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Sample records for burkholderia pseudomallei infection

  1. Burkholderia pseudomallei musculoskeletal infections (melioidosis in India

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    Pandey Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis, an infection due to gram negative Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important cause of sepsis in east Asia especially Thailand and northern Australia. It usually causes abscesses in lung, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle and parotids especially in patients with diabetes, chronic renal failure and thalassemia. Musculoskeletal melioidosis is not common in India even though sporadic cases have been reported mostly involving soft tissues. During a two-year-period, we had five patients with musculoskeletal melioidosis. All patients presented with multifocal osteomyelitis, recurrent osteomyelitis or septic arthritis. One patient died early because of septicemia and multi-organ failure. All patients were diagnosed on the basis of positive pus culture. All patients were treated by surgical debridement followed by a combination of antibiotics; (ceftazidime, amoxy-clavulanic acid, co-trimoxazole and doxycycline for six months except for one who died due to fulminant septicemia. All other patients recovered completely with no recurrences. With increasing awareness and better diagnostic facilities, probably musculoskeletal melioidosis will be increasingly diagnosed in future.

  2. Burkholderia Pseudomallei Causing Bone and Joint Infections: A Clinical Update

    OpenAIRE

    Raja, Nadeem Sajjad; Scarsbrook, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei), a causative agent of an emerging infectious disease melioidosis, is endemic in the tropical regions of the world. Due to increased international travel, the infection is now also seen outside of the tropics. The majority of patients with identified risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, heavy alcohol use, malignancy, chronic lung and kidney disease, corticosteroid use, thalassemia, rheumatic heart disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac ...

  3. Development of ceftazidime resistance in an acute Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

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    Sarovich DS

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Derek S Sarovich,1,2,* Erin P Price,1,2,* Direk Limmathurotsakul,3 James M Cook,1 Alex T Von Schulze,1 Spenser R Wolken,1 Paul Keim,1 Sharon J Peacock,3,4 Talima Pearson1 1Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA; 2Tropical and Emerging Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Australia; 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterium that causes the disease melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. First-line antibiotic therapy for treating melioidosis is usually the synthetic β-lactam, ceftazidime (CAZ, as almost all B. pseudomallei strains are susceptible to this drug. However, acquired CAZ resistance can develop in vivo during treatment with CAZ, which can lead to mortality if therapy is not switched to a different drug in a timely manner. Serial B. pseudomallei isolates obtained from an acute Thai melioidosis patient infected by a CAZ susceptible strain, who ultimately succumbed to infection despite being on CAZ therapy for the duration of their infection, were analyzed. Isolates that developed CAZ resistance due to a proline to serine change at position 167 in the β-lactamase PenA were identified. Importantly, these CAZ resistant isolates remained sensitive to the alternative melioidosis treatments; namely, amoxicillin-clavulanate, imipenem, and meropenem. Lastly, real-time polymerase chain reaction-based assays capable of rapidly identifying CAZ resistance in B. pseudomallei isolates at the position 167 mutation site were developed. The ability to rapidly identify the emergence of CAZ resistant B. pseudomallei populations in melioidosis patients will allow timely alterations in treatment strategies

  4. Burkholderia Pseudomallei Causing Bone and Joint Infections: A Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Nadeem Sajjad; Scarsbrook, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei), a causative agent of an emerging infectious disease melioidosis, is endemic in the tropical regions of the world. Due to increased international travel, the infection is now also seen outside of the tropics. The majority of patients with identified risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, heavy alcohol use, malignancy, chronic lung and kidney disease, corticosteroid use, thalassemia, rheumatic heart disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac failure acquire this organism through percutaneous inoculation or inhalation. The clinical manifestations are variable, ranging from localized abscess formation to septicemia. Melioidotic bone and joint infections are rarely reported but are an established entity. The knee joint is the most commonly affected joint in melioidosis, followed by the ankle, hip and shoulder joints. Melioidosis should be in the differential diagnosis of bone and joint infections in residents or returning travelers from the endemic area. Melioidosis diagnosis is missed in many parts of the world due to the lack of awareness of this infection and limited laboratory training and diagnostic techniques. It also mimics other diseases such as tuberculosis. Delay in the diagnosis, or the initiation of appropriate and effective treatment against melioidosis, could worsen the outcome. Initial therapy with ceftazidime, or carbapenem with or without cotrimoxazole is recommended, followed by the oral eradication therapy (based on the antimicrobial susceptibility) with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or cotrimoxazole. Surgical intervention remains important. This paper reviews current literature on the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of melioidotic bone and joint infections. PMID:26728713

  5. Screening for potential anti-infective agents towards Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

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    Eng, Su Anne; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The established treatment for melioidosis is antibiotic therapy. However, a constant threat to this form of treatment is resistance development of the causative agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, towards antibiotics. One option to circumvent this threat of antibiotic resistance is to search for new alternative anti-infectives which target the host innate immune system and/or bacterial virulence. In this study, 29 synthetic compounds were evaluated for their potential to increase the lifespan of an infected host. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was adopted as the infection model as its innate immune pathways are homologous to humans. Screens were performed in a liquid-based survival assay containing infected worms exposed to individual compounds and survival of untreated and compound-treated worms were compared. A primary screen identified nine synthetic compounds that extended the lifespan of B. pseudomallei-infected worms. Subsequently, a disc diffusion test was performed on these selected compounds to delineate compounds into those that enhanced the survival of worms via antimicrobial activity i.e. reducing the number of infecting bacteria, or into those that did not target pathogen viability. Out of the nine hits selected, two demonstrated antimicrobial effects on B. pseudomallei. Therefore, the findings from this study suggest that the other seven identified compounds are potential anti-infectives which could protect a host against B. pseudomallei infection without developing the risk of drug resistance.

  6. Nasal Acai Polysaccharides Potentiate Innate Immunity to Protect against Pulmonary Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Skyberg, Jerod A.; Rollins, MaryClare F.; Holderness, Jeff S.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Schepetkin, Igor A; Goodyear, Andrew; Dow, Steven W.; Jutila, Mark A.; Pascual, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections are highly lethal in untreated patients, and current antibiotic regimens are not always effective. Activating the innate immune system provides an alternative means of treating infection and can also complement antibiotic therapies. Several natural agonists were screened for their ability to enhance host resistance to infection, and polysaccharides derived from the Acai berry (Acai PS) were found to have potent abilitie...

  7. Use of a Safe, Reproducible, and Rapid Aerosol Delivery Method to Study Infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Eric R Lafontaine; Zimmerman, Shawn M.; Teresa L Shaffer; Frank Michel; Xiudan Gao; Hogan, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most comm...

  8. Fatal Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection Initially Reported as a Bacillus Species, Ohio, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Doker, Thomas J.; Quinn, Celia L.; Salehi, Ellen D.; Sherwood, Joshua J.; Benoit, Tina J.; Elrod, Mindy Glass; Gee, Jay E.; Shadomy, Sean V.; Bower, William A.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Walke, Henry T.; Blaney, David D.; DiOrio, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    A fatal case of melioidosis was diagnosed in Ohio one month after culture results were initially reported as a Bacillus species. To identify a source of infection and assess risk in patient contacts, we abstracted patient charts; interviewed physicians and contacts; genetically characterized the isolate; performed a Burkholderia pseudomallei antibody indirect hemagglutination assay on household contacts and pets to assess seropositivity; and collected household plant, soil, liquid, and insect...

  9. Fatal Burkholderia pseudomallei infection initially reported as a Bacillus species, Ohio, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doker, Thomas J; Quinn, Celia L; Salehi, Ellen D; Sherwood, Joshua J; Benoit, Tina J; Glass Elrod, Mindy; Gee, Jay E; Shadomy, Sean V; Bower, William A; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Walke, Henry T; Blaney, David D; DiOrio, Mary S

    2014-10-01

    A fatal case of melioidosis was diagnosed in Ohio one month after culture results were initially reported as a Bacillus species. To identify a source of infection and assess risk in patient contacts, we abstracted patient charts; interviewed physicians and contacts; genetically characterized the isolate; performed a Burkholderia pseudomallei antibody indirect hemagglutination assay on household contacts and pets to assess seropositivity; and collected household plant, soil, liquid, and insect samples for culturing and real-time polymerase chain reaction testing. Family members and pets tested were seronegative for B. pseudomallei. Environmental samples were negative by real-time polymerase chain reaction and culture. Although the patient never traveled internationally, the isolate genotype was consistent with an isolate that originated in Southeast Asia. This investigation identified the fifth reported locally acquired non-laboratory melioidosis case in the contiguous United States. Physicians and laboratories should be aware of this potentially emerging disease and refer positive cultures to a Laboratory Response Network laboratory. PMID:25092821

  10. φX216, a P2-like bacteriophage with broad Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei strain infectivity

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    Kvitko Brian H

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are closely related Category B Select Agents of bioterrorism and the causative agents of the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Rapid phage-based diagnostic tools would greatly benefit early recognition and treatment of these diseases. There is extensive strain-to-strain variation in B. pseudomallei genome content due in part to the presence or absence of integrated prophages. Several phages have previously been isolated from B. pseudomallei lysogens, for example φK96243, φ1026b and φ52237. Results We have isolated a P2-like bacteriophage, φX216, which infects 78% of all B. pseudomallei strains tested. φX216 also infects B. mallei, but not other Burkholderia species, including the closely related B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. The nature of the φX216 host receptor remains unclear but evidence indicates that in B. mallei φX216 uses lipopolysaccharide O-antigen but a different receptor in B. pseudomallei. The 37,637 bp genome of φX216 encodes 47 predicted open reading frames and shares 99.8% pairwise identity and an identical strain host range with bacteriophage φ52237. Closely related P2-like prophages appear to be widely distributed among B. pseudomallei strains but both φX216 and φ52237 readily infect prophage carrying strains. Conclusions The broad strain infectivity and high specificity for B. pseudomallei and B. mallei indicate that φX216 will provide a good platform for the development of phage-based diagnostics for these bacteria.

  11. Molecular Procedure for Rapid Detection of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

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    Bauernfeind, Adolf; Roller, Carsten; Meyer, Detlef; Jungwirth, Renate; Schneider, Ines

    1998-01-01

    A PCR procedure for the discrimination of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei was developed. It is based on the nucleotide difference T 2143 C (T versus C at position 2143) between B. mallei and B. pseudomallei detected in the 23S rDNA sequences. In comparison with conventional methods the procedure allows more rapid identification at reduced risk for infection of laboratory personnel.

  12. Burkholderia pseudomallei infection in a cystic fibrosis patient from the Caribbean: A case report

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    Dimas Mateos Corral; Allan L Coates; Yvonne CW Yau; Raymond Tellier; Mindy Glass; Jones, Steven M.; Waters, Valerie J.

    2008-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a pathogen identified with increasing frequency in the respiratory tracts of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from endemic areas such as Southeast Asia and northern Australia. The following report describes the first known reported case in a CF patient from the Caribbean attending a North American CF clinic.

  13. Burkholderia pseudomallei transcriptional adaptation in macrophages

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    Chieng Sylvia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen of phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. How the bacterium interacts with host macrophage cells is still not well understood and is critical to appreciate the strategies used by this bacterium to survive and how intracellular survival leads to disease manifestation. Results Here we report the expression profile of intracellular B. pseudomallei following infection of human macrophage-like U937 cells. During intracellular growth over the 6 h infection period, approximately 22 % of the B. pseudomallei genome showed significant transcriptional adaptation. B. pseudomallei adapted rapidly to the intracellular environment by down-regulating numerous genes involved in metabolism, cell envelope, motility, replication, amino acid and ion transport system and regulatory function pathways. Reduced expression in catabolic and housekeeping genes suggested lower energy requirement and growth arrest during macrophage infection, while expression of genes encoding anaerobic metabolism functions were up regulated. However, whilst the type VI secretion system was up regulated, expression of many known virulence factors was not significantly modulated over the 6hours of infection. Conclusions The transcriptome profile described here provides the first comprehensive view of how B. pseudomallei survives within host cells and will help identify potential virulence factors and proteins that are important for the survival and growth of B. pseudomallei within human cells.

  14. Use of a safe, reproducible, and rapid aerosol delivery method to study infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Lafontaine

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most common manifestation is severe pneumonia leading to fatal bacteremia. Glanders and melioidosis are difficult to diagnose and require prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There are no vaccines available to protect against either Burkholderia species, and there is concern regarding their use as biological warfare agents given that B. mallei has previously been utilized in this manner. Hence, experiments were performed to establish a mouse model of aerosol infection to study the organisms and develop countermeasures. Using a hand-held aerosolizer, BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with strains B. pseudomallei 1026b and B. mallei ATCC23344 and growth of the agents in the lungs, as well as dissemination to the spleen, were examined. Mice infected with 10(2, 10(3 and 10(4 organisms were unable to control growth of B. mallei in the lungs and bacteria rapidly disseminated to the spleen. Though similar results were observed in mice inoculated with 10(3 and 10(4 B. pseudomallei cells, animals infected with 10(2 organisms controlled bacterial replication in the lungs, dissemination to the spleen, and the extent of bacteremia. Analysis of sera from mice surviving acute infection revealed that animals produced antibodies against antigens known to be targets of the immune response in humans. Taken together, these data show that small volume aerosol inoculation of mice results in acute disease, dose-dependent chronic infection, and immune responses

  15. Use of a safe, reproducible, and rapid aerosol delivery method to study infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in mice.

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    Lafontaine, Eric R; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Shaffer, Teresa L; Michel, Frank; Gao, Xiudan; Hogan, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most common manifestation is severe pneumonia leading to fatal bacteremia. Glanders and melioidosis are difficult to diagnose and require prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There are no vaccines available to protect against either Burkholderia species, and there is concern regarding their use as biological warfare agents given that B. mallei has previously been utilized in this manner. Hence, experiments were performed to establish a mouse model of aerosol infection to study the organisms and develop countermeasures. Using a hand-held aerosolizer, BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with strains B. pseudomallei 1026b and B. mallei ATCC23344 and growth of the agents in the lungs, as well as dissemination to the spleen, were examined. Mice infected with 10(2), 10(3) and 10(4) organisms were unable to control growth of B. mallei in the lungs and bacteria rapidly disseminated to the spleen. Though similar results were observed in mice inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) B. pseudomallei cells, animals infected with 10(2) organisms controlled bacterial replication in the lungs, dissemination to the spleen, and the extent of bacteremia. Analysis of sera from mice surviving acute infection revealed that animals produced antibodies against antigens known to be targets of the immune response in humans. Taken together, these data show that small volume aerosol inoculation of mice results in acute disease, dose-dependent chronic infection, and immune responses that correlate

  16. The Burkholderia pseudomallei Δasd Mutant Exhibits Attenuated Intracellular Infectivity and Imparts Protection against Acute Inhalation Melioidosis in Mice ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Michael H. Norris; Propst, Katie L.; Kang, Yun; Dow, Steven W.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Hoang, Tung T.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the cause of serious and life-threatening diseases in humans, is of national biodefense concern because of its potential use as a bioterrorism agent. This microbe is listed as a select agent by the CDC; therefore, development of vaccines is of significant importance. Here, we further investigated the growth characteristics of a recently created B. pseudomallei 1026b Δasd mutant in vitro, in a cell model, and in an animal model of infection. The mutant was typified b...

  17. The innate interferon gamma response of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice to in vitro Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

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    Gan Yunn-Hwen; Koo Ghee

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent for melioidosis. For many bacterial infections, cytokine dysregulation is one of the contributing factors to the severe clinical outcomes in the susceptible hosts. The C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice have been established as a differential model of susceptibility in murine melioidosis. In this study, we compared the innate IFN-γ response to B. pseudomallei between the C57BL/6 and BALB/c splenocytes and characterized the hyperproduct...

  18. Gene Microarray Analyses of Daboia russelli russelli Daboiatoxin Treatment of THP-1 Human Macrophages Infected with Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Perumal Samy, R; Manikandan, J; Pachiappan, A; Ooi, E E; Aw, L T; Stiles, B G; Franco, O L; Kandasamy, M; Mathi, K M; Rane, G; Siveen, K S; Arunachalam, C; Zayed, M E; Alharbi, S A; Kumar, A P; Sethi, G; Lim, L H K; Chow, V T

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and represents a potential bioterrorism threat. In this study, the transcriptomic responses of B. pseudomallei infection of a human macrophage cell model were investigated using whole-genome microarrays. Gene expression profiles were compared between infected THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells with or without treatment with Daboia russelli russelli daboiatoxin (DRRDbTx) or ceftazidime (antibiotic control). Microarray analyses of infected and treated cells revealed differential upregulation of various inflammatory genes such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 4 (CXCL4), transcription factor p65 (NF-kB); and several genes involved in immune and stress responses, cell cycle, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, following DRR-DbTx treatment of infected cells, there was enhanced expression of the tolllike receptor 2 (TLR-2) mediated signaling pathway involved in recognition and initiation of acute inflammatory responses. Importantly, we observed that highly inflammatory cytokine gene responses were similar in infected cells exposed to DRR-DbTx or ceftazidime after 24 h. Additionally, there were increased transcripts associated with cell death by caspase activation that can promote host tissue injury. In summary, the transcriptional responses during B. pseudomallei infection of macrophages highlight a broad range of innate immune mechanisms that are activated within 24 h post-infection. These data provide insights into the transcriptomic kinetics following DRR-DbTx treatment of human macrophages infected with B. pseudomallei. PMID:26592245

  19. Multiplex qPCR for reliable detection and differentiation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Janse Ingmar; Hamidjaja Raditijo A; Hendriks Amber CA; van Rotterdam Bart J

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are two closely related species of highly virulent bacteria that can be difficult to detect. Pathogenic Burkholderia are endemic in many regions worldwide and cases of infection, sometimes brought by travelers from unsuspected regions, also occur elsewhere. Rapid, sensitive methods for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are urgently needed in the interests of patient treatment and epidemiological surveillance. Methods Si...

  20. Brain abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Melioidosis, or infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important human disease in South East Asia and Northern Australia. Neurological manifestations are well recognized amongst its protean presentations, but direct focal central nervous system infection is infrequently described with only 9 adult and 5 paediatric cases reported in the English language literature. A case of brain abscess due to Burkholderia pseudomallei occurring in a 20 year old Dutch visitor to Australia which progressed despite antibiotic treatment is described. A review of the clinical manifestations, Magnetic Resonance (MR) appearance, diagnosis and treatment of melioidosis is presented, highlighting that: (i) physicians outside endernic areas should consider melioidosis in any patient with an appropriate travel history, (ii) MR imaging is more sensitive then CT in diagnosing early brain infection, especially of the brainstem; (iii) Bacterial culture, the mainstay of diagnosis, has many shortcomings; (iv)In vitro antibiotic sensitivity testing may not translate into clinical efficacy; and (v) Steroids appear to have little role, even in severe disease

  1. Novel Selective Medium for Isolation of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, K; Inglis, T. J. J.

    2003-01-01

    Isolation of Burkholderia pseudomallei currently relies on the use of Ashdown's selective agar (ASA). We designed a new selective agar (Burkholderia pseudomallei selective agar [BPSA]) to improve recovery of the more easily inhibited strains of B. pseudomallei. B. pseudomallei, Burkholderia cepacia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used to determine the selectivity and sensitivity of BPSA. BPSA was more inhibitory to P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia and should make recognition of Burkholderia spec...

  2. Novel lytic bacteriophages from soil that lyse Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Yordpratum, Umaporn; Tattawasart, Unchalee; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Sermswan, Rasana W

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative saprophytic bacterium that causes severe sepsis with a high mortality rate in humans and a vaccine is not available. Bacteriophages are viruses of bacteria that are ubiquitous in nature. Several lysogenic phages of Burkholderia spp. have been found but information is scarce for lytic phages. Six phages, ST2, ST7, ST70, ST79, ST88 and ST96, which lyse B. pseudomallei, were isolated from soil in an endemic area. The phages belong to the Myoviridae family. The range of estimated genome sizes is 24.0-54.6 kb. Phages ST79 and ST96 lysed 71% and 67% of tested B. pseudomallei isolates and formed plaques on Burkholderia mallei but not other tested bacteria, with the exception of closely related Burkholderia thailandensis which was lysed by ST2 and ST96 only. ST79 and ST96 were observed to clear a mid-log culture by lysis within 6 h when infected at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1. As ST79 and ST96 phages effectively lysed B. pseudomallei, their potential use as a biocontrol of B. pseudomallei in the environment or alternative treatment in infected hosts could lead to benefits from phages that are available in nature. PMID:21091532

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei induces IL-23 production in primary human monocytes.

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    Kulsantiwong, Panthong; Pudla, Matsayapan; Boondit, Jitrada; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Dunachie, Susanna J; Chantratita, Narisara; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a gram-negative intracellular bacterium, is a causative agent of melioidosis. The bacterium has been shown to induce the innate immune response, particularly pro-inflammatory cytokine production in several of both mouse and human cell types. In the present study, we investigate host immune response in B. pseudomallei-infected primary human monocytes. We discover that wild-type B. pseudomallei is able to survive and multiply inside the primary human monocytes. In contrast, B. pseudomallei LPS mutant, a less virulent strain, is susceptible to host killing during bacterial infection. Moreover, microarray result showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei but not B. pseudomallei LPS mutant is able to activate gene expression of IL-23 as demonstrated by the up-regulation of p19 and p40 subunit expression. Consistent with gene expression analysis, the secretion of IL-23 analyzed by ELISA also showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei induces a significantly higher level of IL-23 secretion than that of B. pseudomallei LPS mutant. These results implied that IL-23 may be an important cytokine for the innate immune response during B. pseudomallei infection. The regulation of IL-23 production may drive the different host innate immune responses between patients and may relate to the severity of melioidosis. PMID:26563410

  4. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates in 2 pet iguanas, California, USA.

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    Zehnder, Ashley M; Hawkins, Michelle G; Koski, Marilyn A; Lifland, Barry; Byrne, Barbara A; Swanson, Alexandra A; Rood, Michael P; Gee, Jay E; Elrod, Mindy Glass; Beesley, Cari A; Blaney, David D; Ventura, Jean; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Beeler, Emily S

    2014-02-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, was isolated from abscesses of 2 pet green iguanas in California, USA. The international trade in iguanas may contribute to importation of this pathogen into countries where it is not endemic and put persons exposed to these animals at risk for infection. PMID:24447394

  5. Comparison of Ashdown's Medium, Burkholderia cepacia Medium, and Burkholderia pseudomallei Selective Agar for Clinical Isolation of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Peacock, Sharon J.; Chieng, Grace; Cheng, Allen C.; Dance, David A. B.; Amornchai, Premjit; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Teerawattanasook, Nittaya; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Day, Nicholas P J; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn

    2005-01-01

    Ashdown's medium, Burkholderia pseudomallei selective agar (BPSA), and a commercial Burkholderia cepacia medium were compared for their abilities to grow B. pseudomallei from 155 clinical specimens that proved positive for this organism. The sensitivity of each was equivalent; the selectivity of BPSA was lower than that of Ashdown's or B. cepacia medium.

  6. Burkholderia pseudomallei is spatially distributed in soil in northeast Thailand.

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    Direk Limmathurotsakul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melioidosis is a frequently fatal infectious disease caused by the soil dwelling Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Environmental sampling is important to identify geographical distribution of the organism and related risk of infection to humans and livestock. The aim of this study was to evaluate spatial distribution of B. pseudomallei in soil and consider the implications of this for soil sampling strategies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A fixed-interval sampling strategy was used as the basis for detection and quantitation by culture of B. pseudomallei in soil in two environmental sites (disused land covered with low-lying scrub and rice field in northeast Thailand. Semivariogram and indicator semivariogram were used to evaluate the distribution of B. pseudomallei and its relationship with range between sampling points. B. pseudomallei was present on culture of 80/100 sampling points taken from the disused land and 28/100 sampling points from the rice field. The median B. pseudomallei cfu/gram from positive sampling points was 378 and 700 for the disused land and the rice field, respectively (p = 0.17. Spatial autocorrelation of B. pseudomallei was present, in that samples taken from areas adjacent to sampling points that were culture positive (negative for B. pseudomallei were also likely to be culture positive (negative, and samples taken from areas adjacent to sampling points with a high (low B. pseudomallei count were also likely to yield a high (low count. Ranges of spatial autocorrelation in quantitative B. pseudomallei count were 11.4 meters in the disused land and 7.6 meters in the rice field. CONCLUSIONS: We discuss the implications of the uneven distribution of B. pseudomallei in soil for future environmental studies, and describe a range of established geostatistical sampling approaches that would be suitable for the study of B. pseudomallei that take account of our findings.

  7. Identification of a LolC Homologue in Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Novel Protective Antigen for Melioidosis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Harland, David N; Chu, Karen; Haque, Ashraful; Nelson, Michelle; Walker, Nicola J.; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Timothy P.; Moore, Benjamin; Brown, Katherine A.; Bancroft, Gregory; Titball, Richard W.; Atkins, Helen S.

    2007-01-01

    Melioidosis is an emerging disease of humans in Southeast Asia and tropical Australia. The bacterium causing this disease, Burkholderia pseudomallei, is also considered a bioterrorism agent, and as yet there is no licensed vaccine for preventing B. pseudomallei infection. In this study, we evaluated selected proteins (LolC, PotF, and OppA) of the ATP-binding cassette systems of B. pseudomallei as candidate vaccine antigens. Nonmembrane regions of the B. pseudomallei proteins were expressed an...

  8. Strategies for Intracellular Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allwood, Elizabeth M; Devenish, Rodney J; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease with high mortality that is prevalent in tropical regions of the world. A key component of the pathogenesis of melioidosis is the ability of B. pseudomallei to enter, survive, and replicate within mammalian host cells. For non-phagocytic cells, bacterial adhesins have been identified both on the bacterial surface and associated with Type 4 pili. Cell invasion involves components of one or more of the three Type 3 Secretion System clusters, which also mediate, at least in part, the escape of bacteria from the endosome into the cytoplasm, where bacteria move by actin-based motility. The mechanism of actin-based motility is not clearly understood, but appears to differ from characterized mechanisms in other bacterial species. A small proportion of intracellular bacteria is targeted by host cell autophagy, involving direct recruitment of LC3 to endosomes rather than through uptake by canonical autophagosomes. However, the majority of bacterial cells are able to circumvent autophagy and other intracellular defense mechanisms such as the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and then replicate in the cytoplasm and spread to adjacent cells via membrane fusion, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated giant cells. A potential role for host cell ubiquitin in the autophagic response to bacterial infection has recently been proposed. PMID:22007185

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei Antibodies in Children, Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Pheaktra, Ngoun; Putchhat, Hor; Sin, Lina; Sen, Bun; Kumar, Varun; Langla, Sayan; Peacock, Sharon J.; Nicholas P. Day

    2008-01-01

    Antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei were detected in 16% of children in Siem Reap, Cambodia. This organism was isolated from 30% of rice paddies in the surrounding vicinity. Despite the lack of reported indigenous cases, melioidosis is likely to occur in Cambodia.

  10. Prevalence of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, G; Zheng, D; Cai, Q; Yuan, Z

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis, an infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is now recognized as an important public health problem in Southeast Asia and tropical northern Australia. Although B. pseudomallei has been detected in various water and soil samples in southeast China, the enviromental distribution of B. pseudomallei in China is unclear. In the winter months of 2007, 154 and 130 soil and water samples, respectively, were collected from several locations in Guangxi, China. The samples were screened for B. pseudomallei by bacterial culture and identification and confirmed by PCR for species-specific 16S rDNA and flagellin genes. B. pseudomallei was detected in 8.4% of the soil samples but in none of the water samples. All positive samples were confined to a single low-lying region from rice paddy fields. Counts of B. pseudomallei ranged from 23 to 521 c.f.u./g soil. This is the first geographical distribution survey of B. pseudomallei in soil in Guangxi, China, and the data are of importance for further evaluating the impact of this pathogen on melioidosis in this region. PMID:19538822

  11. Multiplex qPCR for reliable detection and differentiation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janse Ingmar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are two closely related species of highly virulent bacteria that can be difficult to detect. Pathogenic Burkholderia are endemic in many regions worldwide and cases of infection, sometimes brought by travelers from unsuspected regions, also occur elsewhere. Rapid, sensitive methods for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are urgently needed in the interests of patient treatment and epidemiological surveillance. Methods Signature sequences for sensitive, specific detection of pathogenic Burkholderia based on published genomes were identified and a qPCR assay was designed and validated. Results A single-reaction quadruplex qPCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Burkholderia, which includes a marker for internal control of DNA extraction and amplification, was developed. The assay permits differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains, and probit analysis showed a very low detection limit. Use of a multicopy signature sequence permits detection of less than 1 genome equivalent per reaction. Conclusions The new assay permits rapid detection of pathogenic Burkholderia and combines enhanced sensitivity, species differentiation, and inclusion of an internal control for both DNA extraction and PCR amplification.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Putative Virulence Determinants in Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suat Moi Puah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative saprophyte Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, an infectious disease which is endemic in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. This bacterium possesses many virulence factors which are thought to contribute to its survival and pathogenicity. Using a virulent clinical isolate of B. pseudomallei and an attenuated strain of the same B. pseudomallei isolate, 6 genes BPSL2033, BP1026B_I2784, BP1026B_I2780, BURPS1106A_A0094, BURPS1106A_1131, and BURPS1710A_1419 were identified earlier by PCR-based subtractive hybridization. These genes were extensively characterized at the molecular level, together with an additional gene BPSL3147 that had been identified by other investigators. Through a reverse genetic approach, single-gene knockout mutants were successfully constructed by using site-specific insertion mutagenesis and were confirmed by PCR. BPSL2033::Km and BURPS1710A_1419::Km mutants showed reduced rates of survival inside macrophage RAW 264.7 cells and also low levels of virulence in the nematode infection model. BPSL2033::Km demonstrated weak statistical significance (P=0.049 at 8 hours after infection in macrophage infection study but this was not seen in BURPS1710A_1419::Km. Nevertheless, complemented strains of both genes were able to partially restore the gene defects in both in vitro and in vivo studies, thus suggesting that they individually play a minor role in the virulence of B. pseudomallei.

  13. Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Water

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    Woods Donald E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of Burkholderia pseudomallei to survive in water likely contributes to its environmental persistence in endemic regions. To determine the physiological adaptations which allow B. pseudomallei to survive in aqueous environments, we performed microarray analyses of B. pseudomallei cultures transferred from Luria broth (LB to distilled water. Findings Increased expression of a gene encoding for a putative membrane protein (BPSL0721 was confirmed using a lux-based transcriptional reporter system, and maximal expression was noted at approximately 6 hrs after shifting cells from LB to water. A BPSL0721 deficient mutant of B. pseudomallei was able to survive in water for at least 90 days indicating that although involved, BPSL0721 was not essential for survival. BPSL2961, a gene encoding a putative phosphatidylglycerol phosphatase (PGP, was also induced when cells were shifted to water. This gene is likely involved in cell membrane biosynthesis. We were unable to construct a PGP mutant suggesting that the gene is not only involved in survival in water but is essential for cell viability. We also examined mutants of polyhydroxybutyrate synthase (phbC, lipopolysaccharide (LPS oligosaccharide and capsule synthesis, and these mutations did not affect survival in water. LPS mutants lacking outer core were found to lose viability in water by 200 days indicating that an intact LPS core provides an outer membrane architecture which allows prolonged survival in water. Conclusion The results from these studies suggest that B. pseudomallei survival in water is a complex process that requires an LPS molecule which contains an intact core region.

  14. Volatile-Sulfur-Compound Profile Distinguishes Burkholderia pseudomallei from Burkholderia thailandensis

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Hahne, Dorothee R.; Merritt, Adam J.; Clarke, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS) was used to show that dimethyl sulfide produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei is responsible for its unusual truffle-like smell and distinguishes the species from Burkholderia thailandensis. SPME-GCMS can be safely used to detect dimethyl sulfide produced by agar-grown B. pseudomallei.

  15. Oropharyngeal aspiration of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei in BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Schully

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are potentially lethal pathogens categorized as biothreat agents due, in part, to their ability to be disseminated via aerosol. There are no protective vaccines against these pathogens and treatment options are limited and cumbersome. Since disease severity is greatest when these agents are inhaled, efforts to develop pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis focus largely on inhalation models of infection. Here, we demonstrate a non-invasive and technically simple method for affecting the inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. In this model, two investigators utilized common laboratory tools such as forceps and a micropipette to conduct and characterize an effective and reproducible inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. mallei and B. pseudomallei. Challenge by oropharyngeal aspiration resulted in acute disease. Additionally, 50% endpoints for B. pseudomallei K96243 and B. mallei ATCC 23344 were nearly identical to published aerosol challenge methods. Furthermore, the pathogens disseminated to all major organs typically targeted by these agents where they proliferated. The pro-inflammatory cytokine production in the proximal and peripheral fluids demonstrated a rapid and robust immune response comparable to previously described murine and human studies. These observations demonstrate that OA is a viable alternative to aerosol exposure.

  16. Less is more: Burkholderia pseudomallei and chronic melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Tannistha; Tan, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. Once considered an esoteric tropical disease confined to Southeast Asia and northern Australia, research on B. pseudomallei has recently gained global prominence due to its classification as a potential bioterrorism agent by countries such as the United States and also by increasing numbers of case reports from regions where it is not endemic. An environmental bacterium typically found in soil and water, assessing the true global prevalence of melioidosis is challenged by the fact that clinical symptoms associated with B. pseudomallei infection are extremely varied and may be confused with diverse conditions such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, or Staphyloccocus aureus infection. These diagnostic challenges, coupled with lack of awareness among clinicians, have likely contributed to underdiagnosis and the high mortality rate of melioidosis, as initial treatment is often either inappropriate or delayed. Even after antibiotic treatment, relapses are frequent, and after resolution of acute symptoms, chronic melioidosis can also occur, and the symptoms can persist for months to years. In a recent article, Price et al. [mBio 4(4):e00388-13, 2013, doi:10.1128/mBio.00388-13] demonstrate how comparative genomic sequencing can reveal the repertoire of genetic changes incurred by B. pseudomallei during chronic human infection. Their results have significant clinical ramifications and highlight B. pseudomallei's ability to survive in a wide range of potential niches within hosts, through the acquisition of genetic adaptations that optimize fitness and resource utilization. PMID:24065633

  17. Accurate and rapid identification of the Burkholderia pseudomallei near-neighbour, Burkholderia ubonensis, using real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    Full Text Available Burkholderia ubonensis is an environmental bacterium belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, a group of genetically related organisms that are associated with opportunistic but generally nonfatal infections in healthy individuals. In contrast, the near-neighbour species Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease that can be fatal in up to 95% of cases if left untreated. B. ubonensis is frequently misidentified as B. pseudomallei from soil samples using selective culturing on Ashdown's medium, reflecting both the shared environmental niche and morphological similarities of these species. Additionally, B. ubonensis shows potential as an important biocontrol agent in B. pseudomallei-endemic regions as certain strains possess antagonistic properties towards B. pseudomallei. Current methods for characterising B. ubonensis are laborious, time-consuming and costly, and as such this bacterium remains poorly studied. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid and inexpensive real-time PCR-based assay specific for B. ubonensis. We demonstrate that a novel B. ubonensis-specific assay, Bu550, accurately differentiates B. ubonensis from B. pseudomallei and other species that grow on selective Ashdown's agar. We anticipate that Bu550 will catalyse research on B. ubonensis by enabling rapid identification of this organism from Ashdown's-positive colonies that are not B. pseudomallei.

  18. An Objective Approach for Burkholderia pseudomallei Strain Selection as Challenge Material for Medical Countermeasures Efficacy Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Van Zandt, Kristopher E.; Tuanyok, Apichai; Keim, Paul S.; Warren, Richard L.; Gelhaus, H. Carl

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a rare disease of biodefense concern with high mortality and extreme difficulty in treatment. No human vaccines are available that protect against B. pseudomallei infection, and with the current limitations of antibiotic treatment, the development of new preventative and therapeutic interventions is crucial. Although clinical trials could be used to test the efficacy of new medical countermeasures (MCMs), the high mortality rate...

  19. Molecular Characterization of Clinical Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates from India

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Kaestli, Mirjam; Vandana, Kalwaje Eshwara; Sushma, Krishna; Mayo, Mark; Richardson, Leisha; Tuanyok, Apichai; Keim, Paul; Godoy, Daniel; Brian G. Spratt; Currie, Bart J.

    2011-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing of seven isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei from India showed considerable diversity, with six different sequence types. Possible dissemination of melioidosis by historical trading routes is supported by links to strains from Southeast Asia, China, and Africa and the presence of the Burkholderia mallei allele of the bimA gene.

  20. Genomic Characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates Selected for Medical Countermeasures Testing: Comparative Genomics Associated with Differential Virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Sahl, Jason W.; Allender, Christopher J.; Colman, Rebecca E.; Califf, Katy J.; Schupp, James M.; Currie, Bart J.; Van Zandt, Kristopher E.; H Carl Gelhaus; Paul Keim; Apichai Tuanyok

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and a potential bioterrorism agent. In the development of medical countermeasures against B. pseudomallei infection, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) animal Rule recommends using well-characterized strains in animal challenge studies. In this study, whole genome sequence data were generated for 6 B. pseudomallei isolates previously identified as candidates for animal challenge studies; an additional 5 isolates were seque...

  1. Isolation of the highly pathogenic and zoonotic agent Burkholderia pseudomallei from a pet green Iguana in Prague, Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Elschner, Mandy C; Hnizdo, Jan; Stamm, Ivonne; El-Adawy, Hosny; Mertens, Katja; Melzer, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Background Melioidosis caused by Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei is an endemic zoonotic disease mainly reported from northern Australia and Southeast Asia. In Europe, cases of human melioidosis have been reported only from patients travelling to endemic regions. Besides humans, B. pseudomallei has a very broad host range in domestic and wild animals. There are some reports about importation of B. pseudomallei-infected animals from endemic areas into Europe. The present report describes the fir...

  2. Comparison of DNA Extraction Kits for Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Spiked Human Whole Blood Using Real-Time PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Podnecky, Nicole L.; Elrod, Mindy G.; Newton, Bruce R.; Dauphin, Leslie A.; Shi, JianRong; Chawalchitiporn, Sutthinan; Baggett, Henry C.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Gee, Jay E.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia and can cause severe septicemia that may lead to death in 20% to 50% of cases. Rapid detection of B. pseudomallei infection is crucial for timely treatment of septic patients. This study evaluated seven commercially available DNA extraction kits to determine the relative recovery of B. pseudomallei DNA from spiked EDTA-containing human whole blood. The evaluation included three m...

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei: First case of melioidosis in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelerito, Ana; Nunes, Alexandra; Coelho, Susana; Piedade, Cátia; Paixão, Paulo; Cordeiro, Rita; Sampaio, Daniel; Vieira, Luís; Gomes, João Paulo; Núncio, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacillus and the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infection associated with high mortality rate in humans. It can be naturally found as an environmental saprophyte in soil or stagnant water, and rice paddies that predominate in regions of endemicity such as Northeast Thailand. B. pseudomallei is a Biosafety Level 3 organism due to risks of aerosolization and severe disease and is now included in formal emergency preparedness plans and guidelines issued by various authorities in the United States and Europe. Here, we report the first case of imported melioidosis in Portugal. B. pseudomallei was isolated from the patient's blood as well as from a left gluteal abscess pus. The isolate strain showed the unusual resistance profile to first-line eradication therapy trimethroprim/sulfamethoxazole. Whole genome sequencing revealed its similarity with isolates from Southeast Asia, suggesting the Thai origin of this Portuguese isolate, which is in agreement with a recent patient's travel to Thailand. PMID:26962474

  4. Burkholderia pseudomallei: First case of melioidosis in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pelerito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacillus and the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infection associated with high mortality rate in humans. It can be naturally found as an environmental saprophyte in soil or stagnant water, and rice paddies that predominate in regions of endemicity such as Northeast Thailand. B. pseudomallei is a Biosafety Level 3 organism due to risks of aerosolization and severe disease and is now included in formal emergency preparedness plans and guidelines issued by various authorities in the United States and Europe. Here, we report the first case of imported melioidosis in Portugal. B. pseudomallei was isolated from the patient's blood as well as from a left gluteal abscess pus. The isolate strain showed the unusual resistance profile to first-line eradication therapy trimethroprim/sulfamethoxazole. Whole genome sequencing revealed its similarity with isolates from Southeast Asia, suggesting the Thai origin of this Portuguese isolate, which is in agreement with a recent patient's travel to Thailand.

  5. Mapping epigenetic changes to the host cell genome induced by Burkholderia pseudomallei reveals pathogen-specific and pathogen-generic signatures of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmeci, Deniz; Dempster, Emma L.; Champion, Olivia L.; Wagley, Sariqa; Akman, Ozgur E.; Prior, Joann L.; Soyer, Orkun S.; Mill, Jonathan; Titball, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The potential for epigenetic changes in host cells following microbial infection has been widely suggested, but few examples have been reported. We assessed genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation in human macrophage-like U937 cells following infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei, an intracellular bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of human melioidosis. Our analyses revealed significant changes in host cell DNA methylation, at multiple CpG sites in the host cell genome, following infection. Infection induced differentially methylated probes (iDMPs) showing the greatest changes in DNA methylation were found to be in the vicinity of genes involved in inflammatory responses, intracellular signalling, apoptosis and pathogen-induced signalling. A comparison of our data with reported methylome changes in cells infected with M. tuberculosis revealed commonality of differentially methylated genes, including genes involved in T cell responses (BCL11B, FOXO1, KIF13B, PAWR, SOX4, SYK), actin cytoskeleton organisation (ACTR3, CDC42BPA, DTNBP1, FERMT2, PRKCZ, RAC1), and cytokine production (FOXP1, IRF8, MR1). Overall our findings show that pathogenic-specific and pathogen-common changes in the methylome occur following infection. PMID:27484700

  6. Autotransporters and Their Role in the Virulence of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, Natalie R. Lazar; Stevens, Joanne M; Stevens, Mark P.; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are closely related Gram-negative bacteria responsible for the infectious diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Autotransporters (ATs) comprise a large and diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins that includes virulence-associated invasins, adhesins, proteases, and actin-nucleating factors. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome contains 11 predicted ATs, eight of which share homologs in the B. mallei ATCC 23344 genome. Th...

  7. In Vitro Activity of Tigecycline against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis

    OpenAIRE

    Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Trakulsomboon, Suwanna

    2006-01-01

    Investigation of the in vitro activity of tigecycline against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis revealed that the inhibition zone diameters of tigecycline against all isolates were ≥20 mm and that the MIC50 values were 0.5 and 1 μg/ml and the MIC90 values were 2 and 1.5 μg/ml for B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, respectively.

  8. Autotransporters and their role in the virulence of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar Adler, N.; Stevens, J; STEVENS, M.; Galyov, E

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are closely related Gram-negative bacteria responsible for the infectious diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Autotransporters (ATs) comprise a large and diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins that includes virulence-associated invasins, adhesins, proteases and actin-nucleating factors. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome contains eleven predicted ATs, eight of which share homologues in the B. mallei ATCC 23344 genom...

  9. Identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei adhesins for human respiratory epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan Robert J; Wooten Ronald M; Grose William; Lazarus John J; Lipski Serena; Balder Rachel; Woods Donald E; Lafontaine Eric R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei cause the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. A well-studied aspect of pathogenesis by these closely-related bacteria is their ability to invade and multiply within eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the means by which B. pseudomallei and B. mallei adhere to cells are poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to identify adherence factors expressed by these organisms. Results Comparative sequence analyses ident...

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsular Polysaccharide Conjugates Provide Protection against Acute Melioidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Andrew E.; Mary N Burtnick; Stokes, Margaret G. M.; Whelan, Adam O.; Williamson, E. Diane; Atkins, Timothy P.; Prior, Joann L.; Brett, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a CDC tier 1 select agent that causes severe disease in both humans and animals. Diagnosis and treatment of melioidosis can be challenging, and in the absence of optimal chemotherapeutic intervention, acute disease is frequently fatal. Melioidosis is an emerging infectious disease for which there are currently no licensed vaccines. Due to the potential malicious use of B. pseudomallei as well as its impact on public health in r...

  11. Burkholderia pseudomallei: Its Detection in Soil and Seroprevalence in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Jilani, Md. Shariful Alam; Robayet, Jamshedul Alam Mohammad; Mohiuddin, Md.; Hasan, Md. Rokib; Ahsan, Chowdhury Rafiqul; Haq, Jalaluddin Ashraful

    2016-01-01

    Background Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an endemic disease in Bangladesh. No systematic study has yet been done to detect the environmental source of the organism and its true extent in Bangladesh. The present study attempted to isolate B. pseudomallei in soil samples and to determine its seroprevalence in several districts in Bangladesh. Methodology and Results Soil samples were collected from rural areas of four districts of Bangladesh from where culture confirmed me...

  12. Revised structures for the predominant O-polysaccharides expressed by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Heiss, Christian; Burtnick, Mary N.; Roberts, Rosemary A.; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Brett, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    O-Polysaccharides (OPS) were isolated from purified Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei lipopolysaccharides by mild-acid hydrolysis and gel-permeation chromatography. 1-D and 2-D 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy experiments revealed that the OPS antigens were unbranched heteropolymers with the following structures:

  13. Misidentification of Burkholderia pseudomallei as Burkholderia cepacia by the VITEK 2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiaohui; Deng, Yiyun; Zhou, Taoyou

    2012-10-01

    A previously healthy Chinese male returned from working in the Malaysian jungle with a fever. A blood culture grew Gram-negative bacilli that were initially identified as Burkholderia cepacia by the VITEK 2 system but were subsequently found to be Burkholderia pseudomallei by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The identification of B. pseudomallei using commercially available automated systems is problematic and clinicians in non-endemic areas should be aware of the possibility of melioidosis in patients with a relevant travel history and blood cultures growing Burkholderia spp. PMID:22820689

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei Strain 350105, Isolated in Hainan, China, in 1976

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Lihua; Yu, Yonghui; Feng, Le; He, Jun; WANG, Tao; Zhu, Hong; Duan, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of the potentially fatal disease melioidosis. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a virulent water isolate obtained from the Hainan Province of China in 1976, B. pseudomallei strain 350105.

  15. Burkholderia Pseudomallei is genetically diverse in agricultural land in Northeast Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaporn Wuthiekanun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The soil-dwelling Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis. Extreme structuring of genotype and genotypic frequency has been demonstrated for B. pseudomallei in uncultivated land, but its distribution and genetic diversity in agricultural land where most human infections are probably acquired is not well defined. METHODS: Fixed-interval soil sampling was performed in a rice paddy in northeast Thailand in which 100 grams of soil was sampled at a depth of 30 cm from 10x10 sampling points each measuring 2.5 m by 2.5 m. Soil was cultured for the presence of B. pseudomallei and genotyping of colonies present on primary culture plates was performed using a combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: B. pseudomallei was cultured from 28/100 samples. Genotyping of 630 primary colonies drawn from 11 sampling points demonstrated 10 PFGE banding pattern types, which on MLST were resolved into 7 sequence types (ST. Overlap of genotypes was observed more often between sampling points that were closely positioned. Two sampling points contained mixed B. pseudomallei genotypes, each with a numerically dominant genotype and one or more additional genotypes present as minority populations. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic diversity and structuring of B. pseudomallei exists despite the effects of flooding and the physical and chemical processes associated with farming. These findings form an important baseline for future studies of environmental B. pseudomallei.

  16. Role for the Burkholderia pseudomallei Type Three Secretion System Cluster 1 bpscN Gene in Virulence ▿

    OpenAIRE

    D'Cruze, Tanya; Gong, Lan; Treerat, Puthayalai; Ramm, Georg; John D Boyce; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben; Rodney J. Devenish

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causal agent of melioidosis, employs a number of virulence factors during its infection of mammalian cells. One such factor is the type three secretion system (TTSS), which is proposed to mediate the transport and secretion of bacterial effector molecules directly into host cells. The B. pseudomallei genome contains three TTSS gene clusters (designated TTSS1, TTSS2, and TTSS3). Previous research has indicated that neither TTSS1 nor TTSS2 is involved in B. pseudo...

  17. Growing Burkholderia pseudomallei in Biofilm Stimulating Conditions Significantly Induces Antimicrobial Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sawasdidoln, Chakrit; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Sermswan, Rasana W.; Tattawasart, Unchalee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi

    2010-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis, was reported to produce biofilm. As the disease causes high relapse rate when compared to other bacterial infections, it therefore might be due to the reactivation of the biofilm forming bacteria which also provided resistance to antimicrobial agents. However, the mechanism on how biofilm can provide tolerance to antimicrobials is still unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings The change in resistance of B...

  18. Identification of an OmpW homologue in Burkholderia pseudomallei, a protective vaccine antigen against melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, William T; Spink, Natasha; Cia, Felipe; Collins, Cassandra; Romano, Maria; Berisio, Rita; Bancroft, Gregory J; McClean, Siobhán

    2016-05-17

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, which is associated with a range of clinical manifestations, including sepsis and fatal pneumonia and is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Treatment can be challenging and control of infection involves prolonged antibiotic therapy, yet there are no approved vaccines available to prevent infection. Our aim was to develop and assess the potential of a prophylactic vaccine candidate targeted against melioidosis. The identified candidate is the 22kDa outer membrane protein, OmpW. We previously demonstrated that this protein was immunoprotective in mouse models of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) infections. We cloned Bp_ompW in Escherichia coli, expressed and purified the protein. Endotoxin free protein administered with SAS adjuvant protected Balb/C mice (75% survival) relative to controls (25% survival) (p<0.05). A potent serological response was observed with IgG2a to IgG1 ratio of 6.0. Furthermore C57BL/6 mice were protected for up to 80 days against a lethal dose of B. pseudomallei and surpassed the efficacy of the live attenuated 2D2 positive control. BpompW is homologous across thirteen sequenced B. pseudomallei strains, indicating that it should be broadly protective against B. pseudomallei. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that BpOmpW is able to induce protective immunity against melioidosis and is likely to be an effective vaccine antigen, possibly in combination with other subunit antigens. PMID:27091689

  19. An ensemble of structures of Burkholderia pseudomallei 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Douglas R.; Staker, Bart L.; Abendroth, Jan A.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Hartley, Robert; Leonard, Jess; Kim, Hidong; Rychel, Amanda L.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Myler, Peter J.; Stewart, Lance J. (UWASH); (Emerald)

    2011-12-07

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil-dwelling bacterium endemic to Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Burkholderia is responsible for melioidosis, a serious infection of the skin. The enzyme 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) catalyzes the interconversion of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate, a key step in the glycolytic pathway. As such it is an extensively studied enzyme and X-ray crystal structures of PGAM enzymes from multiple species have been elucidated. Vanadate is a phosphate mimic that is a powerful tool for studying enzymatic mechanisms in phosphoryl-transfer enzymes such as phosphoglycerate mutase. However, to date no X-ray crystal structures of phosphoglycerate mutase have been solved with vanadate acting as a substrate mimic. Here, two vanadate complexes together with an ensemble of substrate and fragment-bound structures that provide a comprehensive picture of the function of the Burkholderia enzyme are reported.

  20. Polar lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei induce different host immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Gonzalez-Juarrero

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4(+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4(+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster.

  1. Complete killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Burkholderia pseudomallei is dependent on prolonged direct association with the viable pathogen.

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    Song-Hua Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease of significant morbidity and mortality in both human and animals in endemic areas. Much remains to be known about the contributions of genotypic variations within the bacteria and the host, and environmental factors that lead to the manifestation of the clinical symptoms of melioidosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we showed that different isolates of B. pseudomallei have divergent ability to kill the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The rate of nematode killing was also dependent on growth media: B. pseudomallei grown on peptone-glucose media killed C. elegans more rapidly than bacteria grown on the nematode growth media. Filter and bacteria cell-free culture filtrate assays demonstrated that the extent of killing observed is significantly less than that observed in the direct killing assay. Additionally, we showed that B. pseudomallei does not persistently accumulate within the C. elegans gut as brief exposure to B. pseudomallei is not sufficient for C. elegans infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A combination of genetic and environmental factors affects virulence. In addition, we have also demonstrated that a Burkholderia-specific mechanism mediating the pathogenic effect in C. elegans requires proliferating B. pseudomallei to continuously produce toxins to mediate complete killing.

  2. An objective approach for Burkholderia pseudomallei strain selection as challenge material for medical countermeasures efficacy testing

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    Kristopher E. Van Zandt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a rare disease of biodefense concern with high mortality and extreme difficulty in treatment. No human vaccines are available that protect against B. pseudomallei infection, and with the current limitations of antibiotic treatment, the development of new preventative and therapeutic interventions is crucial. Although clinical trials could be used to test the efficacy of new medical countermeasures (MCMs, the high mortality rates associated with melioidosis raises significant ethical issues concerning treating individuals with new compounds with unknown efficacies. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA has formulated a set of guidelines for the licensure of new MCMs to treat diseases in which it would be unethical to test the efficacy of these drugs in humans. The FDA Animal Rule 21 CFR 314 calls for consistent, well-characterized B. pseudomallei strains to be used as challenge material in animal models. In order to facilitate the efficacy testing of new MCMs for melioidosis using animal models, we intend to develop a well-characterized panel of strains for use. This panel will comprise of strains that were isolated from human cases, have a low passage history, are virulent in animal models, and are well characterized phenotypically and genotypically. We have reviewed published and unpublished data on various B. pseudomallei strains to establish an objective method for selecting the strains to be included in the panel of B. pseudomallei strains with attention to five categories: animal infection models, genetic characterization, clinical and passage history, and availability of the strain to the research community. We identified 109 strains with data in at least one of the five categories, scored each strain based on the gathered data and identified 6 strains as candidate for a B. pseudomallei strain panel.

  3. Molecular evidence of Burkholderia pseudomallei genotypes based on geographical distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkefli, Noorfatin Jihan; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Chong, Chun Wie; Thong, Kwai Lin; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central intermediary metabolism (CIM) in bacteria is defined as a set of metabolic biochemical reactions within a cell, which is essential for the cell to survive in response to environmental perturbations. The genes associated with CIM are commonly found in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. As these genes are involved in vital metabolic processes of bacteria, we explored the efficiency of the genes in genotypic characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates, compared with the established pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes. Methods. Nine previously sequenced B. pseudomallei isolates from Malaysia were characterized by PFGE, MLST and CIM genes. The isolates were later compared to the other 39 B. pseudomallei strains, retrieved from GenBank using both MLST and sequence analysis of CIM genes. UniFrac and hierachical clustering analyses were performed using the results generated by both MLST and sequence analysis of CIM genes. Results. Genetic relatedness of nine Malaysian B. pseudomallei isolates and the other 39 strains was investigated. The nine Malaysian isolates were subtyped into six PFGE profiles, four MLST profiles and five sequence types based on CIM genes alignment. All methods demonstrated the clonality of OB and CB as well as CMS and THE. However, PFGE showed less than 70% similarity between a pair of morphology variants, OS and OB. In contrast, OS was identical to the soil isolate, MARAN. To have a better understanding of the genetic diversity of B. pseudomallei worldwide, we further aligned the sequences of genes used in MLST and genes associated with CIM for the nine Malaysian isolates and 39 B. pseudomallei strains from NCBI database. Overall, based on the CIM genes, the strains were subtyped into 33 profiles where majority of the strains from Asian countries were clustered together. On the other hand, MLST resolved the isolates into 31 profiles which formed three clusters

  4. Sterile-α- and Armadillo Motif-Containing Protein Inhibits the TRIF-Dependent Downregulation of Signal Regulatory Protein α To Interfere with Intracellular Bacterial Elimination in Burkholderia pseudomallei-Infected Mouse Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Baral, Pankaj; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, evades macrophage killing by suppressing the TRIF-dependent pathway, leading to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. We previously demonstrated that virulent wild-type B. pseudomallei inhibits the TRIF-dependent pathway by upregulating sterile-α- and armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM) and by inhibiting downregulation of signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα); both molecules are negative regulators o...

  5. Identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei adhesins for human respiratory epithelial cells

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    Hogan Robert J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei cause the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. A well-studied aspect of pathogenesis by these closely-related bacteria is their ability to invade and multiply within eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the means by which B. pseudomallei and B. mallei adhere to cells are poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to identify adherence factors expressed by these organisms. Results Comparative sequence analyses identified a gene product in the published genome of B. mallei strain ATCC23344 (locus # BMAA0649 that resembles the well-characterized Yersinia enterocolitica autotransporter adhesin YadA. The gene encoding this B. mallei protein, designated boaA, was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to significantly increase adherence to human epithelial cell lines, specifically HEp2 (laryngeal cells and A549 (type II pneumocytes, as well as to cultures of normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE. Consistent with these findings, disruption of the boaA gene in B. mallei ATCC23344 reduced adherence to all three cell types by ~50%. The genomes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and DD503 were also found to contain boaA and inactivation of the gene in DD503 considerably decreased binding to monolayers of HEp2 and A549 cells and to NHBE cultures. A second YadA-like gene product highly similar to BoaA (65% identity was identified in the published genomic sequence of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 (locus # BPSL1705. The gene specifying this protein, termed boaB, appears to be B. pseudomallei-specific. Quantitative attachment assays demonstrated that recombinant E. coli expressing BoaB displayed greater binding to A549 pneumocytes, HEp2 cells and NHBE cultures. Moreover, a boaB mutant of B. pseudomallei DD503 showed decreased adherence to these respiratory cells. Additionally, a B. pseudomallei strain lacking expression of both boaA and boaB was impaired in its ability to

  6. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human memory T cell responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Patcharaporn Tippayawat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important cause of community-acquired lethal sepsis in endemic regions in southeast Asia and northern Australia and is increasingly reported in other tropical areas. In animal models, production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma is critical for resistance, but in humans the characteristics of IFN-gamma production and the bacterial antigens that are recognized by the cell-mediated immune response have not been defined. METHODS: Peripheral blood from 133 healthy individuals who lived in the endemic area and had no history of melioidosis, 60 patients who had recovered from melioidosis, and 31 other patient control subjects were stimulated by whole bacteria or purified bacterial proteins in vitro, and IFN-gamma responses were analyzed by ELISPOT and flow cytometry. FINDINGS: B. pseudomallei was a potent activator of human peripheral blood NK cells for innate production of IFN-gamma. In addition, healthy individuals with serological evidence of exposure to B. pseudomallei and patients recovered from active melioidosis developed CD4(+ (and CD8(+ T cells that recognized whole bacteria and purified proteins LolC, OppA, and PotF, members of the B. pseudomallei ABC transporter family. This response was primarily mediated by terminally differentiated T cells of the effector-memory (T(EMRA phenotype and correlated with the titer of anti-B. pseudomallei antibodies in the serum. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals living in a melioidosis-endemic region show clear evidence of T cell priming for the ability to make IFN-gamma that correlates with their serological status. The ability to detect T cell responses to defined B. pseudomallei proteins in large numbers of individuals now provides the opportunity to screen candidate antigens for inclusion in protein or polysaccharide-conjugate subunit vaccines against this important but neglected disease.

  7. Genomic Sequence of Burkholderia multivorans NKI379, a Soil Bacterium That Inhibits the Growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Pei-Tan; Liu, Jong-Kang; Chen, Ya-Lei; Liu, Pei-Ju; Ni, Wen-Fan; Chen, Yao-Shen; Wu, Keh-Ming; Lin, Hsi-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia multivorans NKI379 is a soil bacterium that exhibits an antagonistic effect against the growth of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of the infectious disease melioidosis. We report the draft genomic sequence of B. multivorans NKI379, which has a G+C content of 67% and 5,203 candidate protein-encoding genes.

  8. Global transcriptional analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei high and low biofilm producers reveals insights into biofilm production and virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Chui-Yoke; Hara, Yuka; Ghazali, Ahmad-Kamal; Yap, Soon-Joo; Kong, Cin; Wong, Yee-Chin; Rozali, Naufal; Koh, Seng-Fook; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Puthucheary, Savithri D.; Nathan, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic bacterial infections occur as a result of the infecting pathogen’s ability to live within a biofilm, hence escaping the detrimental effects of antibiotics and the immune defense system. Burkholderia pseudomallei, a gram-negative facultative pathogen, is distinctive in its ability to survive within phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells, to persist in vivo for many years and subsequently leading to relapse as well as the development of chronic disease. The capacity to persist h...

  9. Interaction of Interferon Gamma-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species with Ceftazidime Leads to Synergistic Killing of Intracellular Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Mosovsky, Kara; Silva, Ediane; Troyer, Ryan; Propst-Graham, Katie; Dow, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a facultative intracellular pathogen, causes severe infections and is inherently refractory to many antibiotics. Previous studies from our group have shown that interferon gamma (IFN-γ) interacts synergistically with the antibiotic ceftazidime to kill bacteria in infected macrophages. The present study aimed to identify the underlying mechanism of that interaction. We first showed that blocking reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathways reversed IFN-γ- and ceftazidime-m...

  10. Protective response to subunit vaccination against intranasal Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Whitlock, Gregory C.; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Qazi, Omar; Judy, Barbara M.; Taylor, Katherine; Propst, Katie L.; Duffy, Angie J.; Johnson, Kate; Kitto, G. Barrie; Brown, Katherine A.; Dow, Steven W.; Torres, Alfredo G.; Estes, D. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, responsible for the diseases glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Furthermore, there is currently no vaccine available against these Burkholderia species. In this study, we aimed to identify protective proteins against these pathogens. Immunization with recombinant B. mallei Hcp1 (type VI secreted/structural protein), BimA (autotransporter protein), BopA (type III secreted protein), and B. pseudomallei LolC (ABC...

  11. Survival, Sublethal Injury, and Recovery of Environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil Subjected to Desiccation

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Eloise; Smith, James J.; Norton, Robert; Corkeron, Maree

    2013-01-01

    Environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei isolated from sandy soil at Castle Hill, Townsville, in the dry tropic region of Queensland, Australia, was inoculated into sterile-soil laboratory microcosms subjected to variable soil moisture. Survival and sublethal injury of the B. pseudomallei strain were monitored by recovery using culture-based methods. Soil extraction buffer yielded higher recoveries as an extraction agent than sterile distilled water. B. pseudomallei was not recoverable when in...

  12. Effectiveness of a Simplified Method for Isolation of Burkholderia pseudomallei from Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Wongsuwan, Gumphol; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2012-01-01

    Detection of environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei indicates a risk for melioidosis and is important for the development of a global risk map. We describe a simple method for detecting B. pseudomallei using direct culture of soil in enrichment broth. This gives a rate of positivity comparable to that obtained with a standard method but is cheaper and labor saving.

  13. The Madagascar hissing cockroach as a novel surrogate host for Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis

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    Fisher Nathan A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are gram-negative pathogens responsible for the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Both species cause disease in humans and animals and have been designated as category B select agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Burkholderia thailandensis is a closely related bacterium that is generally considered avirulent for humans. While it can cause disease in rodents, the B. thailandensis 50% lethal dose (LD50 is typically ≥ 104-fold higher than the B. pseudomallei and B. mallei LD50 in mammalian models of infection. Here we describe an alternative to mammalian hosts in the study of virulence and host-pathogen interactions of these Burkholderia species. Results Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MH cockroaches possess a number of qualities that make them desirable for use as a surrogate host, including ease of breeding, ease of handling, a competent innate immune system, and the ability to survive at 37°C. MH cockroaches were highly susceptible to infection with B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis and the LD50 was 50 for Escherichia coli in MH cockroaches was >105 cfu. B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1 mutants were all attenuated in MH cockroaches, which is consistent with previous virulence studies conducted in rodents. B. pseudomallei mutants deficient in the other five T6SS gene clusters, T6SS-2 through T6SS-6, were virulent in both MH cockroaches and hamsters. Hemocytes obtained from MH cockroaches infected with B. pseudomallei harbored numerous intracellular bacteria, suggesting that this facultative intracellular pathogen can survive and replicate inside of MH cockroach phagocytic cells. The hemolymph extracted from these MH cockroaches also contained multinuclear giant cells (MNGCs with intracellular B. pseudomallei, which indicates that infected hemocytes can

  14. Beclin 1 Is Required for Starvation-Enhanced, but Not Rapamycin-Enhanced, LC3-Associated Phagocytosis of Burkholderia pseudomallei in RAW 264.7 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xuelei; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben; John D Boyce; Rodney J. Devenish

    2013-01-01

    LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP) of Burkholderia pseudomallei by murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) cells is an intracellular innate defense mechanism. Beclin 1, a protein with several roles in autophagic processes, is known to be recruited to phagosomal membranes as a very early event in LAP. We sought to determine whether knockdown of Beclin 1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) would affect recruitment of LC3 and subsequent LAP of infecting B. pseudomallei. Both starvation and rapamycin treatment...

  15. Use of a Real-Time PCR TaqMan Assay for Rapid Identification and Differentiation of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    U'Ren, Jana M.; Matthew N. Van Ert; James M Schupp; Easterday, W. Ryan; Simonson, Tatum S.; Okinaka, Richard T; Pearson, Talima; Keim, Paul

    2005-01-01

    A TaqMan allelic-discrimination assay designed around a synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism was used to genotype Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei isolates. The assay rapidly identifies and discriminates between these two highly pathogenic bacteria and does not cross-react with genetic near neighbors, such as Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia cepacia.

  16. Actin-binding proteins from Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis can functionally compensate for the actin-based motility defect of a Burkholderia pseudomallei bimA mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, J. M.; Ulrich, R L; Taylor, L A; Wood, M W; DeShazer, D; M.P. Stevens; Galyov, E. E.

    2005-01-01

    Recently we identified a bacterial factor (BimA) required for actin-based motility of Burkholderia pseudomallei. Here we report that Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis are capable of actin-based motility in J774.2 cells and that BimA homologs of these bacteria can restore the actin-based motility defect of a B. pseudomallei bimA mutant. While the BimA homologs differ in their amino-terminal sequence, they interact directly with actin in vitro and vary in their ability to bind ...

  17. Actin-Binding Proteins from Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis Can Functionally Compensate for the Actin-Based Motility Defect of a Burkholderia pseudomallei bimA Mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Joanne M; Ulrich, Ricky L.; Taylor, Lowrie A.; Wood, Michael W.; DeShazer, David; Stevens, Mark P.; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2005-01-01

    Recently we identified a bacterial factor (BimA) required for actin-based motility of Burkholderia pseudomallei. Here we report that Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis are capable of actin-based motility in J774.2 cells and that BimA homologs of these bacteria can restore the actin-based motility defect of a B. pseudomallei bimA mutant. While the BimA homologs differ in their amino-terminal sequence, they interact directly with actin in vitro and vary in their ability to bind ...

  18. A Unique Set of the Burkholderia Collagen-Like Proteins Provides Insight into Pathogenesis, Genome Evolution and Niche Adaptation, and Infection Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Bachert, Beth A.; Choi, Soo J.; Snyder, Anna K.; Rio, Rita V. M.; Durney, Brandon C.; Holland, Lisa A.; Amemiya, Kei; Welkos, Susan L.; Bozue, Joel A.; Cote, Christopher K.; Berisio, Rita; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, classified as category B priority pathogens, are significant human and animal pathogens that are highly infectious and broad-spectrum antibiotic resistant. Currently, the pathogenicity mechanisms utilized by Burkholderia are not fully understood, and correct diagnosis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei infection remains a challenge due to limited detection methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of a set of 13 novel Burkholderia coll...

  19. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei toxin-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis using a Caenorhabditis elegans ugt-29 biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rui-Rui; Kong, Cin; Lee, Song-Hua; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Toxins are believed to play a crucial role in Burkholderia pseudomallei pathogenicity, however to date, only a few have been identified. The discovery of additional toxic molecules is limited by the lack of a sensitive indicator of B. pseudomallei toxicity. Previously, from a whole genome transcriptome analysis of B. pseudomallei-infected Caenorhabditis elegans, we noted significant overexpression of a number of worm genes encoding detoxification enzymes, indicating the host's attempt to clear bacterial toxic molecules. One of these genes, ugt-29, a family member of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, was the most robustly induced phase II detoxification gene. In this study, we show that strong induction of ugt-29 is restricted to infections by the most virulent species among the pathogens tested. We also noted that ugt-29 is activated upon disruption of host protein synthesis. Hence, we propose that UGT-29 could be a promising biosensor to detect B. pseudomallei toxins that compromise host protein synthesis. The identification of bactobolin, a polyketide-peptide hybrid molecule, as a toxic molecule of B. pseudomallei further verifies the utilization of this surveillance system to search for bacterial toxins. Hence, a ugt-29 based reporter should be useful in screening for other molecules that inhibit host protein synthesis. PMID:27273550

  20. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei toxin-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis using a Caenorhabditis elegans ugt–29 biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rui-Rui; Kong, Cin; Lee, Song-Hua; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Toxins are believed to play a crucial role in Burkholderia pseudomallei pathogenicity, however to date, only a few have been identified. The discovery of additional toxic molecules is limited by the lack of a sensitive indicator of B. pseudomallei toxicity. Previously, from a whole genome transcriptome analysis of B. pseudomallei-infected Caenorhabditis elegans, we noted significant overexpression of a number of worm genes encoding detoxification enzymes, indicating the host’s attempt to clear bacterial toxic molecules. One of these genes, ugt–29, a family member of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, was the most robustly induced phase II detoxification gene. In this study, we show that strong induction of ugt–29 is restricted to infections by the most virulent species among the pathogens tested. We also noted that ugt–29 is activated upon disruption of host protein synthesis. Hence, we propose that UGT–29 could be a promising biosensor to detect B. pseudomallei toxins that compromise host protein synthesis. The identification of bactobolin, a polyketide-peptide hybrid molecule, as a toxic molecule of B. pseudomallei further verifies the utilization of this surveillance system to search for bacterial toxins. Hence, a ugt–29 based reporter should be useful in screening for other molecules that inhibit host protein synthesis. PMID:27273550

  1. Characterization of ceftazidime resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei from Australia.

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    Derek S Sarovich

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the serious human disease, melioidosis. There is no vaccine against melioidosis and it can be fatal if not treated with a specific antibiotic regimen, which typically includes the third-generation cephalosporin, ceftazidime (CAZ. There have been several resistance mechanisms described for B. pseudomallei, of which the best described are amino acid changes that alter substrate specificity in the highly conserved class A β-lactamase, PenA. In the current study, we sequenced penA from isolates sequentially derived from two melioidosis patients with wild-type (1.5 µg/mL and, subsequently, resistant (16 or ≥256 µg/mL CAZ phenotypes. We identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that directly increased CAZ hydrolysis. One SNP caused an amino acid substitution (C69Y near the active site of PenA, whereas a second novel SNP was found within the penA promoter region. In both instances, the CAZ resistance phenotype corresponded directly with the SNP genotype. Interestingly, these SNPs appeared after infection and under selection from CAZ chemotherapy. Through heterologous cloning and expression, and subsequent allelic exchange in the native bacterium, we confirmed the role of penA in generating both low-level and high-level CAZ resistance in these clinical isolates. Similar to previous studies, the amino acid substitution altered substrate specificity to other β-lactams, suggesting a potential fitness cost associated with this mutation, a finding that could be exploited to improve therapeutic outcomes in patients harboring CAZ resistant B. pseudomallei. Our study is the first to functionally characterize CAZ resistance in clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei and to provide proven and clinically relevant signatures for monitoring the development of antibiotic resistance in this important pathogen.

  2. Burkholderia pseudomallei penetrates the brain via destruction of the olfactory and trigeminal nerves: implications for the pathogenesis of neurological melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, James A; Ekberg, Jenny A K; Dando, Samantha J; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Horton, Rachel E; Batzloff, Michael; Owen, Suzzanne J; Holt, Stephanie; Peak, Ian R; Ulett, Glen C; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Beacham, Ifor R

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Melioidosis is a potentially fatal disease that is endemic to tropical northern Australia and Southeast Asia, with a mortality rate of 14 to 50%. The bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent which infects numerous parts of the human body, including the brain, which results in the neurological manifestation of melioidosis. The olfactory nerve constitutes a direct conduit from the nasal cavity into the brain, and we have previously reported that B. pseudomallei can colonize this nerve in mice. We have now investigated in detail the mechanism by which the bacteria penetrate the olfactory and trigeminal nerves within the nasal cavity and infect the brain. We found that the olfactory epithelium responded to intranasal B. pseudomallei infection by widespread crenellation followed by disintegration of the neuronal layer to expose the underlying basal layer, which the bacteria then colonized. With the loss of the neuronal cell bodies, olfactory axons also degenerated, and the bacteria then migrated through the now-open conduit of the olfactory nerves. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that B. pseudomallei migrated through the cribriform plate via the olfactory nerves to enter the outer layer of the olfactory bulb in the brain within 24 h. We also found that the bacteria colonized the thin respiratory epithelium in the nasal cavity and then rapidly migrated along the underlying trigeminal nerve to penetrate the cranial cavity. These results demonstrate that B. pseudomallei invasion of the nerves of the nasal cavity leads to direct infection of the brain and bypasses the blood-brain barrier. IMPORTANCE Melioidosis is a potentially fatal tropical disease that is endemic to northern Australia and Southeast Asia. It is caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, which can infect many organs of the body, including the brain, and results in neurological symptoms. The pathway by which the bacteria can penetrate the brain is unknown, and

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system mutants exhibit delayed vacuolar escape phenotypes in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtnick, Mary N; Brett, Paul J; Nair, Vinod; Warawa, Jonathan M; Woods, Donald E; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen capable of surviving and replicating within eukaryotic cells. Recent studies have shown that B. pseudomallei Bsa type III secretion system 3 (T3SS-3) mutants exhibit vacuolar escape and replication defects in J774.2 murine macrophages. In the present study, we characterized the interactions of a B. pseudomallei bsaZ mutant with RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Following uptake, the mutant was found to survive and replicate within infected RAW 264.7 cells over an 18-h period. In addition, high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and RANTES, but not IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, were detected in culture supernatants harvested from infected monolayers. The subcellular location of B. pseudomallei within infected RAW 264.7 cells was determined, and as expected, the bsaZ mutant demonstrated early-vacuolar-escape defects. Interestingly, however, experiments also indicated that this mutant was capable of delayed vacuolar escape. Consistent with this finding, evidence of actin-based motility and multinucleated giant cell formation were observed between 12 and 18 h postinfection. Further studies demonstrated that a triple mutant defective in all three B. pseudomallei T3SSs exhibited the same phenotype as the bsaZ mutant, indicating that functional T3SS-1 and T3SS-2 did not appear to be responsible for the delayed escape phenotype in RAW 264.7 cells. Based upon these findings, it appears that B. pseudomallei may not require T3SS-1, -2, and -3 to facilitate survival, delayed vacuolar escape, and actin-based motility in activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. PMID:18443088

  4. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Sputum using Selective Enrichment Broth and Ashdown's Medium at Kampong Cham Provincial Hospital, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhem, Somary; Letchford, Joanne; Meas, Chea; Thann, Sovanndeth; McLaughlin, James C; Baron, Ellen Jo; West, T Eoin

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis, infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is increasingly reported in Cambodia. We hypothesized that implementation of an enhanced sputum testing protocol in a provincial hospital diagnostic microbiology laboratory would increase detection of B. pseudomallei. We tested 241 sputum specimens that were deemed acceptable for culture, comparing culture in selective enrichment broth followed by sub-culture on Ashdown's medium to standard culture methods. Two specimens (0.8%) were positive for B. pseudomallei using the enhanced protocol whereas one specimen (0.4%) was positive using standard methods. Given the low numbers of positive specimens, we could not conclusively determine the utility of the enhanced sputum testing protocol. However, the ramifications of identification of  B. pseudomallei are substantial, and the benefit of the enhanced testing protocol may be more apparent in patients selected based on risk factors and clinical presentation. Promoting clinician awareness of the infection and encouraging utilization of diagnostic microbiology services are also likely to be important factors in facilitating identification of melioidosis. PMID:25717370

  5. Interaction of insulin with Burkholderia pseudomallei may be caused by a preservative

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, A; Wuthiekanun, V

    2000-01-01

    Aim—To re-examine the previously reported in vitro interaction of insulin with Burkholderia pseudomallei, in the light of a suggestion that the interaction may have resulted from the presence of the preservative m-cresol in commercial preparations.

  6. Genome Sequence of the Historical Clinical Isolate Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, Patrik; Johnson, Shannon L; Davenport, Karen W; Chain, Patrick S; Schoeniger, Joe; Ray, Debjit; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P; Peña, José; Branda, Steven S; El-Etr, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6, a virulent clinical strain isolated from a melioidosis patient in Bangladesh in 1960. The draft genome consists of 39 contigs and is 7,322,181 bp long. PMID:27365360

  7. Genome Sequence of the Historical Clinical Isolate Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Karen W.; Chain, Patrick S.; Schoeniger, Joe; Ray, Debjit; Sinha, Anupama; Williams, Kelly P.; Peña, José; El-Etr, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei PHLS 6, a virulent clinical strain isolated from a melioidosis patient in Bangladesh in 1960. The draft genome consists of 39 contigs and is 7,322,181 bp long. PMID:27365360

  8. Distribution of Melioidosis Cases and Viable Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil: Evidence for Emerging Melioidosis in Taiwan▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yao-Shen; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Mu, Jung-Jung; Chiang, Chuen-Sheue; Chen, Chang-Hsun; Buu, Leh-Mia; Lin, Yusen E.; Chen, Ya-Lei

    2010-01-01

    A survey for the prevalence if Burkholderia pseudomallei in soil in Taiwan found that its incidence is comparable to that in other regions of the world where melioidosis is endemic. The presence of identical genetic patterns among the clinical and environmental isolates evaluated suggested a link between the pathogens present in contaminated soil and the emergence of indigenous melioidosis.

  9. Discrimination of Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei from Burkholderia thailandensis by sequence comparison of a fragment of the ribosomal protein S21 (rpsU) gene

    OpenAIRE

    Frickmann, H.; Chantratita, N.; Gauthier, Y. P.; Neubauer, H.; Hagen, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Discrimination of Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei from environmental B. thailandensis is challenging. We describe a discrimination method based on sequence comparison of the ribosomal protein S21 (rpsU) gene.

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsular Polysaccharide Recognition by a Monoclonal Antibody Reveals Key Details toward a Biodefense Vaccine and Diagnostics against Melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Roberta; Dillon, Michael J; Burtnick, Mary N; Hubbard, Mark A; Kenfack, Marielle Tamigney; Blériot, Yves; Gauthier, Charles; Brett, Paul J; AuCoin, David P; Lanzetta, Rosa; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-10-16

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the bacterium responsible for melioidosis, an infectious disease with high mortality rates. Since melioidosis is a significant public health concern in endemic regions and the organism is currently classified as a potential biothreat agent, the development of effective vaccines and rapid diagnostics is a priority. The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) expressed by B. pseudomallei is a highly conserved virulence factor and a protective antigen. Because of this, CPS is considered an attractive antigen for use in the development of both vaccines and diagnostics. In the present study, we describe the interactions of CPS with the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4C4 using a multidisciplinary approach including organic synthesis, molecular biology techniques, surface plasmon resonance, and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Using these methods, we determined the mode of binding between mAb 4C4 and native CPS or ad hoc synthesized capsular polysaccharide fragments. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the O-acetyl moiety of CPS is essential for the interaction of the CPS epitope with mAb 4C4. Collectively, our results provide important insights into the structural features of B. pseudomallei CPS that enable antibody recognition that may help the rational design of CPS-based vaccine candidates. In addition, our findings confirm that the mAb 4C4 is suitable for use in an antibody-based detection assay for diagnosis of B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:26198038

  11. Land use and soil type determine the presence of the pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei in tropical rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolzi, Olivier; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Dittrich, Sabine; Auda, Yves; Newton, Paul N; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Knappik, Michael; Soulileuth, Bounsamai; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Dance, David A B; Pierret, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the bacterium that causes melioidosis in humans. While B. pseudomallei is known to be endemic in South East Asia (SEA), the occurrence of the disease in other parts of the tropics points towards a potentially large global distribution. We investigated the environmental factors that influence the presence (and absence) of B. pseudomallei in a tropical watershed in SEA. Our main objective was to determine whether there is a link between the presence of the organism in the hydrographic network and the upstream soil and land-use type. The presence of B. pseudomallei was determined using a specific quantitative real-time PCR assay following enrichment culture. Land use, soil, geomorphology, and environmental data were then analyzed using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) to compare the B. pseudomallei positive and negative sites. Soil type in the surrounding catchment and turbidity had a strong positive influence on the presence (acrisols and luvisols) or absence (ferralsols) of B. pseudomallei. Given the strong apparent links between soil characteristics, water turbidity, and the presence/absence of B. pseudomallei, actions to raise public awareness about factors increasing the risk of exposure should be undertaken in order to reduce the incidence of melioidosis in regions of endemicity. PMID:26758304

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D10 values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased (P10 values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  13. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei O-antigen serotypes in near-neighbor species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Joshua K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and a CDC category B select agent with no available effective vaccine. Previous immunizations in mice have utilized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a potential vaccine target because it is known as one of the most important antigenic epitopes in B. pseudomallei. Complicating this strategy are the four different B. pseudomallei LPS O-antigen types: A, B, B2, and rough. Sero-crossreactivity is common among O-antigens of Burkholderia species. Here, we identified the presence of multiple B. pseudomallei O-antigen types and sero-crossreactivity in its near-neighbor species. Results PCR screening of O-antigen biosynthesis genes, phenotypic characterization using SDS-PAGE, and immunoblot analysis showed that majority of B. mallei and B. thailandensis strains contained the typical O-antigen type A. In contrast, most of B. ubonensis and B. thailandensis-like strains expressed the atypical O-antigen types B and B2, respectively. Most B. oklahomensis strains expressed a distinct and non-seroreactive O-antigen type, except strain E0147 which expressed O-antigen type A. O-antigen type B2 was also detected in B. thailandensis 82172, B. ubonensis MSMB108, and Burkholderia sp. MSMB175. Interestingly, B. thailandensis-like MSMB43 contained a novel serotype B positive O-antigen. Conclusions This study expands the number of species which express B. pseudomallei O-antigen types. Further work is required to elucidate the full structures and how closely these are to the B. pseudomallei O-antigens, which will ultimately determine the efficacy of the near-neighbor B serotypes for vaccine development.

  14. Burkholderia pseudomallei is frequently detected in groundwater that discharges to major watercourses in northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anthony L; Warner, Jeffrey M

    2016-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the environmental bacterium that causes the serious disease melioidosis. Recently, a high prevalence of viable B. pseudomallei was reported from natural groundwater seeps around Castle Hill, a clinical focus of melioidosis in Townsville, Australia. This study sought to expand previous findings to determine the extent of B. pseudomallei in more diverse natural groundwater seeps in northern Queensland to ascertain if the presence of the organism in groundwater on Castle Hill was an isolated occurrence. Analysis of water samples (n = 26) obtained from natural groundwater seeps following an intensive rainfall event in the Townsville region determined the presence of B. pseudomallei DNA in duplicates of 18 samples (69.2 % [95 % CI, 51.5 to 87.0]). From 26 water samples, a single isolate of B. pseudomallei was recovered despite plating of both pre-enriched samples and original water samples onto selective media, indicating that the sensitivity of these molecular techniques far exceeds culture-based methods. Furthermore, the identification of new environments endemic for melioidosis may be more effectively determined by analysing surface groundwater seeps than by the analysis of random soil samples. This study suggests that a higher incidence of melioidosis following monsoonal rains may be partially the result of exposure to groundwater sources carrying B. pseudomallei, and that modifications to public health messages in endemic regions may be warranted. Moreover, these findings have implications for predictive models of melioidosis, effective models requiring consideration of topographical and surface hydrological data. PMID:26620184

  15. Comparison of DNA extraction kits for detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in spiked human whole blood using real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Podnecky

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia and can cause severe septicemia that may lead to death in 20% to 50% of cases. Rapid detection of B. pseudomallei infection is crucial for timely treatment of septic patients. This study evaluated seven commercially available DNA extraction kits to determine the relative recovery of B. pseudomallei DNA from spiked EDTA-containing human whole blood. The evaluation included three manual kits: the QIAamp DNA Mini kit, the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini kit, and the High Pure PCR Template Preparation kit; and four automated systems: the MagNAPure LC using the DNA Isolation Kit I, the MagNAPure Compact using the Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit I, and the QIAcube using the QIAamp DNA Mini kit and the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini kit. Detection of B. pseudomallei DNA extracted by each kit was performed using the B. pseudomallei specific type III secretion real-time PCR (TTS1 assay. Crossing threshold (C T values were used to compare the limit of detection and reproducibility of each kit. This study also compared the DNA concentrations and DNA purity yielded for each kit. The following kits consistently yielded DNA that produced a detectable signal from blood spiked with 5.5×10(4 colony forming units per mL: the High Pure PCR Template Preparation, QIAamp DNA Mini, MagNA Pure Compact, and the QIAcube running the QIAamp DNA Mini and QIAamp DNA Blood Mini kits. The High Pure PCR Template Preparation kit yielded the lowest limit of detection with spiked blood, but when this kit was used with blood from patients with confirmed cases of melioidosis, the bacteria was not reliably detected indicating blood may not be an optimal specimen.

  16. Ubiquity of Putative Type III Secretion Genes among Clinical and Environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates in Northern Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Smith-Vaughan, H C; Gal, D; Lawrie, P. M.; Winstanley, C.; Sriprakash, K S; Currie, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase-like type III secretion (TTS1) genes were present in all 116 Northern Australian Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates tested but were not detected in other common environmental Burkholderia species. PCR of TTS1 genes may prove valuable as a diagnostic test.

  17. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  18. Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei Near-Neighbor Species in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Ginther

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of near-neighbor species are critical to the development of robust molecular diagnostic tools for biothreat agents. One such agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, a soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis, is lacking in this area because of its genomic diversity and widespread geographic distribution. The Burkholderia genus contains over 60 species and occupies a large range of environments including soil, plants, rhizospheres, water, animals and humans. The identification of novel species in new locations necessitates the need to identify the true global distribution of Burkholderia species, especially the members that are closely related to B. pseudomallei. In our current study, we used the Burkholderia-specific recA sequencing assay to analyze environmental samples from the Darwin region in the Northern Territory of Australia where melioidosis is endemic. Burkholderia recA PCR negative samples were further characterized using 16s rRNA sequencing for species identification. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that over 70% of the bacterial isolates were identified as B. ubonensis indicating that this species is common in the soil where B. pseudomallei is endemic. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis reveals many novel branches within the B. cepacia complex, one novel B. oklahomensis-like species, and one novel branch containing one isolate that is distinct from all other samples on the phylogenetic tree. During the analysis with recA sequencing, we discovered 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the reverse priming region of B. oklahomensis. A degenerate primer was developed and is proposed for future use. We conclude that the recA sequencing technique is an effective tool to classify Burkholderia and identify soil organisms in a melioidosis endemic area.

  19. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Sputum using Selective Enrichment Broth and Ashdown’s Medium at Kampong Cham Provincial Hospital, Cambodia [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4w7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somary Nhem

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis infection, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is increasingly reported in Cambodia. We hypothesized that implementation of an enhanced sputum testing protocol in a provincial hospital diagnostic microbiology laboratory would increase detection of B. pseudomallei. We tested 241 sputum specimens that were deemed acceptable for culture, comparing culture in selective enrichment broth followed by sub-culture on Ashdown’s medium to standard culture methods. Two specimens (0.8% were positive for B. pseudomallei using the enhanced protocol whereas one specimen (0.4% was positive using standard methods. These findings demonstrate that B. pseudomallei is rarely detected in sputum at this hospital. The low frequency of B. pseudomallei in sputum specimens precludes drawing any conclusions about the relative benefits of an enhanced sputum testing protocol at this site. Promoting clinician awareness of the infection and encouraging utilization of diagnostic microbiology services are likely to be important factors in facilitating identification of melioidosis.

  20. A Burkholderia pseudomallei Toxin Inhibits Helicase Activity of Translation Factor eIF4A

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Abimael; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Baker, Patrick J.; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Chang, Chung-Te; Dickman, Mark J.; Essex-Lopresti, Angela; Harding, Sarah V.; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Marshall, Laura E.; Mobbs, George W.; Mohamed, Rahmah; Nathan, Sheila; Ngugi, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of BPSL1549, a protein of unknown function from Burkholderia pseudomallei reveals a similarity to E. coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1. We found that BPSL1549 acted as a potent cytotoxin against eukaryotic cells and was lethal when administered to mice. Expression levels of bpsl1549 correlate with conditions expected to promote or suppress pathogenicity. BPSL1549 promotes deamidation of Gln339 of the translation initiation factor eIF4A, abolishing its helicase activity and inh...

  1. CD4+ T cell immunity to the Burkholderia pseudomallei ABC transporter LolC in melioidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Karen K.; Tippayawat, Patcharaporn; Walker, Nicola J.; Harding, Sarah V.; Atkins, Helen S.; Maillere, Bernard; Bancroft, Gregory J; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Altmann, Daniel M

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) causes melioidosis, a disease with a wide range of possible outcomes, from seroconversion and dormancy to sepsis and death. This spectrum of host-pathogen interactions poses challenging questions about heterogeneity in immunity to Bp. Models show protection to be dependent on CD4+ cells and IFNγ, but little is known about specific target antigens. Having previously implicated the ABC transporter, LolC, in protective immunity, we here use epitope prediction, HLA ...

  2. Antimicrobial Drug–Selection Markers for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Schweizer, Herbert P.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic research into the select agents Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei is currently hampered by a paucity of approved antimicrobial drug–selection markers. The strict regulations imposed on researchers in the United States but not in other parts of the world lead to discrepancies in practice, hinder distribution of genetically modified strains, and impede progress in the field. Deliberation and decisions regarding alternative selection markers (antimicrobial and nonantimicrobial drug...

  3. Tandem repeat regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome and their application for high resolution genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Steven P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The facultative, intracellular bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. We identified and categorized tandem repeat arrays and their distribution throughout the genome of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 in order to develop a genetic typing method for B. pseudomallei. We then screened 104 of the potentially polymorphic loci across a diverse panel of 31 isolates including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis in order to identify loci with varying degrees of polymorphism. A subset of these tandem repeat arrays were subsequently developed into a multiple-locus VNTR analysis to examine 66 B. pseudomallei and 21 B. mallei isolates from around the world, as well as 95 lineages from a serial transfer experiment encompassing ~18,000 generations. Results B. pseudomallei contains a preponderance of tandem repeat loci throughout its genome, many of which are duplicated elsewhere in the genome. The majority of these loci are composed of repeat motif lengths of 6 to 9 bp with 4 to 10 repeat units and are predominately located in intergenic regions of the genome. Across geographically diverse B. pseudomallei and B.mallei isolates, the 32 VNTR loci displayed between 7 and 28 alleles, with Nei's diversity values ranging from 0.47 and 0.94. Mutation rates for these loci are comparable (>10-5 per locus per generation to that of the most diverse tandemly repeated regions found in other less diverse bacteria. Conclusion The frequency, location and duplicate nature of tandemly repeated regions within the B. pseudomallei genome indicate that these tandem repeat regions may play a role in generating and maintaining adaptive genomic variation. Multiple-locus VNTR analysis revealed extensive diversity within the global isolate set containing B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, and it detected genotypic differences within clonal lineages of both species that were

  4. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsule Exacerbates Respiratory Melioidosis but Does Not Afford Protection against Antimicrobial Signaling or Bacterial Killing in Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Ipe, Deepak S; Batzloff, Michael; Sullivan, Matthew J; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael; Strong, Emily; Kyan, Stephanie; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James; Beacham, Ifor R; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-07-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often severe infection that regularly involves respiratory disease following inhalation exposure. Intranasal (i.n.) inoculation of mice represents an experimental approach used to study the contributions of bacterial capsular polysaccharide I (CPS I) to virulence during acute disease. We used aerosol delivery of B. pseudomallei to establish respiratory infection in mice and studied CPS I in the context of innate immune responses. CPS I improved B. pseudomallei survival in vivo and triggered multiple cytokine responses, neutrophil infiltration, and acute inflammatory histopathology in the spleen, liver, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, and olfactory mucosa (OM). To further explore the role of the OM response to B. pseudomallei infection, we infected human olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in vitro and measured bacterial invasion and the cytokine responses induced following infection. Human OECs killed >90% of the B. pseudomallei in a CPS I-independent manner and exhibited an antibacterial cytokine response comprising granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and several regulatory cytokines. In-depth genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of the OEC response by RNA-Seq revealed a network of signaling pathways activated in OECs following infection involving a novel group of 378 genes that encode biological pathways controlling cellular movement, inflammation, immunological disease, and molecular transport. This represents the first antimicrobial program to be described in human OECs and establishes the extensive transcriptional defense network accessible in these cells. Collectively, these findings show a role for CPS I in B. pseudomallei survival in vivo following inhalation infection and the antibacterial signaling network that exists in human OM and OECs. PMID:27091931

  5. Novel engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides display broad-spectrum activity against Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbaqi, Suha; Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan; Montelaro, Ronald; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-02-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobials are needed to effectively treat patients infected in the event of a pandemic or intentional release of a pathogen prior to confirmation of the pathogen's identity. Engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides (eCAPs) display activity against a number of bacterial pathogens including multi-drug-resistant strains. Two lead eCAPs, WLBU2 and WR12, were compared with human cathelicidin (LL-37) against three highly pathogenic bacteria: Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Both WLBU2 and WR12 demonstrated bactericidal activity greater than that of LL-37, particularly against F. tularensis and Y. pestis. Only WLBU2 had bactericidal activity against B. pseudomallei. WLBU2, WR12 and LL-37 were all able to inhibit the growth of the three bacteria in vitro. Because these bacteria can be facultative intracellular pathogens, preferentially infecting macrophages and dendritic cells, we evaluated the activity of WLBU2 against F. tularensis in an ex vivo infection model with J774 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line. In that model WLBU2 was able to achieve greater than 50 % killing of F. tularensis at a concentration of 12.5 μM. These data show the therapeutic potential of eCAPs, particularly WLBU2, as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial for treating highly pathogenic bacterial infections. PMID:26673248

  6. Complete Killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Burkholderia pseudomallei Is Dependent on Prolonged Direct Association with the Viable Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Song-Hua; Ooi, Soon-Keat; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Tan, Man-Wah; Nathan, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease of significant morbidity and mortality in both human and animals in endemic areas. Much remains to be known about the contributions of genotypic variations within the bacteria and the host, and environmental factors that lead to the manifestation of the clinical symptoms of melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we showed that different isolates of B. pseudomallei have divergent ability t...

  7. Development and validation of Burkholderia pseudomallei-specific real-time PCR assays for clinical, environmental or forensic detection applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    Full Text Available The bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a rare but serious illness that can be fatal if untreated or misdiagnosed. Species-specific PCR assays provide a technically simple method for differentiating B. pseudomallei from near-neighbor species. However, substantial genetic diversity and high levels of recombination within this species reduce the likelihood that molecular signatures will differentiate all B. pseudomallei from other Burkholderiaceae. Currently available molecular assays for B. pseudomallei detection lack rigorous validation across large in silico datasets and isolate collections to test for specificity, and none have been subjected to stringent quality control criteria (accuracy, precision, selectivity, limit of quantitation (LoQ, limit of detection (LoD, linearity, ruggedness and robustness to determine their suitability for environmental, clinical or forensic investigations. In this study, we developed two novel B. pseudomallei specific assays, 122018 and 266152, using a dual-probe approach to differentiate B. pseudomallei from B. thailandensis, B. oklahomensis and B. thailandensis-like species; other species failed to amplify. Species specificity was validated across a large DNA panel (>2,300 samples comprising Burkholderia spp. and non-Burkholderia bacterial and fungal species of clinical and environmental relevance. Comparison of assay specificity to two previously published B. pseudomallei-specific assays, BurkDiff and TTS1, demonstrated comparable performance of all assays, providing between 99.7 and 100% specificity against our isolate panel. Last, we subjected 122018 and 266152 to rigorous quality control analyses, thus providing quantitative limits of assay performance. Using B. pseudomallei as a model, our study provides a framework for comprehensive quantitative validation of molecular assays and provides additional, highly validated B. pseudomallei assays for the scientific research community.

  8. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Genetic Characterisation of Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolated from Malaysian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Ceftazidime (CAZ, the synthetic β-lactam, is normally used as the first-line antibiotic therapy for treatment of melioidosis. However, acquired CAZ resistance can develop in vivo during treatment with CAZ, leading to mortality if therapy is not switched to a different antibiotic(s in a timely manner. In this study, susceptibilities of 81 B. pseudomallei isolates to nine different antimicrobial agents were determined using the disk diffusion method, broth microdilution test and Etest. Highest percentage of susceptibility was demonstrated to CAZ, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, meropenem, imipenem, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Although these drugs demonstrated the highest percentage of susceptibility in B. pseudomallei, the overall results underline the importance of the emergence of resistance in this organism. PCR results showed that, of the 81 B. pseudomallei, six multidrug resistant (MDR isolates carried bpeB, amrB, and BPSS1119 and penA genes. Genotyping of the isolates using random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis showed six different PCR fingerprinting patterns generated from the six MDR isolates clusters (A and eight PCR fingerprinting patterns generated for the remaining 75 non-MDR isolates clusters (B.

  9. Cloning, purification and crystallographic analysis of a hypothetical protein, BPSL1549, from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B. pseudomallei BPSL1549 has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Burkholderia pseudomallei BPSL1549, a putative protein of unknown function, has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and subsequently crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG as a precipitant to give crystals with overall dimensions of 0.15 × 0.15 × 0.1 mm. Native data were collected to 1.47 Å resolution at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The crystals belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.1, b = 45.4, c = 111.9 Å and with a single polypeptide chain in the asymmetric unit

  10. Identification and cloning of four riboswitches from Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyati-Othman, Noor; Fatah, Ahmad Luqman Abdul; Piji, Mohd Al Akmarul Fizree Bin Md; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Raih, Mohd Firdaus

    2015-09-01

    Structured RNAs referred as riboswitches have been predicted to be present in the genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243. Four of the riboswitches were identified and analyzed through BLASTN, Rfam search and multiple sequence alignment. The RNA aptamers belong to the following riboswitch classifications: glycine riboswitch, cobalamin riboswitch, S-adenosyl-(L)-homocysteine (SAH) riboswitch and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch. The conserved nucleotides for each aptamer were identified and were marked on the secondary structure generated by RNAfold. These riboswitches were successfully amplified and cloned for further study.

  11. AN IMPORTED CASE OF ACUTE MELIOIDOSIS CAUSED BY ST881 BURKHOLDERIA PSEUDOMALLEI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiaohui; Deng, Yiyun

    2016-03-01

    A previously healthy Chinese male working in Malaysia returned to China with high fever. A blood culture showed Burkholderia pseudomallei strain WCBP1. This isolate was sequenced, showing type, ST881, which appears to be present in Malaysia. WCP1 had unusual susceptibility to aminoglycosides and habored the Yersinia-like fimbrial gene cluster for virulence. The patient's condition deteriorated rapidly but he recovered after receiving meropenem and intensive care support. Melioidosis is a potential problem among Chinese imigrant workers with strains new to China being identified. PMID:27244959

  12. Toll-like receptor 2 impairs host defense in gram-negative sepsis caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (Melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Joost Wiersinga

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Toll-like receptors (TLRs are essential in host defense against pathogens by virtue of their capacity to detect microbes and initiate the immune response. TLR2 is seen as the most important receptor for gram-positive bacteria, while TLR4 is regarded as the gram-negative TLR. Melioidosis is a severe infection caused by the gram-negative bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei, that is endemic in Southeast Asia. We aimed to characterize the expression and function of TLRs in septic melioidosis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Patient studies: 34 patients with melioidosis demonstrated increased expression of CD14, TLR1, TLR2, and TLR4 on the cell surfaces of monocytes and granulocytes, and increased CD14, TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, LY96 (also known as MD-2, TLR5, and TLR10 mRNA levels in purified monocytes and granulocytes when compared with healthy controls. In vitro experiments: Whole-blood and alveolar macrophages obtained from TLR2 and TLR4 knockout (KO mice were less responsive to B. pseudomallei in vitro, whereas in the reverse experiment, transfection of HEK293 cells with either TLR2 or TLR4 rendered these cells responsive to this bacterium. In addition, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS of B. pseudomallei signals through TLR2 and not through TLR4. Mouse studies: Surprisingly, TLR4 KO mice were indistinguishable from wild-type mice with respect to bacterial outgrowth and survival in experimentally induced melioidosis. In contrast, TLR2 KO mice displayed a markedly improved host defenses as reflected by a strong survival advantage together with decreased bacterial loads, reduced lung inflammation, and less distant-organ injury. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with melioidosis displayed an up-regulation of multiple TLRs in peripheral blood monocytes and granulocytes. Although both TLR2 and TLR4 contribute to cellular responsiveness to B. pseudomallei in vitro, TLR2 detects the LPS of B. pseudomallei, and only TLR2 impacts on the immune response of the intact host in

  13. Solution structure of monomeric BsaL, the type III secretion needle protein of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Yu; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2006-06-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria that are important human pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. During the establishment of infection, these pathogens coordinately assemble greater than 20 different proteins into a macromolecular structure that spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and, in many respects, resembles and functions like a syringe. This type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) is used to inject proteins into a host cell's membrane and cytoplasm to subvert normal cellular processes. The external portion of the TTSA is a needle that is composed of a single type of protein that is polymerized in a helical fashion to form an elongated tube with a central channel of 2-3 nm in diameter. TTSA needle proteins from a variety of bacterial pathogens share sequence conservation; however, no atomic structure for any TTSA needle protein is yet available. Here, we report the structure of a TTSA needle protein called BsaL from Burkholderia pseudomallei determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The central part of the protein assumes a helix-turn-helix core domain with two well-defined alpha-helices that are joined by an ordered, four-residue linker. This forms a two-helix bundle that is stabilized by interhelix hydrophobic contacts. Residues that flank this presumably exposed core region are not completely disordered, but adopt a partial helical conformation. The atomic structure of BsaL and its sequence homology with other TTSA needle proteins suggest potentially unique structural dynamics that could be linked with a universal mechanism for control of type III secretion in diverse gram-negative bacterial pathogens. PMID:16631790

  14. The melioidosis agent Burkholderia pseudomallei and related opportunistic pathogens detected in faecal matter of wildlife and livestock in northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höger, A C R; Mayo, M; Price, E P; Theobald, V; Harrington, G; Machunter, B; Choy, J Low; Currie, B J; Kaestli, M

    2016-07-01

    The Darwin region in northern Australia has experienced rapid population growth in recent years, and with it, an increased incidence of melioidosis. Previous studies in Darwin have associated the environmental presence of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, with anthropogenic land usage and proximity to animals. In our study, we estimated the occurrence of B. pseudomallei and Burkholderia spp. relatives in faecal matter of wildlife, livestock and domestic animals in the Darwin region. A total of 357 faecal samples were collected and bacteria isolated through culture and direct DNA extraction after enrichment in selective media. Identification of B. pseudomallei, B. ubonensis, and other Burkholderia spp. was carried out using TTS1, Bu550, and recA BUR3-BUR4 quantitative PCR assays, respectively. B. pseudomallei was detected in seven faecal samples from wallabies and a chicken. B. cepacia complex spp. and Pandoraea spp. were cultured from wallaby faecal samples, and B. cenocepacia and B. cepacia were also isolated from livestock animals. Various bacteria isolated in this study represent opportunistic human pathogens, raising the possibility that faecal shedding contributes to the expanding geographical distribution of not just B. pseudomallei but other Burkholderiaceae that can cause human disease. PMID:26935879

  15. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, Jeollabuk 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyoung-Hee [Department of Oral Microbiology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeollabuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon, E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.k [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, Jeollabuk 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D{sub 10} values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased (P<0.05) as irradiation dose increased, and no differences (P>=0.05) in cell counts of the bacteria were observed among different levels of NaCl and pH. D{sub 10} values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D10 values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased ( P<0.05) as irradiation dose increased, and no differences ( P≥0.05) in cell counts of the bacteria were observed among different levels of NaCl and pH. D10 values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  17. A preliminary X-ray study of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate isomerase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedoheptulose-7-phosphate isomerase (GmhA) from B. pseudomallei is one of the targets of antibiotic adjuvants for melioidosis. In this study, GmhA has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Sedoheptulose-7-phosphate isomerase (GmhA) converts d-sedoheptulose 7-phosphate to d,d-heptose 7-phosphate. This is the first step in the biosynthesis pathway of NDP-heptose, which is responsible for the pleiotropic phenotype. This biosynthesis pathway is the target of inhibitors to increase the membrane permeability of Gram-negative pathogens or of adjuvants working synergistically with known antibiotics. Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a seriously invasive disease in animals and humans in tropical and subtropical areas. GmhA from B. pseudomallei is one of the targets of antibiotic adjuvants for melioidosis. In this study, GmhA has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Synchrotron X-ray data were also collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the primitive orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.3, b = 84.2, c = 142.3 Å. A full structural determination is under way in order to provide insights into the structure–function relationships of this protein

  18. Molecular phylogeny of Burkholderia pseudomallei from a remote region of Papua New Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Baker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The island of New Guinea is located midway between the world's two major melioidosis endemic regions of Australia and Southeast Asia. Previous studies in Papua New Guinea have demonstrated autochthonous melioidosis in Balimo, Western province. In contrast to other regions of endemicity, isolates recovered from both environmental and clinical sources demonstrate narrow genetic diversity over large spatial and temporal scales. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed molecular typing techniques to determine the phylogenetic relationships of these isolates to each other and to others worldwide to aid in understanding the origins of the Papua New Guinean isolates. Multi-locus sequence typing of the 39 isolates resolved three unique sequence types. Phylogenetic reconstruction and Structure analysis determined that all isolates were genetically closer to those from Australia than those from Southeast Asia. Gene cluster analysis however, identified a Yersinia-like fimbrial gene cluster predominantly found among Burkholderia pseudomallei derived from Southeast Asia. Higher resolution VNTR typing and phylogenetic reconstruction of the Balimo isolates resolved 24 genotypes with long branch lengths. These findings are congruent with long term persistence in the region and a high level of environmental stability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given that anthropogenic influence has been hypothesized as a mechanism for the dispersal of B. pseudomallei, these findings correlate with limited movement of the indigenous people in the region. The palaeogeographical and anthropogenic history of Australasia and the results from this study indicate that New Guinea is an important region for the further study of B. pseudomallei origins and dissemination.

  19. Multilocus sequence typing of 102 Burkholderia pseudomallei strains isolated from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y; Zhu, P; Li, Q; Chen, H; Li, Y; Ren, C; Hu, Y; Tan, Z; Gu, J; Mao, X

    2016-07-01

    The phylogenetic and epidemiological relationships of 102 Burkholderia pseudomallei clinical isolates from different geographical and population sources in China were investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The MLST data were analysed using the e-BURST algorithm, and an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram was constructed based on the pair-wise differences in the allelic profiles of the strains. Forty-one sequence types (STs) were identified, of which eight were novel (ST1341, ST1345, ST1346, ST1347, ST1348, ST1349, ST1350, ST1351). No geographical-specific or host population-specific phylogenetic lineages were identified. ST46, ST50, ST55, ST58, ST70 and ST1095 predominated, but ~44% of isolates were assigned to 45 STs illustrating high genetic diversity in the strain collection. Additionally, the phylogenetic relationships of the dominant STs in China showed significant linkeage with B. pseudomallei isolates from Thailand. Analysis of the gmhD allele suggests high genetic variation in B. pseudomallei in China. PMID:26744829

  20. Phylogenomic Analysis Reveals an Asian Origin for African Burkholderia pseudomallei and Further Supports Melioidosis Endemicity in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarovich, Derek S; Garin, Benoit; De Smet, Birgit; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Vandamme, Peter; Jacobs, Jan; Lompo, Palpouguini; Tahita, Marc C; Tinto, Halidou; Djaomalaza, Innocente; Currie, Bart J; Price, Erin P

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, an environmental bacterium that causes the deadly disease melioidosis, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. An increasing number of melioidosis cases are being reported in other tropical regions, including Africa and the Indian Ocean islands. B. pseudomallei first emerged in Australia, with subsequent rare dissemination event(s) to Southeast Asia; however, its dispersal to other regions is not yet well understood. We used large-scale comparative genomics to investigate the origins of three B. pseudomallei isolates from Madagascar and two from Burkina Faso. Phylogenomic reconstruction demonstrates that these African B. pseudomallei isolates group into a single novel clade that resides within the more ancestral Asian clade. Intriguingly, South American strains reside within the African clade, suggesting more recent dissemination from West Africa to the Americas. Anthropogenic factors likely assisted in B. pseudomallei dissemination to Africa, possibly during migration of the Austronesian peoples from Indonesian Borneo to Madagascar ~2,000 years ago, with subsequent genetic diversity driven by mutation and recombination. Our study provides new insights into global patterns of B. pseudomallei dissemination and adds to the growing body of evidence of melioidosis endemicity in Africa. Our findings have important implications for melioidosis diagnosis and management in Africa. IMPORTANCE Sporadic melioidosis cases have been reported in the African mainland and Indian Ocean islands, but until recently, these regions were not considered areas where B. pseudomallei is endemic. Given the high mortality rate of melioidosis, it is crucial that this disease be recognized and suspected in all regions of endemicity. Previous work has shown that B. pseudomallei originated in Australia, with subsequent introduction into Asia; however, the precise origin of B. pseudomallei in other tropical regions remains poorly understood. Using

  1. A preliminary X-ray study of transketolase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transketolase TktA from B. pseudomallei has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Synchrotron X-ray data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. TktA is the most critical enzyme in the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway. It catalyzes the conversion of xylulose 5-phosphate and ribose 5-phosphate into sedoheptulose 7-phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, and its products are used in the biosynthesis of acetyl-CoA, aromatic amino acids, nucleic acids and ADP-l-glycero-β-d-manno-heptose. TktA also has an unexpected role in chromosome structure that is independent of its metabolic responsibilities. Therefore, it is a new potent antibiotic target. In this study, TktA from Burkholderia pseudomallei has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Synchrotron X-ray data were also collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 146.2, b = 74.6, c = 61.6 Å, β = 113.0°. A full structural determination is under way in order to provide insight into the structure–function relationship of this protein

  2. In silico analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei genome sequence for potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Chan-Eng; Lim, Boon-San; Nathan, Sheila; Mohamed, Rahmah

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have enabled elucidation of whole genome information from a plethora of organisms. In parallel with this technology, various bioinformatics tools have driven the comparative analysis of the genome sequences between species and within isolates. While drawing meaningful conclusions from a large amount of raw material, computer-aided identification of suitable targets for further experimental analysis and characterization, has also led to the prediction of non-human homologous essential genes in bacteria as promising candidates for novel drug discovery. Here, we present a comparative genomic analysis to identify essential genes in Burkholderia pseudomallei. Our in silico prediction has identified 312 essential genes which could also be potential drug candidates. These genes encode essential proteins to support the survival of B. pseudomallei including outer-inner membrane and surface structures, regulators, proteins involved in pathogenenicity, adaptation, chaperones as well as degradation of small and macromolecules, energy metabolism, information transfer, central/intermediate/miscellaneous metabolism pathways and some conserved hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Therefore, our in silico approach has enabled rapid screening and identification of potential drug targets for further characterization in the laboratory. PMID:16922696

  3. A genomic survey of positive selection in Burkholderia pseudomallei provides insights into the evolution of accidental virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tannistha Nandi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain environmental microorganisms can cause severe human infections, even in the absence of an obvious requirement for transition through an animal host for replication ("accidental virulence". To understand this process, we compared eleven isolate genomes of Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp, a tropical soil microbe and causative agent of the human and animal disease melioidosis. We found evidence for the existence of several new genes in the Bp reference genome, identifying 282 novel genes supported by at least two independent lines of supporting evidence (mRNA transcripts, database homologs, and presence of ribosomal binding sites and 81 novel genes supported by all three lines. Within the Bp core genome, 211 genes exhibited significant levels of positive selection (4.5%, distributed across many cellular pathways including carbohydrate and secondary metabolism. Functional experiments revealed that certain positively selected genes might enhance mammalian virulence by interacting with host cellular pathways or utilizing host nutrients. Evolutionary modifications improving Bp environmental fitness may thus have indirectly facilitated the ability of Bp to colonize and survive in mammalian hosts. These findings improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of melioidosis, and establish Bp as a model system for studying the genetics of accidental virulence.

  4. Production of a Recombinant Vaccine Candidate against Burkholderia pseudomallei Exploiting the Bacterial N-Glycosylation Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MarioFeldman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines developing immune responses towards surface carbohydrates conjugated to proteins are effective in preventing infection and death by bacterial pathogens. Traditional production of these vaccines utilizes complex synthetic chemistry to acquire and conjugate the glycan to a protein. However, glycoproteins produced by bacterial protein glycosylation systems are significantly easier to produce, and could possible be used as vaccine candidates. In this work we functionally expressed the B. pseudomallei O polysaccharide (OPS II, the C. jejuni oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase, and a suitable glycoprotein (AcrA in a designer E. coli strain with a higher efficiency for production of glycoconjugates. We were able to produce and purify the OPS II-AcrA glycoconjugate, and MS analysis confirmed correct glycan was produced and attached. We observed the attachment of the O-acetylated deoxyhexose directly to the acceptor protein, which expands the range of substrates utilized by the OTase PglB. Injection of the glycoprotein into mice generated an IgG immune response against B. pseudomallei, and this response was partially protective against an intranasal challenge. Our experiments show that bacterial engineered glycoconjugates can be utilized as vaccine candidates against B. pseudomallei. Additionally, our new E. coli strain SDB1 is more efficient in glycoprotein production, and could have additional applications in the future.

  5. Development of Rapid Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Detection of Antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttisunhakul, Vichaya; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Brett, Paul J.; Khusmith, Srisin; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Burtnick, Mary N.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is an environmental bacillus found in northeast Thailand. The mortality rate of melioidosis is ∼40%. An indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA) is used as a reference serodiagnostic test; however, it has low specificity in areas where the background seropositivity of healthy people is high. To improve assay specificity and reduce the time for diagnosis, four rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed using two purified polysaccharide antigens (O-polysaccharide [OPS] and 6-deoxyheptan capsular polysaccharide [CPS]) and two crude antigens (whole-cell [WC] antigen and culture filtrate [CF] antigen) of B. pseudomallei. The ELISAs were evaluated using serum samples from 141 culture-confirmed melioidosis patients from Thailand along with 188 healthy donors from Thailand and 90 healthy donors from the United States as controls. The areas under receiver operator characteristic curves (AUROCC) using Thai controls were high for the OPS-ELISA (0.91), CF-ELISA (0.91), and WC-ELISA (0.90), while those of CPS-ELISA (0.84) and IHA (0.72) were lower. AUROCC values using U.S. controls were comparable to those of the Thai controls for all ELISAs except IHA (0.93). Using a cutoff optical density (OD) of 0.87, the OPS-ELISA had a sensitivity of 71.6% and a specificity of 95.7% for Thai controls; for U.S. controls, specificity was 96.7%. An additional 120 serum samples from tuberculosis, scrub typhus, or leptospirosis patients were evaluated in all ELISAs and resulted in comparable or higher specificities than using Thai healthy donors. Our findings suggest that antigen-specific ELISAs, particularly the OPS-ELISA, may be useful for serodiagnosis of melioidosis in areas where it is endemic and nonendemic. PMID:26912754

  6. Development of Rapid Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Detection of Antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttisunhakul, Vichaya; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Brett, Paul J; Khusmith, Srisin; Day, Nicholas P J; Burtnick, Mary N; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Chantratita, Narisara

    2016-05-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is an environmental bacillus found in northeast Thailand. The mortality rate of melioidosis is ∼40%. An indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA) is used as a reference serodiagnostic test; however, it has low specificity in areas where the background seropositivity of healthy people is high. To improve assay specificity and reduce the time for diagnosis, four rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed using two purified polysaccharide antigens (O-polysaccharide [OPS] and 6-deoxyheptan capsular polysaccharide [CPS]) and two crude antigens (whole-cell [WC] antigen and culture filtrate [CF] antigen) of B. pseudomallei The ELISAs were evaluated using serum samples from 141 culture-confirmed melioidosis patients from Thailand along with 188 healthy donors from Thailand and 90 healthy donors from the United States as controls. The areas under receiver operator characteristic curves (AUROCC) using Thai controls were high for the OPS-ELISA (0.91), CF-ELISA (0.91), and WC-ELISA (0.90), while those of CPS-ELISA (0.84) and IHA (0.72) were lower. AUROCC values using U.S. controls were comparable to those of the Thai controls for all ELISAs except IHA (0.93). Using a cutoff optical density (OD) of 0.87, the OPS-ELISA had a sensitivity of 71.6% and a specificity of 95.7% for Thai controls; for U.S. controls, specificity was 96.7%. An additional 120 serum samples from tuberculosis, scrub typhus, or leptospirosis patients were evaluated in all ELISAs and resulted in comparable or higher specificities than using Thai healthy donors. Our findings suggest that antigen-specific ELISAs, particularly the OPS-ELISA, may be useful for serodiagnosis of melioidosis in areas where it is endemic and nonendemic. PMID:26912754

  7. Metabolomic profiling of Burkholderia pseudomallei using UHPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS reveals specific biomarkers including 4-methyl-5-thiazoleethanol and unique thiamine degradation pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lam, Ching-Wan; Curreem, Shirly O. T.; Lee, Kim-Chung; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Lau, Candy C. Y.; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C. Y.; Martelli, Paolo; Hui, Suk-Wai; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is an emerging pathogen that causes melioidosis, a serious and potentially fatal disease which requires prolonged antibiotics to prevent relapse. However, diagnosis of melioidosis can be difficult, especially in culture-negative cases. While metabolomics represents an uprising tool for studying infectious diseases, there were no reports on its applications to B. pseudomallei. To search for potential specific biomarkers, we compared the metabolomics profile...

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei Type III Secretion System Cluster 3 ATPase BsaS, a Chemotherapeutic Target for Small-Molecule ATPase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Lan; Lai, Shu-Chin; Treerat, Puthayalai; Prescott, Mark; Adler, Ben; John D Boyce; Rodney J. Devenish

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is an infectious disease of high mortality for humans and other animal species; it is prevalent in tropical regions worldwide. The pathogenesis of melioidosis depends on the ability of its causative agent, the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, to enter and survive in host cells. B. pseudomallei can escape from the phagosome into the cytosol of phagocytic cells where it replicates and acquires actin-mediated motility, avoiding killing by the autophagy-dependent pro...

  9. Leveraging structure determination with fragment screening for infectious disease drug targets: MECP synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begley, Darren W.; Hartley, Robert C.; Davies, Douglas R.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Leonard, Jess T.; Abendroth, Jan; Burris, Courtney A.; Bhandari, Janhavi; Myler, Peter J.; Staker, Bart L.; Stewart, Lance J. (UWASH); (Emerald)

    2011-09-28

    As part of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease, we seek to enhance structural genomics with ligand-bound structure data which can serve as a blueprint for structure-based drug design. We have adapted fragment-based screening methods to our structural genomics pipeline to generate multiple ligand-bound structures of high priority drug targets from pathogenic organisms. In this study, we report fragment screening methods and structure determination results for 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclo-diphosphate (MECP) synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei, the gram-negative bacterium which causes melioidosis. Screening by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as crystal soaking followed by X-ray diffraction led to the identification of several small molecules which bind this enzyme in a critical metabolic pathway. A series of complex structures obtained with screening hits reveal distinct binding pockets and a range of small molecules which form complexes with the target. Additional soaks with these compounds further demonstrate a subset of fragments to only bind the protein when present in specific combinations. This ensemble of fragment-bound complexes illuminates several characteristics of MECP synthase, including a previously unknown binding surface external to the catalytic active site. These ligand-bound structures now serve to guide medicinal chemists and structural biologists in rational design of novel inhibitors for this enzyme.

  10. A family history of deoxyribonuclease II: surprises from Trichinella spiralis and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLea, Kyle S; Krieser, Ronald J; Eastman, Alan

    2003-02-13

    Deoxyribonuclease IIalpha (DNase IIalpha) is an acidic endonuclease found in lysosomes and nuclei, and it is also secreted. Though its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, NUC-1, is required for digesting DNA of apoptotic cell corpses and dietary DNA, it is not required for viability. However, DNase IIalpha is required in mice for correct development and viability, because undigested cell corpses lead to lesions throughout the body. Recently, we showed that, in contrast to previous reports, active DNase IIalpha consists of one contiguous polypeptide. To better analyze DNase II protein structure and determine residues important for activity, extensive database searches were conducted to find distantly related family members. We report 29 new partial or complete homologs from 21 species. Four homologs with differences at the purported active site histidine residue were detected in the parasitic nematodes Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella pseudospiralis. When these mutations were reconstructed in human DNase IIalpha, the expressed proteins were inactive. DNase II homologs were also identified in non-metazoan species. In particular, the slime-mold Dictyostelium, the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis, and the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei all contain sequences with significant similarity and identity to previously cloned DNase II family members. We report an analysis of their sequences and implications for DNase II protein structure and evolution. PMID:12594037

  11. Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei by Use of Laser Light Scattering Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugrysheva, Julia V; Lascols, Christine; Sue, David; Weigel, Linda M

    2016-06-01

    Rapid methods to determine antimicrobial susceptibility would assist in the timely distribution of effective treatment or postexposure prophylaxis in the aftermath of the release of bacterial biothreat agents such as Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, or Burkholderia pseudomallei Conventional susceptibility tests require 16 to 48 h of incubation, depending on the bacterial species. We evaluated a method that is based on laser light scattering technology that measures cell density in real time. We determined that it has the ability to rapidly differentiate between growth (resistant) and no growth (susceptible) of several bacterial threat agents in the presence of clinically relevant antimicrobials. Results were available in 10 h of incubation. Use of laser scattering technology decreased the time required to determine antimicrobial susceptibility by 50% to 75% for B. anthracis, Y. pestis, and B. pseudomallei compared to conventional methods. PMID:26984973

  12. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Burkholderia pseudomallei L1 ribosomal protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The L1 ribosomal protein from B. pseudomallei has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in a form suitable for X-ray analysis. The gene encoding the L1 ribosomal protein from Burkholderia pseudomallei strain D286 has been cloned into the pETBLUE-1 vector system, overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals of the native protein were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and diffracted to beyond 1.65 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.6, b = 127.1, c = 31.8 Å and with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit

  13. Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Related Bacteria by Multiple-Locus Sequence Typing-Derived PCR and Real-Time PCR▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wattiau, Pierre; Van Hessche, Mieke; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zachariah, Reena; Wernery, Ulrich; Imberechts, Hein

    2007-01-01

    Close relatedness and genomic plasticity characterizing the high-threat pathogens Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei render the molecular diagnosis of these species hard to guarantee with a maximal confidence level. This article describes fast molecular assays derived from compiled sequences of housekeeping genes determined in more than 1,000 strains. The assays proved to be robust and appropriate for general detection as well as species identification purposes.

  14. The art of persistence-the secrets to Burkholderia chronic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Eric R G; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    The Gram-negative proteobacteria genus Burkholderia encompasses multiple bacterial species that are pathogenic to humans and other vertebrates. Two pathogenic species of interest within this genus are Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bpm) and the B. cepacia complex (Bcc); the former is the causative agent of melioidosis in humans and other mammals, and the latter is associated with pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. One understudied and shared characteristic of these two pathogenic groups is their ability to persist and establish chronic infection within the host. In this review, we will explore the depth of knowledge about chronic infections caused by persistent Bpm and Bcc. We examine the host risk factors and immune responses associated with more severe chronic infections. We also discuss host adaptation and phenotypes associated with persistent Burkholderia species. Lastly, we survey how other intracellular bacteria associated with chronic infections are combatted and explore possible future applications to target Burkholderia Our goal is to highlight understudied areas that should be addressed for a more thorough understanding of chronic Burkholderia infections and how to combat them. PMID:27440810

  15. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Sputum using Selective Enrichment Broth and Ashdown’s Medium at Kampong Cham Provincial Hospital, Cambodia [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5e9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somary Nhem

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis, infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is increasingly reported in Cambodia. We hypothesized that implementation of an enhanced sputum testing protocol in a provincial hospital diagnostic microbiology laboratory would increase detection of B. pseudomallei. We tested 241 sputum specimens that were deemed acceptable for culture, comparing culture in selective enrichment broth followed by sub-culture on Ashdown’s medium to standard culture methods. Two specimens (0.8% were positive for B. pseudomallei using the enhanced protocol whereas one specimen (0.4% was positive using standard methods. Given the low numbers of positive specimens, we could not conclusively determine the utility of the enhanced sputum testing protocol. However, the ramifications of identification of B. pseudomallei are substantial, and the benefit of the enhanced testing protocol may be more apparent in patients selected based on risk factors and clinical presentation. Promoting clinician awareness of the infection and encouraging utilization of diagnostic microbiology services are also likely to be important factors in facilitating identification of melioidosis.

  16. Molecular basis of rare aminoglycoside susceptibility and pathogenesis of Burkholderia pseudomallei clinical isolates from Thailand.

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    Lily A Trunck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei is intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides and macrolides, mostly due to AmrAB-OprA efflux pump expression. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of aminoglycoside susceptibility exhibited by Thai strains 708a, 2188a, and 3799a. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: qRT-PCR revealed absence of amrB transcripts in 708a and greatly reduced levels in 2188a and 3799a. Serial passage on increasing gentamicin concentrations yielded 2188a and 3799a mutants that became simultaneously resistant to other aminoglycosides and macrolides, whereas such mutants could not be obtained with 708a. Transcript analysis showed that the resistance of the 2188a and 3799a mutants was due to upregulation of amrAB-oprA expression by unknown mechanism(s. Use of a PCR walking strategy revealed that the amrAB-oprA operon was missing in 708a and that this loss was associated with deletion of more than 70 kb of genetic material. Rescue of the amrAB-oprB region from a 708a fosmid library and sequencing showed the presence of a large chromosome 1 deletion (131 kb and 141 kb compared to strains K96243 and 1710b, respectively. This deletion not only removed the amrAB-oprA operon, but also the entire gene clusters for malleobactin and cobalamin synthesis. Other genes deleted included the anaerobic arginine deiminase pathway, putative type 1 fimbriae and secreted chitinase. Whole genome sequencing and PCR analysis confirmed absence of these genes from 708a. Despite missing several putative virulence genes, 708a was fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Strain 708a may be a natural candidate for genetic manipulation experiments that use Select Agent compliant antibiotics for selection and validates the use of laboratory-constructed Delta(amrAB-oprA mutants in such experiments.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of BipD, a virulence factor from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BipD is likely to be a component of a type-III protein secretion system (TTSS) in B. pseudomallei. Native and selenomethionyl-BipD proteins have been expressed and crystals have been obtained which diffract to 2.1 Å. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, possesses a protein-secretion apparatus that is similar to those found in Salmonella and Shigella. A major function of these secretion systems is to secrete virulence-associated proteins into target cells of the host organism. The BipD gene of B. pseudomallei encodes a secreted virulence factor that is similar in sequence and most likely functionally analogous to IpaD from Shigella and SipD from Salmonella. Thus, the BipD protein is likely to be a component of a type III protein-secretion system (TTSS) in B. pseudomallei. Proteins in the same class as BipD, such as IpaD and SipD, are thought to act as extracellular chaperones to help the hydrophobic translocator proteins enter the target cell membrane, where they form a pore and might even link the translocon pore with the secretion needle. There is evidence that the translocator proteins also bind an integrin which stimulates actin-mediated insertion of the bacterium into the host-cell membrane. Native BipD has been crystallized in a monoclinic crystal form that diffracts X-rays to 2.5 Å resolution. BipD protein which incorporates selenomethionine (SeMet-BipD) has also been expressed and forms crystals which diffract to a higher resolution of 2.1 Å

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of BipD, a virulence factor from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, M. J.; Ruaux, A.; Mikolajek, H.; Erskine, P. T.; Gill, R.; Wood, S. P. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton SO16 7PX (United Kingdom); Wood, M. [Institute of Animal Health, Division of Environmental Microbiology, Institute for Animal Health, Compton Laboratory, Berkshire RG20 7NN (United Kingdom); Cooper, J. B., E-mail: j.b.cooper@soton.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton SO16 7PX (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-01

    BipD is likely to be a component of a type-III protein secretion system (TTSS) in B. pseudomallei. Native and selenomethionyl-BipD proteins have been expressed and crystals have been obtained which diffract to 2.1 Å. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, possesses a protein-secretion apparatus that is similar to those found in Salmonella and Shigella. A major function of these secretion systems is to secrete virulence-associated proteins into target cells of the host organism. The BipD gene of B. pseudomallei encodes a secreted virulence factor that is similar in sequence and most likely functionally analogous to IpaD from Shigella and SipD from Salmonella. Thus, the BipD protein is likely to be a component of a type III protein-secretion system (TTSS) in B. pseudomallei. Proteins in the same class as BipD, such as IpaD and SipD, are thought to act as extracellular chaperones to help the hydrophobic translocator proteins enter the target cell membrane, where they form a pore and might even link the translocon pore with the secretion needle. There is evidence that the translocator proteins also bind an integrin which stimulates actin-mediated insertion of the bacterium into the host-cell membrane. Native BipD has been crystallized in a monoclinic crystal form that diffracts X-rays to 2.5 Å resolution. BipD protein which incorporates selenomethionine (SeMet-BipD) has also been expressed and forms crystals which diffract to a higher resolution of 2.1 Å.

  19. Stable, Site-Specific Fluorescent Tagging Constructs Optimized for Burkholderia Species▿

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Michael H.; Kang, Yun (Kenneth); Wilcox, Bruce; Hoang, Tung T.

    2010-01-01

    Several vectors that facilitate stable fluorescent labeling of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis were constructed. These vectors combined the effectiveness of the mini-Tn7 site-specific transposition system with fluorescent proteins optimized for Burkholderia spp., enabling bacterial tracking during cellular infection.

  20. Natural Burkholderia mallei Infection in Dromedary, Bahrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernery, Ulrich; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Marina; Al-Salloom, Fajer; Johnson, Bobby; Kinne, Joerg; Jose, Shanti; Jose, Sherry; Tappendorf, Britta; Hornstra, Heidie

    2011-01-01

    We confirm a natural infection of dromedaries with glanders. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of a Burkholderia mallei strain isolated from a diseased dromedary in Bahrain revealed close genetic proximity to strain Dubai 7, which caused an outbreak of glanders in horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004. PMID:21762586

  1. Natural Burkholderia mallei Infection in Dromedary, Bahrain

    OpenAIRE

    Wernery, Ulrich; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Marina; Al-Salloom, Fajer; Johnson, Bobby; Kinne, Joerg; Jose, Shanti; Jose, Sherry; Tappendorf, Britta; Hornstra, Heidie; Scholz, Holger C.

    2011-01-01

    We confirm a natural infection of dromedaries with glanders. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of a Burkholderia mallei strain isolated from a diseased dromedary in Bahrain revealed close genetic proximity to strain Dubai 7, which caused an outbreak of glanders in horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004.

  2. Population-Sequencing as a Biomarker of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei Evolution through Microbial Forensic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jakupciak, John P; Wells,Jeffrey M.; Karalus, Richard J.; David R. Pawlowski; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Feldman, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale genomics projects are identifying biomarkers to detect human disease. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are two closely related select agents that cause melioidosis and glanders. Accurate characterization of metagenomic samples is dependent on accurate measurements of genetic variation between isolates with resolution down to strain level. Often single biomarker sensitivity is augmented by use of multiple or panels of biomarkers. In parallel with single biomarker validation, advances ...

  3. Role of Burkholderia pseudomallei Sigma N2 in Amino Acids Utilization and in Regulation of Catalase E Expression at the Transcriptional Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong Thi Hong Diep

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis. The complete genome sequences of this pathogen have been revealed, which explain some pathogenic mechanisms. In various hostile conditions, for example, during nitrogen and amino acid starvation, bacteria can utilize alternative sigma factors such as RpoS and RpoN to modulate genes expression for their adaptation and survival. In this study, we demonstrate that mutagenesis of rpoN2, which lies on chromosome 2 of B. pseudomallei and encodes a homologue of the sigma factor RpoN, did not alter nitrogen and amino acid utilization of the bacterium. However, introduction of B. pseudomallei rpoN2 into E. coli strain deficient for rpoN restored the ability to utilize amino acids. Moreover, comparative partial proteomic analysis of the B. pseudomallei wild type and its rpoN2 isogenic mutant was performed to elucidate its amino acids utilization property which was comparable to its function found in the complementation assay. By contrast, the rpoN2 mutant exhibited decreased katE expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Our finding indicates that B. pseudomallei RpoN2 is involved in a specific function in the regulation of catalase E expression.

  4. Near-atomic resolution analysis of BipD, a component of the type III secretion system of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The type III secretion system needle-tip protein BipD has been crystallized in a form that diffracts X-rays to 1.5 Å resolution and the structure has been refined to an R factor of 16.1% and an Rfree of 19.8% at this resolution. The putative antiparallel dimer interface that was observed in earlier structures is conserved. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, possesses a type III protein secretion apparatus that is similar to those found in Salmonella and Shigella. A major function of these secretion systems is to inject virulence-associated proteins into target cells of the host organism. The bipD gene of B. pseudomallei encodes a secreted virulence factor that is similar in sequence and is most likely to be functionally analogous to IpaD from Shigella and SipD from Salmonella. Proteins in this family are thought to act as extracellular chaperones at the tip of the secretion needle to help the hydrophobic translocator proteins enter the target cell membrane, where they form a pore and may also link the translocon pore with the secretion needle. BipD has been crystallized in a monoclinic crystal form that diffracted X-rays to 1.5 Å resolution and the structure was refined to an R factor of 16.1% and an Rfree of 19.8% at this resolution. The putative dimer interface that was observed in previous crystal structures was retained and a larger surface area was buried in the new crystal form

  5. Macrophage and Galleria mellonella infection models reflect the virulence of naturally occurring isolates of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michell Stephen L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a tropical disease of humans with a variable and often fatal outcome. In murine models of infection, different strains exhibit varying degrees of virulence. In contrast, two related species, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis, are highly attenuated in mice. Our aim was to determine whether virulence in mice is reflected in macrophage or wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella infection models. Results B. pseudomallei strains 576 and K96243, which have low median lethal dose (MLD values in mice, were able to replicate and induce cellular damage in macrophages and caused rapid death of G. mellonella. In contrast, B. pseudomallei strain 708a, which is attenuated in mice, showed reduced replication in macrophages, negligible cellular damage and was avirulent in G. mellonella larvae. B. thailandensis isolates were less virulent than B. pseudomallei in all of the models tested. However, we did record strain dependent differences. B. oklahomensis isolates were the least virulent isolates. They showed minimal ability to replicate in macrophages, were unable to evoke actin-based motility or to form multinucleated giant cells and were markedly attenuated in G. mellonella compared to B. thailandensis. Conclusions We have shown that the alternative infection models tested here, namely macrophages and Galleria mellonella, are able to distinguish between strains of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis and that these differences reflect the observed virulence in murine infection models. Our results indicate that B. oklahomensis is the least pathogenic of the species investigated. They also show a correlation between isolates of B. thailandensis associated with human infection and virulence in macrophage and Galleria infection models.

  6. Population-Sequencing as a Biomarker of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei Evolution through Microbial Forensic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Jakupciak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genomics projects are identifying biomarkers to detect human disease. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are two closely related select agents that cause melioidosis and glanders. Accurate characterization of metagenomic samples is dependent on accurate measurements of genetic variation between isolates with resolution down to strain level. Often single biomarker sensitivity is augmented by use of multiple or panels of biomarkers. In parallel with single biomarker validation, advances in DNA sequencing enable analysis of entire genomes in a single run: population-sequencing. Potentially, direct sequencing could be used to analyze an entire genome to serve as the biomarker for genome identification. However, genome variation and population diversity complicate use of direct sequencing, as well as differences caused by sample preparation protocols including sequencing artifacts and mistakes. As part of a Department of Homeland Security program in bacterial forensics, we examined how to implement whole genome sequencing (WGS analysis as a judicially defensible forensic method for attributing microbial sample relatedness; and also to determine the strengths and limitations of whole genome sequence analysis in a forensics context. Herein, we demonstrate use of sequencing to provide genetic characterization of populations: direct sequencing of populations.

  7. Redefining the PF06864 Pfam family based on Burkholderia pseudomallei PilO2(Bp S-SAD crystal structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Lassaux

    Full Text Available Type IV pili are surface-exposed filaments and bacterial virulence factors, represented by the Tfpa and Tfpb types, which assemble via specific machineries. The Tfpb group is further divided into seven variants, linked to heterogeneity in the assembly machineries. Here we focus on PilO2(Bp, a protein component of the Tfpb R64 thin pilus variant assembly machinery from the pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei. PilO2(Bp belongs to the PF06864 Pfam family, for which an improved definition is presented based on newly derived Hidden Markov Model (HMM profiles. The 3D structure of the N-terminal domain of PilO2(Bp (N-PilO2(Bp, here reported, is the first structural representative of the PF06864 family. N-PilO2(Bp presents an actin-like ATPase fold that is shown to be present in BfpC, a different variant assembly protein; the new HMM profiles classify BfpC as a PF06864 member. Our results provide structural insight into the PF06864 family and on the Type IV pili assembly machinery.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the receiver domain of a putative response regulator, BPSL0128, from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The receiver domain of a putative response regulator from B. pseudomallei, BPSL0128, has been crystallized in a form suitable for X-ray analysis. bpsl0128, a gene encoding a putative response regulator from Burkholderia pseudomallei strain D286, has been cloned into a pETBLUE-1 vector system, overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The full-length protein is degraded during purification to leave a fragment corresponding to the putative receiver domain, and crystals of this protein that diffracted to beyond 1.75 Å resolution have been grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 6000 as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to one of the enantiomorphic pair of space groups P3121 and P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 65.69, c = 105.01 Å and either one or two molecules in the asymmetric unit

  9. A Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secreted protein, BopE, facilitates bacterial invasion of epithelial cells and exhibits guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity

    OpenAIRE

    M.P. Stevens; Friebel, A; Taylor, L A; Wood, M W; Brown, P. J.; Hardt, W D; Galyov, E E

    2003-01-01

    We report the characterization of BopE, a type III secreted protein that is encoded adjacent to the Burkholderia pseudomallei bsa locus and is homologous to Salmonella enterica SopE/SopE2. Inactivation of bopE impaired bacterial entry into HeLa cells, indicating that BopE facilitates invasion. Consistent with this notion, BopE expressed in eukaryotic cells induced rearrangements in the subcortical actin cytoskeleton, and purified BopE exhibited guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity for ...

  10. Method for Regulated Expression of Single-Copy Efflux Pump Genes in a Surrogate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain: Identification of the BpeEF-OprC Chloramphenicol and Trimethoprim Efflux Pump of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ayush; Chua, Kim-Lee; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2006-01-01

    Construction and integration of recombinant mini-Tn7 expression vectors into the chromosome of a surrogate, efflux-sensitized, and biosafe Pseudomonas aeruginosa host was validated as a generally applicable method for studies of uncharacterized bacterial efflux pumps. Using this method, the Burkholderia pseudomallei bpeEF-oprC operon was shown to encode a chloramphenicol and trimethoprim efflux pump.

  11. rpsU-based discrimination within the genus Burkholderia

    OpenAIRE

    Frickmann, H.; Neubauer, H.; Loderstaedt, U.; Derschum, H.; Hagen, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing of the gene rpsU reliably delineates saprophytic Burkholderia (B.) thailandensis from highly pathogenic B. mallei and B. pseudomallei. We analyzed the suitability of this technique for the delineation of the B. pseudomallei complex from other Burkholderia species.

  12. [Immune response in experimental animals immunized with Burkholderia pseudomallei surface antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrorova, I V; Piven', N N; Zhukova, S I; Viktorov, D V; Khrapova, N P; Popov, S F

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the chromatographic fractions of B. pseudomallei surface antigenic complex (C, C1, D, H) on immune response in white rats and white mice was under study. These antigenic complexes were noted to produce perceptible stimulating effect on the immune system of white rats, in contrast to that of white mice. The immunization of the mice the above-mentioned fractions suppressed the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages (PM) and slightly enhanced cell-mediated immunity. In experiments on white rats, fraction C induced the growth of specific antibody titers and stimulated the phagocytic activity of PM, as well as the indices of delayed hypersensitivity (DH). Fraction D showed a lower level of the induction of the phagocytic activity of PM and was inactive in the manifestation of cell-mediated immunity, but induced a high level of humoral immunity. Antigenic complexes C1 and H increased the phagocytic activity of PM and DH characteristics with a low level of antibody production. The studied fractions of the causative agent of melioidosis decreased the content of bactericidal cationic proteins (BCP) in rat blood neutrophils, and in mice a decreased content of BCP in phagocytes was registered. The fractions increased the activity of myeloperoxidase in blood neutrophils in mice and rats. As revealed with the use of immunoelectrophoresis, SDS PAAG electrophoresis and immunoblotting, the surface antigenic complex contained proteins of 18, 22, 39 kD and glycoproteins 42, 55, 90 kD. The latter glycoprotein was found in all the fractions under study, having protective properties. PMID:15554321

  13. Nitric oxide from IFNγ-primed macrophages modulates the antimicrobial activity of β-lactams against the intracellular pathogens Burkholderia pseudomallei and Nontyphoidal Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Jones-Carson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Our investigations show that nonlethal concentrations of nitric oxide (NO abrogate the antibiotic activity of β-lactam antibiotics against Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli and nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. NO protects B. pseudomallei already exposed to β-lactams, suggesting that this diatomic radical tolerizes bacteria against the antimicrobial activity of this important class of antibiotics. The concentrations of NO that elicit antibiotic tolerance repress consumption of oxygen (O2, while stimulating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 synthesis. Transposon insertions in genes encoding cytochrome c oxidase-related functions and molybdenum assimilation confer B. pseudomallei a selective advantage against the antimicrobial activity of the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem. Cumulatively, these data support a model by which NO induces antibiotic tolerance through the inhibition of the electron transport chain, rather than by potentiating antioxidant defenses as previously proposed. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of terminal oxidases and nitrate reductases tolerizes aerobic and anaerobic bacteria to β-lactams. The degree of NO-induced β-lactam antibiotic tolerance seems to be inversely proportional to the proton motive force (PMF, and thus the dissipation of ΔH+ and ΔΨ electrochemical gradients of the PMF prevents β-lactam-mediated killing. According to this model, NO generated by IFNγ-primed macrophages protects intracellular Salmonella against imipenem. On the other hand, sublethal concentrations of imipenem potentiate the killing of B. pseudomallei by NO generated enzymatically from IFNγ-primed macrophages. Our investigations indicate that NO modulates the antimicrobial activity of β-lactam antibiotics.

  14. BurkDiff: a real-time PCR allelic discrimination assay for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene R Bowers

    Full Text Available A real-time PCR assay, BurkDiff, was designed to target a unique conserved region in the B. pseudomallei and B. mallei genomes containing a SNP that differentiates the two species. Sensitivity and specificity were assessed by screening BurkDiff across 469 isolates of B. pseudomallei, 49 isolates of B. mallei, and 390 isolates of clinically relevant non-target species. Concordance of results with traditional speciation methods and no cross-reactivity to non-target species show BurkDiff is a robust, highly validated assay for the detection and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei.

  15. Structural characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei adenylate kinase (Adk): Profound asymmetry in the crystal structure of the 'open' state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, G.W.; Robinson, H.; Abendroth, J.; Staker, B. L.; Myler, P. J.

    2010-04-16

    In all organisms adenylate kinases (Adks) play a vital role in cellular energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. Due to differences in catalytic properties between the Adks found in prokaryotes and in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes, there is interest in targeting this enzyme for new drug therapies against infectious bacterial agents. Here we report the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure for the 220-residue Adk from Burkholderia pseudomallei (BpAdk), the etiological agent responsible for the infectious disease melioidosis. The general structure of apo BpAdk is similar to other Adk structures, composed of a CORE subdomain with peripheral ATP-binding (ATP{sub bd}) and LID subdomains. The two molecules in the asymmetric unit have significantly different conformations, with a backbone RMSD of 1.46 {angstrom}. These two BpAdk conformations may represent 'open' Adk sub-states along the preferential pathway to the 'closed' substrate-bound state.

  16. BurkDiff: A Real-Time PCR Allelic Discrimination Assay for Burkholderia Pseudomallei and B. mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, Jolene R.; Engelthaler, David M.; Jennifer L Ginther; Talima Pearson; Peacock, Sharon J.; Apichai Tuanyok; Wagner, David M.; Currie, Bart J.; Keim, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay, BurkDiff, was designed to target a unique conserved region in the B. pseudomallei and B. mallei genomes containing a SNP that differentiates the two species. Sensitivity and specificity were assessed by screening BurkDiff across 469 isolates of B. pseudomallei, 49 isolates of B. mallei, and 390 isolates of clinically relevant non-target species. Concordance of results with traditional speciation methods and no cross-reactivity to non-target species show BurkDiff is a ro...

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of BipD, a component of the Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A construct consisting of residues 10–310 of mature BipD, a component of the B. pseudomallei type III secretion system, has been crystallized. Native BipD crystals and SeMet and K2PtCl4 derivative crystals have undergone preliminary crystallographic analysis. A construct consisting of residues 10–310 of BipD, a component of the Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system (T3SS), has been overexpressed as a GST fusion, cleaved from the GST tag and purified. Crystals were grown of native and selenomethionine-labelled BipD. The crystals grow in two different polymorphs from the same condition. The first polymorph belongs to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.98, b = 122.79, c = 49.17 Å, a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.4 Å3 Da−1 (47% solvent content) and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The second polymorph belongs to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 136.47, b = 89.84, c = 50.15 Å, and a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.3 Å3 Da−1 (45% solvent content) for two molecules per asymmetric unit (analysis of the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a weak twofold non-crystallographic symmetry axis in this P21212 form). The native crystals of both forms give diffraction data to 2.7 Å resolution, while the SeMet-labelled P21212 crystals diffract to 3.3 Å resolution. A K2PtCl4 derivative of the P21212 form was also obtained and data were collected to 2.7 Å with radiation of wavelength λ = 0.933 Å. The Pt-derivative anomalous difference Patterson map revealed two self-peaks on the Harker sections

  18. Systematic mutagenesis of genes encoding predicted autotransported proteins of Burkholderia pseudomallei identifies factors mediating virulence in mice, net intracellular replication and a novel protein conferring serum resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar Adler, Natalie R; Stevens, Mark P; Dean, Rachel E; Saint, Richard J; Pankhania, Depesh; Prior, Joann L; Atkins, Timothy P; Kessler, Bianca; Nithichanon, Arnone; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Galyov, Edouard E

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the severe tropical disease melioidosis, which commonly presents as sepsis. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome encodes eleven predicted autotransporters, a diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins often associated with virulence. In a systematic study of these autotransporters, we constructed insertion mutants in each gene predicted to encode an autotransporter and assessed them for three pathogenesis-associated phenotypes: virulence in the BALB/c intra-peritoneal mouse melioidosis model, net intracellular replication in J774.2 murine macrophage-like cells and survival in 45% (v/v) normal human serum. From the complete repertoire of eleven autotransporter mutants, we identified eight mutants which exhibited an increase in median lethal dose of 1 to 2-log10 compared to the isogenic parent strain (bcaA, boaA, boaB, bpaA, bpaC, bpaE, bpaF and bimA). Four mutants, all demonstrating attenuation for virulence, exhibited reduced net intracellular replication in J774.2 macrophage-like cells (bimA, boaB, bpaC and bpaE). A single mutant (bpaC) was identified that exhibited significantly reduced serum survival compared to wild-type. The bpaC mutant, which demonstrated attenuation for virulence and net intracellular replication, was sensitive to complement-mediated killing via the classical and/or lectin pathway. Serum resistance was rescued by in trans complementation. Subsequently, we expressed recombinant proteins of the passenger domain of four predicted autotransporters representing each of the phenotypic groups identified: those attenuated for virulence (BcaA), those attenuated for virulence and net intracellular replication (BpaE), the BpaC mutant with defects in virulence, net intracellular replication and serum resistance and those displaying wild-type phenotypes (BatA). Only BcaA and BpaE elicited a strong IFN-γ response in a restimulation assay using whole blood from seropositive donors and were

  19. Efflux Pump-mediated Drug Resistance in Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Podnecky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in B. cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance.

  20. Melioidosis: an emerging infection in Taiwan?

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, P. R.; Teng, L J; Lee, L N; Yu, C. J.; Yang, P. C.; Ho, S W; Luh, K. T.

    2001-01-01

    From January 1982 to May 2000, 17 infections caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei were diagnosed in 15 patients in Taiwan; almost all the infections were diagnosed from 1994 to May 2000. Of the 15 patients, 9 (60%) had underlying diseases, and 10 (67%) had bacteremic pneumonia. Thirteen (76%) episodes of infection were considered indigenous. Four patients died of melioidosis. Seventeen B. pseudomallei isolates, recovered from eight patients from November 1996 to May 2000, were analyzed to dete...

  1. Recurrent urinary tract infection by burkholderia cepacia in a live related renal transplant recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkholderia cepacia is high virulent organism usually causing lower respiratory tract infections especially in Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and post lung transplant. Urinary tract infections with Burkholderia cepacia have been associated after bladder irrigation or use of contaminated hospital objects. Post renal transplant urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complications. Recurrent urinary tract infection with Burkholderia cepacia is a rare finding. Complete anatomical evaluation is essential in case recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) after renal transplant. Vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR) and neurogenic urinary bladder was found to be important risk factors. (author)

  2. Recurrent Burkholderia Infection in Patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease: 11-Year Experience at a Large Referral Center

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, David E.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; Stock, Frida; Murray, Patrick R.; Holland, Steven M.; LiPuma, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiology of Burkholderia infection in persons with chronic granulomatous disease is poorly understood. We used species-specific polymerase chain reaction–based assays and genotyping analyses to identify 32 strains representing 9 Burkholderia species among 50 isolates recovered from 18 patients with chronic granulomatous disease. We found that recurrent pulmonary infection with distinct Burkholderia strains is common in chronic granulomatous disease.

  3. Use of the common marmoset to study Burkholderia mallei infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Jelesijevic

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted bacterium that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir. The organism causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by B. mallei typically occurs via the respiratory or percutaneous route, and the most common manifestations are life-threatening pneumonia and bacteremia. Glanders is difficult to diagnose and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There is no vaccine to protect against B. mallei and there is concern regarding its use as a biothreat agent. Thus, experiments were performed to establish a non-human primate model of intranasal infection to study the organism and develop countermeasures. Groups of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus were inoculated intranasally with B. mallei strain ATCC 23344 and monitored for clinical signs of illness for up to 13 days. We discovered that 83% of marmosets inoculated with doses of 2.5 X 10(4 to 2.5 X 10(5 bacteria developed acute lethal infection within 3-4 days. Signs of disease were severe and included lethargy, inappetence, conjunctivitis, mucopurulent and hemorrhagic nasal discharges, and increased respiratory effort with abdominal lifts. Burkholderia mallei was cultured from the lungs, spleen and liver of these animals, and pathologic examination of tissues revealed lesions characteristic of glanders. Challenge experiments also revealed that 91% of animals infected with doses ranging from 25 to 2.5 X 10(3 bacteria exhibited mild non-specific signs of illness and were culture negative. One marmoset inoculated with 2.5 X 10(3 organisms developed moderate signs of disease and reached humane end-points 8 days post-infection. The liver and spleen of this animal were colonized with the agent and pathological analysis of tissues showed nasal, splenic and hepatic lesions. Taken together, these data indicate that the marmoset is a suitable model to study respiratory infection by B

  4. Identification of CD4+ T-cell epitope and investigation of HLA distribution for the immunogenic proteins of Burkholderia pseudomallei using in silico approaches - A key vaccine development strategy for melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetha, Rayapadi G; Sandhya, Madangopal; Ramaiah, Sudha; Anbarasu, Anand

    2016-07-01

    Melioidosis is a serious infectious diseases affecting multi-organ system in humans with high mortality rate. The disease is caused by the bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei and it is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Thus, there is an urgent need for protective vaccine against B. pseudomallei; which may reduce morbidity and mortality in endemic areas. The identification of peptides that bind to major histocompatibility complex II class helps in understanding the nature of immune response and identifying T-cell epitopes for the design of new vaccines. Previous studies indicate that, ompA, bipB, fliC and groEL proteins of B. pseudomallei stimulate CD4+ T-cell immune response and act as protective immunogens. However, the data for CD4+ T-cell epitopes of these immunogenic proteins are very limited. Hence, in this present study we attempted to identify CD4+ T-cell epitopes in B. pseudomallei immunogenic proteins using in silico approaches. We did population coverage analysis for these identified epitopic core sequences to identify individuals in endemic areas expected to respond to a given set of these epitopes on the basis of HLA genotype frequencies. We observed that eight epitopic core sequences, two from each immunogenic protein, were associated with the maximum number of HLA-DR binding alleles. These eight peptides are found to be immunogenic in more than 90% of population in endemic areas considered. Thus, these eight peptides containing epitopic core sequences may act as probable vaccine candidates and they may be considered for the development of epitope-based vaccines for melioidosis. PMID:27086038

  5. In Vitro Susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei in Comparison to Those of Other Pathogenic Burkholderia spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, D J; Russell, P; Rogers, D.; Eley, S M; Titball, R W

    1999-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities of isolates of Burkholderia mallei to 16 antibiotics were assessed and compared with the susceptibilities of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia cepacia. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of B. mallei resembled that of B. pseudomallei more closely than that of B. cepacia, which corresponds to their similarities in terms of biochemistry, antigenicity, and pathogenicity. Ceftazidime, imipenem, doxycycline, and ciprofloxacin were active agai...

  6. Monitoring Therapeutic Treatments against Burkholderia Infections Using Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M. Mott

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, are Category B select agents with biothreat potential, and yet effective therapeutic treatments are lacking. In this study, we showed that CpG administration increased survival, demonstrating protection in the murine glanders model. Bacterial recovery from infected lungs, liver and spleen was significantly reduced in CpG-treated animals as compared with non-treated mice. Reciprocally, lungs of CpG-treated infected animals were infiltrated with higher levels of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes, as compared to control animals. Employing the B. mallei bioluminescent strain CSM001 and the Neutrophil-Specific Fluorescent Imaging Agent, bacterial dissemination and neutrophil trafficking were monitored in real-time using multimodal in vivo whole body imaging techniques. CpG-treatment increased recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs and reduced bioluminescent bacteria, correlating with decreased bacterial burden and increased protection against acute murine glanders. Our results indicate that protection of CpG-treated animals was associated with recruitment of neutrophils prior to infection and demonstrated, for the first time, simultaneous real time in vivo imaging of neutrophils and bacteria. This study provides experimental evidence supporting the importance of incorporating optimized in vivo imaging methods to monitor disease progression and to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic treatment during bacterial infections.

  7. Two Novel Clinical Presentations of Burkholderia cepacia Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjoy; Bhargava, Anudita; Ayyagari, Archana

    2004-01-01

    We report two cases of multidrug-resistant Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia genomovar I) and Burkholderia multivorans causing multiple liver abscesses in a patient with bronchial asthma (case 1) and peritonitis in a patient with cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus disease (case 2), respectively. Both patients were treated successfully.

  8. Sero-characterization of lipopolysaccharide from Burkholderia thailandensis

    OpenAIRE

    Qazi, Omar; Prior, Joann L.; Judy, Barbara M; Whitlock, Gregory C.; Kitto, G. Barrie; Torres, Alfredo G.; Estes, D. Mark; Brown, Katherine A

    2008-01-01

    We report the successful purification of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Burkholderia thailandesis, a Gram-negative bacterium, closely related to the highly pathogenic organisms Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. B. thailandensis LPS is shown to cross-react with rabbit and mouse sera obtained from inoculation with B. pseudomallei or B. mallei, respectively. These data suggest that B. thailandensis LPS shares similar structural features with LPS molecules from highly pathogenic B...

  9. Complete Genome Sequences for 59 Burkholderia Isolates, Both Pathogenic and Near Neighbor

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, S. L.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Ladner, Jason T.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; Jaissle, James; Frey, Kenneth G.; Koroleva, Galina I.; Bruce, David C.; Coyne, Susan R.; Broomall, Stacey M.; Li, Po-E; Teshima, Hazuki; Gibbons, Henry S.; Palacios, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia encompasses both pathogenic (including Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Category B listed), and nonpathogenic Gram-negative bacilli. Here we present full genome sequences for a panel of 59 Burkholderia strains, selected to aid in detection assay development.

  10. Concomitant Cryptococcosis and Burkholderia Infection in an Asymptomatic Lung Transplant Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Concomitant pulmonary infections with Cryptococcus neoformans and Burkholderia cepacia in lung transplant recipients are very rare and create unique diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Herein, we present a double lung transplant patient with cystic fibrosis who was found to have coinfection with these two rare organisms, though he was completely asymptomatic.

  11. A Possible Link between Infection with Burkholderia Bacteria and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Based on Epitope Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that purified polyclonal and monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibodies bind a 15-mer peptide ASPVTARVLWKASHV in ELISA and Dot blot. This 15-mer peptide partial sequence ARVLWKASH shares similarity with burkholderia bacterial cytochrome B 561 partial sequence ARVLWRATH. In this study, we show that purified anti-dsDNA antibodies react with burkholderia fungorum bacterial cell lysates in Western blot. We used anti-dsDNA antibodies to make an anti-dsDNA antibodies affinity column and used this column to purify the burkholderia fungorum bacterial protein. Purified anti-dsDNA antibodies bind specifically to purified bacterial antigen and purified bacterial antigen blocked the anti-dsDNA antibodies binding to dsDNA antigen. Sera with anti-dsDNA antibodies bind specifically to purified bacterial antigen. We obtained protein partial sequence of RAGTDEGFG which is shared with burkholderia bacterial transcription regulator protein sequence. Sera with anti-dsDNA antibodies bind to RAGTDEGFG peptide better than control groups. These data support our hypothesis that the origin of anti-dsDNA antibodies in SLE may be associated with burkholderia bacterial infection.

  12. Cystic fibrosis adults' perception and management of the risk of infection with Burkholderia cepacia complex

    OpenAIRE

    Lowton, Karen; Gabe, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The risk of infection for cystic fibrosis patients from Burkholderia cepacia complex pathogens is of increasing concern to doctors and scientists. This paper reports on how these patients perceive and manage the risk of cepacia infection using Douglas and Calvez's (1990) typology of four cultures of the community (the central community, dissenting enclaves, isolates, and individualists) and Douglas' works on pollution, risk, and culture. We attempt to develop Douglas's cultural theory in the ...

  13. Differential Persistence among Genomovars of the Burkholderia cepacia Complex in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Karen K.; Donald J Davidson; Halsey, T. Keith; Chung, Jacqueline W.; Speert, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients infected with strains from different genomovars of the Burkholderia cepacia complex can experience diverse clinical outcomes. To identify genomovar-specific determinants that might be responsible for these differences, we developed a pulmonary model of infection in BALB/c mice. Mice were rendered leukopenic by administration of cyclophosphamide prior to intranasal challenge with 1.6 × 104 bacteria. Five of six genomovar II strains persisted at stable numbers in the lu...

  14. Airborne Transmission of Melioidosis to Humans from Environmental Aerosols Contaminated with B. pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Shih; Chen, Yao-Shen; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Liu, Pei-Ju; Ni, Wei-Fan; Hsueh, Pei-Tan; Liang, Shih-Hsiung; Chen, Chialin; Chen, Ya-Lei

    2015-06-01

    Melioidosis results from an infection with the soil-borne pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, and cases of melioidosis usually cluster after rains or a typhoon. In an endemic area of Taiwan, B. pseudomallei is primarily geographically distributed in cropped fields in the northwest of this area, whereas melioidosis cases are distributed in a densely populated district in the southeast. We hypothesized that contaminated cropped fields generated aerosols contaminated with B. pseudomallei, which were carried by a northwesterly wind to the densely populated southeastern district. We collected soil and aerosol samples from a 72 km2 area of land, including the melioidosis-clustered area and its surroundings. Aerosols that contained B. pseudomallei-specific TTSS (type III secretion system) ORF2 DNA were well distributed in the endemic area but were rare in the surrounding areas during the rainy season. The concentration of this specific DNA in aerosols was positively correlated with the incidence of melioidosis and the appearance of a northwesterly wind. Moreover, the isolation rate in the superficial layers of the contaminated cropped field in the northwest was correlated with PCR positivity for aerosols collected from the southeast over a 2-year period. According to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analyses, PFGE Type Ia (ST58) was the predominant pattern linking the molecular association among soil, aerosol and human isolates. Thus, the airborne transmission of melioidosis moves from the contaminated soil to aerosols and/or to humans in this endemic area. PMID:26061639

  15. A rare case of community acquired Burkholderia cepacia infection presenting as pyopneumothorax in an immunocompetent individual

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suman S Karanth; Hariharan Regunath; Kiran Chawla; Mukhyaprana Prabhu

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia) infection is rarely reported in an immunocompetent host. It is a well known occurence in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease where it increases both morbidity and mortality. It has also been included in the list of organisms causing nosocomial infections in an immunocompetent host, most of them transmitted from the immunocompromised patient in which this organism harbors. We report a rare case of isolation of B. cepacia from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of an immunocompetent agriculturist who presented with productive cough and fever associated with a pyopneumothorax. This is the first case of community acquired infection reported in an immunocompetent person in India.

  16. The promise of bacteriophage therapy for Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Dawn Semler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, increased attention has been given to evaluating the efficacy of phage therapy, especially in scenarios where the bacterial infectious agent of interest is highly antibiotic resistant. In this regard, phage therapy is especially applicable to infections caused by the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC since members of the BCC are antibiotic pan-resistant. Current studies in BCC phage therapy are unique from many other avenues of phage therapy research in that the research is not only comprised of phage isolation, in vitro phage characterization and in vivo infection model efficacy, but also adapting aerosol drug delivery techniques to aerosol phage formulation delivery and storage.

  17. Developing Peptide Mimotopes of Capsular Polysaccharides and Lipopolysaccharides Protective Antigens of Pathogenic Burkholderia Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pengfei; Zhang, Jing; Tsai, Shien; Li, Bingjie; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP) and Burkholderia mallei (BM) are two species of pathogenic Burkholderia bacteria. Our laboratory previously identified four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that reacted against Burkholderia capsular polysaccharides (PS) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and effectively protected against a lethal dose of BP/BM infections in mice. In this study, we used phage display panning against three different phage peptide libraries to select phage clones specifically recognized by each of the four protective MAbs. After sequencing a total of 179 candidate phage clones, we examined in detail six selected phage clones carrying different peptide inserts for the specificity of binding by the respective target MAbs. Chemically synthesized peptides corresponding to those displayed by the six phage clones were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin carrier protein and tested for their binding specificity to the respective protective MAbs. The study revealed that four of the six peptides, all derived from the library displaying dodecapeptides, functioned well as "mimotopes" of Burkholderia PS and LPS as demonstrated by a high degree of specific competition against the binding of three protective MAbs to BP and BM. Our results suggest that the four selected peptide mimics corresponding to PS/LPS protective antigens of BP and BM could potentially be developed into peptide vaccines against pathogenic Burkholderia bacteria. PMID:27328059

  18. Outbreak of Subclinical Mastitis in a Flock of Dairy Sheep Associated with Burkholderia cepacia Complex Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriatua, E.; Ziluaga, I.; Miguel-Virto, C.; Uribarren, P.; Juste, R.; Laevens, S.; Vandamme, P.; Govan, J. R. W.

    2001-01-01

    An outbreak of subclinical mastitis in a flock of 620 milking sheep was investigated. Microbiological and epidemiological analyses identified the causative agent as belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (formerly Pseudomonas cepacia). Every ewe in the milking flock was individually tested for subclinical mastitis on two separate occasions, 6 weeks apart, by the California (rapid) mastitis test (CMT). The proportion of CMT-positive ewes was 69 of 393 (17.6%) on the first sampling and 27 of 490 (5.5%) on the second sampling. Pure B. cepacia cultures identified with the API 20 NE system were grown from 64 of 96 (66.7%) CMT-positive ewes and from 1 of 33 (3.0%) CMT-negative ewes. Statistical analysis confirmed the significant association between a positive CMT result and a positive culture result for B. cepacia complex. Additional polyphasic taxonomic analyses of eight isolates showed that seven belonged to B. cepacia genomovar III; the remaining isolate was identified as Burkholderia vietnamiensis (formerly B. cepacia genomovar V). Bacteriological investigation of samples from milking equipment and other environmental sites failed to identify “B. cepacia” in any of the samples taken. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an outbreak of natural infection in animals caused by B. cepacia complex and the first description of B. cepacia complex infection in sheep. PMID:11230416

  19. Identification of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain H111 virulence factors using nonmammalian infection hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwager, Stephan; Agnoli, Kirsty; Köthe, Manuela;

    2013-01-01

    approximately 5,500 B. cenocepacia H111 random mini-Tn5 insertion mutants that were screened, 22 showed attenuated virulence in C. elegans. Except for the quorum-sensing regulator cepR, none of the mutated genes coded for the biosynthesis of classical virulence factors such as extracellular proteases or......Burkholderia cenocepacia H111, a strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, has been shown to effectively kill the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used the C. elegans model of infection to screen a mini-Tn5 mutant library of B. cenocepacia H111 for attenuated virulence. Of the...... siderophores. Instead, the mutants contained insertions in metabolic and regulatory genes. Mutants attenuated in virulence in the C. elegans infection model were also tested in the Drosophila melanogaster pricking model, and those also attenuated in this model were further tested in Galleria mellonella. Six of...

  20. Using multispectral imaging flow cytometry to assess an in vitro intracellular Burkholderia thailandensis infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Dominic; Ducker, Catherine; Clark, Graeme; Prior, Jo; Rowland, Caroline A

    2016-04-01

    The use of in vitro models to understand the interaction of bacteria with host cells is well established. In vitro bacterial infection models are often used to quantify intracellular bacterial load by lysing cell populations and subsequently enumerating the bacteria. Modern established techniques employ the use of fluorescence technologies such as flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy, and/or confocal microscopy. However, these techniques often lack either the quantification of large data sets (microscopy) or use of gross fluorescence signal which lacks the visual confirmation that can provide additional confidence in data sets. Multispectral imaging flow cytometry (MIFC) is a novel emerging field of technology. This technology captures a bright field and fluorescence image of cells in a flow using a charged coupled device camera. It allows the analysis of tens of thousands of single cell images, making it an extremely powerful technology. Here MIFC was used as an alternative method of analyzing intracellular bacterial infection using Burkholderia thailandensis E555 as a model organism. It has been demonstrated that the data produced using traditional enumeration is comparable to data analyzed using MIFC. It has also been shown that by using MIFC it is possible to generate other data on the dynamics of the infection model rather than viable counts alone. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to inhibit the uptake of bacteria into mammalian cells and identify differences between treated and untreated cell populations. The authors believe this to be the first use of MIFC to analyze a Burkholderia bacterial species during intracellular infection. © 2016 Crown copyright. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of ISAC. PMID:26841315

  1. Relative uptake of technetium 99m stannous colloid by neutrophils and monocytes is altered by gram-negative infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gram-negative infection alters phagocytic cell function; hence, it could affect phagocytic uptake of inorganic colloids by these cells. Neutrophil and monocyte uptake of technetium 99m stannous colloid (99mTc SnC) in whole blood was measured in 10 patients with gram-negative infection (Burkholderia pseudomallei) and 7 controls. Mean uptake per individual neutrophil was reduced in infection. Uptake per monocyte was not significantly different. Blood from six normal individuals was incubated with lysed B. pseudomallei and colloid, which showed reduced neutrophil uptake, but increased monocyte uptake. These results indicate that uptake of 99mTc SnC stannous colloid can be used to measure alteration in phagocytic cell function. They suggest that infection with B. pseudomallei is associated with reduced phagocytosis by individual neutrophils, possibly through toxic effects of bacterial products. This could have immunopathogenic consequences for this gram-negative infection and may explain why it responds to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

  2. Studies on the sensitivity of guinea pigs and golden hamsters irradiated with different doses of gamma rays to infections with R and S forms of Pseudomonas pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body gamma irradiation was carried out on guinea pigs of both sexes with 2 Gy (sublethal dose), 2 Gy fractionated (4 x 0.5 Gy a day) and 0.5 Gy, and on golden hamsters with 6 Gy (sublethal dose) and 0.5 Gy. The animals were injected i.p. 24 h after irradiation with bacterial suspensions of P. pseudomallei R7 and R15. The results showed a great increase of sensitivity to infection in the animals irradiated with sublethal dose, both as regards the R and S forms. Susceptibility rose appreciably also in guinea pigs irradiated fractionally with a dose of 2 Gy and to a relatively lower degree upon irradiation with 0.5 Gy. For the golden hamsters the sensitivity toward both investigated strains was extremely high and it remained unchanged upon irradiation with 6 Gy and 0.5 Gy. The data obtained provided grounds for the existence of a certain correlation between the different radioresistance of guinea pigs and golden hamsters and the changes established in their sensitivity to infections with R and S forms of Ps. pseudomallei after whole-body gamma irradiation

  3. In vivo bioluminescence imaging of Burkholderia mallei respiratory infection and treatment in the mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane eMassey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent imaging (BLI technology is a powerful tool for monitoring infectious disease progression and treatment approaches. BLI is particularly useful for tracking fastidious intracellular pathogens that might be difficult to recover from certain organs. Burkholderia mallei, the causative agent of glanders, is a facultative intracellular pathogen and has been classified by the CDC as a Category B select agent due to its highly infectious nature and potential use as a biological weapon. Very little is known regarding pathogenesis or treatment of glanders. We investigated the use of bioluminescent reporter constructs to monitor the dynamics of infection as well as the efficacy of therapeutics for B. mallei in real time. A stable luminescent reporter B. mallei strain was created using the pUTmini-Tn5::luxKm2 plasmid and used to monitor glanders in the BALB/c murine model. Mice were infected via the intranasal route with 5x103 bacteria and monitored by BLI at 24, 48 and 72 h. We verified that our reporter construct maintained similar virulence and growth kinetics compared to wild-type B. mallei and confirmed that it maintains luminescent stability in the presence or absence of antibiotic selection. The luminescent signal was initially seen in the lungs, and progressed to the liver and spleen over the course of infection. We demonstrated that antibiotic treatment 24 h post-infection resulted in reduction of bioluminescence that can be attributed to decreased bacterial burden in target organs. These findings suggest that BLI can be used to monitor disease progression and efficacy of therapeutics during glanders infections. Finally, we report an alternative method to mini-Tn5::luxKm2 transposon using mini-Tn7-lux elements that insert site-specifically at known genomic attachment sites and that can also be used to tag bacteria.

  4. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein

    OpenAIRE

    Ghequire, Maarten; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombin...

  5. Cytidine derivatives as IspF inhibitors of Burkolderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zheng; Jakkaraju, Sriram; Blain, Joy; Gogol, Kenneth; Zhao, Lei; Hartley, Robert C.; Karlsson, Courtney A.; Staker, Bart L.; Lance J Stewart; Myler, Peter J.; Clare, Michael; Begley, Darren W.; Horn, James R.; Hagen, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Published biological data suggest that the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, a non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway, is essential for certain bacteria and other infectious disease organisms. One highly conserved enzyme in the MEP pathway is 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase (IspF). Fragment-bound complexes of IspF from Burkholderia pseudomallei were used to design and synthesize a series of molecules linking the cytidine moiety to different zinc pocket fr...

  6. Recovery efficiencies for Burkholderia thailandensis from various aerosol sampling media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eDabisch

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia thailandensis is used in the laboratory as a surrogate of the more virulent B. pseudomallei. Since inhalation is believed to be a natural route of infection for B. pseudomallei, many animal studies with B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis utilize the inhalation route of exposure. The aim of the present study was to quantify the recovery efficiency of culturable B. thailandensis from several common aerosol sampling devices to ensure that collected microorganisms could be reliably recovered post-collection. The sampling devices tested included 25-mm gelatin filters, 25-mm stainless steel disks used in Mercer cascade impactors, and two types of glass impingers. The results demonstrate that while several processing methods tested resulted in significantly lower physical recovery efficiencies than other methods, it was possible to obtain culturable recovery efficiencies for B. thailandensis and physical recovery efficiencies for 1 μm fluorescent spheres of at least 0.95 from all of the sampling media tested given an appropriate sample processing procedure. The results of the present study also demonstrated that the bubbling action of liquid media in all-glass impingers (AGIs can result in physical loss of material from the collection medium, although additional studies are needed to verify the exact mechanisms involved. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that the collection mechanism as well as the post-collection processing method can significantly affect the recovery from and retention of culturable microorganisms in sampling media, potentially affecting the calculated airborne concentration and any subsequent estimations of risk or dose derived from such data.

  7. Infection of Burkholderia cepacia induces homeostatic responses in the host for their prolonged survival: the microarray perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanitha Mariappan

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic human pathogen associated with life-threatening pulmonary infections in immunocompromised individuals. Pathogenesis of B. cepacia infection involves adherence, colonisation, invasion, survival and persistence in the host. In addition, B. cepacia are also known to secrete factors, which are associated with virulence in the pathogenesis of the infection. In this study, the host factor that may be the cause of the infection was elucidated in human epithelial cell line, A549, that was exposed to live B. cepacia (mid-log phase and its secretory proteins (mid-log and early-stationary phases using the Illumina Human Ref-8 microarray platform. The non-infection A549 cells were used as a control. Expression of the host genes that are related to apoptosis, inflammation and cell cycle as well as metabolic pathways were differentially regulated during the infection. Apoptosis of the host cells and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines were found to be inhibited by both live B. cepacia and its secretory proteins. In contrast, the host cell cycle and metabolic processes, particularly glycolysis/glycogenesis and fatty acid metabolism were transcriptionally up-regulated during the infection. Our microarray analysis provided preliminary insights into mechanisms of B. cepacia pathogenesis. The understanding of host response to an infection would provide novel therapeutic targets both for enhancing the host's defences and repressing detrimental responses induced by the invading pathogen.

  8. Combining functional and structural genomics to sample the essential Burkholderia structome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Baugh

    Full Text Available The genus Burkholderia includes pathogenic gram-negative bacteria that cause melioidosis, glanders, and pulmonary infections of patients with cancer and cystic fibrosis. Drug resistance has made development of new antimicrobials critical. Many approaches to discovering new antimicrobials, such as structure-based drug design and whole cell phenotypic screens followed by lead refinement, require high-resolution structures of proteins essential to the parasite.We experimentally identified 406 putative essential genes in B. thailandensis, a low-virulence species phylogenetically similar to B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, using saturation-level transposon mutagenesis and next-generation sequencing (Tn-seq. We selected 315 protein products of these genes based on structure-determination criteria, such as excluding very large and/or integral membrane proteins, and entered them into the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infection Disease (SSGCID structure determination pipeline. To maximize structural coverage of these targets, we applied an "ortholog rescue" strategy for those producing insoluble or difficult to crystallize proteins, resulting in the addition of 387 orthologs (or paralogs from seven other Burkholderia species into the SSGCID pipeline. This structural genomics approach yielded structures from 31 putative essential targets from B. thailandensis, and 25 orthologs from other Burkholderia species, yielding an overall structural coverage for 49 of the 406 essential gene families, with a total of 88 depositions into the Protein Data Bank. Of these, 25 proteins have properties of a potential antimicrobial drug target i.e., no close human homolog, part of an essential metabolic pathway, and a deep binding pocket. We describe the structures of several potential drug targets in detail.This collection of structures, solubility and experimental essentiality data provides a resource for development of drugs against

  9. Outbreak of Subclinical Mastitis in a Flock of Dairy Sheep Associated with Burkholderia cepacia Complex Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Berriatua, E.; Ziluaga, I.; Miguel-Virto, C.; Uribarren, P.; Juste, R.; Laevens, S.; Vandamme, P.; Govan, J. R. W.

    2001-01-01

    An outbreak of subclinical mastitis in a flock of 620 milking sheep was investigated. Microbiological and epidemiological analyses identified the causative agent as belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (formerly Pseudomonas cepacia). Every ewe in the milking flock was individually tested for subclinical mastitis on two separate occasions, 6 weeks apart, by the California (rapid) mastitis test (CMT). The proportion of CMT-positive ewes was 69 of 393 (17.6%) on the first sampling and 2...

  10. Divergent homologs of the predicted small RNA BpCand697 in Burkholderia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiri, Nadzirah; Mohd-Padil, Hirzahida; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    The small RNA (sRNA) gene candidate, BpCand697 was previously reported to be unique to Burkholderia spp. and is encoded at 3' non-coding region of a putative AraC family transcription regulator gene. This study demonstrates the conservation of BpCand697 sequence across 32 Burkholderia spp. including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, B. thailandensis and Burkholderia sp. by integrating both sequence homology and secondary structural analyses of BpCand697 within the dataset. The divergent sequence of BpCand697 was also used as a discriminatory power in clustering the dataset according to the potential virulence of Burkholderia spp., showing that B. thailandensis was clearly secluded from the virulent cluster of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. Finally, the differential co-transcript expression of BpCand697 and its flanking gene, bpsl2391 was detected in Burkholderia pseudomallei D286 after grown under two different culture conditions using nutrient-rich and minimal media. It is hypothesized that the differential expression of BpCand697-bpsl2391 co-transcript between the two standard prepared media might correlate with nutrient availability in the culture media, suggesting that the physical co-localization of BpCand697 in B. pseudomallei D286 might be directly or indirectly involved with the transcript regulation of bpsl2391 under the selected in vitro culture conditions.

  11. Variant of X-Linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease Revealed by a Severe Burkholderia cepacia Invasive Infection in an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Oswaldo Lugo Reyes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to bacteria and fungi since early in life, caused by mutations in any of the five genes coding for protein subunits in NADPH oxidase. X-linked variant CGD can be missed during routine evaluation or present later in life due to hypomorphic mutations and a residual superoxide production. The case of a 10-month-old boy who died of pneumonia is reported. The isolation of Burkholderia cepacia from his lung, together with a marginally low nitroblue tetrazolium reduction assay (NBT, made us suspect and pursue the molecular diagnosis of CGD. A postmortem genetic analysis finally demonstrated CGD caused by a hypomorphic missense mutation with normal gp91phox expression. In a patient being investigated for unusually severe or recurrent infection, a high index of suspicion of immunodeficiency must be maintained.

  12. Zoospore Homing and Infection Events: Effects of the Biocontrol Bacterium Burkholderia cepacia AMMDR1 on Two Oomycete Pathogens of Pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Heungens, K; Parke, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AMMDR1 is a biocontrol agent that protects pea and sweet corn seeds from Pythium damping-off in field experiments. The goal of this work was to understand the effect of B. cepacia AMMDR1 on Pythium aphanidermatum and Aphanomyces euteiches zoospore homing events and on infection of pea seeds or roots. In vitro, B. cepacia AMMDR1 caused zoospore lysis, prevented cyst germination, and inhibited germ tube growth of both oomycetes. B. cepacia AMMDR1 also reduced the attractive...

  13. Serological Evidence of Infection with Endemic Human Pathogens Among Free-Ranging Old World Monkeys in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemme, Ryan R; Lopez-Ortiz, Ricardo; Garcia, Brenda Rivera; Sharp, Tyler M; Galloway, Renee L; Elrod, Mindy G; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Serum specimens from free-ranging but nonnative patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in southwestern Puerto Rico (PR) were tested for antibodies to infection with dengue viruses (DENVs), West Nile virus (WNV), Leptospira species, and Burkholderia pseudomallei by microneutralization, plaque reduction neutralization, microscopic agglutination, and indirect hemagglutination, respectively. Of 23 animals (21 E. patas and two M. mulatta) tested, all had evidence of prior DENV infection, and of 17 animals tested for WNV, nine (53%) had evidence of prior infection. Of 24 (22 E. patas, two M. mulatta) tested for Leptospira spp., 10 (42%) had evidence of prior exposure, and one patas monkey had antibodies against B. pseudomallei The acquisition of pathogens endemic among humans in PR by resident nonhuman primates merits further study to define modes of acquisition. PMID:27001754

  14. Burkholderia cenocepacia type VI secretion system mediates escape of type II secreted proteins into the cytoplasm of infected macrophages.

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    Roberto Rosales-Reyes

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that survives intracellularly in macrophages and causes serious respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We have previously shown that bacterial survival occurs in bacteria-containing membrane vacuoles (BcCVs resembling arrested autophagosomes. Intracellular bacteria stimulate IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1-dependent manner and induce dramatic changes to the actin cytoskeleton and the assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex onto the BcCV membrane. A Type 6 secretion system (T6SS is required for these phenotypes but surprisingly it is not required for the maturation arrest of the BcCV. Here, we show that macrophages infected with B. cenocepacia employ the NLRP3 inflammasome to induce IL-1β secretion and pyroptosis. Moreover, IL-1β secretion by B. cenocepacia-infected macrophages is suppressed in deletion mutants unable to produce functional Type VI, Type IV, and Type 2 secretion systems (SS. We provide evidence that the T6SS mediates the disruption of the BcCV membrane, which allows the escape of proteins secreted by the T2SS into the macrophage cytoplasm. This was demonstrated by the activity of fusion derivatives of the T2SS-secreted metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB with adenylcyclase. Supporting this notion, ZmpA and ZmpB are required for efficient IL-1β secretion in a T6SS dependent manner. ZmpA and ZmpB are also required for the maturation arrest of the BcCVs and bacterial intra-macrophage survival in a T6SS-independent fashion. Our results uncover a novel mechanism for inflammasome activation that involves cooperation between two bacterial secretory pathways, and an unanticipated role for T2SS-secreted proteins in intracellular bacterial survival.

  15. Molecular Signatures and Phylogenomic Analysis of the Genus Burkholderia: Proposal for Division of this Genus into the Emended Genus Burkholderia Containing Pathogenic Organisms and a New Genus Paraburkholderia gen. nov. Harboring Environmental Species

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    Aman eSawana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Burkholderia contains large number of diverse species which are not reliably distinguished by the available biochemical or molecular characteristics. We report here results of detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of 45 sequenced species of the genus Burkholderia. In phylogenetic trees based upon concatenated sequences for 21 conserved proteins as well as 16S rRNA gene sequences, Burkholderia species grouped into two major clades. Within these main clades a number of smaller clades were also clearly distinguished. Our comparative analysis of protein sequences from Burkholderia spp. has identified 42 highly specific molecular markers in the form of conserved sequence indels (CSIs that are uniquely found in different clades of Burkholderia spp. Six of these CSIs are specific for a group of Burkholderia spp. (referred to as Clade I which contains all clinically relevant members of the genus as well as the phytopathogenic Burkholderia species. The second main clade (Clade II composed of the environmental Burkholderia species, is also distinguished by 2 of the identified CSIs. Additionally, our work has also identified 3 CSIs that are specific for the Burkholderia cepacia complex, 4 CSIs that are uniquely found in the Burkholderia pseudomallei group, 5 CSIs that are specific for the phytopathogenic Burkholderia spp. and 22 other CSI that distinguish two groups within Clade II. The described molecular markers provide highly specific means for the demarcation of different groups of Burkholderia spp. and for development of novel diagnostic assays for the clinically important members of the group. Based upon the results from different lines of studies, a division of the genus Burkholderia into two genera is proposed. In this new proposal, the emended genus Burkholderia will contain only the clinically relevant and phytopathogenic Burkholderia species, whereas all other Burkholderia spp. are transferred to a new genus

  16. Meropenem in cystic fibrosis patients infected with resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Burkholderia cepacia and with hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Jensen, Tim; Pressler, Tacjana;

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of meropenem, administered on a compassionate basis to 62 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (age: 24plus minus6 years) with hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics and/or infection by bacteria resistant to other antibiotics. METHODS: Fifty......-seven patients were chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 5 with Burkholderia cepacia. In total, 124 courses (1 to 6/patient) of meropenem, 2 g three times a day by intravenous infusion (10 to 15 min) for 14 days, were administered. RESULTS: During treatment for P. aeruginosa the mean increase in...... chronic infection with B. cepacia the post treatment FEV1 and FVC values were higher than the pre-treatment values, and all the inflammatory parameters decreased. The geometric means of minimal inhibitory concentration (MICs) (microg/mL) for P. aeruginosa (B. cepacia) were: tobramycin 6 (59...

  17. [Comparative analysis of total cell protein electrophoregram of pathogenic Burkholderia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budchenko, A A; Iliukhin, V I; Viktorov, D V

    2005-01-01

    Whole-cell proteins of 22 strain of Burkhoderia pseudomallei, including 13 B. mallei, 5 B. cepacia strains and 14 strains of opportunistically pathogenic Pseudomonas defined by 1D SDC-PAAG electrophoresis. Electrophoregrams contained 35 to 45 protein fractions sized 19 to 130 kDa, which were highly reproductive. On the basis of computer-aided comparative analysis of protein patterns the interspecies and intraspecies grouping of studied microorganisms was made. The cluster analysis of the similarity matrix of protein spectra made it possible to allocate two groups of strains at the level of similarity of 78%. Group I was formed by Burkholderia species that previously belonged to the II RNA-DNA homology group of Pseudomonas: B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, B. cepacia. All Pseudomonas species were added to the 2nd Group: P. aeruginosa, P. stutzeri, P. testosterone, P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. mendocina. Four phenons were isolated among the strains of B. pseudomallei and 2 phenons--among the strains of B. mallei at the threshold similarity level (89%). The authors conclude that the comparative analysis of electrophoregrams of whole-cell proteins can be useful in the identification and typing of pathogenic Burkholderia. PMID:15954473

  18. An ancient but promiscuous host–symbiont association between Burkholderia gut symbionts and their heteropteran hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2010-01-01

    Here, we investigated 124 stinkbug species representing 20 families and 5 superfamilies for their Burkholderia gut symbionts, of which 39 species representing 6 families of the superfamilies Lygaeoidea and Coreoidea were Burkholderia-positive. Diagnostic PCR surveys revealed high frequencies of Burkholderia infection in natural populations of the stinkbugs, and substantial absence of vertical transmission of Burkholderia infection to their eggs. In situ hybridization confirmed localization of...

  19. Burkholderia rhizoxinica sp. nov. and Burkholderia endofungorum sp. nov., bacterial endosymbionts of the plant-pathogenic fungus Rhizopus microsporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partida-Martinez, Laila P; Groth, Ingrid; Schmitt, Imke; Richter, Walter; Roth, Martin; Hertweck, Christian

    2007-11-01

    Several strains of the fungus Rhizopus microsporus harbour endosymbiotic bacteria for the production of the causal agent of rice seedling blight, rhizoxin, and the toxic cyclopeptide rhizonin. R. microsporus and isolated endobacteria were selected for freeze-fracture electron microscopy, which allowed visualization of bacterial cells within the fungal cytosol by their two parallel-running envelope membranes and by the fine structure of the lipopolysaccharide layer of the outer membrane. Two representatives of bacterial endosymbionts were chosen for phylogenetic analyses on the basis of full 16S rRNA gene sequences, which revealed that the novel fungal endosymbionts formed a monophyletic group within the genus Burkholderia. Inter-sequence similarities ranged from 98.94 to 100%, and sequence similarities to members of the Burkholderia pseudomallei group, the closest neighbours, were 96.74-97.38%. In addition, the bacterial strains were distinguished from their phylogenetic neighbours by their fatty acid profiles and other biochemical characteristics. The phylogenetic studies based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data, together with conclusive DNA-DNA reassociation experiments, strongly support the proposal that these strains represent two novel species within the genus Burkholderia, for which the names Burkholderia rhizoxinica sp. nov. (type strain, HKI 454T=DSM 19002T=CIP 109453T) and Burkholderia endofungorum sp. nov. (type strain, HKI 456T=DSM 19003T=CIP 109454T) are proposed. PMID:17978222

  20. Members of the genus Burkholderia: good and bad guys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Leo; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the 1990s several biocontrol agents on that contained Burkholderia strains were registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). After risk assessment these products were withdrawn from the market and a moratorium was placed on the registration of Burkholderia-containing products, as these strains may pose a risk to human health. However, over the past few years the number of novel Burkholderia species that exhibit plant-beneficial properties and are normally not isolated from infected patients has increased tremendously. In this commentary we wish to summarize recent efforts that aim at discerning pathogenic from beneficial Burkholderia strains. PMID:27303639

  1. Genetic and phenotypic diversity in Burkholderia: contributions by prophage and phage-like elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ricky L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia species exhibit enormous phenotypic diversity, ranging from the nonpathogenic, soil- and water-inhabiting Burkholderia thailandensis to the virulent, host-adapted mammalian pathogen B. mallei. Genomic diversity is evident within Burkholderia species as well. Individual isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, for example, carry a variety of strain-specific genomic islands (GIs, including putative pathogenicity and metabolic islands, prophage-like islands, and prophages. These GIs may provide some strains with a competitive advantage in the environment and/or in the host relative to other strains. Results Here we present the results of analysis of 37 prophages, putative prophages, and prophage-like elements from six different Burkholderia species. Five of these were spontaneously induced to form bacteriophage particles from B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis strains and were isolated and fully sequenced; 24 were computationally predicted in sequenced Burkholderia genomes; and eight are previously characterized prophages or prophage-like elements. The results reveal numerous differences in both genome structure and gene content among elements derived from different species as well as from strains within species, due in part to the incorporation of additional DNA, or 'morons' into the prophage genomes. Implications for pathogenicity are also discussed. Lastly, RNAseq analysis of gene expression showed that many of the genes in ϕ1026b that appear to contribute to phage and lysogen fitness were expressed independently of the phage structural and replication genes. Conclusions This study provides the first estimate of the relative contribution of prophages to the vast phenotypic diversity found among the Burkholderiae.

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Burkholderia contaminans, a Burkholderia cepacia Complex Species That Is Increasingly Recovered from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bloodworth, Ruhi A M; Selin, Carrie; López De Volder, Maria Agustina; Drevinek, Pavel; Galanternik, Laura; Degrossi, José; Cardona, Silvia T.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia contaminans belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a group of bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and capable of infecting the immunocompromised and people with cystic fibrosis. We report here draft genome sequences for the B. contaminans type strain LMG 23361 and an Argentinian cystic fibrosis sputum isolate.

  3. A polar-localized iron-binding protein determines the polar targeting of Burkholderia BimA autotransporter and actin tail formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiuhe; Xu, Yue; Yao, Qing; Niu, Miao; Shao, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens including Shigella, Listeria, Mycobacteria, Rickettsia and Burkholderia spp. deploy a specialized surface protein onto one pole of the bacteria to induce filamentous actin tail formation for directional movement within host cytosol. The mechanism underlying polar targeting of the actin tail proteins is unknown. Here we perform a transposon screen in Burkholderia thailandensis and identify a conserved bimC that is required for actin tail formation mediated by BimA from B. thailandensis and its closely related pathogenic species B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. bimC is located upstream of bimA in the same operon. Loss of bimC results in even distribution of BimA on the outer membrane surface, where actin polymerization still occurs. BimC is targeted to the same bacterial pole independently of BimA. BimC confers polar targeting of BimA prior to BimA translocation across bacterial inner membrane. BimC is an iron-binding protein, requiring a four-cysteine cluster at the carboxyl terminus. Mutation of the cysteine cluster disrupts BimC polar localization. Truncation analyses identify the transmembrane domain in BimA being responsible for its polar targeting. Consistently, BimC can interact with BimA transmembrane domain in an iron binding-dependent manner. Our study uncovers a new mechanism that determines the polar distribution of bacteria-induced actin tail in infected host cells. PMID:25293534

  4. Zoospore homing and infection events: effects of the biocontrol bacterium Burkholderia cepacia AMMDR1 on two oomycete pathogens of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heungens, K; Parke, J L

    2000-12-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AMMDR1 is a biocontrol agent that protects pea and sweet corn seeds from Pythium damping-off in field experiments. The goal of this work was to understand the effect of B. cepacia AMMDR1 on Pythium aphanidermatum and Aphanomyces euteiches zoospore homing events and on infection of pea seeds or roots. In vitro, B. cepacia AMMDR1 caused zoospore lysis, prevented cyst germination, and inhibited germ tube growth of both oomycetes. B. cepacia AMMDR1 also reduced the attractiveness of seed exudates to Pythium zoospores to nondetectable levels. However, when present at high levels on seeds, B. cepacia AMMDR1 had little net effect on zoospore attraction, probably because it also enhanced seed exudation. Seed-applied B. cepacia AMMDR1 dramatically reduced the incidence of infection by Pythium zoospores in situ compared with an antibiosis-deficient Tn5 mutant strain. This mutant strain also decreased Pythium infection incidence to some extent, but only when the pathogen inoculum potential was low. B. cepacia AMMDR1 did not affect attraction of Aphanomyces zoospores or Aphanomyces root rot incidence. These results suggest that B. cepacia AMMDR1 controls P. aphanidermatum largely through antibiosis, but competition for zoospore-attracting compounds can contribute to the effect. Differences in suppression of Aphanomyces and Pythium are discussed in relation to differences in the ecology of the two pathogens. PMID:11097889

  5. Common duckweed (Lemna minor is a versatile high-throughput infection model for the Burkholderia cepacia complex and other pathogenic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euan L S Thomson

    Full Text Available Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc have emerged in recent decades as problematic pulmonary pathogens of cystic fibrosis (CF patients, with severe infections progressing to acute necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis. This study presents evidence that Lemna minor (Common duckweed is useful as a plant model for the Bcc infectious process, and has potential as a model system for bacterial pathogenesis in general. To investigate the relationship between Bcc virulence in duckweed and Galleria mellonella (Greater wax moth larvae, a previously established Bcc infection model, a duckweed survival assay was developed and used to determine LD50 values. A strong correlation (R(2 = 0.81 was found between the strains' virulence ranks in the two infection models, suggesting conserved pathways in these vastly different hosts. To broaden the application of the duckweed model, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC and five isogenic mutants with previously established LD50 values in the larval model were tested against duckweed, and a strong correlation (R(2 = 0.93 was found between their raw LD50 values. Potential virulence factors in B. cenocepacia K56-2 were identified using a high-throughput screen against single duckweed plants. In addition to the previously characterized antifungal compound (AFC cluster genes, several uncharacterized genes were discovered including a novel lysR regulator, a histidine biosynthesis gene hisG, and a gene located near the gene encoding the recently characterized virulence factor SuhB(Bc. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this model in therapeutic applications, duckweed was rescued from Bcc infection by treating with bacteriophage at 6-h intervals. It was observed that phage application became ineffective at a timepoint that coincided with a sharp increase in bacterial invasion of plant tissue. These results indicate that common duckweed can serve as an effective infection model for the investigation of bacterial

  6. Meropenem in cystic fibrosis patients infected with resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Burkholderia cepacia and with hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, Oana; Jensen, Tim; Pressler, Tacjana; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Koch, Christian; Høiby, Niels

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of meropenem, administered on a compassionate basis to 62 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (age: 24plus minus6 years) with hypersensitivity reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics and/or infection by bacteria resistant to other antibiotics. METHODS: Fifty-seven patients were chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 5 with Burkholderia cepacia. In total, 124 courses (1 to 6/patient) of meropenem, 2 g three times a day by intravenous infusion (10 to 15 min) for 14 days, were administered. RESULTS: During treatment for P. aeruginosa the mean increase in pulmonary function (as a percentage of the predictive values) was 5.6% for FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in the first second) and 8.6% for FVC (forced vital capacity). C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and leukocyte count decreased significantly. In courses administered for chronic infection with B. cepacia the post treatment FEV1 and FVC values were higher than the pre-treatment values, and all the inflammatory parameters decreased. The geometric means of minimal inhibitory concentration (MICs) (microg/mL) for P. aeruginosa (B. cepacia) were: tobramycin 6 (59), ciprofloxacin 1.2 (9.7), piperacillin 49 (16.3), ceftazidime 26 (23), aztreonam 26 (35), imipenem 6.4 (not determined) and meropenem 5.1 (4.8). No statistically significant increase in the MICs of meropenem for either pathogen occurred during therapy. Of the 124 courses, 115 were tolerated without any clinical complaint. The following side effects were observed: nausea (0.8%), itching (4%), rash (3.2%), drug fever (1.6%). CONCLUSIONS: Meropenem proved to be a valuable drug in the treatment of CF patients with chronic pulmonary infection with multiresistant P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia and with hypersensitivity reactions to other beta-lactam drugs. PMID:11866824

  7. Burkholderia fungorum Septicemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gerrits, G. Peter; Klaassen, Corné; Coenye, Tom; Vandamme, Peter; Meis, Jacques F

    2005-01-01

    We report the first case of community-acquired bacteremia with Burkholderia fungorum, a newly described member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex. A 9-year-old girl sought treatment with septic arthritis in her right knee and ankle with soft tissue involvement. Commercial identification systems did not identify the causative microorganism.

  8. The Tomato Rhizosphere, an Environment Rich in Nitrogen-Fixing Burkholderia Species with Capabilities of Interest for Agriculture and Bioremediation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Onofre-Lemus, Janette; Estrada-De Los Santos, Paulina; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia strains are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. Unfortunately, most of these strains belong to species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) involved in human infections, hampering potential applications. Novel diazotrophic Burkholderia species, phylogenetically distant from the Bcc species, have been discovered recently, but their environmental distribution and relevant features for agro-biotechnological applications are little known. In this work, the oc...

  9. Cytidine derivatives as IspF inhibitors of Burkolderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Jakkaraju, Sriram; Blain, Joy; Gogol, Kenneth; Zhao, Lei; Hartley, Robert C; Karlsson, Courtney A; Staker, Bart L; Edwards, Thomas E; Stewart, Lance J; Myler, Peter J; Clare, Michael; Begley, Darren W; Horn, James R; Hagen, Timothy J

    2013-12-15

    Published biological data suggest that the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, a non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway, is essential for certain bacteria and other infectious disease organisms. One highly conserved enzyme in the MEP pathway is 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase (IspF). Fragment-bound complexes of IspF from Burkholderia pseudomallei were used to design and synthesize a series of molecules linking the cytidine moiety to different zinc pocket fragment binders. Testing by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) found one molecule in the series to possess binding affinity equal to that of cytidine diphosphate, despite lacking any metal-coordinating phosphate groups. Close inspection of the SPR data suggest different binding stoichiometries between IspF and test compounds. Crystallographic analysis shows important variations between the binding mode of one synthesized compound and the pose of the bound fragment from which it was designed. The binding modes of these molecules add to our structural knowledge base for IspF and suggest future refinements in this compound series. PMID:24157367

  10. Healthcare-associated respiratory tract infection and colonization in an intensive care unit caused by Burkholderia cepacia isolated in mouthwash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannete Zurita

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Our findings strongly suggest that alcohol-free mouthwash solution intrinsically contaminated with B. cepacia was the source of these colonizations and infections involving adults in the ICU.

  11. Pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first published case report en Colombia about pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia. This uncommon pathogen is from the epidemiological standpoint a very important one and medical community should be aware to look after it in those patients where no other etiological pathogen is recovered. A brief summary about epidemiology is showed, emphasizing those regions where it can be found. Likewise, comments about the differential diagnosis are important since it should be considered in those patients where tuberculosis is suspected. This is particularly representative for countries with high tuberculosis rates. Furthermore, a microbiological review is shown, emphasizing on isolation techniques, descriptions about therapeutics and other regarding treatment issues according international standards. Finally; a description about the clinical picture, laboratory findings, treatment and evolution of the case reported are shown for discussion

  12. Novel diagnostic PCR assay for Burkholderia cenocepacia epidemic strain ST32 and its utility in monitoring infection in cystic fibrosis patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dědečková, K.; Kalferstová, L.; Strnad, Hynek; Vávrová, J.; Dřevínek, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 5 (2013), s. 475-481. ISSN 1569-1993 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Burkholderia cenocepacia * diagnostic PCR * B. cenocepacia ST32 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2013

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia dolosa PC543 Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Airways

    OpenAIRE

    Workentine, Matthew L; Michael G Surette; Bernier, Steve P

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of opportunistic bacterial pathogens often associated with fatal chronic infections in the lungs of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of B. dolosa PC543 (LMG 19468), a CF airway isolate.

  14. Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia H111, a Cystic Fibrosis Airway Isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Carlier, A; Agnoli, K; Pessi, G; Suppiger, A; Jenul, C; Schmid, N; Tummler, B.; Pinto-Carbo, M; Eberl, L

    2014-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is a group of related bacterial species that are commonly isolated from environmental samples. Members of the BCC can cause respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. We report here the genome sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia H111, a well-studied model strain of the BCC.

  15. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M Mott

    Full Text Available In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001 deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis.Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001.Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  16. Induction of mouse melioidosis with meningitis by CD11b+ phagocytic cells harboring intracellular B. pseudomallei as a Trojan horse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ju Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 3-5% of patients with melioidosis manifest CNS symptoms; however, the clinical data regarding neurological melioidosis are limited. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We established a mouse model of melioidosis with meningitis characterized by neutrophil infiltration into the meninges histologically and B. pseudomallei in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF by bacteriological culturing methods. As the disease progresses, the bacteria successively colonize the spleen, liver, bone marrow (BM and brain and invade splenic and BM cells by days 2 and 6 post-infection, respectively. The predominant cell types intracellularly infected with B. pseudomallei were splenic and BM CD11b(+ populations. The CD11b(+Ly6C(high inflamed monocytes, CD11b(+Ly6C(low resident monocytes, CD11b(+Ly6G(+ neutrophils, CD11b(+F4/80(+ macrophages and CD11b(+CD19(+ B cells were expanded in the spleen and BM during the progression of melioidosis. After adoptive transfer of CD11b populations harboring B. pseudomallei, the infected CD11b(+ cells induced bacterial colonization in the brain, whereas CD11b(- cells only partially induced colonization; extracellular (free B. pseudomallei were unable to colonize the brain. CD62L (selectin was absent on splenic CD11b(+ cells on day 4 but was expressed on day 10 post-infection. Adoptive transfer of CD11b(+ cells expressing CD62L (harvested on day 10 post-infection resulted in meningitis in the recipients, but transfer of CD11b(+ CD62L-negative cells did not. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that B. pseudomallei-infected CD11b(+ selectin-expressing cells act as a Trojan horse and are able to transmigrate across endothelial cells, resulting in melioidosis with meningitis.

  17. Persistence of Burkholderia multivorans within the Pulmonary Macrophage in the Murine Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Karen K.; MacDonald, Kelly L.; Davidson, Donald J; Speert, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Differences in infection kinetics and host response between Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia were demonstrated in a pulmonary infection model in BALB/c mice. B. multivorans persisted in the lung, while B. cenocepacia was cleared. Indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy of B. multivorans-infected lungs localized bacteria to macrophages. Clearance of B. cenocepacia was associated with greater interleukin-1β and neutrophil responses than the responses induced by ...

  18. УГЛЕВОДСОДЕРЖАЩИЕ АНТИГЕНЫ BURKHOLDERIA PSEUDOMALLEI И BURKHOLDERIA MALLEI КАК ПОТЕНЦИАЛЬНАЯ ОСНОВА СРЕДСТВ ДИАГНОСТИКИ И ПРОФИЛАКТИКИ МЕЛИОИДОЗА И САПА

    OpenAIRE

    Корсакова, И.; Пивень, Н.; Храпова, Н.; Жукова, С.; Авророва, И.; Кулаков, М.; Ломова, Л.; Напалкова, Г.; Сидорук, В.; Чупрына, Н.

    2008-01-01

    Были выделены и описаны антигенные комплексы B.pseudomallei и B.mallei, содержащие углеводы. Они находились в поверхностных структурах наружных мембран этих микробиологических агентов. Изучалась иммуногенность некоторых антигенов. При назначении животным антигенных фракций B.pseudomallei и B.mallei 83-66 % белых крыс оказывались защищенными от инфицирования вирулентным штаммом B.pseudomallei. Эти фракции вместе с антигенами Аг 2, Аг 3, Аг 6, Аг 8 и Аг d B.pseudomallei и главные антигены B.pse...

  19. Phylogenomic Study of Burkholderia glathei-like Organisms, Proposal of 13 Novel Burkholderia Species and Emended Descriptions of Burkholderia sordidicola, Burkholderia zhejiangensis, and Burkholderia grimmiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Charlotte; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Verheyde, Bart; De Brandt, Evie; Cooper, Vaughn S.; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Partial gyrB gene sequence analysis of 17 isolates from human and environmental sources revealed 13 clusters of strains and identified them as Burkholderia glathei clade (BGC) bacteria. The taxonomic status of these clusters was examined by whole-genome sequence analysis, determination of the G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and biochemical characterization. The whole-genome sequence-based phylogeny was assessed using the Genome Blast Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) method and an extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach. The results demonstrated that these 17 BGC isolates represented 13 novel Burkholderia species that could be distinguished by both genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. BGC strains exhibited a broad metabolic versatility and developed beneficial, symbiotic, and pathogenic interactions with different hosts. Our data also confirmed that there is no phylogenetic subdivision in the genus Burkholderia that distinguishes beneficial from pathogenic strains. We therefore propose to formally classify the 13 novel BGC Burkholderia species as Burkholderia arvi sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29317T = CCUG 68412T), Burkholderia hypogeia sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29322T = CCUG 68407T), Burkholderia ptereochthonis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29326T = CCUG 68403T), Burkholderia glebae sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29325T = CCUG 68404T), Burkholderia pedi sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29323T = CCUG 68406T), Burkholderia arationis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29324T = CCUG 68405T), Burkholderia fortuita sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29320T = CCUG 68409T), Burkholderia temeraria sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29319T = CCUG 68410T), Burkholderia calidae sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29321T = CCUG 68408T), Burkholderia concitans sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29315T = CCUG 68414T), Burkholderia turbans sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29316T = CCUG 68413T), Burkholderia catudaia sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29318T = CCUG 68411T) and Burkholderia peredens sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29314T = CCUG

  20. The Burkholderia cenocepacia OmpA-like protein BCAL2958: identification, characterization, and detection of anti-BCAL2958 antibodies in serum from B. cepacia complex-infected Cystic Fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sílvia A; Morad, Mostafa; Feliciano, Joana R; Pita, Tiago; Nady, Soad; El-Hennamy, Rehab E; Abdel-Rahman, Mona; Cavaco, José; Pereira, Luísa; Barreto, Celeste; Leitão, Jorge H

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory infections by bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality among cystic fibrosis patients, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic strategies. In the present work we have studied the B. cenocepacia protein BCAL2958, a member of the OmpA-like family of proteins, demonstrated as highly immunogenic in other pathogens and capable of eliciting strong host immune responses. The encoding gene was cloned and the protein, produced as a 6× His-tagged derivative, was used to produce polyclonal antibodies. Bioinformatics analyses led to the identification of sequences encoding proteins with a similarity higher than 96 % to BCAL2958 in all the publicly available Bcc genomes. Furthermore, using the antibody it was experimentally demonstrated that this protein is produced by all the 12 analyzed strains from 7 Bcc species. In addition, results are also presented showing the presence of anti-BCAL2958 antibodies in sera from cystic fibrosis patients with a clinical record of respiratory infection by Bcc, and the ability of the purified protein to in vitro stimulate neutrophils. The widespread production of the protein by Bcc members, together with its ability to stimulate the immune system and the detection of circulating antibodies in patients with a documented record of Bcc infection strongly suggest that the protein is a potential candidate for usage in preventive therapies of infections by Bcc. PMID:27325348

  1. A case of native valve endocarditis caused by Burkholderia cepacia without predisposing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Seong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infective endocarditis is rarely caused by Burkholderia cepacia. This infection is known to occur particularly in immunocompromised hosts, intravenous heroin users, and in patients with prosthetic valve replacement. Most patients with Burkholderia cepacia endocarditis usually need surgical treatment in addition to antimicrobial treatment. Case Presentation Here, we report the case of a patient who developed Burkholderia cepacia-induced native valve endocarditis with consequent cerebral involvement without any predisposing factors; she was successfully treated by antimicrobial agents only. Conclusion In this report, we also present literature review of relevant cases.

  2. Identification of Burkholderia spp. in the clinical microbiology laboratory: comparison of conventional and molecular methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van Pelt (Cindy); C.M. Verduin (Cees); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); M.C. Vos (Margreet); B. Tummler; C. Segonds; F. Reubsaet; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) predisposes patients to bacterial colonization and infection of the lower airways. Several species belonging to the genus Burkholderia are potential CF-related pathogens, but microbiological identification may be complicated. This situat

  3. Atypical presentation of chronic granulomatous disease with Burkholderia cepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Mac; Sharma, Nirupma; Guill, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare inherited disorder of neutrophil oxidative burst. In patients with CGD, phagocyte destruction of catalase-producing organisms is impaired, resulting in recurrent and potentially fatal infections. Burkholderia cepacia, a catalase-producing organism, is known to infect patients with dysfunctional immune systems. We report a case of a 3-year-old boy with this rare infection that unravelled the diagnosis of CGD. PMID:25103315

  4. Burkholderia cepacia complex: Beyond pseudomonas and acinetobacter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is an important nosocomial pathogen in hospitalised patients, particularly those with prior broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy. BCC causes infections that include bacteraemia, urinary tract infection, septic arthritis, peritonitis and respiratory tract infection. Due to high intrinsic resistance and being one of the most antimicrobial-resistant organisms encountered in the clinical laboratory, these infections can prove very difficult to treat and, in some cases, result in death. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF and those with chronic granulomatous disease are predisposed to infection by BCC bacteria. BCC survives and multiplies in aqueous hospital environments, including disinfectant agents and intravenous fluids, where it may persist for long periods. Outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks of BCC septicaemia have been documented in intensive care units, oncology units and renal failure patients. BCC is phenotypically unremarkable, and the complex exhibits an extensive diversity of genotypes. BCC is of increasing importance for agriculture and bioremediation because of their antinematodal and antifungal properties as well as their capability to degrade a wide range of toxic compounds. It has always been a tedious task for a routine microbiological laboratory to identify the nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli, and poor laboratory proficiency in identification of this nonfermenter worldwide still prevails. In India, there are no precise reports of the prevalence of BCC infection, and in most cases, these bacteria have been ambiguously reported as nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli or simply Pseudomonas spp. The International Burkholderia cepacia Working Group is open to clinicians and scientists interested in advancing knowledge of BCC infection/colonisation in persons with CF through the collegial exchange of information and promotion of coordinated approaches to research.

  5. Charakterisierung des Burkholderia cenocepacia Aquaglyceroporins

    OpenAIRE

    Wree, Dorothea

    2010-01-01

    In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde ein Aquaglyceroporin des Krankenhausproblemkeims Burkholderia cenocepacia, BccGlpF, charakterisiert. Unter besonderer Beobachtung stand die Struktur-Funktionsbeziehung der eigentlich kochkonservierten NPA-Motive.

  6. Burkholderia in gladiool lastige bacterie

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, B.J.; Aanholt, van, J.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    In de bollen- en bloementeelt van gladiolen komt de laatste jaren de bacterieziekte Burkholderia gladiola voor die onder vochtige warme omstandigheden veel uitval veroorzaken. PPO onderzocht een aantal maatregelen om de ziekte in kralen, pitten en knollen te bestrijden

  7. Virulence and Cellular Interactions of Burkholderia multivorans in Chronic Granulomatous Disease▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zelazny, Adrian M.; Ding, Li; Elloumi, Houda Z.; Brinster, Lauren R; Benedetti, Fran; Czapiga, Meggan; Ulrich, Ricky L.; Ballentine, Samuel J.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Holland, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients are susceptible to life-threatening infections by the Burkholderia cepacia complex. We used leukocytes from CGD and healthy donors and compared cell association, invasion, and cytokine induction by Burkholderia multivorans strains. A CGD isolate, CGD1, showed higher cell association than that of an environmental isolate, Env1, which correlated with cell entry. All B. multivorans strains associated significantly more with cells from CGD patients tha...

  8. Mechanisms of Disease: Host-Pathogen Interactions between Burkholderia Species and Lung Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    David, Jonathan; Bell, Rachel E.; Clark, Graeme C.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia species can cause a range of severe, often fatal, respiratory diseases. A variety of in vitro models of infection have been developed in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism by which Burkholderia spp. gain entry to and interact with the body. The majority of studies have tended to focus on the interaction of bacteria with phagocytic cells with a paucity of information available with regard to the lung epithelium. However, the lung epithelium is becoming more widel...

  9. Characterization of integrons in Burkholderia cepacia clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Furlanis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the airways of Cystic Fibrosis (CF patients, frequently developing chronic infections. In 20% of cases these infections cause severe and poorly controlled pathological situations because of the intrinsic antibiotic resistance expressed by the microorganism. CF patients are often subjected to antibiotic therapy: this facilitates the acquisition of antibiotic resistance determinants by the infecting bacteria. Integrons are mobile genetic elements that are widespread in bacterial populations and favor the acquisition of gene cassettes coding for these determinants.The presence of class 1 integrons was investigated by PCR with primers specific for the 5’ and 3’ ends in Burkholderia isolates recovered from patients in treatment at the CF center of Friuli Venezia Giulia. The same integron, carrying an uncommon allelic form (Ib of the aacA4 gene in its cassette array and conferring resistance to some aminoglycosides, was found in two independent isolates (different RAPD profiles infecting two different patients. In both isolates the integron was carried by plasmids and was still present 3 and 6 years later the first finding. Despite the exchange of integrons between bacterial pathogens is fully described, these items were not frequently found in Burkholderia isolates. Although the clinical relevance of the integron we identified is low (a single gene cassette encoding a widespread resistance,we feel concerned that these genetic elements begin to circulate in this bacterial species, as this could make more and more troublesome the treatment of infections notoriously difficult to eradicate.

  10. Burkholderia genome mining for nonribosomal peptide synthetases reveals a great potential for novel siderophores and lipopeptides synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeel, Qassim; Pupin, Maude; Kieu, Nam Phuong; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Béchet, Max; Deravel, Jovana; Krier, François; Höfte, Monica; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia is an important genus encompassing a variety of species, including pathogenic strains as well as strains that promote plant growth. We have carried out a global strategy, which combined two complementary approaches. The first one is genome guided with deep analysis of genome sequences and the second one is assay guided with experiments to support the predictions obtained in silico. This efficient screening for new secondary metabolites, performed on 48 gapless genomes of Burkholderia species, revealed a total of 161 clusters containing nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), with the potential to synthesize at least 11 novel products. Most of them are siderophores or lipopeptides, two classes of products with potential application in biocontrol. The strategy led to the identification, for the first time, of the cluster for cepaciachelin biosynthesis in the genome of Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD and a cluster corresponding to a new malleobactin-like siderophore, called phymabactin, was identified in Burkholderia phymatum STM815 genome. In both cases, the siderophore was produced when the strain was grown in iron-limited conditions. Elsewhere, the cluster for the antifungal burkholdin was detected in the genome of B. ambifaria AMMD and also Burkholderia sp. KJ006. Burkholderia pseudomallei strains harbor the genetic potential to produce a novel lipopeptide called burkhomycin, containing a peptidyl moiety of 12 monomers. A mixture of lipopeptides produced by Burkholderia rhizoxinica lowered the surface tension of the supernatant from 70 to 27 mN·m(-1) . The production of nonribosomal secondary metabolites seems related to the three phylogenetic groups obtained from 16S rRNA sequences. Moreover, the genome-mining approach gave new insights into the nonribosomal synthesis exemplified by the identification of dual C/E domains in lipopeptide NRPSs, up to now essentially found in Pseudomonas strains. PMID:27060604

  11. Screening and expression of selected taxonomically conserved and unique hypothetical proteins in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhir, Nor Azurah Mat; Nadzirin, Nurul; Mohamed, Rahmah; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Hypothetical proteins of bacterial pathogens represent a large numbers of novel biological mechanisms which could belong to essential pathways in the bacteria. They lack functional characterizations mainly due to the inability of sequence homology based methods to detect functional relationships in the absence of detectable sequence similarity. The dataset derived from this study showed 550 candidates conserved in genomes that has pathogenicity information and only present in the Burkholderiales order. The dataset has been narrowed down to taxonomic clusters. Ten proteins were selected for ORF amplification, seven of them were successfully amplified, and only four proteins were successfully expressed. These proteins will be great candidates in determining the true function via structural biology.

  12. Development and characterization of a caprine aerosol infection model of melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Soffler

    Full Text Available Infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the disease melioidosis, which often presents as a serious suppurative infection that is typically fatal without intensive treatment and is a significant emerging infectious disease in Southeast Asia. Despite intensive research there is still much that remains unknown about melioidosis pathogenesis. New animal models of melioidosis are needed to examine novel aspects of pathogenesis as well as for the evaluation of novel therapeutics. The objective of the work presented here was to develop a subacute to chronic caprine model of melioidosis and to characterize the progression of disease with respect to clinical presentation, hematology, clinical microbiology, thoracic radiography, and gross and microscopic pathology. Disease was produced in all animals following an intratracheal aerosol of 10(4 CFU delivered, with variable clinical manifestations indicative of subacute and chronic disease. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia was apparent microscopically by day 2 and radiographically and grossly apparent by day 7 post infection (PI. Early lesions of bronchopneumonia soon progressed to more severe bronchointerstitial pneumonia with pyogranuloma formation. Extrapulmonary dissemination appeared to be a function of pyogranuloma invasion of pulmonary vasculature, which peaked around day 7 PI. Histopathology indicated that leukocytoclastic vasculitis was the central step in dissemination of B. pseudomallei from the lungs as well as in the establishment of new lesions. While higher doses of organism in goats can produce acute fatal disease, the dose investigated and resulting disease had many similarities to human melioidosis and may warrant further development to provide a model for the study of both natural and bioterrorism associated disease.

  13. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  14. Burkholderia thailandensis harbors two identical rhl gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of rhamnolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Donald E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhamnolipids are surface active molecules composed of rhamnose and β-hydroxydecanoic acid. These biosurfactants are produced mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and have been thoroughly investigated since their early discovery. Recently, they have attracted renewed attention because of their involvement in various multicellular behaviors. Despite this high interest, only very few studies have focused on the production of rhamnolipids by Burkholderia species. Results Orthologs of rhlA, rhlB and rhlC, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of rhamnolipids in P. aeruginosa, have been found in the non-infectious Burkholderia thailandensis, as well as in the genetically similar important pathogen B. pseudomallei. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, both Burkholderia species contain these three genes necessary for rhamnolipid production within a single gene cluster. Furthermore, two identical, paralogous copies of this gene cluster are found on the second chromosome of these bacteria. Both Burkholderia spp. produce rhamnolipids containing 3-hydroxy fatty acid moieties with longer side chains than those described for P. aeruginosa. Additionally, the rhamnolipids produced by B. thailandensis contain a much larger proportion of dirhamnolipids versus monorhamnolipids when compared to P. aeruginosa. The rhamnolipids produced by B. thailandensis reduce the surface tension of water to 42 mN/m while displaying a critical micelle concentration value of 225 mg/L. Separate mutations in both rhlA alleles, which are responsible for the synthesis of the rhamnolipid precursor 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxyalkanoic acid, prove that both copies of the rhl gene cluster are functional, but one contributes more to the total production than the other. Finally, a double ΔrhlA mutant that is completely devoid of rhamnolipid production is incapable of swarming motility, showing that both gene clusters contribute to this phenotype. Conclusions Collectively, these

  15. Chemistry and biology of the potent endotoxin from a Burkholderia dolosa clinical isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo, Flaviana Di; Sturiale, Luisa; Palmigiano, Angelo; Lembo-Fazio, Luigi; Paciello, Ida; Coutinho, Carla P.; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Bernardini, Marialina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Garozzo, Domenico; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This is the first report of the chemical and biological properties of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) endotoxin isolated from Burkholderia dolosa IST4208, an isolate recovered from a cystic fibrosis (CF) patient in a Portuguese CF center. B. dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of closely related species that are highly problematic and opportunistic pathogens in CF. B. dolosa infection leads to accelerated loss of lung function and decreased survival. The structural d...

  16. Activities of five new fluoroquinolones against Pseudomonas pseudomallei.

    OpenAIRE

    Winton, M D; Everett, E D; Dolan, S A

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-four isolates of Pseudomonas pseudomallei were tested by a broth microdilution technique for susceptibility to amifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin was the most active agent tested, with an MIC for 90% of the strains tested of 8 micrograms/ml. These in vitro results suggest that the fluoroquinolones tested would not be optimal for therapy of melioidosis.

  17. Evaluation of Aromatic Plants and Compounds Used to Fight Multidrug Resistant Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Ramar Perumal Samy; Jayapal Manikandan; Mohammed Al Qahtani

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100  μ g of residue) was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW) and Staphyloc...

  18. Disease: H00317 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00317 Melioidosis Melioidosis is an infection caused by the gram-negative soil-dwe...lling bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei. It predominantly affects people in regular contact with soil and w

  19. Evaluation of Surrogate Animal Models of Melioidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Warawa, Jonathan Mark

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for the disease melioidosis. B. pseudomallei establishes disease in susceptible individuals through multiple routes of infection, all of which may proceed to a septicemic disease associated with a high mortality rate. B. pseudomallei opportunistically infects humans and a wide range of animals directly from the environment, and modeling of experimental melioidosis has been conducted in numerous biologically relevant...

  20. PPO zoekt naar mogelijkheden aanpak Burkholderia

    OpenAIRE

    Dwarswaard, A.; Van Dam

    2014-01-01

    In de bloemen- en knollenteelt van gladiool komt de afgelopen decennia met enige regelmaat de bacterieziekte Burkholderia voor. Vorig jaar startte PPO met een onderzoek naar de mogelijkheden om deze ziekte aan te pakken. Een tussenstand.

  1. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Blower

    Full Text Available Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly "highly resistant" to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2 and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3 were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis.

  2. 40 CFR 725.1075 - Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Burkholderia cepacia complex. 725.1075... Specific Microorganisms § 725.1075 Burkholderia cepacia complex. (a) Microorganism and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The microorganisms identified as the Burkholderia cepacia complex defined...

  3. Polyphasic characterisation of Burkholderia cepacia complex species isolated from children with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicenzi, Fernando José; Pillonetto, Marcelo; de Souza, Helena Aguilar Peres Homem de Mello; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; Riedi, Carlos Antônio; Rosario-Filho, Nelson Augusto; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) pulmonary infections have high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to compare different methods for identification of Bcc species isolated from paediatric CF patients. Oropharyngeal swabs from children with CF were used to obtain isolates of Bcc samples to evaluate six different tests for strain identification. Conventional (CPT) and automatised (APT) phenotypic tests, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-recA, restriction fragment length polymorphism-recA, recAsequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) were applied. Bacterial isolates were also tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. PCR-recA analysis showed that 36 out of the 54 isolates were Bcc. Kappa index data indicated almost perfect agreement between CPT and APT, CPT and PCR-recA, and APT and PCR-recA to identify Bcc, and MALDI-TOF and recAsequencing to identify Bcc species. The recAsequencing data and the MALDI-TOF data agreed in 97.2% of the isolates. Based on recA sequencing, the most common species identified were Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIA (33.4%),Burkholderia vietnamiensis (30.6%), B. cenocepaciaIIIB (27.8%), Burkholderia multivorans (5.5%), and B. cepacia (2.7%). MALDI-TOF proved to be a useful tool for identification of Bcc species obtained from CF patients, although it was not able to identify B. cenocepacia subtypes. PMID:26814642

  4. The symbiotic role of O-antigen of Burkholderia symbiont in association with host Riptortus pedestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Park, Ha Young; Lee, Bok Luel

    2016-07-01

    Riptortus pedestris harboring Burkholderia symbiont is a useful symbiosis model to study the molecular interactions between insects and bacteria. We recently reported that the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen is absent in the Burkholderia symbionts isolated from Riptortus guts. Here, we investigated the symbiotic role of O-antigen comprehensively in the Riptortus-Burkholderia model. Firstly, Burkholderia mutant strains deficient of O-antigen biosynthesis genes were generated and confirmed for their different patterns of the lipopolysaccharide by electrophoretic analysis. The O-antigen-deficient mutant strains initially exhibited a reduction of infectivity, having significantly lower level of symbiont population at the second-instar stage. However, both the wild-type and O-antigen mutant symbionts exhibited a similar level of symbiont population from the third-instar stage, indicating that the O-antigen deficiency did not affect the bacterial persistence in the host midgut. Taken together, we showed that the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen of gut symbiont plays an exclusive role in the initial symbiotic association. PMID:26875632

  5. A preliminary X-ray study of d,d-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase from Burkholderia thailandensis E264

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, d,d-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. d,d-Heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase (GmhB), which is involved in the third step of the NDP-heptose biosynthesis pathway, converts d,d-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate to d,d-heptose-1-phosphate. This biosynthesis pathway is a target for new antibiotics or antibiotic adjuvants for Gram-negative pathogens. Burkholderia thailandensis is a useful surrogate organism for studying the pathogenicity of melioidosis owing to its extensive genomic similarity to B. pseudomallei. Melioidosis caused by B. pseudomallei is a serious invasive disease of animals and humans in tropical and subtropical areas. In this study, GmhB has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray data have also been collected to 2.50 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = 243.2, b = 243.2, c = 41.1 Å

  6. Disruption of Tight Junctions during Traversal of the Respiratory Epithelium by Burkholderia cenocepacia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jason Y.; Sajjan, Umadevi S.; Krasan, Graham P.; LiPuma, John J.

    2005-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic bacterial species capable of causing life-threatening respiratory tract infection in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF). Unlike most other pathogens in CF, which typically remain confined to the endobronchial spaces, B. cenocepacia can traverse airway epithelium to cause bacteremia and sepsis. The mechanisms by which this occurs, however, are unknown. We examined the transmigration of B. cenocepacia through polarized respiratory epithelium. Represen...

  7. An Effect of Biofield Treatment on Multidrug-resistant Burkholderia cepacia: A Multihost Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia) is an opportunistic, Gram negative pathogen which causes infection mainly in immunocompromised population and associated with high rate of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. Aim of the present study was to analyze the impact of biofield treatment on multidrug resistant B. cepacia. Clinical sample of B. cepacia was divided into two groups i.e. control and biofield treated. The analysis was done after 10 days of treatment and compared with con...

  8. Eradication of Burkholderia cepacia Using Inhaled Aztreonam Lysine in Two Patients with Bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Iglesias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are not many articles about the chronic bronchial infection/colonization in patients with underlying lung disease other than cystic fibrosis (CF, especially with non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFBQ. The prevalence of B. cepacia complex is not well known in NCFBQ. The vast majority of published clinical data on Burkholderia infection in individuals with CF is comprised of uncontrolled, anecdotal, and/or single center experiences, and no consensus has emerged regarding treatment. We present two cases diagnosed with bronchiectasis (BQ of different etiology, with early pulmonary infection by B. cepacia complex, which was eradicated with inhaled aztreonam lysine.

  9. GENOME ANALYSIS OF BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA AC1100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholderia cepacia is an important organism in bioremediation of environmental pollutants and it is also of increasing interest as a human pathogen. The genomic organization of B. cepacia is being studied in order to better understand its unusual adaptive capacity and genome pl...

  10. Outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteremia in a chemotherapy day care unit due to intrinsic contamination of an antiemetic drug

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, T.; Shah, S.; Naik, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the end of 2009, a large number of patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy at the day care unit of a private hospital in Mumbai, India developed Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) blood stream infection (BSI). Objective: The objectives were to identify the source of the outbreak and terminate the outbreak as rapidly as possible. Materials and Methods: All infection control protocols and processes were reviewed. Intensive training was started for all nursing staff involved ...

  11. Structural flexibility in the Burkholderia mallei genome

    OpenAIRE

    Nierman, William C.; DeShazer, David; Kim, H Stanley; Tettelin, Herve; Karen E Nelson; Feldblyum, Tamara; Ulrich, Ricky L.; Ronning, Catherine M.; Brinkac, Lauren M; Daugherty, Sean C.; Davidsen, Tanja D.; DeBoy, Robert T.; Dimitrov, George; Robert J Dodson; Durkin, A. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 provides insight into this highly infectious bacterium's pathogenicity and evolutionary history. B. mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, has come under renewed scientific investigation as a result of recent concerns about its past and potential future use as a biological weapon. Genome analysis identified a number of putative virulence factors whose function was supported by comparative genome hybridization and expression prof...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Fenitrothion-Degrading Burkholderia sp. Strain YI23

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jong Sung; Choi, Beom Soon; Choi, Ah Young; Kim, Kyung Duk; Kim, Dong In; Choi, Ik Young; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia species are ubiquitous in soil environments. Many Burkholderia species isolated from various environments have the potential to biodegrade man-made chemicals. Burkholderia sp. strain YI23 was isolated from a golf course soil and identified as a fenitrothion-degrading bacterium. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain YI23.

  13. Clinical guideline for diagnosis and management of melioidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis Timothy J.J.; Rolim Dionne B.; Rodriguez Jorge L.N.

    2006-01-01

    Melioidosis is an emerging infection in Brazil and neighbouring South American countries. The wide range of clinical presentations include severe community-acquired pneumonia, septicaemia, central nervous system infection and less severe soft tissue infection. Diagnosis depends heavily on the clinical microbiology laboratory for culture. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the bacterial cause of melioidosis, is easily cultured from blood, sputum and other clinical samples. However, B. pseudomallei can...

  14. Inflammation in Achromobacter xylosoxidans infected cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Pressler, T.; Nielsen, K. G.;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection may cause conspicuous chronic pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Evolution in lung function was compared in chronically infected patients. Cytokine...

  15. Influence of neutrophil defects on Burkholderia cepacia complex pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Porter

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is a group of Gram-negative bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and have emerged as opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients. The primary patient populations infected with Bcc include individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF, as well as those with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD. While Bcc infection in CF is better characterized than in CGD, these two genetic diseases are not obviously similar and it is currently unknown if there is any commonality in host immune defects that is responsible for the susceptibility to Bcc. CF is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, resulting in manifestations in various organ systems, however the major cause of morbidity and mortality is currently due to bacterial respiratory infections. CGD, on the other hand, is a genetic disorder that is caused by defects in phagocyte NADPH oxidase. Because of the defect in CGD, phagocytes in these patients are unable to produce reactive oxygen species, which results in increased susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections. Despite this significant defect in microbial clearance, the spectrum of pathogens frequently implicated in infections in CGD is relatively narrow and includes some bacterial species that are considered almost pathognomonic for this disorder. Very little is known about the cause of the specific susceptibility to Bcc over other potential pathogens more prevalent in the environment, and a better understanding of specific mechanisms required for bacterial virulence has become a high priority. This review will summarize both the current knowledge and future directions related to Bcc virulence in immunocompromised individuals with a focus on the roles of bacterial factors and neutrophil defects in pathogenesis.

  16. Cloning and sequencing of the genes involved in glyphosate utilization by Pseudomonas pseudomallei.

    OpenAIRE

    Peñaloza-Vazquez, A; Mena, G L; Herrera-Estrella, L.; Bailey, A M

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-four strains of Pseudomonas pseudomallei isolated from soil were selected for their ability to degrade the phosphonate herbicide glyphosate. All strains tested were able to grow on glyphosate as the only phosphorus source without the addition of aromatic amino acids. One of these strains, P. pseudomallei 22, showed 50% glyphosate degradation in 40 h in glyphosate medium. From a genomic library of this strain constructed in pUC19, we have isolated a plasmid carrying a 3.0-kb DNA fragmen...

  17. Role of phages in the pathogenesis of Burkholderia or “Where are the toxin genes in Burkholderia phages?”

    OpenAIRE

    Summer, Elizabeth J.; Gill, Jason J.; Upton, Chris; Gonzalez, Carlos F.; Young, Ry

    2007-01-01

    Most bacteria of the genus Burkholderia are soil- and rhizosphere- associated, noted for their metabolic plasticity in the utilization of a wide range of organic compounds as carbon sources. Many Burkholderia species are also opportunistic human and plant pathogens and the distinction between environmental, plant, and human pathogens is not always clear. Burkholderia phages are not uncommon and multiple cryptic prophages are identifiable in the sequenced Burkholderia genomes. Phages have play...

  18. Binding of protegrin-1 to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrer Robert I

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia infections of cystic fibrosis patients' lungs are often resistant to conventional antibiotic therapy. Protegrins are antimicrobial peptides with potent activity against many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa. The present study evaluates the correlation between protegrin-1 (PG-1 sensitivity/resistance and protegrin binding in P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia. Methods The PG-1 sensitivity/resistance and PG-1 binding properties of P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia were assessed using radial diffusion assays, radioiodinated PG-1, and surface plasmon resonance (BiaCore. Results The six P. aeruginosa strains examined were very sensitive to PG-1, exhibiting minimal active concentrations from 0.0625–0.5 μg/ml in radial diffusion assays. In contrast, all five B. cepacia strains examined were greater than 10-fold to 100-fold more resistant, with minimal active concentrations ranging from 6–10 μg/ml. When incubated with a radioiodinated variant of PG-1, a sensitive P. aeruginosa strain bound considerably more protegrin molecules per cell than a resistant B. cepacia strain. Binding/diffusion and surface plasmon resonance assays revealed that isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipid A from the sensitive P. aeruginosa strains bound PG-1 more effectively than LPS and lipid A from resistant B. cepacia strains. Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that the relative resistance of B. cepacia to protegrin is due to a reduced number of PG-1 binding sites on the lipid A moiety of its LPS.

  19. Environmental Transmission of the Gut Symbiont Burkholderia to Phloem-Feeding Blissus insularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Buss, Eileen A; Boucias, Drion G

    2016-01-01

    The plant-phloem-feeding Blissus insularis possesses specialized midgut crypts, which harbor a dense population of the exocellular bacterial symbiont Burkholderia. Most individual B. insularis harbor a single Burkholderia ribotype in their midgut crypts; however, a diverse Burkholderia community exists within a host population. To understand the mechanism underlying the consistent occurrence of various Burkholderia in B. insularis and their specific association, we investigated potential gut symbiont transmission routes. PCR amplification detected a low titer of Burkholderia in adult reproductive tracts; however, fluorescence in situ hybridization assays failed to produce detectable signals in these tracts. Furthermore, no Burkholderia-specific PCR signals were detected in eggs and neonates, suggesting that it is unlikely that B. insularis prenatally transmits gut symbionts via ovarioles. In rearing experiments, most nymphs reared on St. Augustinegrass treated with cultured Burkholderia harbored the cultured Burkholderia strains. Burkholderia was detected in the untreated host grass of B. insularis, and most nymphs reared on untreated grass harbored a Burkholderia ribotype that was closely related to a plant-associated Burkholderia strain. These findings revealed that B. insularis neonates acquired Burkholderia primarily from the environment (i.e., plants and soils), even though the possibility of acquisition via egg surface cannot be excluded. In addition, our study explains how the diverse Burkholderia symbiont community in B. insularis populations can be maintained. PMID:27548682

  20. Chemistry and biology of the potent endotoxin from a Burkholderia dolosa clinical isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Flaviana Di; Sturiale, Luisa; Palmigiano, Angelo; Lembo-Fazio, Luigi; Paciello, Ida; Coutinho, Carla P; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Bernardini, MariaLina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Garozzo, Domenico; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio

    2013-06-17

    This is the first report of the chemical and biological properties of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) endotoxin isolated from Burkholderia dolosa IST4208, an isolate recovered from a cystic fibrosis (CF) patient in a Portuguese CF center. B. dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of closely related species that are highly problematic and opportunistic pathogens in CF. B. dolosa infection leads to accelerated loss of lung function and decreased survival. The structural determination of its endotoxin was achieved using a combination of chemistry and spectroscopy, and has revealed a novel endotoxin structure. The purified LOS was tested for its immunostimulatory activity on human HEK 293 cells expressing TLR-4, MD-2, and CD-14. In these assays, the LOS showed strong proinflammatory activity. PMID:23733445

  1. Passive Protection of Diabetic Rats with Antisera Specific for the Polysaccharide Portion of the Lipopolysaccharide Isolated from Pseudomonas pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, Larry E.; Wong, Sallene; Woods, Don E; Dance, David AB; Chaowagul, W.

    1994-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antisera raised to tetanus toxoid-conjugated polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide (lps) and purified lps of Pseudomonas pseudomallei that reacted with a collection of 41 strains of this bacterium from 23 patients are described. The common antigen recognized by these sera was within the polysaccharide component of the lps of the cells. The sera were specific for P pseudomallei in that none of 37 strains of other bacteria, including 20 Gram-negative and three Gram-posi...

  2. A Burkholderia Type VI Effector Deamidates Rho GTPases to Activate the Pyrin Inflammasome and Trigger Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Daniel F; Xu, Hao; Yang, Jieling; Shi, Xuyan; Gao, Wenqing; Li, Lin; Bisaro, Fabiana; Chen, She; Valvano, Miguel A; Shao, Feng

    2016-05-11

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen of the cystic fibrosis lung that elicits a strong inflammatory response. B. cenocepacia employs a type VI secretion system (T6SS) to survive in macrophages by disarming Rho-type GTPases, causing actin cytoskeletal defects. Here, we identified TecA, a non-VgrG T6SS effector responsible for actin disruption. TecA and other bacterial homologs bear a cysteine protease-like catalytic triad, which inactivates Rho GTPases by deamidating a conserved asparagine in the GTPase switch-I region. RhoA deamidation induces caspase-1 inflammasome activation, which is mediated by the familial Mediterranean fever disease protein Pyrin. In mouse infection, the deamidase activity of TecA is necessary and sufficient for B. cenocepacia-triggered lung inflammation and also protects mice from lethal B. cenocepacia infection. Therefore, Burkholderia TecA is a T6SS effector that modifies a eukaryotic target through an asparagine deamidase activity, which in turn elicits host cell death and inflammation through activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. PMID:27133449

  3. Understanding the direction of evolution in Burkholderia glumae through comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Hee; Park, Jungwook; Kim, Jinnyun; Park, Inmyoung; Seo, Young-Su

    2016-02-01

    Members of the genus Burkholderia occupy remarkably diverse niches, with genome sizes ranging from ~3.75 to 11.29 Mbp. The genome of Burkholderia glumae ranges in size from ~5.81 to 7.89 Mbp. Unlike other plant pathogenic bacteria, B. glumae can infect a wide range of monocot and dicot plants. Comparative genome analysis of B. glumae strains can provide insight into genome variation as well as differential features of whole metabolism or pathways between multiple strains of B. glumae infecting the same host. Comparative analysis of complete genomes among B. glumae BGR1, B. glumae LMG 2196, and B. glumae PG1 revealed the largest departmentalization of genes onto separate replicons in B. glumae BGR1 and considerable downsizing of the genome in B. glumae LMG 2196. In addition, the presence of large-scale evolutionary events such as rearrangement and inversion and the development of highly specialized systems were found to be related to virulence-associated features in the three B. glumae strains. This connection may explain why this bacterium broadens its host range and reinforces its interaction with hosts. PMID:26454852

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-0169 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available subunit [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pakistan 9] gb|EEH26464.1| putative DNA-directed RNA polymerase II, large subunit [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pakistan 9] ZP_03792652.1 2e-14 37% ...

  5. Versatility of the Burkholderia cepacia complex for the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides: a comparative structural investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Bruno; Herasimenka, Yury; Silipo, Alba; Lanzetta, Rosa; Liut, Gianfranco; Rizzo, Roberto; Cescutti, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia Complex assembles at least eighteen closely related species that are ubiquitous in nature. Some isolates show beneficial potential for biocontrol, bioremediation and plant growth promotion. On the contrary, other strains are pathogens for plants and immunocompromised individuals, like cystic fibrosis patients. In these subjects, they can cause respiratory tract infections sometimes characterised by fatal outcome. Most of the Burkholderia cepacia Complex species are mucoid when grown on a mannitol rich medium and they also form biofilms, two related characteristics, since polysaccharides are important component of biofilm matrices. Moreover, polysaccharides contribute to bacterial survival in a hostile environment by inhibiting both neutrophils chemotaxis and antimicrobial peptides activity, and by scavenging reactive oxygen species. The ability of these microorganisms to produce exopolysaccharides with different structures is testified by numerous articles in the literature. However, little is known about the type of polysaccharides produced in biofilms and their relationship with those obtained in non-biofilm conditions. The aim of this study was to define the type of exopolysaccharides produced by nine species of the Burkholderia cepacia Complex. Two isolates were then selected to compare the polysaccharides produced on agar plates with those formed in biofilms developed on cellulose membranes. The investigation was conducted using NMR spectroscopy, high performance size exclusion chromatography, and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The results showed that the Complex is capable of producing a variety of exopolysaccharides, most often in mixture, and that the most common exopolysaccharide is always cepacian. In addition, two novel polysaccharide structures were determined: one composed of mannose and rhamnose and another containing galactose and glucuronic acid. Comparison of exopolysaccharides obtained from cultures on

  6. Versatility of the Burkholderia cepacia complex for the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides: a comparative structural investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Cuzzi

    Full Text Available The Burkholderia cepacia Complex assembles at least eighteen closely related species that are ubiquitous in nature. Some isolates show beneficial potential for biocontrol, bioremediation and plant growth promotion. On the contrary, other strains are pathogens for plants and immunocompromised individuals, like cystic fibrosis patients. In these subjects, they can cause respiratory tract infections sometimes characterised by fatal outcome. Most of the Burkholderia cepacia Complex species are mucoid when grown on a mannitol rich medium and they also form biofilms, two related characteristics, since polysaccharides are important component of biofilm matrices. Moreover, polysaccharides contribute to bacterial survival in a hostile environment by inhibiting both neutrophils chemotaxis and antimicrobial peptides activity, and by scavenging reactive oxygen species. The ability of these microorganisms to produce exopolysaccharides with different structures is testified by numerous articles in the literature. However, little is known about the type of polysaccharides produced in biofilms and their relationship with those obtained in non-biofilm conditions. The aim of this study was to define the type of exopolysaccharides produced by nine species of the Burkholderia cepacia Complex. Two isolates were then selected to compare the polysaccharides produced on agar plates with those formed in biofilms developed on cellulose membranes. The investigation was conducted using NMR spectroscopy, high performance size exclusion chromatography, and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The results showed that the Complex is capable of producing a variety of exopolysaccharides, most often in mixture, and that the most common exopolysaccharide is always cepacian. In addition, two novel polysaccharide structures were determined: one composed of mannose and rhamnose and another containing galactose and glucuronic acid. Comparison of exopolysaccharides obtained

  7. Diagnostically and Experimentally Useful Panel of Strains from the Burkholderia cepacia Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Coenye, Tom; Chung, Jacqueline W.; Speert, David P.; Govan, John R. W.; Taylor, Peter; Vandamme, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Two new species, Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia vietnamiensis, and three genomovars (genomovars I, III, and IV) currently constitute the Burkholderia cepacia complex. A panel of 30 well-characterized strains representative of each genomovar and new species was assembled to assist with identification, epidemiological analysis, and virulence studies on this important group of opportunistic pathogens.

  8. Differentiation of Species Combined into the Burkholderia cepacia Complex and Related Taxa on the Basis of Their Fatty Acid Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Krejčí, Eva; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M.

    2006-01-01

    Using the established commercial system Sherlock (MIDI, Inc.), cellular fatty acid methyl ester analysis for differentiation among Burkholderia cepacia complex species was proven. The identification key based on the diagnostic fatty acids is able to discern phenotypically related Ralstonia pickettii and Pandoraea spp. and further distinguish Burkholderia pyrrocinia, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis.

  9. Microbiological and Epidemiological Features of Clinical Respiratory Isolates of Burkholderia gladioli▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segonds, Christine; Clavel-Batut, Patricia; Thouverez, Michelle; Grenet, Dominique; Le Coustumier, Alain; Plésiat, Patrick; Chabanon, Gérard

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia gladioli, primarily known as a plant pathogen, is involved in human infections, especially in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In the present study, the first respiratory isolates recovered from 14 French patients with CF and 4 French patients without CF, identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis, were tested for growth on B. cepacia selective media, for identification by commercial systems, and for their antimicrobial susceptibilities, and were compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Patients' data were collected. All 18 isolates grew on oxidation-fermentation-polymyxin B-bacitracin-lactose medium and Pseudomonas cepacia agar, but only 13 grew on Burkholderia cepacia selective agar. API 20NE strips did not differentiate B. gladioli from B. cepacia, whereas Vitek 2 GN cards correctly identified 15 isolates. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin, imipenem, aminoglycosides, and ciprofloxacin and were far less resistant to ticarcillin than B. cepacia complex organisms. Fifteen PFGE types were observed among the 18 isolates, but shared types were not identified among epidemiologically related patients. The microbiological follow-up of CF patients showed that colonization was persistent in 3 of 13 documented cases; B. gladioli was isolated from posttransplantation cultures of blood from 1 patient. Among the patients without CF, B. gladioli was associated with intubation (three cases) or bronchiectasis (one case). In summary, the inclusion of B. gladioli in the databases of commercial identification systems should improve the diagnostic capabilities of those systems. In CF patients, this organism is more frequently involved in transient infections than in chronic infections, but it may be responsible for complications posttransplantation; patient-to-patient transmission has not been demonstrated to date. Lastly, B. gladioli appears to be naturally susceptible to aminoglycosides and ciprofloxacin, although resistant isolates may emerge in

  10. Inhibition of Burkholderia multivorans Adhesion to Lung Epithelial Cells by Bivalent Lactosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinidad Velasco-Torrijos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is an opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients which is inherently resistant to antimicrobial agents. The mechanisms of attachment and pathogenesis of Bcc, a group of 17 species, are poorly understood. The most commonly identified Bcc species in newly colonised patients, Burkholderia multivorans, continues to be acquired from the environment. Development of therapies which can prevent or reduce the risk of colonization on exposure to Bcc in the environment would be a better alternative to antimicrobial agents. Previously, it has been shown that Bcc strains bound to many glycolipid receptors on lung epithelia. Using a real-time PCR method to quantify the levels of binding of B. multivorans to the lung epithelial cells, we have examined glycoconjugate derivatives for their potential to inhibit host cell attachment. Bivalent lactosides previously shown to inhibit galectin binding significantly reduced the attachment of B. multivorans to CF lung epithelial cells at micromolar concentrations. This was in contrast to monosaccharides and lactose, which were only effective in the millimolar range. Development of glycoconjugate therapies such as these, which inhibit attachment to lung epithelial cells, represent an alternative means of preventing infection with inherently antimicrobially resistant pathogens such as B. multivorans.

  11. Characterization of the Poly-β-1,6-N-Acetylglucosamine Polysaccharide Component of Burkholderia Biofilms ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Gawande, Purushottam V.; LoVetri, Karen; Cardona, Silvia T.; Romeo, Tony; Nitz, Mark; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated the production of poly-β-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide in the biofilms of Burkholderia multivorans, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Burkholderia ambifaria, Burkholderia cepacia, and Burkholderia cenocepacia using an immunoblot assay for PNAG. These results were confirmed by further studies, which showed that the PNAG hydrolase, dispersin B, eliminated immunoreactivity of extracts from the species that were tested (B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans). Dispersin B als...

  12. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Potential Hazards Exposure of employees to community and nosocomial infections, e.g., Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) . Nosocomial infections are infections that occur from exposure to infectious ...

  13. Postinfection Biological Control of Oomycete Pathogens of Pea by Burkholderia cepacia AMMDR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heungens, K; Parke, J L

    2001-04-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia cepacia AMMDR1 is a biocontrol agent that reduces Pythium damping-off and Aphanomyces root rot severity on peas in the field. We studied the effect of B. cepacia AMMDR1 on post-infection stages in the life cycles of these pathogens, including mycelial colonization of the host, production of oogonia, and production of secondary zoospore inoculum. We used Burkholderia cepacia 1324, a seed and rootcolonizing but antibiosis-deficient Tn5 mutant of B. cepacia AMMDR1, to study mechanisms of biological control other than antibiosis. B. cepacia AMMDR1 significantly reduced Pythium aphanidermatum postinfection colonization and damping-off of pea seeds, even when the bacteria were applied 12 h after zoospore inoculation. B. cepacia AMMDR1 also significantly reduced colonization of taproots by Aphanomyces euteiches mycelium, but only when the bacteria were applied at high population densities at the site of zoospore inoculation. The antibiosisdeficient mutant, B. cepacia 1324, had no effect on mycelial colonization of seeds or roots by Pythium aphanidermatum nor A. euteiches, suggesting that antibiosis is the primary mechanism of biological control. B. cepacia AMMDR1, but not B. cepacia 1324, reduced production of A. euteiches oogonia. This effect occurred even when the population size of B. cepacia AMMDR1 was too small to cause a reduction in lesion length early on in the infection process and may result from in situ antibiotic production. B. cepacia AMMDR1 had no effect on the production of secondary zoospores of A. euteiches from infected roots. The main effects of B. cepacia AMMDR1 on postinfection stages in the life cycles of these pathogens therefore were reductions in mycelial colonization by Pythium aphanidermatum and in formation of oogonia by A. euteiches. No mechanism other than antibiosis could be identified. PMID:18943851

  14. Phenotypic Characterization of a Novel Virulence-Factor Deletion Strain of Burkholderia mallei That Provides Partial Protection against Inhalational Glanders in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bozue, Joel A.; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Amemiya, Kei; Chua, Jennifer; Cote, Christopher K.; Toothman, Ronald G.; Dankmeyer, Jennifer L.; Klimko, Christopher P.; Wilhelmsen, Catherine L; Raymond, Jolynn W.; Zavaljevski, Nela; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei (Bm) is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes i...

  15. The Type IV Pilin of Burkholderia mallei Is Highly Immunogenic but Fails To Protect against Lethal Aerosol Challenge in a Murine Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Paula J.; Guo, Qin; Waag, David M.; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the cause of glanders and a proven biological weapon. We identified and purified the type IV pilin protein of this organism to study its potential as a subunit vaccine. We found that purified pilin was highly immunogenic. Furthermore, mice infected via sublethal aerosol challenge developed significant increases in titers of antibody against the pilin, suggesting that it is expressed in vivo. Nevertheless, we found no evidence that high-titer antipilin antisera provided ...

  16. Stress conditions triggering mucoid morphotype variation in Burkholderia species and effect on virulence in Galleria mellonella and biofilm formation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês N Silva

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc bacteria are opportunistic pathogens causing chronic respiratory infections particularly among cystic fibrosis patients. During these chronic infections, mucoid-to-nonmucoid morphotype variation occurs, with the two morphotypes exhibiting different phenotypic properties. Here we show that in vitro, the mucoid clinical isolate Burkholderia multivorans D2095 gives rise to stable nonmucoid variants in response to prolonged stationary phase, presence of antibiotics, and osmotic and oxidative stresses. Furthermore, in vitro colony morphotype variation within other members of the Burkholderia genus occurred in Bcc and non-Bcc strains, irrespectively of their clinical or environmental origin. Survival to starvation and iron limitation was comparable for the mucoid parental isolate and the respective nonmucoid variant, while susceptibility to antibiotics and to oxidative stress was increased in the nonmucoid variants. Acute infection of Galleria mellonella larvae showed that, in general, the nonmucoid variants were less virulent than the respective parental mucoid isolate, suggesting a role for the exopolysaccharide in virulence. In addition, most of the tested nonmucoid variants produced more biofilm biomass than their respective mucoid parental isolate. As biofilms are often associated with increased persistence of pathogens in the CF lungs and are an indicative of different cell-to-cell interactions, it is possible that the nonmucoid variants are better adapted to persist in this host environment.

  17. Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria beyond legumes: Burkholderia in Rubiaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brecht Verstraete

    Full Text Available Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria not only occur in root nodules of legumes but are also found in leaves of certain Rubiaceae. The discovery of bacteria in plants formerly not implicated in endosymbiosis suggests a wider occurrence of plant-microbe interactions. Several ß-proteobacteria of the genus Burkholderia are detected in close association with tropical plants. This interaction has occurred three times independently, which suggest a recent and open plant-bacteria association. The presence or absence of Burkholderia endophytes is consistent on genus level and therefore implies a predictive value for the discovery of bacteria. Only a single Burkholderia species is found in association with a given plant species. However, the endophyte species are promiscuous and can be found in association with several plant species. Most of the endophytes are part of the plant-associated beneficial and environmental group, but others are closely related to B. glathei. This soil bacteria, together with related nodulating and non-nodulating endophytes, is therefore transferred to a newly defined and larger PBE group within the genus Burkholderia.

  18. Burkholderia: an update on taxonomy and biotechnological potential as antibiotic producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoorter, Eliza; Bull, Matt J; Peeters, Charlotte; Coenye, Tom; Vandamme, Peter; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia is an incredibly diverse and versatile Gram-negative genus, within which over 80 species have been formally named and multiple other genotypic groups likely represent new species. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and core genome ribosomal multilocus sequence typing analysis indicates the presence of at least three major clades within the genus. Biotechnologically, Burkholderia are well-known for their bioremediation and biopesticidal properties. Within this review, we explore the ability of Burkholderia to synthesise a wide range of antimicrobial compounds ranging from historically characterised antifungals to recently described antibacterial antibiotics with activity against multiresistant clinical pathogens. The production of multiple Burkholderia antibiotics is controlled by quorum sensing and examples of quorum sensing pathways found across the genus are discussed. The capacity for antibiotic biosynthesis and secondary metabolism encoded within Burkholderia genomes is also evaluated. Overall, Burkholderia demonstrate significant biotechnological potential as a source of novel antibiotics and bioactive secondary metabolites. PMID:27115756

  19. Removal of Burkholderia cepacia biofilms with oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, D. W.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Iodine is used to disinfect the water system aboard US space shuttles and is the anticipated biocide for the international space station. Water quality on spacecraft must be maintained at the highest possible levels for the safety of the crew. Furthermore, the treatment process used to maintain the quality of water on research must be robust and operate for long periods with minimal crew intervention. Biofilms are recalcitrant and pose a major threat with regard to chronic contamination of spacecraft water systems. We measured the effectiveness of oxidizing biocides on the removal and regrowth of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia biofilms. B. cepacia, isolated from the water distribution system of the space shuttle Discovery, was grown in continuous culture to produce a bacterial contamination source for biofilm formation and removal studies. A 10(7) CFU ml-1 B. cepacia suspension, in distilled water, was used to form biofilms on 3000 micrometers2 glass surfaces. Rates of attachment were measured directly with image analysis and were found to be 7.8, 15.2, and 22.8 attachment events h-1 for flow rates of 20.7, 15.2, and 9.8 ml min-1, respectively. After 18 h of formation, the B. cepacia biofilms were challenged with oxidants (ozone, chlorine, and iodine) and the rates of biofilm removal determined by image analysis. Fifty percent of the biofilm material was removed in the first hour of continous treatment with 24 mg l-1 chlorine or 2 mg l-1 ozone. Iodine (48 mg l-1) did not remove any measurable cellular material after 6 h continuous contact. After this first removal of biofilms by the oxidants, the surface was allowed to refoul and was again treated with the biocide. Iodine was the only compound that was unable to remove cellular debris from either primary or secondary biofilms. Moreover, treating primary biofilms with iodine increased the rate of formation of secondary biofilms, from 4.4 to 5.8 attachment events h-1. All the oxidants tested inactivated the B

  20. Diabetes does not influence activation of coagulation, fibrinolysis or anticoagulant pathways in Gram-negative sepsis (melioidosis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.C.K.W. Koh; J.C.M. Meijers; R.R. Maude; D. Limmathurotsakul; N.P.J. Day; S.J. Peacock; T. van der Poll; W.J. Wiersinga

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a disturbance of the haemostatic balance and is an important risk factor for sepsis, but the influence of diabetes on the pathogenesis of sepsis remains unclear. Melioidosis (Burkholderia pseudomallei infection) is a common cause of community-acquired sepsis in Southeast

  1. Development of a recA Gene-Based Identification Approach for the Entire Burkholderia Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, George W.; Vandamme, Peter; Morgan, Sara H.; LiPuma, John J.; Coenye, Tom; Weightman, Andrew J.; Jones, T. Hefin; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2005-01-01

    Burkholderia is an important bacterial genus containing species of ecological, biotechnological, and pathogenic interest. With their taxonomy undergoing constant revision and the phenotypic similarity of several species, correct identification of Burkholderia is difficult. A genetic scheme based on the recA gene has greatly enhanced the identification of Burkholderia cepacia complex species. However, the PCR developed for the latter approach was limited by its specificity for the complex. By ...

  2. Species Distribution and Ribotype Diversity of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Isolates from French Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Brisse, Sylvain; Cordevant, Christophe; Vandamme, Peter; Bidet, Philippe; Loukil, Chawki; Chabanon, Gérard; Lange, Marc; Bingen, Edouard

    2004-01-01

    A total of 153 Burkholderia cepacia strains obtained from 153 French patients with cystic fibrosis were identified as Burkholderia multivorans (51.6%) or Burkholderia cenocepacia (45.1%). Eighty-two genotypes were identified using PvuII and EcoRI ribotyping. B. multivorans genotype A (found in 32 French patients) and two other genotypes were also identified among isolates from Austrian, German, Italian, and Canadian patients.

  3. Molecular Method To Assess the Diversity of Burkholderia Species in Environmental Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Salles, J; Souza, de, H.R.; Elsas, van, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    In spite of the importance of many members of the genus Burkholderia in the soil microbial community, no direct method to assess the diversity of this genus has been developed so far. The aim of this work was the development of soil DNA-based PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), a powerful tool for studying the diversity of microbial communities, for detection and analysis of the Burkholderia diversity in soil samples. Primers specific for the genus Burkholderia were developed ...

  4. Members of the genus Burkholderia: good and bad guys [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Leo Eberl; Peter Vandamme

    2016-01-01

    In the 1990s several biocontrol agents on that contained Burkholderia strains were registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). After risk assessment these products were withdrawn from the market and a moratorium was placed on the registration of Burkholderia-containing products, as these strains may pose a risk to human health. However, over the past few years the number of novel Burkholderia species that exhibit plant-beneficial properties and are normally not isol...

  5. Effect of agricultural management regime on Burkholderia community structure in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, J F; van Elsas, J D; van Veen, J A

    2006-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the Burkholderia community structure associated with areas under different agricultural management and to evaluate to which extent this community structure is affected by changes in agricultural management. Two fields with distinct soil history (arable land and permanent grassland) were exposed to three agricultural management regimes (crop rotation, maize monoculture, and grassland). By using a culture-independent approach, based on a Burkholderia-specific polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis system, it was possible to observe the conversion of Burkholderia communities typical for permanent grassland to those of arable land after four consecutive years. However, the time needed to achieve the reverse transition, i.e., converting the Burkholderia community associated with arable land to that of grassland, was beyond the duration of the field experiment. In addition, by applying principal response curves, the direction and extent of the conversion from grassland to arable land (maize monoculture and to crop rotation) were determined. Hence, the results suggested that agricultural practices, such as fertilization and tillage, were more effective in changing the Burkholderia community structure than agricultural management regime. To determine the effect of agricultural management on the Burkholderia population with biocontrol abilities, the culturable fraction of the Burkholderia community was assessed. The areas under permanent grassland and grassland converted to maize monoculture had the highest percentages of Burkholderia strains with antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani AG-3, mainly Burkholderia pyrrocinia and Burkholderia sp. LMG 22929. The isolation frequency of antagonistic isolates from arable land was extremely low. Our results indicate that (changes in) agricultural management, mainly crop rotation, affect the frequency of isolation of antagonistic Burkholderia

  6. Host immunity in the protective response to vaccination with heat-killed Burkholderia mallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paessler Slobodan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed initial cell, cytokine and complement depletion studies to investigate the possible role of these effectors in response to vaccination with heat-killed Burkholderia mallei in a susceptible BALB/c mouse model of infection. Results While protection with heat-killed bacilli did not result in sterilizing immunity, limited protection was afforded against an otherwise lethal infection and provided insight into potential host protective mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that mice depleted of either B cells, TNF-α or IFN-γ exhibited decreased survival rates, indicating a role for these effectors in obtaining partial protection from a lethal challenge by the intraperitoneal route. Additionally, complement depletion had no effect on immunoglobulin production when compared to non-complement depleted controls infected intranasally. Conclusion The data provide a basis for future studies of protection via vaccination using either subunit or whole-organism vaccine preparations from lethal infection in the experimental BALB/c mouse model. The results of this study demonstrate participation of B220+ cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α in protection following HK vaccination.

  7. The Burkholderia Genome Database: facilitating flexible queries and comparative analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Khaira, Bhavjinder; Van Rossum, Thea; Lo, Raymond; Whiteside, Matthew D.; Fiona S.L. Brinkman

    2008-01-01

    Summary: As the genome sequences of multiple strains of a given bacterial species are obtained, more generalized bacterial genome databases may be complemented by databases that are focused on providing more information geared for a distinct bacterial phylogenetic group and its associated research community. The Burkholderia Genome Database represents a model for such a database, providing a powerful, user-friendly search and comparative analysis interface that contains features not found in ...

  8. Methods for genetic manipulation of Burkholderia gladioli pathovar cocovenenans

    OpenAIRE

    Karkhoff-Schweizer RoxAnn R; McMillan Ian; Somprasong Nawarat; Mongkolsuk Skorn; Schweizer Herbert P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Burkholderia gladioli pathovar cocovenenans (BGC) is responsible for sporadic food-poisoning outbreaks with high morbidity and mortality in Asian countries. Little is known about the regulation of virulence factor and toxin production in BGC, and studies in this bacterium have been hampered by lack of genetic tools. Findings Establishment of a comprehensive antibiotic susceptibility profile showed that BGC strain ATCC33664 is susceptible to a number of antibiotics includin...

  9. Cytotoxicity Associated with Trichloroethylene Oxidation in Burkholderia cepacia G4

    OpenAIRE

    Yeager, Chris M.; Bottomley, Peter J; Arp, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) oxidation on toluene 2-monooxygenase activity, general respiratory activity, and cell culturability were examined in the toluene-oxidizing bacterium Burkholderia cepacia G4. Nonspecific damage outpaced inactivation of toluene 2-monooxygenase in B. cepacia G4 cells. Cells that had degraded approximately 0.5 μmol of TCE (mg of cells−1) lost 95% of their acetate-dependent O2 uptake activity (a measure of general respiratory activity), yet toluene-dependent ...

  10. Dissecting novel virulent determinants in the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    OpenAIRE

    George P Tegos; Haynes, Mark K.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2012-01-01

    Prevention and control of infectious diseases remains a major public health challenge and a number of highly virulent pathogens are emerging both in and beyond the hospital setting. Despite beneficial aspects such as use in biocontrol and bioremediation exhibited by members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) some members of this group have recently gained attention as significant bacterial pathogens due to their high levels of intrinsic antibiotic resistance, transmissibility in nosoco...

  11. Symbiotic ß-Proteobacteria beyond Legumes: Burkholderia in Rubiaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Brecht Verstraete; Steven Janssens; Erik Smets; Steven Dessein

    2013-01-01

    Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria not only occur in root nodules of legumes but are also found in leaves of certain Rubiaceae. The discovery of bacteria in plants formerly not implicated in endosymbiosis suggests a wider occurrence of plant-microbe interactions. Several ß-proteobacteria of the genus Burkholderia are detected in close association with tropical plants. This interaction has occurred three times independently, which suggest a recent and open plant-bacteria association. The presence or a...

  12. Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 escapes to the cytosol and actively subverts autophagy in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Marshall-Batty, Kimberly; Nair, Vinod; Ding, Li; Greenberg, David E; Fraser, Iain D C

    2014-03-01

    Selective autophagy functions to specifically degrade cellular cargo tagged by ubiquitination, including bacteria. Strains of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are opportunistic pathogens that cause life-threatening infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). While there is evidence that defective macrophage autophagy in a mouse model of CF can influence B. cenocepacia susceptibility, there have been no comprehensive studies on how this bacterium is sensed and targeted by the host autophagy response in human macrophages. Here, we describe the intracellular life cycle of B. cenocepacia J2315 and its interaction with the autophagy pathway in human cells. Electron and confocal microscopy analyses demonstrate that the invading bacteria interact transiently with the endocytic pathway before escaping to the cytosol. This escape triggers theselective autophagy pathway, and the recruitment of ubiquitin, the ubiquitin-binding adaptors p62 and NDP52 and the autophagosome membrane-associated protein LC3B, to the bacterial vicinity. However, despite recruitment of these key autophagy pathway effectors, B. cenocepacia blocks autophagosome completion and replicates in the host cytosol. We find that a pre-infection increase in cellular autophagy flux can significantly inhibit B. cenocepacia replication and that lower autophagy flux in macrophages from immunocompromised CGD patients could contribute to increased B. cenocepacia susceptibility, identifying autophagy manipulation as a potential therapeutic approach to reduce bacterial burden in B. cenocepacia infections. PMID:24119232

  13. Investigation into the susceptibility of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates to photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Watters, A. L.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    The main cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) sufferers is progressive pulmonary damage caused by recurrent and often unremitting respiratory tract infection. Causative organisms include Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenzae, but in recent years the Burkholderia cepacia complex has come to the fore. This group of highly drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are associated with a rapid decline in lung function and the often fatal cepacia syndrome, with treatment limited to patient segregation and marginally effective antibacterial regimens. Thus, development of an effective treatment is of the upmost importance. PACT, a non-target specific therapy, has proven successful in killing both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, planktonic cultures of six strains of the B. cepacia complex were irradiated (635 nm, 200 J cm-2,10 minutes irradiation) following 30 seconds incubation with methylene blue (MB) or meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP). Rates of kill of > 99 % were achieved with MB- and TMP-PACT. A MB concentration of 50 μg ml-1 and TMP concentration of 500 μg ml-1 were associated with highest percentage kills for each photosensitizer. PACT is an attractive option for treatment of B.cepacia complex infection. Further study, involving biofilm culture susceptibility, delivery of light to the target and in vivo testing will be necessary before it PACT becomes a viable treatment option for CF patients who are colonised or infected with B. cepacia complex.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Organophosphorus Compound-Degrading Burkholderia zhejiangensis Strain CEIB S4-3

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia species are widely distributed in the environment. A Burkholderia zhejiangensis strain was isolated from pesticide-contaminated soil from an agricultural field in Mexico and identified as an organophosphorus compound-degrading bacterium. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia zhejiangensis strain CEIB S4-3.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Lignin-Degrading Burkholderia sp. Strain LIG30, Isolated from Wet Tropical Forest Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Hannah L.; Utturkar, Sagar; Klingeman, Dawn; Simmons, Blake A.; DeAngelis, Kristen M; Brown, Steven D.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia species are common soil Betaproteobacteria capable of degrading recalcitrant aromatic compounds and xenobiotics. Burkholderia sp. strain LIG30 was isolated from wet tropical forest soil and is capable of utilizing lignin as a sole carbon source. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain LIG30.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-2, a Methyl Parathion- and p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium, Isolated from Agricultural Soils in Morelos, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Fernández López, Maikel Gilberto; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, M. Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Villalobos-López, Miguel A.; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that belongs to Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2 was isolated from agricultural soils in Morelos, Mexico, and previously has shown its abilities for bioremediation. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-2, a Methyl Parathion- and p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium, Isolated from Agricultural Soils in Morelos, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Fernández López, Maikel Gilberto; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, M Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Villalobos-López, Miguel A; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that belongs to Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2 was isolated from agricultural soils in Morelos, Mexico, and previously has shown its abilities for bioremediation. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2. PMID:27125479

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-2, a Methyl Parathion- and p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium, Isolated from Agricultural Soils in Morelos, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Fernández López, Maikel Gilberto; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, M. Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Villalobos-López, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that belongs to Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2 was isolated from agricultural soils in Morelos, Mexico, and previously has shown its abilities for bioremediation. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2. PMID:27125479

  19. Eradication and phenotypic tolerance of Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilms exposed to atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshraiedeh, Nida H; Higginbotham, Sarah; Flynn, Padrig B; Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y; Tunney, Michael M; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2016-06-01

    Chronic lung infection with bacteria from the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), and in particular B. cenocepacia, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). B. cenocepacia can spread from person to person and exhibits intrinsic broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. Recently, atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas (APNTPs) have gained increasing attention as a novel approach to the prevention and treatment of a variety of hospital-acquired infections. In this study, we evaluated an in-house-designed kHz-driven plasma source for the treatment of biofilms of a number of clinical CF B. cenocepacia isolates. The results demonstrated that APNTP is an effective and efficient tool for the eradication of B. cenocepacia biofilms but that efficacy is highly variable across different isolates. Determination of phenotypic differences between isolates in an attempt to understand variability in plasma tolerance revealed that isolates which are highly tolerant to APNTP typically produce biofilms of greater biomass than their more sensitive counterparts. This indicates a potential role for biofilm matrix components in biofilm tolerance to APNTP exposure. Furthermore, significant isolate-dependent differences in catalase activity in planktonic bacteria positively correlated with phenotypic resistance to APNTP by isolates grown in biofilms. PMID:27179816

  20. Biosynthesis of antifungal and antibacterial polyketides by Burkholderia gladioli in coculture with Rhizopus microsporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Claudia; Opel, Viktoria; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Fungi-bacteria interactions can impact the course of fungal infection and biotechnological use. The mucoralean fungus Rhizopus microsporus, traditionally used in food fermentations (tempe and sufu), is frequently accompanied by Burkholderia gladioli pv. cocovenenans. When producing tempe bongkrek, the bacterial contamination can lead to lethal food-related intoxications caused by the respiratory toxin bongkrekic acid. To unveil the metabolic potential of the fungus-associated bacterium, we sequenced its genome, assigned secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters and monitored the metabolic profile under various growth conditions. In addition to the bongkrekic acid biosynthesis gene cluster we found gene clusters coding for the biosynthesis of toxoflavin and a complex polyketide. The orphan polyketide synthase gene cluster was activated under conditions that emulate tempe production, which enabled isolation and structure elucidation of four members of the enacyloxin family of antibiotics, out of which one is new. Moreover, we found that the fungus positively influences the growth of the bacteria and dramatically increases bongkrekic acid production in stationary culture, which inhibits the growth of the fungus. These results showcase the context-dependent formation of antifungal and antibacterial agents at the fungal-bacterial interface, which may also serve as a model for scenarios observed in mixed infections. PMID:25250879

  1. Genomic analysis and relatedness of P2-like phages of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Jonathan J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is comprised of at least seventeen Gram-negative species that cause infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Because BCC bacteria are broadly antibiotic resistant, phage therapy is currently being investigated as a possible alternative treatment for these infections. The purpose of our study was to sequence and characterize three novel BCC-specific phages: KS5 (vB_BceM-KS5 or vB_BmuZ-ATCC 17616, KS14 (vB_BceM-KS14 and KL3 (vB_BamM-KL3 or vB_BceZ-CEP511. Results KS5, KS14 and KL3 are myoviruses with the A1 morphotype. The genomes of these phages are between 32317 and 40555 base pairs in length and are predicted to encode between 44 and 52 proteins. These phages have over 50% of their proteins in common with enterobacteria phage P2 and so can be classified as members of the Peduovirinae subfamily and the "P2-like viruses" genus. The BCC phage proteins similar to those encoded by P2 are predominantly structural components involved in virion morphogenesis. As prophages, KS5 and KL3 integrate into an AMP nucleosidase gene and a threonine tRNA gene, respectively. Unlike other P2-like viruses, the KS14 prophage is maintained as a plasmid. The P2 E+E' translational frameshift site is conserved among these three phages and so they are predicted to use frameshifting for expression of two of their tail proteins. The lysBC genes of KS14 and KL3 are similar to those of P2, but in KS5 the organization of these genes suggests that they may have been acquired via horizontal transfer from a phage similar to λ. KS5 contains two sequence elements that are unique among these three phages: an ISBmu2-like insertion sequence and a reverse transcriptase gene. KL3 encodes an EcoRII-C endonuclease/methylase pair and Vsr endonuclease that are predicted to function during the lytic cycle to cleave non-self DNA, protect the phage genome and repair methylation-induced mutations. Conclusions KS5, KS14 and KL3 are the

  2. Burkholderia glumae EN EL CULTIVO DE ARROZ EN COSTA RICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Quesada-Gonz\\u00E1lez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae en el cultivo de arroz en Costa Rica. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la presencia de Burkholderia glumae en arroz en Costa Rica. La bacteria Burkholderia glumae está asociada al cultivo del arroz en el que provoca la enfermedad llamada añublo bacterial. Bajo condiciones ambientales favorables, la densidad bacteriana aumenta, lo que provoca que, bajo un sistema de regulación denominado quorum sensing, se expresen sus mecanismos de virulencia mediante la activación de genes responsables para la síntesis de la toxoflavina, que bloquea el flujo de nutrientes, para la biogénesis de flagelos y la respuesta quimiotáctica, y la producción de la enzima catalasa. Las plantas desarrollan la sintomatología que finalmente conlleva a un vaneamiento del grano provocando pérdidas económicas importantes. Se investigó la situación referente a la contaminación del grano de arroz causado por esta bacteria en Costa Rica durante los años 2009 y 2010, mediante un convenio entre la Corporación Nacional Arrocera y el Laboratorio de Fitopatología del Centro de Investigación en Protección de Cultivos de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Se usó la metodología de PCR de punto final recomendada por investigadores del Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical en Colombia y se reforzó la identificación, por medio de técnicas de microbiología convencional. Se obtuvieron resultados que indican la presencia de la bacteria en Costa Rica, la primera información sobre la prevalencia de un fitopatógeno bacteriano de gran importancia para el sector arrocero.

  3. Exploring the HME and HAE1 efflux systems in the genus Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasca Maria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Burkholderia includes a variety of species with opportunistic human pathogenic strains, whose increasing global resistance to antibiotics has become a public health problem. In this context a major role could be played by multidrug efflux pumps belonging to Resistance Nodulation Cell-Division (RND family, which allow bacterial cells to extrude a wide range of different substrates, including antibiotics. This study aims to i identify rnd genes in the 21 available completely sequenced Burkholderia genomes, ii analyze their phylogenetic distribution, iii define the putative function(s that RND proteins perform within the Burkholderia genus and iv try tracing the evolutionary history of some of these genes in Burkholderia. Results BLAST analysis of the 21 Burkholderia sequenced genomes, using experimentally characterized ceoB sequence (one of the RND family counterpart in the genus Burkholderia as probe, allowed the assembly of a dataset comprising 254 putative RND proteins. An extensive phylogenetic analysis revealed the occurrence of several independent events of gene loss and duplication across the different lineages of the genus Burkholderia, leading to notable differences in the number of paralogs between different genomes. A putative substrate [antibiotics (HAE1 proteins/heavy-metal (HME proteins] was also assigned to the majority of these proteins. No correlation was found between the ecological niche and the lifestyle of Burkholderia strains and the number/type of efflux pumps they possessed, while a relation can be found with genome size and taxonomy. Remarkably, we observed that only HAE1 proteins are mainly responsible for the different number of proteins observed in strains of the same species. Data concerning both the distribution and the phylogenetic analysis of the HAE1 and HME in the Burkholderia genus allowed depicting a likely evolutionary model accounting for the evolution and spreading of HME and HAE

  4. A sensor kinase recognizing the cell-cell signal BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) regulates virulence in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, Y.; Yang, Liang; Twomey, K.B.;

    2010-01-01

    P>Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF) as a quorum-sensing signal to control expression of virulence factors. BDSF is a signal molecule of the diffusible signal factor (DSF) family that was first described in the plant pathogen...... input domain of RpfC was active in BDSF signal perception when expressed in X. campestris. Mutation of BCAM0227 gave rise to reduced cytotoxicity to Chinese hamster ovary cells and reduced virulence to Wax moth larvae and in the agar-bead mouse model of pulmonary infection. The findings identify BCAM......0227 as a novel BDSF sensor and a potential target for interference in virulence-related signalling in B. cenocepacia....

  5. Burkholderia cepacia lipase is a promising biocatalyst for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, Francesco; Natalello, Antonino; Castoldi, Simone; Lotti, Marina; Santambrogio, Carlo; Grandori, Rita

    2016-07-01

    Lipases resistant to inhibition and denaturation by methanol are valuable tools for biotechnological applications, in particular for biofuel production. Microbial lipases have attracted a great deal of interest because of their stability at high concentrations of organic solvents. Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) is tested here for robustness towards methanol in terms of conformational stability and catalytic activity in transesterification assays. This lipase turns out to be even more tolerant than the homologous and better characterized enzyme from Burkholderia glumae. BCL unfolding transition, as monitored by far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and intrinsic fluorescence, displays a Tm above 60°C in the presence of 50% methanol. The protein unfolds at low pH, and the organic solvent affects the nature of the denatured state under acidic conditions. The protein performs well in transesterification assays upon prolonged incubations at high methanol concentrations. BCL is highly tolerant to methanol and displays particularly high conformational stability under conditions employed for transesterification reactions. These features depict BCL as a promising enzyme for biofuel industry. PMID:27067648

  6. Genotyping of Burkholderia mallei from an Outbreak of Glanders in Bahrain Suggests Multiple Introduction Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstra, Heidie; Projahn, Michaela; Terzioglu, Rahime; Wernery, Renate; Georgi, Enrico; Riehm, Julia M.; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul S.; Joseph, Marina; Johnson, Bobby; Kinne, Joerg; Jose, Shanti; Hepp, Crystal M.; Witte, Angela; Wernery, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Background Glanders, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia mallei, is a highly infectious zoonotic disease of solipeds causing severe disease in animals and men. Although eradicated from many Western countries, it recently emerged in Asia, the Middle-East, Africa, and South America. Due to its rareness, little is known about outbreak dynamics of the disease and its epidemiology. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated a recent outbreak of glanders in Bahrain by applying high resolution genotyping (multiple locus variable number of tandem repeats, MLVA) and comparative whole genome sequencing to B. mallei isolated from infected horses and a camel. These results were compared to samples obtained from an outbreak in the United Arab Emirates in 2004, and further placed into a broader phylogeographic context based on previously published B. mallei data. The samples from the outbreak in Bahrain separated into two distinct clusters, suggesting a complex epidemiological background and evidence for the involvement of multiple B. mallei strains. Additionally, the samples from Bahrain were more closely related to B. mallei isolated from horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004 than other B. mallei which is suggestive of repeated importation to the region from similar geographic sources. Conclusion/Significance High-resolution genotyping and comparative whole genome analysis revealed the same phylogenetic patterns among our samples. The close relationship of the Dubai/UAE B. mallei populations to each other may be indicative of a similar geographic origin that has yet to be identified for the infecting strains. The recent emergence of glanders in combination with worldwide horse trading might pose a new risk for human infections. PMID:25255232

  7. Transport of nanoparticles and tobramycin-loaded liposomes in Burkholderia cepacia complex biofilms.

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    Anne-Sophie Messiaen

    Full Text Available Due to the intrinsic resistance of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc to many antibiotics and the production of a broad range of virulence factors, lung infections by these bacteria, primarily occurring in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, are very difficult to treat. In addition, the ability of Bcc organisms to form biofilms contributes to their persistence in the CF lung. As Bcc infections are associated with poor clinical outcome, there is an urgent need for new effective therapies to treat these infections. In the present study, we investigated whether liposomal tobramycin displayed an increased anti-biofilm effect against Bcc bacteria compared to free tobramycin. Single particle tracking (SPT was used to study the transport of positively and negatively charged nanospheres in Bcc biofilms as a model for the transport of liposomes. Negatively charged nanospheres became immobilized in close proximity of biofilm cell clusters, while positively charged nanospheres interacted with fiber-like structures, probably eDNA. Based on these data, encapsulation of tobramycin in negatively charged liposomes appeared promising for targeted drug delivery. However, the anti-biofilm effect of tobramycin encapsulated into neutral or anionic liposomes did not increase compared to that of free tobramycin. Probably, the fusion of the anionic liposomes with the negatively charged bacterial surface of Bcc bacteria was limited by electrostatic repulsive forces. The lack of a substantial anti-biofilm effect of tobramycin encapsulated in neutral liposomes could be further investigated by increasing the liposomal tobramycin concentration. However, this was hampered by the low encapsulation efficiency of tobramycin in these liposomes.

  8. A Pipeline for Screening Small Molecules with Growth Inhibitory Activity against Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Selin

    Full Text Available Infections with the bacteria Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc are very difficult to eradicate in cystic fibrosis patients due the intrinsic resistance of Bcc to most available antibiotics and the emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains during antibiotic treatment. In this work, we used a whole-cell based assay to screen a diverse collection of small molecules for growth inhibitors of a relevant strain of Bcc, B. cenocepacia K56-2. The primary screen used bacterial growth in 96-well plate format and identified 206 primary actives among 30,259 compounds. From 100 compounds with no previous record of antibacterial activity secondary screening and data mining selected a total of Bce bioactives that were further analyzed. An experimental pipeline, evaluating in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, toxicity and in vivo antibacterial activity using C. elegans was used for prioritizing compounds with better chances to be further investigated as potential Bcc antibacterial drugs. This high throughput screen, along with the in vitro and in vivo analysis highlights the utility of this experimental method to quickly identify bioactives as a starting point of antibacterial drug discovery.

  9. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence. PMID:27597847

  10. Discovery of new diketopiperazines inhibiting Burkholderia cenocepacia quorum sensing in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffone, Viola C; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Makarov, Vadim; Brackman, Gilles; Israyilova, Aygun; Azzalin, Alberto; Forneris, Federico; Riabova, Olga; Savina, Svetlana; Coenye, Tom; Riccardi, Giovanna; Buroni, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, an opportunistic respiratory pathogen particularly relevant for cystic fibrosis patients, is difficult to eradicate due to its high level of resistance to most clinically relevant antimicrobials. Consequently, the discovery of new antimicrobials as well as molecules capable of inhibiting its virulence is mandatory. In this regard quorum sensing (QS) represents a good target for anti-virulence therapies, as it has been linked to biofilm formation and is important for the production of several virulence factors, including proteases and siderophores. Here, we report the discovery of new diketopiperazine inhibitors of the B. cenocepacia acyl homoserine lactone synthase CepI, and report their anti-virulence properties. Out of ten different compounds assayed against recombinant CepI, four were effective inhibitors, with IC50 values in the micromolar range. The best compounds interfered with protease and siderophore production, as well as with biofilm formation, and showed good in vivo activity in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. These molecules were also tested in human cells and showed very low toxicity. Therefore, they could be considered for in vivo combined treatments with established or novel antimicrobials, to improve the current therapeutic strategies against B. cenocepacia. PMID:27580679

  11. Discovery of new diketopiperazines inhibiting Burkholderia cenocepacia quorum sensing in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffone, Viola C.; Chiarelli, Laurent R.; Makarov, Vadim; Brackman, Gilles; Israyilova, Aygun; Azzalin, Alberto; Forneris, Federico; Riabova, Olga; Savina, Svetlana; Coenye, Tom; Riccardi, Giovanna; Buroni, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, an opportunistic respiratory pathogen particularly relevant for cystic fibrosis patients, is difficult to eradicate due to its high level of resistance to most clinically relevant antimicrobials. Consequently, the discovery of new antimicrobials as well as molecules capable of inhibiting its virulence is mandatory. In this regard quorum sensing (QS) represents a good target for anti-virulence therapies, as it has been linked to biofilm formation and is important for the production of several virulence factors, including proteases and siderophores. Here, we report the discovery of new diketopiperazine inhibitors of the B. cenocepacia acyl homoserine lactone synthase CepI, and report their anti-virulence properties. Out of ten different compounds assayed against recombinant CepI, four were effective inhibitors, with IC50 values in the micromolar range. The best compounds interfered with protease and siderophore production, as well as with biofilm formation, and showed good in vivo activity in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. These molecules were also tested in human cells and showed very low toxicity. Therefore, they could be considered for in vivo combined treatments with established or novel antimicrobials, to improve the current therapeutic strategies against B. cenocepacia. PMID:27580679

  12. TRACKING THE RESPONSE OF BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 5223-PR1 IN AQUIFER MICROCOSMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The introduction of bacteria into the environment for bioremediation purposes (bioaugmentation) requires analysis and monitoring of microbial population dynamics to define persistence and activity from both efficacy and risk assessment perspectives, Burkholderia cepacia G4 5223-P...

  13. AQUIFER PROTIST RESPONSE AND THE POTENTIAL FOR TCE BIOREMEDIATION WITH BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 PR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The introduction of bacteria into the environment for bioremediation purposes (bioaugmentation) requires analysis and monitoring of the persistence and activity of microbial population for efficacy and risk assessment purposes. Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR123 and PR131 constitutive...

  14. BIOAUGMENTATION WITH BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA PR1301 FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot field study was conducted at the Moffett Federal Airfield, Mountain View, California, to determine whether effective in-situ aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of TCE could be accomplished through bioaugmentation with a genetically modified strain of Burkholderia cepacia ...

  15. Molecular signatures and phylogenomic analysis of the genus Burkholderia: proposal for division of this genus into the emended genus Burkholderia containing pathogenic organisms and a new genus Paraburkholderia gen. nov. harboring environmental species

    OpenAIRE

    Sawana, Amandeep; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia contains large number of diverse species which include many clinically important organisms, phytopathogens, as well as environmental species. However, currently, there is a paucity of biochemical or molecular characteristics which can reliably distinguish different groups of Burkholderia species. We report here the results of detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of 45 sequenced species of the genus Burkholderia. In phylogenetic trees based upon concate...

  16. Vertical transmission explains the specific Burkholderia pattern in Sphagnum mosses at multi-geographic scale

    OpenAIRE

    AnastasiaBragina; ChristianBerg

    2013-01-01

    The betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia is known for its versatile interactions with its hosts that can range from beneficial to pathogenic. A plant-beneficial-environmental (PBE) Burkholderia cluster was recently separated from the pathogen cluster, yet still little is known about burkholderial diversity, distribution, colonization, and transmission patterns on plants. In our study, we applied a combination of high-throughput molecular and microscopic methods to examine the aforementioned...

  17. Multivariate Analyses of Burkholderia Species in Soil: Effect of Crop and Land Use History

    OpenAIRE

    Salles, J.F.; Veen, van, R.; Elsas, van, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of Burkholderia diversity in agricultural areas is important considering the potential use of this genus for agronomic and environmental applications. Therefore, the aim of this work was to ascertain how plant species and land use management drive the diversity of the genus Burkholderia. In a greenhouse experiment, different crops, i.e., maize, oat, barley, and grass, were planted in pots containing soils with different land use histories, i.e., maize monoculture, crop rotation...

  18. Characterization and Inference of Gene Gain/Loss Along Burkholderia Evolutionary History

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Zhu; Shengli Zhou; Miaomiao Lou; Jun Zhu; Bin Li; Guanlin Xie; GuLei Jin; René De Mot

    2011-01-01

    A comparative analysis of 60 complete Burkholderia genomes was conducted to obtain insight in the evolutionary history behind the diversity and pathogenicity at species level. A concatenated multiprotein phyletic pattern and a dataset with Burkholderia clusters of orthologous genes (BuCOGs) were constructed. The extent of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) was assessed using a Markov based probabilistic method. A reconstruction of the gene gains and losses history shows that more than half of the...

  19. Comparative Genome Sequence Analysis Reveals the Extent of Diversity and Conservation for Glycan-Associated Proteins in Burkholderia spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Hui San; Mohamed, Rahmah; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia family occupy diverse ecological niches. In pathogenic family members, glycan-associated proteins are often linked to functions that include virulence, protein conformation maintenance, surface recognition, cell adhesion, and immune system evasion. Comparative analysis of available Burkholderia genomes has revealed a core set of 178 glycan-associated proteins shared by all Burkholderia of which 68 are homologous to known essential genes. The genome sequence compari...

  20. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils. PMID:25989372

  1. Melioidosis and idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis: a cast-iron case

    OpenAIRE

    Gerhardy, Benjamin; Simpson, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is an infection with clinical importance in northern Australia due to the high associated mortality despite appropriate therapy. This report presents a case of acute pulmonary melioidosis on a background remarkable for the absence of typical risk factors for infection, but the presence of a high iron pulmonary microenvironment consequent to idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis. In light of recent genetic analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei, we postulate that the patient inadverten...

  2. Imported melioidosis in Danish travellers: a diagnostic challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badran, Shadia; Pedersen, Thomas Ingemann; Roed, Casper;

    2010-01-01

    Infections with Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis) are rare events in Scandinavian countries, but the bacterium may be contracted during travel to endemic areas, i.e. Southeast Asia (especially Thailand) and northern Australia. Here, 5 travel-related cases occurring within the last 3 y in...... Denmark are reported, with particular emphasis on diagnostic and therapeutic challenges posed to health staff with little experience in the management of melioidosis. A newly developed B. pseudomallei-specific polymerase chain reaction test was applied and was able to correctly identify all isolates....

  3. Outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteremia in a chemotherapy day care unit due to intrinsic contamination of an antiemetic drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the end of 2009, a large number of patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy at the day care unit of a private hospital in Mumbai, India developed Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC blood stream infection (BSI. Objective: The objectives were to identify the source of the outbreak and terminate the outbreak as rapidly as possible. Materials and Methods: All infection control protocols and processes were reviewed. Intensive training was started for all nursing staff involved in patient care. Cultures were sent from the environment (surfaces, water, air, intravenous fluids, disinfectants and antiseptics and opened/unopened medication. Results: A total of 13 patients with cancer with tunneled catheters were affected with BCC BSI. The isolates were of similar antimicrobial sensitivity. No significant breach of infection control protocols could be identified. Cultures from the prepared intravenous medication bags grew BCC. Subsequently, culture from unused vials of the antiemetic granisetron grew BCC, whereas those from the unopened IV fluid bag and chemotherapy medication were negative. On review, it was discovered that the outbreak started when a new brand of granisetron was introduced. The result was communicated to the manufacturer and the brand was withdrawn. There were no further cases. Conclusions: This outbreak was thus linked to intrinsic contamination of medication vials. We acknowledge a delay in identifying the source as we were concentrating more on human errors in medication preparation and less on intrinsic contamination. We recommend that in an event of an outbreak, unopened vials be cultured at the outset.

  4. Oxalotrophy, a widespread trait of plant-associated Burkholderia species, is involved in successful root colonization of lupin and maize by Burkholderia phytofirmans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaureWeisskopf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots and shoots harbour complex bacterial communities. Early seed and plantlet colonization plays a key role in determining which bacterial populations will successfully invade plant tissues, yet the mechanisms enabling plants to select for beneficial rather than harmful populations are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a role of oxalate as a determinant in this selection process, using members of the genus Burkholderia as model organisms. Oxalotrophy, i.e. the ability to use oxalate as a carbon source, was found to be a property strictly associated with plant-beneficial species of the Burkholderia genus, while plant pathogenic (B. glumae, B. plantarii or human opportunistic pathogens (Burkholderia cepacia complex strains were unable to degrade oxalate. We further show that oxalotrophy is required for successful plant colonization by the broad host endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN: an engineered Δoxc mutant, which lost the ability to grow on oxalate, was significantly impaired in early colonization of both lupin and maize compared with the wild-type. This work suggests that in addition to the role of oxalate in heavy metal tolerance of plants and in virulence of phytopathogenic fungi, it is also involved in specifically recruiting plant-beneficial members from complex bacterial communities.

  5. Oxalotrophy, a widespread trait of plant-associated Burkholderia species, is involved in successful root colonization of lupin and maize by Burkholderia phytofirmans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Thomas; Stopnisek, Nejc; Agnoli, Kirsty; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots and shoots harbor complex bacterial communities. Early seed and plantlet colonization plays a key role in determining which bacterial populations will successfully invade plant tissues, yet the mechanisms enabling plants to select for beneficial rather than harmful populations are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a role of oxalate as a determinant in this selection process, using members of the genus Burkholderia as model organisms. Oxalotrophy, i.e., the ability to use oxalate as a carbon source, was found to be a property strictly associated with plant-beneficial species of the Burkholderia genus, while plant pathogenic (B. glumae, B. plantarii) or human opportunistic pathogens (Burkholderia cepacia complex strains) were unable to degrade oxalate. We further show that oxalotrophy is required for successful plant colonization by the broad host endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN: an engineered Δoxc mutant, which lost the ability to grow on oxalate, was significantly impaired in early colonization of both lupin and maize compared with the wild-type. This work suggests that in addition to the role of oxalate in heavy metal tolerance of plants and in virulence of phytopathogenic fungi, it is also involved in specifically recruiting plant-beneficial members from complex bacterial communities. PMID:24409174

  6. Phylogenetically Diverse Burkholderia Associated with Midgut Crypts of Spurge Bugs, Dicranocephalus spp. (Heteroptera: Stenocephalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Matsuura, Yu; Dettner, Konrad; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2016-06-25

    Diverse phytophagous heteropteran insects, commonly known as stinkbugs, are associated with specific gut symbiotic bacteria, which have been found in midgut cryptic spaces. Recent studies have revealed that members of the stinkbug families Coreidae and Alydidae of the superfamily Coreoidea are consistently associated with a specific group of the betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia, called the "stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)" group, and horizontally acquire specific symbionts from the environment every generation. However, the symbiotic system of another coreoid family, Stenocephalidae remains undetermined. We herein investigated four species of the stenocephalid genus Dicranocephalus. Examinations via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the typical arrangement and ultrastructures of midgut crypts and gut symbionts. Cloning and molecular phylogenetic analyses of bacterial genes showed that the midgut crypts of all species are colonized by Burkholderia strains, which were further assigned to different subgroups of the genus Burkholderia. In addition to the SBE-group Burkholderia, a number of stenocephalid symbionts belonged to a novel clade containing B. sordidicola and B. udeis, suggesting a specific symbiont clade for the Stenocephalidae. The symbiotic systems of stenocephalid bugs may provide a unique opportunity to study the ongoing evolution of symbiont associations in the stinkbug-Burkholderia interaction. PMID:27265344

  7. A N2-fixing endophytic Burkholderia sp. associated with maize plants cultivated in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Paulina; Mavingui, Patrick; Cournoyer, Benoit; Fontaine, Fanette; Balandreau, Jacques; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus

    2002-04-01

    In the frame of a survey of potentially endophytic N2-fixing Burkholderia associated with maize in Mexico, its country of origin, the soil of an indigenous maize field near Oaxaca was studied. Under laboratory conditions, plant seedlings of two ancient maize varieties were used as a trap to select endophyte candidates from the soil sample. Among the N2 fixers isolated from inside plant tissues and able to grow on PCAT medium, the most abundant isolates belonged to genus Burkholderia (API 20NE, rrs sequences). Representative isolates obtained from roots and shoots of different plants appeared identical (rrs and nifH RFLP), showing that they were closely related. In addition, their 16S rDNA sequences differed from described Burkholderia species and, phylogenetically, they constituted a separate deep-branching new lineage in genus Burkholderia. This indicated that these isolates probably constituted a new species. An inoculation experiment confirmed that these N2-fixing Burkholderia isolates could densely colonize the plant tissues of maize. More isolates of this group were subsequently obtained from field-grown maize and teosinte plants. It was hypothesized that strains of this species had developed a sort of primitive symbiosis with one of their host plants, teosinte, which persisted during the domestication of teosinte into maize. PMID:12030700

  8. Transcriptional response of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 sessile cells to treatments with high doses of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite

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    Nelis Hans

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria are opportunistic pathogens, which can cause severe respiratory tract infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. As treatment of infected CF patients is problematic, multiple preventive measures are taken to reduce the infection risk. Besides a stringent segregation policy to prevent patient-to-patient transmission, clinicians also advise patients to clean and disinfect their respiratory equipment on a regular basis. However, problems regarding the efficacy of several disinfection procedures for the removal and/or killing of B. cepacia complex bacteria have been reported. In order to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved in the resistance of biofilm-grown Burkholderia cenocepacia cells against high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS, the present study focussed on the transcriptional response in sessile B. cenocepacia J2315 cells following exposure to high levels of H2O2 or NaOCl. Results The exposure to H2O2 and NaOCl resulted in an upregulation of the transcription of 315 (4.4% and 386 (5.4% genes, respectively. Transcription of 185 (2.6% and 331 (4.6% genes was decreased in response to the respective treatments. Many of the upregulated genes in the NaOCl- and H2O2-treated biofilms are involved in oxidative stress as well as general stress response, emphasizing the importance of the efficient neutralization and scavenging of ROS. In addition, multiple upregulated genes encode proteins that are necessary to repair ROS-induced cellular damage. Unexpectedly, a prolonged treatment with H2O2 also resulted in an increased transcription of multiple phage-related genes. A closer inspection of hybridisation signals obtained with probes targeting intergenic regions led to the identification of a putative 6S RNA. Conclusion Our results reveal that the transcription of a large fraction of B. cenocepacia J2315 genes is altered upon exposure of sessile cells to ROS. These

  9. Survey of Bartonella spp. in U.S. bed bugs detects Burkholderia multivorans but not Bartonella.

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    Virna L Saenz

    Full Text Available Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. have resurged in the United States and globally. Bed bugs are hematophagous ectoparasites of humans and other animals, including domestic pets, chickens, and bats, and their blood feeding habits contribute to their potential as disease vectors. Several species of Bartonella are re-emergent bacterial pathogens that also affect humans, domestic pets, bats and a number of other wildlife species. Because reports of both bed bugs and Bartonella have been increasing in the U.S., and because their host ranges can overlap, we investigated whether the resurgences of these medically important pathogens and their potential vector might be linked, by screening for Bartonella spp. in bed bugs collected from geographic areas where these pathogens are prevalent and from bed bugs that have been in culture in the laboratory for several years. We screened a total of 331 bed bugs: 316 bed bugs from 36 unique collections in 29 geographic locations in 13 states, 10 bed bugs from two colonies maintained in the laboratory for 3 yr, and 5 bed bugs from a colony that has been in culture since before the recent resurgence of bed bugs. Bartonella spp. DNA was screened using a polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer region. Bartonella DNA was not amplified from any bed bug, but five bed bugs from four different apartments of an elderly housing building in North Carolina contained DNA sequences that corresponded to Burkholderia multivorans, an important pathogen in nosocomial infections that was not previously linked to an arthropod vector.

  10. The biofilm produced by Burkholderia cepacia complex: molecular aspects and relationship with exopolysaccharides

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    Lucia Corich

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In cystic fibrosis patients, Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc can cause serious pulmonary chronic infections thanks in part to the ability to form biofilm, matrix rich in exopolysaccharides. In Bcc grown in the planktonic state, the main exopolysaccharide is cepacian while in biofilm its presence is controversial. Methods and Results. Two clinical isolates, named BTS7 and BTS2, were studied. BTS7 produces abundant cepacian but not much biofilm (quantified by colorimetric method.At least two of the genes involved in cepacian biosynthesis are not necessary for biofilm production as two BTS7 derivatives, bceB and bceQ knocked out by transposon mutagenesis, produce biofilm levels comparable to the wild-type. BTS2 sinthesyzes cepacian only if cultured on a specific medium. It has been colonizing a patient for almost ten years, showing a significant reduction of biofilm production during this period. This reduction did not appear together with the lack of factors required for the initial adhesion to the surface, or to differences in some of the Bcc genes involved in biofilm formation. Moreover, sequencing of its bce locus revealed a bceX gene, absent in BTS7, coding for a trascriptional regulator. Its product may negatively regulate the production of cepacian but not the one of other polysaccharides, promoting the formation of biofilm. Conclusions. Cepacian seems to be marginal in the production of biofilm.The reduced ability to produce biofilm of BTS2 suggests possible gene mutations occurred over time. Using custom arrays we will compare the gene expression of the BTS2 isolates, to identify the genes responsible for the observed phenotypic changes.

  11. Activation of Human Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4)·Myeloid Differentiation Factor 2 (MD-2) by Hypoacylated Lipopolysaccharide from a Clinical Isolate of Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Kubik, Łukasz; Oblak, Alja; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Hamad, Mohamad A; De Soyza, Anthony; Silipo, Alba; Jerala, Roman; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Valvano, Miguel A; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-08-28

    Lung infection by Burkholderia species, in particular Burkholderia cenocepacia, accelerates tissue damage and increases post-lung transplant mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. Host-microbe interplay largely depends on interactions between pathogen-specific molecules and innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which recognizes the lipid A moiety of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The human TLR4·myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) LPS receptor complex is strongly activated by hexa-acylated lipid A and poorly activated by underacylated lipid A. Here, we report that B. cenocepacia LPS strongly activates human TLR4·MD-2 despite its lipid A having only five acyl chains. Furthermore, we show that aminoarabinose residues in lipid A contribute to TLR4-lipid A interactions, and experiments in a mouse model of LPS-induced endotoxic shock confirmed the proinflammatory potential of B. cenocepacia penta-acylated lipid A. Molecular modeling combined with mutagenesis of TLR4-MD-2 interactive surfaces suggests that longer acyl chains and the aminoarabinose residues in the B. cenocepacia lipid A allow exposure of the fifth acyl chain on the surface of MD-2 enabling interactions with TLR4 and its dimerization. Our results provide a molecular model for activation of the human TLR4·MD-2 complex by penta-acylated lipid A explaining the ability of hypoacylated B. cenocepacia LPS to promote proinflammatory responses associated with the severe pathogenicity of this opportunistic bacterium. PMID:26160169

  12. Pathological findings and diagnostic implications of a rhesus macaque (Macacca mulatta) model of aerosol exposure to Burkholderia mallei (glanders).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, Samuel L; Facemire, Paul; Chuvala, Lara; Norwood, David; Wolcott, Mark; Huzella, Louis

    2015-06-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a Gram-negative bacillus that causes a pneumonic disease known as glanders in equids and humans, and a lymphatic infection known as farcy, primarily in equids. With the potential to infect humans by the respiratory route, aerosol exposure can result in severe, occasionally fatal, pneumonia. Today, glanders infections in humans are rare, likely due to less frequent contact with infected equids than in the past. Acutely ill humans often have non-specific clinical signs and in order to diagnose cases, especially in scenarios of multiple cases in an unexpected setting, rapid diagnostics for B. mallei may be critical. The pathogenesis of acute glanders in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was studied as an initial effort to improve diagnostic methods. In the study described here, the diagnostic techniques of PCR, culture and histopathology were compared. The results indicated that PCR may provide rapid, non-invasive diagnosis of glanders in some cases. As expected, PCR results were positive in lung tissue in 11/12 acutely infected rhesus macaques, but more importantly in terms of diagnostic algorithm development, PCR results were frequently positive in non-invasive samples such as broncho-alveolar lavage or nasal swabs (7/12) and occasionally in blood (3/12). However, conventional bacterial culture failed to recover bacteria in many of these samples. The study showed that the clinical presentation of aerosol-exposed rhesus macaques is similar to descriptions of human glanders and that PCR has potential for rapid diagnosis of outbreaks, if not individual cases. PMID:25850696

  13. [Phylogenetic analysis of the genes for naphthalene and phenanthrene degradation in Burkholderia sp. strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmalkova, T Yu; Sazonova, O I; Kosheleva, I A; Boronin, A M

    2013-06-01

    The genetic systems responsible for naphthalene and phenanthrene catabolism have been analyzed in the five strains of Burkholderia sp. isolated from soil samples (West Siberia) contaminated by heavy residual fuel oil and in the strain Burkholderia sp. BS3702 from the laboratory collection isolated from soil samples of the coke gas works (Vidnoe, Moscow oblast). The results of this work demonstrate that naphthalene and phenanthrene degradation in the above strains is encoded by the sequences not homologous to the classical nah genes of pseudomonades. In the Burkholderia sp. BS3702 strain, the initial stages of phenanthrene degradation and the subsequent stages of salicylate degradation are controlled by the sequences of different evolutionary origins (phn and nag genes). PMID:24450193

  14. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  15. Methods for genetic manipulation of Burkholderia gladioli pathovar cocovenenans

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    Karkhoff-Schweizer RoxAnn R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia gladioli pathovar cocovenenans (BGC is responsible for sporadic food-poisoning outbreaks with high morbidity and mortality in Asian countries. Little is known about the regulation of virulence factor and toxin production in BGC, and studies in this bacterium have been hampered by lack of genetic tools. Findings Establishment of a comprehensive antibiotic susceptibility profile showed that BGC strain ATCC33664 is susceptible to a number of antibiotics including aminoglycosides, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines and trimethoprim. In this study, we established that gentamicin, kanamycin and trimethoprim are good selection markers for use in BGC. Using a 10 min method for preparation of electrocompetent cells, the bacterium could be transformed by electroporation at high frequencies with replicative plasmids containing the pRO1600-derived origin of replication. These plasmids exhibited a copy number of > 100 in BGC. When co-conjugated with a transposase expressing helper plasmid, mini-Tn7 vectors inserted site- and orientation-specifically at a single glmS-associated insertion site in the BGC genome. Lastly, a Himar1 transposon was used for random transposon mutagenesis of BGC. Conclusions A series of genetic tools previously developed for other Gram-negative bacteria was adapted for use in BGC. These tools now facilitate genetic studies of this pathogen and allow establishment of toxin biosynthetic pathways and their genetic regulation.

  16. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis. PMID:24067292

  17. Efflux pump genes of the resistance-nodulation-division family in Burkholderia cenocepacia genome

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    Manina Giulia

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia is recognized as opportunistic pathogen that can cause lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A hallmark of B. cenocepacia infections is the inability to eradicate the organism because of multiple intrinsic antibiotic resistance. As Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND efflux systems are responsible for much of the intrinsic multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, this study aims to identify RND genes in the B. cenocepacia genome and start to investigate their involvement into antimicrobial resistance. Results Genome analysis and homology searches revealed 14 open reading frames encoding putative drug efflux pumps belonging to RND family in B. cenocepacia J2315 strain. By reverse transcription (RT-PCR analysis, it was found that orf3, orf9, orf11, and orf13 were expressed at detectable levels, while orf10 appeared to be weakly expressed in B. cenocepacia. Futhermore, orf3 was strongly induced by chloramphenicol. The orf2 conferred resistance to fluoroquinolones, tetraphenylphosphonium, streptomycin, and ethidium bromide when cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli KAM3, a strain lacking the multidrug efflux pump AcrAB. The orf2-overexpressing E. coli also accumulate low concentrations of ethidium bromide, which was restored to wild type level in the presence of CCCP, an energy uncoupler altering the energy of the drug efflux pump. Conclusion The 14 RND pumps gene we have identified in the genome of B. cenocepacia suggest that active efflux could be a major mechanism underlying antimicrobial resistance in this microorganism. We have characterized the ORF2 pump, one of these 14 potential RND efflux systems. Its overexpression in E. coli conferred resistance to several antibiotics and to ethidium bromide but it remains to be determined if this pump play a significant role in the antimicrobial intrinsic resistance of B. cenocepacia. The characterization of antibiotic efflux pumps in B

  18. Oxalotrophy, a widespread trait of plant-associated Burkholderia species, is involved in successful root colonization of lupin and maize by Burkholderia phytofirmans

    OpenAIRE

    Kost, Thomas; Stopnisek, Nejc; Agnoli, Kirsty; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots and shoots harbor complex bacterial communities. Early seed and plantlet colonization plays a key role in determining which bacterial populations will successfully invade plant tissues, yet the mechanisms enabling plants to select for beneficial rather than harmful populations are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a role of oxalate as a determinant in this selection process, using members of the genus Burkholderia as model organisms. Oxalotrophy, i.e., the ability to ...

  19. Oxalotrophy, a widespread trait of plant-associated Burkholderia species, is involved in successful root colonization of lupin and maize by Burkholderia phytofirmans.

    OpenAIRE

    LaureWeisskopf; ThomasKost; NejcStopnisek

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots and shoots harbour complex bacterial communities. Early seed and plantlet colonization plays a key role in determining which bacterial populations will successfully invade plant tissues, yet the mechanisms enabling plants to select for beneficial rather than harmful populations are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a role of oxalate as a determinant in this selection process, using members of the genus Burkholderia as model organisms. Oxalotrophy, i.e. the ability to ...

  20. Proof that Burkholderia Strains Form Effective Symbioses with Legumes: a Study of Novel Mimosa-Nodulating Strains from South America

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wen-Ming; de Faria, Sergio M.; Straliotto, Rosângela; Pitard, Rosa M.; Simões-Araùjo, Jean L.; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Chou, Yi-Ju; Barrios, Edmundo; Prescott, Alan R; Geoffrey N Elliott; Sprent, Janet I.; J. Peter W. Young; James, Euan K.

    2005-01-01

    Twenty Mimosa-nodulating bacterial strains from Brazil and Venezuela, together with eight reference Mimosa-nodulating rhizobial strains and two other β-rhizobial strains, were examined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. They fell into 16 patterns and formed a single cluster together with the known β-rhizobia, Burkholderia caribensis, Burkholderia phymatum, and Burkholderia tuberum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 15 of the 20 strains were determined, and all were shown to belong to t...

  1. Deciphering the role of RND efflux transporters in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

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    Silvia Bazzini

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 is representative of a highly problematic group of cystic fibrosis (CF pathogens. Eradication of B. cenocepacia is very difficult with the antimicrobial therapy being ineffective due to its high resistance to clinically relevant antimicrobial agents and disinfectants. RND (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division efflux pumps are known to be among the mediators of multidrug resistance in gram-negative bacteria. Since the significance of the 16 RND efflux systems present in B. cenocepacia (named RND-1 to -16 has been only partially determined, the aim of this work was to analyze mutants of B. cenocepacia strain J2315 impaired in RND-4 and RND-9 efflux systems, and assess their role in the efflux of toxic compounds. The transcriptomes of mutants deleted individually in RND-4 and RND-9 (named D4 and D9, and a double-mutant in both efflux pumps (named D4-D9, were compared to that of the wild-type B. cenocepacia using microarray analysis. Microarray data were confirmed by qRT-PCR, phenotypic experiments, and by Phenotype MicroArray analysis. The data revealed that RND-4 made a significant contribution to the antibiotic resistance of B. cenocepacia, whereas RND-9 was only marginally involved in this process. Moreover, the double mutant D4-D9 showed a phenotype and an expression profile similar to D4. The microarray data showed that motility and chemotaxis-related genes appeared to be up-regulated in both D4 and D4-D9 strains. In contrast, these gene sets were down-regulated or expressed at levels similar to J2315 in the D9 mutant. Biofilm production was enhanced in all mutants. Overall, these results indicate that in B. cenocepacia RND pumps play a wider role than just in drug resistance, influencing additional phenotypic traits important for pathogenesis.

  2. The relationship of biofilm production to biocontrol activity of Burkholderia pyrrocinia FP62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foliar biocontrol agent (BCA) efficacy is often inconsistent due to poor colonization and survival on plant surfaces. Burkholderia pyrrocinia FP62, a superior leaf colonist and BCA of Botrytis cinerea, forms unsaturated biofilms on plant surfaces. To determine the relationship between biocontrol act...

  3. N-acylhomoserine-lactone-mediated communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia in mixed biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K.; Hentzer, Morten; Geisenberger, O.;

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are capable of forming mixed biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria employ quorum-sensing systems, which rely on N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to co- ordinate expression of virulence factors with the...

  4. Antimicrobial Properties of an Oxidizer Produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia P525

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compound with both oxidizing properties and antibiotic properties was extracted and purified from broth cultures of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain P525. A four step purification procedure was used to increase its specific activity ~ 400 fold and to yield a HPLC- UV chromatogram containing a sing...

  5. NOVEL ORGANIZATION OF THE GENES FOR PHTHALATE DEGRADATION FROM BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA DBO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholderia cepacia DBO1 is able to utilize phthalate as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Two overlapping cosmid clones containing the genes for phthalate degradation were isolated from this strain. Subcloning and activity analysis localized the genes for phthala...

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia gladioli Strain UCD-UG_CHAPALOTE (Phylum Proteobacteria)

    OpenAIRE

    Ettinger, CL; Shehata, HR; Johnston-Monje, D; Raizada, MN; Eisen, JA

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Burkholderia gladioli strain UCD-UG_CHAPALOTE. This strain is an endophyte isolated from surface sterilized seeds of an ancient Mexican landrace of corn, Chapalote. The genome contains 8,527,129 bp in 109 scaffolds.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Haloacid-Degrading Burkholderia caribensis Strain MBA4

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yanling; Kong, Ka Fai; Tsang, Jimmy S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia caribensis MBA4 was isolated from soil for its ability to utilize 2-haloacid. An inducible haloacid operon, encoding for a dehalogenase and a permease, is mainly responsible for the biotransformation. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain.

  8. Multivariate Analyses of Burkholderia species in soil: effect of crop and land use history.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salles, J.F.; Veen, van J.A.; Elsas, van J.D.

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of Burkholderia diversity in agricultural areas is important considering the potential use of this genus for agronomic and environmental applications. Therefore, the aim of this work was to ascertain how plant species and land use management drive the diversity of the genus Burkholder

  9. Multivariate analyses of Burkholderia species in soil : Effect of crop and land use history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salles, JF; van Veen, JA; van Elsas, JD

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of Burkholderia diversity in agricultural areas is important considering the potential use of this genus for agronomic and environmental applications. Therefore, the aim of this work was to ascertain how plant species and land use management drive the diversity of the genus Burkholder

  10. Multivariate analyses of Burkholderia species in soil: effect of crop and land use history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salles, J.F.; Van Veen, J.A.; van Elsas, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of Burkholderia diversity in agricultural areas is important considering the potential use of this genus for agronomic and environmental applications. Therefore, the aim of this work was to ascertain how plant species and land use management drive the diversity of the genus Burkholder

  11. N-acylhomoserine-lactone-mediated communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia in mixed biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K; Hentzer, Morten; Geisenberger, O;

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are capable of forming mixed biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria employ quorum-sensing systems, which rely on N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to co-ordinate expression of virulence factors with the forma...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain 869T2, a Plant-Beneficial Endophytic Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ying-Ning; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    An endophytic bacterium, Burkholderia cenocepacia 869T2, isolated from vetiver grass, has shown its abilities for both in planta biocontrol and plant growth promotion. Its draft genome sequence was determined to provide insights into those metabolic pathways involved in plant-beneficial activity. This is the first genome report for endophytic B. cenocepacia. PMID:26564046

  13. N-acylhomoserine-lactone-mediated communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia in mixed biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K.; Hentzer, Morten; Geisenberger, O.;

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are capable of forming mixed biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria employ quorum-sensing systems, which rely on N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to co- ordinate expression of virulence factors with the form...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia gladioli Strain UCD-UG_CHAPALOTE (Phylum Proteobacteria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Cassandra L; Shehata, Hanan R; Johnston-Monje, David; Raizada, Manish N; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Burkholderia gladioli strain UCD-UG_CHAPALOTE. This strain is an endophyte isolated from surface sterilized seeds of an ancient Mexican landrace of corn, Chapalote. The genome contains 8,527,129 bp in 109 scaffolds. PMID:25614570

  15. Burkholderia tropica sp. nov., a novel nitrogen-fixing, plant-associated bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, V M; Estrada-de los Santos, P; Tenorio-Salgado, S; Vogel, J; Stoffels, M; Guyon, S; Mavingui, P; Baldani, V L D; Schmid, M; Baldani, J I; Balandreau, J; Hartmann, A; Caballero-Mellado, J

    2004-11-01

    In an ecological survey of nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere and as endophytes of sugarcane, maize and teosinte plants in Brazil, Mexico and South Africa, a new phylogenetically homogeneous group of N(2)-fixing bacteria was identified within the genus Burkholderia. This polyphasic taxonomic study included microscopic and colony morphology, API 20NE tests and growth on different culture media at different pH and temperatures, as well as carbon source assimilation tests and whole-cell protein pattern analysis. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed 99.2-99.9 % similarity within the novel species and 97.2 % similarity to the closest related species, Burkholderia sacchari. The novel species was composed of four distinct amplified 16S rDNA restriction analysis groups. The DNA-DNA reassociation values within the novel species were greater than 70 % and less than 42 % for the closest related species, B. sacchari. Based on these results and on many phenotypic characteristics, a novel N(2)-fixing species is proposed for the genus Burkholderia, Burkholderia tropica sp. nov., with the type strain Ppe8(T) (=ATCC BAA-831(T)=LMG 22274(T)=DSM 15359(T)). B. tropica was isolated from plants grown in geographical regions with climates ranging from temperate subhumid to hot humid. PMID:15545451

  16. A bioinformatics approach to the determination of genes involved in endophytic behavior in Burkholderia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shimaila; Duan, Jin; Charles, Trevor C; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-02-21

    The vast majority of plants harbor endophytic bacteria that colonize a portion of the plant's interior tissues without harming the plant. Like plant pathogens, endophytes gain entry into their plants hosts through various mechanisms. Bacterial endophytes display a broad range of symbiotic interactions with their host plants. The molecular bases of these plant-endophyte interactions are currently not fully understood. In the present study, a set of genes possibly responsible for endophytic behavior for genus Burkholderia was predicted and then compared and contrasted with a number (nine endophytes from different genera) of endophytes by comparative genome analysis. The nine endophytes included Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN, Burkholderia spp. strain JK006, Azospirillum lipoferum 4B, Enterobacter cloacae ENHKU01, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Pseudomonas putida W619, Enterobacter spp. 638, Azoarcus spp. BH72, and Serratia proteamaculans 568. From the genomes of the analyzed bacterial strains, a set of bacterial genes orthologs was identified that are predicted to be involved in determining the endophytic behavior of Burkholderia spp. The genes and their possible functions were then investigated to establish a potential connection between their presence and the role they play in bacterial endophytic behavior. Nearly all of the genes identified by this bioinformatics procedure encode function previously suggested in other studies to be involved in endophytic behavior. PMID:24513137

  17. In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging of Bacteriogenic Cyanide in the Lungs of Live Mice Infected with Cystic Fibrosis Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Seong-Won; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Lim, Jeesun; Kim, So Hyun; Kim, Sang-Tae; Cho, You-Hee; Yoon, Juyoung; Park, Sungsu

    2011-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), commonly found in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, often produce cyanide (CN), which inhibits cellular respiration. CN in sputa is a potential biomarker for lung infection by CF pathogens. However, its actual concentration in the infected lungs is unknown. Methods and Findings This work reports observation of CN in the lungs of mice infected with cyanogenic PA or Bcc strains using a CN fluorescent chemos...

  18. Burkholderia glumae ToxA Is a Dual-Specificity Methyltransferase That Catalyzes the Last Two Steps of Toxoflavin Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Michael K; Philmus, Benjamin; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2016-05-17

    Toxoflavin is a major virulence factor of the rice pathogen Burkholderia glumae. The tox operon of B. glumae contains five putative toxoflavin biosynthetic genes toxABCDE. ToxA is a predicted S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase, and toxA knockouts of B. glumae are less virulent in plant infection models. In this study, we show that ToxA performs two consecutive methylations to convert the putative azapteridine intermediate, 1,6-didemethyltoxoflavin, to toxoflavin. In addition, we report a series of crystal structures of ToxA complexes that reveals the molecular basis of the dual methyltransferase activity. The results suggest sequential methylations with initial methylation at N6 of 1,6-didemethyltoxoflavin followed by methylation at N1. The two azapteridine orientations that position N6 or N1 for methylation are coplanar with a 140° rotation between them. The structure of ToxA contains a class I methyltransferase fold having an N-terminal extension that either closes over the active site or is largely disordered. The ordered conformation places Tyr7 at a position of a structurally conserved tyrosine site of unknown function in various methyltransferases. Crystal structures of ToxA-Y7F consistently show a closed active site, whereas structures of ToxA-Y7A consistently show an open active site, suggesting that the hydroxyl group of Tyr7 plays a role in opening and closing the active site during the multistep reaction. PMID:27070241

  19. Powder formulation of Burkholderia cepacia for control of rape seed damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Tehrani, A; Ahmadzadeh, M; Sarani, S; Farzaneh, M

    2007-01-01

    Talc-based formulation of Burkholderia cepaci strain Bu1 was tested as seed and soil drenchs separately for its ability to control Rhizoctonia soloni the causal agent of rape seed damping-off in greenhouse and field trials. In general, the formulated bacteria was more effective to suppress the disease than the suspension of bacteria cells in carboxymethylcellulose solution (1% w/v), in both greenhouse and field trials. The formulation of strain Bul as soil and seed treatments had the greatest effect on reducing the rape seed damping-off in greenhouse and field trials (66.7, 53.3, 64.4 and 40% respectively). The formulation of strain Bu1 as soil and seed treatments were the most effective treatments to increase the root dry weights in the infected soil in greenhouse. The formulation of strain Bul as soil drench had the greatest effect on enhancement of the fresh weight of roots and stem fresh and dry weights. The formulation of strain Bu1 stored at 4 degrees C exhibited better shelf Life and efficacy in vitro than it's counterpart stored at 25 degrees C. PMID:18399433

  20. Investigation of quorum sensing-dependent gene expression in Burkholderia gladioli BSR3 through RNA-seq analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunyoung; Park, Jungwook; Choi, Okhee; Kim, Jinwoo; Seo, Young-Su

    2014-12-28

    The plant pathogen Burkholderia gladioli, which has a broad host range that includes rice and onion, causes bacterial panicle blight and sheath rot. Based on the complete genome sequence of B. gladioli BSR3 isolated from infected rice sheaths, the genome of B. gladioli BSR3 contains the luxI/luxR family of genes. Members of this family encode N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing (QS) signal synthase and the LuxR-family AHL signal receptor, which are similar to B. glumae BGR1. In B. glumae, QS has been shown to play pivotal roles in many bacterial behaviors. In this study, we compared the QS-dependent gene expression between B. gladioli BSR3 and a QS-defective B. gladioli BSR3 mutant in two different culture states (10 and 24 h after incubation, corresponding to an exponential phase and a stationary phase) using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq analyses including gene ontology and pathway enrichment revealed that the B. gladioli BSR3 QS system regulates genes related to motility, toxin production, and oxalogenesis, which were previously reported in B. glumae. Moreover, the uncharacterized polyketide biosynthesis is activated by QS, which was not detected in B. glumae. Thus, we observed not only common QS-dependent genes between B. glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3, but also unique QS-dependent genes in B. gladioli BSR3. PMID:25223327

  1. Complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain PAMC28687, a potential octopine-utilizing bacterium isolated from Antarctica lichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, So-Ra; Yu, Sang-Cheol; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Oh, Tae-Jin

    2016-05-20

    We report the complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. PAMC28687, which was isolated from the Antarctica lichen Useea sp., for better understanding of its catabolic traits in utilizing octopine as a source of carbon/nitrogen between Burkholderia and lichen. The genome consists of three circular chromosomes with five circular plasmids for the total 6,881,273bp sized genome with a G+C content of 58.14%. PMID:27034021

  2. Burkholderia cepacia XXVI siderophore with biocontrol capacity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Santos-Villalobos, Sergio; Barrera-Galicia, Guadalupe Coyolxauhqui; Miranda-Salcedo, Mario Alberto; Peña-Cabriales, Juan José

    2012-08-01

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is the causal agent of anthracnose in mango. Burkholderia cepacia XXVI, isolated from mango rhizosphere and identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as a member of B. cepacia complex, was more effective than 6 other mango rhizosphere bacteria in inhibiting the model mango pathogen, C. gloeosporioides ATCC MYA 456. Biocontrol of this pathogen was demonstrated on Petri-dishes containing PDA by > 90 % reduction of surface colonization. The nature of the biocontrol metabolite(s) was characterized via a variety of tests. The inhibition was almost exclusively due to production of agar-diffusible, not volatile, metabolite(s). The diffusible metabolite(s) underwent thermal degradation at 70 and 121 °C (1 atm). Tests for indole acetic acid production and lytic enzyme activities (cellulase, glucanase and chitinase) by B. cepacia XXVI were negative, indicating that these metabolites were not involved in the biocontrol effect. Based on halo formation and growth inhibition of the pathogen on the diagnostic medium, CAS-agar, as well as colorimetric tests we surmised that strain XXVI produced a hydroxamate siderophore involved in the biocontrol effect observed. The minimal inhibitory concentration test showed that 0.64 μg ml(-1) of siderophore (Deferoxamine mesylate salt-equivalent) was sufficient to achieve 91.1 % inhibition of the pathogen growth on Petri-dishes containing PDA. The biocontrol capacity against C. gloeosporioides ATCC MYA 456 correlated directly with the siderophore production by B. cepacia XXVI: the highest concentration of siderophore production in PDB on day 7, 1.7 μg ml(-1) (Deferoxamine mesylate salt-equivalent), promoted a pathogen growth inhibition of 94.9 %. The growth of 5 additional strains of C. gloeosporioides (isolated from mango "Ataulfo" orchards located in the municipality of Chahuites, State of Oaxaca in Mexico) was also inhibited when confronted with B. cepacia XXVI. Results indicate that B. cepacia XXVI or its

  3. Evaluation of surrogate animal models of melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Mark Warawa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for the disease melioidosis. B. pseudomallei establishes disease in susceptible individuals through multiple routes of infection, all of which may proceed to a septicemic disease associated with a high mortality rate. B. pseudomallei opportunistically infects humans and a wide range of animals directly from the environment, and modeling of experimental melioidosis has been conducted in numerous biologically relevant models including mammalian and invertebrate hosts. This review seeks to summarize published findings related to established animal models of melioidosis, with an aim to compare and contrast the virulence of B. pseudomallei in these models. The effect of the route of delivery on disease is also discussed for intravenous, intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, intranasal, aerosol, oral, and intratracheal infection methodologies, with a particular focus on how they relate to modeling clinical melioidosis. The importance of the translational validity of the animal models used in B. pseudomallei research is highlighted as these studies have become increasingly therapeutic in nature.

  4. Direct Detection of Burkholderia cepacia in Susceptible Pharmaceutical Products Using Semi-Nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Mohamed A; Ali, Amal E; Essam, Tamer M; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cepaciahas recently received a considerable attention as one of the major risks in susceptible pharmaceutical products. This microorganism can easily propagate and cause vast and severe contamination, especially to the water supplies for pharmaceutical companies. Moreover, it proliferates within the products and can cause severe infections for humans. Therefore, fast and sensitive detection of these bacteria is of a great demand. The present study introduces improved application of a polymerase chain reaction assay with relatively high sensitivity and specificity for the direct detection ofB. cepaciafrom the aqueous pharmaceutical products. A semi-nested polymerase chain reaction approach using the primer set BCR1/BCR2 followed by BCR1/Mr yielding a 465 bp fragment of the recA gene was applied and tested using both crude lysate from isolated colonies and DNA directly extracted from artificially prepared and spiked reference syrup. The polymerase chain reaction assay showed no interference with other bacterial reference and environmental strains tested, includingStaphylococcus aureusATCC® 6538,Pseudomonas aeruginosaATCC® 9027,Escherichia coliATCC® 8739,Salmonella abonyNCTC® 6017,Bacillus subtilisATCC® 6633,Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus warneri, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, andRalstonia pickettii Moreover, this semi-nested assay showed a detection limit of around 10 colony-forming units per sample and could detectB. cepaciastrains isolated from a municipal pre-treated potable water tank. Comparing the results for detection ofB. cepaciain 100 randomly collected commercial syrup preparations using both conventional standard method and polymerase chain reaction assay revealed thatB. cepaciawas detected in two samples using polymerase chain reaction assay while all samples showed negative results by conventional culturing and biochemical methods. These results highlight the advantage of using this polymerase chain reaction assay to

  5. Actin-Based Motility of Burkholderia thailandensis Requires a Central Acidic Domain of BimA That Recruits and Activates the Cellular Arp2/3 Complex▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sitthidet, Chayada; Stevens, Joanne M; Field, Terence R.; Layton, Abigail N.; Korbsrisate, Sunee; Stevens, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia species use BimA for intracellular actin-based motility. Uniquely, Burkholderia thailandensis BimA harbors a central and acidic (CA) domain. The CA domain was required for actin-based motility, binding to the cellular Arp2/3 complex, and Arp2/3-dependent polymerization of actin monomers. Our data reveal distinct strategies for actin-based motility among Burkholderia species.

  6. Changes in the repertoire of natural antibodies caused by immunization with bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shilova, N V; Navakouski, M J; Huflejt, M; Kuehn, A; Grunow, R; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bovin, N V

    2011-01-01

    The repertoire of natural anti-glycan antibodies in naïve chickens and in chickens immunized with bacteria Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Francisella tularensis as well as with peptides from an outer membrane protein of B. pseudomallei was studied. A relatively restricted...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1647 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1647 ref|ZP_03792095.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pakistan... 9] gb|EEH27396.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pakistan 9] ZP_03792095.1 1e-12 26% ...

  8. Burkholderia cenocepacia BC2L-C is a super lectin with dual specificity and proinflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Sulák

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lectins and adhesins are involved in bacterial adhesion to host tissues and mucus during early steps of infection. We report the characterization of BC2L-C, a soluble lectin from the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia, which has two distinct domains with unique specificities and biological activities. The N-terminal domain is a novel TNF-α-like fucose-binding lectin, while the C-terminal part is similar to a superfamily of calcium-dependent bacterial lectins. The C-terminal domain displays specificity for mannose and l-glycero-d-manno-heptose. BC2L-C is therefore a superlectin that binds independently to mannose/heptose glycoconjugates and fucosylated human histo-blood group epitopes. The apo form of the C-terminal domain crystallized as a dimer, and calcium and mannose could be docked in the binding site. The whole lectin is hexameric and the overall structure, determined by electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, reveals a flexible arrangement of three mannose/heptose-specific dimers flanked by two fucose-specific TNF-α-like trimers. We propose that BC2L-C binds to the bacterial surface in a mannose/heptose-dependent manner via the C-terminal domain. The TNF-α-like domain triggers IL-8 production in cultured airway epithelial cells in a carbohydrate-independent manner, and is therefore proposed to play a role in the dysregulated proinflammatory response observed in B. cenocepacia lung infections. The unique architecture of this newly recognized superlectin correlates with multiple functions including bacterial cell cross-linking, adhesion to human epithelia, and stimulation of inflammation.

  9. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venturi Vittorio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic

  10. Exploring the metabolic network of the epidemic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 via genome-scale reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda Gurudutta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia is a threatening nosocomial epidemic pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF or a compromised immune system. Its high level of antibiotic resistance is an increasing concern in treatments against its infection. Strain B. cenocepacia J2315 is the most infectious isolate from CF patients. There is a strong demand to reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315 to systematically analyze its metabolic capabilities and its virulence traits, and to search for potential clinical therapy targets. Results We reconstructed the genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315. An iterative reconstruction process led to the establishment of a robust model, iKF1028, which accounts for 1,028 genes, 859 internal reactions, and 834 metabolites. The model iKF1028 captures important metabolic capabilities of B. cenocepacia J2315 with a particular focus on the biosyntheses of key metabolic virulence factors to assist in understanding the mechanism of disease infection and identifying potential drug targets. The model was tested through BIOLOG assays. Based on the model, the genome annotation of B. cenocepacia J2315 was refined and 24 genes were properly re-annotated. Gene and enzyme essentiality were analyzed to provide further insights into the genome function and architecture. A total of 45 essential enzymes were identified as potential therapeutic targets. Conclusions As the first genome-scale metabolic network of B. cenocepacia J2315, iKF1028 allows a systematic study of the metabolic properties of B. cenocepacia and its key metabolic virulence factors affecting the CF community. The model can be used as a discovery tool to design novel drugs against diseases caused by this notorious pathogen.

  11. Expression and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF in melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Joost Wiersinga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF has emerged as a pivotal mediator of innate immunity and has been shown to be an important effector molecule in severe sepsis. Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important cause of community-acquired sepsis in Southeast-Asia. We aimed to characterize the expression and function of MIF in melioidosis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MIF expression was determined in leukocytes and plasma from 34 melioidosis patients and 32 controls, and in mice infected with B. pseudomallei. MIF function was investigated in experimental murine melioidosis using anti-MIF antibodies and recombinant MIF. Patients demonstrated markedly increased MIF mRNA leukocyte and MIF plasma concentrations. Elevated MIF concentrations were associated with mortality. Mice inoculated intranasally with B. pseudomallei displayed a robust increase in pulmonary and systemic MIF expression. Anti-MIF treated mice showed lower bacterial loads in their lungs upon infection with a low inoculum. Conversely, mice treated with recombinant MIF displayed a modestly impaired clearance of B. pseudomallei. MIF exerted no direct effects on bacterial outgrowth or phagocytosis of B. pseudomallei. CONCLUSIONS: MIF concentrations are markedly elevated during clinical melioidosis and correlate with patients' outcomes. In experimental melioidosis MIF impaired antibacterial defense.

  12. Quorum Sensing Controls Swarming Motility of Burkholderia glumae through Regulation of Rhamnolipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvin Nickzad

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae is a plant pathogenic bacterium that uses an acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing system to regulate protein secretion, oxalate production and major virulence determinants such as toxoflavin and flagella. B. glumae also releases surface-active rhamnolipids. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia thailandensis, rhamnolipids, along with flagella, are required for the social behavior called swarming motility. In the present study, we demonstrate that quorum sensing positively regulates the production of rhamnolipids in B. glumae and that rhamnolipids are necessary for swarming motility also in this species. We show that a rhlA- mutant, which is unable to produce rhamnolipids, loses its ability to swarm, and that this can be complemented by providing exogenous rhamnolipids. Impaired rhamnolipid production in a quorum sensing-deficient B. glumae mutant is the main factor responsible for its defective swarming motility behaviour.

  13. Quorum Sensing Controls Swarming Motility of Burkholderia glumae through Regulation of Rhamnolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickzad, Arvin; Lépine, François; Déziel, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae is a plant pathogenic bacterium that uses an acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing system to regulate protein secretion, oxalate production and major virulence determinants such as toxoflavin and flagella. B. glumae also releases surface-active rhamnolipids. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia thailandensis, rhamnolipids, along with flagella, are required for the social behavior called swarming motility. In the present study, we demonstrate that quorum sensing positively regulates the production of rhamnolipids in B. glumae and that rhamnolipids are necessary for swarming motility also in this species. We show that a rhlA- mutant, which is unable to produce rhamnolipids, loses its ability to swarm, and that this can be complemented by providing exogenous rhamnolipids. Impaired rhamnolipid production in a quorum sensing-deficient B. glumae mutant is the main factor responsible for its defective swarming motility behaviour. PMID:26047513

  14. Synthesis of the tetrasaccharide outer core fragment of Burkholderia multivorans lipooligosaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaco, Marcello; De Castro, Cristina; Silipo, Alba; Corsaro, Maria Michela; Molinaro, Antonio; Iadonisi, Alfonso; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Bedini, Emiliano

    2015-02-11

    The first synthesis of the outer core fragment of Burkholderia multivorans lipooligosaccharide [β-D-Glc-(1→3)-α-D-GalNAc-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc-(1→3)-L-Rha] as α-allyl tetrasaccharide was accomplished. The glycosylations involving GalNAc units were studied in depth testing them under several conditions. This allowed the building of both the α- and the β-configured glycosidic bonds by employing the same GalNAc glycosyl donor, thus considerably shortening the total number of synthetic steps. The target tetrasaccharide was synthesized with an allyl aglycone to allow its future conjugation with an immunogenic protein en route to the development of a synthetic neoglycoconjugate vaccine against the Burkholderia cepacia pathogens. PMID:24933233

  15. Properties of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Granules and Bioemulsifiers from Pseudomonas sp. and Burkholderia sp. Isolates Growing on Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Laís Postai; Castellane, Tereza Cristina Luque; Lopes, Erica Mendes; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes; Alves, Lúcia Maria Carareto

    2016-03-01

    A Burkholderia and Pseudomonas species designated as AB4 and AS1, respectively, were isolated from soil containing decomposing straw or sugar cane bagasse collected from Brazil. This study sought to evaluate the capacities of culture media, cell-free medium, and crude lysate preparations (containing PHB inclusion bodies) from bacterial cell cultures to stabilize emulsions with several hydrophobic compounds. Four conditions showed good production of bioemulsifiers (E24 ≥ 50 %), headed by substantially cell-free media from bacterial cell cultures in which bacterial isolates from Burkholderia sp. strain AB4 and Pseudomonas sp. strain AS1 were grown. Our results revealed that the both isolates (AB4 and AS1 strains) exhibited high emulsification indices (indicating usefulness in bioremediation) and good stabilities. PMID:26578147

  16. Entwicklung eines polyklonalen Antiköpers gegen Burkholderia cepacia Exopolysaccharid

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwig, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Die cystische Fibrose (CF) ist die häufigste autosomal rezessiv vererbte Stoffwechselerkrankung der weißen Rasse. Patienten mit CF leiden häufig an Lungeninfektionen mit Erregern, die dem Burkholderia cepacia Komplex (BCC) zugeordnet werden. Der Krankheitsverlauf kann sehr dramatisch sein und wird als Cepacia Syndrom bezeichnet. Die eigentlich Pflanzen pathogenen, bei Patienten mit CF aber opportunistischen Erreger, zeigen eine ausgeprägte Resistenz gegenüber den vorhandenen Antibiotika. Es w...

  17. Genotyping of Burkholderia mallei from an Outbreak of Glanders in Bahrain Suggests Multiple Introduction Events

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, Holger C.; Pearson, Talima; Hornstra, Heidie; Projahn, Michaela; Terzioglu, Rahime; Wernery, Renate; Georgi, Enrico; Riehm, Julia M; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul S.; Joseph, Marina; Johnson, Bobby; Kinne, Joerg; Jose, Shanti; Hepp, Crystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glanders, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia mallei, is a highly infectious zoonotic disease of solipeds causing severe disease in animals and men. Although eradicated from many Western countries, it recently emerged in Asia, the Middle-East, Africa, and South America. Due to its rareness, little is known about outbreak dynamics of the disease and its epidemiology. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated a recent outbreak of glanders in Bahrain by applying hi...

  18. Purification and characterization of chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    OpenAIRE

    Xun, L

    1996-01-01

    Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) cepacia AC1100 mineralizes the herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4,5-T), and the first intermediate of 2,4,5-T degradation is 2,4,5-trichlorophenol. Chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase activity responsible for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol degradation was detected in the cell extract. The enzyme consisted of two components separated during purification, and both were purified to more than 95% homogeneity. The reconstituted enzyme catalyzed the hydroxylation of se...

  19. Comparative Assessment of Genotyping Methods for Epidemiologic Study of Burkholderia cepacia Genomovar III

    OpenAIRE

    Coenye, Tom; Spilker, Theodore; Martin, Alissa; LiPuma, John J.

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed a collection of 97 well-characterized Burkholderia cepacia genomovar III isolates to evaluate multiple genomic typing systems, including pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), BOX-PCR fingerprinting and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typing. The typeability, reproducibility, and discriminatory power of these techniques were evaluated, and the results were compared to each other and to data obtained in previous studies by using multilocus restriction typing (MLRT). All m...

  20. Isolation and characterization of Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53 exhibiting ligninolytic potential

    OpenAIRE

    Akita, Hironaga; Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Mohd Yusoff, Mohd Zulkhairi; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Microbial degradation of lignin releases fermentable sugars, effective utilization of which could support biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. In the present study, a lignin-degrading bacterium was isolated from leaf soil and identified as Burkholderia sp. based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This strain was named CCA53, and its lignin-degrading capability was assessed by observing its growth on medium containing alkali lignin or lignin-associated aromatic monomers as the sole carbo...

  1. In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola against Some Phytopathogenic Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Elshafie, Hazem S.; Ippolito Camele; Rocco Racioppi; Laura Scrano; Iacobellis, Nicola S.; Bufo, Sabino A.

    2012-01-01

    The trend to search novel microbial natural biocides has recently been increasing in order to avoid the environmental pollution from use of synthetic pesticides. Among these novel natural biocides are the bioactive secondary metabolites of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola (Bga). The aim of this study is to determine antifungal activity of Bga strains against some phytopathogenic fungi. The fungicidal tests were carried out using cultures and cell-free culture filtrates against Botrytis c...

  2. Plant host and sugar alcohol induced exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    OpenAIRE

    Bartholdson, S. Josefin; Brown, Alan R.; Mewburn, Ben R.; Clarke, David J.; Fry, Stephen C; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Govan, John R. W.

    2008-01-01

    The species that presently constitute the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have multiple roles; they include soil and water saprophytes, bioremediators, and plant, animal and human pathogens. Since the first description of pathogenicity in the Bcc was based on sour skin rot of onion bulbs, this study returned to this plant host to investigate the onion-associated phenotype of the Bcc. Many Bcc isolates, which were previously considered to be non-mucoid, produced copious amounts of exopolysa...

  3. Agricultural use of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia: a threat to human health?

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, A; Govan, J; Goldstein, R.

    1998-01-01

    In the past 2 decades, Burkholderia cepacia has emerged as a human pathogen causing numerous outbreaks, particularly among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. One highly transmissible strain has spread across North America and Britain, and another between hospitalized CF and non-CF patients. Meanwhile, the organism has been developed as a biopesticide for protecting crops against fungal diseases and has potential as a bioremediation agent for breaking down recalcitrant herbicides and pesticides. H...

  4. Comparison of different PCR approaches for characterization of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia isolates.

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, P. Y.; Shi, Z Y; Lau, Y J; HU, B S; Shyr, J M; Tsai, W S; Lin, Y. H.; Tseng, C Y

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated three PCR methods for epidemiological typing of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia--PCR-ribotyping, arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR)--and compared them with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The analysis was performed with 31 isolates of B. cepacia, comprising 23 epidemiologically unrelated isolates and 8 isolates collected from the same patient during two episodes of bacteremia. Pulsed-fiel...

  5. Burkholderia cepacia and cystic fibrosis: do natural environments present a potential hazard?

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, S. L.; DOHERTY, C.J; Hughes, J. E.; Nelson, J W; Govan, J R

    1995-01-01

    An environmental survey of 55 sites yielded only 12 Burkholderia cepacia isolates, none of which displayed the phenotypic properties of a multiresistant epidemic strain associated with pulmonary colonization in patients with cystic fibrosis. Although the environment probably poses a low risk for patients with cystic fibrosis as a source of B. cepacia, the pathogenic potential of individual environmental strains remains unclear. We advise caution in the development of B. cepacia as a biocontro...

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain CCA53, Isolated from Leaf Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Yusoff, Mohd Zulkhairi Mohd; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53 was isolated from leaf soil collected in Higashi-Hiroshima City in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a total of 4 contigs containing 6,647,893 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0% and comprising 9,329 predicted coding sequences. PMID:27389268

  7. Influence of glycerol on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production by Cupriavidus necator and Burkholderia sacchari

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Contreras, Alejandra; Koller, Martin; Miranda-de Sousa Dias, Miguel; Calafell-Monfort, Margarita; Braunegg, Gehart; Marqués Calvo, M. Soledad

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is a co-product of many industrial processes and is generated in large quantities from different origins. In this study, glycerol is used as a cheap carbon source for the production of poly(3- hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) with two different collection strains, Cupriavidus necator and Burkholderia sacchari, in order to provide an alternative outlet for glycerol and produce value-added bioproducts. The objective of this work was to study the influence of this carbon source on their growth...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans Strain PsJN▿

    OpenAIRE

    Weilharter, Alexandra; Mitter, Birgit; Shin, Maria V.; Patrick S G Chain; Nowak, Jerzy; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJNT is able to efficiently colonize the rhizosphere, root, and above-ground plant tissues of a wide variety of genetically unrelated plants, such as potatoes, canola, maize, and grapevines. Strain PsJN shows strong plant growth-promoting effects and was reported to enhance plant vigor and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the genome sequence of this strain, which indicates the presence of multiple traits relevant for endophytic colonization...

  9. Hexadecane and Tween 80 Stimulate Lipase Production in Burkholderia glumae by Different Mechanisms▿

    OpenAIRE

    Boekema, Bouke K. H. L.; Beselin, Anke; Breuer, Michael; Hauer, Bernhard; Koster, Margot; Rosenau, Frank; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Tommassen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae strain PG1 produces a lipase of biotechnological relevance. Lipase production by this strain and its derivative LU8093, which was obtained through classical strain improvement, was investigated under different conditions. When 10% hexadecane was included in the growth medium, lipolytic activity in both strains could be increased ∼7-fold after 24 h of growth. Hexadecane also stimulated lipase production in a strain containing the lipase gene fused to the tac promoter, indic...

  10. Bioremediation of refinery wastewater using immobilised Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp and their transconjugants

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullahi T. Ajao; Sabo E. Yakubu; Veronica J. Umoh; Joseph B. Ameh

    2013-01-01

    When oil spill occurs, it poses serious toxic hazards to all forms of life. Mixed culture of Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp isolated from refinery sludge using selective enrichment technique was used for bioremediation of refinery wastewater in a laboratoryscale bioreactor. Physicochemical parameters of both raw and treated water were as determined and compared with Federal Environ - mental Protection Agency (FEPA-limit, Abuja, Nigeria) to asses the efficiency of the bioremediati...

  11. Identification and characterization of a conserved haloacids transporter gene in the Burkholderia genus

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Xianbin.; 苏现斌.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial degradation is an important way to detoxify environmental pollutants haloacids, and the key enzyme involved is dehalogenase. In contrast to the well characterized dehalogenases, haloacids transporters that mediate uptake of haloacids are poorly understood. The deh4p gene in a haloacids-degrading bacterium Burkholderia species MBA4 is the first reported haloacids transporter gene. It is located downstream of the dehalogenase gene deh4a and the two forms a haloacids operon. The role ...

  12. Burkholderia kirstenboschensis sp. nov. nodulates papilionoid legumes indigenous to South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Emma T; van Zyl, Elritha; Beukes, Chrizelle W; Avontuur, Juanita R; Chan, Wai Yin; Palmer, Marike; Mthombeni, Lunghile S; Phalane, Francina L; Sereme, T Karabo; Venter, Stephanus N

    2015-12-01

    Despite the diversity of Burkholderia species known to nodulate legumes in introduced and native regions, relatively few taxa have been formally described. For example, the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa is thought to represent one of the major centres of diversity for the rhizobial members of Burkholderia, yet only five species have been described from legumes occurring in this region and numerous are still awaiting taxonomic treatment. Here, we investigated the taxonomic status of 12 South African root-nodulating Burkholderia isolates from native papilionoid legumes (Hypocalyptus coluteoides, H. oxalidifolius, H. sophoroides and Virgilia oroboides). Analysis of four gene regions (16S rRNA, recA, atpD and rpoB) revealed that the isolates represent a genealogically unique and exclusive assemblage within the genus. Its distinctness was supported by all other aspects of the polyphasic approach utilized, including the genome-based criteria DNA-DNA hybridization (≥70.9%) and average nucleotide identities (≥96%). We accordingly propose the name B. kirstenboschensis sp. nov. for this taxon with isolate Kb15(T) (=LMG 28727(T); =SARC 695(T)) as its type strain. Our data showed that intraspecific genome size differences (≥0.81 Mb) and the occurrence of large DNA regions that are apparently unique to single individuals (16-23% of an isolate's genome) can significantly limit the value of data obtained from DNA-DNA hybridization experiments. Substitution of DNA-DNA hybridization with whole genome sequencing as a prerequisite for the description of Burkholderia species will undoubtedly speed up the pace at which their diversity are documented, especially in hyperdiverse regions such as the Cape Floristic Region. PMID:26472229

  13. Structural stability of Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilms is reliant on eDNA structure and presence of a bacterial nucleic acid binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Novotny

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common lethal inherited genetic disorder affection Caucasians. Even with medical advances, CF is life-shortening with patients typically surviving only to age 38. Infection of the CF lung by Burkholderia cenocepacia presents exceptional challenges to medical management of these patients as clinically this microbe is resistant to virtually all antibiotics, is highly transmissible and infection of CF patients with this microbe renders them ineligible for lung transplant, often the last lifesaving option. Here we have targeted two abundant components of the B. cenocepacia biofilm for immune intervention: extracellular DNA and DNABII proteins, the latter of which are bacterial nucleic acid binding proteins. Treatment of B. cenocepacia biofilms with antiserum directed at one of these DNABII proteins (integration host factor or IHF resulted in significant disruption of the biofilm. Moreover, when anti-IHF mediated destabilization of a B. cenocepacia biofilm was combined with exposure to traditional antibiotics, B. cenocepacia resident within the biofilm and thereby typically highly resistant to the action of antibiotics, were now rendered susceptible to killing. Pre-incubation of B. cenocepacia with anti-IHF serum prior to exposure to murine CF macrophages, which are normally unable to effectively degrade ingested B. cenocepacia, resulted in a statistically significant increase in killing of phagocytized B. cenocepacia. Collectively, these findings support further development of strategies that target DNABII proteins as a novel approach for treatment of CF patients, particularly those whose lungs are infected with B. cenocepacia.

  14. Functional and genomic insights into the pathogenesis of Burkholderia species to rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Lynn M; An, Shi-Qi; Hwang, Ingyu; Chou, Shan-Ho; He, Yong-Qiang; Tang, Ji-Liang; Ryan, Robert P; Dow, J Maxwell

    2016-03-01

    A number of species of bacteria from the genus Burkholderia have been shown to be causal agents of diseases of rice. These diseases, caused by Burkholderia glumae, B. gladioli and B. plantarii, are becoming increasingly common across the globe. This is particularly so for B. glumae, whose ability to grow at elevated temperatures suggests that it may become a prevalent problem in an era of global warming. Despite the increasing threat to rice, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms employed by these pathogens. Work over the last 5 years has provided an increasing insight into these factors and their control by environmental and other cues. In addition, the determination of a number of genome sequences has allowed bioinformatic predictions of further possible mechanisms, which can now be investigated experimentally. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of virulence of Burkholderia to rice, to include discussion of the roles of toxins, type II secreted enzymes, type III secreted effectors and motility as well as their regulation by quorum sensing, two-component systems and cyclic di-GMP signalling. Finally, we consider a number of approaches for the control of bacterial virulence through the modulation of quorum sensing and toxin degradation. PMID:26690879

  15. In Vitro Pharmacodynamics of Levofloxacin and Other Aerosolized Antibiotics under Multiple Conditions Relevant to Chronic Pulmonary Infection in Cystic Fibrosis ▿

    OpenAIRE

    King, Paula; Lomovskaya, Olga; Griffith, David C.; Burns, Jane L.; Dudley, Michael N.

    2009-01-01

    The inhalational administration of antibiotics can provide high concentrations locally in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and, thus, can be useful for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections. The present study evaluated the in vitro activities of levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, amikacin, and aztreonam against clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, and Staphylococcus aureus from cys...

  16. Indole-3-Acetic Acid Produced by Burkholderia heleia Acts as a Phenylacetic Acid Antagonist to Disrupt Tropolone Biosynthesis in Burkholderia plantarii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengcen; Tachibana, Seiji; Murai, Yuta; Li, Li; Lau, Sharon Yu Ling; Cao, Mengchao; Zhu, Guonian; Hashimoto, Makoto; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia heleia PAK1-2 is a potent biocontrol agent isolated from rice rhizosphere, as it prevents bacterial rice seedling blight disease caused by Burkholderia plantarii. Here, we isolated a non-antibacterial metabolite from the culture fluid of B. heleia PAK1-2 that was able to suppress B. plantarii virulence and subsequently identified as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). IAA suppressed the production of tropolone in B. plantarii in a dose-dependent manner without any antibacterial and quorum quenching activity, suggesting that IAA inhibited steps of tropolone biosynthesis. Consistent with this, supplementing cultures of B. plantarii with either L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine or [ring-2H2~5]phenylacetic acid revealed that phenylacetic acid (PAA), which is the dominant metabolite during the early growth stage, is a direct precursor of tropolone. Exposure of B. plantarii to IAA suppressed production of both PAA and tropolone. These data particularly showed that IAA produced by B. heleia PAK1-2 disrupts tropolone production during bioconversion of PAA to tropolone via the ring-rearrangement on the phenyl group of the precursor to attenuate the virulence of B. plantarii. B. heleia PAK1-2 is thus likely a microbial community coordinating bacterium in rhizosphere ecosystems, which never eliminates phytopathogens but only represses production of phytotoxins or bacteriocidal substances. PMID:26935539

  17. Draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sordidicola S170, a potential plant growth promoter isolated from coniferous forest soil in the Czech Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lladó, Salvador; Xu, Zhuofei; Sørensen, Søren Johannes;

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia species are key players in the accumulation of carbon from cellulose decomposition in coniferous forest ecosystems. We report here the draft genome of Burkholderia sordidicola strain S170, containing features associated with known genes involved in plant growth promotion, the biologi...

  18. A reliable method for the selection and confirmation of transconjugants of plant growth-promoting bacteria especially plant-associated Burkholderia spp.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Tariq; Lum, MR; Chong, AW; Amirapu, AB; Hameed, S.; Hirsch, AM

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Selectable markers, e.g., antibiotic resistance, for conjugation experiments are not always effective for slow-growing plant growth promoting bacteria such as Burkholderia. We used PCAT medium containing Congo Red for selecting Burkholderia transconjugants. This method allows for the reliable selection of transconjugants of these novel plant growth-promoting bacteria.

  19. Evaluation of Aromatic Plants and Compounds Used to Fight Multidrug Resistant Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramar Perumal Samy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100 μg of residue was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW and Staphylococcus aureus, of which Tragia involucrata L., Citrus acida Roxb. Hook.f., and Aegle marmelos (L. Correa ex Roxb. showed powerful inhibition of bacteria. Eighteen plants displayed only a moderate effect, while six plants failed to provide any evidence of inhibition against the tested bacteria. Purified compounds showed higher antimicrobial activity than crude extracts. The compounds showed less toxic effect to the human skin fibroblasts (HEPK cells than their corresponding aromatic fractions. Phytochemical screening indicates that the presence of various secondary metabolites may be responsible for this activity. Most of the plant extracts contained high levels of phenolic or polyphenolic compounds and exhibited activity against MDR pathogens. In conclusion, plants are promising agents that deserve further exploration. Lead molecules available from such extracts may serve as potential antimicrobial agents for future drug development to combat diseases caused by the MDR bacterial strains as reported in this study.

  20. Understanding regulation of the host-mediated gut symbiont population and the symbiont-mediated host immunity in the Riptortus-Burkholderia symbiosis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Jun Beom; Jang, Ho Am; Han, Yeon Soo; Fukatsu, Takema; Lee, Bok Luel

    2016-11-01

    Valuable insect models have tremendously contributed to our understanding of innate immunity and symbiosis. Bean bug, Riptortus pedestris, is a useful insect symbiosis model due to harboring cultivable monospecific gut symbiont, genus Burkholderia. Bean bug is a hemimetabolous insect whose immunity is not well-understood. However, we recently identified three major antimicrobial peptides of Riptortus and examined the relationship between gut symbiosis and host immunity. We found that the presence of Burkholderia gut symbiont positively affects Riptortus immunity. From studying host regulation mechanisms of symbiont population, we revealed that the symbiotic Burkholderia cells are much more susceptible to Riptortus immune responses than the cultured cells. We further elucidated that the immune-susceptibility of the Burkholderia gut symbionts is due to the drastic change of bacterial cell envelope. Finally, we show that the immune-susceptible Burkholderia symbionts are able to prosper in host owing to the suppression of immune responses of the symbiotic midgut. PMID:26774501

  1. The Crystal Structure of Burkholderia cenocepacia DfsA Provides Insights into Substrate Recognition and Quorum Sensing Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, Francesca; Scoffone, Viola C; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Fumagalli, Marco; Buroni, Silvia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Forneris, Federico

    2016-06-14

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is a major concern among respiratory tract infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This pathogen is particularly difficult to treat because of its high level of resistance to the clinically relevant antimicrobial agents. In B. cenocepacia, the quorum sensing cell-cell communication system is involved in different processes that are important for bacterial virulence, such as biofilm formation and protease and siderophore production. Targeting the enzymes involved in this process represents a promising therapeutic approach. With the aim of finding effective quorum sensing inhibitors, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of B. cenocepacia diffusible factor synthase A, DfsA. This bifunctional crotonase (dehydratase/thioesterase) produces the characteristic quorum sensing molecule of B. cenocepacia, cis-2-dodecenoic acid or BDSF, starting from 3-hydroxydodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure revealed the presence of a lipid molecule in the catalytic site of the enzyme, which was identified as dodecanoic acid. Our biochemical characterization shows that DfsA is able to use dodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein as a substrate, demonstrating that dodecanoic acid, the product of this reaction, is released very slowly from the DfsA active site, therefore acting as a DfsA inhibitor. This molecule shows an unprecedented conformational arrangement inside the DfsA active site. In contrast with previous hypotheses, our data illustrate how DfsA and closely related homologous enzymes can recognize long hydrophobic substrates without large conformational changes or assistance by additional regulator molecules. The elucidation of the substrate binding mode in DfsA provides the starting point for structure-based drug discovery studies targeting B. cenocepacia quorum sensing-assisted virulence. PMID:27198181

  2. Global changes in gene expression by the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia in response to internalization by murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolman Jennifer S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen causing life-threatening infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The bacterium survives within macrophages by interfering with endocytic trafficking and delaying the maturation of the B. cenocepacia-containing phagosome. We hypothesize that B. cenocepacia undergoes changes in gene expression after internalization by macrophages, inducing genes involved in intracellular survival and host adaptation. Results We examined gene expression by intracellular B. cenocepacia using selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS combined with microarray analysis. We identified 767 genes with significantly different levels of expression by intracellular bacteria, of which 330 showed increased expression and 437 showed decreased expression. Affected genes represented all aspects of cellular life including information storage and processing, cellular processes and signaling, and metabolism. In general, intracellular gene expression demonstrated a pattern of environmental sensing, bacterial response, and metabolic adaptation to the phagosomal environment. Deletion of various SCOTS-identified genes affected bacterial entry into macrophages and intracellular replication. We also show that intracellular B. cenocepacia is cytotoxic towards the macrophage host, and capable of spread to neighboring cells, a role dependent on SCOTS-identified genes. In particular, genes involved in bacterial motility, cobalamin biosynthesis, the type VI secretion system, and membrane modification contributed greatly to macrophage entry and subsequent intracellular behavior of B. cenocepacia. Conclusions B. cenocepacia enters macrophages, adapts to the phagosomal environment, replicates within a modified phagosome, and exhibits cytotoxicity towards the host cells. The analysis of the transcriptomic response of intracellular B. cenocepacia reveals that metabolic adaptation to a new niche plays a major role

  3. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzai, S; Safi, S; Mossavari, N; Afshar, D; Bolourchian, M

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to establish a Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique for the rapid detection of B. mallei the etiologic agent of glanders, a highly contagious disease of equines. A set of six specific primers targeting integrase gene cluster were designed for the LAMP test. The reaction was optimized using different temperatures and time intervals. The specificity of the assay was evaluated using DNA from B.pseudomallei and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The LAMP products were analyzed both visually and under UV light after electrophoresis. The optimized conditions were found to be at 63ºC for 60 min. The assay showed high specificity and sensitivity. It was concluded that the established LAMP assay is a rapid, sensitive and practical tool for detection of B. mallei and early diagnosis of glanders. PMID:27609471

  4. Rhizonin A from Burkholderia sp. KCTC11096 and Its Growth Promoting Role in Lettuce Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Mo Kang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We isolated and identified a gibberellin-producing Burkholderia sp. KCTC 11096 from agricultural field soils. The culture filtrate of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR significantly increased the germination and growth of lettuce and Chinese cabbage seeds. The ethyl acetate extract of the PGPR culture showed significantly higher rate of lettuce seed germination and growth as compared to the distilled water treated control. The ethyl acetate fraction of the Burkholderia sp. was subjected to bioassay-guided isolation and we obtained for the first time from a Burkholderia sp. the plant growth promoting compound rhizonin A (1, which was characterized through NMR and MS techniques. Application of various concentrations of 1 significantly promoted the lettuce seed germination as compared to control.

  5. Characterization of a chromosomally encoded 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid/alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase from Burkholderia sp. strain RASC.

    OpenAIRE

    Suwa, Y.; Wright, A D; Fukimori, F; Nummy, K A; Hausinger, R P; Holben, W E; Forney, L J

    1996-01-01

    The findings of previous studies indicate that the genes required for metabolism of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) are typically encoded on broad-host-range plasmids. However, characterization of plasmid-cured strains of Burkholderia sp. strain RASC, as well as mutants obtained by transposon mutagenesis, suggested that the 2,4-D catabolic genes were located on the chromosome of this strain. Mutants of Burkholderia strain RASC unable to degrade 2,4-D (2,4-D- strains) were...

  6. Structural identification of the O-antigen fraction from the lipopolysaccharide of the Burkholderia ambifaria strain 19182.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Castro, Cristina; Dinischiotu, Natalia; Feys, Bart; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Molinaro, Antonio

    2013-09-20

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex comprises a group of bacterial strains with both beneficial and detrimental effects to plant and animals. Gram negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide is one of the most important molecular factors involved in the dialogue between the microbe and the host and in this context we have isolated and identified the O-antigen fraction of the Burkholderia ambifaria strain 19182. It consists of two different O-polysaccharides built up on 6-deoxy sugars, among which the 6-deoxy-altrose in the d absolute configuration, is present. This monosaccharide is found for the first time and it is a unique feature associated to this strain. PMID:23886988

  7. Sri Lankan National Melioidosis Surveillance Program Uncovers a Nationwide Distribution of Invasive Melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Enoka M; Merritt, Adam J; Ler, Yi-Horng; Thevanesam, Vasanthi; Inglis, Timothy J J

    2016-02-01

    The epidemiologic status of melioidosis in Sri Lanka was unclear from the few previous case reports. We established laboratory support for a case definition and started a nationwide case-finding study. Suspected Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates were collated, identified by polymerase chain reaction assay, referred for Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight analysis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and named according to the international MLST database. Between 2006 and early 2014, there were 32 patients with culture-confirmed melioidosis with an increasing annual total and a falling fatality rate. Patients were predominantly from rural communities, diabetic, and male. The major clinical presentations were sepsis, pneumonia, soft tissue and joint infections, and other focal infection. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates came from all parts of Sri Lanka except the Sabaragamuwa Province, the south central hill country, and parts of northern Sri Lanka. Bacterial isolates belonged to 18 multilocus sequence types, one of which (ST 1137) was associated with septicemia and a single-organ focus (Fisher's exact, P = 0.004). Melioidosis is an established endemic infection throughout Sri Lanka, and is caused by multiple genotypes of B. pseudomallei, which form a distinct geographic group based upon related sequence types (BURST) cluster at the junction of the southeast Asian and Australasian clades. PMID:26621560

  8. Melioidosis and idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis: a cast-iron case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardy, Benjamin; Simpson, Graham

    2013-12-01

    Melioidosis is an infection with clinical importance in northern Australia due to the high associated mortality despite appropriate therapy. This report presents a case of acute pulmonary melioidosis on a background remarkable for the absence of typical risk factors for infection, but the presence of a high iron pulmonary microenvironment consequent to idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis. In light of recent genetic analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei, we postulate that the patient inadvertently provided a high-substrate environment for the iron-scavenging ability of B. pseudomallei's siderophore associated virulence factors, giving her a unique major risk factor for infection. This highlights the importance of considering individual patient factors in addition to population-wide risk factors in the differential diagnosis of a serious illness, and the value of genetic analysis of clinically significant pathogens. PMID:25473541

  9. Colonization of Morus alba L. by the plant-growth-promoting and antagonistic bacterium Burkholderia cepacia strain Lu10-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Baoyun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum dematium, is a serious threat to the production and quality of mulberry leaves in susceptible varieties. Control of the disease has been a major problem in mulberry cultivation. Some strains of Burkholderia cepacia were reported to be useful antagonists of plant pests and could increase the yields of several crop plants. Although B. cepacia Lu10-1 is an endophytic bacterium obtained from mulberry leaves, it has not been deployed to control C. dematium infection in mulberry nor its colonization patterns in mulberry have been studied using GFP reporter or other reporters. The present study sought to evaluate the antifungal and plant-growth-promoting properties of strain Lu10-1, to clarify its specific localization within a mulberry plant, and to better understand its potential as a biocontrol and growth-promoting agent. Results Lu10-1 inhibited conidial germination and mycelial growth of C. dematium in vitro; when applied on leaves or to the soil, Lu10-1 also inhibited the development of anthracnose in a greenhouse, but the effectiveness varied with the length of the interval between the strain treatment and inoculation with the pathogen. Strain Lu10-1 could survive in both sterile and non-sterile soils for more than 60 days. The strain produced auxins, contributed to P solubilization and nitrogenase activity, and significantly promoted the growth of mulberry seedlings. The bacteria infected mulberry seedlings through cracks formed at junctions of lateral roots with the main root and in the zone of differentiation and elongation, and the cells were able to multiply and spread, mainly to the intercellular spaces of different tissues. The growth in all the tissues was around 1-5 × 105 CFU per gram of fresh plant tissue. Conclusions Burkholderia cepacia strain Lu10-1 is an endophyte that can multiply and spread in mulberry seedlings rapidly and efficiently. The strain is antagonistic to C

  10. Alteration in cell surface properties of Burkholderia spp. during surfactant-aided biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Sagarika; Mukherji, Suparna [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India). Centre for Environmental Science and Engineering (CESE)

    2012-04-15

    Chemical surfactants may impact microbial cell surface properties, i.e., cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and cell surface charge, and may thus affect the uptake of components from non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). This work explored the impact of Triton X-100, Igepal CA 630, and Tween 80 (at twice the critical micelle concentration, CMC) on the cell surface characteristics of Burkholderia cultures, Burkholderia cepacia (ES1, aliphatic degrader) and Burkholderia multivorans (NG1, aromatic degrader), when grown on a six-component model NAPL. In the presence of Triton X-100, NAPL biodegradation was enhanced from 21% to 60% in B. cepacia and from 18% to 53% in B. multivorans. CSH based on water contact angle (50-52 ) was in the same range for both strains while zeta potential at neutral pH was -38 and -31 mV for B. cepacia and B. multivorans, respectively. In the presence of Triton X-100, their CSH increased to greater than 75 and the zeta potential decreased. This induced a change in the mode of uptake and initiated aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation by B. multivorans and increased the rate of aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation in B. cepacia. Igepal CA 630 and Tween 80 also altered the cell surface properties. For B. cepacia grown in the presence of Triton X-100 at two and five times its CMC, CSH increased significantly in the log growth phase. Growth in the presence of the chemical surfactants also affected the abundance of chemical functional groups on the cell surface. Cell surface changes had maximum impact on NAPL degradation in the presence of emulsifying surfactants, Triton X-100 and Igepal CA630.

  11. Plant host and sugar alcohol induced exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdson, S Josefin; Brown, Alan R; Mewburn, Ben R; Clarke, David J; Fry, Stephen C; Campopiano, Dominic J; Govan, John R W

    2008-08-01

    The species that presently constitute the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have multiple roles; they include soil and water saprophytes, bioremediators, and plant, animal and human pathogens. Since the first description of pathogenicity in the Bcc was based on sour skin rot of onion bulbs, this study returned to this plant host to investigate the onion-associated phenotype of the Bcc. Many Bcc isolates, which were previously considered to be non-mucoid, produced copious amounts of exopolysaccharide (EPS) when onion tissue was provided as the sole nutrient. EPS production was not species-specific, was observed in isolates from both clinical and environmental sources, and did not correlate with the ability to cause maceration of onion tissue. Chemical analysis suggested that the onion components responsible for EPS induction were primarily the carbohydrates sucrose, fructose and fructans. Additional sugars were investigated, and all alcohol sugars tested were able to induce EPS production, in particular mannitol and glucitol. To investigate the molecular basis for EPS biosynthesis, we focused on the highly conserved bce gene cluster thought to be involved in cepacian biosynthesis. We demonstrated induction of the bce gene cluster by mannitol, and found a clear correlation between the inability of representatives of the Burkholderia cenocepacia ET12 lineage to produce EPS and the presence of an 11 bp deletion within the bceB gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase. Insertional inactivation of bceB in Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD results in loss of EPS production on sugar alcohol media. These novel and surprising insights into EPS biosynthesis highlight the metabolic potential of the Bcc and show that a potential virulence factor may not be detected by routine laboratory culture. Our results also highlight a potential hazard in the use of inhaled mannitol as an osmolyte to improve mucociliary clearance in individuals with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18667584

  12. Burkholderia unamae sp. nov., an N2-fixing rhizospheric and endophytic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Paredes-Valdez, Guadalupe; Santos, Paulina Estrada-De los

    2004-07-01

    It was shown recently that the genus Burkholderia is rich in N2-fixing bacteria that are associated with plants. A group of these diazotrophic isolates with identical or very similar 16S rDNA restriction patterns [designated amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) genotypes 13, 14 and 15] was selected and a polyphasic taxonomic study was performed, which included new isolates that were recovered from rhizospheres, rhizoplanes or internal tissues of maize, sugarcane and coffee plants. Morphological, physiological and biochemical features, as well as multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis profiles and whole-cell protein patterns, of 20 strains were analysed. In addition, analysis of cellular fatty acid profiles, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA reassociation experiments were performed with representative strains. The taxonomic data indicated that the strains analysed belong to a novel diazotrophic Burkholderia species, for which the name Burkholderia unamae sp. nov. is proposed. Strain MTl-641T (=ATCC BAA-744T=CIP 107921T), isolated from the rhizosphere of maize, was designated as the type strain. B. unamae was found as an endophyte of plants grown in regions with climates ranging from semi-hot subhumid to hot humid, but not from plants grown in regions with semi-hot or hot dry climates. Moreover, B. unamae was isolated from rhizospheres and plants growing in soils with pH values in the range 4.5-7.1, but not from soils with pH values higher than 7.5. PMID:15280286

  13. Complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilharter, Alexandra; Mitter, Birgit; Shin, Maria V; Chain, Patrick S G; Nowak, Jerzy; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-07-01

    Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN(T) is able to efficiently colonize the rhizosphere, root, and above-ground plant tissues of a wide variety of genetically unrelated plants, such as potatoes, canola, maize, and grapevines. Strain PsJN shows strong plant growth-promoting effects and was reported to enhance plant vigor and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the genome sequence of this strain, which indicates the presence of multiple traits relevant for endophytic colonization and plant growth promotion. PMID:21551308

  14. Purification, biochemical characterization, and genetic cloning of the phytase produced by Burkholderia sp. strain a13

    OpenAIRE

    Rezende Graminho, Eduardo; Takaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    A phytase-producing bacterium, Burkholderia sp. a13 (JCM 30421), was isolated from Lake Kasumigaura by enrichment cultivation using minimum medium containing phytic acid as the sole phosphorus source. The phytase production by strain a13 was induced by the presence of phytic acid and repressed by the addition of glucose. The purified enzyme had a molecular weight of 44 kDa and a phytase activity of 174 μmol min–1 mg–1. The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity, but the highest activity wa...

  15. Comparative genome-wide analysis reveals that Burkholderia contaminans MS14 possesses multiple antimicrobial biosynthesis genes but not major genetic loci required for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peng; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Baird, Sonya M; Showmaker, Kurt C; Smith, Leif; Peterson, Daniel G; Lu, Shien

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia contaminans MS14 shows significant antimicrobial activities against plant and animal pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The antifungal agent occidiofungin produced by MS14 has great potential for development of biopesticides and pharmaceutical drugs. However, the use of Burkholderia species as biocontrol agent in agriculture is restricted due to the difficulties in distinguishing between plant growth-promoting bacteria and the pathogenic bacteria. The complete MS14 genome was sequenced and analyzed to find what beneficial and virulence-related genes it harbors. The phylogenetic relatedness of B. contaminans MS14 and other 17 Burkholderia species was also analyzed. To research MS14's potential virulence, the gene regions related to the antibiotic production, antibiotic resistance, and virulence were compared between MS14 and other Burkholderia genomes. The genome of B. contaminans MS14 was sequenced and annotated. The genomic analyses reveal the presence of multiple gene sets for antimicrobial biosynthesis, which contribute to its antimicrobial activities. BLAST results indicate that the MS14 genome harbors a large number of unique regions. MS14 is closely related to another plant growth-promoting Burkholderia strain B. lata 383 according to the average nucleotide identity data. Moreover, according to the phylogenetic analysis, plant growth-promoting species isolated from soils and mammalian pathogenic species are clustered together, respectively. MS14 has multiple antimicrobial activity-related genes identified from the genome, but it lacks key virulence-related gene loci found in the pathogenic strains. Additionally, plant growth-promoting Burkholderia species have one or more antimicrobial biosynthesis genes in their genomes as compared with nonplant growth-promoting soil-isolated Burkholderia species. On the other hand, pathogenic species harbor multiple virulence-associated gene loci that are not present in nonpathogenic Burkholderia species. The MS14

  16. The genome of the fungal-interactive soil bacterium Burkholderia terrae BS001 : A plethora of outstanding interactive capabilities unveiled

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, Irshad Ul; Graupner, Katharina; Nazir, Rashid; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia terrae strain BS001, obtained as an inhabitant of the mycosphere of Laccaria proxima (a close relative of Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten), actively interacts with Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. We here summarize the remarkable ecological behavior of B. terrae BS001 in the mycosphere and

  17. The cep quorum-sensing system of Burkholderia cepacia H111 controls biofilm formation and swarming motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, B.; Riedel, K.; Hentzer, Morten;

    2001-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa often co-exist as mixed biofilms in the lungs of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, the isolation of random mini-Tn5 insertion mutants of B. cepacia H111 defective in biofilm formation on an abiotic surface is reported. It is demons...

  18. Application of lipase from Burkholderia cepacia in the degradation of agro-industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello Bueno, Pabline Rafaella; de Oliveira, Tatianne Ferreira; Castiglioni, Gabriel Luis; Soares Júnior, Manoel Soares; Ulhoa, Cirano Jose

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the physical and chemical characteristics of Amano PS commercial lipase - Burkholderia cepacia and lipase produced by Burkholderia cepacia strain ATCC 25416, in addition to studying the hydrolysis of agro-industrial effluent collected in a fried potato industry. The optimum temperature for increasing lipase activity was 37 °C. The temperature increase caused a decrease in thermostability of lipase, and the commercial lipase was less stable, with values of 10.5, 4.6 and 4.9%, respectively, lower than those obtained by lipase from strain ATCC 25416, at temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 °C. The enzymatic activity was higher in alkaline conditions, achieving better results at pH 8.0. The pH was the variable that most influenced the hydrolysis of triacylglycerides of the agro-industrial effluent, followed by enzyme concentration, and volume of gum arabic used in the reaction medium. Thus, it can be observed that the enzymatic hydrolytic process of the studied effluent presents a premising contribution to reduction of environmental impacts of potato chip processing industries. PMID:25860696

  19. Polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis and simultaneous remotion of organic inhibitors from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by Burkholderia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Mateus Schreiner Garcez; Gomez, José Gregório Cabrera; Taciro, Marilda Keico; Mendonça, Thatiane Teixeira; Silva, Luiziana Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia sp. F24, originally isolated from soil, was capable of growth on xylose and removed organic inhibitors present in a hemicellulosic hydrolysate and simultaneously produced poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P3HB). Using non-detoxified hydrolysate, Burkholderia sp. F24 reached a cell dry weight (CDW) of 6.8 g L(-1), containing 48 % of P3HB and exhibited a volumetric productivity (PP3HB) of 0.10 g L(-1) h(-1). Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate copolymers (P3HB-co-3HV) were produced using xylose and levulinic acid (LA) as carbon sources. In shake flask cultures, the 3HV content in the copolymer increased from 9 to 43 mol% by adding LA from 1.0 to 5.0 g L(-1). In high cell density cultivation using concentrated hemicellulosic hydrolysate F24 reached 25.04 g L(-1) of CDW containing 49 % of P3HB and PP3HB of 0.28 g L(-1 )h(-1). Based on these findings, second-generation ethanol and bioplastics from sugarcane bagasse is proposed. PMID:25059637

  20. Cyanide Toxicity to Burkholderia cenocepacia Is Modulated by Polymicrobial Communities and Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Steve P; Workentine, Matthew L; Li, Xiang; Magarvey, Nathan A; O'Toole, George A; Surette, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Microbes within polymicrobial communities can establish positive and negative interactions that have the potential to influence the overall behavior of the community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) can co-exist in the lower airways, however several studies have shown that P. aeruginosa can effectively kill the Bcc in vitro, for which hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was recently proposed to play a critical role. Here we show that modification of the environment (i.e., culture medium), long-term genetic adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, or the addition of another bacterial species to the community can alter the sensitivity of Burkholderia cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins. We specifically demonstrate that undefined rich media leads to higher susceptibility of B. cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins like cyanide as compared to a synthetic medium (SCFM), that mimics the CF lung nutritional content. Overall, our study shows that the polymicrobial environment can have profound effects on negative interactions mediated by P. aeruginosa against B. cenocepacia. In fact, evolved P. aeruginosa or the presence of other species such as Staphylococcus aureus can directly abolish the direct competition mediated by cyanide and consequently maintaining a higher level of species diversity within the community. PMID:27242743

  1. Intraspecific variation in Burkholderia caledonica: Europe vs. Africa and soil vs. endophytic isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Brecht; Peeters, Charlotte; van Wyk, Braam; Smets, Erik; Dessein, Steven; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The best-known interaction between bacteria and plants is the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, but other bacteria-plant interactions exist, such as between Burkholderia and Rubiaceae (coffee family). A number of bacterial endophytes in Rubiaceae are closely related to the soil bacterium Burkholderia caledonica. This intriguing observation is explored by investigating isolates from different geographic regions (Western Europe vs. sub-Saharan Africa) and from different niches (free-living bacteria in soil vs. endophytic bacteria in host plants). The multilocus sequence analysis shows five clades, of which clade 1 with two basal isolates deviates from the rest and is therefore not considered further. All other isolates belong to the species B. caledonica, but two genetically different groups are identified. Group A holds only European isolates and group B holds isolates from Africa, with the exception of one European isolate. Although the European and African isolates are considered one species, some degree of genetic differentiation is evident. Endophytic isolates of B. caledonica are found in certain members of African Rubiaceae, but only in group B. Within this group, the endophytes cannot be distinguished from the soil isolates, which indicates a possible exchange of bacteria between soil and host plant. PMID:24433672

  2. Genomovars of Burkholderia cepacia Complex from Rice Rhizosphere and Clinic in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is regarded as a genetically distinct but phenotypically similar bacteria group referring to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), which is found not only in clinic but also in rice growing environment. It is very important in microbial safety of rice for us to understand the genomovar status of Bcc. Genomovar analysis was performed among 87 Bcc isolates by means of Hae Ⅲ-recA RFLP assays and species-specific PCR tests. Three genomovars were found from the rice rhizosphere including Ⅰ, ⅢB and Ⅴ, and genomovar Ⅴ was predominant. Genomovars Ⅰ, ⅢA and ⅢB existed in the clinical samples, and genomovar ⅢA was the most popular. It showed that genomovar composition was different between the Bcc strains from the rice rhizosphere and clinical environment. Simultaneously, the results revealed the genetic diversity of Bcc strains from the rice rhizosphere, and genomovar Ⅲ referred as virulent species in clinic also existed in the rice rhizosphere.

  3. Maize responds to Azotobacter sp and Burkholderia sp inoculation at reduced dose of nitrogen fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Sánchez-Yáñez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The positive maize response to inoculation with plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB as Azotobacter sp and Burkholderia sp an endophytic type, are an alternative to reduced and optimize nitrogen fertilizer (NF dose, recommended for this plant, without adversely affect its growth. The aim of this study was to analyze maize respond to inoculation with Azotobacter sp and Burkholderia sp at the dose 50% of FN. Used an experimental design of randomized blocks. By response variables: percent germination (%, the shoot and root phenology: plant height (PH, root length (RL and biomass: shoot fresh weight (SFW and root fresh weight (RFW, the shoot dry weight (SDW and root dry weight (RDW. The results indicated a positive maize respond to PGPB inoculation at germination, seedling and flowering level, reached a RDW of 7.03 g, statistically significant value compared with 2.60 g of RDW non inoculated maize feed with NF dose recommended regard as relative control (RC. This suggests a synergistic interaction among these PGPB in synthesis of plant growth promoting substances (PGPS on maize, to optimize the reduced NF dose.

  4. Biofilms produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia: influence of media and solid supports on composition of matrix exopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzoni, Elena; Ravalico, Fabio; Scaini, Denis; Delneri, Ambra; Rizzo, Roberto; Cescutti, Paola

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria usually grow forming biofilms, which are communities of cells embedded in a self-produced dynamic polymeric matrix, characterized by a complex three-dimensional structure. The matrix holds cells together and above a surface, and eventually releases them, resulting in colonization of other surfaces. Although exopolysaccharides (EPOLs) are important components of the matrix, determination of their structure is usually performed on samples produced in non-biofilm conditions, or indirectly through genetic studies. Among the Burkholderia cepacia complex species, Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and is generally more aggressive than other species. In the present investigation, B. cenocepacia strain BTS2, a CF isolate, was grown in biofilm mode on glass slides and cellulose membranes, using five growth media, one of which mimics the nutritional content of CF sputum. The structure of the matrix EPOLs was determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, while visualization of the biofilms on glass slides was obtained by means of confocal laser microscopy, phase-contrast microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results confirmed that the type of EPOLs biosynthesized depends both on the medium used and on the type of support, and showed that mucoid conditions do not always lead to significant biofilm production, while bacteria in a non-mucoid state can still form biofilm containing EPOLs. PMID:26586192

  5. Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are cyanogenic under biofilm and colonial growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshino Saiko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is a collection of nine genotypically distinct but phenotypically similar species. They show wide ecological diversity and include species that are used for promoting plant growth and bio-control as well species that are opportunistic pathogens of vulnerable patients. Over recent years the Bcc have emerged as problematic pathogens of the CF lung. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is another important CF pathogen. It is able to synthesise hydrogen cyanide (HCN, a potent inhibitor of cellular respiration. We have recently shown that HCN production by P. aeruginosa may have a role in CF pathogenesis. This paper describes an investigation of the ability of bacteria of the Bcc to make HCN. Results The genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia has 3 putative HCN synthase encoding (hcnABC gene clusters. B. cenocepacia and all 9 species of the Bcc complex tested were able to make cyanide at comparable levels to P. aeruginosa, but only when grown surface attached as colonies or during biofilm growth on glass beads. In contrast to P. aeruginosa and other cyanogenic bacteria, cyanide was not detected during planktonic growth of Bcc strains. Conclusion All species in the Bcc are cyanogenic when grown as surface attached colonies or as biofilms.

  6. Use of a recombinant burkholderia intracellular motility a protein for immunodiagnosis of glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Subodh; Malik, Praveen; Verma, Shailendra Kumar; Pal, Vijai; Gautam, Vandana; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Rai, Ganga Prasad

    2011-09-01

    Glanders, caused by the Gram-negative, nonmotile bacterium Burkholderia mallei, is a contagious and highly fatal disease of equines. During the last decade, the number of glanders outbreaks has increased steadily. The disease also has high zoonotic significance and B. mallei is listed biological warfare agent. The complement fixation test (CFT) is a routinely used and internationally recognized test to screen equine sera for the glanders. However, discrepant results have been observed using the CFT. The low sensitivity and specificity of the CFT and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) have been linked to the use of crude test antigens. We expressed a novel recombinant Burkholderia intracellular motility A (rBimA) protein in Escherichia coli for the diagnosis of equine glanders. Purified rBimA was used in an indirect ELISA format. All of the 21 true-positive serum samples used in the study tested positive, whereas only 17 of the 1,524 potentially negative sera tested positive by indirect ELISA, thus exhibiting 100% sensitivity and 98.88% specificity. Also, rBimA protein did not react with melioidosis patient and normal healthy human serum samples, showing its high specificity. The developed assay can be used as a simple and rapid tool for diagnosis of glanders in equine serum samples. An Indian patent (1328/DEL/2010) has been filed for the reagent. PMID:21752949

  7. Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species: antimicrobial resistance and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Iain J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-02-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species, namely, Burkholderia cepacia complex, collectively are a group of troublesome nonfermenters. Although not inherently virulent organisms, these environmental Gram negatives can complicate treatment in those who are immunocompromised, critically ill in the intensive care unit and those patients with suppurative lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis. Through a range of intrinsic antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, virulence factors, and the ability to survive in biofilms, these opportunistic pathogens are well suited to persist, both in the environment and the host. Treatment recommendations are hindered by the difficulties in laboratory identification, the lack of reproducibility of antimicrobial susceptibility testing, the lack of clinical breakpoints, and the absence of clinical outcome data. Despite trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole often being the mainstay of treatment, resistance is widely encountered, and alternative regimens, including combination therapy, are often used. This review will highlight the important aspects and unique challenges that these three nonfermenters pose, and, in the absence of clinical outcome data, our therapeutic recommendations will be based on reported antimicrobial susceptibility and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles. PMID:25643274

  8. Pulmonary melioidosis presenting with pleural effusion: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ian Soo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a serious infection, which can involve multiple systems. We report a case of pulmonary melioidosis with the initial presentation mimicking a partially treated pneumonia complicated by right-sided pleural effusion. The patient is a 49-year old man who did not respond to parenteral ceftriaxone and tazobactam/piperacillin therapy. However, upon culture and sensitivity results from blood and pleural samples isolated Burkholderia pseudomallei; antimicrobial therapy was de-escalated to parenteral ceftazidime. Within 72 h duration, his fever subsided and other respiratory symptoms improved tremendously. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of B. pseudomallei in pulmonary infection in order for prompt institution of appropriate antibiotics treatment; thus reducing morbidity and mortality.

  9. Burkholderia cepacia complex and its drug resistance%洋葱伯克霍尔德菌复合体及其耐药性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温丽; 殷瑜; 陈代杰

    2011-01-01

    洋葱伯克霍尔德菌复合体(BCC)是一组基因型不同、表型相近的细菌,上世纪80年代作为一种重要的临床病原菌尤见于囊性纤维化和慢性肉芽肿病患者.BCC可在患者之间传播且对多种抗生素高度耐药,现行治疗方法尚无法根治BCC引起的感染.本文简要综述BCC及其耐药性、治疗现状及潜在药物治疗靶点开发.%Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is a group of bacteria with different genotypes and similar phenotypes. It emerged in the 1980s as important human pathogens, especially to patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous. BCC can be spread between patients and resistant to various antibacterial drugs. Current treatment can not eradicate BCC infection. This review describes BCC, its resistance and current status of treatment and potential drug targets development.

  10. Minocycline activity tested against Acinetobacter baumannii complex, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Burkholderia cepacia species complex isolates from a global surveillance program (2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, Robert K; Castanheira, Mariana; Streit, Jennifer M; Jones, Ronald N

    2016-07-01

    Clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii complex (1312), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (464), and Burkholderia cepacia species complex (30) were selected from medical centers in the United States (USA), Europe and the Mediterranean (EU-M) region, Latin America, and Asia Pacific. Only one isolate per infected patient episode was included and local identifications were confirmed by the monitoring laboratory. Susceptibility testing was performed at the monitoring laboratory using the reference broth microdilution method as described by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). A. baumannii complex were classified as MDR (multi-drug resistant [MDR]; nonsusceptible to ≥1 agent in ≥3 antimicrobial classes) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR; nonsusceptible to ≥1 agent in all but ≤2 antimicrobial classes). A total of 81.6% of A. baumannii complex were MDR. Colistin was the most active agent against MDR A. baumannii complex. Minocycline was the most active "tetracycline" against these organisms based on susceptibility. Against B. cepacia, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (MIC90, 2 μg/mL; 100.0% susceptible) was the most active agent tested. Overall, minocycline was the most active tetracycline tested against A. baumannii complex and S. maltophilia isolates collected from patients throughout EU-M, USA, Latin America, and the Asia-Pacific. Minocycline, particularly the intravenous formulation, has activity against several ESKAPE pathogens and merits consideration in seriously ill patients where treatment options may be limited due to the presence of MDR bacteria. PMID:27112832

  11. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 PR1: ANALYSIS OF MICROBIAL ECOLOGY PARAMETERS FOR RISK ASSESSMENT (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The introduction of bacteria into aquifers for bioremediation purposes requires monitoring of the persistence and activity of microbial populations for efficacy and risk assessment purposes. Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR1 constitutively expresses a toluene ortho-monooxygenase (tom) ...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain PML1(12), an Ectomycorrhizosphere-Inhabiting Bacterium with Effective Mineral-Weathering Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Uroz, Stéphane; Oger, Phil

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. PML1(12), a soil bacterium isolated from the Oak-Scleroderma citrinum ectomycorrhizosphere in the experimental forest site of Breuil-Chenue (France).

  13. ACC (1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate) Deaminase Activity, a Widespread Trait in Burkholderia Species, and Its Growth-Promoting Effect on Tomato Plants▿

    OpenAIRE

    Onofre-Lemus, Janette; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael; Girard, Lourdes; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia includes pathogens of plants and animals and some human opportunistic pathogens, such as the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), but most species are nonpathogenic, plant associated, and rhizospheric or endophytic. Since rhizobacteria expressing ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase may enhance plant growth by lowering plant ethylene levels, in this work we investigated the presence of ACC deaminase activity and the acdS gene in 45 strains, most of which are...

  14. Metabolism of Chlorotoluenes by Burkholderia sp. Strain PS12 and Toluene Dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida F1: Evidence for Monooxygenation by Toluene and Chlorobenzene Dioxygenases

    OpenAIRE

    Lehning, A.; Fock, U.; Wittich, R.; Timmis, K N; Pieper, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    The degradation of toluene by Pseudomonas putida F1 and of chlorobenzenes by Burkholderia sp. strain PS12 is initiated by incorporation of dioxygen into the aromatic nucleus to form cis-dihydrodihydroxybenzenes. Toluene-grown cells of P. putida F1 and 3-chlorobenzoate-grown cells of Burkholderia sp. strain PS12 were found to monooxygenate the side chain of 2- and 3-chlorotoluene to the corresponding chlorobenzyl alcohols. Further metabolism of these products was slow, and the corresponding ch...

  15. Comparative genome‐wide analysis reveals that Burkholderia contaminans MS14 possesses multiple antimicrobial biosynthesis genes but not major genetic loci required for pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Peng; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Baird, Sonya M.; Showmaker, Kurt C.; Smith, Leif; Peterson, Daniel G.; Lu, Shien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Burkholderia contaminans MS14 shows significant antimicrobial activities against plant and animal pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The antifungal agent occidiofungin produced by MS14 has great potential for development of biopesticides and pharmaceutical drugs. However, the use of Burkholderia species as biocontrol agent in agriculture is restricted due to the difficulties in distinguishing between plant growth‐promoting bacteria and the pathogenic bacteria. The complete MS14 genome wa...

  16. Single amino acid substitution in homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase is responsible for pigmentation in a subset of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Gonyar, Laura A.; Fankhauser, Sarah C.; Joanna B Goldberg

    2014-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of Gram-negative bacilli that are ubiquitous in the environment and have emerged over the past 30 years as opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised populations, specifically individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic granulomatous disease. This complex of at least 18 distinct species is phenotypically and genetically diverse. One phenotype observed in a subset of Burkholderia cenocepacia (a prominent Bcc pathogen) isolates is the ab...

  17. Burkholderia novacaledonica sp. nov. and B. ultramafica sp. nov. isolated from roots of Costularia spp. pioneer plants of ultramafic soils in New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guentas, Linda; Gensous, Simon; Cavaloc, Yvon; Ducousso, Marc; Amir, Hamid; De Georges de Ledenon, Benjamin; Moulin, Lionel; Jourand, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of eleven rhizospheric bacterial strains belonging to the genus Burkholderia and isolated from roots of Costularia (Cyperaceae), tropical herbaceous pioneer plants growing on ultramafic soils in New Caledonia, was investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The genetic analyses (16S rRNA genes, gyrB, recA, nreB and cnr) confirmed that all strains are Burkholderia and cluster into two separated groups. The DNA hybridization results showed low relatedness values to the closest relatives Burkholderia species. The phenotypic analyses confirmed that the two groups of strains could be differentiated from each other and from other known Burkholderia species. This polyphasic study revealed that these two groups of strains represent each a novel species of Burkholderia, for which the names Burkholderia novacaledonica sp. nov. (type strain STM10272(T)=LMG28615(T)=CIP110887(T)) and B. ultramafica sp. nov. (type strain STM10279(T)=LMG28614(T)=CIP110886(T)) are proposed, respectively. These strains of Burkholderia presented specific ecological traits such as the tolerance to the extreme edaphic constraints of ultramafic soils: they grew at pH between 4 and 8 and tolerate the strong unbalanced Ca/Mg ratio (1/19) and the high concentrations of heavy metals i.e. Co, Cr, Mn and Ni. Noteworthy B. ultramafica tolerated nickel until 10mM and B. novacaledonica up to 5mM. The presence of the nickel (nreB) and cobalt/nickel (cnr) resistance determinants encoding for protein involved in metal tolerance was found in all strains of both groups. Moreover, most of the strains were able to produce plant growth promoting molecules (ACC, IAA, NH3 and siderophores). Such ecological traits suggest that these new species of Burkholderia might be environmentally adaptable plant-associated bacteria and beneficial to plants. PMID:27049869

  18. Lipopolysaccharide modification in Gram-negative bacteria during chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Rita F; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Valvano, Miguel A

    2016-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major component of the outer membrane that plays a key role in host-pathogen interactions with the innate immune system. During infection, bacteria are exposed to a host environment that is typically dominated by inflammatory cells and soluble factors, including antibiotics, which provide cues about regulation of gene expression. Bacterial adaptive changes including modulation of LPS synthesis and structure are a conserved theme in infections, irrespective of the type or bacteria or the site of infection. In general, these changes result in immune system evasion, persisting inflammation and increased antimicrobial resistance. Here, we review the modifications of LPS structure and biosynthetic pathways that occur upon adaptation of model opportunistic pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria, Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella enterica) to chronic infection in respiratory and gastrointestinal sites. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms of these variations and their role in the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:27075488

  19. Burkholderia dabaoshanensis sp. nov., a heavy-metal-tolerant bacteria isolated from Dabaoshan mining area soil in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghui Zhu

    Full Text Available Heavy-metal-tolerant bacteria, GIMN1.004(T, was isolated from mine soils of Dabaoshan in South China, which were acidic (pH 2-4 and polluted with heavy metals. The isolation was Gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, and rod-shaped bacteria having a cellular width of 0.5-0.6 µm and a length of 1.3-1.8 µm. They showed a normal growth pattern at pH 4.0-9.0 in a temperature ranging from 5 °C to 40 °C.The organism contained ubiquinone Q-8 as the predominant isoprenoid quinine, and C(16:0, summed feature 8 (C(18:1ω7c and C(18:1ω6c, C(18:0, summed feature 3 (C(16:1ω7c or iso-C(15:0 2-OH, C(17:0 cyclo, C(18:1ω9c, C(19:0 cyclo ω8c, C(14:0 as major fatty acid. These profiles were similar to those reported for Burkholderia species. The DNA G+C % of this strain was 61.6%. Based on the similarity to 16S rRNA gene sequence, GIMN1.004(T was considered to be in the genus Burkholderia. The similarities of 16S rRNA gene sequence between strain GIMN1.004(T and members of the genus Burkholderia were 96-99.4%, indicating that this novel strain was phylogenetically related to members of that genus. The novel strain showed the highest sequence similarities to Burkholderia soli DSM 18235(T (99.4%; Levels of DNA-DNA hybridization with DSM 18235(T was 25%. Physiological and biochemical tests including cell wall composition analysis, differentiated phenotype of this strain from that closely related Burkholderia species. The isolation had great tolerance to cadmium with MIC of 22 mmol/L, and adsorbability of 144.94 mg/g cadmium,and it was found to exhibit antibiotic resistance characteristics. The adsorptive mechanism of GIMN1.004(T for cadmium depended on the action of the amide,carboxy and phosphate of cell surface and producing low-molecular-weight (LMW organic acids to complex or chelated Cd(2+.Therefore, the strain GIMN1.004(T represented a new cadmium resistance species, which was tentatively named as Burkholderia dabaoshanensis sp. nov. The strain type

  20. Aspergillus infections in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jill; Brunel, Shan F; Warris, Adilia

    2016-07-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic lung infection and airway inflammation. Respiratory failure secondary to chronic or recurrent infection remains the commonest cause of death and accounts for over 90% of mortality. Bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex have been regarded the main CF pathogens and their role in progressive lung decline has been studied extensively. Little attention has been paid to the role of Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi in the pathogenesis of non-ABPA (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis) respiratory disease in CF, despite their frequent recovery in respiratory samples. It has become more apparent however, that Aspergillus spp. may play an important role in chronic lung disease in CF. Research delineating the underlying mechanisms of Aspergillus persistence and infection in the CF lung and its link to lung deterioration is lacking. This review summarizes the Aspergillus disease phenotypes observed in CF, discusses the role of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator)-protein in innate immune responses and new treatment modalities. PMID:27177733

  1. Isolation and optimization of IAA producing Burkholderia seminalis and its effect on seedlings of tomato

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    Padmavathi Tallapragada

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to isolate Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR strain from rhizosphere. Isolated strain was identified as Burkholderia seminalis using 16s rDNA. This strain was subjected to screening for indole acetic acid (IAA production followed by optimization using statistical approach namely response surface methodology. IAA production from B. seminalis in nutrient broth supplemented with tryptophan was confirmed through thin layer chromatography (TLC. The effect of cell free culture medium (CFCM obtained from isolated strain was examined on tomato seeds with Murashige and Skoog 2 (MS2 medium and it had a positive impact on germination of seeds. Further the IAA produced by B. seminalis in nutrient broth was purified and different concentrations were checked on tomato seed. It was observed that the germination index was similar to the control but the lateral roots development increased in the presence of 1 and 3 mg/mL of IAA in the medium.

  2. A Functional oriT in the Ptw Plasmid of Burkholderia cenocepacia Can Be Recognized by the R388 Relaxase TrwC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Esther; Bakioui, Sawsane; Gomes, Margarida C.; O'Callaghan, David; Vergunst, Annette C.; Sangari, Félix J.; Llosa, Matxalen

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is both a plant pathogen and the cause of serious opportunistic infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis patients. B. cenocepacia K56-2 harbors a native plasmid named Ptw for its involvement in the Plant Tissue Watersoaking phenotype. Ptw has also been reported to be important for survival in human cells. Interestingly, the presence of PtwC, a homolog of the conjugative relaxase TrwC of plasmid R388, suggests a possible function for Ptw in conjugative DNA transfer. The ptw region includes Type IV Secretion System genes related to those of the F plasmid. However, genes in the adjacent region shared stronger homology with the R388 genes involved in conjugative DNA metabolism. This region included the putative relaxase ptwC, a putative coupling protein and accessory nicking protein, and a DNA segment with high number of inverted repeats and elevated AT content, suggesting a possible oriT. Although we were unable to detect conjugative transfer of the Ptw resident plasmid, we detected conjugal mobilization of a co-resident plasmid containing the ptw region homologous to R388, demonstrating the cloned ptw region contains an oriT. A similar plasmid lacking ptwC could not be mobilized, suggesting that the putative relaxase PtwC must act in cis on its oriT. Remarkably, we also detected mobilization of a plasmid containing the Ptw oriT by the R388 relaxase TrwC, yet we could not detect PtwC-mediated mobilization of an R388 oriT-containing plasmid. Our data unambiguously show that the Ptw plasmid harbors DNA transfer functions, and suggests the Ptw plasmid may play a dual role in horizontal DNA transfer and eukaryotic infection. PMID:27200362

  3. Immobilization of Burkholderia sp. lipase on a ferric silica nanocomposite for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dang-Thuan; Chen, Ching-Lung; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-04-15

    In this work, lipase produced from an isolated strain Burkholderia sp. C20 was immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles to catalyze biodiesel synthesis. Core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by coating Fe(3)O(4) core with silica shell. The nanoparticles treated with dimethyl octadecyl [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl] ammonium chloride were used as immobilization supporters. The Burkholderia lipase was then bound to the synthesized nanoparticles for immobilization. The protein binding efficiency on alkyl-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) was estimated as 97%, while the efficiency was only 76% on non-modified Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2). Maximum adsorption capacity of lipase on alkyl-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) was estimated as 29.45 mg g(-1) based on Langmuir isotherm. The hydrolytic kinetics (using olive oil as substrate) of the lipase immobilized on alkyl-grafted Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) followed Michaelis-Menten model with a maximum reaction rate and a Michaelis constant of 6251 Ug(-1) and 3.65 mM, respectively. Physical and chemical properties of the nanoparticles and the immobilized lipase were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Moreover, the immobilized lipase was used to catalyze the transesterification of olive oil with methanol to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), attaining a FAMEs conversion of over 90% within 30 h in batch operation when 11 wt% immobilized lipase was employed. The immobilized lipase could be used for ten cycles without significant loss in its transesterification activity. PMID:22306108

  4. Genomic sequence and activity of KS10, a transposable phage of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

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    Shrivastava Savita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is a versatile group of Gram negative organisms that can be found throughout the environment in sources such as soil, water, and plants. While BCC bacteria can be involved in beneficial interactions with plants, they are also considered opportunistic pathogens, specifically in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. These organisms also exhibit resistance to many antibiotics, making conventional treatment often unsuccessful. KS10 was isolated as a prophage of B. cenocepacia K56-2, a clinically relevant strain of the BCC. Our objective was to sequence the genome of this phage and also determine if this prophage encoded any virulence determinants. Results KS10 is a 37,635 base pairs (bp transposable phage of the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia. Genome sequence analysis and annotation of this phage reveals that KS10 shows the closest sequence homology to Mu and BcepMu. KS10 was found to be a prophage in three different strains of B. cenocepacia, including strains K56-2, J2315, and C5424, and seven tested clinical isolates of B. cenocepacia, but no other BCC species. A survey of 23 strains and 20 clinical isolates of the BCC revealed that KS10 is able to form plaques on lawns of B. ambifaria LMG 19467, B. cenocepacia PC184, and B. stabilis LMG 18870. Conclusion KS10 is a novel phage with a genomic organization that differs from most phages in that its capsid genes are not aligned into one module but rather separated by approximately 11 kb, giving evidence of one or more prior genetic rearrangements. There were no potential virulence factors identified in KS10, though many hypothetical proteins were identified with no known function.

  5. Unusual Multiple Production of N-Acylhomoserine Lactones a by Burkholderia sp. Strain C10B Isolated from Dentine Caries

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    Share Yuan Goh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria realize the ability to communicate by production of quorum sensing (QS molecules called autoinducers, which regulate the physiological activities in their ecological niches. The oral cavity could be a potential area for the presence of QS bacteria. In this study, we report the isolation of a QS bacterial isolate C10B from dentine caries. Preliminary screening using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 biosensor showed that isolate C10B was able to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs. This bacterium was further identified as a member of Burkholderia, an opportunistic pathogen. The isolated Burkholderia sp. was confirmed to produce N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL, N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL, N-decanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL and N-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL.

  6. Biphenyl and Benzoate Metabolism in a Genomic Context: Outlining Genome-Wide Metabolic Networks in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    OpenAIRE

    Denef, V. J.; Park, J; Tsoi, T. V.; Rouillard, J.-M.; Zhang, H; Wibbenmeyer, J. A.; Verstraete, W; Gulari, E.; Hashsham, S. A.; Tiedje, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    We designed and successfully implemented the use of in situ-synthesized 45-mer oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (XeoChips) for genome-wide expression profiling of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, which is among the best aerobic polychlorinated biphenyl degraders known so far. We conducted differential gene expression profiling during exponential growth on succinate, benzoate, and biphenyl as sole carbon sources and investigated the transcriptome of early-stationary-phase cells grown on biphenyl....

  7. Evaluation of PCR, DNA hybridization and immunomagnetic separation — PCR for detection of Burkholderia mallei in artificially inoculated environmental samples

    OpenAIRE

    Merwyn, S.; Kumar, S.; Agarwal, G. S.; Rai, G. P.

    2010-01-01

    Glanders is highly contagious disease of equines, caused by Burkholderia mallei. The disease though rare, can be transmitted to humans. Here, we report a strategy for rapid detection of B. mallei from environmental samples. Different bacteriological media were evaluated and brain heart infusion broth medium with selective supplements (BHIB-SS) of penicillin (200 U/ml) and crystal violet (1:10,00000) was found to support the maximum growth of B. mallei even in the presence of other bacteria li...

  8. Selective media for isolation of Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia from the respiratory secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cimolai, N; Trombley, C.; Davidson, A. G.; Wong, L T

    1995-01-01

    One hundred and six specimens from 90 patients with cystic fibrosis were evaluated for the presence of Burkholderia cepacia using a current routine diagnostic protocol as well as a research protocol involving polymyxin B-MacConkey agar without crystal violet, PC agar, OFPVL agar, and a selective brain-heart infusion broth. Ten specimens from eight patients (8.9%) were positive by any method. The selective enrichment broth was the only medium that yielded B cepacia from all 10 positive samples...

  9. Substrate Spectrum Extension of PenA in Burkholderia thailandensis with a Single Amino Acid Deletion, Glu168del

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Hyojeong; Kim, Karan; Cho, Kwang-Hwi; Jung, Oksung; Kim, Heenam Stanley

    2012-01-01

    We describe a deletion mutation in a class A β-lactamase, PenA, of Burkholderia thailandensis that extended the substrate spectrum of the enzyme to include ceftazidime. Glu168del was located in a functional domain called the omega loop causing expansion of the space in the loop, which in turn increased flexibility at the active site. This deletion mutation represents a rare but significant alternative mechanical path to substrate spectrum extension in PenA besides more common substitution mut...

  10. Thiolactomycin-Based Inhibitors of Bacterial β-Ketoacyl-ACP Synthases with in Vivo Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommineni, Gopal R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Cummings, Jason E; Lu, Yang; Knudson, Susan E; Gu, Chendi; Walker, Stephen G; Slayden, Richard A; Tonge, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP synthases (KAS) are key enzymes involved in the type II bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) pathway and are putative targets for antibacterial discovery. Several natural product KAS inhibitors have previously been reported, including thiolactomycin (TLM), which is produced by Nocardia spp. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of optically pure 5R-thiolactomycin (TLM) analogues that show improved whole cell activity against bacterial strains including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and priority pathogens such as Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. In addition, we identify TLM analogues with in vivo efficacy against MRSA and Klebsiella pneumoniae in animal models of infection. PMID:27187871

  11. Clinically lesser known entity in India: A Report of two cases of Melioidosis

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    Purabi Barman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is endemic in the South Asian regions, like Thailand, Singapore Malaysia and Australia. The disease is more pronounced in the southern part of the country. It is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei which causes systemic involvement, morbidity and mortality associated with the disease is high. Due to highly varied clinical presentation, and low general awareness this infection is largely underdiagnosed and under reported in our country. Most laboratories in the country still rely on conventional culturing methods with their low sensitivity, adding to the under reporting. To enhance physician awareness we describe here two cases who presented to our institute after months of misdiagnosis.

  12. Clinically lesser known entity in India: A Report of two cases of Melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Purabi; Kaur, Ravneet; Kumar, Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is endemic in the South Asian regions, like Thailand, Singapore Malaysia and Australia. The disease is more pronounced in the southern part of the country. It is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei which causes systemic involvement, morbidity and mortality associated with the disease is high. Due to highly varied clinical presentation, and low general awareness this infection is largely underdiagnosed and under reported in our country. Most laboratories in the country still rely on conventional culturing methods with their low sensitivity, adding to the under reporting. To enhance physician awareness we describe here two cases who presented to our institute after months of misdiagnosis. PMID:23833477

  13. Transverse myelitis secondary to Melioidosis; A case report

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    Nandasiri Shanika

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melioidosis has become an emerging infection in Sri Lanka; a country which is considered non endemic for it. Paraplegia due to Burkholderia pseudomallei is a very rare entity encountered even in countries where the disease is endemic. There are no reported cases of transverse myelitis due to melioidosis in Sri Lankan population thus we report the first case. Case presentation A 21 year old farmer presented with sudden onset bi lateral lower limb weakness, numbness and urine retention. Examination revealed flaccid areflexic lower limbs with a sensory loss of all modalities and a sensory level at T10 together with sphincter involvement. MRI of the thoracolumbar spine showed extensive myelitis of the thoracic spine complicating left psoas abscess without definite extension to the spinal cord or cord compression. Burkholderia pseudomallei was isolated from the psoas abscess pus cultures and the diagnosis of melioidosis was confirmed with high titers of Burkholderia pseudomallei antibodies and positive PCR. He was treated with high doses of IV ceftazidime and oral cotrimoxazole for one month with a plan to continue cotrimoxazole and doxycycline till one year. Patient’s general condition improved but the residual neurological problems persisted. Conclusion The exact pathogenesis of spinal cord melioidosis is not quite certain except in the cases where there is direct microbial invasion, which does not appear to be the case in our patient. We postulate our patient’s presentation could be due to ischemia of the spinal cord following septic embolisation or thrombosis of spinal artery due to the abscess nearby. A neurotrophic exotoxin causing myelitis or post infectious immunological demyelination is yet another possibility. This emphasizes the necessity of further studies to elucidate the exact pathogenesis in this type of presentations. Health care professionals in Sri Lanka, where this is an emerging infection, need to improve

  14. Indagine epidemiologica locale sulle infezioni sostenute da Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia e sensibilità agli antibiotici di questi microrganismi.

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    Valeria Di Marcello

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this local surveillance study was to determine the distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia in our geographic area, their impact in the hospital and community acquired infections and their resistance to antimicrobial agents currently used in the treatment of infections due to these microrganisms. Materials and Methods: During the period January 2001 - June 2003, 14.200 clinical isolates were collected from urine,wounds, catheters, body fluids, blood, respiratory tract specimens. Bacterial identifications were performed according to the standard methods (Murray, 2003 and antibiotic susceptibility tests were carry out in microassay by the automated system MicroScan (Dade Behring, Milano, Italy.The following antimicrobial agents were tested: piperacillin (PIP, ticarcillin (TIC, piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (TTC, ceftazidime (CAZ, ceftriaxone (CRO, aztreonam (ATM, imipenem (IPM, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT, gentamicin (CN, amikacin (AK, tobramycin (TOB, ciprofloxacin (CIP. Results: A total of 994 Pseudomonadaceae were isolated from in- (67% and out-patients (33%.They were P.aeruginosa (81%, other Pseudomonas species as P.fluorescens and P.putida (8%, S.maltophilia (9% and B.cepacia (2%.The great majority of the strains were collected from respiratory tract specimens (70% and urine (15%.The divisions from which derived the greater quantity of isolates were pediatric (33.8%, intensive care (22.7% and pneumology (10% units.Antibiotics more active against P. aeruginosa were IPM, CAZ,AK and TZP. IPM was effective against B. cepacia also.The other drugs, except SXT, displayed against this microrganism high rates of resistance. Even S. maltophilia was not susceptible to much antimicrobial agents, whereas SXT was the drug more active against this germ. Conclusion: P. aeruginosa was the microrganism more frequently isolated among non-fermenting Gram

  15. Clinical guideline for diagnosis and management of melioidosis

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    Inglis Timothy J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is an emerging infection in Brazil and neighbouring South American countries. The wide range of clinical presentations include severe community-acquired pneumonia, septicaemia, central nervous system infection and less severe soft tissue infection. Diagnosis depends heavily on the clinical microbiology laboratory for culture. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the bacterial cause of melioidosis, is easily cultured from blood, sputum and other clinical samples. However, B. pseudomallei can be difficult to identify reliably, and can be confused with closely related bacteria, some of which may be dismissed as insignificant culture contaminants. Serological tests can help to support a diagnosis of melioidosis, but by themselves do not provide a definitive diagnosis. The use of a laboratory discovery pathway can help reduce the risk of missing atypical B. pseudomallei isolates. Recommended antibiotic treatment for severe infection is either intravenous Ceftazidime or Meropenem for several weeks, followed by up to 20 weeks oral treatment with a combination of trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and doxycycline. Consistent use of diagnostic microbiology to confirm the diagnosis, and rigorous treatment of severe infection with the correct antibiotics in two stages; acute and eradication, will contribute to a reduction in mortality from melioidosis.

  16. Correlation of rpsU Gene Sequence Clusters and Biochemical Properties, Gc–Ms Spectra and Resistance Profiles of Clinical Burkholderia Spp. Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Maria Franziska; Neubauer, Heinrich; Frickmann, Hagen; Hagen, Ralf Matthias

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the variation of phenotypic features of clinical isolates of Burkholderia spp. from common rpsU gene sequence clusters. A total of 41 clinical Burkholderia spp. isolates from German mucoviscidosis patients was subjected to rpsU gene sequencing. Biochemical assessment included the API systems 20 NE and 50 CHE as well as the Micronaut NF system. Fatty acid patterns were assessed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Broth microdilution was used to identify minimum inhibitory concentrations. Five rpsU gene sequence clusters comprised more than one clinical isolate. Altogether, assignments to three species and seven clusters comprising more than one Burkholderia species were performed. Inhomogeneity of biochemical reactions within the clusters ranged from 0/28 to 45/50 reactions. The standard deviation for fatty acid distributions ranged from 0% to 11.5%. Minimum inhibitory concentrations within the clusters showed a wide variation but only minor differences between the clusters. Broad variations within identified rpsU gene sequence clusters regarding biochemical reactions, fatty acid patterns, and resistance patterns of clinical Burkholderia spp. isolates make the application of rpsU gene sequence analysis as a stand-alone procedure for discriminations within the Burkholderia cepacia complex unreliable.

  17. Scientific Opinion on the risk to plant health posed by Burkholderia caryophylli for the EU territory with the identification and evaluation of risk reduction options

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    EFSA Panel on Plant Health (PLH

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The EFSA Panel on Plant Health conducted a pest risk assessment for Burkholderia caryophylli for the EU territory under the scenario of current EU legislation and identified and evaluated risk reduction options. B. caryophylli is absent from the EU territory. The host range of B. caryophylli includes the genus Dianthus and three other incidental, minor, hosts (statice, lisianthus and gypsophila. Seven entry pathways were identified, with carnation cuttings and cut flowers being the most frequently traded. All pathways were considered unlikely as the pathogen is rarely associated with the pathways at origin mostly because of the high phytosanitary quality of the plant propagation material. The establishment is unlikely because outdoors the environmental conditions are not favourable to the pathogen and alternative hosts are not present, whereas in protected crops the cultural practices are very effective to keep the crop free from this bacterium. Only very short-distance spread within a crop is likely, and spread between different crops is unlikely. Risk reduction options addressing the sanitary status of the propagation material have the best effectiveness and feasibility. Effective control measures are based on healthy propagation materials (cuttings and hygiene practices. With the existing certification scheme of carnation plant propagation material, the probability of spread through infected cuttings is largely reduced. The high effectiveness of current measures is ensured by the absence of B. caryophylli in the EU, as in recent decades no findings of B. caryophylli have been reported.B. caryophylli is reported to be present in some third countries in Asia, where it still causes high crop losses. If the current regulation were to be removed, major consequences or changes in the potential impact of B. caryophylli are expected if no voluntary certification scheme were applied, together with good sanitation standards, along the crop

  18. Chronic Melioidosis in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Schülin, Tanja; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2001-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is endemic in Southeast Asia and northern Australia, where it can be found in soil and surface water. We report a case of chronic pulmonary melioidosis in a patient with cystic fibrosis who had traveled to an area where B. pseudomallei is endemic.

  19. Cloning, expression and mutation of a triazophos hydrolase gene from Burkholderia sp. SZL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Qiang; Guo, Su-Hui; Cheng, Ming-Gen; Zhao, Meng-Jun; Hong, Qing; Huang, Xing

    2016-06-01

    Triazophos is a broad-spectrum and highly effective insecticide, and the residues of triazophos have been frequently detected in the environment. A triazophos-degrading bacterium, Burkholderia sp. SZL-1, was isolated from a long-term triazophos-polluted soil. Strain SZL-1 could hydrolyze triazophos to 1-phenyl-3-hydroxy-1,2,4-triazole, which was further utilized as the carbon sources for growth. The triazophos hydrolase gene trhA, cloned from strain SZL-1, was expressed and homogenously purified using Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. TrhA is 55 kDa and displays maximum activity at 25°C, pH 8.0. This enzyme still has nearly 60% activity at the range of 15°C-50°C for 30 min. TrhA was mutated by sequential error prone PCR and screened for improved activity for triazophos degradation. One purified variant protein (Val89-Gly89) named TrhA-M1 showed up to 3-fold improvement in specific activity against triazophos, and the specificity constants of Kcat and Kcat/Km for TrhA-M1 were improved up to 2.3- and 8.28-fold, respectively, compared to the wild-type enzyme. The results in this paper provided potential material for the contaminated soil remediation and hydrolase genetic structure research. PMID:27190294

  20. Pivotal role of anthranilate dioxygenase genes in the adaptation of Burkholderia multivorans ATCC 17616 in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Eri; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2012-05-01

    In our recent screen for soil-induced genes, the expression of andA operon (andAcAdAbAa) for anthranilate catabolism in Burkholderia multivorans ATCC 17616 was found to increase dramatically in a soil sample (Nishiyama et al., Environ Microbiol 12: 2539, 2010). The operon was preceded by andR encoding a putative transcriptional regulator for the andA operon. In this study, the andA promoter was induced by tryptophan and anthranilate in an andR-dependent manner. The andA promoter in a deletion mutant lacking tryptophan dioxygenase (one of enzymes for the catabolism of tryptophan to anthranilate) did not respond to tryptophan, indicating that not tryptophan but anthranilate is the effector of AndR. Although both anthranilate and tryptophan were under the detection levels in the soil sample, andA promoter showed higher activity in the soil sample than in a laboratory medium. Such induction required andR and was moderately dependent on the ferric uptake regulator (Fur). The proliferation ability of andAc mutant in the sterile soil was low compared with the co-incubated wild-type cells. These findings suggested that in the soil environment, anthranilate dioxygenase genes are induced by AndR and Fur, and play a pivotal role in the proliferation in the soil environment. PMID:22360670

  1. Bioleaching remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils using Burkholderia sp. Z-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhi; Chai, Liyuan; Wang, Yong; Liu, Yi; Xiao, Ruiyang

    2016-01-15

    Bioleaching is an environment-friendly and economical technology to remove heavy metals from contaminated soils. In this study, a biosurfactant-producing strain with capacity of alkaline production was isolated from cafeteria sewer sludge and its capability for removing Zn, Pb, Mn, Cd, Cu, and As was investigated. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rDNA gene sequences confirmed that the strain belonged to Burkholderia sp. and named as Z-90. The biosurfactant was glycolipid confirmed by thin layer chromatography and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Z-90 broth was then used for bioleaching remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils. The removal efficiency was 44.0% for Zn, 32.5% for Pb, 52.2% for Mn, 37.7% for Cd, 24.1% for Cu and 31.6% for As, respectively. Mn, Zn and Cd were more easily removed from soil than Cu, Pb and As, which was attributed to the presence of high acid-soluble fraction of Mn, Zn and Cd and high residual fraction of Cu, Pb and As. The heavy metal removal in soils was contributed to the adhesion of heavy metal-contaminated soil minerals with strain Z-90 and the formation of a metal complex with biosurfactant. PMID:26348147

  2. In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola against Some Phytopathogenic Fungi

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    Hazem S. Elshafie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The trend to search novel microbial natural biocides has recently been increasing in order to avoid the environmental pollution from use of synthetic pesticides. Among these novel natural biocides are the bioactive secondary metabolites of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola (Bga. The aim of this study is to determine antifungal activity of Bga strains against some phytopathogenic fungi. The fungicidal tests were carried out using cultures and cell-free culture filtrates against Botrytis cinerea, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium expansum, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Phytophthora cactorum. Results demonstrated that all tested strains exert antifungal activity against all studied fungi by producing diffusible metabolites which are correlated with their ability to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. All strains significantly reduced the growth of studied fungi and the bacterial cells were more bioactive than bacterial filtrates. All tested Bulkholderia strains produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs, which inhibited the fungal growth and reduced the growth rate of Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani. GC/MS analysis of VOCs emitted by strain Bga 11096 indicated the presence of a compound that was identified as 1-methyl-4-(1-methylethenyl-cyclohexene, a liquid hydrocarbon classified as cyclic terpene. This compound could be responsible for the antifungal activity, which is also in agreement with the work of other authors.

  3. Expression of the six chromate ion transporter homologues of Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Navarrete, Yaned M; León-Márquez, Yhoana L; Salinas-Herrera, Karina; Jácome-Galarza, Irvin E; Meza-Carmen, Víctor; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The chromate ion transporter (CHR) superfamily comprises transporters that confer chromate resistance by extruding toxic chromate ions from cytoplasm. Burkholderia xenovorans strain LB400 has been reported to encode six CHR homologues in its multireplicon genome. We found that strain LB400 displays chromate-inducible resistance to chromate. Susceptibility tests of Escherichia coli strains transformed with cloned B. xenovorans chr genes indicated that the six genes confer chromate resistance, although under different growth conditions, and suggested that expression of chr genes is regulated by sulfate. Expression of chr genes was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR) from total RNA of B. xenovorans LB400 grown under different concentrations of sulfate and exposed or not to chromate. The chr homologues displayed distinct expression levels, but showed no significant differences in transcription under the various sulfate concentrations tested, indicating that sulfate does not regulate chr gene expression in B. xenovorans. The chrA2 gene, encoded in the megaplasmid, was the only chr gene whose expression was induced by chromate and it was shown to constitute the chromate-responsive chrBACF operon. These data suggest that this determinant is mainly responsible for the B. xenovorans LB400 chromate resistance phenotype. PMID:24257816

  4. Real-time Fluorescence PCR Method for Detection of Burkholderia glumae from Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yuan; XU Li-hui; TIAN Wen-xiao; HUAI Yan; YU Shan-hong; LOU Miao-miao; XIE Guan-lin

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae causing seedling rot and grain rot of rice was listed as a plant quarantine disease of China in 2007. It's quite necessary to set up effective detection methods for the pathogen to manage further dispersal of this disease. The present study combined the real-time PCR method with classical PCR to increase the detecting efficiency, and to develop an accurate, rapid and sensitive method to detect the pathogen in the seed quarantine for effective management of the disease. The results showed that all the tested strains of B. glumae produced about 139 bp specific fragments by the real-time PCR and the general PCR methods, while others showed negative PCR result. The bacteria could be detected at the concentrations of 1×104 CFU/mL by general PCR method and at the concentrations below 100 CFU/mL by real-time fluorescence PCR method. B. glumae could be detected when the inoculated and healthy seeds were mixed with a proportion of 1:100.

  5. A new aldehyde oxidase catalyzing the conversion of glycolaldehyde to glycolate from Burkholderia sp. AIU 129.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Miwa; Adachi, Keika; Ogawa, Natsumi; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Kataoka, Michihiko; Shimizu, Sakayu; Isobe, Kimiyasu

    2015-04-01

    We found a new aldehyde oxidase (ALOD), which catalyzes the conversion of glycolaldehyde to glycolate, from Burkholderia sp. AIU 129. The enzyme further oxidized aliphatic aldehydes, an aromatic aldehyde, and glyoxal, but not glycolate or alcohols. The molecular mass of this enzyme was 130 kDa, and it was composed of three different subunits (αβγ structure), in which the α, β, and γ subunits were 76 kDa, 36 kDa, and 14 kDa, respectively. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of each subunit showed high similarity to those of putative subunits of xanthine dehydrogenase. Metals (copper, iron and molybdenum) and chelating reagents (α,α'-dipyridyl and 8-hydroxyquinoline) inhibited the ALOD activity. The ALOD showed highest activity at pH 6.0 and 50°C. Twenty mM glycolaldehyde was completely converted to glycolate by incubation at 30°C for 3 h, suggesting that the ALOD found in this study would be useful for enzymatic production of glycolate. PMID:25283808

  6. Bioremediation of refinery wastewater using immobilised Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp and their transconjugants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi T. Ajao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available When oil spill occurs, it poses serious toxic hazards to all forms of life. Mixed culture of Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp isolated from refinery sludge using selective enrichment technique was used for bioremediation of refinery wastewater in a laboratoryscale bioreactor. Physicochemical parameters of both raw and treated water were as determined and compared with Federal Environ - mental Protection Agency (FEPA-limit, Abuja, Nigeria to asses the efficiency of the bioremediation process. Each of the bacterium was screened for the presence of plasmid DNA and for the involvement or otherwise of plasmid in the bioremediation of wastewater. The immobilised cells showed percentage decrease in chemical oxygen demand (97%, biochemical oxygen demand (94%, phenol (98%, total petroleum hydrocarbon (79%, oil and grease (90% of the refinery waste water after 20 days of treatment while their transconjugants showed the multiplicative effect by achieving the same percentage after 10 days of treatment. Therefore, the findings revealed that bioaugmentation of wastewater using transmissible catabolic plasmid will enhance efficiency of the bioremediation by spreading the plasmid among indigenous microbial community either through horizontal gene transfer or transformation.

  7. Antioxidant enzymes activities of Burkholderia spp. strains-oxidative responses to Ni toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, M N; Franco, M R; Peters, L P; Martins, P F; Souza, L A; Piotto, F A; Azevedo, R A

    2015-12-01

    Increased agriculture production associated with intense application of herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides leads to soil contamination worldwide. Nickel (Ni), due to its high mobility in soils and groundwater, constitutes one of the greatest problems in terms of environmental pollution. Metals, including Ni, in high concentrations are toxic to cells by imposing a condition of oxidative stress due to the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. This study aimed to characterize the Ni antioxidant response of two tolerant Burkholderia strains (one isolated from noncontaminated soil, SNMS32, and the other from contaminated soil, SCMS54), by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities. Ni accumulation and bacterial growth in the presence of the metal were also analyzed. The results showed that both strains exhibited different trends of Ni accumulation and distinct antioxidant enzymes responses. The strain from contaminated soil (SCMS54) exhibited a higher Ni biosorption and exhibited an increase in SOD and GST activities after 5 and 12 h of Ni exposure. The analysis of SOD, CAT, and GR by nondenaturing PAGE revealed the appearance of an extra isoenzyme in strain SCMS54 for each enzyme. The results suggest that the strain SCMS54 isolated from contaminated soil present more plasticity with potential to be used in soil and water bioremediation. PMID:26289332

  8. Diversidade de bactérias diazotróficas endofíticas dos gêneros Herbaspirillum e Burkholderia na cultura do arroz inundado Diversity of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria of the genus Herbaspirillum and Burkholderia in wetland rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana da Silva Rodrigues

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a diversidade de bactérias diazotróficas endofíticas, dos gêneros Herbaspirillum e Burkholderia, em duas variedades de arroz, consideradas de alta (IR 42 e baixa (IAC 4440 eficiência de fixação biológica de nitrogênio. Foram realizados dois experimentos em casa de vegetação, em vasos com dois tipos de solos, provenientes dos Estados de Goiás e do Rio de Janeiro. Foi feita a contagem do número de bactérias e o isolamento em diferentes partes e estágios de desenvolvimento das plantas, mediante o uso de meios de cultivo JNFb e JMV. Os isolados bacterianos foram caracterizados a partir de aspectos morfológicos das colônias, com o crescimento em meios de cultivo, e de testes fisiológicos (uso de fontes de carbono e atividade de redução de acetileno. A contagem revelou grande número de bactérias diazotróficas (10(6 células g-1 matéria fresca, presentes em ambas as variedades de arroz, principalmente nas amostras radiculares. Os dados, obtidos na matriz de similaridade, mostram a presença de representantes da espécie Herbaspirillum seropedicae, bem como a diversidade entre isolados pertencentes ao gênero Burkholderia.The objective of this work was to evaluate the diversity of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria of the genera Herbaspirillum and Burkholderia, in two rice varieties, considered of high (IR 42 and low (IAC 4440 contribution on BNF. Two experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions, in order to study the association of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria with wetland rice varieties, which were planted in two types of soil: one from Rio de Janeiro State and another from Goiás State, Brazil. Bacterial population (in different parts and physiological stages of the plants were evaluated, followed by the both genera strains isolation using culture media. The isolated bacteria were characterized based on morphological and physiological aspects. High bacterial counts were detected

  9. Susceptibility of Select Agents to Predation by Predatory Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Russo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Select Agents are microorganisms and toxins considered to be exploitable as biological weapons. Although infections by many Select Agents can be treated by conventional antibiotics, the risk of an emerging or engineered drug resistant strain is of great concern. One group of microorganisms that is showing potential to control drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria are the predatory bacteria from the genera Bdellovibrio spp. and Micavibrio spp. In this study, we have examined the ability of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (B. bacteriovorus strain 109J, HD100 and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus (M. aeruginosavorus ARL-13 to prey on a variety of Select Agents. Our findings demonstrate that B. bacteriovorus and M. aeruginosavorus are able to prey efficiently on Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia mallei. Modest predation was also measured in co-cultures of B. bacteriovorus and Francisella tularensis. However, neither of the predators showed predation when Burkholderia pseudomallei and Brucella melitensis were used as prey.

  10. Biological control of Botrytis cinerea using the antagonistic and endophytic Burkholderia cepacia Cs5 for vine plantlet protection

    OpenAIRE

    Kilani-Feki, Olfa; Jaoua, Samir

    2011-01-01

    Antifungal activity of the Burkholderia cepacia Cs5 was tested in vitro and in vivo for the control of Botrytis cinerea . Bacterial biomass was significantly improved by the amendment of ZnSO(4), Mo(7)(NH(4))(6)O(24), and mannitol to the NBY medium; consequently, the amount of the secreted fungicides was increased. The quantification of B. cinerea inhibition, in liquid and solid conditions, showed an important sensitivity of this fungus to the strain Cs5 fungicides. Microscopic monitoring imp...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Burkholderia terrae Strain BS001, Which Interacts with Fungal Surface Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazir, Rashid; Hansen, Martin A.; Sorensen, Soren;

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia terrae BS001 is a soil bacterium which was originally isolated from the mycosphere of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria proxima. It exhibits a range of fungus-interacting traits which reveal its propensity to actively interact at fungal interfaces. Here, we present the approximately...... 11.5-Mb (G+C content, 61.52 draft genome sequence of B. terrae BS001 with the aim of providing insight into the genomic basis of its ecological success in fungus-affected soil settings....

  12. Crystal structures of IspF from Plasmodium falciparum and Burkholderia cenocepacia: comparisons inform antimicrobial drug target assessment

    OpenAIRE

    O’Rourke, Patrick EF; Kalinowska-Tłuścik, Justyna; Fyfe, Paul K.; Dawson, Alice; Hunter, William N.

    2014-01-01

    Background 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase (IspF) catalyzes the conversion of 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2-phosphate to 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate and cytidine monophosphate in production of isoprenoid-precursors via the methylerythritol phosphate biosynthetic pathway. IspF is found in the protozoan Plasmodium falciparum, a parasite that causes cerebral malaria, as well as in many Gram-negative bacteria such as Burkholderia cenocepacia. Isp...

  13. Effect of nitrofurans and NO generators on biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Julia; Granik, Vladimir; Belik, Alexandr; Koksharova, Olga; Khmel, Inessa

    2009-06-01

    Antibacterial drugs in the nitrofuran series, such as nitrofurazone, furazidin, nitrofurantoin and nifuroxazide, as well as the nitric oxide generators sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide mononitrate in concentrations that do not suppress bacterial growth, were shown to increase the capacity of pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Burkholderia cenocepacia 370 to form biofilms. At 25-100microg/ml, nitrofurans 2-2.5-fold enhanced biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1, and NO donors 3-6-fold. For B. cenocepacia 370, the enhancement was 2-5-fold (nitrofurans) and 4.5-fold (sodium nitroprusside), respectively. PMID:19460431

  14. Tinea Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body they infect. Tinea corporis is a fungal infection of the skin on the body. ("Corporis" is ... Causes & Risk Factors How did I get a fungal infection? You can get a fungal infection by touching ...

  15. Molecular detection of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Burkholderia glumae in infected rice seeds and leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is particularly useful for plant pathogen detection. In the present study, multiplex PCR and SYBR green real-time PCR were developed to facilitate simultaneous detection of three important rice pathogens, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, and Bur...

  16. Extraction of lipase from Burkholderia cepacia by PEG/Phosphate ATPS and its biochemical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana da Silva Padilha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to study the partitioning of a lipase produced by Burkholderia cepacia in PEG/Phosphate aqueous two phase system (ATPS and its characterization. Lipase was produced by B. cepacia strains in a fermenter. Enzyme partitioning occurred at pH 6.0 and 8.0, using PEG 1500 and 6000 on two tie lines. Metal ions, pH and temperature effects on enzyme activity were evaluated. Five milliliter of 7.5% olive oil emulsion with 2.5% gumarabic in 0.1M sodium phosphate buffer at pH 8.0 and 37ºC were used for the activity determinations. Results showed that crude stratum from B. cepacia was partitioned by PEG1500/phosphate ATPS at pH 6.0 or 8.0 for, which the partitioning coefficients were 108-and 209-folds. Lipase presented optimal activity conditions at 37ºC and pH 8.0; it showed pH-stability for 4 h of incubation at different pH values at 37ºC. Metal ions such as Mn2+ , Co2+, I-and Ca2+ sustained enzymatic activities; however, it was inhibited by the presence of Fe2+, Hg2+ and Al3+ . Km and Vmax values were 0.258 U/mg and 43.90 g/L, respectively. A molecular weight of 33 kDa and an isoelectric point at pH 5.0 were determined by SDS-PAGE and IFS electrophoresis, respectively.

  17. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN reduces impact of freezing temperatures on photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fan; Jacquard, Cédric; Villaume, Sandra; Michel, Jean; Rabenoelina, Fanja; Clément, Christophe; Barka, Essaid A.; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Several plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are known to improve plant tolerance to multiple stresses, including low temperatures. However, mechanisms underlying this protection are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the endophytic PGPR, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN (Bp PsJN), on Arabidopsis thaliana cold tolerance using photosynthesis parameters as physiological markers. Under standard conditions, our results indicated that Bp PsJN inoculation led to growth promotion of Arabidopsis plants without significant modification on photosynthesis parameters and chloroplast organization. However, bacterial colonization induced a cell wall strengthening in the mesophyll. Impact of inoculation modes (either on seeds or by soil irrigation) and their effects overnight at 0, -1, or -3°C, were investigated by following photosystem II (PSII) activity and gas exchanges. Following low temperatures stress, a decrease of photosynthesis parameters was observed. In addition, during three consecutive nights or days at -1°C, PSII activity was monitored. Pigment contents, RuBisCO protein abundance, expression of several genes including RbcS, RbcL, CBF1, CBF2, CBF3, ICE1, COR15a, and COR78 were evaluated at the end of exposure. To assess the impact of the bacteria on cell ultrastructure under low temperatures, microscopic observations were achieved. Results indicated that freezing treatment induced significant changes in PSII activity as early as the first cold day, whereas the same impact on PSII activity was observed only during the third cold night. The significant effects conferred by PsJN were differential accumulation of pigments, and reduced expression of RbcL and COR78. Microscopical observations showed an alteration/disorganization in A. thaliana leaf mesophyll cells independently of the freezing treatments. The presence of bacteria during the three successive nights or days did not significantly improved A. thaliana

  18. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN reduces damages to freezing temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan eSU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are known to improve plant tolerance to multiple stresses, including low temperatures. However, mechanisms underlying this protection are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the endophytic PGPR, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN (Bp PsJN, on Arabidopsis thaliana cold tolerance using photosynthesis parameters as physiological markers.Under standard conditions, our results indicated that Bp PsJN inoculation led to growth promotion of Arabidopsis plants without significant modification on photosynthesis parameters and chloroplast organization. However, bacterial colonization induced a cell wall strengthening in the mesophyllImpact of inoculation modes (either on seeds or by soil irrigation and their effects overnight at 0, -1 or -3°C, were investigated by following photosystem II (PSII activity and gas exchanges. Following low temperatures stress, a decrease of photosynthesis parameters was observed. In addition, during three consecutive nights or days at -1°C, PSII activity was monitored. Pigment contents, RuBisCO protein abundance, expression of several genes including RbcS, RbcL, CBF1, CBF2, CBF3, ICE1, COR15a, and COR78 were evaluated at the end of exposure. To assess the impact of the bacteria on cell ultrastructure under low temperatures, microscopic observations were achieved. Results indicated that freezing treatment induced significant changes in PSII activity as early as the first cold day, whereas the same impact on PSII activity was observed only during the third cold night. The significant effects conferred by PsJN were differential accumulation of pigments, and reduced expression of RbcL and COR78. Microscopical observations showed an alteration/disorganization in A. thaliana leaf mesophyll cells independently of the freezing treatments. The presence of bacteria during the three successive nights or days did not significantly improved A

  19. Burkholderia cepacia complex in Serbian patients with cystic fibrosis: prevalence and molecular epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljevic, Z V; Novovic, K; Kojic, M; Minic, P; Sovtic, A; Djukic, S; Jovcic, B

    2016-08-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) organisms remain significant pathogens in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence, epidemiological characteristics, and presence of molecular markers associated with virulence and transmissibility of the Bcc strains in the National CF Centre in Belgrade, Serbia. The Bcc isolates collected during the four-year study period (2010-2013) were further examined by 16 s rRNA gene, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA, multilocus sequence typing analysis, and phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated sequence of seven alleles. Fifty out of 184 patients (27.2 %) were colonized with two Bcc species, B. cenocepacia (n = 49) and B. stabilis (n = 1). Thirty-four patients (18.5 %) had chronic colonization. Typing methods revealed a high level of similarity among Bcc isolates, indicating a person-to-person transmission or acquisition from a common source. New sequence types (STs) were identified, and none of the STs with an international distribution were found. One centre-specific ST, B. cenocepacia ST856, was highly dominant and shared by 48/50 (96 %) patients colonized by Bcc. This clone was characterized by PCR positivity for both the B. cepacia epidemic strain marker and cable pilin, and showed close genetic relatedness to the epidemic strain CZ1 (ST32). These results indicate that the impact of Bcc on airway colonization in the Serbian CF population is high and virtually exclusively limited to a single clone of B. cenocepacia. The presence of a highly transmissible clone and probable patient-to-patient spread was observed. PMID:27177755

  20. Cedecea davisae’s Role in a Polymicrobial Lung Infection in a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayer G. Ismaael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic airway colonization and infection are the hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia cepacia are well-documented bacterial culprits in this chronic suppurative airway disease. Advanced molecular diagnostics have uncovered a possible role of a larger group of microorganisms in CF. Cedecea is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and is an emerging pathogen. We present a case of a polymicrobial healthcare-associated pneumonia in a CF patient caused by Cedecea davisae, among other bacteria.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Burkholderia caribensis Bcrs1W (NBRC110739), a strain co-residing with phenanthrene degrader Mycobacterium sp. EPa45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nonoyama, Shouta; Ogawa, Natsumi; Kato, Hiromi; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2016-06-20

    Complete genome sequence of Burkholderia caribensis Bcrs1W, isolated from a phenanthrene-degrading mixed culture, was determined. The genomic information of Bcrs1W will be beneficial to elucidating the mechanisms of its positive effects on phenanthrene degradation by co-residing Mycobacterium sp. Epa45, and to exploiting their degradation potentials. PMID:27130496

  2. Saturation mutagenesis of a CepR binding site as a means to identify new quorum-regulated promoters in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, an opportunistic pathogen of humans, encodes the CepI and CepR proteins, which resemble the LuxI and LuxR quorum sensing proteins of Vibrio fischeri. CepI directs the synthesis of octanoylhomoserine lactone (OHL), while CepR is an OHL dependent transcription factor. In pr...

  3. Biodegradation of 4-chloronitrobenzene by biochemical cooperation between Sphingomonas sp. strain CNB3 and Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6 isolated from activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longjiang; Wang, Xin; Jiao, Yiying; Chen, Xu; Zhou, Lingyan; Guo, Kun; Ge, Feng; Wu, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Two bacterial strains were isolated from activated sludge by using 4-chloronitrobenzene (4-CB) as the sole source of carbon for enrichment. One of the isolates was identified as Sphingomonas sp. strain CNB3 and the other as Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6, mainly through morphological and physiological characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Sphingomonas sp. strain CNB3 could transform 4-CB to 4-chloroaniline, which accumulated in the medium. Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6 could transform 4-chloroaniline but not 4-CB. The co-culture of Sphingomonas sp. strain CNB3 and Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6 could degrade 4-CB completely by the biochemical cooperation of two strains to overcome the degradative limitations of each species alone. In addition, the biochemical pathway of 4-chloroaniline transformation by Burkholderia sp. strain CAN6 was proposed based on the determined related enzyme activities. The results suggested that 4-chloroaniline was completely transformed via the ortho-cleavage and modified ortho-cleavage pathways. PMID:23473429

  4. Characterization of the papilionoid-Burkholderia interaction in the Fynbos biome: The diversity and distribution of beta-rhizobia nodulating Podalyria calyptrata (Fabaceae, Podalyrieae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Benny; Van Cauwenberghe, Jannick; Verstraete, Brecht; Chimphango, Samson; Stirton, Charles; Honnay, Olivier; Smets, Erik; Sprent, Janet; James, Euan K; Muasya, A Muthama

    2016-02-01

    The South African Fynbos soils are renowned for nitrogen-fixing Burkholderia associated with diverse papilionoid legumes of the tribes Crotalarieae, Hypocalypteae, Indigofereae, Phaseoleae and Podalyrieae. However, despite numerous rhizobial studies in the region, the symbiotic diversity of Burkholderia has not been investigated in relation to a specific host legume and its geographical provenance. This study analyzed the diversity of nodulating strains of Burkholderia from the legume species Podalyria calyptrata. Diverse lineages were detected that proved to be closely related to Burkholderia taxa, originating from hosts in other legume tribes. By analyzing the genetic variation of chromosomal (recA) and nodulation (nodA) sequence data in relation to the sampling sites we assessed the geographical distribution patterns of the P. calyptrata symbionts. Although we found a degree of genetically differentiated rhizobial populations, a correlation between genetic (recA and nodA) and geographic distances among populations was not observed, suggesting high rates of dispersal and rhizobial colonization within Fynbos soils. PMID:26689612

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia ambifaria RZ2MS16, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Guarana, a Tropical Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Bruna Durante; Taniguti, Lucas Mitsuo; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia Barros; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Quecine, Maria Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia ambifaria strain RZ2MS16 was isolated from the rhizosphere of Amazon guarana in Brazil. This bacterium exhibits a remarkable capacity to promote the growth of corn and soybean. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of RZ2MS16 and some genes related to multiple traits involved in plant growth promotion. PMID:26988044

  6. Genome sequencing and transposon mutagenesis of Burkholderia seminalis TC3.4.2R3 identify genes contributing to suppression of orchid necrosis caused by B. gladioli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty six strains of Burkholderia spp. isolated from sugarcane were evaluated for biological control of leaf and pseudobulb necrosis of orchid caused by B. gladioli. Twenty nine of the sugarcane strains suppressed the disease in greenhouse assays. We generated a draft genomic sequence of one suppr...

  7. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Yi, Yoon-Sun; Kim, Jonghyun; Chung, Young-Ho; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX), as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX. PMID:27124467

  8. Gene : CBRC-OPRI-01-0923 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0923 Novel UN C UNKNOWN VE2_RHPV1 8.3 50% ref|YP_002897474.1| iron -sulfur cluster b ... [Burkholderia pseudomallei MSHR346] gb|ACQ95483.1| iron -sulfur cluster binding protein [Burkholderia pseud ...

  9. Melioidosis in acute cholangitis of diabetic patient: a forgotten diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad N

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Nasir Mohamad,1 Suresh Ponnusamy,2 Sunita Devi,3 Rishya Manikam,4 Ilya Irinaz Idrus,1 Nor Hidayah Abu Bakar51Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Malaysia; 2AIMST University, Bedong, Malaysia; 3Hospital Sultan Abdul Halim, Sungai Petani, Malaysia; 4University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 5Department of Pathology, Hospital Raja Perempuan Zainab II, Kota Bharu, MalaysiaAbstract: Melioidosis presents with a wide range of clinical presentations, which include severe community-acquired pneumonia, septicemia, central nervous system infection, and less severe soft tissue infection. Hence, its diagnosis depends heavily on the clinical microbiology laboratory for culture. In this case report, we describe an atypical presentation of melioidosis in a 52-year-old man who had fever, right upper-abdominal pain, and jaundice for 15 days. Melioidosis caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei was subsequently diagnosed from blood culture. As a primary care physician, high suspicion index is of great importance. High suspicion index of melioidosis in a high-risk group patient, such as the patient with diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot, is crucial in view of atypical presentations of pseudomonas sepsis. A correct combination of antibiotic administration in the early phase of therapy will determine its successful outcome.Keywords: Burkholderia pseudomallei, atypical, high suspicion, primary care

  10. Sinonasal Melioidosis in a Returned Traveller Presenting with Nasal Cellulitis and Sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Sin Mei Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We illustrate a case involving a 51-year-old man who presented to a tertiary hospital with sepsis secondary to an abscess of the nasal vestibule and pustular eruptions of the nasal mucosa. Associated cellulitis extended across the face to the eye, and mucosal thickening of the sinuses was seen on computed tomography. The patient underwent incision and drainage and endoscopic sinus surgery. Blood cultures and swabs were positive for a gram-negative bacillus, Burkholderia pseudomallei. He had multiple risk factors including travel to an endemic area. The patient received extended antibiotic therapy in keeping with published national guidelines. Melioidosis is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, found in the soil in Northern Australia and Asia. It is transmitted via cutaneous or inhaled routes, leading to pneumonia, skin or soft tissue abscesses, and genitourinary infections. Risk factors include diabetes, chronic lung disease, and alcohol abuse. It can exist as a latent, active, or reactivated infection. A high mortality rate has been identified in patients with sepsis. Melioidosis is endemic in tropical Northern Australia and northeastern Thailand where it is the most common cause of severe community-acquired sepsis. There is one other report of melioidosis in the literature involving orbital cellulitis and sinusitis.

  11. Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans antimicrobial peptide NLP-31 in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mei-Perng; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a fulminant disease endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. The standardized form of therapy is antibiotics treatment; however, the bacterium has become increasingly resistant to these antibiotics. This has spurred the need to search for alternative therapeutic agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small proteins that possess broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. In a previous study, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was infected by B. pseudomallei and a whole animal transcriptome analysis identified a number of AMP-encoded genes which were induced significantly in the infected worms. One of the AMPs identified is NLP-31 and to date, there are no reports of anti-B. pseudomallei activity demonstrated by NLP-31. To produce NLP-31 protein for future studies, the gene encoding for NLP-31 was cloned into the pET32b expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Protein expression was induced with 1 mM IPTG for 20 hours at 20°C and recombinant NLP-31 was detected in the soluble fraction. Taken together, a simple optimized heterologous production of AMPs in an E. coli expression system has been successfully developed.

  12. Protection against Experimental Melioidosis with a Synthetic manno-Heptopyranose Hexasaccharide Glycoconjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew E; Christ, William J; George, Alison J; Stokes, Margaret G M; Lohman, Gregory J S; Guo, Yuhong; Jones, Matthew; Titball, Richard W; Atkins, Timothy P; Campbell, A Stewart; Prior, Joann L

    2016-06-15

    Melioidosis is an emerging infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in endemic areas. Antibiotic treatment is protracted and not always successful; even with appropriate therapy, up to 40% of individuals presenting with melioidosis in Thailand succumb to infection. In these circumstances, an effective vaccine has the potential to have a dramatic impact on both the scale and the severity of disease. Currently, no vaccines are licensed for human use. A leading vaccine candidate is the capsular polysaccharide consisting of a homopolymer of unbranched 1→3 linked 2-O-acetyl-6-deoxy-β-d-manno-heptopyranose. Here, we present the chemical synthesis of this challenging antigen using a novel modular disaccharide assembly approach. The resulting hexasaccharide was coupled to the nontoxic Hc domain of tetanus toxin as a carrier protein to promote recruitment of T-cell help and provide a scaffold for antigen display. Mice immunized with the glycoconjugate developed IgM and IgG responses capable of recognizing native capsule, and were protected against infection with over 120 × LD50 of B. pseudomallei strain K96243. This is the first report of the chemical synthesis of an immunologically relevant and protective hexasaccharide fragment of the capsular polysaccharide of B. pseudomallei and serves as the rational starting point for the development of an effective licensed vaccine for this emerging infectious disease. PMID:27124182

  13. Production of p-hydroxybenzoic acid from p-coumaric acid by Burkholderia glumae BGR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Da-Hye; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, Eunok; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-07-01

    p-Coumaric acid (pCA) is abundant in biomass with low lignin content, such as straw and stubble from rye, wheat, and barley. pCA can be isolated from biomass and used for the synthesis of aromatic hydrocarbons. Here, we report engineering of the natural pathway for conversion of pCA into p-hydroxybenzoic acid (pHBA) to increase the amount of pHBA that accumulates more than 100-fold. Burkholderia glumae strain BGR1 (BGR1) grows efficiently on pCA as a sole carbon source via a CoA-dependent non-β-oxidation pathway. This pathway removes two carbons from pCA as acetyl-CoA yielding p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and subsequently oxidizes it to pHBA. To increase the amount of accumulated pHBA in BGR1, we first deleted two genes encoding enzymes that degrade pHBA in the β-ketoadipate pathway. At 10 mM of pCA, the double deletion mutant BGR1_PB4 (Δphb3hΔbcl) accumulated pHBA with 95% conversion, while the control BGR1 accumulated only with 11.2% conversion. When a packed bed reactor containing immobilized BGR1_PB4 cells was operated at a dilution rate 0.2 h(-1) , the productivity of pHBA was achieved at 9.27 mg/L/h for 134 h. However, in a batch reactor at 20 mM pCA, growth of BGR1_PB4 was strongly inhibited, resulting in a low conversion of 19.3%. To further increase the amount of accumulated pCA, we identified the first enzyme in the pathway, p-hydroxcinnmaoyl-CoA synthetase II (phcs II), as the rate-limiting enzyme. Over expression of phcs II using a Palk promoter in a batch reaction at 20 mM of pCA yielded 99.0% conversion to pHBA, which is the highest concentration of pHBA ever reported using a biological process. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1493-1503. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26693833

  14. Biochemical Characterization of 3-Methyl-4-nitrophenol Degradation in Burkholderia sp. Strain SJ98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jun; Lu, Yang; Hu, Xiaoke; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Several strains have been reported to grow on 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol (3M4NP), the primary breakdown product of the excessively used insecticide fenitrothion. However, the microbial degradation of 3M4NP at molecular and biochemical levels remains unknown. Here, methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MBQ) and methylhydroquinone (MHQ), rather than catechol proposed previously, were identified as the intermediates before ring cleavage during 3M4NP degradation by Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the pnpABA1CDEF cluster involved in para-nitrophenol (PNP) and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) catabolism was also likely responsible for 3M4NP degradation in this strain. Purified PNP 4-monooxygenase (PnpA) is able to catalyze the monooxygenation of 3M4NP to MBQ and exhibited an apparent Km value of 20.3 ± 2.54 μM for 3M4NP, and pnpA is absolutely necessary for the catabolism of 3M4NP by gene knock-out and complementation. PnpB, a 1,4-benzoquinone reductase catalyzes the reduction of MBQ to MHQ, and also found to enhance PnpA activity in vitro in the conversion of 3M4NP to MBQ. By sequential catalysis assays, PnpCD, PnpE, and PnpF were likely involved in the lower pathway of 3M4NP catabolism. Although NpcCD, NpcE, and NpcF are able to catalyze the sequential conversion of MHQ in vitro, these enzymes are unlikely involved in 3M4NP catabolism because their coding genes were not upregulated by 3M4NP induction in vivo. These results revealed that the enzymes involved in PNP and 2C4NP catabolism were also responsible for 3M4NP degradation in strain SJ98. This fills a gap in our understanding of the microbial degradation of 3M4NP at molecular and biochemical levels and also provides another example to illustrate the adaptive flexibility in microbial catabolism for structurally similar compounds. PMID:27252697

  15. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Li; Dubarry, Nelly; Passot, Fanny M; Kamgoué, Alain; Murray, Heath; Lane, David; Pasta, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315). It comprises an extra replicon (c2) of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1), another extra replicon(c3) of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the choreography of

  16. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Li Du

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315. It comprises an extra replicon (c2 of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1, another extra replicon(c3 of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the

  17. Staph Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... staph infections are caused by the species Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) . Which of these infections do you worry about most? S. aureus most commonly causes skin infections like folliculitis, boils, ...

  18. Hookworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm ... with any of the following roundworms: Necator americanus Ancylostoma ... Ancylostoma ceylanicum Ancylostoma braziliense The first 2 ...

  19. Burkholderia terrae BS001 migrates proficiently with diverse fungal hosts through soil and provides protection from antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Rashid; Tazetdinova, Diana I; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Soil bacteria can benefit from co-occurring soil fungi in respect of the acquisition of carbonaceous nutrients released by fungal hyphae and the access to novel territories in soil. Here, we investigated the capacity of the mycosphere-isolated bacterium Burkholderia terrae BS001 to comigrate through soil along with hyphae of the soil fungi Trichoderma asperellum, Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum, F. oxysporum pv lini, Coniochaeta ligniaria, Phanerochaete velutina, and Phallus impudicus. We used Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten as the reference migration-inciting fungus. Bacterial migration through presterilized soil on the extending fungal hyphae was detected with six of the seven test fungi, with only Phallus impudicus not showing any bacterial transport. Much like with Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten, intermediate (10(6)-10(8) CFU g(-1) dry soil) to high (>10(8) CFU g(-1) dry soil) strain BS001 cell population sizes were found at the hyphal migration fronts of four fungi, i.e., T. asperellum, Rhizoctonia solani, F. oxysporum and F. oxysporum pv lini, whereas for two fungi, Coniochaeta ligniaria and Phanerochaete velutina, the migration responses were retarded and population sizes were lower (10(3)-10(6) CFU g(-1) dry soil). Consistent with previous data obtained with the reference fungus, migration with the migration-inciting fungi occurred only in the direction of the hyphal growth front. Remarkably, Burkholderia terrae BS001 provided protection from several antifungal agents to the canonical host Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. Specifically, this host was protected from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0 metabolites, as well as from the anti-fungal agent cycloheximide. Similar protection by strain BS001was observed for T. asperellum, and, to a lower extent, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani. The protective effect may be related to the consistent occurrence of biofilm-like cell layers or agglomerates at the surfaces of the protected fungi. The current study

  20. Diversidade de bactérias diazotróficas endofíticas dos gêneros Herbaspirillum e Burkholderia na cultura do arroz inundado Diversity of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria of the genus Herbaspirillum and Burkholderia in wetland rice

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana da Silva Rodrigues; Vera Lucia Divan Baldani; Veronica Massena Reis; José Ivo Baldani

    2006-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a diversidade de bactérias diazotróficas endofíticas, dos gêneros Herbaspirillum e Burkholderia, em duas variedades de arroz, consideradas de alta (IR 42) e baixa (IAC 4440) eficiência de fixação biológica de nitrogênio. Foram realizados dois experimentos em casa de vegetação, em vasos com dois tipos de solos, provenientes dos Estados de Goiás e do Rio de Janeiro. Foi feita a contagem do número de bactérias e o isolamento em diferentes partes e estágios d...