia strain, depending on the type of host plant. Sequence analysis was performed to determine the transcription units and suggested that there could be an independent operon starting from the nifW gene in the EuIK strain. Considering the organization patterns and their total extensions on the genome, we propose that the nif gene clusters remained stable despite genetic variations occurring in the Frankia genomes.

  18. Reduction of azo dyes by redox mediators originating in the naphthalenesulfonic acid degradation pathway of Sphingomonas sp. strain BN6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, A; Klein, J; Kudlich, M; Stolz, A; Knackmuss, H J; Mattes, R

    1997-01-01

    The anaerobic reduction of azo dyes by Sphingomonas sp. strain BN6 was analyzed. Aerobic conversion of 2-naphthalenesulfonate (2NS) by cells of strain BN6 stimulated the subsequent anaerobic reduction of the sulfonated azo dye amaranth at least 10-fold. In contrast, in crude extracts, the azo reductase activity was not stimulated. A mutant of strain BN6 which was not able to metabolize 2NS showed increased amaranth reduction rates only when the cells were resuspended in the culture supernatant of 2NS-grown BN6 wild-type cells. The same increase could be observed with different bacterial strains. This suggested the presence of an extracellular factor which was formed during the degradation of 2NS by strain BN6. The addition of 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene, the first intermediate of the degradation pathway of 2NS, or its decomposition products to cell suspensions of the mutant of strain BN6 (2NS-) increased the activity of amaranth reduction. The presence of bacterial cells was needed to maintain the reduction process. Thus, the decomposition products of 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene are suggested to act as redox mediators which are able to anaerobically shuttle reduction equivalents from the cells to the extracellular azo dye. PMID:9293019

  19. SACCHAROTHRIX SP. ABH26, A NEW ACTINOBACTERIAL STRAIN FROM ALGERIAN SAHARAN SOIL: ISOLATION, IDENTIFICATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhadi Lahoum

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new strain of actinobacteria, designated ABH26, was isolated from a Saharan soil in the Adrar region (Algeria, by the dilution agar plating method using a chitin-vitamins B medium supplemented with polymyxin and penicillin. The morphological studies showed that this strain represents a member of the Saccharothrix genus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this strain had 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities ranging from 97.63% (with Saccharothrix violaceirubra NBRC 102064T to 99.86% (with Saccharothrix xinjiangensis NBRC 101911T. Furthermore, strain ABH26 presented a strong activity against mycotoxigenic and phytopathogenic fungi including Aspergillus carbonarius (M333, A. flavus (NRRL 3251, A. westerdijkiae (ATCC 3174, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini (Fol and F. solani (Fsol. Additionally, the strain exhibited an important antimicrobial activity against many strains of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans (M2, M3 and IPA200 and against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA 639c. Thus, four solvents (n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol were used for the extraction of produced antibiotic compounds. The highest antimicrobial activities were obtained using the butanolic extract. The thin layer chromatography (TLC method showed two bioactive spots, named HAD1 and HAD2, which were reveled negatively by using chemical revelators (ninhydrin, naphtoresorcinol-sulfuric acid, ferrous iron chloride and formaldehyde-sulfuric. These results indicated the absence of amine group, sugar, hydroxamic acid, phenol and aromatic compound.

  20. Metabolic engineering and comparative performance studies of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strains for effective utilization of xylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh eRanade

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wood sugars such as xylose can be used as an inexpensive carbon source for biotechnological applications. The model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks the ability to catabolize wood sugars as an energy source. Here, we generated four Synechocystis strains that heterologously expressed XylAB enzymes, which mediate xylose catabolism, either in combination with or without one of three xylose transporters, namely XylE, GalP, or Glf. Except for glf, which is derived from the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4, the heterologous genes were sourced from Escherichia coli K-12. All of the recombinant strains were able to utilize xylose in the absence of catabolite repression. When xylose was the lone source of organic carbon, strains possessing the XylE and Glf transporters were most efficient in terms of dry biomass production and xylose consumption and the strain lacking a heterologous transporter was the least efficient. However, in the presence of a xylose-glucose mixed sugar source, the strains exhibited similar levels of growth and xylose consumption. This study demonstrates that various bacterial xylose transporters can boost xylose catabolism in transgenic Synechocystis strains, and paves the way for the sustainable production of bio-compounds and green fuels from lignocellulosic biomass.

  1. Anticancer activity of Cyanothece sp. strain extracts from Egypt: First record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Adel El Semary

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: This is the first study to report the anticancer effect of aqueous extracts derived from the unicellular Cyanothece sp. from Egypt and its potential as a plausible candidate for future mass biotechnological applications.

  2. Characterization of Methylobacterium strains isolated from the phyllosphere and description of Methylobacterium longum sp nov

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knief, C.; Dengler, V.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Vorholt, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Methylobacterium strains are abundantly found in the phyllosphere of plants. Morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomical properties of 12 previously isolated strains were analyzed in order to obtain a more detailed overview of the characteristics of phyllosphere colonizing Methylobacterium

  3. Immune Recognition of the Epidemic Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen Burkholderia dolosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Damien; Weatherholt, Molly; Clark, Bradley; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Renaud, Diane; Scott, David; Skurnik, David; Priebe, Gregory P; Pier, Gerald; Gerard, Craig; Yoder-Himes, Deborah R

    2017-06-01

    Burkholderia dolosa caused an outbreak in the cystic fibrosis (CF) clinic at Boston Children's Hospital from 1998 to 2005 and led to the infection of over 40 patients, many of whom died due to complications from infection by this organism. To assess whether B. dolosa significantly contributes to disease or is recognized by the host immune response, mice were infected with a sequenced outbreak B. dolosa strain, AU0158, and responses were compared to those to the well-studied CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa In parallel, mice were also infected with a polar flagellin mutant of B. dolosa to examine the role of flagella in B. dolosa lung colonization. The results showed a higher persistence in the host by B. dolosa strains, and yet, neutrophil recruitment and cytokine production were lower than those with P. aeruginosa The ability of host immune cells to recognize B. dolosa was then assessed, B. dolosa induced a robust cytokine response in cultured cells, and this effect was dependent on the flagella only when bacteria were dead. Together, these results suggest that B. dolosa can be recognized by host cells in vitro but may avoid or suppress the host immune response in vivo through unknown mechanisms. B. dolosa was then compared to other Burkholderia species and found to induce similar levels of cytokine production despite being internalized by macrophages more than Burkholderia cenocepacia strains. These data suggest that B. dolosa AU0158 may act differently with host cells and is recognized differently by immune systems than are other Burkholderia strains or species. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Non-obligate predatory bacterium Burkholderia casidae and uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    A novel predator bacterium Burkholderia casidae is disclosed. The invention is directed to the isolation and use of Burkholderia casidae to control microbial diseases of plants. The genetic, biochemical and physiological characteristics of Burkholderia casidae are described. Biocontrol compositions comprising Burkholderia casidae, and antimicrobial compounds and antimicrobial preparations prepared from Burkholderia casidae are also disclosed, as are methods for accomplishing all of the forego...

  5. Non-obligate predatory bacterium burkholderia casidaeand uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    A novel predator bacterium Burkholderia casidae is disclosed. The invention is directed to the isolation and use of Burkholderia casidae to control microbial diseases of plants. The genetic, biochemical and physiological characteristics of Burkholderia casidae are described. Biocontrol compositions comprising Burkholderia casidae, and antimicrobial compounds and antimicrobial preparations prepared from Burkholderia casidae are also disclosed, as are methods for accomplishing all of the forego...

  6. Degradation of nicosulfuron by a novel isolated bacterial strain Klebsiella sp. Y1: condition optimization, kinetics and degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Li, Yongmei

    2016-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain Klebsiella sp. Y1 was isolated from the soil of a constructed wetland, and it was identified based on the 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The co-metabolic degradation of nicosulfuron with glucose by Klebsiella sp. Y1 was investigated. The response surface methodology analysis indicated that the optimal pH and temperature were 7.0 and 35 °C, respectively, for the degradation of nicosulfuron. Under the optimal conditions, the degradation of nicosulfuron fitted Haldane kinetics model well. The removal of nicosulfuron was triggered by the acidification of glucose, which accelerated the hydrolysis of nicosulfuron. Then, the C-N bond of the sulfonylurea bridge was attacked and cleaved. Finally, the detected intermediate 2-amino-4,6-dimethoxypyrimidine was further biodegraded.

  7. Transcriptional analysis of the multicopy hao gene coding for hydroxylamine oxidoreductase in Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao; Kato, Junichi

    2006-08-01

    The nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11 has three copies of the gene encoding hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (hao(1), hao(2), and hao(3)) on its genome. Broad-host-range reporter plasmids containing transcriptional fusion genes between hao copies and lacZ were constructed to analyze the expression of each hydroxylamine oxidoreductase gene (hao) copy individually and quantitatively. beta-Galactosidase assays of ENI-11 harboring reporter plasmids revealed that all hao copies were transcribed in the wild-type strain. Promoter analysis of hao copies revealed that transcription of hao(3) was highest among the hao copies. Expression levels of hao(1) and hao(2) were 40% and 62% of that of hao(3) respectively. Transcription of hao(1) was negatively regulated, whereas a portion of hao(3) transcription was read through transcription from the rpsT promoter. When energy-depleted cells were incubated in the growth medium, only hao(3) expression increased. This result suggests that it is hao(3) that is responsible for recovery from energy-depleted conditions in Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11.

  8. Identification and characterization of an archaeal kojibiose catabolic pathway in the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2014-03-01

    A unique gene cluster responsible for kojibiose utilization was identified in the genome of Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04. The proteins it encodes hydrolyze kojibiose, a disaccharide product of glucose caramelization, and form glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) in two steps. Heterologous expression of the kojibiose-related enzymes in Escherichia coli revealed that two genes, Py04_1502 and Py04_1503, encode kojibiose phosphorylase (designated PsKP, for Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 kojibiose phosphorylase) and β-phosphoglucomutase (PsPGM), respectively. Enzymatic assays show that PsKP hydrolyzes kojibiose to glucose and β-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P). The Km values for kojibiose and phosphate were determined to be 2.53 ± 0.21 mM and 1.34 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. PsPGM then converts β-G1P into G6P in the presence of 6 mM MgCl2. Conversion activity from β-G1P to G6P was 46.81 ± 3.66 U/mg, and reverse conversion activity from G6P to β-G1P was 3.51 ± 0.13 U/mg. The proteins are highly thermostable, with optimal temperatures of 90°C for PsKP and 95°C for PsPGM. These results indicate that Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 converts kojibiose into G6P, a substrate of the glycolytic pathway. This is the first report of a disaccharide utilization pathway via phosphorolysis in hyperthermophilic archaea.

  9. Efflux Pump-mediated Drug Resistance in Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Podnecky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in B. cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance.

  10. [Study on the bioleaching mechanism of manganse (II) from manganese-electrolytic residue by manganese-resistant strain Fusarium sp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Xia; Cao, Jian-Bing; Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Huang, Hua-Jun; Liu, Xian; Yang, Hui

    2011-09-01

    The manganse bioleaching mechanism by a manganese-resistant strain Fusarium sp. was investigated, through analyzing the bioleaching rate and manganese-electrolytic residue characterizations with the presence of Fusarium sp. and with the addition of organic acids. Special attention was paid to explore the relationship among the manganese's leaching rate, pH, and organic acid concentration during Fusarium sp. bioleaching process. The research results showed that, with the addition of Fusarium sp., some looser and more porous manganese-electrolytic residues could be obtained. And after 47 hours, the leaching rate reached to 84% which was 2.30 times higher than that leached by individual organic acid even after 130 hours; the leaching rate of manganese and the concentrations of organic acids increased at the initial stage and then decreased, while pH was the reversed. Additionally, the concentration of Succinic acid and L-Malic acid reached their crest value (11.12 g/L and 10.23 g/L) at 57 and 62 hours respectively. Yet the pH reached the lowest (4.09) at 29 h, which implied that, Fusarium sp. and organic acid produced played an important role in the leaching of manganese, leading to a high-efficiency and time-saving process. However, due to the high density of manganese-electrolytic residue and the concurrence of the produce and consumption of organic acid together with the adsorption and complexation, the relationship among the extraction rate for manganese ion, pH, and the concentration of organic acid produced could not be described by simple linear correlation and the leaching rate decreased significantly in the later stage.

  11. Molecular identification and typing of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei: when is enough enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Valery A; Tkachenko, Galina A; Altukhova, Viktoriya V; Savchenko, Sergey S; Zinchenko, Olga V; Viktorov, Dmitry V; Zamaraev, Valery S; Ilyukhin, Vladimir I; Alekseev, Vladimir V

    2008-12-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are highly pathogenic microorganisms for both humans and animals. Moreover, they are regarded as potential agents of bioterrorism. Thus, rapid and unequivocal detection and identification of these dangerous pathogens is critical. In the present study, we describe the use of an optimized protocol for the early diagnosis of experimental glanders and melioidosis and for the rapid differentiation and typing of Burkholderia strains. This experience with PCR-based identification methods indicates that single PCR targets (23S and 16S rRNA genes, 16S-23S intergenic region, fliC and type III secretion gene cluster) should be used with caution for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei, and need to be used alongside molecular methods such as gene sequencing. Several molecular typing procedures have been used to identify genetically related B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates, including ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. However, these methods are time consuming and technically challenging for many laboratories. RAPD, variable amplicon typing scheme, Rep-PCR, BOX-PCR and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis have been recommended by us for the rapid differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains.

  12. ATP-binding cassette systems in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titball Richard W

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP binding cassette (ABC systems are responsible for the import and export of a wide variety of molecules across cell membranes and comprise one of largest protein superfamilies found in prokarya, eukarya and archea. ABC systems play important roles in bacterial lifestyle, virulence and survival. In this study, an inventory of the ABC systems of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243 and Burkholderia mallei strain ATCC 23344 has been compiled using bioinformatic techniques. Results The ABC systems in the genomes of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei have been reannotated and subsequently compared. Differences in the number and types of encoded ABC systems in belonging to these organisms have been identified. For example, ABC systems involved in iron acquisition appear to be correlated with differences in genome size and lifestyles between these two closely related organisms. Conclusion The availability of complete inventories of the ABC systems in B. pseudomallei and B. mallei has enabled a more detailed comparison of the encoded proteins in this family. This has resulted in the identification of ABC systems which may play key roles in the different lifestyles and pathogenic properties of these two bacteria. This information has the potential to be exploited for improved clinical identification of these organisms as well as in the development of new vaccines and therapeutics targeted against the diseases caused by these organisms.

  13. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, a moderately halophilic bacterium that produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  14. Mode of action of metabolites from Bacillus sp. strain IBA 33 on Geotrichum citri-aurantii arthroconidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, María Antonieta; Navarro, Antonio R; Maldonado, María Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Geotrichum citri-aurantii is a postharvest phytopathogenic fungus of lemons. We studied the mode of action of antifungal metabolites from Bacillus sp. strain IBA 33 on arthroconidia of G. citri-aurantii. These metabolites are lipopeptides belonging to the iturin family. Membrane permeabilization of G. citri-aurantii was analyzed and mitochondrial respiratory rate was evaluated. Disturbance of the plasma membrane promotes the leakage of many cellular components into the surrounding media, and mitochondrial membrane disorganization promotes the inhibition of the respiratory rate. Our findings provide insights into the ability of lipopeptides to suppress plant fungal pathogens and their possible agronomical applications.

  15. Chemical Mechanism of the Phosphotriesterase from Sphingobium sp. Strain TCM1, an Enzyme Capable of Hydrolyzing Organophosphate Flame Retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigley, Andrew N; Xiang, Dao Feng; Ren, Zhongjie; Xue, Haoran; Hull, Kenneth G; Romo, Daniel; Raushel, Frank M

    2016-03-09

    The mechanism of action of the manganese-dependent phosphotriesterase from Sphingobium sp. strain TCM1 that is capable of hydrolyzing organophosphate flame retardants was determined. The enzyme was shown to hydrolyze the RP-enantiomer of O-methyl O-cyclohexyl p-nitrophenyl thiophosphate with net inversion of configuration and without the formation of a covalent reaction intermediate. These results demonstrate that the enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of substrates by activation of a nucleophilic water molecule for direct attack at the phosphorus center.

  16. Evidence for Increased Aggressiveness in a Recent Widespread Strain of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Causing Stripe Rust of Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milus, Eugene A; Kristensen, Kristian; Hovmøller, Mogens S

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust (yellow rust) of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, has become more severe in eastern United States, Australia, and elsewhere since 2000. Recent research has shown that this coincided with a global spread of two closely related strains that were similar based...... regimes for latent period, lesion length, lesion width, lesion area, and spore production on adult plants of a susceptible wheat cultivar with no known genes for resistance to stripe rust. "New" isolates (since 2000) were significantly more aggressive than "old" isolates (before 2000) for all variables...... that wheat rust fungi can adapt to warmer temperatures and cause severe disease in previously unfavorable environments...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain KM-1, a Moderately Halophilic Bacterium That Produces the Bioplastic Poly(3-Hydroxybutyrate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate. PMID:22535927

  18. Immunoproteomic analysis of proteins expressed by two related pathogens, Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia, during human infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minu Shinoy

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes chronic infections in people with cystic fibrosis (CF. It is a highly antibiotic resistant organism and Bcc infections are rarely cleared from patients, once they are colonized. The two most clinically relevant species within Bcc are Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans. The virulence of these pathogens has not been fully elucidated and the virulence proteins expressed during human infection have not been identified to date. Furthermore, given its antibiotic resistance, prevention of infection with a prophylactic vaccine may represent a better alternative than eradication of an existing infection. We have compared the immunoproteome of two strains each from these two species of Bcc, with the aim of identifying immunogenic proteins which are common to both species. Fourteen immunoreactive proteins were exclusive to both B. cenocepacia strains, while 15 were exclusive to B. multivorans. A total of 15 proteins were immunogenic across both species. DNA-directed RNA polymerase, GroEL, 38kDa porin and elongation factor-Tu were immunoreactive proteins expressed by all four strains examined. Many proteins which were immunoreactive in both species, warrant further investigations in order to aid in the elucidation of the mechanisms of pathogenesis of this difficult organism. In addition, identification of some of these could also allow the development of protective vaccines which may prevent colonisation.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain XI10 Isolated from the Brine-Seawater Interface of Erba Deep in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Guishan

    2016-03-10

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain XI10 was isolated from the brine-seawater interface of Erba Deep in the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain XI10, a gammaproteobacterium that synthesizes polysaccharides for biofilm formation when grown in liquid culture.

  20. Expression of the neutral protease gene from a thermophilic Bacillus sp BT1 strain in Bacillus subtilis and its natural host : Identification of a functional promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecerek, B; Venema, G

    The expression of the neutral protease gene (npr) from the thermophilic Bacillus sp. BT1 strain was studied in its natural host and in mesophilic Bacillus subtilis. In the thermophilic BT1 strain, the transcription of the protease gene is initiated from its own promoter, just 5' to the gene. In

  1. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens Strain MCB, Associated with Oscheius sp. MCB (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) Isolated from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serepa, Mahloro H; Gray, Vincent M

    2014-09-18

    Here we report on the draft genome sequence of Serratia marcescens strain MCB associated with Oscheius sp. MCB (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) isolated from South African soil. S. marcescens strain MCB has 5,304,212-bp genome size with 4,877 genes and a G+C content of 59.1%. Copyright © 2014 Serepa and Gray.

  2. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Serratia marcescens Strain MCB, Associated with Oscheius sp. MCB (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) Isolated from South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Serepa, Mahloro H.; Vincent M. Gray

    2014-01-01

    Here we report on the draft genome sequence of Serratia marcescens strain MCB associated with Oscheius sp. MCB (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) isolated from South African soil. S. marcescens strain MCB has 5,304,212-bp genome size with 4,877 genes and a G+C content of 59.1%.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic Strain Clostridium sp. Bc-iso-3 Isolated from an Industrial-Scale Anaerobic Digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Schnürer, Anna

    2016-10-27

    Clostridium sp. Bc-iso-3 is a cellulolytic strain isolated from a Swedish industrial-scale biogas digester. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of four contigs with a total length of 4,327,139 bp and an average coverage of 312.97×. Copyright © 2016 Sun and Schnürer.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium sp. Strain L2-4, a Leaf-Associated Endophytic N-Fixing Bacterium Isolated from Jatropha curcas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Chan, Kam Lock; Ji, Lianghui

    2014-01-01

    Methylobacterium sp. strain L2-4 is an efficient nitrogen-fixing leaf colonizer of biofuel crop Jatropha curcas. This strain is able to greatly improve the growth and seed yield of Jatropha curcas and is the second reported genome sequence of plant growth-promoting bacteria isolated from Jatropha curcas.

  5. Effects of Bacterial Community Members on the Proteome of the Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. Strain Is79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, Christopher J; Nielsen, Susanne; Greis, Kenneth D; Haffey, Wendy D; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ticak, Tomislav; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Bollmann, Annette

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms in the environment do not exist as the often-studied pure cultures but as members of complex microbial communities. Characterizing the interactions within microbial communities is essential to understand their function in both natural and engineered environments. In this study, we investigated how the presence of a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium (NOB) and heterotrophic bacteria affect the growth and proteome of the chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) Nitrosomonas sp. strain Is79. We investigated Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 in co-culture with Nitrobacter winogradskyi, in co-cultures with selected heterotrophic bacteria, and as a member of the nitrifying enrichment culture G5-7. In batch culture, N. winogradskyi and heterotrophic bacteria had positive effects on the growth of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics approach was used to investigate the effect of N. winogradskyi and the co-cultured heterotrophic bacteria from G5-7 on the proteome of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79. In co-culture with N. winogradskyi, several Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 oxidative stress response proteins changed in abundance, with periplasmic proteins increasing and cytoplasmic proteins decreasing in abundance. In the presence of heterotrophic bacteria, the abundance of proteins directly related to the ammonia oxidation pathway increased, while the abundance of proteins related to amino acid synthesis and metabolism decreased. In summary, the proteome of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 was differentially influenced by the presence of either N. winogradskyi or heterotrophic bacteria. Together, N. winogradskyi and heterotrophic bacteria reduced the oxidative stress for Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, which resulted in more efficient metabolism. Aerobic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms play an important role in the global nitrogen cycle, converting ammonia to nitrite. In their

  6. Counts of Slackia sp. strain NATTS in intestinal flora are correlated to serum concentrations of equol both in prostate cancer cases and controls in Japanese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yukiko; Nagata, Yoshie; Fukuta, Fumimasa; Takayanagi, Akio; Masumori, Naoya; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Saito, Shigeyuki; Miura, Tetsuji; Moriyama, Kaoru; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Akaza, Hideyuki; Mori, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Isoflavones, which are included in soybeans, have been suggested to protect against prostate cancer. Equol, one of isoflavones, is an intestinally derived bacterial metabolite of daidzein. A newly identified equol-producing bacterium, Slackia sp. strain NATTS, with a high equol-producing activity was isolated from human feces in Japanese adults. Counts of Slackia sp. strain NATTS in intestinal flora have not been assessed with regard to prostate cancer risk. In this study, we investigated the association of serum isoflavones and counts of Slackia sp. strain NATTS with prostate cancer risk in a case-control study. Concentrations of isoflavones and counts of Slackia sp. strain NATTS in feces were measured from 44 patients with prostate cancer and 28 hospital controls. The risk of prostate cancer was evaluated in terms of odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by the logistic regression analysis. The detection proportions of Slackia sp. strain NATTS in cases and controls were 34.1% and 25.0%, respectively. Counts of Slackia sp. strain NATTS were significantly correlated with serum concentrations of equol both in cases and controls (Spearman correlation coefficients, rs=0.639 and rs=0.572, p<0.01, respectively). Serum concentrations of genistein, daidzein, glycitein, and equol were not significantly associated with risk of prostate cancer. This study found that counts of Slackia sp. strain NATTS correlated with serum concentrations of equol both in prostate cancer cases and controls, but serum isoflavone concentrations were not associated with risk of prostate cancer in our patients.

  7. Identification of a novel dihydrodaidzein racemase essential for biosynthesis of equol from daidzein in Lactococcus sp. strain 20-92.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Masayuki; Miyazawa, Norihiro; Abiru, Yasuhiro; Uchiyama, Shigeto; Hishigaki, Haretsugu

    2012-07-01

    Equol is metabolized from daidzein, a soy isoflavone, by the gut microflora. In this study, we identified a novel dihydrodaidzein racemase (L-DDRC) that is involved in equol biosynthesis in a lactic acid bacterium, Lactococcus sp. strain 20-92, and confirmed that histidine-tagged recombinant L-DDRC (L-DDRC-His) was able to convert both the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of dihydrodaidzein to the racemate. Moreover, we showed that recombinant L-DDRC-His was essential for in vitro equol production from daidzein by a recombinant enzyme mixture and that efficient in vitro equol production from daidzein was possible using at least four enzymes, including L-DDRC. We also proposed a model of the metabolic pathway from daidzein to equol in Lactococcus strain 20-92.

  8. Identification of a Novel Dihydrodaidzein Racemase Essential for Biosynthesis of Equol from Daidzein in Lactococcus sp. Strain 20-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Miyazawa, Norihiro; Abiru, Yasuhiro; Uchiyama, Shigeto; Hishigaki, Haretsugu

    2012-01-01

    Equol is metabolized from daidzein, a soy isoflavone, by the gut microflora. In this study, we identified a novel dihydrodaidzein racemase (l-DDRC) that is involved in equol biosynthesis in a lactic acid bacterium, Lactococcus sp. strain 20-92, and confirmed that histidine-tagged recombinant l-DDRC (l-DDRC-His) was able to convert both the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of dihydrodaidzein to the racemate. Moreover, we showed that recombinant l-DDRC-His was essential for in vitro equol production from daidzein by a recombinant enzyme mixture and that efficient in vitro equol production from daidzein was possible using at least four enzymes, including l-DDRC. We also proposed a model of the metabolic pathway from daidzein to equol in Lactococcus strain 20-92. PMID:22582059

  9. Biocontrol of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria and bacterial phytopathogens by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Damian; Chanyi, Ryan M; Dooley, James S; Moore, John E; Koval, Susan F

    2017-04-01

    Bdellovibrio and like organisms are predatory bacteria that have the unusual property of using the cytoplasmic constituents of other Gram-negative bacteria as nutrients. These predators may thus provide an alternative approach to the biocontrol of human and plant pathogens. Predators were isolated on Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 and J2315 as prey cells, in enrichment cultures with soil and sewage. Three isolates (DM7C, DM8A, and DM11A) were identified as Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus on the basis of morphology, a periplasmic life cycle, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The prey range of these isolates was tested on Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria and several phytopathogenic bacteria of agricultural importance. Of 31 strains of the Burkholderia cepacia complex tested, only 4 were resistant to predation by strain DM7C. A subset of 9 of the prey tested were also susceptible to strains DM8A and DM11A. Of 12 phytopathogens tested, 4 were resistant to strains DM7C and DM8A, and only 2 were resistant to strain DM11A. Thus, Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus strains retrieved from environmental samples on 2 Burkholderia cenocepacia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients did not distinguish in their prey range between other isolates of that pathogen or phytopathogens. Such strains hold promise as potential wide-spectrum biocontrol agents.

  10. Weight and morphometric growth of different strains of tilapia (Oreochromis sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bezerra Allaman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the morphometric growth and weight gain of strains of tilapia (Thai, Red, UFLA and Commercial by nonlinear models. Initially, 500 male fingerlings of each strain, at 85 (Red and UFLA and 86 (Thai and Commercial days of age, were stocked separately in raceways with 56 m³. Twenty fish of each strain were randomly sampled, weighed and measured monthly. Five nonlinear models (Brody, von Bertalanffy, Gompertz, logistic and exponential were tested, choosing one that best fit to the data. The variables studied were: weight, standard length (SL, head length (HL, height 1 (H1, height 2 (H2, height 3 (H3, first distance (D1, second distance (D2, first width (W1, second width (W2 and third width (W3. The exponential model had the best fit to weight and morphometric data, with the exception of W2, in which the best fitted model was von Bertalanffy. The convergence of the exponential model to data indicates that the cultivation period studied was not enough for the strains to reach maturity weight. The UFLA strain presented the lowest value for parameter "a" (initial weight estimate, 8.71 g, and the highest for parameter k (specific growth rate, 0.0127, when compared with other evaluated strains. However, the highest k of UFLA was not enough to overcome the final weight observed for the Commercial strain (603.1 g, which was higher than all other strains. Regarding the morphometric measurements, the UFLA strain also had the highest k for the variables SL, HL, HH, H1, H2, H3 and D2, and similar k to Commercial and Thai strains for the variables D1 and W3 respectively. The strains differ as to weight gain and morphometric growth.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium sp. Strain AMS5, an Isolate from a Soybean Stem

    OpenAIRE

    Minami, Tomoyuki; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Anda, Mizue; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Sugawara, Masayuki; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2016-01-01

    Nonrhizobial Methylobacterium spp. inhabit the phyllosphere of a wide variety of plants. We report here the complete genome sequence of Methylobacterium sp. AMS5, which was isolated from a soybean stem. The information is useful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between nonrhizobial Methylobacterium spp. and plants.

  12. Mixotrophic growth of two thermophilic Methanosarcina strains, Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 and Methanosarcina sp. SO-2P, on methanol and hydrogen/carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1997-01-01

    Two thermophilic strains, Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 and Methanosarcina sp. SO-2P, were capable of mixotrophic growth on methanol and H-2/CO2. Activated carbon was, however, found to be necessary to support good growth. Both strains used hydrogen and methanol simultaneously. When methanol...... was depleted, hydrogen utilization continued and methane was further produced with concurrent cell growth. UV epifluorescence microscopy revealed that aggregates of both strains exhibited a bright red fluorescence besides the usual blue-green fluorescence....

  13. Crosstalk between sugarcane and a plant-growth promoting Burkholderia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat; Lonhienne, Thierry G. A.; Yeoh, Yun Kit; Donose, Bogdan C.; Webb, Richard I.; Parsons, Jeremy; Liao, Webber; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Hugenholtz, Philip; Schmidt, Susanne; Ragan, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species in the plant-beneficial-environmental clade of Burkholderia represent a substantial component of rhizosphere microbes in many plant species. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction, we combined functional studies with high-resolution dual transcriptome analysis of sugarcane and root-associated diazotrophic Burkholderia strain Q208. We show that Burkholderia Q208 forms a biofilm at the root surface and suppresses the virulence factors that typically trigger immune response in plants. Up-regulation of bd-type cytochromes in Burkholderia Q208 suggests an increased energy production and creates the microaerobic conditions suitable for BNF. In this environment, a series of metabolic pathways are activated in Burkholderia Q208 implicated in oxalotrophy, microaerobic respiration, and formation of PHB granules, enabling energy production under microaerobic conditions. In the plant, genes involved in hypoxia survival are up-regulated and through increased ethylene production, larger aerenchyma is produced in roots which in turn facilitates diffusion of oxygen within the cortex. The detected changes in gene expression, physiology and morphology in the partnership are evidence of a sophisticated interplay between sugarcane and a plant-growth promoting Burkholderia species that advance our understanding of the mutually beneficial processes occurring in the rhizosphere. PMID:27869215

  14. Raman spectroscopic detection and identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei in feedstuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Stephan; Meisel, Susann; Elschner, Mandy; Melzer, Falk; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei (the etiologic agent of glanders in equines and rarely humans) and Burkholderia pseudomallei, causing melioidosis in humans and animals, are designated category B biothreat agents. The intrinsically high resistance of both agents to many antibiotics, their potential use as bioweapons, and their low infectious dose, necessitate the need for rapid and accurate detection methods. Current methods to identify these organisms may require up to 1 week, as they rely on phenotypic characteristics and an extensive set of biochemical reactions. In this study, Raman microspectroscopy, a cultivation-independent typing technique for single bacterial cells with the potential for being a rapid point-of-care analysis system, is evaluated to identify and differentiate B. mallei and B. pseudomallei within hours. Here, not only broth-cultured microbes but also bacteria isolated out of pelleted animal feedstuff were taken into account. A database of Raman spectra allowed a calculation of classification functions, which were trained to differentiate Raman spectra of not only both pathogens but also of five further Burkholderia spp. and four species of the closely related genus Pseudomonas. The developed two-stage classification system comprising two support vector machine (SVM) classifiers was then challenged by a test set of 11 samples to simulate the case of a real-world-scenario, when "unknown samples" are to be identified. In the end, all test set samples were identified correctly, even if the contained bacterial strains were not incorporated in the database before or were isolated out of animal feedstuff. Specifically, the five test samples bearing B. mallei and B. pseudomallei were correctly identified on species level with accuracies between 93.9 and 98.7%. The sample analysis itself requires no biomass enrichment step prior to the analysis and can be performed under biosafety level 1 (BSL 1) conditions after inactivating the bacteria with formaldehyde.

  15. Pesticide tolerant and phosphorus solubilizing Pseudomonas sp. strain SGRAJ09 isolated from pesticides treated Achillea clavennae rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasankar, R; Manju Gayathry, G; Sathiavelu, A; Ramalingam, C; Saravanan, V S

    2013-05-01

    In this study, an attempt was made to identify an effective phosphate solubilizing bacteria from pesticide polluted field soil. Based on the formation of solubilization halo on Pikovskaya's agar, six isolates were selected and screened for pesticide tolerance and phosphate (P) solubilization ability through liquid assay. The results showed that only one strain (SGRAJ09) obtained from Achillea clavennae was found to tolerate maximum level of the pesticides tested and it was phylogenetically identified as Pseudomonas sp. It possessed a wide range of pesticide tolerance, ranging from 117 μg mL(-1) for alphamethrin to 2,600 μg mL(-1) for endosulfan. The available P concentrations increased with the maximum and double the maximum dose of monocrotophos and imidacloprid, respectively. On subjected to FT-IR and HPLC analysis, the presence of organic acids functional group in the culture broth and the production of gluconic acid as dominant acid aiding the P solubilization were identified. On comparison with control broth, monocrotophos and imidacloprid added culture broth showed quantitatively high organic acids production. In addition to gluconic acid production, citric and acetic acids were also observed in the pesticide amended broth. Furthermore, the Pseudomonas sp. strain SGRAJ09 possessed all the plant growth promoting traits tested. In presence of monocrotophos and imidacloprid, its plant growth promoting activities were lower than that of the pesticides unamended treatment.

  16. Approach toward enhancement of halophilic protease production by Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 using statistical design response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julalak Chuprom

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new potent halophilic protease producer, Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 was isolated from salt-fermented fish samples (budu and identified by phenotypic analysis, and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Thereafter, sequential statistical strategy was used to optimize halophilic protease production from Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 by shake-flask fermentation. The classical one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT approach determined gelatin was the best nitrogen source. Based on Plackett–Burman (PB experimental design; gelatin, MgSO4·7H2O, NaCl and pH significantly influenced the halophilic protease production. Central composite design (CCD determined the optimum level of medium components. Subsequently, an 8.78-fold increase in corresponding halophilic protease yield (156.22 U/mL was obtained, compared with that produced in the original medium (17.80 U/mL. Validation experiments proved the adequacy and accuracy of model, and the results showed the predicted value agreed well with the experimental values. An overall 13-fold increase in halophilic protease yield was achieved using a 3 L laboratory fermenter and optimized medium (231.33 U/mL.

  17. Influence of growth medium on cometabolic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong Yin; Wang Xiaowei [Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). State Key Lab. of Biocontrol; Futian-CityU Mangrove Research and Development Centre, Shenzhen (China). Futian National Nature Reserve; Luan Tiangang; Lan Chongyu [Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Guangzhou (China). State Key Lab. of Biocontrol; Tam, N.F.Y. [Futian-CityU Mangrove Research and Development Centre, Shenzhen (China). Futian National Nature Reserve; City Univ. of Hong Kong, Kowloon (China). Dept. of Biology and Chemistry

    2007-05-15

    The influence of growth medium on cometabolic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated when Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4 isolated from surface mangrove sediments was grown in either phenanthrene-containing mineral salts medium (PMSM) or nutrient broth (NB). The NB-grown culture exhibited a more rapid cometabolic degradation of single and mixed non-growth substrate PAHs compared to the PMSM-grown culture. The concentrations of PAH metabolites were also lower in NB-grown culture than in PMSM-grown culture, suggesting that NB-grown culture removed metabolites at a faster rate, particularly, for metabolites produced from cometabolic degradation of a binary mixture of PAHs. Cometabolic pathways of single PAH (anthracene, fluorene, or fluoranthene) in NB-grown culture showed similarity to that in PMSM-grown culture. However, cometabolic pathways of mixed PAHs were more diverse in NB-grown culture than that in PMSM-grown culture. These results indicated that nutrient rich medium was effective in enhancing cometabolic degradation of mixed PAHs concomitant with a rapid removal of metabolites, which could be useful for the bioremediation of mixed PAHs contaminated sites using Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4. (orig.)

  18. Influence of growth medium on cometabolic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yin; Luan, Tiangang; Wang, Xiaowei; Lan, Chongyu; Tam, Nora F Y

    2007-05-01

    The influence of growth medium on cometabolic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated when Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4 isolated from surface mangrove sediments was grown in either phenanthrene-containing mineral salts medium (PMSM) or nutrient broth (NB). The NB-grown culture exhibited a more rapid cometabolic degradation of single and mixed non-growth substrate PAHs compared to the PMSM-grown culture. The concentrations of PAH metabolites were also lower in NB-grown culture than in PMSM-grown culture, suggesting that NB-grown culture removed metabolites at a faster rate, particularly, for metabolites produced from cometabolic degradation of a binary mixture of PAHs. Cometabolic pathways of single PAH (anthracene, fluorene, or fluoranthene) in NB-grown culture showed similarity to that in PMSM-grown culture. However, cometabolic pathways of mixed PAHs were more diverse in NB-grown culture than that in PMSM-grown culture. These results indicated that nutrient rich medium was effective in enhancing cometabolic degradation of mixed PAHs concomitant with a rapid removal of metabolites, which could be useful for the bioremediation of mixed PAHs contaminated sites using Sphingomonas sp. strain PheB4.

  19. Yeast extract promotes decolorization of azo dyes by stimulating azoreductase activity in Shewanella sp. strain IFN4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Negm, Fayek; Khalid, Azeem; Shaharoona, Baby; Hussain, Sabir; Mahmood Nadeem, Sajid; Crowley, David E

    2016-02-01

    Biological treatment of azo dyes commonly requires a combined anaerobic-aerobic process in which initial decolorization is achieved by reductive cleavage of azo bonds on the parent molecule. The present study was conducted to examine the relative importance of co-substrates for driving reductive decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. strain IFN4 using whole cells and enzyme assays. Results showed that the dye decolorization by strain IFN4 was faster in medium containing 1gL(-1) yeast extract (YE) as compared to nine other co-substrates. Moreover, only YE stimulated azoreductase activity (increased from 1.32 to 4.19U/mg protein). Increasing the level of YE up to 8gL(-)(1) resulted into 81% decolorization of the dye in 1h along with an increase in azoreductase activity up to 6.16U/mg protein. Among the components of YE, only riboflavin stimulated the decolorization process as well as enzyme activity. Moreover, strain IFN4 demonstrated flavin reductase activity, and a significant correlation (r(2)=0.98) between flavin reduction and dye reduction by this strain emphasized the involvement of flavin compounds in the decolorization process. The results of this study show that YE serves both as a source of reducing equivalents and an electron shuttle for catalyzing dye reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysing the dhaT gene in Colombian Clostridium sp. (Clostridia 1,3-propanediol-producing strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Milena Quilaguy-Ayure

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the dhaT gene, one of the genes responsible for the 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD production, in two native Clostridiumstrains. Materials and methods: The dhaT gene was amplified by Polimerase Chain Reaction with specific primers designed fromClostridium butyricum VPI1718 operon. Bioinformatics tools like BLASTN, ORF finder, BLASTP and ClustalW were used to determinethe identity of the sequence and to assign a function. Results: DNA amplification products were obtained from Colombian Clostridium sp.native strains (IBUN 13A and IBUN 158B and the Clostridium butyricum DSM 2478 strain, which were sequenced. According to thebioinformatics analysis of the above sequences, a high degree of similarity was found with the dhaT gene of different bacterial species. Thehighest percentage of identity was obtained with the Clostridium butyricum VPI 1718 strain. Conclusion: knowledge of the physicalstructure of the 1,3-PD operon in native strains opens the way for developing genetic and metabolic engineering strategies for improvingprocesses productivity.

  1. Microbial community dynamics during the bioremediation process of chlorimuron-ethyl-contaminated soil by Hansschlegelia sp. strain CHL1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Yang

    Full Text Available Long-term and excessive application of chlorimuron-ethyl has led to a series of environmental problems. Strain Hansschlegelia sp. CHL1, a highly efficient chlorimuron-ethyl degrading bacterium isolated in our previous study, was employed in the current soil bioremediation study. The residues of chlorimuron-ethyl in soils were detected, and the changes of soil microbial communities were investigated by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA analysis. The results showed that strain CHL1 exhibited significant chlorimuron-ethyl degradation ability at wide range of concentrations between 10μg kg-1 and 1000μg kg-1. High concentrations of chlorimuron-ethyl significantly decreased the total concentration of PLFAs and the Shannon-Wiener indices and increased the stress level of microbes in soils. The inoculation with strain CHL1, however, reduced the inhibition on soil microbes caused by chlorimuron-ethyl. The results demonstrated that strain CHL1 is effective in the remediation of chlorimuron-ethyl-contaminated soil, and has the potential to remediate chlorimuron-ethyl contaminated soils in situ.

  2. Characterization of the Polyurethanolytic Activity of Two Alicycliphilus sp. Strains Able To Degrade Polyurethane and N-Methylpyrrolidone▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oceguera-Cervantes, Alejandro; Carrillo-García, Agustín; López, Néstor; Bolaños-Nuñez, Sandra; Cruz-Gómez, M. Javier; Wacher, Carmen; Loza-Tavera, Herminia

    2007-01-01

    Two bacterial strains (BQ1 and BQ8) were isolated from decomposed soft foam. These were selected for their capacity to grow in a minimal medium (MM) supplemented with a commercial surface-coating polyurethane (PU) (Hydroform) as the carbon source (MM-PUh). Both bacterial strains were identified as Alicycliphilus sp. by comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Growth in MM-PUh showed hyperbolic behavior, with BQ1 producing higher maximum growth (17.8 ± 0.6 mg·ml−1) than BQ8 (14.0 ± 0.6 mg·ml−1) after 100 h of culture. Nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of Hydroform showed that it was a polyester PU type which also contained N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) as an additive. Alicycliphilus sp. utilizes NMP during the first stage of growth and was able to use it as the sole carbon and nitrogen source, with calculated Ks values of about 8 mg·ml−1. Enzymatic activities related to PU degradation (esterase, protease, and urease activities) were tested by using differential media and activity assays in cell-free supernatants of bacterial cultures in MM-PUh. Induction of esterase activity in inoculated MM-PUh, but not that of protease or urease activities, was observed at 12 h of culture. Esterase activity reached its maximum at 18 h and was maintained at 50% of its maximal activity until the end of the analysis (120 h). The capacity of Alicycliphilus sp. to degrade PU was demonstrated by changes in the PU IR spectrum and by the numerous holes produced in solid PU observed by scanning electron microscopy after bacterial culture. Changes in the PU IR spectra indicate that an esterase activity is involved in PU degradation. PMID:17693569

  3. Characterization of the polyurethanolytic activity of two Alicycliphilus sp. strains able to degrade polyurethane and N-methylpyrrolidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oceguera-Cervantes, Alejandro; Carrillo-García, Agustín; López, Néstor; Bolaños-Nuñez, Sandra; Cruz-Gómez, M Javier; Wacher, Carmen; Loza-Tavera, Herminia

    2007-10-01

    Two bacterial strains (BQ1 and BQ8) were isolated from decomposed soft foam. These were selected for their capacity to grow in a minimal medium (MM) supplemented with a commercial surface-coating polyurethane (PU) (Hydroform) as the carbon source (MM-PUh). Both bacterial strains were identified as Alicycliphilus sp. by comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Growth in MM-PUh showed hyperbolic behavior, with BQ1 producing higher maximum growth (17.8 +/- 0.6 mg.ml(-1)) than BQ8 (14.0 +/- 0.6 mg.ml(-1)) after 100 h of culture. Nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of Hydroform showed that it was a polyester PU type which also contained N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) as an additive. Alicycliphilus sp. utilizes NMP during the first stage of growth and was able to use it as the sole carbon and nitrogen source, with calculated K(s) values of about 8 mg.ml(-1). Enzymatic activities related to PU degradation (esterase, protease, and urease activities) were tested by using differential media and activity assays in cell-free supernatants of bacterial cultures in MM-PUh. Induction of esterase activity in inoculated MM-PUh, but not that of protease or urease activities, was observed at 12 h of culture. Esterase activity reached its maximum at 18 h and was maintained at 50% of its maximal activity until the end of the analysis (120 h). The capacity of Alicycliphilus sp. to degrade PU was demonstrated by changes in the PU IR spectrum and by the numerous holes produced in solid PU observed by scanning electron microscopy after bacterial culture. Changes in the PU IR spectra indicate that an esterase activity is involved in PU degradation.

  4. Draft genome sequences of eight bacteria isolated from the indoor environment: Staphylococcus capitis strain H36, S. capitis strain H65, S. cohnii strain H62, S. hominis strain H69, Microbacterium sp. strain H83, Mycobacterium iranicum strain H39, Plantibacter sp. strain H53, and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strain H72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulou, Despoina S; Coil, David A; Schichnes, Denise; Lindow, Steven E; Jospin, Guillaume; Eisen, Jonathan A; Adams, Rachel I

    2017-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of eight bacterial strains of the genera Staphylococcus, Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Plantibacter, and Pseudomonas. These isolates were obtained from aerosol sampling of bathrooms of five residences in the San Francisco Bay area. Taxonomic classifications as well as the genome sequence and gene annotation of the isolates are described. As part of the "Built Environment Reference Genome" project, these isolates and associated genome data provide valuable resources for studying the microbiology of the built environment.

  5. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therien, Jesse B; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Posewitz, Matthew C; Bryant, Donald A; Peters, John W

    2014-01-01

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. Here we demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Optimal growth conditions for co-cultivation of C. reinhardtii with wild-type and mutant strains of Synechococcus sp. 7002 were established. In co-culture, acetate produced by a glycogen synthase knockout mutant of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was able to support the growth of a lipid-accumulating mutant strain of C. reinhardtii defective in starch production. Encapsulation of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 using an alginate matrix was successfully employed in co-cultures to limit growth and maintain the stability. The ability of immobilized strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to produce acetate at a level adequate to support the growth of lipid-accumulating strains of C. reinhartdii offers a potentially practical, photosynthetic alternative to providing exogenous acetate into growth media.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  7. Phylogeographic, genomic, and meropenem susceptibility analysis of Burkholderia ubonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Burkholderia ubonensis is commonly co-isolated from environmental specimens harbouring the melioidosis pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. B. ubonensis has been reported in northern Australia and Thailand but not North America, suggesting similar geographic distribution to B. pseudomallei. Unlike most other Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc species, B. ubonensis is considered non-pathogenic, although its virulence potential has not been tested. Antibiotic resistance in B. ubonensis, particularly towards drugs used to treat the most severe B. pseudomallei infections, has also been poorly characterised. This study examined the population biology of B. ubonensis, and includes the first reported isolates from the Caribbean. Phylogenomic analysis of 264 B. ubonensis genomes identified distinct clades that corresponded with geographic origin, similar to B. pseudomallei. A small proportion (4% of strains lacked the 920kb chromosome III replicon, with discordance of presence/absence amongst genetically highly related strains, demonstrating that the third chromosome of B. ubonensis, like other Bcc species, probably encodes for a nonessential pC3 megaplasmid. Multilocus sequence typing using the B. pseudomallei scheme revealed that one-third of strains lack the "housekeeping" narK locus. In comparison, all strains could be genotyped using the Bcc scheme. Several strains possessed high-level meropenem resistance (≥32 μg/mL, a concern due to potential transmission of this phenotype to B. pseudomallei. In silico analysis uncovered a high degree of heterogeneity among the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen cluster loci, with at least 35 different variants identified. Finally, we show that Asian B. ubonensis isolate RF23-BP41 is avirulent in the BALB/c mouse model via a subcutaneous route of infection. Our results provide several new insights into the biology of this understudied species.

  8. Phylogeographic, genomic, and meropenem susceptibility analysis of Burkholderia ubonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; Webb, Jessica R; Hall, Carina M; Jaramillo, Sierra A; Sahl, Jason W; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Harrington, Glenda; Baker, Anthony L; Sidak-Loftis, Lindsay C; Settles, Erik W; Lummis, Madeline; Schupp, James M; Gillece, John D; Tuanyok, Apichai; Warner, Jeffrey; Busch, Joseph D; Keim, Paul; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M

    2017-09-01

    The bacterium Burkholderia ubonensis is commonly co-isolated from environmental specimens harbouring the melioidosis pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. B. ubonensis has been reported in northern Australia and Thailand but not North America, suggesting similar geographic distribution to B. pseudomallei. Unlike most other Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species, B. ubonensis is considered non-pathogenic, although its virulence potential has not been tested. Antibiotic resistance in B. ubonensis, particularly towards drugs used to treat the most severe B. pseudomallei infections, has also been poorly characterised. This study examined the population biology of B. ubonensis, and includes the first reported isolates from the Caribbean. Phylogenomic analysis of 264 B. ubonensis genomes identified distinct clades that corresponded with geographic origin, similar to B. pseudomallei. A small proportion (4%) of strains lacked the 920kb chromosome III replicon, with discordance of presence/absence amongst genetically highly related strains, demonstrating that the third chromosome of B. ubonensis, like other Bcc species, probably encodes for a nonessential pC3 megaplasmid. Multilocus sequence typing using the B. pseudomallei scheme revealed that one-third of strains lack the "housekeeping" narK locus. In comparison, all strains could be genotyped using the Bcc scheme. Several strains possessed high-level meropenem resistance (≥32 μg/mL), a concern due to potential transmission of this phenotype to B. pseudomallei. In silico analysis uncovered a high degree of heterogeneity among the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen cluster loci, with at least 35 different variants identified. Finally, we show that Asian B. ubonensis isolate RF23-BP41 is avirulent in the BALB/c mouse model via a subcutaneous route of infection. Our results provide several new insights into the biology of this understudied species.

  9. Bioaugmentation with Pseudomonas sp. strain MHP41 promotes simazine attenuation and bacterial community changes in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, Verónica; López-López, Arantxa; Flores, Cecilia; González, Myriam; González, Bernardo; Vásquez, Mónica; Rosselló-Mora, Ramón; Seeger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Bioremediation is an important technology for the removal of persistent organic pollutants from the environment. Bioaugmentation with the encapsulated Pseudomonas sp. strain MHP41 of agricultural soils contaminated with the herbicide simazine was studied. The experiments were performed in microcosm trials using two soils: soil that had never been previously exposed to s-triazines (NS) and soil that had >20 years of s-triazine application (AS). The efficiency of the bioremediation process was assessed by monitoring simazine removal by HPLC. The simazine-degrading microbiota was estimated using an indicator for respiration combined with most-probable-number enumeration. The soil bacterial community structures and the effect of bioaugmentation on these communities were determined using 16S RNA gene clone libraries and FISH analysis. Bioaugmentation with MHP41 cells enhanced simazine degradation and increased the number of simazine-degrading microorganisms in the two soils. In highly contaminated NS soil, bioaugmentation with strain MHP41 was essential for simazine removal. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from NS and AS soils revealed high bacterial diversity. Bioaugmentation with strain MHP41 promoted soil bacterial community shifts. FISH analysis revealed that bioaugmentation increased the relative abundances of two phylogenetic groups (Acidobacteria and Planctomycetes) in both soils. Although members of the Archaea were metabolically active in these soils, their relative abundance was not altered by bioaugmentation.

  10. Complete Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium bovis SP38 and Comparative Genomics of Mycobacterium bovis and M. tuberculosis Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpel, Cristina Kraemer; Brandão, Paulo E.; de Souza Filho, Antônio F.; de Souza, Robson F.; Ikuta, Cássia Y.; Ferreira Neto, José Soares; Camargo, Naila C. Soler; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan; Guimarães, Ana M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis causes bovine tuberculosis and is the main organism responsible for zoonotic tuberculosis in humans. We performed the sequencing, assembly and annotation of a Brazilian strain of M. bovis named SP38, and performed comparative genomics of M. bovis genomes deposited in GenBank. M. bovis SP38 has a traditional tuberculous mycobacterium genome of 4,347,648 bp, with 65.5% GC, and 4,216 genes. The majority of CDSs (2,805, 69.3%) have predictive function, while 1,206 (30.07%) are hypothetical. For comparative analysis, 31 M. bovis, 32 M. bovis BCG, and 23 Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomes available in GenBank were selected. M. bovis RDs (regions of difference) and Clonal Complexes (CC) were identified in silico. Genome dynamics of bacterial groups were analyzed by gene orthology and polymorphic sites identification. M. bovis polymorphic sites were used to construct a phylogenetic tree. Our RD analyses resulted in the exclusion of three genomes, mistakenly annotated as virulent M. bovis. M. bovis SP38 along with strain 35 represent the first report of CC European 2 in Brazil, whereas two other M. bovis strains failed to be classified within current CC. Results of M. bovis orthologous genes analysis suggest a process of genome remodeling through genomic decay and gene duplication. Quantification, pairwise comparisons and distribution analyses of polymorphic sites demonstrate greater genetic variability of M. tuberculosis when compared to M. bovis and M. bovis BCG (p ≤ 0.05), indicating that currently defined M. tuberculosis lineages are more genetically diverse than M. bovis CC and animal-adapted MTC (M. tuberculosis Complex) species. As expected, polymorphic sites annotation shows that M. bovis BCG are subjected to different evolutionary pressures when compared to virulent mycobacteria. Lastly, M. bovis phylogeny indicates that polymorphic sites may be used as markers of M. bovis lineages in association with CC. Our findings highlight the need to

  11. Phenotypic and Genotypic Antimicrobial Resistance of Lactococcus Sp. Strains Isolated from Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ture Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A current profile of antimicrobial resistance and plasmid of 29 Lactococcus garvieae and one Lactococcus lactis strains isolated from rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss from farms throughout Turkey were investigated. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G (90%, ampicillin (86.7%, florfenicol (83.3%, amoxicillin (80.1%, and tetracycline (73.4%, and resistant to trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole (86.6% and gentamycin (46.6% by disc diffusion method. Twenty-eight (93% isolates had two to seven antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs determined by PCR. The most prevalent ARGs were tetracycline (tetB, erythromycin (ereB, and β-lactam (blaTEM. Bacterial strains were also screened for plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis and two strains harboured plasmids, with sizes ranging from 3 to 9 kb.

  12. Nitrous oxide emission potentials of Burkholderia species isolated from the leaves of a boreal peat moss Sphagnum fuscum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yanxia; Li, Li; Wang, Mengcen; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Using a culture-based nitrous oxide (N2O) emission assay, three active N2O emitters were isolated from Sphagnum fuscum leaves and all identified as members of Burkholderia. These isolates showed N2O emission in the medium supplemented with [Formula: see text] but not with [Formula: see text], and Burkholderia sp. SF-E2 showed the most efficient N2O emission (0.20 μg·vial(-1)·day(-1)) at 1.0 mM KNO3. In Burkholderia sp. SF-E2, the optimum pH for N2O production was 5.0, close to that of the phyllosphere of Sphagnum mosses, while the optimum temperature was uniquely over 30 °C. The stimulating effect of additional 1.5 mM sucrose on N2O emission was ignorable, but Burkholderia sp. SF-E2 upon exposure to 100 mg·L(-1) E-caffeic acid showed uniquely 67-fold higher N2O emission. All of the three N2O emitters were negative in both acetylene inhibition assay and PCR assay for nosZ-detection, suggesting that N2O reductase or the gene itself is missing in the N2O-emitting Burkholderia.

  13. Physicochemical effects on sulfite transformation in a lipid-rich Chlorella sp. strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2014-11-01

    SO2 is very rapidly hydrated to sulfurous acid in water solution at pH value above 6.0, whereby sulfite is yielded from the disassociation of protons. We aimed to improve the sulfite transformation efficiency and provide a basis for the direct utilization of SO2 from flue gas by a microalgal suspension. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 was cultured in a medium with 20 mmol/L sodium sulfite under different physicochemical conditions. Under light conditions, sulfite concentration in the algal suspension reduced linearly over time, and was completely converted into sulfate within 8 h. The highest sulfite transformation rate (3.25 mmol/(L·h)) was obtained under the following conditions: 35°C, light intensity of 300 μmol/(m2·s), NaHCO3 concentration of 6 g/L, initial cell density (OD540) of 0.8 and pH of 9-10. There was a positive correlation between sulfite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella, with the conditions favorable to algal growth giving better sulfite transformation. Although oxygen in the air plays a role in the transformation of SO2- 3 to SO2- 4, the transformation is mainly dependent on the metabolic activity of algal cells. Chlorella sp. XQ-20044 is capable of tolerating high sulfite concentration, and can utilize sulfite as the sole sulfur source for maintaining healthy growth. We found that sulfite ≤20 mmol/L had no obvious effect on the total lipid content and fatty acid profiles of the algae. Thus, the results suggest it is feasible to use flue gas for the mass production of feedstock for biodiesel using Chlorella sp. XQ-20044, without preliminary removal of SO2, assuming there is adequate control of the pH.

  14. Divergent homologs of the predicted small RNA BpCand697 in Burkholderia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiri, Nadzirah; Mohd-Padil, Hirzahida; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    The small RNA (sRNA) gene candidate, BpCand697 was previously reported to be unique to Burkholderia spp. and is encoded at 3' non-coding region of a putative AraC family transcription regulator gene. This study demonstrates the conservation of BpCand697 sequence across 32 Burkholderia spp. including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, B. thailandensis and Burkholderia sp. by integrating both sequence homology and secondary structural analyses of BpCand697 within the dataset. The divergent sequence of BpCand697 was also used as a discriminatory power in clustering the dataset according to the potential virulence of Burkholderia spp., showing that B. thailandensis was clearly secluded from the virulent cluster of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. Finally, the differential co-transcript expression of BpCand697 and its flanking gene, bpsl2391 was detected in Burkholderia pseudomallei D286 after grown under two different culture conditions using nutrient-rich and minimal media. It is hypothesized that the differential expression of BpCand697-bpsl2391 co-transcript between the two standard prepared media might correlate with nutrient availability in the culture media, suggesting that the physical co-localization of BpCand697 in B. pseudomallei D286 might be directly or indirectly involved with the transcript regulation of bpsl2391 under the selected in vitro culture conditions.

  15. Pseudomonas sp. strain MF30 suppresses Fusarium wilt of tomato in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Berndt Gerhardson; Idress H. Attitalla; P. Maria Johansson; Sture Brishammar

    2001-01-01

    In a search of bacterial biological control agents, 50 bacterial isolates collected from roots of wild plants in northern Sweden were tested in vivo for suppression of wilt of tomato caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Tomato plants were sown in 10-cm-diam. pots and after 21 d 7 ml of bacterial suspension (ca. 2x109 cfu ml-1) was poured into the soil around each plant. Two days later, 10 ml of pathogen suspension was soil-inoculated (106 conidia ml-1) around the same ...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Hymenobacter sp. Strain AT01-02, Isolated from a Surface Soil Sample in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Cai Holm; Paulino-Lima, Ivan Glaucio; Fujishima, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 5.09-Mb draft genome sequence of Hymenobacter sp. strain AT01-02, which was isolated from a surface soil sample in the Atacama Desert, Chile. The isolate is extremely resistant to UV-C radiation and is able to accumulate high intracellular levels of Mn/Fe.......Here, we report the 5.09-Mb draft genome sequence of Hymenobacter sp. strain AT01-02, which was isolated from a surface soil sample in the Atacama Desert, Chile. The isolate is extremely resistant to UV-C radiation and is able to accumulate high intracellular levels of Mn/Fe....

  17. Penicillium donkii sp. nov. and some observations on sclerotial strains of Penicillium funiculosum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, Amelia C.

    1973-01-01

    A description and drawings of a new species of Penicillium, P. donkii, are presented. Penicillium purpurogenum Stoll var. rubri-sclerotium Thom is considered a synonym of P. funiculosum Thom. Some observations are recorded, especially in connection with the cultural appearance of sclerotial strains

  18. Degradation of 1,2-Dibromoethane by Mycobacterium sp. Strain GP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, Gerrit J.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johannes; Marchesi, Julian R.; Freitas dos Santos, Luisa M.; Janssen, Dick B.

    The newly isolated bacterial strain GP1 can utilize 1,2-dibromoethane as the sole carbon and energy source. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the organism was identified as a member of the subgroup which contains the fast-growing mycobacteria, The first step in 1,2-dibromoethane

  19. Phylogeny of bacteria isolated from Rhabditis sp. (Nematoda) and identification of novel entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambong, James T

    2013-02-01

    Twenty-five bacterial strains isolated from entomopathogenic nematodes were characterized to the genus level by 16S rRNA phylogeny and BLAST analyses. Bacteria strains isolated could be affiliated with seven genera. Microbacterium-like isolates phylogenetically affiliated with M. oxydans while those of Serratia were highly similar to S. marcescens. 16S rRNA sequences of Bacillus isolates matched those of both B. mycoides and B. weihenstephanesis. One isolate each matched Pseudomonas mosselii, Rheinheimera aquimaris, Achromobacter marplatensis, or Staphylococcus hominis. Serratia isolates were examined further for their pathogenicity to Galleria mellonella larvae. All the Serratia isolates exhibited potent pathogenicity toward G. mellonella larvae and possessed a metalloprotease gene encoding for a novel serralysin-like protein. The nucleotide sequence of the metalloprotease gene had 60 synonymous and 8 nonsynonymous substitutions when compared to the closest genBank entry, S. marcescens E-15, with an insertion of a new aspartic acid residue. Tajima's test for equality of evolutionary rate was significant between the metalloprotease gene sequence of S. marcescens strain DOAB 216-82 (this study) and strain E-15. This new insecticidal metalloprotease gene and/or its product could have applications in agricultural biotechnology.

  20. Safety and persistence of orally administered human Lactobacillus sp. strains in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütt, P; Kõll, P; Stsepetova, J; Alvarez, B; Mändar, R; Krogh-Andersen, K; Marcotte, H; Hammarström, L; Mikelsaar, M

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the safety and persistence of selected Lactobacillus strains in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of healthy adult volunteers after oral consumption of high doses of lactobacilli to identify potential candidates for probiotic and biotechnological applications. In the first phase of the study, nine individuals consumed capsules containing Lactobacillus gasseri 177 and E16B7, Lactobacillus acidophilus 821-3, Lactobacillus paracasei 317 and Lactobacillus fermentum 338-1-1 (each daily dose 1×1010 cfu) for 5 consecutive days. Data on gut health, blood parameters, and liver and kidney function were collected. The persistence of Lactobacillus strains was assessed by culturing combined with arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) on days 0, 5, 8, 10 and 20 from faecal samples. All strains survived gastrointestinal passage and were detected on the 5th day. L. acidophilus 821-3 was detected in four volunteers on the 8th day (4.3 to 7.0 log10 cfu/g) and in two on the 10th day (8.3 and 3.9 log10 cfu/g, respectively). In the second phase of the study, five additional volunteers consumed L. acidophilus 821-3 (daily 1×1010 cfu) for 5 consecutive days. The strain was subsequently detected in faeces of all individuals using real-time PCR on the 10th day (range 4.6-6.7; median 6.0 log10 cell/g) in both phases of the study for at least 5 days after discontinuation of consumption. The administration of high doses of different Lactobacillus strains did not result in any severe adverse effects in GIT and/or abnormal values of blood indices. Thus, the strain L. acidophilus 821-3 is a promising candidate for probiotic and biotechnological applications. Further studies will be performed to confirm the strain persistence and safety in a larger number of individuals.

  1. Two new antioxidant actinosporin analogues from the calcium alginate beads culture of sponge-associated Actinokineospora sp. strain EG49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grkovic, Tanja; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Othman, Eman Maher; Stopper, Helga; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Hentschel, Ute; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-11-01

    Marine sponge-associated actinomycetes represent an exciting new resource for the identification of new and novel natural products . Previously, we have reported the isolation and structural elucidation of actinosporins A (1) and B (2) from Actinokineospora sp. strain EG49 isolated from the marine sponge Spheciospongia vagabunda. Herein, by employing different fermentation conditions on the same microorganism, we report on the isolation and antioxidant activity of structurally related metabolites, actinosporins C (3) and D (4). The antioxidant potential of actinosporins C and D was demonstrated using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Additionally, at 1.25 μM, actinosporins C and D showed a significant antioxidant and protective capacity from the genomic damage induced by hydrogen peroxide in the human promyelocytic (HL-60) cell line. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Tomomi; Goda, Yuko [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Yoshida, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tadao [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Materials and Bioengineering, Kansai University, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Hata, Yasuo, E-mail: hata@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2008-08-01

    Maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005 has been crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and microseeding. The crystals contained one dimeric molecule per asymmetric unit and diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution. Maleylacetate reductase (EC 1.3.1.32), which catalyzes the reduction of maleylacetate to 3-oxoadipate, plays an important role in the aerobic microbial catabolism of resorcinol. The enzyme has been crystallized at 293 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method supplemented with a microseeding technique, using ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.85, b = 121.13, c = 94.09 Å, β = 101.48°, and contained one dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. It diffracted to 1.79 Å resolution.

  3. Molecular characterization and antibacterial effect of endophytic actinomycetes Nocardiopsis sp. GRG1 (KT235640 from brown algae against MDR strains of uropathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindan Rajivgandhi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Our study is to evaluate the potential bioactive compound of Nocardiopsis sp. GRG1 (KT235640 and its antibacterial activity against multi drug resistant strains (MDRS on urinary tract infections (UTIs. Two brown algae samples were collected and were subjected to isolation of endophytic actinomycetes. 100 strains of actinomycetes were isolated from algal samples based on observation of morphology and physiological characters. 40 strains were active in antagonistic activity against various clinical pathogens. Among the strains, 10 showed better antimicrobial activity against MDRS on UTIs. The secondary metabolite of Nocardiopsis sp. GRG1 (KT235640 has showed tremendous antibacterial activity against UTI pathogens compared to other strains. Influence of various growth parameters were used for synthesis of secondary metabolites, such as optimum pH 7, incubation time 5–7 days, temperature (30 °C, salinity (5%, fructose and mannitol as the suitable carbon and nitrogen sources. At 100 μg/ml concentration MIC of Nocardiopsis sp. GRG1 (KT235640 showed highest percentage of inhibition against Proteus mirabilis (85%, and E.coli, Staphylococcus auerues, Psuedomonas aeroginasa, Enterobactor sp and Coagulinase negative staphylococci 78–85% respectively.

  4. THE RESISTANCE TO ANTIBIOTICS IN STRAINS OF E. COLI AND ENTEROCOCCUS SP. ISOLATED FROM RECTAL SWABS OF LAMBS AND CALVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA NOVÁKOVÁ

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available he aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of enterococcii and E. coli strains isolated from dairy calves and lambs. Susceptibilities of isolated enterococci were tested using the disk diffusion method. The interpretation of inhibition zones around the disks was according to CLSI 2004 Performance standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. In our study, all isolates (E. coli and enterococci were multiresistant (100% to tetracycline, streptomycin and compound sulphonamides. Lower levels of resistance to enrofloxacin were noted. Antimicrobial resistance profiles of Enterococcus sp. isolated from lambs indicated that the highest percentage of susceptibility was exhibited to tetracycline (100% and streptomycin (100% and compound sulphonamides (100%. The intermediate resistance was exhibited against compound enrofloxacin (80%. The high frequencies of resistant isolates of Enterococcus sp. from calves were documented in tetracycline (100%, streptomycin (100% and compound sulphonamides (100% and enrofloxacin (50%. The high percentage (compound sulphonamides-100%, tetracycline-100% and streptomycin- 100% of multiresistant E. coli (isolates from dairy calves was noticed. There were no significant correlations between groups.

  5. Direct Adherence of Fe(III Particles onto Sheaths of Leptothrix sp. Strain OUMS1 in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Kunoh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptothrix species, one of the Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria, oxidize Fe(II and produce extracellular, microtubuar, Fe-encrusted sheaths. Since protein(s involved in Fe(II oxidation is excreted from Leptothrix cells, the oxidation from Fe(II to Fe(III and subsequent Fe(III deposition to sheaths have been thought to occur in the vicinity or within the sheaths. Previously, Fe(III particles generated in MSVP medium amended with Fe(II salts by abiotic oxidation were directly recruited onto cell-encasing and/or -free sheaths of L. cholodnii SP-6. In this study, whether this direct Fe(III adherence to sheaths also occurs in silicon-glucose-peptone (SGP medium amended with Fe(0 (SGP + Fe was investigated using another strain of Leptothrix sp., OUMS1. Preparation of SGP + Fe with Fe powder caused turbidity within a few hours due to abiotic generation of Fe(III particles via Fe(II, and the medium remained turbid until day 8. When OUMS1 was added to SGP + Fe, the turbidity of the medium cleared within 35 h as Fe(III particles adhered to sheaths. When primitive sheaths, cell-killed, cell-free, or lysozyme/EDTA/SDS- and proteinase K-treated sheath remnants were mixed with Fe(III particles, the particles immediately adhered to each. Thus, vital activity of cells was not required for the direct Fe(III particle deposition onto sheaths regardless of Leptothrix strains.

  6. Structure, Function, and Regulation of the Aldouronate Utilization Gene Cluster from Paenibacillus sp. Strain JDR-2▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Preston, James F.

    2007-01-01

    Direct bacterial conversion of the hemicellulose fraction of hardwoods and crop residues to biobased products depends upon extracellular depolymerization of methylglucuronoxylan (MeGAXn), followed by assimilation and intracellular conversion of aldouronates and xylooligosaccharides to fermentable xylose. Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium, secretes a multimodular cell-associated GH10 endoxylanase (XynA1) that catalyzes depolymerization of MeGAXn and rapidly assimilates the principal products, β-1,4-xylobiose, β-1,4-xylotriose, and MeGAX3, the aldotetrauronate 4-O-methylglucuronosyl-α-1,2-xylotriose. Genomic libraries derived from this bacterium have now allowed cloning and sequencing of a unique aldouronate utilization gene cluster comprised of genes encoding signal transduction regulatory proteins, ABC transporter proteins, and the enzymes AguA (GH67 α-glucuronidase), XynA2 (GH10 endoxylanase), and XynB (GH43 β-xylosidase/α-arabinofuranosidase). Expression of these genes, as well as xynA1 encoding the secreted GH10 endoxylanase, is induced by growth on MeGAXn and repressed by glucose. Sequences in the yesN, lplA, and xynA2 genes within the cluster and in the distal xynA1 gene show significant similarity to catabolite responsive element (cre) defined in Bacillus subtilis for recognition of the catabolite control protein (CcpA) and consequential repression of catabolic regulons. The aldouronate utilization gene cluster in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 operates as a regulon, coregulated with the expression of xynA1, conferring the ability for efficient assimilation and catabolism of the aldouronate product generated by a multimodular cell surface-anchored GH10 endoxylanase. This cluster offers a desirable metabolic potential for bacterial conversion of hemicellulose fractions of hardwood and crop residues to biobased products. PMID:17921311

  7. Biodegradation of methyl red by Bacillus sp. strain UN2: decolorization capacity, metabolites characterization, and enzyme analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Sun, Peng-Fei; Du, Lin-Na; Wang, Guan; Jia, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2014-05-01

    Azo dyes are recalcitrant and refractory pollutants that constitute a significant menace to the environment. The present study is focused on exploring the capability of Bacillus sp. strain UN2 for application in methyl red (MR) degradation. Effects of physicochemical parameters (pH of medium, temperature, initial concentration of dye, and composition of the medium) were studied in detail. The suitable pH and temperature range for MR degradation by strain UN2 were respectively 7.0-9.0 and 30-40 °C, and the optimal pH value and temperature were respectively 8.0 and 35 °C. Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) (1 mM) were found to significantly accelerate the MR removal rate, while the enhancement by either Fe(3+) or Fe(2+) was slight. Under the optimal degradation conditions, strain UN2 exhibited greater than 98 % degradation of the toxic azo dye MR (100 ppm) within 30 min. Analysis of samples from decolorized culture flasks confirmed biodegradation of MR into two prime metabolites: N,N'dimethyl-p-phenyle-nediamine and 2-aminobenzoic acid. A study of the enzymes responsible for the biodegradation of MR, in the control and cells obtained during (10 min) and after (30 min) degradation, showed a significant increase in the activities of azoreductase, laccase, and NADH-DCIP reductase. Furthermore, a phytotoxicity analysis demonstrated that the germination inhibition was almost eliminated for both the plants Triticum aestivum and Sorghum bicolor by MR metabolites at 100 mg/L concentration, yet the germination inhibition of parent dye was significant. Consequently, the high efficiency of MR degradation enables this strain to be a potential candidate for bioremediation of wastewater containing MR.

  8. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of 2-Chloro-5-Nitrophenol Degradation in a Newly Isolated Bacterium, Cupriavidus sp. Strain CNP-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Min

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Compound 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP is a typical chlorinated nitroaromatic pollutant. To date, the bacteria with the ability to degrade 2C5NP are rare, and the molecular mechanism of 2C5NP degradation remains unknown. In this study, Cupriavidus sp. strain CNP-8 utilizing 2-chloro-5-nitrophenol (2C5NP and meta-nitrophenol (MNP via partial reductive pathways was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil. Biodegradation kinetic analysis indicated that 2C5NP degradation by this strain was concentration dependent, with a maximum specific degradation rate of 21.2 ± 2.3 μM h−1. Transcriptional analysis showed that the mnp genes are up-regulated in both 2C5NP- and MNP-induced strain CNP-8. Two Mnp proteins were purified to homogeneity by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. In addition to catalyzing the reduction of MNP, MnpA, a NADPH-dependent nitroreductase, also catalyzes the partial reduction of 2C5NP to 2-chloro-5-hydroxylaminophenol via 2-chloro-5-nitrosophenol, which was firstly identified as an intermediate of 2C5NP catabolism. MnpC, an aminohydroquinone dioxygenase, is likely responsible for the ring-cleavage reaction of 2C5NP degradation. Gene knockout and complementation indicated that mnpA is necessary for both 2C5NP and MNP catabolism. To our knowledge, strain CNP-8 is the second 2C5NP-utilizing bacterium, and this is the first report of the molecular mechanism of microbial 2C5NP degradation.

  9. Enhanced degradation of isoproturon in an agricultural soil by a Sphingomonas sp. strain and a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renyi; Dörfler, Ulrike; Munch, Jean Charles; Schroll, Reiner

    2017-02-01

    Isoproturon (IPU) degradation in an agricultural soil inoculated with an isolated IPU-degrader strain (Sphingomonas sp. strain AK1, IS) or a microbial consortium (MC) harboring this strain, with or without carrier material, were investigated in soil microcosm experiments during 46 days. Effect of the carrier material and inoculation size on IPU-degradation efficacy of the inoculants were studied. Mineralization, extractable residues and non-extractable residues of 14 C-labeled IPU were analyzed. The low IPU mineralization in untreated soil (7.0%) was enhanced to different extents by inoculation of IS (17.4%-46.0%) or MC (58.9%-67.5%). Concentrations of IPU residues in soils amended with MC (0.002-0.095 μg g dry soil -1 ) were significantly lower than in soils amended with IS (0.02-0.67 μg g dry soil -1 ) and approximately 10 times lower than in the uninoculated soil (0.06-0.80 μg g dry soil -1 ). Less extractable residues and non-extractable residues were detected in soil with higher IPU mineralization. Inoculation size (as indicated by the volume of liquid cultures or by the number of carrier particles) determined the IPU-removal efficacy of IS in soil, but this effect was less pronounced for MC. The low sorption of IPU to soil and the decreasing IPU-mineralizing rates suggested incapability of IS to establish the IPU-mineralizing function in the soil. The thorough removal of IPU and persistent IPU-mineralizing activity of soil inoculated with MC indicated a high persistence of IPU-metabolic trait. Our results showed that microbial consortia might be more efficient than single degrader strains to enhance clean-up of organic chemicals in soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase from Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T acting as a key enzyme during catabolism of 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, Marc; Deters, Anika; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    3-Sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase (AcdDPN7) is a new desulfinase that catalyzes the sulfur abstraction from 3SP-CoA in the betaproteobacterium Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T). During investigation of a Tn5::mob-induced mutant defective in growth on 3,3'-dithiodipropionate (DTDP) and also 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), the transposon insertion was mapped to an open reading frame with the highest homology to an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) from Burkholderia phenoliruptrix strain BR3459a (83% identical and 91% similar amino acids). An A. mimigardefordensis Δacd mutant was generated and verified the observed phenotype of the Tn5::mob-induced mutant. For enzymatic studies, AcdDPN7 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pLysS by using pET23a::acdDPN7. The purified protein is yellow and contains a noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, as verified by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) analyses. Size-exclusion chromatography revealed a native molecular mass of about 173 kDa, indicating a homotetrameric structure (theoretically 179 kDa), which is in accordance with other members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. In vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated that the purified enzyme converted 3SP-CoA into propionyl-CoA and sulfite (SO3(2-)). Kinetic studies of AcdDPN7 revealed a Vmax of 4.19 μmol min(-1) mg(-1), an apparent Km of 0.013 mM, and a kcat/Km of 240.8 s(-1) mM(-1) for 3SP-CoA. However, AcdDPN7 is unable to perform a dehydrogenation, which is the usual reaction catalyzed by members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Comparison to other known desulfinases showed a comparably high catalytic efficiency of AcdDPN7 and indicated a novel reaction mechanism. Hence, AcdDPN7 encodes a new desulfinase based on an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.x) scaffold. Concomitantly, we identified the gene product that is responsible for the

  11. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel methylglyoxal synthase from Thermus sp. strain GH5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazhang, Mohammad; Khajeh, Khosro; Asghari, S Mohsen; Falahati, Hanieh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2010-11-01

    A gene encoding methylglyoxal synthase from Thermus sp. GH5 (TMGS) was cloned, sequenced, overexpressed, and purified by Q-Sepharose. The TMGS gene was composed of 399 bp which encoded a polypeptide of 132 amino acids with a molecular mass of 14.3 kDa. The K (m) and k (cat) values of TMGS were 0.56 mM and 325 (s(-1)), respectively. The enzyme exhibited its optimum activity at pH 6 and 75 degrees C. Comparing the amino acid sequences and Hill coefficients of Escherichia coli MGS and TMGS revealed that the loss of Arg 150 in TMGS has caused a decrease in the cooperativity between the enzyme subunits in the presence of phosphate as an allosteric inhibitor. Gel filtration experiments showed that TMGS is a hexameric enzyme, and its quaternary structure did not change in the presence of phosphate.

  12. Biogenic formation of photoactive arsenic-sulfide nanotubes by Shewanella sp. strain HN-41

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Yoo, Bongyoung; Myung, Nosang V.; Maeng, Jongsun; Lee, Takhe; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2007-12-18

    Microorganisms facilitate the formation of a wide range of minerals that have unique physical and chemical properties as well as morphologies that are not produced by abiotic processes. Here, we report the production of an extensive extracellular network of filamentous, arsenic-sulfide (As-S) nanotubes (20–100 nm in diameter by 30 µm in length) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella sp. HN-41. The As-S nanotubes, formed via the reduction of As(V) and S2O, were initially amorphous As2S3 but evolved with increasing incubation time toward polycrystalline phases of the chalcogenide minerals realgar (AsS) and duranusite (As4S). Upon maturation, the As-S nanotubes behaved as metals and semiconductors in terms of their electrical and photoconductive properties, respectively. The As-S nanotubes produced by Shewanella may provide useful materials for novel nano- and opto-electronic devices.

  13. Influence of Temperature on the Physiology and Virulence of the Insect Pathogen Serratia sp. Strain SCBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Lauren M.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of a newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae Isolate (SCBI), which is both a nematode mutualist and an insect pathogen, was investigated and compared to that of Serratia marcescens Db11, a broad-host-range pathogen. The two Serratia strains had comparable levels of virulence for Manduca sexta and similar cytotoxic activity patterns, but motility and lipase and hemolytic activities differed significantly between them. PMID:23042169

  14. Use of the phytopathogenic effect for studies of Burkholderia virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanova, E V; Ageeva, N P

    2015-02-01

    The phytopathogenic effect of the pseudomallei group Burkholderia is demonstrated on the Peireskia aculeata model. A method for evaluation of the effect is suggested. The effect correlates with the levels of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia thailandensis virulence for laboratory animals. P. aculeata can be used as a model for preliminary studies of the virulence of the above species.

  15. Mercury remediation potential of a mercury resistant strain Sphingopyxis sp. SE2 isolated from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Khandaker Rayhan; Krishnan, Kannan; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2017-01-01

    A mercury resistant bacterial strain SE2 was isolated from contaminated soil. The 16s rRNA gene sequencing confirms the strain as Sphingopyxis belongs to the Sphingomonadaceae family of the α-Proteobacteria group. The isolate showed high resistance to mercury with estimated concentrations of Hg that caused 50% reduction in growth (EC50) of 5.97 and 6.22mg/L and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 32.19 and 34.95mg/L in minimal and rich media, respectively. The qualitative detection of volatilized mercury and the presence of mercuric reductase enzyme proved that the strain SE2 can potentially remediate mercury. ICP-QQQ-MS analysis of the remaining mercury in experimental broths indicated that a maximum of 44% mercury was volatilized within 6hr by live SE2 culture. Furthermore a small quantity (23%) of mercury was accumulated in live cell pellets. While no volatilization was caused by dead cells, sorption of mercury was confirmed. The mercuric reductase gene merA was amplified and sequenced. Homology was observed among the amino acid sequences of mercuric reductase enzyme of different organisms from α-Proteobacteria and ascomycota groups. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Biological Efficacy of Streptomyces sp. Strain BN1 against the Cereal Head Blight Pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boknam Jung

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB caused by the filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum is one of the most severe diseases threatening the production of small grains. Infected grains are often contaminated with mycotoxins such as zearalenone and trichothecences. During survey of contamination by FHB in rice grains, we found a bacterial isolate, designated as BN1, antagonistic to F. graminearum. The strain BN1 had branching vegetative hyphae and spores, and its aerial hyphae often had long, straight filaments bearing spores. The 16S rRNA gene of BN1 had 100% sequence identity with those found in several Streptomyces species. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS regions showed that BN1 grouped with S. sampsonii with 77% bootstrap value, suggesting that BN1 was not a known Streptomyces species. In addition, the efficacy of the BN1 strain against F. graminearum strains was tested both in vitro and in vivo. Wheat seedling length was significantly decreased by F. graminearum infection. However, this effect was mitigated when wheat seeds were treated with BN1 spore suspension prior to F. graminearum infection. BN1 also significantly decreased FHB severity when it was sprayed onto wheat heads, whereas BN1 was not effective when wheat heads were point inoculated. These results suggest that spraying of BN1 spores onto wheat heads during the wheat flowering season can be efficient for plant protection. Mechanistic studies on the antagonistic effect of BN1 against F. graminearum remain to be analyzed.

  17. Iron-Dependent Enzyme Catalyzes the Initial Step in Biodegradation of N-Nitroglycine by Variovorax sp. Strain JS1663.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Kristina M; Zheng, Hangping; Fida, Tekle T; Parry, Ronald J; Graham, David E; Spain, Jim C

    2017-08-01

    Nitramines are key constituents of most of the explosives currently in use and consequently contaminate soil and groundwater at many military facilities around the world. Toxicity from nitramine contamination poses a health risk to plants and animals. Thus, understanding how nitramines are biodegraded is critical to environmental remediation. The biodegradation of synthetic nitramine compounds such as hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) has been studied for decades, but little is known about the catabolism of naturally produced nitramine compounds. In this study, we report the isolation of a soil bacterium, Variovorax sp. strain JS1663, that degrades N-nitroglycine (NNG), a naturally produced nitramine, and the key enzyme involved in its catabolism. Variovorax sp. JS1663 is a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming motile bacterium isolated from activated sludge based on its ability to use NNG as a sole growth substrate under aerobic conditions. A single gene (nnlA) encodes an iron-dependent enzyme that releases nitrite from NNG through a proposed β-elimination reaction. Bioinformatics analysis of the amino acid sequence of NNG lyase identified a PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain. PAS domains can be associated with heme cofactors and function as signal sensors in signaling proteins. This is the first instance of a PAS domain present in a denitration enzyme. The NNG biodegradation pathway should provide the basis for the identification of other enzymes that cleave the N-N bond and facilitate the development of enzymes to cleave similar bonds in RDX, nitroguanidine, and other nitramine explosives.IMPORTANCE The production of antibiotics and other allelopathic chemicals is a major aspect of chemical ecology. The biodegradation of such chemicals can play an important ecological role in mitigating or eliminating the effects of such compounds. N-Nitroglycine (NNG) is produced by the Gram-positive filamentous soil bacterium Streptomyces noursei This study reports the

  18. Draft genome sequence of Thermus sp. strain RL, isolated from a hot water spring located atop the Himalayan ranges at Manikaran, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Vatsala; Sangwan, Naseer; Nigam, Aeshna; Garg, Nidhi; Niharika, Neha; Khurana, Paramjit; Khurana, Jitendra P; Lal, Rup

    2012-07-01

    Thermus sp. strain RL was isolated from a hot water spring (90°C to 98°C) at Manikaran, Himachal Pradesh, India. Here we report the draft genome sequence (20,36,600 bp) of this strain. The draft genome sequence consists of 17 contigs and 1,986 protein-coding sequences and has an average G+C content of 68.77%.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Uncultivated Desulfosporosinus sp. Strain Tol-M, Obtained by Stable Isotope Probing Using [13C6]Toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Laban, Nidal; Tan, BoonFei; Dao, Anh; Foght, Julia

    2015-01-15

    A draft Desulfosporosinus genome was assembled from the metagenome of a methanogenic [(13)C6]toluene-degrading community. The Desulfosporosinus sp. strain Tol-M genome is distinguished from that of previously published Desulfosporosinus strain by containing bss, bbs, and bam genes encoding enzymes for anaerobic biodegradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons and lacking dsrAB genes for dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Copyright © 2015 Abu Laban et al.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Chloroflexus sp. Strain isl-2, a Thermophilic Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Isolated from the Strokkur Geyser, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisin, Vasil A; Ivanov, Timophey M; Kuznetsov, Boris B; Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Grouzdev, Denis S

    2016-07-21

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus sp. strain isl-2, which was isolated from the Strokkur geyser, Iceland, and contains 5,222,563 bp with a G+C content of 59.65%. The annotated genome sequence offers the genetic basis for understanding the strain's ecological role as a phototrophic bacterium within the bacterial community. Copyright © 2016 Gaisin et al.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium sp. Strain C100, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium from the Deep-Sea Sediment of the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunming; Bai, Xiuhua; Lai, Qiliang; Xie, Yanrong; Chen, Xin; Shao, Zongze

    2014-01-30

    Sphingobium sp. strain C100 was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading consortium from the deep-sea sediment of the Arctic Ocean. It can degrade two- to four-ring PAHs at 25°C. Here we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,776,810 bp with a G+C content of 63.9%.

  2. Accurate and rapid identification of the Burkholderia pseudomallei near-neighbour, Burkholderia ubonensis, using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; Webb, Jessica R; Ginther, Jennifer L; Mayo, Mark; Cook, James M; Seymour, Meagan L; Kaestli, Mirjam; Theobald, Vanessa; Hall, Carina M; Busch, Joseph D; Foster, Jeffrey T; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M; Tuanyok, Apichai; Pearson, Talima; Currie, Bart J

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia ubonensis is an environmental bacterium belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of genetically related organisms that are associated with opportunistic but generally nonfatal infections in healthy individuals. In contrast, the near-neighbour species Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease that can be fatal in up to 95% of cases if left untreated. B. ubonensis is frequently misidentified as B. pseudomallei from soil samples using selective culturing on Ashdown's medium, reflecting both the shared environmental niche and morphological similarities of these species. Additionally, B. ubonensis shows potential as an important biocontrol agent in B. pseudomallei-endemic regions as certain strains possess antagonistic properties towards B. pseudomallei. Current methods for characterising B. ubonensis are laborious, time-consuming and costly, and as such this bacterium remains poorly studied. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid and inexpensive real-time PCR-based assay specific for B. ubonensis. We demonstrate that a novel B. ubonensis-specific assay, Bu550, accurately differentiates B. ubonensis from B. pseudomallei and other species that grow on selective Ashdown's agar. We anticipate that Bu550 will catalyse research on B. ubonensis by enabling rapid identification of this organism from Ashdown's-positive colonies that are not B. pseudomallei.

  3. Accurate and rapid identification of the Burkholderia pseudomallei near-neighbour, Burkholderia ubonensis, using real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    Full Text Available Burkholderia ubonensis is an environmental bacterium belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, a group of genetically related organisms that are associated with opportunistic but generally nonfatal infections in healthy individuals. In contrast, the near-neighbour species Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease that can be fatal in up to 95% of cases if left untreated. B. ubonensis is frequently misidentified as B. pseudomallei from soil samples using selective culturing on Ashdown's medium, reflecting both the shared environmental niche and morphological similarities of these species. Additionally, B. ubonensis shows potential as an important biocontrol agent in B. pseudomallei-endemic regions as certain strains possess antagonistic properties towards B. pseudomallei. Current methods for characterising B. ubonensis are laborious, time-consuming and costly, and as such this bacterium remains poorly studied. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid and inexpensive real-time PCR-based assay specific for B. ubonensis. We demonstrate that a novel B. ubonensis-specific assay, Bu550, accurately differentiates B. ubonensis from B. pseudomallei and other species that grow on selective Ashdown's agar. We anticipate that Bu550 will catalyse research on B. ubonensis by enabling rapid identification of this organism from Ashdown's-positive colonies that are not B. pseudomallei.

  4. Antimicrobial Properties of an Oxidizer Produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia P525

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound with both oxidizing properties and antibiotic properties was extracted and purified from broth cultures of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain P525. A four step purification procedure was used to increase its specific activity ~ 400 fold and to yield a HPLC- UV chromatogram containing a sing...

  5. NOVEL ORGANIZATION OF THE GENES FOR PHTHALATE DEGRADATION FROM BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA DBO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholderia cepacia DBO1 is able to utilize phthalate as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Two overlapping cosmid clones containing the genes for phthalate degradation were isolated from this strain. Subcloning and activity analysis localized the genes for phthala...

  6. Role of flagella and type four pili in the co-migration of Burkholderia terrae BS001 with fungal hyphae through soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pu; Zhang, Miaozhi; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2017-06-07

    Burkholderia terrae BS001 has previously been found to be able to disperse along with growing fungal hyphae in soil, with the type-3 secretion system having a supportive role in this movement. In this study, we focus on the role of two motility- and adherence-associated appendages, i.e. type-4 pili (T4P) and flagella. Electron microcopy and motility testing revealed that strain BS001 produces polar flagella and can swim on semi-solid R2A agar. Flagellum- and T4P-negative mutants were then constructed to examine the ecological roles of the respective systems. Both in liquid media and on swimming agar, the mutant strains showed similar fitness to the wild-type strain in mixed culture. The flagellar mutant had completely lost its flagella, as well as its swimming capacity. It also lost its co-migration ability with two soil-exploring fungi, Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten and Trichoderma asperellum 302, in soil microcosms. In contrast, the T4P mutant showed reduced surface twitching motility, whereas its co-migration ability in competition with the wild-type strain was slightly reduced. We conclude that the co-migration of strain BS001 with fungal hyphae through soil is dependent on the presence of functional flagella conferring swimming motility, with the T4P system having a minor effect.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Two Cryptic Plasmids in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. Strain ENI-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Akira; Kato, Junichi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao

    1999-01-01

    Two plasmids were discovered in the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11, which was isolated from activated sludge. The plasmids, designated pAYS and pAYL, were relatively small, being approximately 1.9 kb long. They were cryptic plasmids, having no detectable plasmid-linked antibiotic resistance or heavy metal resistance markers. The complete nucleotide sequences of pAYS and pAYL were determined, and their physical maps were constructed. There existed two major open reading frames, ORF1 in pAYS and ORF2 in pAYL, each of which was more than 500 bp long. The predicted product of ORF2 was 28% identical to part of the replication protein of a Bacillus plasmid, pBAA1. However, no significant similarity to any known protein sequences was detected with the predicted product of ORF1. pAYS and pAYL had a highly homologous region, designated HHR, of 262 bp. The overall identity was 98% between the two nucleotide sequences. Interestingly, HHR-homologous sequences were also detected in the genomes of ENI-11 and the plasmidless strain Nitrosomonas europaea IFO14298. Deletion analysis of pAYS and pAYL indicated that HHR, together with either ORF1 or ORF2, was essential for plasmid maintenance in ENI-11. To our knowledge, pAYS and pAYL are the first plasmids found in the ammonia-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria. PMID:10348848

  8. Isolation of a novel strain of Monoraphidium sp. and characterization of its potential application as biodiesel feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; He, Cian; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianhua; Zhou, Junpei; Huang, Zunxi

    2012-10-01

    A novel green microalgae strain from Lake Fuxian has been isolated and identified as a potential feedstock for biodiesel production. The novel strain was named Monoraphidium sp. FXY-10 based on its morphological and genomic characterization. The lipid productivities, fatty acid profiles, and microalgae recovery efficiency (η(a)) of FXY-10 were investigated and compared under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. FXY-10 under autotrophic conditions exhibited a higher cellular lipid content (56.8%) than those under heterotrophic conditions (37.56%). However, FXY-10 growing under heterotrophic conditions exhibited more than 20-fold increase in lipid productivity compared with that under autotrophic conditions (148.74 mg L(-1)d(-1) versus 6.88 mg L(-1)d(-1)). Moreover, higher saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (77.5%) of FXY-10 was obtained under heterotrophic culture conditions, suggesting its potential as a biodiesel feedstock. Gravity sedimentation was proposed as the harvesting biomass method based on the 97.9% microalgae recovery efficiency of heterotrophic cells after settling for 24h. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A new lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Arthrobacter sp. strain MIS38.

    OpenAIRE

    Morikawa, M; Daido, H; Takao, T; Murata, S; Shimonishi, Y; Imanaka, T

    1993-01-01

    A biosurfactant termed arthrofactin produced by Arthrobacter species strain MIS38 was purified and chemically characterized as 3-hydroxydecanoyl-D-leucyl-D-asparagyl-D-threonyl-D- leucyl-D-leucyl-D-seryl-L-leucyl-D-seryl-L-isoleucyl-L-isoleucyl-L-as paragyl lactone. Surface activity of arthrofactin was examined, with surfactin as a control. Critical micelle concentration values of arthrofactin and surfactin were around 1.0 x 10(-5) M and 7.0 x 10(-5) M at 25 degrees C, respectively. Arthrofac...

  10. A Highly Expressed High-Molecular-Weight S-Layer Complex of Pelosinus sp. Strain UFO1 Binds Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorgersen, Michael P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Lancaster, W. Andrew [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Rajeev, Lara [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Biological Systems and Engineering Division; Ge, Xiaoxuan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Vaccaro, Brian J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Poole, Farris L. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Arkin, Adam P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Biological Systems and Engineering Division; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Biological Systems and Engineering Division; Adams, Michael W. W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    2016-12-02

    Cell suspensions of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 were previously shown, using spectroscopic analysis, to sequester uranium as U(IV) complexed with carboxyl and phosphoryl group ligands on proteins. The goal of our present study was to characterize the proteins involved in uranium binding. Virtually all of the uranium in UFO1 cells was associated with a heterodimeric protein, which was termed the uranium-binding complex (UBC). The UBC was composed of two S-layer domain proteins encoded by UFO1_4202 and UFO1_4203. Samples of UBC purified from the membrane fraction contained 3.3 U atoms/heterodimer, but significant amounts of phosphate were not detected. The UBC had an estimated molecular mass by gel filtration chromatography of 15 MDa, and it was proposed to contain 150 heterodimers (UFO1_4203 and UFO1_4202) and about 500 uranium atoms. The UBC was also the dominant extracellular protein, but when purified from the growth medium, it contained only 0.3 U atoms/heterodimer. The two genes encoding the UBC were among the most highly expressed genes within the UFO1 genome, and their expressions were unchanged by the presence or absence of uranium. Therefore, the UBC appears to be constitutively expressed and is the first line of defense against uranium, including by secretion into the extracellular medium. Although S-layer proteins were previously shown to bind U(VI), here we showed that U(IV) binds to S-layer proteins, we identified the proteins involved, and we quantitated the amount of uranium bound. Widespread uranium contamination from industrial sources poses hazards to human health and to the environment. Here in this paper, we identified a highly abundant uranium-binding complex (UBC) from Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1. The complex makes up the primary protein component of the S-layer of strain UFO1 and binds 3.3 atoms of U(IV) per heterodimer. Finally, while other bacteria have been shown to bind U(VI) on their S-layer, we demonstrate here an example of U(IV) bound by

  11. The desA gene of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is the structural gene for delta 12 desaturase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, H; Avelange-Macherel, M H; Murata, N

    1993-09-01

    The desA gene of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 was expressed in Escherichia coli, which does not contain any fatty acid desaturase. The product of the desA gene catalyzed the desaturation of fatty acids at the delta 12 position. This result demonstrates that desA is the structural gene for a delta 12 desaturase.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium sp. Strain Ade.TY, a New Biohydrogen- and Biochemical-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y M; Juan, J C; Ting, Adeline; Wu, T Y; Gan, H M; Austin, C M

    2014-03-06

    Clostridium sp. strain Ade.TY is potentially a new biohydrogen-producing species isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into its gene interactions for efficient biohydrogen production.

  13. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain Chol1, a Model Organism for the Degradation of Bile Salts and Other Steroid Compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Holert, Johannes

    2013-01-15

    Bacterial degradation of steroid compounds is of high ecological and biotechnological relevance. Pseudomonas sp. strain Chol1 is a model organism for studying the degradation of the steroid compound cholate. Its draft genome sequence is presented and reveals one gene cluster responsible for the metabolism of steroid compounds.

  14. Concerted changes in gene expression and cell physiology of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 during transitions between nitrogen and light-limited growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aquirre von Wobeser, E.; Ibelings, B.W.; Bok, J.M.; Krasikov, V.; Huisman, J.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological adaptation and genome-wide expression profiles of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in response to gradual transitions between nitrogen-limited and light-limited growth conditions were measured in continuous cultures. Transitions induced changes in pigment

  15. INFLUENCE OF METRONIDAZOLE, CO, CO2, AND METHANOGENS ON THE FERMENTATIVE METABOLISM OF THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS NEOCALLIMASTIX SP STRAIN L2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARVINSIKKEMA, FD; REES, E; KRAAK, MN; GOTTSCHAL, JC; PRINS, RA

    The effects of metronidazole, CO, methanogens, and CO, on the fermentation of glucose by the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix sp. strain L2 were investigated. Both metronidazole and CO caused a shift in the fermentation products from predominantly H-2, acetate, and formate to lactate as the major

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köberl, Martina;