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Sample records for burkholderia pseudomallei clinical

  1. Pathogenesis of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Joseph C; Johnson, Nathan H

    2009-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and mallei are biological agents of military significance. There has been significant research in recent years to develop medical countermeasures for these organisms. This review summarizes work which details aspects of the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and mallei and discusses key scientific questions and directions for future research.

  2. Development of a multiplex PCR assay for rapid identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Seng Fook; Tay, Sun Tee; Sermswan, Rasana; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Chua, Kek Heng; Puthucheary, Savithri D

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a multiplex PCR assay for rapid identification and differentiation of cultures for Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia cepacia complex. The assay is valuable for use in clinical and veterinary laboratories, and in a deployable laboratory during outbreaks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and validation of Burkholderia pseudomallei-specific real-time PCR assays for clinical, environmental or forensic detection applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    Full Text Available The bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a rare but serious illness that can be fatal if untreated or misdiagnosed. Species-specific PCR assays provide a technically simple method for differentiating B. pseudomallei from near-neighbor species. However, substantial genetic diversity and high levels of recombination within this species reduce the likelihood that molecular signatures will differentiate all B. pseudomallei from other Burkholderiaceae. Currently available molecular assays for B. pseudomallei detection lack rigorous validation across large in silico datasets and isolate collections to test for specificity, and none have been subjected to stringent quality control criteria (accuracy, precision, selectivity, limit of quantitation (LoQ, limit of detection (LoD, linearity, ruggedness and robustness to determine their suitability for environmental, clinical or forensic investigations. In this study, we developed two novel B. pseudomallei specific assays, 122018 and 266152, using a dual-probe approach to differentiate B. pseudomallei from B. thailandensis, B. oklahomensis and B. thailandensis-like species; other species failed to amplify. Species specificity was validated across a large DNA panel (>2,300 samples comprising Burkholderia spp. and non-Burkholderia bacterial and fungal species of clinical and environmental relevance. Comparison of assay specificity to two previously published B. pseudomallei-specific assays, BurkDiff and TTS1, demonstrated comparable performance of all assays, providing between 99.7 and 100% specificity against our isolate panel. Last, we subjected 122018 and 266152 to rigorous quality control analyses, thus providing quantitative limits of assay performance. Using B. pseudomallei as a model, our study provides a framework for comprehensive quantitative validation of molecular assays and provides additional, highly validated B. pseudomallei assays for the scientific research community.

  4. Genomic islands as a marker to differentiate between clinical and environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Thanatchaporn Bartpho

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, as a saprophytic bacterium that can cause a severe sepsis disease named melioidosis, has preserved several extra genes in its genome for survival. The sequenced genome of the organism showed high diversity contributed mainly from genomic islands (GIs. Comparative genome hybridization (CGH of 3 clinical and 2 environmental isolates, using whole genome microarrays based on B. pseudomallei K96243 genes, revealed a difference in the presence of genomic islands between clinical and environmental isolates. The largest GI, GI8, of B. pseudomallei was observed as a 2 sub-GI named GIs8.1 and 8.2 with distinguishable %GC content and unequal presence in the genome. GIs8.1, 8.2 and 15 were found to be more common in clinical isolates. A new GI, GI16c, was detected on chromosome 2. Presences of GIs8.1, 8.2, 15 and 16c were evaluated in 70 environmental and 64 clinical isolates using PCR assays. A combination of GIs8.1 and 16c (positivity of either GI was detected in 70% of clinical isolates and 11.4% of environmental isolates (P0.05. Some virulence genes located in the absent GIs and the difference of GIs seems to contribute less to bacterial virulence. The PCR detection of 2 GIs could be used as a cost effective and rapid tool to detect potentially virulent isolates that were contaminated in soil.

  5. Defense mechanisms of hepatocytes against Burkholderia pseudomallei

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    Antje eBast

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The gram-negative facultative intracellular rod Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, an infectious disease with a wide range of clinical presentations. Among the observed visceral abscesses, the liver is commonly affected. However, neither this organotropism of B. pseudomallei nor local hepatic defense mechanisms have been thoroughly investigated so far. Own previous studies using electron microscopy of the murine liver after systemic infection of mice indicated that hepatocytes might be capable of killing B. pseudomallei. Therefore, the aim of this study was to further elucidate the interaction of B. pseudomallei with these cells and to analyse the role of hepatocytes in anti-B. pseudomallei host defense. In vitro studies using the human hepatocyte cell line HepG2 revealed that B. pseudomallei can invade these cells. Subsequently, B. pseudomallei is able to escape from the vacuole, to replicate within the cytosol of HepG2 cells involving its type 3 and type 6 secretion systems, and to induce actin tail formation. Furthermore, stimulation of HepG2 cells showed that IFNgamma can restrict growth of B. pseudomallei in the early and late phase of infection whereas the combination of IFNgamma, IL-1beta and TNFalpha is required for the maximal antibacterial activity. This anti-B. pseudomallei defense of HepG2 cells did not seem to be mediated by iNOS-derived nitric oxide or NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide. In summary, this is the first study describing B. pseudomallei intracellular life cycle characteristics in hepatocytes and showing that IFNgamma-mediated, but nitric oxide- and reactive oxygen species-independent, effector mechanisms are important in anti-B. pseudomallei host defense of hepatocytes.

  6. The effect of environmental conditions on biofilm formation of Burkholderia pseudomallei clinical isolates.

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    Nur Siti K Ramli

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative saprophytic bacterium, is the causative agent of the potentially fatal melioidosis disease in humans. In this study, environmental parameters including temperature, nutrient content, pH and the presence of glucose were shown to play a role in in vitro biofilm formation by 28 B. pseudomallei clinical isolates, including four isolates with large colony variants (LCVs and small colony variants (SCVs morphotypes. Enhanced biofilm formation was observed when the isolates were tested in LB medium, at 30 °C, at pH 7.2, and in the presence of as little as 2 mM glucose respectively. It was also shown that all SVCs displayed significantly greater capacity to form biofilms than the corresponding LCVs when cultured in LB at 37 °C. In addition, octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C(8-HSL, a quorum sensing molecule, was identified by mass spectrometry analysis in bacterial isolates referred to as LCV CTH, LCV VIT, SCV TOM, SCV CTH, 1 and 3, and the presence of other AHL's with higher masses; decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C(10-HSL and dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C(12-HSL were also found in all tested strain in this study. Last but not least, we had successfully acquired two Bacillus sp. soil isolates, termed KW and SA respectively, which possessed strong AHLs degradation activity. Biofilm formation of B. pseudomallei isolates was significantly decreased after treated with culture supernatants of KW and SA strains, demonstrating that AHLs may play a role in B. pseudomallei biofilm formation.

  7. Burkholderia pseudomallei in Unchlorinated Domestic Bore Water, Tropical Northern Australia

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    Mayo, Mark; Kaestli, Mirjam; Harrington, Glenda; Cheng, Allen C.; Ward, Linda; Karp, Danuta; Jolly, Peter; Godoy, Daniel; Spratt, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether unchlorinated bore water in northern Australia contained Burkholderia pseudomallei organisms, we sampled 55 bores; 18 (33%) were culture positive. Multilocus sequence typing identified 15 sequence types. The B. pseudomallei sequence type from 1 water sample matched a clinical isolate from a resident with melioidosis on the same property. PMID:21762588

  8. Evaluation of a latex agglutination assay for the identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

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    Duval, Brea D; Elrod, Mindy G; Gee, Jay E; Chantratita, Narisara; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Cases of melioidosis and glanders are rare in the United States, but the etiologic agents of each disease (Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, respectively) are classified as Tier 1 select agents because of concerns about their potential use as bioterrorism agents. A rapid, highly sensitive, and portable assay for clinical laboratories and field use is required. Our laboratory has further evaluated a latex agglutination assay for its ability to identify B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates. This assay uses a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes the capsular polysaccharide produced by B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, but is absent in closely related Burkholderia species. A total of 110 B. pseudomallei and B. mallei were tested, and 36 closely related Burkholderia species. The latex agglutination assay was positive for 109 of 110 (99.1% sensitivity) B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates tested. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei vaccines: Are we close to clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titball, Richard W; Burtnick, Mary N; Bancroft, Gregory J; Brett, Paul

    2017-10-20

    B. pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a serious an often fatal disease of humans and animals. The closely related bacterium B. mallei, which cases glanders, is considered to be a clonal derivative of B. pseudomallei. Both B. pseudomallei and B. mallei were evaluated by the United States and the former USSR as potential bioweapons. Much of the effort to devise biodefence vaccines in the past decade has been directed towards the identification and formulation of sub-unit vaccines which could protect against both melioidosis and glanders. A wide range of proteins and polysaccharides have been identified which protective immunity in mice. In this review we highlight the significant progress that has been made in developing glycoconjugates as sub-unit vaccines. We also consider some of the important the criteria for licensing, including the suitability of the "animal rule" for assessing vaccine efficacy, the protection required from a vaccine and the how correlates of protection will be identified. Vaccines developed for biodefence purposes could also be used in regions of the world where naturally occurring disease is endemic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of vaccines against burkholderia pseudomallei

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Natasha; Conejero, Laura; De Reynal, Melanie; Easton, Anna; Bancroft, Gregory J; Titball, Richard W

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium which is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease which carries a high mortality and morbidity rate in endemic areas of South East Asia and Northern Australia...

  11. Brain abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padigione, A.; Spelman, D.; Ferris, N. [Alfred Hospital, Prahran, VIC (Australia)

    1997-10-01

    Full text: Melioidosis, or infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important human disease in South East Asia and Northern Australia. Neurological manifestations are well recognized amongst its protean presentations, but direct focal central nervous system infection is infrequently described with only 9 adult and 5 paediatric cases reported in the English language literature. A case of brain abscess due to Burkholderia pseudomallei occurring in a 20 year old Dutch visitor to Australia which progressed despite antibiotic treatment is described. A review of the clinical manifestations, Magnetic Resonance (MR) appearance, diagnosis and treatment of melioidosis is presented, highlighting that: (i) physicians outside endernic areas should consider melioidosis in any patient with an appropriate travel history, (ii) MR imaging is more sensitive then CT in diagnosing early brain infection, especially of the brainstem; (iii) Bacterial culture, the mainstay of diagnosis, has many shortcomings; (iv)In vitro antibiotic sensitivity testing may not translate into clinical efficacy; and (v) Steroids appear to have little role, even in severe disease.

  12. Burkholderia pseudomallei Data Gap Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    was clinically isolated by Alfred Whitmore in Burma (Myanmar). Figure 1-1 illustrates the prevalence of melioidosis worldwide. Since the addition of B...probability of survival. Animals used in this research include mice, hamsters, rats, ferrets, guinea pigs , rabbits, pigs , and non-human primates...and approved vaccine there is no protective countermeasure against B. pseudomallei . Prophylaxis using antibiotics has been investigated in mice

  13. Molecular insights into Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei pathogenesis.

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    Galyov, Edouard E; Brett, Paul J; DeShazer, David

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are closely related gram-negative bacteria that can cause serious diseases in humans and animals. This review summarizes the current and rapidly expanding knowledge on the specific virulence factors employed by these pathogens and their roles in the pathogenesis of melioidosis and glanders. In particular, the contributions of recently identified virulence factors are described in the context of the intracellular lifestyle of these pathogens. Throughout this review, unique and shared virulence features of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are discussed.

  14. Competition between Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. thailandensis.

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    Ngamdee, Wikanda; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Reamtong, Onrapak; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Salje, Jeanne; Low, David A; Peacock, Sharon J; Chantratita, Narisara

    2015-03-03

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis, an often fatal disease in tropical countries. Burkholderia thailandensis is a non-virulent but closely related species. Both species are soil saprophytes but are almost never isolated together. We identified two mechanisms by which B. pseudomallei affects the growth of B. thailandensis. First, we found that six different isolates of B. pseudomallei inhibited the growth of B. thailandensis on LB agar plates. Second, our results indicated that 55% of isolated strains of B. pseudomallei produced a secreted compound that inhibited the motility but not the viability of B. thailandensis. Analysis showed that the active compound was a pH-sensitive and heat-labile compound, likely a protein, which may affect flagella processing or facilitate their degradation. Analysis of bacterial sequence types (STs) demonstrated an association between this and motility inhibition. The active compound was produced from B. pseudomallei during the stationary growth phase. Taken together, our results indicate that B. pseudomallei inhibits both the growth and motility of its close relative B. thailandensis. The latter phenomenon appears to occur via a previously unreported mechanism involving flagellar processing or degradation.

  15. Burkholderia pseudomallei Genotype Distribution in the Northern Territory, Australia.

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    Chapple, Stephanie N J; Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; McRobb, Evan; Mayo, Mark; Kaestli, Mirjam; Spratt, Brian G; Currie, Bart J

    2016-01-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical disease of high mortality caused by the environmental bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei. We have collected clinical isolates from the highly endemic Northern Territory of Australia routinely since 1989, and animal and environmental B. pseudomallei isolates since 1991. Here we provide a complete record of all B. pseudomallei multilocus sequence types (STs) found in the Northern Territory to date, and distribution maps of the eight most common environmental STs. We observed surprisingly restricted geographic distributions of STs, which is contrary to previous reports suggesting widespread environmental dissemination of this bacterium. Our data suggest that B. pseudomallei from soil and water does not frequently disperse long distances following severe weather events or by migration of infected animals. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. Pathogenesis of percutaneous infection of goats with Burkholderia pseudomallei: clinical, pathologic, and immunological responses in chronic melioidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffler, Carl; Bosco-Lauth, Angela M; Aboellail, Tawfik A; Marolf, Angela J; Bowen, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe suppurative to granulomatous infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. The disease is endemic to South-East Asia and Northern Australasia and is also of interest as a potential biological weapon. Natural infection can occur by percutaneous inoculation, inhalation or ingestion, but the relative importance of each route is unknown. Experimental infection models using mice have shown inhalation to be the most lethal route of exposure, but few studies have examined the pathogenesis of percutaneous infection despite its presumptive importance in natural disease. Caprine models are useful in the study of melioidosis because goats are susceptible to natural infection by B. pseudomallei, display similar epizootiology/epidemiology to that of humans within the endemic range and develop similar pathologic lesions. Percutaneous inoculation with 104 CFU of B. pseudomallei produced disease in all experimental animals with rapid dissemination to the lungs, spleen and kidneys. Initial fever was brief, but temperatures did not return to pre-infection levels until day 18, concurrent with a dramatic lymphocytosis and the transition to chronic disease. Distribution and appearance of gross pathologic and radiographic lesions in goats were similar to caprine aerosol infection and to reported human disease. The similarities seen despite different routes of infection suggest that host or bacterial factors may be more important than the route of infection in disease pathogenesis. The nature of melioidosis in goats makes it amenable for modelling additional risk factors to produce acute clinical disease, which is important to the study of human melioidosis. PMID:24571408

  17. Burkholderia pseudomallei transcriptional adaptation in macrophages

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    Chieng Sylvia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen of phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. How the bacterium interacts with host macrophage cells is still not well understood and is critical to appreciate the strategies used by this bacterium to survive and how intracellular survival leads to disease manifestation. Results Here we report the expression profile of intracellular B. pseudomallei following infection of human macrophage-like U937 cells. During intracellular growth over the 6 h infection period, approximately 22 % of the B. pseudomallei genome showed significant transcriptional adaptation. B. pseudomallei adapted rapidly to the intracellular environment by down-regulating numerous genes involved in metabolism, cell envelope, motility, replication, amino acid and ion transport system and regulatory function pathways. Reduced expression in catabolic and housekeeping genes suggested lower energy requirement and growth arrest during macrophage infection, while expression of genes encoding anaerobic metabolism functions were up regulated. However, whilst the type VI secretion system was up regulated, expression of many known virulence factors was not significantly modulated over the 6hours of infection. Conclusions The transcriptome profile described here provides the first comprehensive view of how B. pseudomallei survives within host cells and will help identify potential virulence factors and proteins that are important for the survival and growth of B. pseudomallei within human cells.

  18. Detection and differentiation of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, May-Ann; Wang, Dongling; Yap, Eu Hian

    2005-03-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis may be differentiated from closely related species of Burkholderia mallei that causes glanders and non-pathogenic species of Burkholderia thailandensis by multiplex PCR. The multiplex PCR consists of primers that flank a 10-bp repetitive element in B. pseudomallei and B. mallei amplifying PCR fragment of varying sizes between 400-700 bp, a unique sequence in B. thailandensis amplifying a PCR fragment of 308 bp and the metalloprotease gene amplifying a PCR fragment of 245 bp in B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis. The multiplex PCR not only can differentiate the three Burkholderia species but can also be used for epidemiological typing of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei strains.

  19. Antimicrobial Carbohydrate Vaccines: Development of Burkholderia pseudomallei immunogens

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The potential bio-terror threat posed by Burkholderia pseudomallei highlights the need for an effective vaccine. Immunisation and challenge experiments in mice have demonstrated that the capsular polysaccharide (CPS-1) of B. pseudomallei, which is composed of β-1,3-linked 6-deoxy-D-manno-heptopyranose residues, is a promising candidate for vaccine development. This thesis set out to explore routes to potential vaccine candidates for Burkholderia pseudomallei infection based on ...

  20. Global and regional dissemination and evolution of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chewapreecha, Claire; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Yang, Zhirong; Harris, Simon R; Mather, Alison E.; Tuanyok, Apichai; De Smet, Birgit; Le Hello, Simon; Bizet, Chantal; Mayo, Mark; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Spratt, Brian G; Corander, Jukka; Keim, Paul; Dougan, Gordon; Dance, David A. B.; Currie, Bart J; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2017-01-01

    The environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes an estimated 165,000 cases of human melioidosis per year worldwide, and is also classified as a biothreat agent. We used whole genome sequences of 469 B. pseudomallei isolates from 30 countries collected over 79 years to explore its geographic transmission. Our data point to Australia as an early reservoir, with transmission to Southeast Asia followed by onward transmission to South Asia, and East Asia. Repeated reintroduction was observed within the Malay Peninsula, and between countries bordered by the Mekong river. Our data support an African origin of the Central and South American isolates with introduction of B. pseudomallei into the Americas between 1650 and 1850, providing a temporal link with the slave trade. We also identified geographically distinct genes/variants in Australasian or Southeast Asian isolates alone, with virulence-associated genes being among those overrepresented. This provides a potential explanation for clinical manifestations of melioidosis that are geographically restricted. PMID:28112723

  1. Development of Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei vaccines

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    Ediane Batista Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are Gram-negative bacteria that cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Inhalational infection with either organism can result in severe and rapidly fatal pneumonia. Inoculation by the oral and cutaneous routes can also produce infection. chronic infection develops after recovery from acute infection with both agents, and control of infection with antibiotics requires prolonged treatment. Symptoms for both meliodosis and glanders are non-specific, making diagnosis difficult.B. pseudomallei can be located in the environment, but in the host, B. mallei and B. psedomallei are intracellular organisms. Thefection results in similar immune responses to both agents. Effective early innate immune responses are critical to controlling the early phase of the infection. Innate immune signaling molecules such as TLR, NOD, MyD88 and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN- and TNF-α play key roles in regulating control of infection. Neutrophils and monocytes are critical cells in the early infection for these microorganisms. Both monocytes and macrophages are necessary for limiting dissemination of B. pseudomallei. In contrast, the role of adaptive immune responses in controlling Burkholderia infection is less well understood. However, T cell responses are critical for vaccine protection from Burkholderia infection. At present, effective vaccines for prevention of glanders or meliodosis have not been developed, although recently progress of Burkholderia vaccines has received renewed attention.This review will summarize current and past approaches to develop Burkholderia mallei and pseudomalllei vaccines, with emphasis on immune mechanisms of protection and the challenges facing the field. At present, immunization with live attenuated bacteria provides the most effective and durable immunity, and it is important therefore to understand the immune correlates of protection induced by live attenuated vaccines.

  2. Genomic Diversity of Burkholderia pseudomallei Clinical Isolates: Subtractive Hybridization Reveals a Burkholderia mallei-Specific Propage in B. pseudomallei 1026b

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Kitajima. 2003. Comparative analysis of the complete genome sequence of Pierce’s disease and citrus varigated chlorosis strains of Xylella...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 8 MAR 2004 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genomic ...the disease melioidosis and is a category B biological threat agent. The genomic sequence of B. pseudomallei K96243 was recently determined, but

  3. Genomic Diversity of Burkholderia pseudomallei Clinical Isolates: Subtractive Hybridization Reveals a Burkholderia mallei-Specific Prophage in B. pseudomallei 1026b

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    J. P. Kitajima. 2003. Comparative analysis of the complete genome sequence of Pierce’s disease and citrus varigated chlorosis strains of Xylella...JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, June 2004, p. 3938–3950 Vol. 186, No. 12 0021-9193/04/$08.000 DOI: 10.1128/JB.186.12.3938–3950.2004 Genomic Diversity of... genomic sequence of B. pseudomallei K96243 was recently determined, but little is known about the overall genetic diversity of this species

  4. Phylogeography of Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates, Western Hemisphere.

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    Gee, Jay E; Gulvik, Christopher A; Elrod, Mindy G; Batra, Dhwani; Rowe, Lori A; Sheth, Mili; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2017-07-01

    The bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, which is mainly associated with tropical areas. We analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among genome sequences from isolates of B. pseudomallei that originated in the Western Hemisphere by comparing them with genome sequences of isolates that originated in the Eastern Hemisphere. Analysis indicated that isolates from the Western Hemisphere form a distinct clade, which supports the hypothesis that these isolates were derived from a constricted seeding event from Africa. Subclades have been resolved that are associated with specific regions within the Western Hemisphere and suggest that isolates might be correlated geographically with cases of melioidosis. One isolate associated with a former World War II prisoner of war was believed to represent illness 62 years after exposure in Southeast Asia. However, analysis suggested the isolate originated in Central or South America.

  5. DNA microarray-based detection and identification of Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoock, Gernot; Ehricht, Ralf; Melzer, Falk; Rassbach, Astrid; Scholz, Holger C; Neubauer, Heinrich; Sachse, Konrad; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; Saqib, Muhammad; Elschner, Mandy

    2009-01-01

    We developed a rapid oligonucleotide microarray assay based on genetic markers for the accurate identification and differentiation of Burkholderia (B.) mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei, the agents of glanders and melioidosis, respectively. These two agents were clearly identified using at least 4 independent genetic markers including 16S rRNA gene, fliC, motB and also by novel species-specific target genes, identified by in silico sequence analysis. Specific hybridization signal profiles allowed the detection and differentiation of up to 10 further Burkholderia spp., including the closely related species Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia-like agents, such as Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Burkholderia gladioli, which are often associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The assay was developed using the easy-to-handle and economical ArrayTube (AT) platform. A representative strain panel comprising 44 B. mallei, 32 B. pseudomallei isolates, and various Burkholderia type strains were examined to validate the test. Assay specificity was determined by examination of 40 non-Burkholderia strains.

  6. Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Water

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    Woods Donald E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of Burkholderia pseudomallei to survive in water likely contributes to its environmental persistence in endemic regions. To determine the physiological adaptations which allow B. pseudomallei to survive in aqueous environments, we performed microarray analyses of B. pseudomallei cultures transferred from Luria broth (LB to distilled water. Findings Increased expression of a gene encoding for a putative membrane protein (BPSL0721 was confirmed using a lux-based transcriptional reporter system, and maximal expression was noted at approximately 6 hrs after shifting cells from LB to water. A BPSL0721 deficient mutant of B. pseudomallei was able to survive in water for at least 90 days indicating that although involved, BPSL0721 was not essential for survival. BPSL2961, a gene encoding a putative phosphatidylglycerol phosphatase (PGP, was also induced when cells were shifted to water. This gene is likely involved in cell membrane biosynthesis. We were unable to construct a PGP mutant suggesting that the gene is not only involved in survival in water but is essential for cell viability. We also examined mutants of polyhydroxybutyrate synthase (phbC, lipopolysaccharide (LPS oligosaccharide and capsule synthesis, and these mutations did not affect survival in water. LPS mutants lacking outer core were found to lose viability in water by 200 days indicating that an intact LPS core provides an outer membrane architecture which allows prolonged survival in water. Conclusion The results from these studies suggest that B. pseudomallei survival in water is a complex process that requires an LPS molecule which contains an intact core region.

  7. Development of Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ediane B; Dow, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative bacteria that cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Inhalational infection with either organism can result in severe and rapidly fatal pneumonia. Inoculation by the oral and cutaneous routes can also produce infection. Chronic infection may develop after recovery from acute infection with both agents, and control of infection with antibiotics requires prolonged treatment. Symptoms for both meliodosis and glanders are non-specific, making diagnosis difficult. B. pseudomallei can be located in the environment, but in the host, B. mallei and B. psedomallei are intracellular organisms, and infection results in similar immune responses to both agents. Effective early innate immune responses are critical to controlling the early phase of the infection. Innate immune signaling molecules such as TLR, NOD, MyD88, and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α play key roles in regulating control of infection. Neutrophils and monocytes are critical cells in the early infection for both microorganisms. Both monocytes and macrophages are necessary for limiting dissemination of B. pseudomallei. In contrast, the role of adaptive immune responses in controlling Burkholderia infection is less well understood. However, T cell responses are critical for vaccine protection from Burkholderia infection. At present, effective vaccines for prevention of glanders or meliodosis have not been developed, although recently development of Burkholderia vaccines has received renewed attention. This review will summarize current and past approaches to develop B. mallei and B. pseudomalllei vaccines, with emphasis on immune mechanisms of protection and the challenges facing the field. At present, immunization with live attenuated bacteria provides the most effective and durable immunity, and it is important therefore to understand the immune correlates of protection induced by live attenuated vaccines. Subunit

  8. Development of Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ediane B.; Dow, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative bacteria that cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Inhalational infection with either organism can result in severe and rapidly fatal pneumonia. Inoculation by the oral and cutaneous routes can also produce infection. Chronic infection may develop after recovery from acute infection with both agents, and control of infection with antibiotics requires prolonged treatment. Symptoms for both meliodosis and glanders are non-specific, making diagnosis difficult. B. pseudomallei can be located in the environment, but in the host, B. mallei and B. psedomallei are intracellular organisms, and infection results in similar immune responses to both agents. Effective early innate immune responses are critical to controlling the early phase of the infection. Innate immune signaling molecules such as TLR, NOD, MyD88, and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α play key roles in regulating control of infection. Neutrophils and monocytes are critical cells in the early infection for both microorganisms. Both monocytes and macrophages are necessary for limiting dissemination of B. pseudomallei. In contrast, the role of adaptive immune responses in controlling Burkholderia infection is less well understood. However, T cell responses are critical for vaccine protection from Burkholderia infection. At present, effective vaccines for prevention of glanders or meliodosis have not been developed, although recently development of Burkholderia vaccines has received renewed attention. This review will summarize current and past approaches to develop B. mallei and B. pseudomalllei vaccines, with emphasis on immune mechanisms of protection and the challenges facing the field. At present, immunization with live attenuated bacteria provides the most effective and durable immunity, and it is important therefore to understand the immune correlates of protection induced by live attenuated vaccines. Subunit

  9. Molecular Procedure for Rapid Detection of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Bauernfeind, Adolf; Roller, Carsten; Meyer, Detlef; Jungwirth, Renate; Schneider, Ines

    1998-01-01

    A PCR procedure for the discrimination of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei was developed. It is based on the nucleotide difference T 2143 C (T versus C at position 2143) between B. mallei and B. pseudomallei detected in the 23S rDNA sequences. In comparison with conventional methods the procedure allows more rapid identification at reduced risk for infection of laboratory personnel.

  10. Molecular Characterization of Putative Virulence Determinants in Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suat Moi Puah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative saprophyte Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, an infectious disease which is endemic in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. This bacterium possesses many virulence factors which are thought to contribute to its survival and pathogenicity. Using a virulent clinical isolate of B. pseudomallei and an attenuated strain of the same B. pseudomallei isolate, 6 genes BPSL2033, BP1026B_I2784, BP1026B_I2780, BURPS1106A_A0094, BURPS1106A_1131, and BURPS1710A_1419 were identified earlier by PCR-based subtractive hybridization. These genes were extensively characterized at the molecular level, together with an additional gene BPSL3147 that had been identified by other investigators. Through a reverse genetic approach, single-gene knockout mutants were successfully constructed by using site-specific insertion mutagenesis and were confirmed by PCR. BPSL2033::Km and BURPS1710A_1419::Km mutants showed reduced rates of survival inside macrophage RAW 264.7 cells and also low levels of virulence in the nematode infection model. BPSL2033::Km demonstrated weak statistical significance (P=0.049 at 8 hours after infection in macrophage infection study but this was not seen in BURPS1710A_1419::Km. Nevertheless, complemented strains of both genes were able to partially restore the gene defects in both in vitro and in vivo studies, thus suggesting that they individually play a minor role in the virulence of B. pseudomallei.

  11. Relationship between antigenicity and pathogenicity for Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei revealed by a large panel of mouse MAbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nianxiang; Tsai, Shien; Feng, Shaw-Huey; Newsome, Tamara; Kim, Hyung-Yong; Li, Bingjie; Zhang, Shimin; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2008-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are two closely related gram-negative bacterial species classified by the CDC as category B biowarfare agents. To develop monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that can recognize as many different strains and/or clinical isolates of these two pathogens as possible, we immunized mice with heat-killed bacterial whole cells and membrane preparations from multiple strains and/or clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. More than 100 different hybridoma clones that produced MAbs strongly reacting to B. pseudomallei and/or B. mallei have been developed. These MAbs were categorized into eight different groups according to their reaction specificity against different species of Burkholderia bacteria as well as the different nature of target antigens (LPS, capsule polysaccharides, proteins, and glycoproteins) on the bacteria they recognized. Characterization of this large panel of MAbs has demonstrated an interesting pattern of various antigenic epitopes shared by the different species of Burkholderia bacteria. More importantly, this study has revealed a pathogenicity-linked antigen epitope(s) on capsule-like polysaccharides found only in the pathogenic species of Burkholderia bacteria and a Burkholderia-specific antigen epitope(s) that did not exist in other gram-negative bacterial species. Our MAbs should prove to be highly valuable in the development of detection, diagnosis, and therapeutic applications against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei infections.

  12. Recent Advances in Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Muruato, Laura A; Torres, Alfredo G

    2015-06-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative organisms, which are etiological agents of glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Although only B. pseudomallei is responsible for a significant number of human cases, both organisms are classified as Tier 1 Select Agents and their diseases lack effective diagnosis and treatment. Despite a recent resurgence in research pertaining to these organisms, there are still a number of knowledge gaps. This article summarizes the latest research progress in the fields of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei pathogenesis, vaccines, and diagnostics.

  13. Strategies for intracellular survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei

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    Ben eAdler

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease with high mortality that is prevalent in tropical regions of the world. A key component of the pathogenesis of melioidosis is the ability of B. pseudomallei to enter, survive and replicate within mammalian host cells. For non-phagocytic cells, bacterial adhesins have been identified both on the bacterial surface and associated with Type 4 pili. Cell invasion involves components of one or more of the three Type 3 Secretion System clusters, which also mediate, at least in part, the escape of bacteria from the endosome into the cytoplasm, where bacteria move by actin-based motility. The mechanism of actin-based motility is not clearly understood, but appears to differ from characterised mechanisms in other bacterial species. A small proportion of intracellular bacteria is targeted by host cell autophagy, involving direct recruitment of LC3 to endosomes rather than through uptake by canonical autophagosomes. However, the majority of bacterial cells are able to circumvent autophagy and other intracellular defence mechanisms such as the induction of iNOS, and then replicate in the cytoplasm and spread to adjacent cells via membrane fusion, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated giant cells. A potential role for host cell ubiquitin in the autophagic response to bacterial infection has recently been proposed.

  14. Comparison of four selective media for the isolation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Mindy B; Beesley, Cari A; Wilkins, Patricia P; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2009-06-01

    Currently there are no commercially available selective media indicated for the isolation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Ashdown's agar, a custom selective medium for isolation of B. pseudomallei, is well described in the literature but unavailable commercially. Three commercially available media, Burkholderia cepacia selective agar (BCSA), oxidative-fermentative-polymyxin B-bacitracin-lactose (OFPBL) agar, and Pseudomonas cepacia (PC) agar are recommended for isolation of B. cepacia from respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis patients. We evaluated the sensitivity and selectivity of these four media using 20 B. mallei, 20 B. pseudomallei, 20 Burkholderia spp., and 15 diagnostically challenging organisms. Ashdown's agar was the most sensitive medium for the isolation of B. pseudomallei, but it was unable to support growth of B. mallei. Pseudomonas cepacia agar was highly sensitive and selective for both organisms. In non-endemic areas, we suggest the use of the commercially available PC agar for the isolation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei.

  15. Burkholderia pseudomallei genome plasticity associated with genomic island variation

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    Currie Bart J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil-dwelling saprophyte and the cause of melioidosis. Horizontal gene transfer contributes to the genetic diversity of this pathogen and may be an important determinant of virulence potential. The genome contains genomic island (GI regions that encode a broad array of functions. Although there is some evidence for the variable distribution of genomic islands in B. pseudomallei isolates, little is known about the extent of variation between related strains or their association with disease or environmental survival. Results Five islands from B. pseudomallei strain K96243 were chosen as representatives of different types of genomic islands present in this strain, and their presence investigated in other B. pseudomallei. In silico analysis of 10 B. pseudomallei genome sequences provided evidence for the variable presence of these regions, together with micro-evolutionary changes that generate GI diversity. The diversity of GIs in 186 isolates from NE Thailand (83 environmental and 103 clinical isolates was investigated using multiplex PCR screening. The proportion of all isolates positive by PCR ranged from 12% for a prophage-like island (GI 9, to 76% for a metabolic island (GI 16. The presence of each of the five GIs did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p > 0.05 for all five islands. The cumulative number of GIs per isolate for the 186 isolates ranged from 0 to 5 (median 2, IQR 1 to 3. The distribution of cumulative GI number did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p = 0.27. The presence of GIs was defined for the three largest clones in this collection (each defined as a single sequence type, ST, by multilocus sequence typing; these were ST 70 (n = 15 isolates, ST 54 (n = 11, and ST 167 (n = 9. The rapid loss and/or acquisition of gene islands was observed within individual clones. Comparisons were drawn between isolates obtained

  16. ATP-binding cassette systems in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

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    Titball Richard W

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP binding cassette (ABC systems are responsible for the import and export of a wide variety of molecules across cell membranes and comprise one of largest protein superfamilies found in prokarya, eukarya and archea. ABC systems play important roles in bacterial lifestyle, virulence and survival. In this study, an inventory of the ABC systems of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243 and Burkholderia mallei strain ATCC 23344 has been compiled using bioinformatic techniques. Results The ABC systems in the genomes of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei have been reannotated and subsequently compared. Differences in the number and types of encoded ABC systems in belonging to these organisms have been identified. For example, ABC systems involved in iron acquisition appear to be correlated with differences in genome size and lifestyles between these two closely related organisms. Conclusion The availability of complete inventories of the ABC systems in B. pseudomallei and B. mallei has enabled a more detailed comparison of the encoded proteins in this family. This has resulted in the identification of ABC systems which may play key roles in the different lifestyles and pathogenic properties of these two bacteria. This information has the potential to be exploited for improved clinical identification of these organisms as well as in the development of new vaccines and therapeutics targeted against the diseases caused by these organisms.

  17. Molecular Procedure for Rapid Detection of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauernfeind, Adolf; Roller, Carsten; Meyer, Detlef; Jungwirth, Renate; Schneider, Ines

    1998-01-01

    A PCR procedure for the discrimination of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei was developed. It is based on the nucleotide difference T 2143 C (T versus C at position 2143) between B. mallei and B. pseudomallei detected in the 23S rDNA sequences. In comparison with conventional methods the procedure allows more rapid identification at reduced risk for infection of laboratory personnel. PMID:9705426

  18. Volatile-sulfur-compound profile distinguishes Burkholderia pseudomallei from Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Timothy J J; Hahne, Dorothee R; Merritt, Adam J; Clarke, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS) was used to show that dimethyl sulfide produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei is responsible for its unusual truffle-like smell and distinguishes the species from Burkholderia thailandensis. SPME-GCMS can be safely used to detect dimethyl sulfide produced by agar-grown B. pseudomallei. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Autotransporters and Their Role in the Virulence of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Natalie eLazar Adler; Joanne eStevens; Mark eStevens; Edouard eGalyov

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are closely related Gram-negative bacteria responsible for the infectious diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Autotransporters (ATs) comprise a large and diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins that includes virulence-associated invasins, adhesins, proteases and actin-nucleating factors. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome contains eleven predicted ATs, eight of which share homologues in the B. mallei ATCC 23344 genom...

  20. DBSecSys 2.0: a database of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei secretion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Memi?evi?, Vesna; Kumar, Kamal; Zavaljevski, Nela; DeShazer, David; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    Background Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are the causative agents of glanders and melioidosis, respectively, diseases with high morbidity and mortality rates. B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are closely related genetically; B. mallei evolved from an ancestral strain of B. pseudomallei by genome reduction and adaptation to an obligate intracellular lifestyle. Although these two bacteria cause different diseases, they share multiple virulence factors, including bacterial secretion syste...

  1. Burkholderia pseudomallei musculoskeletal infections (melioidosis in India

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    Pandey Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis, an infection due to gram negative Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important cause of sepsis in east Asia especially Thailand and northern Australia. It usually causes abscesses in lung, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle and parotids especially in patients with diabetes, chronic renal failure and thalassemia. Musculoskeletal melioidosis is not common in India even though sporadic cases have been reported mostly involving soft tissues. During a two-year-period, we had five patients with musculoskeletal melioidosis. All patients presented with multifocal osteomyelitis, recurrent osteomyelitis or septic arthritis. One patient died early because of septicemia and multi-organ failure. All patients were diagnosed on the basis of positive pus culture. All patients were treated by surgical debridement followed by a combination of antibiotics; (ceftazidime, amoxy-clavulanic acid, co-trimoxazole and doxycycline for six months except for one who died due to fulminant septicemia. All other patients recovered completely with no recurrences. With increasing awareness and better diagnostic facilities, probably musculoskeletal melioidosis will be increasingly diagnosed in future.

  2. Evaluation of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry system for identification of clinical and environmental isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei

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    He eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is not represented in the current version of Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS system. A total of 66 isolates of B. pseudomallei, including 30 clinical isolates collected from National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH, n=27 and Peking Union Medical College Hospital (PUMCH, n=3, and 36 isolates of genetically confirmed strains, including 13 from clinical samples and 23 from environmental samples, collected from southern Taiwan were included in this study. All these isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing analysis and the Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS system. Among the 30 isolates initially identified as B. pseudomallei by conventional identification methods, one was identified as B. cepacia complex (NTUH and three were identified as B. putida (PUMCH by partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing analysis and Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS system. The Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS system misidentified 62 genetically confirmed B. pseudomallei isolates as B. thailandensis or Burkholderia species (score values, 1.803-2.063 when the currently available database (DB 5627 was used. However, using a newly created MALDI-TOF MS database (including B. pseudomallei NTUH-3 strain, all isolates were correctly identified as B. pseudomallei (score values >2.000, 100%. An additional 60 isolates of genetically confirmed B. cepacia complex and B. putida were also evaluated by the Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS system using the newly created database and none of these isolates were identified as B. pseudomallei. MALDI-TOF MS is a versatile and robust tool for the rapid identification of B. pseudomallei using the enhanced database.

  3. Improved detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei from non-blood clinical specimens using enrichment culture and PCR: narrowing diagnostic gap in resource-constrained settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellapragada, Chaitanya; Shaw, Tushar; D'Souza, Annet; Eshwara, Vandana Kalwaje; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic utility of enrichment culture and PCR for improved case detection rates of non-bacteraemic form of melioidosis in limited resource settings. Clinical specimens (n = 525) obtained from patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital of South India with clinical symptoms suggestive of community-acquired pneumonia, lower respiratory tract infections, superficial or internal abscesses, chronic skin ulcers and bone or joint infections were tested for the presence of Burkholderia pseudomallei using conventional culture (CC), enrichment culture (EC) and PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CC and PCR were initially deduced using EC as the gold standard method. Further, diagnostic accuracies of all the three methods were analysed using Bayesian latent class modelling (BLCM). Detection rates of B. pseudomallei using CC, EC and PCR were 3.8%, 5.3% and 6%, respectively. Diagnostic sensitivities and specificities of CC and PCR were 71.4, 98.4% and 100 and 99.4%, respectively in comparison with EC as the gold standard test. With Bayesian latent class modelling, EC and PCR demonstrated sensitivities of 98.7 and 99.3%, respectively, while CC showed a sensitivity of 70.3% for detection of B. pseudomallei. An increase of 1.6% (95% CI: 1.08-4.32%) in the case detection rate of melioidosis was observed in the study population when EC and/or PCR were used in adjunct to the conventional culture technique. Our study findings underscore the diagnostic superiority of enrichment culture and/or PCR over conventional microbiological culture for improved case detection of melioidosis from non-blood clinical specimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Revised structures for the predominant O-polysaccharides expressed by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Heiss, Christian; Burtnick, Mary N.; Rosemary A Roberts; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Brett, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    O-Polysaccharides (OPS) were isolated from purified Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei lipopolysaccharides by mild-acid hydrolysis and gel-permeation chromatography. 1-D and 2-D 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy experiments revealed that the OPS antigens were unbranched heteropolymers with the following structures:

  5. A Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection Imported from Eritrea to Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Almog, Yaniv; Yagel, Yael; Geffen, Yuval; Yagupsky, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Although it has been predicted that melioidosis is probably endemic in the Horn of Africa, no confirmed cases have ever been detected in the region. We have recently isolated Burkholderia pseudomallei from an Eritrean patient in Israel. The isolate was assigned a novel multilocus sequence type (ST-1479). The observation has important epidemiological implications in an era of massive human migration.

  6. In vitro susceptibility of Burkholderia pseudomallei to antimicrobial peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanthawong, S.; Nazmi, K.; Wongratanacheewin, S.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Wuthiekanun, V.; Taweechaisupapong, S.

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics, resulting in high mortality rates of 19% in Australia and even 50% in Thailand. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) possess potent broad-spectrum bactericidal activities and are regarded as

  7. Ultrastructural effects and antibiofilm activity of LFchimera against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puknun, A.; Kanthawong, S.; Anutrakunchai, C.; Nazmi, K.; Tigchelaar, W.; Hoeben, K.A.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Taweechaisupong, S.

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin chimera (LFchimera), a hybrid peptide containing the two antimicrobial stretches of the innate immunity factor bovine lactoferrin, viz. LFampin265-284 and LFcin17-30, has strikingly high antimicrobial activity against the category B pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei. The action

  8. Survival and Intra-Nuclear Trafficking of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Strategies of Evasion from Immune Surveillance?

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    Jamuna Vadivelu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During infection, successful bacterial clearance is achieved via the host immune system acting in conjunction with appropriate antibiotic therapy. However, it still remains a tip of the iceberg as to where persistent pathogens namely, Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei reside/hide to escape from host immune sensors and antimicrobial pressure.We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM to investigate post-mortem tissue sections of patients with clinical melioidosis to identify the localisation of a recently identified gut microbiome, B. pseudomallei within host cells. The intranuclear presence of B. pseudomallei was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM of experimentally infected guinea pig spleen tissues and Live Z-stack, and ImageJ analysis of fluorescence microscopy analysis of in vitro infection of A549 human lung epithelial cells.TEM investigations revealed intranuclear localization of B. pseudomallei in cells of infected human lung and guinea pig spleen tissues. We also found that B. pseudomallei induced actin polymerization following infection of A549 human lung epithelial cells. Infected A549 lung epithelial cells using 3D-Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the intranuclear localization of B. pseudomallei.B. pseudomallei was found within the nuclear compartment of host cells. The nucleus may play a role as an occult or transient niche for persistence of intracellular pathogens, potentially leading to recurrrent episodes or recrudescence of infection.

  9. Promethazine improves antibiotic efficacy and disrupts biofilms of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Vasconcelos, David Caldas; Riello, Giovanna Barbosa; Guedes, Glaucia Morgana de Melo; Serpa, Rosana; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Monteiro, André Jalles; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira

    2017-01-01

    Efflux pumps are important defense mechanisms against antimicrobial drugs and maintenance of Burkholderia pseudomallei biofilms. This study evaluated the effect of the efflux pump inhibitor promethazine on the structure and antimicrobial susceptibility of B. pseudomallei biofilms. Susceptibility of planktonic cells and biofilms to promethazine alone and combined with antimicrobials was assessed by the broth microdilution test and biofilm metabolic activity was determined with resazurin. The effect of promethazine on 48 h-grown biofilms was also evaluated through confocal and electronic microscopy. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of promethazine was 780 mg l(-1), while the minimum biofilm elimination concentration (MBEC) was 780-3,120 mg l(-1). Promethazine reduced the MIC values for erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin and reduced the MBEC values for all tested drugs (pbiofilm structure of B. pseudomallei, even at subinhibitory concentrations, possibly facilitating antibiotic penetration. Promethazine improves antibiotics efficacy against B. pseudomallei biofilms, by disrupting biofilm structure.

  10. A genetic programming approach for Burkholderia Pseudomallei diagnostic pattern discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng Rong; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Tan, Gladys; Felgner, Philip L.; Titball, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Finding diagnostic patterns for fighting diseases like Burkholderia pseudomallei using biomarkers involves two key issues. First, exhausting all subsets of testable biomarkers (antigens in this context) to find a best one is computationally infeasible. Therefore, a proper optimization approach like evolutionary computation should be investigated. Second, a properly selected function of the antigens as the diagnostic pattern which is commonly unknown is a key to the diagnostic accuracy and the diagnostic effectiveness in clinical use. Results: A conversion function is proposed to convert serum tests of antigens on patients to binary values based on which Boolean functions as the diagnostic patterns are developed. A genetic programming approach is designed for optimizing the diagnostic patterns in terms of their accuracy and effectiveness. During optimization, it is aimed to maximize the coverage (the rate of positive response to antigens) in the infected patients and minimize the coverage in the non-infected patients while maintaining the fewest number of testable antigens used in the Boolean functions as possible. The final coverage in the infected patients is 96.55% using 17 of 215 (7.4%) antigens with zero coverage in the non-infected patients. Among these 17 antigens, BPSL2697 is the most frequently selected one for the diagnosis of Burkholderia Pseudomallei. The approach has been evaluated using both the cross-validation and the Jack–knife simulation methods with the prediction accuracy as 93% and 92%, respectively. A novel approach is also proposed in this study to evaluate a model with binary data using ROC analysis. Contact: z.r.yang@ex.ac.uk PMID:19561021

  11. Autotransporters and Their Role in the Virulence of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar Adler, Natalie R; Stevens, Joanne M; Stevens, Mark P; Galyov, Edouard E

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are closely related Gram-negative bacteria responsible for the infectious diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Autotransporters (ATs) comprise a large and diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins that includes virulence-associated invasins, adhesins, proteases, and actin-nucleating factors. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome contains 11 predicted ATs, eight of which share homologs in the B. mallei ATCC 23344 genome. This review distils key findings from in silico, in vitro, and in vivo studies on the ATs of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. To date, the best characterized of the predicted ATs of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei is BimA, a predicted trimeric AT mediating actin-based motility which varies in sequence and mode of action between Burkholderia species. Of the remaining eight predicted B. pseudomallei trimeric autotransporters, five of which are also present in B. mallei, two (BoaA and BoaB), have been implicated in bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Several predicted Burkholderia ATs are recognized by human humoral and cell-mediated immunity, indicating that they are expressed during infection and may be useful for diagnosis and vaccine-mediated protection. Further studies on the mode of secretion and functions of Burkholderia ATs will facilitate the rational design of control strategies.

  12. Autotransporters and their role in the virulence of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie eLazar Adler

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are closely related Gram-negative bacteria responsible for the infectious diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Autotransporters (ATs comprise a large and diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins that includes virulence-associated invasins, adhesins, proteases and actin-nucleating factors. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome contains eleven predicted ATs, eight of which share homologues in the B. mallei ATCC 23344 genome. This review distils key findings from in silico, in vitro and in vivo studies on the ATs of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. To date, the best characterized of the predicted ATs of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei is BimA, a predicted trimeric AT mediating actin-based motility which varies in sequence and mode of action between Burkholderia species. Of the remaining eight predicted B. pseudomallei trimeric autotransporters, five of which are also present in B. mallei, two (BoaA and BoaB, have been implicated in bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Several predicted Burkholderia ATs are recognized by human humoral and cell-mediated immunity, indicating that they are expressed during infection and may be useful for diagnosis and vaccine-mediated protection. Further studies on the mode of secretion and functions of Burkholderia ATs will facilitate the rational design of control strategies.

  13. Revised structures for the predominant O-polysaccharides expressed by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Christian; Burtnick, Mary N; Roberts, Rosemary A; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Brett, Paul J

    2013-11-15

    O-Polysaccharides (OPS) were isolated from purified Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei lipopolysaccharides by mild-acid hydrolysis and gel-permeation chromatography. 1-D and 2-D (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy experiments revealed that the OPS antigens were unbranched heteropolymers with the following structures: Collectively, our results demonstrate that the predominant OPS antigens expressed by B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates are structurally more complex than previously described and provide evidence that different capping residues are used by these closely related pathogens to terminate chain elongation. Additionally, they confirm that Burkholderia thailandensis and B. pseudomallei express OPS antigens that are essentially identical to one another. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clear distinction between Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei using fluorescent motB primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoock, Gernot; Elschner, Mandy; Sprague, Lisa D

    2015-03-07

    A frame-shift mutation in the flagellum motor gene motB coding for the chemotaxis MotB protein of Burkholderia mallei has been utilized to design a conventional duplex PCR assay with fluorescent labelled primers. Species specificity was tested with a panel of 13 Burkholderia type strains. A total of 41 B. mallei field strains, 36 B. pseudomallei field strains, and 1 B. thailandensis field strain from different geographic regions were tested and correctly identified. Testing of 55 non-Burkholderia bacterial species revealed 100% specificity of the assay. The minimum detection limit was 1 pg DNA or 160 GE for B. mallei and 130 GE for B. pseudomallei, respectively. This assay enables the clear distinction between B. mallei and B. pseudomallei/B. thailandensis.

  15. Development of mouse hybridomas for production of monoclonal antibodies specific to Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shaw-Huey; Tsai, Shien; Rodriguez, Jose; Newsome, Tamara; Emanuel, Peter; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2006-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are designated category B biothreat agents on the "select agents" list established by the NIH and CDC. Development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that could effectively differentiate these two closely related species of bacteria and other non-pathogenic Burkholderia bacteria is urgently needed. Splenocytes from mice immunized with various antigen preparations from either B. mallei (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC] 23344) or B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) were used for production of hybridomas. Using a three-step cross-screening protocol, a total of 10 hybridomas were selected that produced MAbs which specifically recognized B. mallei 23344 but did not bind B. pseudomallei, Pseudomonas aeruginasa, or any of the other nine Burkholderia species tested. All 10 MAbs targeted to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules of B. mallei and reacted strongly with 12 out of 15 different strains of B. mallei tested. A total of 14 hybridomas that produced MAbs reacting with B. pseudomallei 23343, but not with B. mallei, P. aeruginasa, or any other nine non-pathogenic Burkholderia species were also selected. All 14 MAbs appeared to react with a proteinase K-sensitive 200-kDa band by immunoblotting analysis. Surprisingly, these 14 MAbs that were raised against the ATCC 23343 strain failed to react to any of the other 13 different strains of B. pseudomallei examined. In conclusion, our B. mallei-specific MAbs can effectively recognize 80% of the different B. mallei strains tested, and all the B. pseudomallei-specific MAbs appeared to react with a unique antigen present only in the ATCC 23343 strain, but not in any other strains of B. pseudomallei tested.

  16. A Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection Imported from Eritrea to Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Yaniv; Yagel, Yael; Geffen, Yuval; Yagupsky, Pablo

    2016-11-02

    Although it has been predicted that melioidosis is probably endemic in the Horn of Africa, no confirmed cases have ever been detected in the region. We have recently isolated Burkholderia pseudomallei from an Eritrean patient in Israel. The isolate was assigned a novel multilocus sequence type (ST-1479). The observation has important epidemiological implications in an era of massive human migration. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Development of ceftazidime resistance in an acute Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

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    Sarovich DS

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Derek S Sarovich,1,2,* Erin P Price,1,2,* Direk Limmathurotsakul,3 James M Cook,1 Alex T Von Schulze,1 Spenser R Wolken,1 Paul Keim,1 Sharon J Peacock,3,4 Talima Pearson1 1Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA; 2Tropical and Emerging Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Australia; 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterium that causes the disease melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. First-line antibiotic therapy for treating melioidosis is usually the synthetic β-lactam, ceftazidime (CAZ, as almost all B. pseudomallei strains are susceptible to this drug. However, acquired CAZ resistance can develop in vivo during treatment with CAZ, which can lead to mortality if therapy is not switched to a different drug in a timely manner. Serial B. pseudomallei isolates obtained from an acute Thai melioidosis patient infected by a CAZ susceptible strain, who ultimately succumbed to infection despite being on CAZ therapy for the duration of their infection, were analyzed. Isolates that developed CAZ resistance due to a proline to serine change at position 167 in the β-lactamase PenA were identified. Importantly, these CAZ resistant isolates remained sensitive to the alternative melioidosis treatments; namely, amoxicillin-clavulanate, imipenem, and meropenem. Lastly, real-time polymerase chain reaction-based assays capable of rapidly identifying CAZ resistance in B. pseudomallei isolates at the position 167 mutation site were developed. The ability to rapidly identify the emergence of CAZ resistant B. pseudomallei populations in melioidosis patients will allow timely alterations in treatment strategies

  18. The Identification and Differentiation between Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei Using One Gene Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilling, Damian H; Luna, Vicki Ann; Pflugradt, Cori

    2014-01-01

    The etiologic agents for melioidosis and glanders, Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei respectively, are genetically similar making identification and differentiation from other Burkholderia species and each other challenging. We used pyrosequencing to determine the presence or absence of an insertion sequence IS407A within the flagellin P (fliP) gene and to exploit the difference in orientation of this gene in the two species. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to selectively target the IS407A-fliP interface in B. mallei and the fliP gene specifically at the insertion point in B. pseudomallei. We then examined DNA from ten B. mallei, ten B. pseudomallei, 14 B. cepacia, eight other Burkholderia spp., and 17 other bacteria. Resultant pyrograms encompassed the target sequence that contained either the fliP gene with the IS407A interruption or the fully intact fliP gene with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These pyrosequencing assays based upon a single gene enable investigators to reliably identify the two species. The information obtained by these assays provides more knowledge of the genomic reduction that created the new species B. mallei from B. pseudomallei and may point to new targets that can be exploited in the future.

  19. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of LL-37 and its truncated variants against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanthawong, S.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; van Marle, J.; de Soet, H.J.J.; Nazmi, K.; Wongratanacheewin, S.; Taweechaisupapong, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the aetiological agent of melioidosis, which is an endemic disease in tropical areas of Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Burkholderia pseudomallei has intrinsic resistance to a number of commonly used antibiotics and has also been

  20. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for rapid identification and differentiation of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei from each other, Burkholderia thailandensis and several members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D; March, J K; Bills, T M; Holt, B C; Wilson, C E; Lowe, W; Tolley, H D; Lee, M L; Robison, R A

    2013-11-01

    To develop a simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the detection and differentiation of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei from each other, Burkholderia thailandensis and several members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex. Biomarkers were generated by one-step thermochemolysis (TCM) and analysed using a GC-MS system. Fragments of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate [poly(3HBA-co-3HVA)] produced by TCM were useful biomarkers. Several cellular fatty acid methyl esters were important in differentiating the various Burkholderia species. A statistical discrimination algorithm was constructed using a combination of biomarkers. The identities of four B. pseudomallei strains, four B. mallei strains and one strain of each near neighbour were confirmed in a statistically designed test using the algorithm. The detection limit for this method was found to be approximately 4000 cells. The method is fast, accurate and easy to use. The algorithm is robust against different growth conditions (medium and temperature). This assay may prove beneficial in a clinical diagnostic setting, where the rapid identification of B. pseudomallei is essential to effective treatment. This method could also be easily employed after a biological attack to confirm the presence of either B. pseudomallei or B. mallei. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Multiplex qPCR for reliable detection and differentiation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janse Ingmar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are two closely related species of highly virulent bacteria that can be difficult to detect. Pathogenic Burkholderia are endemic in many regions worldwide and cases of infection, sometimes brought by travelers from unsuspected regions, also occur elsewhere. Rapid, sensitive methods for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are urgently needed in the interests of patient treatment and epidemiological surveillance. Methods Signature sequences for sensitive, specific detection of pathogenic Burkholderia based on published genomes were identified and a qPCR assay was designed and validated. Results A single-reaction quadruplex qPCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Burkholderia, which includes a marker for internal control of DNA extraction and amplification, was developed. The assay permits differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains, and probit analysis showed a very low detection limit. Use of a multicopy signature sequence permits detection of less than 1 genome equivalent per reaction. Conclusions The new assay permits rapid detection of pathogenic Burkholderia and combines enhanced sensitivity, species differentiation, and inclusion of an internal control for both DNA extraction and PCR amplification.

  3. Multiplex qPCR for reliable detection and differentiation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse, Ingmar; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Hendriks, Amber C A; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2013-02-14

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are two closely related species of highly virulent bacteria that can be difficult to detect. Pathogenic Burkholderia are endemic in many regions worldwide and cases of infection, sometimes brought by travelers from unsuspected regions, also occur elsewhere. Rapid, sensitive methods for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are urgently needed in the interests of patient treatment and epidemiological surveillance. Signature sequences for sensitive, specific detection of pathogenic Burkholderia based on published genomes were identified and a qPCR assay was designed and validated. A single-reaction quadruplex qPCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Burkholderia, which includes a marker for internal control of DNA extraction and amplification, was developed. The assay permits differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains, and probit analysis showed a very low detection limit. Use of a multicopy signature sequence permits detection of less than 1 genome equivalent per reaction. The new assay permits rapid detection of pathogenic Burkholderia and combines enhanced sensitivity, species differentiation, and inclusion of an internal control for both DNA extraction and PCR amplification.

  4. Genetic diversity and microevolution of Burkholderia pseudomallei in the environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narisara Chantratita

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The soil dwelling Gram-negative pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis. The diversity and population structure of this organism in the environment is poorly defined.We undertook a study of B. pseudomallei in soil sampled from 100 equally spaced points within 237.5 m(2 of disused land in northeast Thailand. B. pseudomallei was present on direct culture of 77/100 sampling points. Genotyping of 200 primary plate colonies from three independent sampling points was performed using a combination of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Twelve PFGE types and nine sequence types (STs were identified, the majority of which were present at only a single sampling point. Two sampling points contained four STs and the third point contained three STs. Although the distance between the three sampling points was low (7.6, 7.9, and 13.3 meters, respectively, only two STs were present in more than one sampling point. Each of the three samples was characterized by the localized expansion of a single B. pseudomallei clone (corresponding to STs 185, 163, and 93. Comparison of PFGE and MLST results demonstrated that two STs contained strains with variable PFGE banding pattern types, indicating geographic structuring even within a single MLST-defined clone.We discuss the implications of this extreme structuring of genotype and genotypic frequency in terms of micro-evolutionary dynamics and ecology, and how our results may inform future sampling strategies.

  5. Polar lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei induce different host immune responses.

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    Mercedes Gonzalez-Juarrero

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4(+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4(+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster.

  6. Polar Lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei Induce Different Host Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Mima, Naoko; Trunck, Lily A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Bowen, Richard A.; Dascher, Kyle; Mwangi, Waithaka; Eckstein, Torsten M.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs) and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor) molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster. PMID:24260378

  7. Structural analysis of capsular polysaccharides expressed by Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Christian; Burtnick, Mary N; Wang, Zhirui; Azadi, Parastoo; Brett, Paul J

    2012-02-15

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) were isolated from O-polysaccharide deficient strains of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei using a modified hot phenol/water extraction procedure. Glycosyl composition, methylation, MALDI-TOF MS analyses as well as (1)H NMR spectroscopy including COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, HMBC and HSQC experiments identified the presence of two distinct CPS antigens in the samples exhibiting the following structures: This study confirms the ability of B. mallei to express a 6-deoxy-heptan CPS and represents the first report of a mannan CPS being expressed by these bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cross-species comparison of the Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei quorum-sensing regulons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D; Brittnacher, Mitchell J; Jacobs, Michael A; Armour, Christopher D; Radey, Matthew C; Bunt, Richard; Hayden, Hillary S; Bydalek, Ryland; Greenberg, E Peter

    2014-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei (the Bptm group) are close relatives with very different lifestyles: B. pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen, B. thailandensis is a nonpathogenic saprophyte, and B. mallei is a host-restricted pathogen. The acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing (QS) systems of these three species show a high level of conservation. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to define the quorum-sensing regulon in each species, and we performed a cross-species analysis of the QS-controlled orthologs. Our analysis revealed a core set of QS-regulated genes in all three species, as well as QS-controlled factors shared by only two species or unique to a given species. This global survey of the QS regulons of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and B. mallei serves as a platform for predicting which QS-controlled processes might be important in different bacterial niches and contribute to the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei: Its Detection in Soil and Seroprevalence in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilani, Md Shariful Alam; Robayet, Jamshedul Alam Mohammad; Mohiuddin, Md; Hasan, Md Rokib; Ahsan, Chowdhury Rafiqul; Haq, Jalaluddin Ashraful

    2016-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an endemic disease in Bangladesh. No systematic study has yet been done to detect the environmental source of the organism and its true extent in Bangladesh. The present study attempted to isolate B. pseudomallei in soil samples and to determine its seroprevalence in several districts in Bangladesh. Soil samples were collected from rural areas of four districts of Bangladesh from where culture confirmed melioidosis cases were detected earlier. Multiple soil samples, collected from 5-7 sampling points of 3-5 sites of each district, were cultured in Ashdown selective media. Suspected colonies of B. pseudomallei were identified by biochemical and serological test, and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using 16s rRNA specific primers. Blood samples were collected from 940 healthy individuals of four districts to determine anti- B. pseudomallei IgG antibody levels by indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using sonicated crude antigen. Out of 179 soil samples, B. pseudomallei was isolated from two samples of Gazipur district which is located 58 km north of capital Dhaka city. Both the isolates were phenotypically identical, arabinose negative and showed specific 550bp band in PCR. Out of 940 blood samples, anti- B. pseudomallei IgG antibody, higher than the cut-off value (>0.8), was detected in 21.5% individuals. Seropositivity rate was 22.6%-30.8% in three districts from where melioidosis cases were detected earlier, compared to 9.8% in a district where no melioidosis case was either detected or reported (p 50 years respectively. The seropositivity rates were 26.0% and 20.6% in male and female respectively, while it was 20-27% among different occupational groups. No significant association was observed with gender (χ2 = 3.441, p = 0.064) or any occupational group (χ2 = 3.835, p = 0.280). This is the first study demonstrating the presence of B. pseudomallei in the environmental (soil) samples of

  10. Molecular identification and typing of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei: when is enough enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Valery A; Tkachenko, Galina A; Altukhova, Viktoriya V; Savchenko, Sergey S; Zinchenko, Olga V; Viktorov, Dmitry V; Zamaraev, Valery S; Ilyukhin, Vladimir I; Alekseev, Vladimir V

    2008-12-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are highly pathogenic microorganisms for both humans and animals. Moreover, they are regarded as potential agents of bioterrorism. Thus, rapid and unequivocal detection and identification of these dangerous pathogens is critical. In the present study, we describe the use of an optimized protocol for the early diagnosis of experimental glanders and melioidosis and for the rapid differentiation and typing of Burkholderia strains. This experience with PCR-based identification methods indicates that single PCR targets (23S and 16S rRNA genes, 16S-23S intergenic region, fliC and type III secretion gene cluster) should be used with caution for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei, and need to be used alongside molecular methods such as gene sequencing. Several molecular typing procedures have been used to identify genetically related B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates, including ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. However, these methods are time consuming and technically challenging for many laboratories. RAPD, variable amplicon typing scheme, Rep-PCR, BOX-PCR and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis have been recommended by us for the rapid differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains.

  11. Oropharyngeal aspiration of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei in BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Schully

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are potentially lethal pathogens categorized as biothreat agents due, in part, to their ability to be disseminated via aerosol. There are no protective vaccines against these pathogens and treatment options are limited and cumbersome. Since disease severity is greatest when these agents are inhaled, efforts to develop pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis focus largely on inhalation models of infection. Here, we demonstrate a non-invasive and technically simple method for affecting the inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. In this model, two investigators utilized common laboratory tools such as forceps and a micropipette to conduct and characterize an effective and reproducible inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. mallei and B. pseudomallei. Challenge by oropharyngeal aspiration resulted in acute disease. Additionally, 50% endpoints for B. pseudomallei K96243 and B. mallei ATCC 23344 were nearly identical to published aerosol challenge methods. Furthermore, the pathogens disseminated to all major organs typically targeted by these agents where they proliferated. The pro-inflammatory cytokine production in the proximal and peripheral fluids demonstrated a rapid and robust immune response comparable to previously described murine and human studies. These observations demonstrate that OA is a viable alternative to aerosol exposure.

  12. Oropharyngeal aspiration of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schully, Kevin L; Bell, Matthew G; Ward, Jerrold M; Keane-Myers, Andrea M

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are potentially lethal pathogens categorized as biothreat agents due, in part, to their ability to be disseminated via aerosol. There are no protective vaccines against these pathogens and treatment options are limited and cumbersome. Since disease severity is greatest when these agents are inhaled, efforts to develop pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis focus largely on inhalation models of infection. Here, we demonstrate a non-invasive and technically simple method for affecting the inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. In this model, two investigators utilized common laboratory tools such as forceps and a micropipette to conduct and characterize an effective and reproducible inhalational challenge of BALB/c mice with B. mallei and B. pseudomallei. Challenge by oropharyngeal aspiration resulted in acute disease. Additionally, 50% endpoints for B. pseudomallei K96243 and B. mallei ATCC 23344 were nearly identical to published aerosol challenge methods. Furthermore, the pathogens disseminated to all major organs typically targeted by these agents where they proliferated. The pro-inflammatory cytokine production in the proximal and peripheral fluids demonstrated a rapid and robust immune response comparable to previously described murine and human studies. These observations demonstrate that OA is a viable alternative to aerosol exposure.

  13. Identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei adhesins for human respiratory epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balder, Rachel; Lipski, Serena; Lazarus, John J; Grose, William; Wooten, Ronald M; Hogan, Robert J; Woods, Donald E; Lafontaine, Eric R

    2010-09-28

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei cause the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. A well-studied aspect of pathogenesis by these closely-related bacteria is their ability to invade and multiply within eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the means by which B. pseudomallei and B. mallei adhere to cells are poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to identify adherence factors expressed by these organisms. Comparative sequence analyses identified a gene product in the published genome of B. mallei strain ATCC23344 (locus # BMAA0649) that resembles the well-characterized Yersinia enterocolitica autotransporter adhesin YadA. The gene encoding this B. mallei protein, designated boaA, was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to significantly increase adherence to human epithelial cell lines, specifically HEp2 (laryngeal cells) and A549 (type II pneumocytes), as well as to cultures of normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE). Consistent with these findings, disruption of the boaA gene in B. mallei ATCC23344 reduced adherence to all three cell types by ~50%. The genomes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and DD503 were also found to contain boaA and inactivation of the gene in DD503 considerably decreased binding to monolayers of HEp2 and A549 cells and to NHBE cultures.A second YadA-like gene product highly similar to BoaA (65% identity) was identified in the published genomic sequence of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 (locus # BPSL1705). The gene specifying this protein, termed boaB, appears to be B. pseudomallei-specific. Quantitative attachment assays demonstrated that recombinant E. coli expressing BoaB displayed greater binding to A549 pneumocytes, HEp2 cells and NHBE cultures. Moreover, a boaB mutant of B. pseudomallei DD503 showed decreased adherence to these respiratory cells. Additionally, a B. pseudomallei strain lacking expression of both boaA and boaB was impaired in its ability to thrive inside J774A.1 murine macrophages

  14. Identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei adhesins for human respiratory epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogan Robert J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei cause the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. A well-studied aspect of pathogenesis by these closely-related bacteria is their ability to invade and multiply within eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the means by which B. pseudomallei and B. mallei adhere to cells are poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to identify adherence factors expressed by these organisms. Results Comparative sequence analyses identified a gene product in the published genome of B. mallei strain ATCC23344 (locus # BMAA0649 that resembles the well-characterized Yersinia enterocolitica autotransporter adhesin YadA. The gene encoding this B. mallei protein, designated boaA, was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to significantly increase adherence to human epithelial cell lines, specifically HEp2 (laryngeal cells and A549 (type II pneumocytes, as well as to cultures of normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE. Consistent with these findings, disruption of the boaA gene in B. mallei ATCC23344 reduced adherence to all three cell types by ~50%. The genomes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and DD503 were also found to contain boaA and inactivation of the gene in DD503 considerably decreased binding to monolayers of HEp2 and A549 cells and to NHBE cultures. A second YadA-like gene product highly similar to BoaA (65% identity was identified in the published genomic sequence of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 (locus # BPSL1705. The gene specifying this protein, termed boaB, appears to be B. pseudomallei-specific. Quantitative attachment assays demonstrated that recombinant E. coli expressing BoaB displayed greater binding to A549 pneumocytes, HEp2 cells and NHBE cultures. Moreover, a boaB mutant of B. pseudomallei DD503 showed decreased adherence to these respiratory cells. Additionally, a B. pseudomallei strain lacking expression of both boaA and boaB was impaired in its ability to

  15. DBSecSys 2.0: a database of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei secretion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memišević, Vesna; Kumar, Kamal; Zavaljevski, Nela; DeShazer, David; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2016-09-20

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are the causative agents of glanders and melioidosis, respectively, diseases with high morbidity and mortality rates. B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are closely related genetically; B. mallei evolved from an ancestral strain of B. pseudomallei by genome reduction and adaptation to an obligate intracellular lifestyle. Although these two bacteria cause different diseases, they share multiple virulence factors, including bacterial secretion systems, which represent key components of bacterial pathogenicity. Despite recent progress, the secretion system proteins for B. mallei and B. pseudomallei, their pathogenic mechanisms of action, and host factors are not well characterized. We previously developed a manually curated database, DBSecSys, of bacterial secretion system proteins for B. mallei. Here, we report an expansion of the database with corresponding information about B. pseudomallei. DBSecSys 2.0 contains comprehensive literature-based and computationally derived information about B. mallei ATCC 23344 and literature-based and computationally derived information about B. pseudomallei K96243. The database contains updated information for 163 B. mallei proteins from the previous database and 61 additional B. mallei proteins, and new information for 281 B. pseudomallei proteins associated with 5 secretion systems, their 1,633 human- and murine-interacting targets, and 2,400 host-B. mallei interactions and 2,286 host-B. pseudomallei interactions. The database also includes information about 13 pathogenic mechanisms of action for B. mallei and B. pseudomallei secretion system proteins inferred from the available literature or computationally. Additionally, DBSecSys 2.0 provides details about 82 virulence attenuation experiments for 52 B. mallei secretion system proteins and 98 virulence attenuation experiments for 61 B. pseudomallei secretion system proteins. We updated the Web interface and data access layer to speed-up users

  16. Membrane-active mechanism of LFchimera against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthawong, Sakawrat; Puknun, Aekkalak; Bolscher, Jan G M; Nazmi, Kamran; van Marle, Jan; de Soet, Johannes J; Veerman, Enno C I; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol

    2014-10-01

    LFchimera, a construct combining two antimicrobial domains of bovine lactoferrin, lactoferrampin265-284 and lactoferricin17-30, possesses strong bactericidal activity. As yet, no experimental evidence was presented to evaluate the mechanisms of LFchimera against Burkholderia isolates. In this study we analyzed the killing activity of LFchimera on the category B pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei in comparison to the lesser virulent Burkholderia thailandensis often used as a model for the highly virulent B. pseudomallei. Killing kinetics showed that B. thailandensis E264 was more susceptible for LFchimera than B. pseudomallei 1026b. Interestingly the bactericidal activity of LFchimera appeared highly pH dependent; B. thailandensis killing was completely abolished at and below pH 6.4. FITC-labeled LFchimera caused a rapid accumulation within 15 min in the cytoplasm of both bacterial species. Moreover, freeze-fracture electron microscopy demonstrated extreme effects on the membrane morphology of both bacterial species within 1 h of incubation, accompanied by altered membrane permeability monitored as leakage of nucleotides. These data indicate that the mechanism of action of LFchimera is similar for both species and encompasses disruption of the plasma membrane and subsequently leakage of intracellular nucleotides leading to cell dead.

  17. An objective approach for Burkholderia pseudomallei strain selection as challenge material for medical countermeasures efficacy testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher E. Van Zandt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a rare disease of biodefense concern with high mortality and extreme difficulty in treatment. No human vaccines are available that protect against B. pseudomallei infection, and with the current limitations of antibiotic treatment, the development of new preventative and therapeutic interventions is crucial. Although clinical trials could be used to test the efficacy of new medical countermeasures (MCMs, the high mortality rates associated with melioidosis raises significant ethical issues concerning treating individuals with new compounds with unknown efficacies. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA has formulated a set of guidelines for the licensure of new MCMs to treat diseases in which it would be unethical to test the efficacy of these drugs in humans. The FDA Animal Rule 21 CFR 314 calls for consistent, well-characterized B. pseudomallei strains to be used as challenge material in animal models. In order to facilitate the efficacy testing of new MCMs for melioidosis using animal models, we intend to develop a well-characterized panel of strains for use. This panel will comprise of strains that were isolated from human cases, have a low passage history, are virulent in animal models, and are well characterized phenotypically and genotypically. We have reviewed published and unpublished data on various B. pseudomallei strains to establish an objective method for selecting the strains to be included in the panel of B. pseudomallei strains with attention to five categories: animal infection models, genetic characterization, clinical and passage history, and availability of the strain to the research community. We identified 109 strains with data in at least one of the five categories, scored each strain based on the gathered data and identified 6 strains as candidate for a B. pseudomallei strain panel.

  18. Diverse Burkholderia Species Isolated from Soils in the Southern United States with No Evidence of B. pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Carina M; Busch, Joseph D; Shippy, Kenzie; Allender, Christopher J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Sahl, Jason W; Schupp, James M; Colman, Rebecca E; Keim, Paul; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M

    2015-01-01

    The global distribution of the soil-dwelling bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, causative agent of melioidosis, is poorly understood. We used established culturing methods developed for B. pseudomallei to isolate Burkholderia species from soil collected at 18 sampling sites in three states in the southern United States (Arizona (n = 4), Florida (n = 7), and Louisiana (n = 7)). Using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of seven genes, we identified 35 Burkholderia isolates from these soil samples. All species belonged to the B. cepacia complex (Bcc), including B. cenocepacia, B. cepacia, B. contaminans, B. diffusa, B. metallica, B. seminalis, B. vietnamiensis and two unnamed members of the Bcc. The MLST analysis provided a high level of resolution among and within these species. Despite previous clinical cases within the U.S. involving B. pseudomallei and its close phylogenetic relatives, we did not isolate any of these taxa. The Bcc contains a number of opportunistic pathogens that cause infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Interestingly, we found that B. vietnamiensis was present in soil from all three states, suggesting it may be a common component in southern U.S. soils. Most of the Burkholderia isolates collected in this study were from Florida (30/35; 86%), which may be due to the combination of relatively moist, sandy, and acidic soils found there compared to the other two states. We also investigated one MLST gene, recA, for its ability to identify species within Burkholderia. A 365bp fragment of recA recovered nearly the same species-level identification as MLST, thus demonstrating its cost effective utility when conducting environmental surveys for Burkholderia. Although we did not find B. pseudomallei, our findings document that other diverse Burkholderia species are present in soils in the southern United States.

  19. Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Morphotypes Show a Synchronized Metabolic Pattern after Acute Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierok, Philipp; Kohler, Christian; Steinmetz, Ivo; Lalk, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a water and soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. A characteristic feature of this bacterium is the formation of different colony morphologies which can be isolated from environmental samples as well as from clinical samples, but can also be induced in vitro. Previous studies indicate that morphotypes can differ in a number of characteristics such as resistance to oxidative stress, cellular adhesion and intracellular replication. Yet the metabolic features of B. pseudomallei and its different morphotypes have not been examined in detail so far. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the exometabolome of B. pseudomallei morphotypes and the impact of acute infection on their metabolic characteristics. We applied nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR) in a metabolic footprint approach to compare nutrition uptake and metabolite secretion of starvation induced morphotypes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and E8. We observed gluconate production and uptake in all morphotype cultures. Our study also revealed that among all morphotypes amino acids could be classified with regard to their fast and slow consumption. In addition to these shared metabolic features, the morphotypes varied highly in amino acid uptake profiles, secretion of branched chain amino acid metabolites and carbon utilization. After intracellular passage in vitro or murine acute infection in vivo, we observed a switch of the various morphotypes towards a single morphotype and a synchronization of nutrient uptake and metabolite secretion. To our knowledge, this study provides first insights into the basic metabolism of B. pseudomallei and its colony morphotypes. Furthermore, our data suggest, that acute infection leads to the synchronization of B. pseudomallei colony morphology and metabolism through yet unknown host signals and bacterial mechanisms.

  20. Assessing the potential for Burkholderia pseudomallei in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is an underreported zoonosis in many countries where environmental conditions may be favorable for B. pseudomallei. This soil saprophyte is most often detected in tropical areas such as Southeast Asia and Northern Australia where the cas...

  1. An allelic exchange system for compliant genetic manipulation of the select agents Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mohamad A; Zajdowicz, Sheryl L; Holmes, Randall K; Voskuil, Martin I

    2009-02-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis in humans and glanders in horses, respectively. Both bacteria are classified as category B select agents in the United States. Due to strict select-agent regulations, the number of antibiotic selection markers approved for use in these bacteria is greatly limited. Approved markers for B. pseudomallei include genes encoding resistance to kanamycin (Km), gentamicin (Gm), and zeocin (Zeo); however, wild type B. pseudomallei is intrinsically resistant to these antibiotics. Selection markers for B. mallei are limited to Km and Zeo resistance genes. Additionally, there are few well developed counter-selection markers for use in Burkholderia. The use of SacB as a counter-selection method has been of limited success due to the presence of endogenous sacBC genes in the genomes of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. These impediments have greatly hampered the genetic manipulation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and currently few reliable tools for the genetic manipulation of Burkholderia exist. To expand the repertoire of genetic tools for use in Burkholderia, we developed the suicide plasmid pMo130, which allows for the compliant genetic manipulation of the select agents B. pseudomallei and B. mallei using allelic exchange. pMo130 harbors an aphA gene which allows for Km selection, the reporter gene xylE, which allows for reliable visual detection of Burkholderia transformants, and carries a modified sacB gene that allows for the resolution of co-integrants. We employed this system to generate multiple unmarked and in-frame mutants in B. pseudomallei, and one mutant in B. mallei. This vector significantly expands the number of available tools that are select-agent compliant for the genetic manipulation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei.

  2. A case report of Tubo-ovarian abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nernsai, Pattaranit; Sophonsritsuk, Areepan; Lertvikool, Srithean; Jinawath, Artit; Chitasombat, Maria Nina

    2018-02-08

    Melioidosis, the disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei is endemic in the Northeastern part of Thailand, South-East Asia, and Northern Australia. The pelvic involvement of disease is rare even in an endemic area. Therefore, we describe in this report the clinical presentation, management, and outcome of the patient with primary tubo-ovarian abscess due to melioidosis. A 31-year-old Thai cassava farmer woman presented with fever and abdominal pain at left lower quadrant for one month. She also had pain, swelling, and redness of the genitalia without any ulcer. She had odorless whitish vaginal discharge. The pelvic examination revealed excitation pain on the left side of her cervix. Transvaginal ultrasonography revealed a large left tubo-ovarian abscess size 9.4 × 4.8 cm located at anterior of the uterus. Urgent exploratory laparotomy revealed left hydrosalpinx with a large amount of pus. The pus culture grew Burkholderia pseudomallei. The computer tomography of the abdomen revealed multiple hepatosplenic abscesses. The patient underwent left salpingo-oophorectomy and pus drainage. The pathological examination of excised left adnexa revealed chronic and acute suppurative inflammation with necrotic tissue. She was given intravenous ceftazidime for one month, and her clinical symptom improved. She was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus at this visit and treated with insulin injection. She continued to take oral co-trimoxazole for 20 weeks. The final diagnosis was disseminated melioidosis with left tubo-ovarian abscess and hepatosplenic abscesses in a newly diagnosed morbidly obese diabetic patient. Burkholderia pseudomallei should be considered as the causative organism of gynecologic infection among patient with risk factor resided in an endemic area who do not respond to standard antibiotics. The pus culture from the site of infection is the only diagnostic method of pelvic melioidosis, appropriate antibiotics, and adequate surgical drainage were the

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei known siderophores and hemin uptake are dispensable for lethal murine melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Kvitko

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a mostly saprophytic bacterium, but can infect humans where it causes the difficult-to-manage disease melioidosis. Even with proper diagnosis and prompt therapeutic interventions mortality rates still range from >20% in Northern Australia to over 40% in Thailand. Surprisingly little is yet known about how B. pseudomallei infects, invades and survives within its hosts, and virtually nothing is known about the contribution of critical nutrients such as iron to the bacterium's pathogenesis. It was previously assumed that B. pseudomallei used iron-acquisition systems commonly found in other bacteria, for example siderophores. However, our previous discovery of a clinical isolate carrying a large chromosomal deletion missing the entire malleobactin gene cluster encoding the bacterium's major high-affinity siderophore while still being fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model suggested that other iron-acquisition systems might make contributions to virulence. Here, we deleted the major siderophore malleobactin (mba and pyochelin (pch gene clusters in strain 1710b and revealed a residual siderophore activity which was unrelated to other known Burkholderia siderophores such as cepabactin and cepaciachelin, and not due to increased secretion of chelators such as citrate. Deletion of the two hemin uptake loci, hmu and hem, showed that Hmu is required for utilization of hemin and hemoglobin and that Hem cannot complement a Hmu deficiency. Prolonged incubation of a hmu hem mutant in hemoglobin-containing minimal medium yielded variants able to utilize hemoglobin and hemin suggesting alternate pathways for utilization of these two host iron sources. Lactoferrin utilization was dependent on malleobactin, but not pyochelin synthesis and/or uptake. A mba pch hmu hem quadruple mutant could use ferritin as an iron source and upon intranasal infection was lethal in an acute murine melioidosis model. These data suggest that B

  4. Raman spectroscopic detection and identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei in feedstuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Stephan; Meisel, Susann; Elschner, Mandy; Melzer, Falk; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei (the etiologic agent of glanders in equines and rarely humans) and Burkholderia pseudomallei, causing melioidosis in humans and animals, are designated category B biothreat agents. The intrinsically high resistance of both agents to many antibiotics, their potential use as bioweapons, and their low infectious dose, necessitate the need for rapid and accurate detection methods. Current methods to identify these organisms may require up to 1 week, as they rely on phenotypic characteristics and an extensive set of biochemical reactions. In this study, Raman microspectroscopy, a cultivation-independent typing technique for single bacterial cells with the potential for being a rapid point-of-care analysis system, is evaluated to identify and differentiate B. mallei and B. pseudomallei within hours. Here, not only broth-cultured microbes but also bacteria isolated out of pelleted animal feedstuff were taken into account. A database of Raman spectra allowed a calculation of classification functions, which were trained to differentiate Raman spectra of not only both pathogens but also of five further Burkholderia spp. and four species of the closely related genus Pseudomonas. The developed two-stage classification system comprising two support vector machine (SVM) classifiers was then challenged by a test set of 11 samples to simulate the case of a real-world-scenario, when "unknown samples" are to be identified. In the end, all test set samples were identified correctly, even if the contained bacterial strains were not incorporated in the database before or were isolated out of animal feedstuff. Specifically, the five test samples bearing B. mallei and B. pseudomallei were correctly identified on species level with accuracies between 93.9 and 98.7%. The sample analysis itself requires no biomass enrichment step prior to the analysis and can be performed under biosafety level 1 (BSL 1) conditions after inactivating the bacteria with formaldehyde.

  5. Use of a Real-Time PCR TaqMan Assay for Rapid Identification and Differentiation of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    U?Ren, Jana M.; Van Ert, Matthew N.; Schupp, James M.; Easterday, W Ryan; Simonson, Tatum S.; Okinaka, Richard T.; Pearson, Talima; Keim, Paul

    2005-01-01

    A TaqMan allelic-discrimination assay designed around a synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism was used to genotype Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei isolates. The assay rapidly identifies and discriminates between these two highly pathogenic bacteria and does not cross-react with genetic near neighbors, such as Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia cepacia.

  6. Source-identifying biomarker ions between environmental and clinical Burkholderia pseudomallei using whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyompanich, Suthamat; Jaresitthikunchai, Janthima; Srisanga, Kitima; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, which is an endemic disease in Northeast Thailand and Northern Australia. Environmental reservoirs, including wet soils and muddy water, serve as the major sources for contributing bacterial infection to both humans and animals. The whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS) has recently been applied as a rapid, accurate, and high-throughput tool for clinical diagnosis and microbiological research. In this present study, we employed a whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS approach for assessing its potency in clustering a total of 11 different B. pseudomallei isolates (consisting of 5 environmental and 6 clinical isolates) with respect to their origins and to further investigate the source-identifying biomarker ions belonging to each bacterial group. The cluster analysis demonstrated that six out of eleven isolates were grouped correctly to their sources. Our results revealed a total of ten source-identifying biomarker ions, which exhibited statistically significant differences in peak intensity between average environmental and clinical mass spectra using ClinProTools software. Six out of ten mass ions were assigned as environmental-identifying biomarker ions (EIBIs), including, m/z 4,056, 4,214, 5,814, 7,545, 7,895, and 8,112, whereas the remaining four mass ions were defined as clinical-identifying biomarker ions (CIBIs) consisting of m/z 3,658, 6,322, 7,035, and 7,984. Hence, our findings represented, for the first time, the source-specific biomarkers of environmental and clinical B. pseudomallei.

  7. Accurate and rapid identification of the Burkholderia pseudomallei near-neighbour, Burkholderia ubonensis, using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; Webb, Jessica R; Ginther, Jennifer L; Mayo, Mark; Cook, James M; Seymour, Meagan L; Kaestli, Mirjam; Theobald, Vanessa; Hall, Carina M; Busch, Joseph D; Foster, Jeffrey T; Keim, Paul; Wagner, David M; Tuanyok, Apichai; Pearson, Talima; Currie, Bart J

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia ubonensis is an environmental bacterium belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of genetically related organisms that are associated with opportunistic but generally nonfatal infections in healthy individuals. In contrast, the near-neighbour species Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease that can be fatal in up to 95% of cases if left untreated. B. ubonensis is frequently misidentified as B. pseudomallei from soil samples using selective culturing on Ashdown's medium, reflecting both the shared environmental niche and morphological similarities of these species. Additionally, B. ubonensis shows potential as an important biocontrol agent in B. pseudomallei-endemic regions as certain strains possess antagonistic properties towards B. pseudomallei. Current methods for characterising B. ubonensis are laborious, time-consuming and costly, and as such this bacterium remains poorly studied. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid and inexpensive real-time PCR-based assay specific for B. ubonensis. We demonstrate that a novel B. ubonensis-specific assay, Bu550, accurately differentiates B. ubonensis from B. pseudomallei and other species that grow on selective Ashdown's agar. We anticipate that Bu550 will catalyse research on B. ubonensis by enabling rapid identification of this organism from Ashdown's-positive colonies that are not B. pseudomallei.

  8. Accurate and rapid identification of the Burkholderia pseudomallei near-neighbour, Burkholderia ubonensis, using real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    Full Text Available Burkholderia ubonensis is an environmental bacterium belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, a group of genetically related organisms that are associated with opportunistic but generally nonfatal infections in healthy individuals. In contrast, the near-neighbour species Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease that can be fatal in up to 95% of cases if left untreated. B. ubonensis is frequently misidentified as B. pseudomallei from soil samples using selective culturing on Ashdown's medium, reflecting both the shared environmental niche and morphological similarities of these species. Additionally, B. ubonensis shows potential as an important biocontrol agent in B. pseudomallei-endemic regions as certain strains possess antagonistic properties towards B. pseudomallei. Current methods for characterising B. ubonensis are laborious, time-consuming and costly, and as such this bacterium remains poorly studied. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid and inexpensive real-time PCR-based assay specific for B. ubonensis. We demonstrate that a novel B. ubonensis-specific assay, Bu550, accurately differentiates B. ubonensis from B. pseudomallei and other species that grow on selective Ashdown's agar. We anticipate that Bu550 will catalyse research on B. ubonensis by enabling rapid identification of this organism from Ashdown's-positive colonies that are not B. pseudomallei.

  9. Actin-Binding Proteins from Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis Can Functionally Compensate for the Actin-Based Motility Defect of a Burkholderia pseudomallei bimA Mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, J M; Ulrich, R L; Taylor, L A; Wood, M W; DeShazer, D; Stevens, M P; Galyov, E E

    2005-01-01

    Recently we identified a bacterial factor (BimA) required for actin-based motility of Burkholderia pseudomallei. Here we report that Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia thailandensis are capable of actin-based motility in J774.2 cells and that BimA homologs of these bacteria can restore the actin-based motility defect of a B. pseudomallei bimA mutant. While the BimA homologs differ in their amino-terminal sequence, they interact directly with actin in vitro and vary in their ability to bind ...

  10. Outer membrane proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei from diverse growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Mark A; Zhao, Peng; Wells, Lance

    2011-05-06

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are closely related, aerosol-infective human pathogens that cause life-threatening diseases. Biochemical analyses requiring large-scale growth and manipulation at biosafety level 3 under select agent regulations are cumbersome and hazardous. We developed a simple, safe, and rapid method to prepare highly purified outer membrane (OM) fragments from these pathogens. Shotgun proteomic analyses of OMs by trypsin shaving and mass spectrometry identified >155 proteins, the majority of which are clearly outer membrane proteins (OMPs). These included: 13 porins, 4 secretins for virulence factor export, 11 efflux pumps, multiple components of a Type VI secreton, metal transport receptors, polysaccharide exporters, and hypothetical OMPs of unknown function. We also identified 20 OMPs in each pathogen that are abundant under a wide variety of conditions, including in serum and with macrophages, suggesting these are fundamental for growth and survival and may represent prime drug or vaccine targets. Comparison of the OM proteomes of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei showed many similarities but also revealed a few differences, perhaps reflecting evolution of B. mallei away from environmental survival toward host-adaptation.

  11. Burkholderia pseudomallei kills the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using an endotoxin-mediated paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Quinn, A L; Wiegand, E M; Jeddeloh, J A

    2001-06-01

    We investigated a non-mammalian host model system for fitness in genetic screening for virulence-attenuating mutations in the potential biowarfare agents Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. We determined that B. pseudomallei is able to cause 'disease-like' symptoms and kill the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Analysis of killing in the surrogate disease model with B. pseudomallei mutants indicated that killing did not require lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen, aminoglycoside/macrolide efflux pumping, type II pathway-secreted exoenzymes or motility. Burkholderia thailandensis and some strains of Burkholderia cepacia also killed nematodes. Manipulation of the nematode host genotype suggests that the neuromuscular intoxication caused by both B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis acts in part through a disruption of normal Ca2+ signal transduction. Both species produce a UV-sensitive, gamma-irradiation-resistant, limited diffusion, paralytic agent as part of their nematode pathogenic mechanism. The results of this investigation suggest that killing by B. pseudomallei is an active process in C. elegans, and that the C. elegans model might be useful for the identification of vertebrate animal virulence factors in B. pseudomallei.

  12. Liver abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei in a young man: A case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Partha; Ray, Sayantan; Moulick, Avijit; Dey, Subhasis; Jana, Anirban; Banerjee, Kokila

    2014-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess is a common entity in Indian subcontinent and is mostly caused by gram negative bacteria. Melioidosis is not commonly seen in India and only a few cases are reported. It can give rise to multiple abscesses at different sites including liver. We report a case of isolated liver abscess caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei) in a 29-year-old recently diagnosed diabetic, immunocompetent male. Diagnosis was made by imaging and culture of pus aspirated from the abscess and he was treated with percutaneous pigtail catheter drainage followed by antibiotics (meropenem and trimethoprim-sulphmethoxazole). Melioidosis is an emerging infection in India and has high mortality rate, so early diagnosis and prompt management is warranted which requires clinical vigilance and an intensive microbiological workup. Clinicians should be aware of isolated liver abscess caused by B. pseudomallei in appropriate clinical settings. PMID:25325075

  13. What drives the occurrence of the melioidosis bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in domestic gardens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Harrington, Glenda; Mayo, Mark; Chatfield, Mark D; Harrington, Ian; Hill, Audrey; Munksgaard, Niels; Gibb, Karen; Currie, Bart J

    2015-03-01

    Melioidosis is an often fatal infectious disease affecting humans and animals in tropical regions and is caused by the saprophytic environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Domestic gardens are not only a common source of exposure to soil and thus to B. pseudomallei, but they also have been found to contain more B. pseudomallei than other environments. In this study we addressed whether anthropogenic manipulations common to gardens such as irrigation or fertilizers change the occurrence of B. pseudomallei. We conducted a soil microcosm experiment with a range of fertilizers and soil types as well as a longitudinal interventional study over three years on an experimental fertilized field site in an area naturally positive for B. pseudomallei. Irrigation was the only consistent treatment to increase B. pseudomallei occurrence over time. The effects of fertilizers upon these bacteria depended on soil texture, physicochemical soil properties and biotic factors. Nitrates and urea increased B. pseudomallei load in sand while phosphates had a positive effect in clay. The high buffering and cation exchange capacities of organic material found in a commercial potting mix led to a marked increase in soil salinity with no survival of B. pseudomallei after four weeks in the potting mix sampled. Imported grasses were also associated with B. pseudomallei occurrence in a multivariate model. With increasing population density in endemic areas these findings inform the identification of areas in the anthropogenic environment with increased risk of exposure to B. pseudomallei.

  14. Variable virulence factors in Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis associated with human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek S Sarovich

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative environmental bacterium that causes melioidosis, a potentially life-threatening infectious disease affecting mammals, including humans. Melioidosis symptoms are both protean and diverse, ranging from mild, localized skin infections to more severe and often fatal presentations including pneumonia, septic shock with multiple internal abscesses and occasionally neurological involvement. Several ubiquitous virulence determinants in B. pseudomallei have already been discovered. However, the molecular basis for differential pathogenesis has, until now, remained elusive. Using clinical data from 556 Australian melioidosis cases spanning more than 20 years, we identified a Burkholderia mallei-like actin polymerization bimA(Bm gene that is strongly associated with neurological disease. We also report that a filamentous hemagglutinin gene, fhaB3, is associated with positive blood cultures but is negatively correlated with localized skin lesions without sepsis. We show, for the first time, that variably present virulence factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of melioidosis. Collectively, our study provides a framework for assessing other non-ubiquitous bacterial virulence factors and their association with disease, such as candidate loci identified from large-scale microbial genome-wide association studies.

  15. Variable virulence factors in Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis) associated with human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarovich, Derek S; Price, Erin P; Webb, Jessica R; Ward, Linda M; Voutsinos, Marcos Y; Tuanyok, Apichai; Mayo, Mark; Kaestli, Mirjam; Currie, Bart J

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative environmental bacterium that causes melioidosis, a potentially life-threatening infectious disease affecting mammals, including humans. Melioidosis symptoms are both protean and diverse, ranging from mild, localized skin infections to more severe and often fatal presentations including pneumonia, septic shock with multiple internal abscesses and occasionally neurological involvement. Several ubiquitous virulence determinants in B. pseudomallei have already been discovered. However, the molecular basis for differential pathogenesis has, until now, remained elusive. Using clinical data from 556 Australian melioidosis cases spanning more than 20 years, we identified a Burkholderia mallei-like actin polymerization bimA(Bm) gene that is strongly associated with neurological disease. We also report that a filamentous hemagglutinin gene, fhaB3, is associated with positive blood cultures but is negatively correlated with localized skin lesions without sepsis. We show, for the first time, that variably present virulence factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of melioidosis. Collectively, our study provides a framework for assessing other non-ubiquitous bacterial virulence factors and their association with disease, such as candidate loci identified from large-scale microbial genome-wide association studies.

  16. Molecular phylogeny of Burkholderia pseudomallei from a remote region of Papua New Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Baker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The island of New Guinea is located midway between the world's two major melioidosis endemic regions of Australia and Southeast Asia. Previous studies in Papua New Guinea have demonstrated autochthonous melioidosis in Balimo, Western province. In contrast to other regions of endemicity, isolates recovered from both environmental and clinical sources demonstrate narrow genetic diversity over large spatial and temporal scales. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed molecular typing techniques to determine the phylogenetic relationships of these isolates to each other and to others worldwide to aid in understanding the origins of the Papua New Guinean isolates. Multi-locus sequence typing of the 39 isolates resolved three unique sequence types. Phylogenetic reconstruction and Structure analysis determined that all isolates were genetically closer to those from Australia than those from Southeast Asia. Gene cluster analysis however, identified a Yersinia-like fimbrial gene cluster predominantly found among Burkholderia pseudomallei derived from Southeast Asia. Higher resolution VNTR typing and phylogenetic reconstruction of the Balimo isolates resolved 24 genotypes with long branch lengths. These findings are congruent with long term persistence in the region and a high level of environmental stability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given that anthropogenic influence has been hypothesized as a mechanism for the dispersal of B. pseudomallei, these findings correlate with limited movement of the indigenous people in the region. The palaeogeographical and anthropogenic history of Australasia and the results from this study indicate that New Guinea is an important region for the further study of B. pseudomallei origins and dissemination.

  17. Characterization of an autotransporter adhesin protein shared by Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Eric R; Balder, Rachel; Michel, Frank; Hogan, Robert J

    2014-04-14

    Autotransporters form a large family of outer membrane proteins specifying diverse biological traits of Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of a novel autotransporter gene product of Burkholderia mallei (locus tag BMA1027 in strain ATCC 23344). Database searches identified the gene in at least seven B. mallei isolates and the encoded proteins were found to be 84% identical. Inactivation of the gene encoding the autotransporter in the genome of strain ATCC 23344 substantially reduces adherence to monolayers of HEp-2 laryngeal cells and A549 type II pneumocytes, as well as to cultures of normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE). Consistent with these findings, expression of the autotransporter on the surface of recombinant E. coli bacteria increases adherence to these cell types by 5-7 fold. The gene specifying the autotransporter was identified in the genome of 29 B. pseudomallei isolates and disruption of the gene in strain DD503 reduced adherence to NHBE cultures by 61%. Unlike B. mallei, the mutation did not impair binding of B. pseudomallei to A549 or HEp-2 cells. Analysis of sera from mice infected via the aerosol route with B. mallei and B. pseudomallei revealed that animals inoculated with as few as 10 organisms produce antibodies against the autotransporter, therefore indicating expression in vivo. Our data demonstrate that we have identified an autotransporter protein common to the pathogenic species B. mallei and B. pseudomallei which mediates adherence to respiratory epithelial cells and is expressed in vivo during the course of aerosol infection.

  18. Development of a multiplex PCR assay for the detection and differentiation of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Irina; Teteryatnikova, Natalya; Toporkov, Andrey; Viktorov, Dmitry

    2017-10-01

    Two species of Burkholderia pseudomallei complex (Bpc), B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, can cause severe life-threatening infections. Rapidly discerning individual species within the group and separating them from other opportunistic pathogens of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is essential to establish a correct diagnosis and for epidemiological surveillance. In this study, a multiplex PCR assay based on the detection of an individual set of chromosomal beta-lactamase genes for single-step identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, B. thailandensis, and Bcc was developed. Two pairs of primers specific to a distinct class of B metallo-beta-lactamase genes and a pair of primers specific to the oxacillin-hydrolyzing class D beta-lactamase gene were demonstrated to successfully discriminate species within Bpc and from Bcc. The assay sensitivity was 9561 genomic equivalents (GE) for B. pseudomallei, 7827 GE for B. mallei, 8749 GE for B. thailandensis and 6023 GE for B. cepacia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The in vitro tolerant persister population in Burkholderia pseudomallei is altered by environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Charles Nierman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial persistence due to antibiotic tolerance is a critical aspect of antibiotic treatment failure, disease latency, and chronic or reemergent infections. The levels of persisters is especially notable for the opportunistic Gram-negative pathogens from the Burkholderia and Pseudomonas genera. We examined the rate of drug tolerant persisters in Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, Burkholderia cepacia complex organisms, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at mid-log growth in LB broth culture. We found that a fraction of the antibiotic-sensitive cells from every species were tolerant to a 24 hour high-dose antibiotic challenge. All tested Burkholderia strains demonstrated a drug tolerant persister population at a rate that was at least 100 – 500 times higher than P. aeruginosa. When challenged with a 10X minimum inhibitory concentration 24 hour exposure to five different antibiotics with different modes of action we found that in B. pseudomallei Bp82 the same fraction of persisters in the bacterial population was revealed when using 4 of them. This observation suggests that our assay is detecting a single homogeneous persister population. Persistence in B. pseudomallei Bp82 was highly dependent on growth stage, with a surprisingly high persister fraction of >64% of the late stationary phase cells being antibiotic tolerant. Adaptation of B. pseudomallei to distilled water storage resulted in a population of drug tolerant cells up to 100% of the non-drug-challenged viable cell count. Cultivation of B. pseudomallei with a sub-inhibitory concentration of several antibiotics resulted in altered persister fractions within the population relative to cultures lacking the antibiotic. Our study provides insight into the sensitivity of the persister fraction within the population of B. pseudomallei due to environmental variables and suggests a lack of diversity within the persister population.

  20. PCR-based Methodologies Used to Detect and Differentiate the Burkholderia pseudomallei complex: B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Woan; March, Jordon K; Bunnell, Annette J; O'Neill, Kim L; Robison, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Methods for the rapid detection and differentiation of the Burkholderia pseudomallei complex comprising B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis, have been the topic of recent research due to the high degree of phenotypic and genotypic similarities of these species. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are recognized by the CDC as tier 1 select agents. The high mortality rates of glanders and melioidosis, their potential use as bioweapons, and their low infectious dose, necessitate the need for rapid and accurate detection methods. Although B. thailandensis is generally avirulent in mammals, this species displays very similar phenotypic characteristics to that of B. pseudomallei. Optimal identification of these species remains problematic, due to the difficulty in developing a sensitive, selective, and accurate assay. The development of PCR technologies has revolutionized diagnostic testing and these detection methods have become popular due to their speed, sensitivity, and accuracy. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview and evaluation of the advancements in PCR-based detection and differentiation methodologies for the B. pseudomallei complex, and examine their potential uses in diagnostic and environmental testing.

  1. Deciphering minimal antigenic epitopes associated with Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei lipopolysaccharide O-antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamigney Kenfack, Marielle; Mazur, Marcelina; Nualnoi, Teerapat; Shaffer, Teresa L; Ngassimou, Abba; Blériot, Yves; Marrot, Jérôme; Marchetti, Roberta; Sintiprungrat, Kitisak; Chantratita, Narisara; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio; AuCoin, David P; Burtnick, Mary N; Brett, Paul J; Gauthier, Charles

    2017-07-24

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) and Burkholderia mallei (Bm), the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively, cause severe disease in both humans and animals. Studies have highlighted the importance of Bp and Bm lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as vaccine candidates. Here we describe the synthesis of seven oligosaccharides as the minimal structures featuring all of the reported acetylation/methylation patterns associated with Bp and Bm LPS O-antigens (OAgs). Our approach is based on the conversion of an L-rhamnose into a 6-deoxy-L-talose residue at a late stage of the synthetic sequence. Using biochemical and biophysical methods, we demonstrate the binding of several Bp and Bm LPS-specific monoclonal antibodies with terminal OAg residues. Mice immunized with terminal disaccharide-CRM197 constructs produced high-titer antibody responses that crossreacted with Bm-like OAgs. Collectively, these studies serve as foundation for the development of novel therapeutics, diagnostics, and vaccine candidates to combat diseases caused by Bp and Bm.Melioidosis and glanders are multifaceted infections caused by gram-negative bacteria. Here, the authors synthesize a series of oligosaccharides that mimic the lipopolysaccharides present on the pathogens' surface and use them to develop novel glycoconjugates for vaccine development.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Genetic Loci Required for Secretion of Exoproducts in Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    DeShazer, David; Brett, Paul J.; Burtnick, Mary N; Woods, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Burkholderia pseudomallei secretes protease, lipase, and phospholipase C (PLC) into the extracellular milieu, but their mechanisms of secretion and roles in pathogenesis have not been elucidated. In this study, we isolated and characterized 29 transposon mutants unable to secrete protease, lipase, and PLC.

  3. Rapid DNA vaccination against Burkholderia pseudomallei flagellin by tattoo or intranasal application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; Wagemakers, Alex; Birnie, Emma; Haak, Bastiaan W.; Trentelman, Jos J. A.; Weehuizen, Tassili A. F.; Ersöz, Jasmin; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Hovius, Joppe W.; Wiersinga, W. Joost; Bins, Adriaan D.

    2017-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe infectious disease with a high mortality that is endemic in South-East Asia and Northern Australia. The causative pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei, is listed as potential bioterror weapon due to its high virulence and potential for easy dissemination. Currently, there is

  4. A heterodimer comprised of two bovine lactoferrin antimicrobial peptides exhibits powerful bactericidal activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puknun, A.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Nazmi, K.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Tungpradabkul, S.; Wongratanacheewin, S.; Kanthawong, S.; Taweechaisupapong, S.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe infectious disease that is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of this disease, has developed resistance to an increasing list of antibiotics, demanding a search for novel agents. Lactoferricin and lactoferrampin

  5. Osteopontin Impairs Host Defense during Established Gram-Negative Sepsis Caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (Melioidosis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, G.J.W.; Wiersinga, W.J.; Wieland, C.W.; Tjia, I.C.S.I.; Day, N.P.; Peacock, S.J.; Florquin, S.; van der Poll, T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Melioidosis, caused by infection with Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei, is a severe illness that is endemic in Southeast Asia. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that is involved in several immune responses including induction of T-helper 1 cytokines and recruitment of

  6. Discrimination of Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei from Burkholderia thailandensis by sequence comparison of a fragment of the ribosomal protein S21 (rpsU) gene

    OpenAIRE

    Frickmann, H.; Chantratita, N; Gauthier, Y. P.; Neubauer, H.; Hagen, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Discrimination of Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei from environmental B. thailandensis is challenging. We describe a discrimination method based on sequence comparison of the ribosomal protein S21 (rpsU) gene.

  7. Increased Neurotropic Threat from Burkholderia pseudomallei Strains with a B. mallei-like Variation in the bimA Motility Gene, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jodie L; Fane, Anne; Sarovich, Derek S; Price, Erin P; Rush, Catherine M; Govan, Brenda L; Parker, Elizabeth; Mayo, Mark; Currie, Bart J; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2017-05-01

    Neurologic melioidosis is a serious, potentially fatal form of Burkholderia pseudomallei infection. Recently, we reported that a subset of clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei from Australia have heightened virulence and potential for dissemination to the central nervous system. In this study, we demonstrate that this subset has a B. mallei-like sequence variation of the actin-based motility gene, bimA. Compared with B. pseudomallei isolates having typical bimA alleles, isolates that contain the B. mallei-like variation demonstrate increased persistence in phagocytic cells and increased virulence with rapid systemic dissemination and replication within multiple tissues, including the brain and spinal cord, in an experimental model. These findings highlight the implications of bimA variation on disease progression of B. pseudomallei infection and have considerable clinical and public health implications with respect to the degree of neurotropic threat posed to human health.

  8. Rapid identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) from culture and paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Ralf M; Frickmann, Hagen; Elschner, Mandy; Melzer, Falk; Neubauer, Heinrich; Gauthier, Yves P; Racz, Paul; Poppert, Sven

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated newly developed probes for rapid identification of Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei and differentiation from B. thailandensis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH correctly identified 100% of the tested B. pseudomallei (11), B. mallei (11), and B. thailandensis (1) strains, excluded 100% of all tested negative controls (61), and allowed demonstration of B. pseudomallei infection in a paraffin-embedded spleen tissue sample of an experimentally infected mouse. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Versatile dual-technology system for markerless allele replacement in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carolina M; Rholl, Drew A; Trunck, Lily A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2009-10-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiologic agent of melioidosis, a rare but serious tropical disease. In the United States, genetic research with this select agent bacterium is strictly regulated. Although several select agent compliant methods have been developed for allelic replacement, all of them suffer from some drawbacks, such as a need for specific host backgrounds or use of minimal media. Here we describe a versatile select agent compliant allele replacement system for B. pseudomallei based on a mobilizable vector, pEXKm5, which contains (i) a multiple cloning site within a lacZalpha gene for facile cloning of recombinant DNA fragments, (ii) a constitutively expressed gusA indicator gene for visual detection of merodiploid formation and resolution, and (iii) elements required for resolution of merodiploids using either I-SceI homing endonuclease-stimulated recombination or sacB-based counterselection. The homing endonuclease-based allele replacement system is completed by pBADSce, which contains an araC-P(BAD)-I-sceI expression cassette for arabinose-inducible I-SceI expression and a temperature-sensitive pRO1600 replicon for facile plasmid curing. Complementing these systems is the improved Deltaasd Escherichia coli mobilizer strain RHO3. This strain is susceptible to commonly used antibiotics and allows nutritional counterselection on rich media because of its diaminopimelic acid auxotrophy. The versatility of the I-SceI- and sacB-based methods afforded by pEXKm5 in conjunction with E. coli RHO3 was demonstrated by isolation of diverse deletion mutants in several clinical, environmental, and laboratory B. pseudomallei strains. Finally, sacB-based counterselection was employed to isolate a defined chromosomal fabD(Ts) allele that causes synthesis of a temperature-sensitive FabD, an essential fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme.

  10. Growing Burkholderia pseudomallei in biofilm stimulating conditions significantly induces antimicrobial resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrit Sawasdidoln

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei, a gram-negative bacterium that causes melioidosis, was reported to produce biofilm. As the disease causes high relapse rate when compared to other bacterial infections, it therefore might be due to the reactivation of the biofilm forming bacteria which also provided resistance to antimicrobial agents. However, the mechanism on how biofilm can provide tolerance to antimicrobials is still unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The change in resistance of B. pseudomallei to doxycycline, ceftazidime, imipenem, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole during biofilm formation were measured as minimum biofilm elimination concentration (MBEC in 50 soil and clinical isolates and also in capsule, flagellin, LPS and biofilm mutants. Almost all planktonic isolates were susceptible to all agents studied. In contrast, when they were grown in the condition that induced biofilm formation, they were markedly resistant to all antimicrobial agents even though the amount of biofilm production was not the same. The capsule and O-side chains of LPS mutants had no effect on biofilm formation whereas the flagellin-defective mutant markedly reduced in biofilm production. No alteration of LPS profiles was observed when susceptible form was changed to resistance. The higher amount of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs was detected in the high biofilm-producing isolates. Interestingly, the biofilm mutant which produced a very low amount of biofilm and was sensitive to antimicrobial agents significantly resisted those agents when grown in biofilm inducing condition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The possible drug resistance mechanism of biofilm mutants and other isolates is not by having biofilm but rather from some factors that up-regulated when biofilm formation genes were stimulated. The understanding of genes related to this situation may lead us to prevent B. pseudomallei biofilms leading to the relapse of melioidosis.

  11. Characterization of BcaA, a putative classical autotransporter protein in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Cristine G; Borst, Luke; Cotter, Peggy A

    2013-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a tier 1 select agent, and the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease with effects ranging from chronic abscesses to fulminant pneumonia and septic shock, which can be rapidly fatal. Autotransporters (ATs) are outer membrane proteins belonging to the type V secretion system family, and many have been shown to play crucial roles in pathogenesis. The open reading frame Bp1026b_II1054 (bcaA) in B. pseudomallei strain 1026b is predicted to encode a classical autotransporter protein with an approximately 80-kDa passenger domain that contains a subtilisin-related domain. Immediately 3' to bcaA is Bp11026_II1055 (bcaB), which encodes a putative prolyl 4-hydroxylase. To investigate the role of these genes in pathogenesis, large in-frame deletion mutations of bcaA and bcaB were constructed in strain Bp340, an efflux pump mutant derivative of the melioidosis clinical isolate 1026b. Comparison of Bp340ΔbcaA and Bp340ΔbcaB mutants to wild-type B. pseudomallei in vitro demonstrated similar levels of adherence to A549 lung epithelial cells, but the mutant strains were defective in their ability to invade these cells and to form plaques. In a BALB/c mouse model of intranasal infection, similar bacterial burdens were observed after 48 h in the lungs and liver of mice infected with Bp340ΔbcaA, Bp340ΔbcaB, and wild-type bacteria. However, significantly fewer bacteria were recovered from the spleen of Bp340ΔbcaA-infected mice, supporting the idea of a role for this AT in dissemination or in survival in the passage from the site of infection to the spleen.

  12. Land use and soil type determine the presence of the pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei in tropical rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolzi, Olivier; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Dittrich, Sabine; Auda, Yves; Newton, Paul N; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Knappik, Michael; Soulileuth, Bounsamai; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Dance, David A B; Pierret, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the bacterium that causes melioidosis in humans. While B. pseudomallei is known to be endemic in South East Asia (SEA), the occurrence of the disease in other parts of the tropics points towards a potentially large global distribution. We investigated the environmental factors that influence the presence (and absence) of B. pseudomallei in a tropical watershed in SEA. Our main objective was to determine whether there is a link between the presence of the organism in the hydrographic network and the upstream soil and land-use type. The presence of B. pseudomallei was determined using a specific quantitative real-time PCR assay following enrichment culture. Land use, soil, geomorphology, and environmental data were then analyzed using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) to compare the B. pseudomallei positive and negative sites. Soil type in the surrounding catchment and turbidity had a strong positive influence on the presence (acrisols and luvisols) or absence (ferralsols) of B. pseudomallei. Given the strong apparent links between soil characteristics, water turbidity, and the presence/absence of B. pseudomallei, actions to raise public awareness about factors increasing the risk of exposure should be undertaken in order to reduce the incidence of melioidosis in regions of endemicity.

  13. Burkholderia pseudomallei Differentially Regulates Host Innate Immune Response Genes for Intracellular Survival in Lung Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumutha Malar Vellasamy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis poses a serious threat to humankind. B. pseudomallei secretes numerous virulence proteins that alter host cell functions to escape from intracellular immune sensors. However, the events underlying disease pathogenesis are poorly understood.We determined the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly in A549 human lung epithelial cells, and also investigated the early transcriptional responses using an Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 microarray platform, after three hours of exposure to live B. pseudomallei (BCMS and its secreted proteins (CCMS.We found that the ability of B. pseudomallei to invade and survive intracellularly correlated with increase of multiplicity of infection and duration of contact. Activation of host carbohydrate metabolism and apoptosis as well as suppression of amino acid metabolism and innate immune responses both by live bacteria and its secreted proteins were evident. These early events might be linked to initial activation of host genes directed towards bacterial dissemination from lungs to target organs (via proposed in vivo mechanisms or to escape potential sensing by macrophages.Understanding the early responses of A549 cells toward B. pseudomallei infection provide preliminary insights into the likely pathogenesis mechanisms underlying melioidosis, and could contribute to development of novel intervention strategies to combat B. pseudomallei infections.

  14. Post-exposure therapeutic efficacy of COX-2 inhibition against Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saja Asakrah

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacillus and the etiologic agent of melioidosis, a severe disease in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Like other multidrug-resistant pathogens, the inherent antibiotic resistance of B. pseudomallei impedes treatment and highlights the need for alternative therapeutic strategies that can circumvent antimicrobial resistance mechanisms. In this work, we demonstrate that host prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production plays a regulatory role in the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei. PGE2 promotes B. pseudomallei intracellular survival within macrophages and bacterial virulence in a mouse model of pneumonic melioidosis. PGE2-mediated immunosuppression of macrophage bactericidal effector functions is associated with increased arginase 2 (Arg2 expression and decreased nitric oxide (NO production. Treatment with a commercially-available COX-2 inhibitor suppresses the growth of B. pseudomallei in macrophages and affords significant protection against rapidly lethal pneumonic melioidosis when administered post-exposure to B. pseudomallei-infected mice. COX-2 inhibition may represent a novel immunotherapeutic strategy to control infection with B. pseudomallei and other intracellular pathogens.

  15. The Madagascar hissing cockroach as a novel surrogate host for Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fisher, Nathan A; Ribot, Wilson J; Applefeld, Willard; DeShazer, David

    2012-01-01

    .... pseudomallei and B. mallei LD50 in mammalian models of infection. Here we describe an alternative to mammalian hosts in the study of virulence and host-pathogen interactions of these Burkholderia species...

  16. Novel pan-genomic analysis approach in target selection for multiplex PCR identification and detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia cepacia complex species: A proof-of-concept study

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Chi-Chun; Lau, Candy C. Y.; Martelli, Paolo; Chan, San-Yuen; Tse, Cindy W. S.; Wu, Alan K.L.; Yuen, Kwok-yung; Lau, Susanna K.P.; Patrick C Y Woo

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and the Burkholderia cepacia complex differ greatly in pathogenicity and epidemiology. Yet, they are occasionally misidentified by biochemical profiling, and even 16S rRNA gene sequencing may not offer adequate discrimination between certain species groups. Using the 23 B. pseudomallei, four B. thailandensis, and 16 B. cepacia complex genome sequences available, we identified gene targets specific to each of them (a Tat domain protein, a ...

  17. Burkholderia humptydooensis sp. nov., A Burkholderia thailandensis-Like Species and the Fifth Member of the pseudomallei Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    2012). The type strain, MSMB43T, has been previously referred to as B. 312 Page 14 of 23 thailandensis-like species in multiple studies (Currie...closely related species were used to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships. 339 Genomes from this study in bold and assembly numbers in...The In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibility of Malaysian 379 Isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei. Int J Microbiol, 2013, 121845. 380 BARNES, J. L

  18. Comparative in vivo and in vitro analyses of putative virulence factors of Burkholderia pseudomallei using lipopolysaccharide, capsule and flagellin mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wikraiphat, C.; Charoensap, J.; Utaisincharoen, P.; Wongratanacheewin, S.; Taweechaisupapong, S.; Woods, D.E.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Sirisinha, S.

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a gram-negative bacillus that is the causative agent of melioidosis. We evaluated host-pathogen interaction at different levels using three separate B. pseudomallei mutants generated by insertional inactivation. One of these mutants is defective in the production of the

  19. Protective response to subunit vaccination against intranasal Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Gregory C; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Qazi, Omar; Judy, Barbara M; Taylor, Katherine; Propst, Katie L; Duffy, Angie J; Johnson, Kate; Kitto, G Barrie; Brown, Katherine A; Dow, Steven W; Torres, Alfredo G; Estes, D Mark

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, responsible for the diseases glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Furthermore, there is currently no vaccine available against these Burkholderia species. In this study, we aimed to identify protective proteins against these pathogens. Immunization with recombinant B. mallei Hcp1 (type VI secreted/structural protein), BimA (autotransporter protein), BopA (type III secreted protein), and B. pseudomallei LolC (ABC transporter protein) generated significant protection against lethal inhaled B. mallei ATCC23344 and B. pseudomallei 1026b challenge. Immunization with BopA elicited the greatest protective activity, resulting in 100% and 60% survival against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei challenge, respectively. Moreover, sera from recovered mice demonstrated reactivity with the recombinant proteins. Dendritic cells stimulated with each of the different recombinant proteins showed distinct cytokine patterns. In addition, T cells from immunized mice produced IFN-γ following in vitro re-stimulation. These results indicated therefore that it was possible to elicit cross-protective immunity against both B. mallei and B. pseudomallei by vaccinating animals with one or more novel recombinant proteins identified in B. mallei.

  20. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Sputum using Selective Enrichment Broth and Ashdown's Medium at Kampong Cham Provincial Hospital, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhem, Somary; Letchford, Joanne; Meas, Chea; Thann, Sovanndeth; McLaughlin, James C; Baron, Ellen Jo; West, T Eoin

    2014-01-01

    Melioidosis, infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is increasingly reported in Cambodia. We hypothesized that implementation of an enhanced sputum testing protocol in a provincial hospital diagnostic microbiology laboratory would increase detection of B. pseudomallei. We tested 241 sputum specimens that were deemed acceptable for culture, comparing culture in selective enrichment broth followed by sub-culture on Ashdown's medium to standard culture methods. Two specimens (0.8%) were positive for B. pseudomallei using the enhanced protocol whereas one specimen (0.4%) was positive using standard methods. Given the low numbers of positive specimens, we could not conclusively determine the utility of the enhanced sputum testing protocol. However, the ramifications of identification of  B. pseudomallei are substantial, and the benefit of the enhanced testing protocol may be more apparent in patients selected based on risk factors and clinical presentation. Promoting clinician awareness of the infection and encouraging utilization of diagnostic microbiology services are also likely to be important factors in facilitating identification of melioidosis.

  1. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei O-antigen serotypes in near-neighbor species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Joshua K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and a CDC category B select agent with no available effective vaccine. Previous immunizations in mice have utilized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a potential vaccine target because it is known as one of the most important antigenic epitopes in B. pseudomallei. Complicating this strategy are the four different B. pseudomallei LPS O-antigen types: A, B, B2, and rough. Sero-crossreactivity is common among O-antigens of Burkholderia species. Here, we identified the presence of multiple B. pseudomallei O-antigen types and sero-crossreactivity in its near-neighbor species. Results PCR screening of O-antigen biosynthesis genes, phenotypic characterization using SDS-PAGE, and immunoblot analysis showed that majority of B. mallei and B. thailandensis strains contained the typical O-antigen type A. In contrast, most of B. ubonensis and B. thailandensis-like strains expressed the atypical O-antigen types B and B2, respectively. Most B. oklahomensis strains expressed a distinct and non-seroreactive O-antigen type, except strain E0147 which expressed O-antigen type A. O-antigen type B2 was also detected in B. thailandensis 82172, B. ubonensis MSMB108, and Burkholderia sp. MSMB175. Interestingly, B. thailandensis-like MSMB43 contained a novel serotype B positive O-antigen. Conclusions This study expands the number of species which express B. pseudomallei O-antigen types. Further work is required to elucidate the full structures and how closely these are to the B. pseudomallei O-antigens, which will ultimately determine the efficacy of the near-neighbor B serotypes for vaccine development.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Tachyplesin 1 against Burkholderia pseudomallei: an in vitro and in silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyn-Fay Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many conventional antibiotics. Therefore, alternative antimicrobial agents such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensively studied to combat this issue. Our study aims to identify and understand the mode of action of the potential AMP(s that are effective against B. pseudomallei in both planktonic and biofilm state as well as to predict the possible binding targets on using in vitro and in silico approaches. In the in vitro study, 11 AMPs were tested against 100 B. pseudomallei isolates for planktonic cell susceptibility, where LL-37, and PG1, demonstrated 100.0% susceptibility and TP1 demonstrated 83% susceptibility. Since the B. pseudomallei activity was reported on LL-37 and PG1, TP1 was selected for further investigation. TP1 inhibited B. pseudomallei cells at 61.69 μM, and membrane blebbing was observed using scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, TP1 inhibited B. pseudomallei cell growth, reaching bactericidal endpoint within 2 h post exposure as compared to ceftazidime (CAZ (8 h. Furthermore, TP1 was shown to suppress the growth of B. pseudomallei cells in biofilm state at concentrations above 221 μM. However, TP1 was cytotoxic to the mammalian cell lines tested. In the in silico study, molecular docking revealed that TP1 demonstrated a strong interaction to the common peptide or inhibitor binding targets for lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli, as well as autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Homology modelled B. pseudomallei PspA protein (YDP also showed a favourable binding with a strong electrostatic contribution and nine hydrogen bonds. In conclusion, TP1 demonstrated a good potential as an anti-B. pseudomallei agent.

  3. Characterization of in vitro phenotypes of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei strains potentially associated with persistent infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhards, R C; Cote, C K; Amemiya, K; Waag, D M; Klimko, C P; Worsham, P L; Welkos, S L

    2017-03-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) and Burkholderia mallei (Bm), the agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively, are Tier 1 biothreats. They infect humans and animals, causing disease ranging from acute and fatal to protracted and chronic. Chronic infections are especially challenging to treat, and the identification of in vitro phenotypic markers which signal progression from acute to persistent infection would be extremely valuable. First, a phenotyping strategy was developed employing colony morphotyping, chemical sensitivity testing, macrophage infection, and lipopolysaccharide fingerprint analyses to distinguish Burkholderia strains. Then mouse spleen isolates collected 3-180 days after infection were characterized phenotypically. Isolates from long-term infections often exhibited increased colony morphology differences and altered patterns of antimicrobial sensitivity and macrophage infection. Some of the Bp and Bm persistent infection isolates clearly displayed enhanced virulence in mice. Future studies will evaluate the potential role and significance of these phenotypic markers in signaling the establishment of a chronic infection.

  4. DISCRIMINATION OF Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei FROM Burkholderia thailandensis BY SEQUENCE COMPARISON OF A FRAGMENT OF THE RIBOSOMAL PROTEIN S21 (RPSU) GENE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frickmann, H; Chantratita, N; Gauthier, Y P; Neubauer, H; Hagen, R M

    2012-06-13

    Discrimination of Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei from environmental B. thailandensis is challenging. We describe a discrimination method based on sequence comparison of the ribosomal protein S21 (rpsU) gene.The rpsU gene was sequenced in ten B. pseudomallei, six B. mallei, one B. thailandensis reference strains, six isolates of B. pseudomallei, and 37 of B. thailandensis. Further rpsU sequences of six B. pseudomallei, three B. mallei, and one B. thailandensis were identified via NCBI GenBank. Three to four variable base-positions were identified within a 120-base-pair fragment, allowing discrimination of the B. pseudomallei/mallei-cluster from B. thailandensis, whose sequences clustered identically. All B. mallei and three B. pseudomallei sequences were identical, while 17/22 B. pseudomallei strains differed in one nucleotide (78A>C). Sequences of the rpsU fragment of 'out-stander' reference strains of B. cepacia, B. gladioli, B. plantarii, and B. vietnamensis clustered differently.Sequence comparison of the described rpsU gene fragment can be used as a supplementary diagnostic procedure for the discrimination of B. mallei/pseudomallei from B. thailandensis as well as from other species of the genus Burkholderia, keeping in mind that it does not allow for a differentiation between B. mallei and B. pseudomallei.

  5. Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei Near-Neighbor Species in the Northern Territory of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, Jennifer L.; Mayo, Mark; Warrington, Stephanie D.; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mullins, Travis; Wagner, David M.; Currie, Bart J.; Tuanyok, Apichai; Keim, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Identification and characterization of near-neighbor species are critical to the development of robust molecular diagnostic tools for biothreat agents. One such agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, a soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis, is lacking in this area because of its genomic diversity and widespread geographic distribution. The Burkholderia genus contains over 60 species and occupies a large range of environments including soil, plants, rhizospheres, water, animals and humans. The identification of novel species in new locations necessitates the need to identify the true global distribution of Burkholderia species, especially the members that are closely related to B. pseudomallei. In our current study, we used the Burkholderia-specific recA sequencing assay to analyze environmental samples from the Darwin region in the Northern Territory of Australia where melioidosis is endemic. Burkholderia recA PCR negative samples were further characterized using 16s rRNA sequencing for species identification. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that over 70% of the bacterial isolates were identified as B. ubonensis indicating that this species is common in the soil where B. pseudomallei is endemic. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis reveals many novel branches within the B. cepacia complex, one novel B. oklahomensis-like species, and one novel branch containing one isolate that is distinct from all other samples on the phylogenetic tree. During the analysis with recA sequencing, we discovered 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the reverse priming region of B. oklahomensis. A degenerate primer was developed and is proposed for future use. We conclude that the recA sequencing technique is an effective tool to classify Burkholderia and identify soil organisms in a melioidosis endemic area. PMID:26121041

  6. Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei Near-Neighbor Species in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Ginther

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of near-neighbor species are critical to the development of robust molecular diagnostic tools for biothreat agents. One such agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, a soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis, is lacking in this area because of its genomic diversity and widespread geographic distribution. The Burkholderia genus contains over 60 species and occupies a large range of environments including soil, plants, rhizospheres, water, animals and humans. The identification of novel species in new locations necessitates the need to identify the true global distribution of Burkholderia species, especially the members that are closely related to B. pseudomallei. In our current study, we used the Burkholderia-specific recA sequencing assay to analyze environmental samples from the Darwin region in the Northern Territory of Australia where melioidosis is endemic. Burkholderia recA PCR negative samples were further characterized using 16s rRNA sequencing for species identification. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that over 70% of the bacterial isolates were identified as B. ubonensis indicating that this species is common in the soil where B. pseudomallei is endemic. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis reveals many novel branches within the B. cepacia complex, one novel B. oklahomensis-like species, and one novel branch containing one isolate that is distinct from all other samples on the phylogenetic tree. During the analysis with recA sequencing, we discovered 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the reverse priming region of B. oklahomensis. A degenerate primer was developed and is proposed for future use. We conclude that the recA sequencing technique is an effective tool to classify Burkholderia and identify soil organisms in a melioidosis endemic area.

  7. Randomized Soil Survey of the Distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Rice Fields in Laos ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Langla, Sayan; Amornchai, Premjit; Sirisouk, Joy; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Moore, Catrin E.; Peacock, Sharon J.; Buisson, Yves; Newton, Paul N.

    2011-01-01

    Melioidosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Southeast Asia, where the causative organism (Burkholderia pseudomallei) is present in the soil. In the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos), B. pseudomallei is a significant cause of sepsis around the capital, Vientiane, and has been isolated in soil near the city, adjacent to the Mekong River. We explored whether B. pseudomallei occurs in Lao soil distant from the Mekong River, drawing three axes across northwest, northeast, and southern Laos to create nine sampling areas in six provinces. Within each sampling area, a random rice field site containing a grid of 100 sampling points each 5 m apart was selected. Soil was obtained from a depth of 30 cm and cultured for B. pseudomallei. Four of nine sites (44%) were positive for B. pseudomallei, including all three sites in Saravane Province, southern Laos. The highest isolation frequency was in east Saravane, where 94% of soil samples were B. pseudomallei positive with a geometric mean concentration of 464 CFU/g soil (95% confidence interval, 372 to 579 CFU/g soil; range, 25 to 10,850 CFU/g soil). At one site in northwest Laos (Luangnamtha), only one sample (1%) was positive for B. pseudomallei, at a concentration of 80 CFU/g soil. Therefore, B. pseudomallei occurs in Lao soils beyond the immediate vicinity of the Mekong River, alerting physicians to the likelihood of melioidosis in these areas. Further studies are needed to investigate potential climatic, soil, and biological determinants of this heterogeneity. PMID:21075883

  8. Workshop on treatment of and postexposure prophylaxis for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei Infection, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, Rebecca; Garges, Susan; Aurigemma, Rosemarie; Baccam, Prasith; Blaney, David D; Cheng, Allen C; Currie, Bart J; Dance, David; Gee, Jay E; Larsen, Joseph; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Morrow, Meredith G; Norton, Robert; O'Mara, Elizabeth; Peacock, Sharon J; Pesik, Nicki; Rogers, L Paige; Schweizer, Herbert P; Steinmetz, Ivo; Tan, Gladys; Tan, Patrick; Wiersinga, W Joost; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Smith, Theresa L

    2012-12-01

    The US Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise convened subject matter experts at the 2010 HHS Burkholderia Workshop to develop consensus recommendations for postexposure prophylaxis against and treatment for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei infections, which cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Drugs recommended by consensus of the participants are ceftazidime or meropenem for initial intensive therapy, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for eradication therapy. For postexposure prophylaxis, recommended drugs are trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or co-amoxiclav. To improve the timely diagnosis of melioidosis and glanders, further development and wide distribution of rapid diagnostic assays were also recommended. Standardized animal models and B. pseudomallei strains are needed for further development of therapeutic options. Training for laboratory technicians and physicians would facilitate better diagnosis and treatment options.

  9. Roles and Interactions of Burkholderia pseudomallei BpsIR Quorum-Sensing System Determinants▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Sanmee, Sittinee

    2008-01-01

    The Burkholderia pseudomallei quorum-sensing system (QSS), designated BpsIR, is encoded by five bpsR genes and three bpsI genes. This study investigated the roles and interactions of the QSS determinants in terms of gene regulation and protein interaction. We report two novel findings, that BpsR can function as an activator and a repressor for bpsI expression and that BpsR may form homodimers and heterodimers.

  10. The BpsIR Quorum-Sensing System of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yan; Xie, Chao; Ong, Yong-Mei; Gan, Yunn-Hwen; Chua, Kim-Lee

    2005-01-01

    BpsIR, a LuxIR quorum-sensing homolog, is required for optimal expression of virulence and secretion of exoproducts in Burkholderia pseudomallei. Cell density-dependent expression of bpsI and bpsR, the positive regulation of bpsIR expression by BpsR, and the synthesis of N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8HSL) by BpsI are described in this report.

  11. Nasal Acai Polysaccharides Potentiate Innate Immunity to Protect against Pulmonary Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Skyberg, Jerod A.; Rollins, MaryClare F.; Holderness, Jeff S.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Goodyear, Andrew; Dow, Steven W.; Jutila, Mark A.; Pascual, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections are highly lethal in untreated patients, and current antibiotic regimens are not always effective. Activating the innate immune system provides an alternative means of treating infection and can also complement antibiotic therapies. Several natural agonists were screened for their ability to enhance host resistance to infection, and polysaccharides derived from the Acai berry (Acai PS) were found to have potent abilitie...

  12. Alanine racemase mutants of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei and use of alanine racemase as a non-antibiotic-based selectable marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheryl L W Zajdowicz

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are category B select agents and must be studied under BSL3 containment in the United States. They are typically resistant to multiple antibiotics, and the antibiotics used to treat B. pseudomallei or B. mallei infections may not be used as selective agents with the corresponding Burkholderia species. Here, we investigated alanine racemase deficient mutants of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei for development of non-antibiotic-based genetic selection methods and for attenuation of virulence. The genome of B. pseudomallei K96243 has two annotated alanine racemase genes (bpsl2179 and bpss0711, and B. mallei ATCC 23344 has one (bma1575. Each of these genes encodes a functional enzyme that can complement the alanine racemase deficiency of Escherichia coli strain ALA1. Herein, we show that B. pseudomallei with in-frame deletions in both bpsl2179 and bpss0711, or B. mallei with an in-frame deletion in bma1575, requires exogenous D-alanine for growth. Introduction of bpsl2179 on a multicopy plasmid into alanine racemase deficient variants of either Burkholderia species eliminated the requirement for D-alanine. During log phase growth without D-alanine, the viable counts of alanine racemase deficient mutants of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei decreased within 2 hours by about 1000-fold and 10-fold, respectively, and no viable bacteria were present at 24 hours. We constructed several genetic tools with bpsl2179 as a selectable genetic marker, and we used them without any antibiotic selection to construct an in-frame ΔflgK mutant in the alanine racemase deficient variant of B. pseudomallei K96243. In murine peritoneal macrophages, wild type B. mallei ATCC 23344 was killed much more rapidly than wild type B. pseudomallei K96243. In addition, the alanine racemase deficient mutant of B. pseudomallei K96243 exhibited attenuation versus its isogenic parental strain with respect to growth and survival in murine

  13. Alanine racemase mutants of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei and use of alanine racemase as a non-antibiotic-based selectable marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdowicz, Sheryl L W; Jones-Carson, Jessica; Vazquez-Torres, Andres; Jobling, Michael G; Gill, Ronald E; Holmes, Randall K

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are category B select agents and must be studied under BSL3 containment in the United States. They are typically resistant to multiple antibiotics, and the antibiotics used to treat B. pseudomallei or B. mallei infections may not be used as selective agents with the corresponding Burkholderia species. Here, we investigated alanine racemase deficient mutants of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei for development of non-antibiotic-based genetic selection methods and for attenuation of virulence. The genome of B. pseudomallei K96243 has two annotated alanine racemase genes (bpsl2179 and bpss0711), and B. mallei ATCC 23344 has one (bma1575). Each of these genes encodes a functional enzyme that can complement the alanine racemase deficiency of Escherichia coli strain ALA1. Herein, we show that B. pseudomallei with in-frame deletions in both bpsl2179 and bpss0711, or B. mallei with an in-frame deletion in bma1575, requires exogenous D-alanine for growth. Introduction of bpsl2179 on a multicopy plasmid into alanine racemase deficient variants of either Burkholderia species eliminated the requirement for D-alanine. During log phase growth without D-alanine, the viable counts of alanine racemase deficient mutants of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei decreased within 2 hours by about 1000-fold and 10-fold, respectively, and no viable bacteria were present at 24 hours. We constructed several genetic tools with bpsl2179 as a selectable genetic marker, and we used them without any antibiotic selection to construct an in-frame ΔflgK mutant in the alanine racemase deficient variant of B. pseudomallei K96243. In murine peritoneal macrophages, wild type B. mallei ATCC 23344 was killed much more rapidly than wild type B. pseudomallei K96243. In addition, the alanine racemase deficient mutant of B. pseudomallei K96243 exhibited attenuation versus its isogenic parental strain with respect to growth and survival in murine peritoneal macrophages.

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Monoclonal Antibodies with Prominent Bactericidal Activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shimin; Feng, Shaw-Huey; Li, Bingjie; Kim, Hyung-Yong; Rodriguez, Joe; Tsai, Shien; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Our laboratory has developed more than a hundred mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. These antibodies have been categorized into different groups based on their specificities and the biochemical natures of their target antigens. The current study first examined the bactericidal activities of a number of these MAbs by an in vitro opsonic assay. Then, the in vivo protective efficacy of selected MAbs was evaluated using BALB/c mice challenged intranasally with a lethal dose of the bacteria. The opsonic assay using dimethyl sulfoxide-treated human HL-60 cells as phagocytes revealed that 19 out of 47 tested MAbs (40%) have prominent bactericidal activities against B. pseudomallei and/or B. mallei. Interestingly, all MAbs with strong opsonic activities are those with specificity against either the capsular polysaccharides (PS) or the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the bacteria. On the other hand, none of the MAbs reacting to bacterial proteins or glycoproteins showed prominent bactericidal activity. Further study revealed that the antigenic epitopes on either the capsular PS or LPS molecules were readily available for binding in intact bacteria, while the epitopes on proteins/glycoproteins were less accessible to the MAbs. Our in vivo study showed that four MAbs reactive to either the capsular PS or LPS were highly effective in protecting mice against lethal bacterial challenge. The result is compatible with that of our in vitro study. The MAbs with the highest protective efficacy are those reactive to either the capsular PS or LPS of the Burkholderia bacteria. PMID:21450976

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo studies of monoclonal antibodies with prominent bactericidal activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shimin; Feng, Shaw-Huey; Li, Bingjie; Kim, Hyung-Yong; Rodriguez, Joe; Tsai, Shien; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2011-05-01

    Our laboratory has developed more than a hundred mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. These antibodies have been categorized into different groups based on their specificities and the biochemical natures of their target antigens. The current study first examined the bactericidal activities of a number of these MAbs by an in vitro opsonic assay. Then, the in vivo protective efficacy of selected MAbs was evaluated using BALB/c mice challenged intranasally with a lethal dose of the bacteria. The opsonic assay using dimethyl sulfoxide-treated human HL-60 cells as phagocytes revealed that 19 out of 47 tested MAbs (40%) have prominent bactericidal activities against B. pseudomallei and/or B. mallei. Interestingly, all MAbs with strong opsonic activities are those with specificity against either the capsular polysaccharides (PS) or the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the bacteria. On the other hand, none of the MAbs reacting to bacterial proteins or glycoproteins showed prominent bactericidal activity. Further study revealed that the antigenic epitopes on either the capsular PS or LPS molecules were readily available for binding in intact bacteria, while the epitopes on proteins/glycoproteins were less accessible to the MAbs. Our in vivo study showed that four MAbs reactive to either the capsular PS or LPS were highly effective in protecting mice against lethal bacterial challenge. The result is compatible with that of our in vitro study. The MAbs with the highest protective efficacy are those reactive to either the capsular PS or LPS of the Burkholderia bacteria.

  16. Tandem repeat regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome and their application for high resolution genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Steven P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The facultative, intracellular bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. We identified and categorized tandem repeat arrays and their distribution throughout the genome of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 in order to develop a genetic typing method for B. pseudomallei. We then screened 104 of the potentially polymorphic loci across a diverse panel of 31 isolates including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis in order to identify loci with varying degrees of polymorphism. A subset of these tandem repeat arrays were subsequently developed into a multiple-locus VNTR analysis to examine 66 B. pseudomallei and 21 B. mallei isolates from around the world, as well as 95 lineages from a serial transfer experiment encompassing ~18,000 generations. Results B. pseudomallei contains a preponderance of tandem repeat loci throughout its genome, many of which are duplicated elsewhere in the genome. The majority of these loci are composed of repeat motif lengths of 6 to 9 bp with 4 to 10 repeat units and are predominately located in intergenic regions of the genome. Across geographically diverse B. pseudomallei and B.mallei isolates, the 32 VNTR loci displayed between 7 and 28 alleles, with Nei's diversity values ranging from 0.47 and 0.94. Mutation rates for these loci are comparable (>10-5 per locus per generation to that of the most diverse tandemly repeated regions found in other less diverse bacteria. Conclusion The frequency, location and duplicate nature of tandemly repeated regions within the B. pseudomallei genome indicate that these tandem repeat regions may play a role in generating and maintaining adaptive genomic variation. Multiple-locus VNTR analysis revealed extensive diversity within the global isolate set containing B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, and it detected genotypic differences within clonal lineages of both species that were

  17. Multitarget Quantitative PCR Improves Detection and Predicts Cultivability of the Pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhler, Andre; Trung, Trinh Thanh; Hopf, Verena; Kohler, Christian; Hartleib, Jörg; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Peacock, Sharon J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Tuanyok, Apichai; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2017-04-15

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is present in the environment in many parts of the world and causes the often-fatal disease melioidosis. The sensitive detection and quantification of B. pseudomallei in the environment are a prerequisite for assessing the risk of infection. We recently reported the direct detection of B. pseudomallei in soil samples using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting a single type three secretion system 1 (TTSS1) gene. Here, we extend the qPCR-based analysis of B. pseudomallei in soil by validating novel qPCR gene targets selected from a comparative genomic analysis. Two hundred soil samples from two rice paddies in northeast Thailand were evaluated, of which 47% (94/200) were B. pseudomallei culture positive. The TTSS1 qPCR and two novel qPCR assays that targeted open reading frames (ORFs) BPSS0087 and BPSS0745 exhibited detection rates of 76.5% (153/200), 34.5% (69/200), and 74.5% (150/200), respectively. The combination of TTSS1 and BPSS0745 qPCR increased the detection rate to 90% (180/200). Combining the results of the three qPCR assays and the BPSS1187 nested PCR previously published, all 200 samples were positive by at least one PCR assay. Samples positive by either TTSS1 (n = 153) or BPSS0745 (n = 150) qPCR were more likely to be direct-culture positive, with odds ratios of 4.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7 to 9.5; P rate in soil samples and predicted culture positivity. This approach has the potential for use as a sensitive environmental screening method for B. pseudomalleiIMPORTANCE The worldwide environmental distribution of the soil bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei remains to be determined. So far, most environmental studies have relied on culture-based approaches to detect this pathogen. Since current culture methods are laborious, are time consuming, and have limited sensitivity, culture-independent and more sensitive methods are needed. In this study, we show that a B. pseudomallei-specific qPCR approach can detect

  18. In vitro antimicrobial activity of natural toxins and animal venoms tested against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Vincent TK

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei are the causative agent of melioidosis. Increasing resistance of the disease to antibiotics is a severe problem in treatment regime and has led to intensification of the search for new drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are the most ubiquitous in nature as part of the innate immune system and host defense mechanism. Methods Here, we investigated a group of venoms (snakes, scorpions and honey bee venoms for antimicrobial properties against two strains of Gram-negative bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei by using disc-diffusion assay for in vitro susceptibility testing. The antibacterial activities of the venoms were compared with that of the isolated L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO and phospholipase A2 (PLA2s enzymes. MICs were determined using broth dilution method. Bacterial growth was assessed by measurement of optical density at the lowest dilutions (MIC 0.25 mg/ml. The cell viability was measured using tetrazolium salts (XTT based cytotoxic assay. Results The studied venoms showed high antimicrobial activity. The venoms of C. adamanteus, Daboia russelli russelli, A. halys, P. australis, B. candidus and P. guttata were equally as effective as Chloramphenicol and Ceftazidime (30 μg/disc. Among those tested, phospholipase A2 enzymes (crotoxin B and daboiatoxin showed the most potent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative (TES bacteria. Naturally occurring venom peptides and phospholipase A2 proved to possess highly potent antimicrobial activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei. The XTT-assay results showed that the cell survival decreased with increasing concentrations (0.05–10 mg/mL of Crotalus adamanteus venom, with no effect on the cell viability evident at 0.5 mg/mL. Conclusion This antibacterial profile of snake venoms reported herein will be useful in the search for potential antibacterial agents against drug resistant microorganisms like B. pseudomallei.

  19. In vitro antimicrobial activity of natural toxins and animal venoms tested against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal Samy, R; Pachiappan, A; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Thwin, Maung M; Hian, Yap E; Chow, Vincent TK; Bow, Ho; Weng, Joseph T

    2006-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei are the causative agent of melioidosis. Increasing resistance of the disease to antibiotics is a severe problem in treatment regime and has led to intensification of the search for new drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are the most ubiquitous in nature as part of the innate immune system and host defense mechanism. Methods Here, we investigated a group of venoms (snakes, scorpions and honey bee venoms) for antimicrobial properties against two strains of Gram-negative bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei by using disc-diffusion assay for in vitro susceptibility testing. The antibacterial activities of the venoms were compared with that of the isolated L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2s) enzymes. MICs were determined using broth dilution method. Bacterial growth was assessed by measurement of optical density at the lowest dilutions (MIC 0.25 mg/ml). The cell viability was measured using tetrazolium salts (XTT) based cytotoxic assay. Results The studied venoms showed high antimicrobial activity. The venoms of C. adamanteus, Daboia russelli russelli, A. halys, P. australis, B. candidus and P. guttata were equally as effective as Chloramphenicol and Ceftazidime (30 μg/disc). Among those tested, phospholipase A2 enzymes (crotoxin B and daboiatoxin) showed the most potent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative (TES) bacteria. Naturally occurring venom peptides and phospholipase A2 proved to possess highly potent antimicrobial activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei. The XTT-assay results showed that the cell survival decreased with increasing concentrations (0.05–10 mg/mL) of Crotalus adamanteus venom, with no effect on the cell viability evident at 0.5 mg/mL. Conclusion This antibacterial profile of snake venoms reported herein will be useful in the search for potential antibacterial agents against drug resistant microorganisms like B. pseudomallei. PMID:16784542

  20. An ensemble of structures of Burkholderia pseudomallei 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Douglas R.; Staker, Bart L.; Abendroth, Jan A.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Hartley, Robert; Leonard, Jess; Kim, Hidong; Rychel, Amanda L.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Myler, Peter J.; Stewart, Lance J. (UWASH); (Emerald)

    2011-12-07

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil-dwelling bacterium endemic to Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Burkholderia is responsible for melioidosis, a serious infection of the skin. The enzyme 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) catalyzes the interconversion of 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate, a key step in the glycolytic pathway. As such it is an extensively studied enzyme and X-ray crystal structures of PGAM enzymes from multiple species have been elucidated. Vanadate is a phosphate mimic that is a powerful tool for studying enzymatic mechanisms in phosphoryl-transfer enzymes such as phosphoglycerate mutase. However, to date no X-ray crystal structures of phosphoglycerate mutase have been solved with vanadate acting as a substrate mimic. Here, two vanadate complexes together with an ensemble of substrate and fragment-bound structures that provide a comprehensive picture of the function of the Burkholderia enzyme are reported.

  1. Secondary metabolites from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens isolated from soil can kill Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boottanun, Patcharaporn; Potisap, Chotima; Hurdle, Julian G; Sermswan, Rasana W

    2017-12-01

    Bacillus species are Gram-positive bacteria found in abundance in nature and their secondary metabolites were found to possess various potential activities, notably antimicrobial. In this study, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens N2-4 and N3-8 were isolated from soil and their metabolites could kill Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium also found in soil in its endemic areas. Moreover, the metabolites were able to kill drug resistant isolates of B. pseudomallei and also inhibit other pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii but not the non-pathogenic Burkholderia thailandensis, which is closely related to B. pseudomallei. Since the antimicrobial activity of N3-8 was not partially decreased or abolished when treated with proteolytic enzymes or autoclaved, but N2-4 was, these two strains should have produced different compounds. The N3-8 metabolites with antimicrobial activity consisted of both protein and non-protein compounds. The inhibition spectrum of the precipitated proteins compared to the culture supernatant indicated a possible synergistic effect of the non-protein and peptide compounds of N3-8 isolates against other pathogens. When either N2-4 or N3-8 isolates was co-cultured with B. pseudomallei the numbers of the bacteria decreased by 5 log10 within 72 h. Further purification and characterization of the metabolites is required for future use of the bacteria or their metabolites as biological controls of B. pseudomallei in the environment or for development as new drugs for problematic pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human memory T cell responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Patcharaporn Tippayawat

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important cause of community-acquired lethal sepsis in endemic regions in southeast Asia and northern Australia and is increasingly reported in other tropical areas. In animal models, production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma is critical for resistance, but in humans the characteristics of IFN-gamma production and the bacterial antigens that are recognized by the cell-mediated immune response have not been defined.Peripheral blood from 133 healthy individuals who lived in the endemic area and had no history of melioidosis, 60 patients who had recovered from melioidosis, and 31 other patient control subjects were stimulated by whole bacteria or purified bacterial proteins in vitro, and IFN-gamma responses were analyzed by ELISPOT and flow cytometry.B. pseudomallei was a potent activator of human peripheral blood NK cells for innate production of IFN-gamma. In addition, healthy individuals with serological evidence of exposure to B. pseudomallei and patients recovered from active melioidosis developed CD4(+ (and CD8(+ T cells that recognized whole bacteria and purified proteins LolC, OppA, and PotF, members of the B. pseudomallei ABC transporter family. This response was primarily mediated by terminally differentiated T cells of the effector-memory (T(EMRA phenotype and correlated with the titer of anti-B. pseudomallei antibodies in the serum.Individuals living in a melioidosis-endemic region show clear evidence of T cell priming for the ability to make IFN-gamma that correlates with their serological status. The ability to detect T cell responses to defined B. pseudomallei proteins in large numbers of individuals now provides the opportunity to screen candidate antigens for inclusion in protein or polysaccharide-conjugate subunit vaccines against this important but neglected disease.

  3. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human memory T cell responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Tippayawat, Patcharaporn; Saenwongsa, Wipawee; Mahawantung, Jirawan; Suwannasaen, Duangchan; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J; Felgner, Philip L; Atkins, Helen S; Titball, Richard W; Bancroft, Gregory J; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2009-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important cause of community-acquired lethal sepsis in endemic regions in southeast Asia and northern Australia and is increasingly reported in other tropical areas. In animal models, production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is critical for resistance, but in humans the characteristics of IFN-gamma production and the bacterial antigens that are recognized by the cell-mediated immune response have not been defined. Peripheral blood from 133 healthy individuals who lived in the endemic area and had no history of melioidosis, 60 patients who had recovered from melioidosis, and 31 other patient control subjects were stimulated by whole bacteria or purified bacterial proteins in vitro, and IFN-gamma responses were analyzed by ELISPOT and flow cytometry. B. pseudomallei was a potent activator of human peripheral blood NK cells for innate production of IFN-gamma. In addition, healthy individuals with serological evidence of exposure to B. pseudomallei and patients recovered from active melioidosis developed CD4(+) (and CD8(+)) T cells that recognized whole bacteria and purified proteins LolC, OppA, and PotF, members of the B. pseudomallei ABC transporter family. This response was primarily mediated by terminally differentiated T cells of the effector-memory (T(EMRA)) phenotype and correlated with the titer of anti-B. pseudomallei antibodies in the serum. Individuals living in a melioidosis-endemic region show clear evidence of T cell priming for the ability to make IFN-gamma that correlates with their serological status. The ability to detect T cell responses to defined B. pseudomallei proteins in large numbers of individuals now provides the opportunity to screen candidate antigens for inclusion in protein or polysaccharide-conjugate subunit vaccines against this important but neglected disease.

  4. Comparison between the antimicrobial susceptibility of Burkholderia pseudomallei to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole by standard disk diffusion method and by minimal inhibitory concentration determination.

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    Lumbiganon, P; Tattawasatra, U; Chetchotisakd, P; Wongratanacheewin, S; Thinkhamrop, B

    2000-08-01

    Melioidosis, an infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, usually occurs in immunocompromised patients and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy. Previously, oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TM/SM), an inexpensive and effective drug has been used as a maintenance therapy. The susceptibility of B. pseudomallei to TM/SM by the standard disk diffusion method is very low. However, some patients who were treated with TM/SM as a maintenance therapy despite the in vitro resistance showed good clinical responses. There were no data comparing the susceptibility of B. pseudomallei by the standard disk diffusion method with other quantitative susceptibility tests. The objective of this study was to determine the agreement between the antimicrobial susceptibility of B. pseudomallei to TM/SM by standard disk diffusion and minimal inhibitory concentration determination (MIC). We performed the susceptibility test of 144 strains of B. pseudomallei to TM/SM by both the standard disk diffusion and microbroth dilution MIC. The sensitivity results were 53.5 per cent and 84.0 per cent respectively. The agreement between the 2 tests was very poor (Kappa = 0.14; 95% CI = -0.01 to 0.29). The false resistant rate by the standard disk diffusion test was 67.9 per cent. Further in vitro susceptibility and clinical study are needed to define the interpretive criteria that correlate with clinical response.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Burkholderia pseudomallei among melioidosis cases in Kedah, Malaysia.

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    Hassan, Muhammad R A; Vijayalakshmi, Natesan; Pani, Subhada Prasad; Peng, Ng P; Mehenderkar, Ranjith; Voralu, Kirtanaa; Michael, Edwin

    2014-05-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality particularly among diabetics. We evaluated 228 isolates of B. pseudomallei for antimicrobial sensitivity during 2005-2010 using the disc diffusion technique, of which 144 were obtained from blood culture. More than 90% of the strains were susceptible to cefoperazone, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol and imipenem. Eighty-two percent of the isolates were susceptible to tetracycline and amoxicillin/clavulanate. The susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin was 78% and to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxezole was 47%. The susceptibilities to aminoglycoside antibiotics were low (21% to gentamicin and 6% to amikacin). The susceptibilities were similar between isolates from females and males, bacteremic and abacteremic cases, diabetics and non-diabetics, pneumonia and non-pneumonia cases and between those who died and those who survived. Our findings show antibiotic susceptibility patterns are not a major factor in determining outcomes of B. pseudomallei infection. Monitoring the drug susceptibilities among B. pseudomallei isolates needs to be conducted regularly to guide empiric therapy for melioidosis, as it causes high mortality, especially among diabetic cases.

  6. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Genetic Characterisation of Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolated from Malaysian Patients

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    Yalda Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Ceftazidime (CAZ, the synthetic β-lactam, is normally used as the first-line antibiotic therapy for treatment of melioidosis. However, acquired CAZ resistance can develop in vivo during treatment with CAZ, leading to mortality if therapy is not switched to a different antibiotic(s in a timely manner. In this study, susceptibilities of 81 B. pseudomallei isolates to nine different antimicrobial agents were determined using the disk diffusion method, broth microdilution test and Etest. Highest percentage of susceptibility was demonstrated to CAZ, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, meropenem, imipenem, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Although these drugs demonstrated the highest percentage of susceptibility in B. pseudomallei, the overall results underline the importance of the emergence of resistance in this organism. PCR results showed that, of the 81 B. pseudomallei, six multidrug resistant (MDR isolates carried bpeB, amrB, and BPSS1119 and penA genes. Genotyping of the isolates using random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis showed six different PCR fingerprinting patterns generated from the six MDR isolates clusters (A and eight PCR fingerprinting patterns generated for the remaining 75 non-MDR isolates clusters (B.

  7. Screening for potential anti-infective agents towards Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Su Anne; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The established treatment for melioidosis is antibiotic therapy. However, a constant threat to this form of treatment is resistance development of the causative agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, towards antibiotics. One option to circumvent this threat of antibiotic resistance is to search for new alternative anti-infectives which target the host innate immune system and/or bacterial virulence. In this study, 29 synthetic compounds were evaluated for their potential to increase the lifespan of an infected host. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was adopted as the infection model as its innate immune pathways are homologous to humans. Screens were performed in a liquid-based survival assay containing infected worms exposed to individual compounds and survival of untreated and compound-treated worms were compared. A primary screen identified nine synthetic compounds that extended the lifespan of B. pseudomallei-infected worms. Subsequently, a disc diffusion test was performed on these selected compounds to delineate compounds into those that enhanced the survival of worms via antimicrobial activity i.e. reducing the number of infecting bacteria, or into those that did not target pathogen viability. Out of the nine hits selected, two demonstrated antimicrobial effects on B. pseudomallei. Therefore, the findings from this study suggest that the other seven identified compounds are potential anti-infectives which could protect a host against B. pseudomallei infection without developing the risk of drug resistance.

  8. Environmental Survival, Military Relevance, and Persistence of Burkholderia Pseudomallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    with other intracellular bacteria [e.g.,Legionella and Listeria (Inglis et al., 2000)]. Entry into Acanthamoeba trophozoites forms vacuoles full of...endosymbioses with plant roots, and therefore provide an intracellular habitat for bacteria, inside another eukaryotic habitat. This double layer of...periodic acquisition of genetic material from either the host fungus or plant from contained Burkholderia could explain the genetic complexity of the

  9. Identification and cloning of four riboswitches from Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyati-Othman, Noor; Fatah, Ahmad Luqman Abdul; Piji, Mohd Al Akmarul Fizree Bin Md; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Raih, Mohd Firdaus

    2015-09-01

    Structured RNAs referred as riboswitches have been predicted to be present in the genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243. Four of the riboswitches were identified and analyzed through BLASTN, Rfam search and multiple sequence alignment. The RNA aptamers belong to the following riboswitch classifications: glycine riboswitch, cobalamin riboswitch, S-adenosyl-(L)-homocysteine (SAH) riboswitch and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch. The conserved nucleotides for each aptamer were identified and were marked on the secondary structure generated by RNAfold. These riboswitches were successfully amplified and cloned for further study.

  10. Preparation of Burkholderia pseudomallei Polysaccharide-CRM197 Conjugate, a Potential Vaccine Candidate for Glanders and Melioidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Glanders Glanders is an infectious disease that is caused by the bacterium Burkholderia mallei The types of infection include localized, pus- forming...Glanders Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are the causative agents for glanders and melioidosis, respectively Both of these organisms have... virulence factor : – Dave DeShazer prepared a capsule mutant (DD3008) and demonstrated that the mouse aerosol LD50 was at least 103 times greater than the

  11. Utility of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay (LFI to Detect Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil Samples.

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    Patpong Rongkard

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Culture is the gold standard for the detection of environmental B. pseudomallei. In general, soil specimens are cultured in enrichment broth for 2 days, and then the culture broth is streaked on an agar plate and incubated further for 7 days. However, identifying B. pseudomallei on the agar plates among other soil microbes requires expertise and experience. Here, we evaluate a lateral flow immunoassay (LFI developed to detect B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS in clinical samples as a tool to detect B. pseudomallei in environmental samples.First, we determined the limit of detection (LOD of LFI for enrichment broth of the soil specimens. Soil specimens (10 grams/specimen culture negative for B. pseudomallei were spiked with B. pseudomallei ranging from 10 to 105 CFU, and incubated in 10 ml of enrichment broth in air at 40°C. Then, on day 2, 4 and 7 of incubation, 50 μL of the upper layer of the broth were tested on the LFI, and colony counts to determine quantity of B. pseudomallei in the broth were performed. We found that all five soil specimens inoculated at 10 CFU were negative by LFI on day 2, but four of those five specimens were LFI positive on day 7. The LOD of the LFI was estimated to be roughly 3.8x106 CFU/ml, and culture broth on day 7 was selected as the optimal sample for LFI testing. Second, we evaluated the utility of the LFI by testing 105 soil samples from Northeast Thailand. All samples were also tested by standard culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR targeting orf2. Of 105 soil samples, 35 (33% were LFI positive, 25 (24% were culture positive for B. pseudomallei, and 79 (75% were qPCR positive. Of 11 LFI positive but standard culture negative specimens, six were confirmed by having the enrichment broth on day 7 culture positive for B. pseudomallei, and an additional three by qPCR. The LFI had 97% (30/31 sensitivity to detect soil specimens culture positive for B. pseudomallei.The LFI can be used to detect B

  12. Prevalence and Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Near-Neighbor Species in the Malabar Coastal Region of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddayelachagiri, Bhavani V.; Paul, Soumya; Nagaraj, Sowmya; Gogoi, Madhurjya; Sripathy, Murali H.; Batra, Harsh V.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification of pathogens with biowarfare importance requires detection tools that specifically differentiate them from near-neighbor species. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of a fatal disease melioidosis, is one such biothreat agent whose differentiation from its near-neighbor species is always a challenge. This is because of its phenotypic similarity with other Burkholderia species which have a wide spread geographical distribution with shared environmental niches. Melioidosis is a major public health concern in endemic regions including Southeast Asia and northern Australia. In India, the disease is still considered to be emerging. Prevalence surveys of this saprophytic bacterium in environment are under-reported in the country. A major challenge in this case is the specific identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei from the growing list of species of Burkholderia genus. The objectives of this study included examining the prevalence of B. pseudomallei and near-neighbor species in coastal region of South India and development of a novel detection tool for specific identification and differentiation of Burkholderia species. Briefly, we analyzed soil and water samples collected from Malabar coastal region of Kerala, South India for prevalence of B. pseudomallei. The presumptive Burkholderia isolates were identified using recA PCR assay. The recA PCR assay identified 22 of the total 40 presumptive isolates as Burkholderia strains (22.72% and 77.27% B. pseudomallei and non-pseudomallei Burkholderia respectively). In order to identify each isolate screened, we performed recA and 16S rDNA sequencing. This two genes sequencing revealed that the presumptive isolates included B. pseudomallei, non-pseudomallei Burkholderia as well as non-Burkholderia strains. Furthermore, a gene termed D-beta hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (bdha) was studied both in silico and in vitro for accurate detection of Burkholderia genus. The optimized bdha

  13. Prevalence and Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Near-Neighbor Species in the Malabar Coastal Region of India.

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    Bhavani V Peddayelachagiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of pathogens with biowarfare importance requires detection tools that specifically differentiate them from near-neighbor species. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of a fatal disease melioidosis, is one such biothreat agent whose differentiation from its near-neighbor species is always a challenge. This is because of its phenotypic similarity with other Burkholderia species which have a wide spread geographical distribution with shared environmental niches. Melioidosis is a major public health concern in endemic regions including Southeast Asia and northern Australia. In India, the disease is still considered to be emerging. Prevalence surveys of this saprophytic bacterium in environment are under-reported in the country. A major challenge in this case is the specific identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei from the growing list of species of Burkholderia genus. The objectives of this study included examining the prevalence of B. pseudomallei and near-neighbor species in coastal region of South India and development of a novel detection tool for specific identification and differentiation of Burkholderia species. Briefly, we analyzed soil and water samples collected from Malabar coastal region of Kerala, South India for prevalence of B. pseudomallei. The presumptive Burkholderia isolates were identified using recA PCR assay. The recA PCR assay identified 22 of the total 40 presumptive isolates as Burkholderia strains (22.72% and 77.27% B. pseudomallei and non-pseudomallei Burkholderia respectively. In order to identify each isolate screened, we performed recA and 16S rDNA sequencing. This two genes sequencing revealed that the presumptive isolates included B. pseudomallei, non-pseudomallei Burkholderia as well as non-Burkholderia strains. Furthermore, a gene termed D-beta hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (bdha was studied both in silico and in vitro for accurate detection of Burkholderia genus. The

  14. Construction and molecular characterization of mouse single-chain variable fragment antibodies against Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho San; Tsai, Shien; Zou, Nianxiang; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Wear, Douglas J; Izadjoo, Mina J

    2011-02-28

    We have selected two lipopolysaccharide (LPS) specific Burkholderia mallei mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and four anti-capsular B. pseudomallei-specific mAbs to generate mouse single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies. This selection was made through extensive in vitro and in vivo assay from our library of mAbs against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei. We initially generated the mouse immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (VH) and light chain (VL) regions from each of these six selected mAbs using a phage display scFv technology. We determined the coding sequences of the VH and VL regions and successfully constructed two B. mallei-specific scFv phage antibodies consisting of two different VH (VH1 and VH2) and one Vλ1 families. Four scFvs constructed against B. pseudomallei had two VH (VH1 and VH6) and two VL (Vκ4/5 and Vκ21) families. All of six scFv antibodies constructed demonstrated good binding activity without any rounds of biopanning against B. mallei (M5D and M18F were 0.425 and 0.480 at OD405nm) and B. pseudomallei (P1E7, P2I67, P7C6, and P7F4 were 0.523, 0.859, 0.775, and 0.449 at OD405nm) by ELISA, respectively. A comparison of the immunoglobulin gene segments revealed that the gene sequences in complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of three out of four B. pseudomallei-specific scFvs are highly conserved. We determined that the two B. mallei-specific scFvs have different CDRs in the VH, but the amino acid sequences of CDRs in the VL are conserved. This high sequence homology found in CDRs of VH or VL of these mAbs contributes to our better understanding and determination of binding to the specific antigenic epitope(s). The scFv phage display technology may be a valuable tool to develop and engineer mAbs with improved antigen-binding affinity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Polysaccharide specific monoclonal antibodies provide passive protection against intranasal challenge with Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    David P AuCoin

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacillus that is the causative agent of melioidosis. The bacterium is inherently resistant to many antibiotics and mortality rates remain high in endemic areas. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS and capsular polysaccharide (CPS are two surface-associated antigens that contribute to pathogenesis. We previously developed two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs specific to the CPS and LPS; the CPS mAb was shown to identify antigen in serum and urine from melioidosis patients. The goal of this study was to determine if passive immunization with CPS and LPS mAbs alone and in combination would protect mice from a lethal challenge with B. pseudomallei. Intranasal (i.n. challenge experiments were performed with B. pseudomallei strains 1026b and K96423. Both mAbs provided significant protection when administered alone. A combination of mAbs was protective when low doses were administered. In addition, combination therapy provided a significant reduction in spleen colony forming units (cfu compared to results when either the CPS or LPS mAbs were administered alone.

  16. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

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    Anis Rageh Al-Maleki

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV] to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk, ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis.

  17. Rapid DNA vaccination against Burkholderia pseudomallei flagellin by tattoo or intranasal application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Wagemakers, Alex; Birnie, Emma; Haak, Bastiaan W; Trentelman, Jos J A; Weehuizen, Tassili A F; Ersöz, Jasmin; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Hovius, Joppe W; Wiersinga, W Joost; Bins, Adriaan D

    2017-11-17

    Melioidosis is a severe infectious disease with a high mortality that is endemic in South-East Asia and Northern Australia. The causative pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei, is listed as potential bioterror weapon due to its high virulence and potential for easy dissemination. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine for prevention of melioidosis. Here, we explore the use of rapid plasmid DNA vaccination against B. pseudomallei flagellin for protection against respiratory challenge. We tested three flagellin DNA vaccines with different subcellular targeting designs. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated via skin tattoo on day 0, 3 and 6 before intranasal challenge with B. pseudomallei on day 21. Next, the most effective construct was used as single vaccination on day 0 by tattoo or intranasal formulation. Mice were sacrificed 72 hours post-challenge to assess bacterial loads, cytokine responses, inflammation and microscopic lesions. A construct encoding a cellular secretion signal resulted in the most effective protection against melioidosis via tattooing, with a 10-fold reduction in bacterial loads in lungs and distant organs compared to the empty vector. Strikingly, a single intranasal administration of the same vaccine resulted in >1000-fold lower bacterial loads and increased survival. Pro-inflammatory cytokine responses were significantly diminished and strong reductions in markers for distant organ damage were observed. A rapid vaccination scheme using flagellin DNA tattoo provides significant protection against intranasal challenge with B. pseudomallei, markedly improved by a single administration via airway mucosa. Hence intranasal vaccination with flagellin-encoding DNA may be applicable when acute mass vaccination is indicated and warrants further testing.

  18. BipC, a Predicted Burkholderia pseudomallei Type 3 Secretion System Translocator Protein with Actin Binding Activity

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    Charles W. Vander Broek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals. Like other clinically important Gram-negative bacteria, fundamental to B. pseudomallei pathogenesis is the Bsa Type III Secretion System. The Bsa system injects bacterial effector proteins into the cytoplasm of target host cells subverting cellular pathways for the benefit of the bacteria. It is required for invasion of non-phagocytic host cells, escape from the endocytic compartment into the host cell cytoplasm, and for virulence in murine models of melioidosis. We have recently described the repertoire of effector proteins secreted by the B. pseudomallei Bsa system, however the functions of many of these effector proteins remain an enigma. One such protein is BipC, a homolog of the translocator/effector proteins SipC and IpaC from Salmonella spp. and Shigella flexneri respectively. SipC and IpaC each have separate and distinct roles acting both as translocators, involved in creating a pore in the eukaryotic cell membrane through which effector proteins can transit, and as effectors by interacting with and polymerizing host cell actin. In this study, pull-down assays demonstrate an interaction between BipC and actin. Furthermore, we show that BipC directly interacts with actin, preferentially with actin polymers (F-actin and has the ability to polymerize actin in a similar manner as that described for SipC. Yet unlike SipC, BipC does not stabilize F-actin filaments, indicating a functionally distinct interaction with actin. Expression of Myc-tagged BipC in HeLa cells induces the formation of pseudopodia similar to that seen for IpaC. This study explores the effector function of BipC and reveals that actin interaction is conserved within the BipC/SipC/IpaC family of translocator/effector proteins.

  19. Two-Phase Bactericidal Mechanism of Silver Nanoparticles against Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Pawinee Siritongsuk

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have a strong antimicrobial activity against a variety of pathogenic bacteria. The killing mechanism of AgNPs involves direct physical membrane destruction and subsequent molecular damage from both AgNPs and released Ag+. Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, an endemic infectious disease primarily found in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. B. pseudomallei is intrinsically resistant to most common antibiotics. In this study, the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of AgNPs (10-20 nm against B. pseudomallei were investigated. The MIC and MBC for nine B. pseudomallei strains ranged from 32-48 μg/mL and 96-128 μg/mL, respectively. Concentrations of AgNPs less than 256 μg/mL were not toxic to human red blood cells. AgNPs exhibited a two-phase mechanism: cell death induction and ROS induction. The first phase was a rapid killing step within 5 min, causing the direct damage of the cytoplasmic membrane of the bacterial cells, as observed by a time-kill assay and fluorescence microscopy. During the period of 5-30 min, the cell surface charge was rapidly neutralized from -8.73 and -7.74 to 2.85 and 2.94 mV in two isolates of B. pseudomallei, as revealed by zeta potential measurement. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy showed the silver element deposited on the bacterial membrane, and TEM micrographs of the AgNP-treated B. pseudomallei cells showed severe membrane damage and cytosolic leakage at 1/5 MIC and cell bursting at MBC. During the killing effect the released Ag+ from AgNPs was only 3.9% from the starting AgNPs concentration as observed with ICP-OES experiment. In the second phase, the ROS induction occurred 1-4 hr after the AgNP treatment. Altogether, we provide direct kinetic evidence of the AgNPs killing mechanism, by which cell death is separable from the ROS induction and AgNPs mainly contributes in the killing action. AgNPs may be considered a potential candidate to

  20. Membrane-active mechanism of LFchimera against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanthawong, S.; Puknun, A.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Nazmi, K.; van Marle, J.; de Soet, J.J.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Wongratanacheewin, S.; Taweechaisupapong, S.

    2014-01-01

    LFchimera, a construct combining two antimicrobial domains of bovine lactoferrin, lactoferrampin265-284 and lactoferricin17-30, possesses strong bactericidal activity. As yet, no experimental evidence was presented to evaluate the mechanisms of LFchimera against Burkholderia isolates. In this study

  1. The Madagascar hissing cockroach as a novel surrogate host for Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis

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    Fisher Nathan A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are gram-negative pathogens responsible for the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Both species cause disease in humans and animals and have been designated as category B select agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Burkholderia thailandensis is a closely related bacterium that is generally considered avirulent for humans. While it can cause disease in rodents, the B. thailandensis 50% lethal dose (LD50 is typically ≥ 104-fold higher than the B. pseudomallei and B. mallei LD50 in mammalian models of infection. Here we describe an alternative to mammalian hosts in the study of virulence and host-pathogen interactions of these Burkholderia species. Results Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MH cockroaches possess a number of qualities that make them desirable for use as a surrogate host, including ease of breeding, ease of handling, a competent innate immune system, and the ability to survive at 37°C. MH cockroaches were highly susceptible to infection with B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis and the LD50 was 50 for Escherichia coli in MH cockroaches was >105 cfu. B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1 mutants were all attenuated in MH cockroaches, which is consistent with previous virulence studies conducted in rodents. B. pseudomallei mutants deficient in the other five T6SS gene clusters, T6SS-2 through T6SS-6, were virulent in both MH cockroaches and hamsters. Hemocytes obtained from MH cockroaches infected with B. pseudomallei harbored numerous intracellular bacteria, suggesting that this facultative intracellular pathogen can survive and replicate inside of MH cockroach phagocytic cells. The hemolymph extracted from these MH cockroaches also contained multinuclear giant cells (MNGCs with intracellular B. pseudomallei, which indicates that infected hemocytes can

  2. The Madagascar hissing cockroach as a novel surrogate host for Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis.

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    Fisher, Nathan A; Ribot, Wilson J; Applefeld, Willard; DeShazer, David

    2012-06-22

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are gram-negative pathogens responsible for the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Both species cause disease in humans and animals and have been designated as category B select agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Burkholderia thailandensis is a closely related bacterium that is generally considered avirulent for humans. While it can cause disease in rodents, the B. thailandensis 50% lethal dose (LD50) is typically ≥ 104-fold higher than the B. pseudomallei and B. mallei LD50 in mammalian models of infection. Here we describe an alternative to mammalian hosts in the study of virulence and host-pathogen interactions of these Burkholderia species. Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MH cockroaches) possess a number of qualities that make them desirable for use as a surrogate host, including ease of breeding, ease of handling, a competent innate immune system, and the ability to survive at 37°C. MH cockroaches were highly susceptible to infection with B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis and the LD50 was 105 cfu. B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1) mutants were all attenuated in MH cockroaches, which is consistent with previous virulence studies conducted in rodents. B. pseudomallei mutants deficient in the other five T6SS gene clusters, T6SS-2 through T6SS-6, were virulent in both MH cockroaches and hamsters. Hemocytes obtained from MH cockroaches infected with B. pseudomallei harbored numerous intracellular bacteria, suggesting that this facultative intracellular pathogen can survive and replicate inside of MH cockroach phagocytic cells. The hemolymph extracted from these MH cockroaches also contained multinuclear giant cells (MNGCs) with intracellular B. pseudomallei, which indicates that infected hemocytes can fuse while flowing through the insect's open circulatory system in vivo. The results

  3. φX216, a P2-like bacteriophage with broad Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei strain infectivity.

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    Kvitko, Brian H; Cox, Christopher R; DeShazer, David; Johnson, Shannon L; Voorhees, Kent J; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2012-12-07

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are closely related Category B Select Agents of bioterrorism and the causative agents of the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Rapid phage-based diagnostic tools would greatly benefit early recognition and treatment of these diseases. There is extensive strain-to-strain variation in B. pseudomallei genome content due in part to the presence or absence of integrated prophages. Several phages have previously been isolated from B. pseudomallei lysogens, for example φK96243, φ1026b and φ52237. We have isolated a P2-like bacteriophage, φX216, which infects 78% of all B. pseudomallei strains tested. φX216 also infects B. mallei, but not other Burkholderia species, including the closely related B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. The nature of the φX216 host receptor remains unclear but evidence indicates that in B. mallei φX216 uses lipopolysaccharide O-antigen but a different receptor in B. pseudomallei. The 37,637 bp genome of φX216 encodes 47 predicted open reading frames and shares 99.8% pairwise identity and an identical strain host range with bacteriophage φ52237. Closely related P2-like prophages appear to be widely distributed among B. pseudomallei strains but both φX216 and φ52237 readily infect prophage carrying strains. The broad strain infectivity and high specificity for B. pseudomallei and B. mallei indicate that φX216 will provide a good platform for the development of phage-based diagnostics for these bacteria.

  4. φX216, a P2-like bacteriophage with broad Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei strain infectivity

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    Kvitko Brian H

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are closely related Category B Select Agents of bioterrorism and the causative agents of the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Rapid phage-based diagnostic tools would greatly benefit early recognition and treatment of these diseases. There is extensive strain-to-strain variation in B. pseudomallei genome content due in part to the presence or absence of integrated prophages. Several phages have previously been isolated from B. pseudomallei lysogens, for example φK96243, φ1026b and φ52237. Results We have isolated a P2-like bacteriophage, φX216, which infects 78% of all B. pseudomallei strains tested. φX216 also infects B. mallei, but not other Burkholderia species, including the closely related B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. The nature of the φX216 host receptor remains unclear but evidence indicates that in B. mallei φX216 uses lipopolysaccharide O-antigen but a different receptor in B. pseudomallei. The 37,637 bp genome of φX216 encodes 47 predicted open reading frames and shares 99.8% pairwise identity and an identical strain host range with bacteriophage φ52237. Closely related P2-like prophages appear to be widely distributed among B. pseudomallei strains but both φX216 and φ52237 readily infect prophage carrying strains. Conclusions The broad strain infectivity and high specificity for B. pseudomallei and B. mallei indicate that φX216 will provide a good platform for the development of phage-based diagnostics for these bacteria.

  5. Identification of the conserved hypothetical protein BPSL0317 in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243

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    Yusoff, Nur Syamimi; Damiri, Nadzirah; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease which is endemic in Northern Australia and Southeastern Asia. The genome encodes several essential proteins including those currently annotated as hypothetical proteins. We studied the conservation and the essentiality of expressed hypothetical proteins in normal and different stress conditions. Based on the comparative genomics, we identified a hypothetical protein, BPSL0317, a potential essential gene that is being expressed in all normal and stress conditions. BPSL0317 is also phylogenetically conserved in the Burkholderiales order suggesting that this protein is crucial for survival among the order's members. BPSL0317 therefore has a potential to be a candidate antimicrobial drug target for this group of bacteria.

  6. Activation of NADPH oxidase is essential, but not sufficient, in controlling intracellular multiplication of Burkholderia pseudomallei in primary human monocytes.

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    Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Pudla, Matsayapan; Baral, Pankaj; Kitthawee, Sangvorn; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2014-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. Innate immune mechanisms against this pathogen, which might contribute to outcomes of melioidosis, are little known. We demonstrated here that B. pseudomallei could activate NADPH oxidase in primary human monocytes as judged by production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p40(phox) phosphorylation after infection. However, as similar to other intracellular bacteria, this bacterium was able to resist and multiply inside monocytes despite being able to activate NADPH oxidase. In the presence of NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium or apocynin, intracellular multiplication of B. pseudomallei was significantly increased, suggesting that NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production is essential in suppressing intracellular multiplication of B. pseudomallei. Additionally, interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-mediated intracellular killing of B. pseudomallei requires NADPH oxidase activity, even though ROS level was not detected at higher levels in IFN-γ-treated infected monocytes. Altogether, these results imply that the activation of NADPH plays an essential role in suppressing intracellular multiplication of B. pseudomallei in human monocytes, although this enzyme is not sufficient to stop intracellular multiplication. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei cluster 1 type VI secretion system gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

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    Burtnick, Mary N; Brett, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes glanders in humans and animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1) expressed by this organism is essential for virulence in hamsters and is positively regulated by the VirAG two-component system. Recently, we have shown that T6SS-1 gene expression is up-regulated following internalization of this pathogen into phagocytic cells and that this system promotes multinucleated giant cell formation in infected tissue culture monolayers. In the present study, we further investigated the complex regulation of this important virulence factor. To assess T6SS-1 expression, B. mallei strains were cultured in various media conditions and Hcp1 production was analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Transcript levels of several VirAG-regulated genes (bimA, tssA, hcp1 and tssM) were also determined using quantitative real time PCR. Consistent with previous observations, T6SS-1 was not expressed during growth of B. mallei in rich media. Curiously, growth of the organism in minimal media (M9G) or minimal media plus casamino acids (M9CG) facilitated robust expression of T6SS-1 genes whereas growth in minimal media plus tryptone (M9TG) did not. Investigation of this phenomenon confirmed a regulatory role for VirAG in this process. Additionally, T6SS-1 gene expression was significantly down-regulated by the addition of iron and zinc to M9CG. Other genes under the control of VirAG did not appear to be as tightly regulated by these divalent metals. Similar results were observed for B. pseudomallei, but not for B. thailandensis. Collectively, our findings indicate that in addition to being positively regulated by VirAG, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei T6SS-1 gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

  8. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei cluster 1 type VI secretion system gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

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    Mary N Burtnick

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes glanders in humans and animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1 expressed by this organism is essential for virulence in hamsters and is positively regulated by the VirAG two-component system. Recently, we have shown that T6SS-1 gene expression is up-regulated following internalization of this pathogen into phagocytic cells and that this system promotes multinucleated giant cell formation in infected tissue culture monolayers. In the present study, we further investigated the complex regulation of this important virulence factor. To assess T6SS-1 expression, B. mallei strains were cultured in various media conditions and Hcp1 production was analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Transcript levels of several VirAG-regulated genes (bimA, tssA, hcp1 and tssM were also determined using quantitative real time PCR. Consistent with previous observations, T6SS-1 was not expressed during growth of B. mallei in rich media. Curiously, growth of the organism in minimal media (M9G or minimal media plus casamino acids (M9CG facilitated robust expression of T6SS-1 genes whereas growth in minimal media plus tryptone (M9TG did not. Investigation of this phenomenon confirmed a regulatory role for VirAG in this process. Additionally, T6SS-1 gene expression was significantly down-regulated by the addition of iron and zinc to M9CG. Other genes under the control of VirAG did not appear to be as tightly regulated by these divalent metals. Similar results were observed for B. pseudomallei, but not for B. thailandensis. Collectively, our findings indicate that in addition to being positively regulated by VirAG, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei T6SS-1 gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

  9. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei Cluster 1 Type VI Secretion System Gene Expression Is Negatively Regulated by Iron and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtnick, Mary N.; Brett, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes glanders in humans and animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1) expressed by this organism is essential for virulence in hamsters and is positively regulated by the VirAG two-component system. Recently, we have shown that T6SS-1 gene expression is up-regulated following internalization of this pathogen into phagocytic cells and that this system promotes multinucleated giant cell formation in infected tissue culture monolayers. In the present study, we further investigated the complex regulation of this important virulence factor. To assess T6SS-1 expression, B. mallei strains were cultured in various media conditions and Hcp1 production was analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Transcript levels of several VirAG-regulated genes (bimA, tssA, hcp1 and tssM) were also determined using quantitative real time PCR. Consistent with previous observations, T6SS-1 was not expressed during growth of B. mallei in rich media. Curiously, growth of the organism in minimal media (M9G) or minimal media plus casamino acids (M9CG) facilitated robust expression of T6SS-1 genes whereas growth in minimal media plus tryptone (M9TG) did not. Investigation of this phenomenon confirmed a regulatory role for VirAG in this process. Additionally, T6SS-1 gene expression was significantly down-regulated by the addition of iron and zinc to M9CG. Other genes under the control of VirAG did not appear to be as tightly regulated by these divalent metals. Similar results were observed for B. pseudomallei, but not for B. thailandensis. Collectively, our findings indicate that in addition to being positively regulated by VirAG, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei T6SS-1 gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc. PMID:24146925

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei resistance to antibiotics in biofilm-induced conditions is related to efflux pumps.

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    Sirijant, Nopphasul; Sermswan, Rasana W; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi

    2016-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, has been found to increase its resistance to antibiotics when growing as a biofilm. The resistance is related to several mechanisms. One of the possible mechanisms is the efflux pump. Using bioinformatics analysis, it was found that BPSL1661, BPSL1664 and BPSL1665 were orthologous genes of the efflux transporter encoding genes for biofilm-related antibiotic resistance, PA1874-PA1877 genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1. Expression of selected encoding genes for the efflux transporter system during biofilm formation were investigated. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR expression of amrB, cytoplasmic membrane protein of AmrAB-OprA efflux transporter encoding gene, was slightly increased, while BPSL1665 was significantly increased during growth of bacteria in biofilm formation. Minimum biofilm inhibition concentration and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of ceftazidime (CTZ), doxycycline (DOX) and imipenem were found to be 2- to 1024-times increased when compared to their MICs for of planktonic cells. Inhibition of the efflux transporter by adding phenylalanine arginine β-napthylamide (PAβN), a universal efflux inhibitor, decreased 2 to 16 times as much as MBEC in B. pseudomallei biofilms with CTZ and DOX. When the intracellular accumulation of antibiotics was tested to reveal the pump inhibition, only the concentrations of CTZ and DOX increased in PAβN treated biofilm. Taken together, these results indicated that BPSL1665, a putative precursor of the efflux pump gene, might be related to the adaptation of B. pseudomallei in biofilm conditions. Inhibition of efflux pumps may lead to a decrease of resistance to CTZ and DOX in biofilm cells.

  11. Osteopontin impairs host defense during established gram-negative sepsis caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis.

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    Gerritje J W van der Windt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis, caused by infection with Burkholderia (B. pseudomallei, is a severe illness that is endemic in Southeast Asia. Osteopontin (OPN is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that is involved in several immune responses including induction of T-helper 1 cytokines and recruitment of inflammatory cells.OPN levels were determined in plasma from 33 melioidosis patients and 31 healthy controls, and in wild-type (WT mice intranasally infected with B. pseudomallei. OPN function was studied in experimental murine melioidosis using WT and OPN knockout (KO mice. Plasma OPN levels were elevated in patients with severe melioidosis, even more so in patients who went on to die. In patients who recovered plasma OPN concentrations had decreased after treatment. In experimental melioidosis in mice plasma and pulmonary OPN levels were also increased. Whereas WT and OPN KO mice were indistinguishable during the first 24 hours after infection, after 72 hours OPN KO mice demonstrated reduced bacterial numbers in their lungs, diminished pulmonary tissue injury, especially due to less necrosis, and decreased neutrophil infiltration. Moreover, OPN KO mice displayed a delayed mortality as compared to WT mice. OPN deficiency did not influence the induction of proinflammatory cytokines.These data suggest that sustained production of OPN impairs host defense during established septic melioidosis.

  12. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei stimulate differential inflammatory responses from human alveolar type II cells (ATII) and macrophages.

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    Lu, Richard; Popov, Vsevolod; Patel, Jignesh; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII) and alveolar macrophages (AM) play a crucial role in the lung's innate immune response. Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP) and Burkholderia mallei (BM) are facultative Gram-negative bacilli that cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. The inhalation of these pathogens can cause lethal disease and death in humans. We sought to compare the pathogenesis of and host responses to BP and BM through contact with human primary ATII cells and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDM). We hypothesized that because BP and BM induce different disease outcomes, each pathogen would induce distinct, unique host immune responses from resident pulmonary cells. Our findings showed that BP adhered readily to ATII cells compared to BM. BP, but not BM, was rapidly internalized by macrophages where it replicated to high numbers. Further, BP-induced significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ATII cells (IL-6, IL-8) and macrophages (IL-6, TNFα) at 6 h post-infection compared to BM (p < 0.05). Interestingly, BM-induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in ATII cells and macrophages at 6 h post-infection, with delayed induction of inflammatory cytokines at 24 h post-infection. Because BP is flagellated and produces LPS, we confirmed that it stimulated both Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR5 via NF-κb activation while the non-flagellated BM stimulated only TLR4. These data show the differences in BP and BM pathogenicity in the lung when infecting human ATII cells and macrophages and demonstrate the ability of these pathogens to elicit distinct immune responses from resident lung cells which may open new targets for therapeutic intervention to fight against these pathogens.

  13. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei stimulate differential inflammatory responses from human alveolar type II cells (ATII and macrophages.

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    Richard eLu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII and alveolar macrophages (AM play a crucial role in the lung’s innate immune response. Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP and Burkholderia mallei (BM are facultative Gram-negative bacilli that cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. The inhalation of these pathogens can cause lethal disease and death in humans. We sought to compare the pathogenesis of and host responses to BP and BM through contact with human primary ATII cells and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDM. We hypothesized that because BP and BM induce different disease outcomes, each pathogen would induce distinct, unique host immune responses from resident pulmonary cells. Our findings showed that BP adhered readily to ATII cells compared to BM. BP, but not BM, was rapidly internalized by macrophages where it replicated to high numbers. Further, BP induced significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ATII cells (IL-6, IL-8 and macrophages (IL-6, TNFα at 6h post-infection compared to BM (p<0.05. Interestingly, BM induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in ATII cells and macrophages at 6h post-infection, with delayed induction of inflammatory cytokines at 24h post-infection. Because BP is flagellated and produces LPS, we confirmed that it stimulated both Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and TLR5 via NF-κb activation while the non-flagellated BM stimulated only TLR4. These data show the differences in BP and BM pathogenicity in the lung when infecting human ATII cells and macrophages and demonstrate the ability of these pathogens to elicit distinct immune responses from resident lung cells which may open new targets for therapeutic intervention to fight against these pathogens.

  14. Functional characterisation of Burkholderia pseudomallei biotin protein ligase: A toolkit for anti-melioidosis drug development.

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    Bond, Thomas E H; Sorenson, Alanna E; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2017-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of melioidosis. The bacterium is responsible for 20% of community-acquired sepsis cases and 40% of sepsis-related mortalities in northeast Thailand, and is intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides, macrolides, rifamycins, cephalosporins, and nonureidopenicillins. There is no vaccine and its diagnosis is problematic. Biotin protein ligase (BirA) which is essential for fatty acid synthesis has been proposed as a drug target in bacteria. Very few bacterial BirA have been characterized, and a better understanding of these enzymes is necessary to further assess their value as drug targets. BirA within the Burkholderia genus have not yet been investigated. We present for the first time the cloning, expression, purification and functional characterisation of the putative Bp BirA and orthologous B. thailandensis (Bt) biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) substrate. A GFP-tagged Bp BirA was produced and applied for the development of a high-throughput (HT) assay based on our differential scanning fluorimetry of GFP-tagged proteins (DSF-GTP) principle as well as an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Our biochemical data in combination with the new HT DSF-GTP and biotinylation activity assay could facilitate future drug screening efforts against this drug-resistant organism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of a safe, reproducible, and rapid aerosol delivery method to study infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in mice.

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    Eric R Lafontaine

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most common manifestation is severe pneumonia leading to fatal bacteremia. Glanders and melioidosis are difficult to diagnose and require prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There are no vaccines available to protect against either Burkholderia species, and there is concern regarding their use as biological warfare agents given that B. mallei has previously been utilized in this manner. Hence, experiments were performed to establish a mouse model of aerosol infection to study the organisms and develop countermeasures. Using a hand-held aerosolizer, BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with strains B. pseudomallei 1026b and B. mallei ATCC23344 and growth of the agents in the lungs, as well as dissemination to the spleen, were examined. Mice infected with 10(2, 10(3 and 10(4 organisms were unable to control growth of B. mallei in the lungs and bacteria rapidly disseminated to the spleen. Though similar results were observed in mice inoculated with 10(3 and 10(4 B. pseudomallei cells, animals infected with 10(2 organisms controlled bacterial replication in the lungs, dissemination to the spleen, and the extent of bacteremia. Analysis of sera from mice surviving acute infection revealed that animals produced antibodies against antigens known to be targets of the immune response in humans. Taken together, these data show that small volume aerosol inoculation of mice results in acute disease, dose-dependent chronic infection, and immune responses

  16. Use of a safe, reproducible, and rapid aerosol delivery method to study infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in mice.

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    Lafontaine, Eric R; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Shaffer, Teresa L; Michel, Frank; Gao, Xiudan; Hogan, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most common manifestation is severe pneumonia leading to fatal bacteremia. Glanders and melioidosis are difficult to diagnose and require prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There are no vaccines available to protect against either Burkholderia species, and there is concern regarding their use as biological warfare agents given that B. mallei has previously been utilized in this manner. Hence, experiments were performed to establish a mouse model of aerosol infection to study the organisms and develop countermeasures. Using a hand-held aerosolizer, BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with strains B. pseudomallei 1026b and B. mallei ATCC23344 and growth of the agents in the lungs, as well as dissemination to the spleen, were examined. Mice infected with 10(2), 10(3) and 10(4) organisms were unable to control growth of B. mallei in the lungs and bacteria rapidly disseminated to the spleen. Though similar results were observed in mice inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) B. pseudomallei cells, animals infected with 10(2) organisms controlled bacterial replication in the lungs, dissemination to the spleen, and the extent of bacteremia. Analysis of sera from mice surviving acute infection revealed that animals produced antibodies against antigens known to be targets of the immune response in humans. Taken together, these data show that small volume aerosol inoculation of mice results in acute disease, dose-dependent chronic infection, and immune responses that correlate

  17. Evaluation of Molecular Methods To Improve the Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil and Water Samples from Laos.

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    Knappik, Michael; Dance, David A B; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Pierret, Alain; Ribolzi, Olivier; Davong, Viengmon; Silisouk, Joy; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Newton, Paul N; Dittrich, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a severe and potentially fatal disease of humans and animals. It is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia and is found in soil and surface water. The environmental distribution of B. pseudomallei worldwide and within countries where it is endemic, such as the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos), remains unclear. However, this knowledge is important to our understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of B. pseudomallei and to facilitate public health interventions. Sensitive and specific methods to detect B. pseudomallei in environmental samples are therefore needed. The aim of this study was to compare molecular and culture-based methods for the detection of B. pseudomallei in soil and surface water in order to identify the optimal approach for future environmental studies in Laos. Molecular detection by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was attempted after DNA extraction directly from soil or water samples or after an overnight enrichment step. The positivity rates obtained by qPCR were compared to those obtained by different culture techniques. The rate of detection from soil samples by qPCR following culture enrichment was significantly higher (84/100) than that by individual culture methods and all culture methods combined (44/100; P Lao environmental samples and is recommended as the preferred method for future surveys. Copyright © 2015, Knappik et al.

  18. In vivo Distribution and Clearance of Purified Capsular Polysaccharide from Burkholderia pseudomallei in a Murine Model.

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    Teerapat Nualnoi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe infection prominent in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. The "gold standard" for melioidosis diagnosis is bacterial isolation, which takes several days to complete. The resulting delay in diagnosis leads to delayed treatments, which could result in death. In an attempt to develop better methods for early diagnosis of melioidosis, B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS was identified as an important diagnostic biomarker. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay utilizing CPS-specific monoclonal antibody was developed and tested in endemic regions worldwide. However, the in vivo fate and clearance of CPS has never been thoroughly investigated. Here, we injected mice with purified CPS intravenously and determined CPS concentrations in serum, urine, and major organs at various intervals. The results indicate that CPS is predominantly eliminated through urine and no CPS accumulation occurs in the major organs. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that intact CPS was excreted through urine. To understand how a large molecule like CPS was eliminated without degradation, a 3-dimenational structure of CPS was modeled. The predicted CPS structure has a rod-like shape with a small diameter that could allow it to flow through the glomerulus of the kidney. CPS clearance was determined using exponential decay models and the corrected Akaike Information Criterion. The results show that CPS has a relatively short serum half-life of 2.9 to 4.4 hours. Therefore, the presence of CPS in the serum and/or urine suggests active melioidosis infection and provides a marker to monitor treatment of melioidosis.

  19. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

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    Senanu M Spring-Pearson

    Full Text Available The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is 'open', with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order.

  20. Activation of MAPK/ERK signaling by Burkholderia pseudomallei cycle inhibiting factor (Cif).

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    Ng, Mei Ying; Wang, Mei; Casey, Patrick J; Gan, Yunn-Hwen; Hagen, Thilo

    2017-01-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are virulence proteins secreted by the type III secretion system of some Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Burkholderia pseudomallei. Cif is known to function to deamidate Nedd8, leading to inhibition of Cullin E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL) and consequently induction of cell cycle arrest. Here we show that Cif can function as a potent activator of MAPK/ERK signaling without significant activation of other signaling pathways downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. Importantly, we found that the ability of Cif to activate ERK is dependent on its deamidase activity, but independent of Cullin E3 ligase inhibition. This suggests that apart from Nedd8, other cellular targets of Cif-dependent deamidation exist. We provide evidence that the mechanism involved in Cif-mediated ERK activation is dependent on recruitment of the Grb2-SOS1 complex to the plasma membrane. Further investigation revealed that Cif appears to modify the phosphorylation status of SOS1 in a region containing the CDC25-H and proline-rich domains. It is known that prolonged Cullin E3 ligase inhibition leads to cellular apoptosis. Therefore, we hypothesize that ERK activation is an important mechanism to counter the pro-apoptotic effects of Cif. Indeed, we show that Cif dependent ERK activation promotes phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein Bim, thereby potentially conferring a pro-survival signal. In summary, we identified a novel deamidation-dependent mechanism of action of the B. pseudomallei virulence factor Cif/CHBP to activate MAPK/ERK signaling. Our study demonstrates that bacterial proteins such as Cif can serve as useful molecular tools to uncover novel aspects of mammalian signaling pathways.

  1. Activation of MAPK/ERK signaling by Burkholderia pseudomallei cycle inhibiting factor (Cif.

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    Mei Ying Ng

    Full Text Available Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs are virulence proteins secreted by the type III secretion system of some Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Burkholderia pseudomallei. Cif is known to function to deamidate Nedd8, leading to inhibition of Cullin E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL and consequently induction of cell cycle arrest. Here we show that Cif can function as a potent activator of MAPK/ERK signaling without significant activation of other signaling pathways downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. Importantly, we found that the ability of Cif to activate ERK is dependent on its deamidase activity, but independent of Cullin E3 ligase inhibition. This suggests that apart from Nedd8, other cellular targets of Cif-dependent deamidation exist. We provide evidence that the mechanism involved in Cif-mediated ERK activation is dependent on recruitment of the Grb2-SOS1 complex to the plasma membrane. Further investigation revealed that Cif appears to modify the phosphorylation status of SOS1 in a region containing the CDC25-H and proline-rich domains. It is known that prolonged Cullin E3 ligase inhibition leads to cellular apoptosis. Therefore, we hypothesize that ERK activation is an important mechanism to counter the pro-apoptotic effects of Cif. Indeed, we show that Cif dependent ERK activation promotes phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein Bim, thereby potentially conferring a pro-survival signal. In summary, we identified a novel deamidation-dependent mechanism of action of the B. pseudomallei virulence factor Cif/CHBP to activate MAPK/ERK signaling. Our study demonstrates that bacterial proteins such as Cif can serve as useful molecular tools to uncover novel aspects of mammalian signaling pathways.

  2. Novel pan-genomic analysis approach in target selection for multiplex PCR identification and detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia cepacia complex species: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chi-Chun; Lau, Candy C Y; Martelli, Paolo; Chan, San-Yuen; Tse, Cindy W S; Wu, Alan K L; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2011-03-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and the Burkholderia cepacia complex differ greatly in pathogenicity and epidemiology. Yet, they are occasionally misidentified by biochemical profiling, and even 16S rRNA gene sequencing may not offer adequate discrimination between certain species groups. Using the 23 B. pseudomallei, four B. thailandensis, and 16 B. cepacia complex genome sequences available, we identified gene targets specific to each of them (a Tat domain protein, a 70-kDa protein, and a 12-kDa protein for B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and the B. cepacia complex, respectively), with an in-house developed algorithm. Using these targets, we designed a robust multiplex PCR assay useful for their identification and detection from soil and simulated sputum samples. For all 43 B. pseudomallei, seven B. thailandensis, and 20 B. cepacia complex (B. multivorans, n = 6; B. cenocepacia, n = 3; B. cepacia, n = 4; B. arboris, n = 2; B. contaminans, B. anthina, and B. pyrrocinia, n = 1 each; other unnamed members, n = 2) isolates, the assay produced specific products of predicted size without false positives or negatives. Of the 60 soil samples screened, 19 (31.6%) and 29 (48.3%) were positive for B. pseudomallei and the B. cepacia complex, respectively, and in four (6.7%) soil samples, the organisms were codetected. DNA sequencing confirmed that all PCR products originated from their targeted loci. This novel pan-genomic analysis approach in target selection is simple, computationally efficient, and potentially applicable to any species that harbors species-specific genes. A multiplex PCR assay for rapid and accurate identification and detection of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and the B. cepacia complex was developed and verified.

  3. Novel Pan-Genomic Analysis Approach in Target Selection for Multiplex PCR Identification and Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia cepacia Complex Species: a Proof-of-Concept Study▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chi-Chun; Lau, Candy C. Y.; Martelli, Paolo; Chan, San-Yuen; Tse, Cindy W. S.; Wu, Alan K. L.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and the Burkholderia cepacia complex differ greatly in pathogenicity and epidemiology. Yet, they are occasionally misidentified by biochemical profiling, and even 16S rRNA gene sequencing may not offer adequate discrimination between certain species groups. Using the 23 B. pseudomallei, four B. thailandensis, and 16 B. cepacia complex genome sequences available, we identified gene targets specific to each of them (a Tat domain protein, a 70-kDa protein, and a 12-kDa protein for B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and the B. cepacia complex, respectively), with an in-house developed algorithm. Using these targets, we designed a robust multiplex PCR assay useful for their identification and detection from soil and simulated sputum samples. For all 43 B. pseudomallei, seven B. thailandensis, and 20 B. cepacia complex (B. multivorans, n = 6; B. cenocepacia, n = 3; B. cepacia, n = 4; B. arboris, n = 2; B. contaminans, B. anthina, and B. pyrrocinia, n = 1 each; other unnamed members, n = 2) isolates, the assay produced specific products of predicted size without false positives or negatives. Of the 60 soil samples screened, 19 (31.6%) and 29 (48.3%) were positive for B. pseudomallei and the B. cepacia complex, respectively, and in four (6.7%) soil samples, the organisms were codetected. DNA sequencing confirmed that all PCR products originated from their targeted loci. This novel pan-genomic analysis approach in target selection is simple, computationally efficient, and potentially applicable to any species that harbors species-specific genes. A multiplex PCR assay for rapid and accurate identification and detection of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and the B. cepacia complex was developed and verified. PMID:21177905

  4. Burkholderia pseudomallei Rapidly Infects the Brain Stem and Spinal Cord via the Trigeminal Nerve after Intranasal Inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, James A; Walkden, Heidi; Nazareth, Lynn; Beagley, Kenneth W; Ulett, Glen C; Batzloff, Michael R; Beacham, Ifor R; Ekberg, Jenny A K

    2016-09-01

    Infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease with a high mortality rate (20% in Australia and 40% in Southeast Asia). Neurological melioidosis is particularly prevalent in northern Australian patients and involves brain stem infection, which can progress to the spinal cord; however, the route by which the bacteria invade the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that B. pseudomallei can infect the olfactory and trigeminal nerves within the nasal cavity following intranasal inoculation. As the trigeminal nerve projects into the brain stem, we investigated whether the bacteria could continue along this nerve to penetrate the CNS. After intranasal inoculation of mice, B. pseudomallei caused low-level localized infection within the nasal cavity epithelium, prior to invasion of the trigeminal nerve in small numbers. B. pseudomallei rapidly invaded the trigeminal nerve and crossed the astrocytic barrier to enter the brain stem within 24 h and then rapidly progressed over 2,000 μm into the spinal cord. To rule out that the bacteria used a hematogenous route, we used a capsule-deficient mutant of B. pseudomallei that does not survive in the blood and found that it also entered the CNS via the trigeminal nerve. This suggests that the primary route of entry is via the nerves that innervate the nasal cavity. We found that actin-mediated motility could facilitate initial infection of the olfactory epithelium. Thus, we have demonstrated that B. pseudomallei can rapidly infect the brain and spinal cord via the trigeminal nerve branches that innervate the nasal cavity. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system and BopA are required for evasion of LC3-associated phagocytosis.

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    Lan Gong

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a fatal infectious disease endemic in tropical regions worldwide, and especially prevalent in southeast Asia and northern Australia. This intracellular pathogen can escape from phagosomes into the host cytoplasm, where it replicates and infects adjacent cells. We previously demonstrated that, in response to B. pseudomallei infection of macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, a subset of bacteria co-localized with the autophagy marker protein, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3, implicating autophagy in host cell defence against infection. Recent reports have suggested that LC3 can be recruited to both phagosomes and autophagosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the identity of the LC3-positive compartments in which invading bacteria reside and the mechanism of the autophagic response to B. pseudomallei infection. Electron microscopy analysis of infected cells demonstrated that the invading bacteria were either free in the cytosol, or sequestered in single-membrane phagosomes rather than double-membrane autophagosomes, suggesting that LC3 is recruited to B. pseudomallei-containing phagosomes. Partial or complete loss of function of type III secretion system cluster 3 (TTSS3 in mutants lacking the BopA (effector or BipD (translocator proteins respectively, resulted in delayed or no escape from phagosomes. Consistent with these observations, bopA and bipD mutants both showed a higher level of co-localization with LC3 and the lysosomal marker LAMP1, and impaired survival in RAW264.7 cells, suggesting enhanced killing in phagolysosomes. We conclude that LC3 recruitment to phagosomes stimulates killing of B. pseudomallei trapped in phagosomes. Furthermore, BopA plays an important role in efficient escape of B. pseudomallei from phagosomes.

  6. Persistent gastric colonization with Burkholderia pseudomallei and dissemination from the gastrointestinal tract following mucosal inoculation of mice.

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    Andrew Goodyear

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a disease of humans caused by opportunistic infection with the soil and water bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Melioidosis can manifest as an acute, overwhelming infection or as a chronic, recurrent infection. At present, it is not clear where B. pseudomallei resides in the mammalian host during the chronic, recurrent phase of infection. To address this question, we developed a mouse low-dose mucosal challenge model of chronic B. pseudomallei infection and investigated sites of bacterial persistence over 60 days. Sensitive culture techniques and selective media were used to quantitate bacterial burden in major organs, including the gastrointestinal (GI tract. We found that the GI tract was the primary site of bacterial persistence during the chronic infection phase, and was the only site from which the organism could be consistently cultured during a 60-day infection period. The organism could be repeatedly recovered from all levels of the GI tract, and chronic infection was accompanied by sustained low-level fecal shedding. The stomach was identified as the primary site of GI colonization as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Organisms in the stomach were associated with the gastric mucosal surface, and the propensity to colonize the gastric mucosa was observed with 4 different B. pseudomallei isolates. In contrast, B. pseudomallei organisms were present at low numbers within luminal contents in the small and large intestine and cecum relative to the stomach. Notably, inflammatory lesions were not detected in any GI tissue examined in chronically-infected mice. Only low-dose oral or intranasal inoculation led to GI colonization and development of chronic infection of the spleen and liver. Thus, we concluded that in a mouse model of melioidosis B. pseudomallei preferentially colonizes the stomach following oral inoculation, and that the chronically colonized GI tract likely serves as a reservoir for dissemination

  7. Leveraging structure determination with fragment screening for infectious disease drug targets: MECP synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begley, Darren W.; Hartley, Robert C.; Davies, Douglas R.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Leonard, Jess T.; Abendroth, Jan; Burris, Courtney A.; Bhandari, Janhavi; Myler, Peter J.; Staker, Bart L.; Stewart, Lance J. (UWASH); (Emerald)

    2011-09-28

    As part of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease, we seek to enhance structural genomics with ligand-bound structure data which can serve as a blueprint for structure-based drug design. We have adapted fragment-based screening methods to our structural genomics pipeline to generate multiple ligand-bound structures of high priority drug targets from pathogenic organisms. In this study, we report fragment screening methods and structure determination results for 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclo-diphosphate (MECP) synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei, the gram-negative bacterium which causes melioidosis. Screening by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as crystal soaking followed by X-ray diffraction led to the identification of several small molecules which bind this enzyme in a critical metabolic pathway. A series of complex structures obtained with screening hits reveal distinct binding pockets and a range of small molecules which form complexes with the target. Additional soaks with these compounds further demonstrate a subset of fragments to only bind the protein when present in specific combinations. This ensemble of fragment-bound complexes illuminates several characteristics of MECP synthase, including a previously unknown binding surface external to the catalytic active site. These ligand-bound structures now serve to guide medicinal chemists and structural biologists in rational design of novel inhibitors for this enzyme.

  8. Crystal structures of Cif from bacterial pathogens Photorhabdus luminescens and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Allister; Race, Paul R; Jubelin, Grégory; Varela Chavez, Carolina; Escoubas, Jean-Michel; Oswald, Eric; Banfield, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    A pre-requisite for bacterial pathogenesis is the successful interaction of a pathogen with a host. One mechanism used by a broad range of Gram negative bacterial pathogens is to deliver effector proteins directly into host cells through a dedicated type III secretion system where they modulate host cell function. The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) family of effector proteins, identified in a growing number of pathogens that harbour functional type III secretion systems and have a wide host range, arrest the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, the crystal structures of Cifs from the insect pathogen/nematode symbiont Photorhabdus luminescens (a gamma-proteobacterium) and human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei (a beta-proteobacterium) are presented. Both of these proteins adopt an overall fold similar to the papain sub-family of cysteine proteases, as originally identified in the structure of a truncated form of Cif from Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), despite sharing only limited sequence identity. The structure of an N-terminal region, referred to here as the 'tail-domain' (absent in the EPEC Cif structure), suggests a surface likely to be involved in host-cell substrate recognition. The conformation of the Cys-His-Gln catalytic triad is retained, and the essential cysteine is exposed to solvent and addressable by small molecule reagents. These structures and biochemical work contribute to the rapidly expanding literature on Cifs, and direct further studies to better understand the molecular details of the activity of these proteins.

  9. BurkDiff: a real-time PCR allelic discrimination assay for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene R Bowers

    Full Text Available A real-time PCR assay, BurkDiff, was designed to target a unique conserved region in the B. pseudomallei and B. mallei genomes containing a SNP that differentiates the two species. Sensitivity and specificity were assessed by screening BurkDiff across 469 isolates of B. pseudomallei, 49 isolates of B. mallei, and 390 isolates of clinically relevant non-target species. Concordance of results with traditional speciation methods and no cross-reactivity to non-target species show BurkDiff is a robust, highly validated assay for the detection and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei.

  10. BurkDiff: a real-time PCR allelic discrimination assay for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Jolene R; Engelthaler, David M; Ginther, Jennifer L; Pearson, Talima; Peacock, Sharon J; Tuanyok, Apichai; Wagner, David M; Currie, Bart J; Keim, Paul S

    2010-11-12

    A real-time PCR assay, BurkDiff, was designed to target a unique conserved region in the B. pseudomallei and B. mallei genomes containing a SNP that differentiates the two species. Sensitivity and specificity were assessed by screening BurkDiff across 469 isolates of B. pseudomallei, 49 isolates of B. mallei, and 390 isolates of clinically relevant non-target species. Concordance of results with traditional speciation methods and no cross-reactivity to non-target species show BurkDiff is a robust, highly validated assay for the detection and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei.

  11. Effects of Colonization of the Roots of Domestic Rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Amaroo) by Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasertsincharoen, Noppadol; Constantinoiu, Constantin; Gardiner, Christopher; Warner, Jeffrey; Elliman, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a saprophytic bacterium that causes melioidosis and is often isolated from rice fields in Southeast Asia, where the infection incidence is high among rice field workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between this bacterium and rice through growth experiments where the effect of colonization of domestic rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Amaroo) roots by B. pseudomallei could be observed. When B. pseudomallei was exposed to surface-sterilized seeds, the growth of both the root and the aerosphere was retarded compared to that in controls. The organism was found to localize in the root hairs and endodermis of the plant. A biofilm formed around the root and root structures that were colonized. Growth experiments with a wild rice species (Oryza meridionalis) produced similar retardation of growth, while another domestic cultivar (O. sativa L. cv Koshihikari) did not show retarded growth. Here we report B. pseudomallei infection and inhibition of O. sativa L. cv Amaroo, which might provide insights into plant interactions with this important human pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Effects of Colonization of the Roots of Domestic Rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Amaroo) by Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinoiu, Constantin; Gardiner, Christopher; Warner, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a saprophytic bacterium that causes melioidosis and is often isolated from rice fields in Southeast Asia, where the infection incidence is high among rice field workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between this bacterium and rice through growth experiments where the effect of colonization of domestic rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Amaroo) roots by B. pseudomallei could be observed. When B. pseudomallei was exposed to surface-sterilized seeds, the growth of both the root and the aerosphere was retarded compared to that in controls. The organism was found to localize in the root hairs and endodermis of the plant. A biofilm formed around the root and root structures that were colonized. Growth experiments with a wild rice species (Oryza meridionalis) produced similar retardation of growth, while another domestic cultivar (O. sativa L. cv Koshihikari) did not show retarded growth. Here we report B. pseudomallei infection and inhibition of O. sativa L. cv Amaroo, which might provide insights into plant interactions with this important human pathogen. PMID:25911477

  13. Diversity of 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS reveals phylogenetic relationships in Burkholderia pseudomallei and its near-neighbors.

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    Andrew P Liguori

    Full Text Available Length polymorphisms within the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS have been described as stable genetic markers for studying bacterial phylogenetics. In this study, we used these genetic markers to investigate phylogenetic relationships in Burkholderia pseudomallei and its near-relative species. B. pseudomallei is known as one of the most genetically recombined bacterial species. In silico analysis of multiple B. pseudomallei genomes revealed approximately four homologous rRNA operons and ITS length polymorphisms therein. We characterized ITS distribution using PCR and analyzed via a high-throughput capillary electrophoresis in 1,191 B. pseudomallei strains. Three major ITS types were identified, two of which were commonly found in most B. pseudomallei strains from the endemic areas, whereas the third one was significantly correlated with worldwide sporadic strains. Interestingly, mixtures of the two common ITS types were observed within the same strains, and at a greater incidence in Thailand than Australia suggesting that genetic recombination causes the ITS variation within species, with greater recombination frequency in Thailand. In addition, the B. mallei ITS type was common to B. pseudomallei, providing further support that B. mallei is a clone of B. pseudomallei. Other B. pseudomallei near-neighbors possessed unique and monomorphic ITS types. Our data shed light on evolutionary patterns of B. pseudomallei and its near relative species.

  14. Characterization of a laboratory-generated variant of BPS beta-lactamase from Burkholderia pseudomallei that hydrolyses ceftazidime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, P L; Cheung, Terence K M; Yam, W C; Yuen, K Y

    2002-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei produces an Ambler class A beta-lactamase, known as BPS-1. The beta-lactamase gene from a laboratory-derived, ceftazidime-resistant strain of B. pseudomallei (LH-1-2) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The beta-lactamase, named BPS-1m, had an identical isoelectric focusing point (pI 7.7) to that of BPS-1, but differed in having a stronger hydrolytic activity against ceftazidime. Susceptibility testing showed that BPS-1m when expressed in E. coli conferred resistance to ceftazidime (MIC >or= 32 mg/L). The amino acid sequence of BPS-1m differed from that of BPS-1 by a Pro-to-Ser change at position 167 in the omega loop.

  15. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS analysis being faster than

  16. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Axel; Stock, Rüdiger; Ziller, Mario; Elschner, Mandy C; Bettin, Barbara; Melzer, Falk; Maier, Thomas; Kostrzewa, Markus; Scholz, Holger C; Neubauer, Heinrich; Tomaso, Herbert

    2012-10-10

    Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343) was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS analysis being faster than nucleic amplification methods. Our

  17. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karger Axel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia (B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343 was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS

  18. Comparison of DNA extraction kits for detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in spiked human whole blood using real-time PCR.

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    Nicole L Podnecky

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia and can cause severe septicemia that may lead to death in 20% to 50% of cases. Rapid detection of B. pseudomallei infection is crucial for timely treatment of septic patients. This study evaluated seven commercially available DNA extraction kits to determine the relative recovery of B. pseudomallei DNA from spiked EDTA-containing human whole blood. The evaluation included three manual kits: the QIAamp DNA Mini kit, the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini kit, and the High Pure PCR Template Preparation kit; and four automated systems: the MagNAPure LC using the DNA Isolation Kit I, the MagNAPure Compact using the Nucleic Acid Isolation Kit I, and the QIAcube using the QIAamp DNA Mini kit and the QIAamp DNA Blood Mini kit. Detection of B. pseudomallei DNA extracted by each kit was performed using the B. pseudomallei specific type III secretion real-time PCR (TTS1 assay. Crossing threshold (C T values were used to compare the limit of detection and reproducibility of each kit. This study also compared the DNA concentrations and DNA purity yielded for each kit. The following kits consistently yielded DNA that produced a detectable signal from blood spiked with 5.5×10(4 colony forming units per mL: the High Pure PCR Template Preparation, QIAamp DNA Mini, MagNA Pure Compact, and the QIAcube running the QIAamp DNA Mini and QIAamp DNA Blood Mini kits. The High Pure PCR Template Preparation kit yielded the lowest limit of detection with spiked blood, but when this kit was used with blood from patients with confirmed cases of melioidosis, the bacteria was not reliably detected indicating blood may not be an optimal specimen.

  19. Evaluation of a biodegradable microparticulate polymer as a carrier for Burkholderia pseudomallei subunit vaccines in a mouse model of melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schully, K L; Bell, M G; Prouty, A M; Gallovic, M D; Gautam, S; Peine, K J; Sharma, S; Bachelder, E M; Pesce, J T; Elberson, M A; Ainslie, K M; Keane-Myers, A

    2015-11-30

    Melioidosis, a potentially lethal disease of humans and animals, is caused by the soil-dwelling bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Due to B. pseudomallei's classification as a Tier 1 Select Agent, there is substantial interest in the development of an effective vaccine. Yet, despite decades of research, no effective target, adjuvant or delivery vehicle capable of inducing protective immunity against B. pseudomallei infection has been identified. We propose a microparticulate delivery vehicle comprised of the novel polymer acetalated dextran (Ac-DEX). Ac-DEX is an acid-sensitive biodegradable carrier that can be fabricated into microparticles (MPs) that are relatively stable at pH 7.4, but rapidly degrade after phagocytosis by antigen presenting cells where the pH can drop to 5.0. As compared to other biomaterials, this acid sensitivity has been shown to enhance cross presentation of subunit antigens. To evaluate this platform as a delivery system for a melioidosis vaccine, BALB/c mice were vaccinated with Ac-DEX MPs separately encapsulating B. pseudomallei whole cell lysate and the toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonist resiquimod. This vaccine elicited a robust antibody response that included both Th1 and Th2 immunity. Following lethal intraperitoneal challenge with B. pseudomallei 1026b, vaccinated mice demonstrated a significant delay to time of death compared to untreated mice. The formulation, however, demonstrated incomplete protection indicating that lysate protein offers limited value as an antigen. Nevertheless, our Ac-DEX MPs may offer an effective delivery vehicle for a subunit B. psuedomallei vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Intramolecular aglycon delivery enables the synthesis of 6-deoxy-β-D-manno-heptosides as fragments of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei capsular polysaccharide.

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    Tamigney Kenfack, Marielle; Blériot, Yves; Gauthier, Charles

    2014-05-16

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are potential bioterrorism agents. They express the same capsular polysaccharide (CPS), a homopolymer featuring an unusual [→3)-2-O-acetyl-6-deoxy-β-D-manno-heptopyranosyl-(1→] as the repeating unit. This CPS is known to be one of the main targets of the adaptive immune response in humans and therefore represents a crucial subunit candidate for vaccine development. Herein, the stereoselective synthesis of mono- and disaccharidic fragments of the B. pseudomallei and B. mallei CPS repeating unit is reported. The synthesis of 6-deoxy-β-D-manno-heptosides was investigated using both inter- and intramolecular glycosylation strategies from thio-manno-heptose that was modified with 2-naphthylmethyl (NAP) at C2. We show here that NAP-mediated intramolecular aglycon delivery (IAD) represents a suitable approach for the stereocontrolled synthesis of 6-deoxy-β-D-manno-heptosides without the need for rigid 4,6-O-cyclic protection of the sugar skeleton. The IAD strategy is highly modular, as it can be applied to structurally diverse acceptors with complete control of stereoselectivity. Problematic hydrogenation of the acetylated disaccharides was overcome by using a microfluidic continuous flow reactor.

  1. Comparing in vitro and in vivo virulence phenotypes of Burkholderia pseudomallei type G strains.

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    Lewis, Eric R G; Kilgore, Paul B; Mott, Tiffany M; Pradenas, Gonzalo A; Torres, Alfredo G

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bpm) is a saprophytic rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. This disease has previously been described as endemic in areas such as northern Australia and Southeast Asia, but, more recently, a better understanding of the epidemiology of melioidosis indicated that the disease is distributed worldwide, including regions of the Americas and Africa. A 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) typing system has been developed for Bpm and has revealed that ITS types C, E, and hybrid CE are mainly associated with Australia and Southeast Asia while type G strains are more associated with cases of melioidosis in the Western Hemisphere. The purpose of the current study was to determine the in vitro and in vivo virulence profiles of the understudied Bpm type G strains Ca2009, Ca2013a, Mx2013, and 724644 and compared such phenotypes to the commonly studied Bpm type C strain K96243. We evaluated virulence by measuring invasion/uptake and survival of these Bpm strains in murine respiratory epithelial LA-4 cells and alveolar macrophage MH-S cells using different multiplicity of infections (MOIs of 1 and 10). We also calculated the lethal dose 50 values (LD50) in BALB/c mice that were inoculated intranasally with either Ca2009, Ca2013a, or Mx2013. Overall, the virulence and lethality phenotypes of Bpm type G strains were similar to the Bpm type C strain K96243. Additional comparative analyses between the Bpm ITS types may lead to a better understanding of the contribution of the ITS type to the epidemiology and ecology of Bpm strains.

  2. Comparison of the Sulfonamide Inhibition Profiles of the β- and γ-Carbonic Anhydrases from the Pathogenic Bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei

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    Daniela Vullo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We have cloned, purified, and characterized a β-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1, BpsCAβ, from the pathogenic bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, responsible for the tropical disease melioidosis. The enzyme showed high catalytic activity for the physiologic CO2 hydration reaction to bicarbonate and protons, with the following kinetic parameters: kcat of 1.6 × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM of 3.4 × 107 M−1 s−1. An inhibition study with a panel of 38 sulfonamides and one sulfamate—including 15 compounds that are used clinically—revealed an interesting structure–activity relationship for the interaction of this enzyme with these inhibitors. Many simple sulfonamides and clinically used agents such as topiramate, sulpiride, celecoxib, valdecoxib, and sulthiame were ineffective BpsCAβ inhibitors (KI > 50 µM. Other drugs, such as ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, brinzolamide, zonisamide, indisulam, and hydrochlorothiazide were moderately potent micromolar inhibitors. The best inhibition was observed with benzene-1,3-disulfonamides—benzolamide and its analogs acetazolamide and methazolamide—which showed KI in the range of 185–745 nM. The inhibition profile of BpsCAβ is very different from that of the γ-class enzyme from the same pathogen, BpsCAγ. Thus, identifying compounds that would effectively interact with both enzymes is relatively challenging. However, benzolamide was one of the best inhibitors of both of these CAs with KI of 653 and 185 nM, respectively, making it an interesting lead compound for the design of more effective agents, which may be useful tools for understanding the pathogenicity of this bacterium.

  3. Capsule influences the deposition of critical complement C3 levels required for the killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei via NADPH-oxidase induction by human neutrophils.

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    Michael E Woodman

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and is a major mediator of sepsis in its endemic areas. Because of the low LD(50 via aerosols and resistance to multiple antibiotics, it is considered a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC and APHIS. B. pseudomallei is an encapsulated bacterium that can infect, multiply, and persist within a variety of host cell types. In vivo studies suggest that macrophages and neutrophils are important for controlling B. pseudomallei infections, however few details are known regarding how neutrophils respond to these bacteria. Our goal is to describe the capacity of human neutrophils to control highly virulent B. pseudomallei compared to the relatively avirulent, acapsular B. thailandensis using in vitro analyses. B. thailandensis was more readily phagocytosed than B. pseudomallei, but both displayed similar rates of persistence within neutrophils, indicating they possess similar inherent abilities to escape neutrophil clearance. Serum opsonization studies showed that both were resistant to direct killing by complement, although B. thailandensis acquired significantly more C3 on its surface than B. pseudomallei, whose polysaccharide capsule significantly decreased the levels of complement deposition on the bacterial surface. Both Burkholderia species showed significantly enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils after critical levels of C3 were deposited. Serum-opsonized Burkholderia induced a significant respiratory burst by neutrophils compared to unopsonized bacteria, and neutrophil killing was prevented by inhibiting NADPH-oxidase. In summary, neutrophils can efficiently kill B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis that possess a critical threshold of complement deposition, and the relative differences in their ability to resist surface opsonization may contribute to the distinct virulence phenotypes observed in vivo.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of BipD, a virulence factor from Burkholderia pseudomallei

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    Knight, M. J.; Ruaux, A.; Mikolajek, H.; Erskine, P. T.; Gill, R.; Wood, S. P. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton SO16 7PX (United Kingdom); Wood, M. [Institute of Animal Health, Division of Environmental Microbiology, Institute for Animal Health, Compton Laboratory, Berkshire RG20 7NN (United Kingdom); Cooper, J. B., E-mail: j.b.cooper@soton.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton SO16 7PX (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-01

    BipD is likely to be a component of a type-III protein secretion system (TTSS) in B. pseudomallei. Native and selenomethionyl-BipD proteins have been expressed and crystals have been obtained which diffract to 2.1 Å. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, possesses a protein-secretion apparatus that is similar to those found in Salmonella and Shigella. A major function of these secretion systems is to secrete virulence-associated proteins into target cells of the host organism. The BipD gene of B. pseudomallei encodes a secreted virulence factor that is similar in sequence and most likely functionally analogous to IpaD from Shigella and SipD from Salmonella. Thus, the BipD protein is likely to be a component of a type III protein-secretion system (TTSS) in B. pseudomallei. Proteins in the same class as BipD, such as IpaD and SipD, are thought to act as extracellular chaperones to help the hydrophobic translocator proteins enter the target cell membrane, where they form a pore and might even link the translocon pore with the secretion needle. There is evidence that the translocator proteins also bind an integrin which stimulates actin-mediated insertion of the bacterium into the host-cell membrane. Native BipD has been crystallized in a monoclinic crystal form that diffracts X-rays to 2.5 Å resolution. BipD protein which incorporates selenomethionine (SeMet-BipD) has also been expressed and forms crystals which diffract to a higher resolution of 2.1 Å.

  5. Inflammasome-dependent pyroptosis and IL-18 protect against Burkholderia pseudomallei lung infection while IL-1β is deleterious.

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    Ivonne Ceballos-Olvera

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects macrophages and other cell types and causes melioidosis. The interaction of B. pseudomallei with the inflammasome and the role of pyroptosis, IL-1β, and IL-18 during melioidosis have not been investigated in detail. Here we show that the Nod-like receptors (NLR NLRP3 and NLRC4 differentially regulate pyroptosis and production of IL-1β and IL-18 and are critical for inflammasome-mediated resistance to melioidosis. In vitro production of IL-1β by macrophages or dendritic cells infected with B. pseudomallei was dependent on NLRC4 and NLRP3 while pyroptosis required only NLRC4. Mice deficient in the inflammasome components ASC, caspase-1, NLRC4, and NLRP3, were dramatically more susceptible to lung infection with B. pseudomallei than WT mice. The heightened susceptibility of Nlrp3⁻/⁻ mice was due to decreased production of IL-18 and IL-1β. In contrast, Nlrc4⁻/⁻ mice produced IL-1β and IL-18 in higher amount than WT mice and their high susceptibility was due to decreased pyroptosis and consequently higher bacterial burdens. Analyses of IL-18-deficient mice revealed that IL-18 is essential for survival primarily because of its ability to induce IFNγ production. In contrast, studies using IL-1RI-deficient mice or WT mice treated with either IL-1β or IL-1 receptor agonist revealed that IL-1β has deleterious effects during melioidosis. The detrimental role of IL-1β appeared to be due, in part, to excessive recruitment of neutrophils to the lung. Because neutrophils do not express NLRC4 and therefore fail to undergo pyroptosis, they may be permissive to B. pseudomallei intracellular growth. Administration of neutrophil-recruitment inhibitors IL-1ra or the CXCR2 neutrophil chemokine receptor antagonist antileukinate protected Nlrc4⁻/⁻ mice from lethal doses of B. pseudomallei and decreased systemic dissemination of bacteria. Thus, the NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes have

  6. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Sputum using Selective Enrichment Broth and Ashdown’s Medium at Kampong Cham Provincial Hospital, Cambodia [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5e9

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    Somary Nhem

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis, infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is increasingly reported in Cambodia. We hypothesized that implementation of an enhanced sputum testing protocol in a provincial hospital diagnostic microbiology laboratory would increase detection of B. pseudomallei. We tested 241 sputum specimens that were deemed acceptable for culture, comparing culture in selective enrichment broth followed by sub-culture on Ashdown’s medium to standard culture methods. Two specimens (0.8% were positive for B. pseudomallei using the enhanced protocol whereas one specimen (0.4% was positive using standard methods. Given the low numbers of positive specimens, we could not conclusively determine the utility of the enhanced sputum testing protocol. However, the ramifications of identification of B. pseudomallei are substantial, and the benefit of the enhanced testing protocol may be more apparent in patients selected based on risk factors and clinical presentation. Promoting clinician awareness of the infection and encouraging utilization of diagnostic microbiology services are also likely to be important factors in facilitating identification of melioidosis.

  7. Antibodies against In Vivo-Expressed Antigens Are Sufficient To Protect against Lethal Aerosol Infection with Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Shawn M; Dyke, Jeremy S; Jelesijevic, Tomislav P; Michel, Frank; Lafontaine, Eric R; Hogan, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei, a facultative intracellular bacterium and tier 1 biothreat, causes the fatal zoonotic disease glanders. The organism possesses multiple genes encoding autotransporter proteins, which represent important virulence factors and targets for developing countermeasures in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. In the present study, we investigated one of these autotransporters, BatA, and demonstrate that it displays lipolytic activity, aids in intracellular survival, is expressed in vivo, elicits production of antibodies during infection, and contributes to pathogenicity in a mouse aerosol challenge model. A mutation in the batA gene of wild-type strain ATCC 23344 was found to be particularly attenuating, as BALB/c mice infected with the equivalent of 80 median lethal doses cleared the organism. This finding prompted us to test the hypothesis that vaccination with the batA mutant strain elicits protective immunity against subsequent infection with wild-type bacteria. We discovered that not only does vaccination provide high levels of protection against lethal aerosol challenge with B. mallei ATCC 23344, it also protects against infection with multiple isolates of the closely related organism and causative agent of melioidosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei Passive-transfer experiments also revealed that the protective immunity afforded by vaccination with the batA mutant strain is predominantly mediated by IgG antibodies binding to antigens expressed exclusively in vivo Collectively, our data demonstrate that BatA is a target for developing medical countermeasures and that vaccination with a mutant lacking expression of the protein provides a platform to gain insights regarding mechanisms of protective immunity against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei, including antigen discovery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Toll-like receptor 2 impairs host defense in gram-negative sepsis caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (Melioidosis.

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    W Joost Wiersinga

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are essential in host defense against pathogens by virtue of their capacity to detect microbes and initiate the immune response. TLR2 is seen as the most important receptor for gram-positive bacteria, while TLR4 is regarded as the gram-negative TLR. Melioidosis is a severe infection caused by the gram-negative bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei, that is endemic in Southeast Asia. We aimed to characterize the expression and function of TLRs in septic melioidosis.Patient studies: 34 patients with melioidosis demonstrated increased expression of CD14, TLR1, TLR2, and TLR4 on the cell surfaces of monocytes and granulocytes, and increased CD14, TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, LY96 (also known as MD-2, TLR5, and TLR10 mRNA levels in purified monocytes and granulocytes when compared with healthy controls. In vitro experiments: Whole-blood and alveolar macrophages obtained from TLR2 and TLR4 knockout (KO mice were less responsive to B. pseudomallei in vitro, whereas in the reverse experiment, transfection of HEK293 cells with either TLR2 or TLR4 rendered these cells responsive to this bacterium. In addition, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS of B. pseudomallei signals through TLR2 and not through TLR4. Mouse studies: Surprisingly, TLR4 KO mice were indistinguishable from wild-type mice with respect to bacterial outgrowth and survival in experimentally induced melioidosis. In contrast, TLR2 KO mice displayed a markedly improved host defenses as reflected by a strong survival advantage together with decreased bacterial loads, reduced lung inflammation, and less distant-organ injury.Patients with melioidosis displayed an up-regulation of multiple TLRs in peripheral blood monocytes and granulocytes. Although both TLR2 and TLR4 contribute to cellular responsiveness to B. pseudomallei in vitro, TLR2 detects the LPS of B. pseudomallei, and only TLR2 impacts on the immune response of the intact host in vivo. Inhibition of TLR2 may be a novel treatment

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei Evades Nramp1 (Slc11a1- and NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Killing in Macrophages and Exhibits Nramp1-Dependent Virulence Gene Expression

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    Veerachat Muangsombut

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial survival in macrophages can be affected by the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1; also known as solute carrier family 11 member a1 or Slc11a1 which localizes to phagosome membranes and transports divalent cations, including iron. Little is known about the role of Nramp1 in Burkholderia infection, in particular whether this differs for pathogenic species like Burkholderia pseudomallei causing melioidosis or non-pathogenic species like Burkholderia thailandensis. Here we show that transfected macrophages stably expressing wild-type Nramp1 (Nramp1+ control the net replication of B. thailandensis, but not B. pseudomallei. Control of B. thailandensis was associated with increased cytokine responses, and could be abrogated by blocking NADPH oxidase-mediated production of reactive oxygen species but not by blocking generation of reactive nitrogen species. The inability of Nramp1+ macrophages to control B. pseudomallei was associated with rapid escape of bacteria from phagosomes, as indicated by decreased co-localization with LAMP1 compared to B. thailandensis. A B. pseudomallei bipB mutant impaired in escape from phagosomes was controlled to a greater extent than the parent strain in Nramp1+ macrophages, but was also attenuated in Nramp1− cells. Consistent with reduced escape from phagosomes, B. thailandensis formed fewer multinucleated giant cells in Nramp1+ macrophages at later time points compared to B. pseudomallei. B. pseudomallei exhibited elevated transcription of virulence-associated genes of Type VI Secretion System cluster 1 (T6SS-1, the Bsa Type III Secretion System (T3SS-3 and the bimA gene required for actin-based motility in Nramp1+ macrophages. Nramp1+ macrophages were found to contain decreased iron levels that may impact on expression of such genes. Our data show that B. pseudomallei is able to evade Nramp1- and NADPH oxidase-mediated killing in macrophages and that expression of virulence

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

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    Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, Jeollabuk 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyoung-Hee [Department of Oral Microbiology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeollabuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon, E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.k [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, Jeollabuk 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D{sub 10} values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased (P<0.05) as irradiation dose increased, and no differences (P>=0.05) in cell counts of the bacteria were observed among different levels of NaCl and pH. D{sub 10} values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D10 values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased ( P<0.05) as irradiation dose increased, and no differences ( P≥0.05) in cell counts of the bacteria were observed among different levels of NaCl and pH. D10 values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  12. Construction and characterization of stable, constitutively expressed, chromosomal green and red fluorescent transcriptional fusions in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Bangar, Hansraj; Saldanha, Roland; Pemberton, Adin; Aronow, Bruce; Dean, Gary E; Lamkin, Thomas J; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    Here, we constructed stable, chromosomal, constitutively expressed, green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and RFP) as reporters in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Using bioinformatic approaches and other experimental analyses, we identified P0253 and P1 as potent promoters that drive the optimal expression of fluorescent reporters in single copy in B. anthracis and Burkholderia spp. as well as their surrogate strains, respectively. In comparison, Y. pestis and its surrogate strain need two chromosomal copies of cysZK promoter (P2cysZK) for optimal fluorescence. The P0253-, P2cysZK-, and P1-driven GFP and RFP fusions were first cloned into the vectors pRP1028, pUC18R6KT-mini-Tn7T-Km, pmini-Tn7-gat, or their derivatives. The resultant constructs were delivered into the respective surrogates and subsequently into the select agent strains. The chromosomal GFP- and RFP-tagged strains exhibited bright fluorescence at an exposure time of less than 200 msec and displayed the same virulence traits as their wild-type parental strains. The utility of the tagged strains was proven by the macrophage infection assays and lactate dehydrogenase release analysis. Such strains will be extremely useful in high-throughput screens for novel compounds that could either kill these organisms, or interfere with critical virulence processes in these important bioweapon agents and during infection of alveolar macrophages. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genome-scale analysis of the genes that contribute to Burkholderia pseudomallei biofilm formation identifies a crucial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene cluster.

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    Grace I Borlee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is an important public health threat due to limited therapeutic options for treatment. Efforts to improve therapeutics for B. pseudomallei infections are dependent on the need to understand the role of B. pseudomallei biofilm formation and its contribution to antibiotic tolerance and persistence as these are bacterial traits that prevent effective therapy. In order to reveal the genes that regulate and/or contribute to B. pseudomallei 1026b biofilm formation, we screened a sequence defined two-allele transposon library and identified 118 transposon insertion mutants that were deficient in biofilm formation. These mutants include transposon insertions in genes predicted to encode flagella, fimbriae, transcriptional regulators, polysaccharides, and hypothetical proteins. Polysaccharides are key constituents of biofilms and B. pseudomallei has the capacity to produce a diversity of polysaccharides, thus there is a critical need to link these biosynthetic genes with the polysaccharides they produce to better understand their biological role during infection. An allelic exchange deletion mutant of the entire B. pseudomallei biofilm-associated exopolysaccharide biosynthetic cluster was decreased in biofilm formation and produced a smooth colony morphology suggestive of the loss of exopolysaccharide production. Conversely, deletion of the previously defined capsule I polysaccharide biosynthesis gene cluster increased biofilm formation. Bioinformatics analyses combined with immunoblot analysis and glycosyl composition studies of the partially purified exopolysaccharide indicate that the biofilm-associated exopolysaccharide is neither cepacian nor the previously described acidic exopolysaccharide. The biofilm-associated exopolysaccharide described here is also specific to the B. pseudomallei complex of bacteria. Since this novel exopolysaccharide biosynthesis cluster is retained in B. mallei

  14. In vitro activities of amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, ceftazidime, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole against biofilm of Brazilian strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Moreira, Camila Alencar; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Neto, Manoel Paiva de Araújo; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Rodrigues, Terezinha de Jesus Santos; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed at investigating the in vitro activities of amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, ceftazidime, imipenem, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole against Burkholderia pseudomallei in planktonic and biofilm forms, through broth microdilution and resazurin-based viability staining, respectively. In planktonic growth, the strains were susceptible to the drugs, while in biofilm growth, significantly higher antimicrobial concentrations were required, especially for ceftazidime and imipenem, surpassing the resistance breakpoints. These results highlight the importance of the routine evaluation of biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility.

  15. Production and characterization of chimeric monoclonal antibodies against Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei using the DHFR expression system.

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    Hyung-Yong Kim

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP and B. mallei (BM are closely related gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacteria which cause life-threatening melioidosis in human and glanders in horse, respectively. Our laboratory has previously generated and characterized more than 100 mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against BP and BM, according to in vitro and in vivo assay. In this study, 3 MAbs (BP7 10B11, BP7 2C6, and BP1 7F7 were selected to develop into chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibodies (cMAbs against BP and/or BM. For the stable production of cMAbs, we constructed 4 major different vector systems with a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR amplification marker, and optimized transfection/selection conditions in mammalian host cells with the single-gene and/or double-gene expression system. These 3 cMAbs were stably produced by the DHFR double mutant Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO-DG44 cells. By ELISA and Western blot analysis using whole bacterial antigens treated by heat (65°C/90 min, sodium periodate, and proteinase K, the cMAb BP7 10B11 (cMAb CK1 reacted with glycoproteins (34, 38, 48 kDa in BP; 28, 38, 48 kDa in BM. The cMAb BP7 2C6 (cMAb CK2 recognized surface-capsule antigens with molecular sizes of 38 to 52 kDa, and 200 kDa in BM. The cMAb CK2 was weakly reactive to 14∼28, 200 kDa antigens in BP. The cMAb BP1 7F7 (cMAb CK3 reacted with lipopolysaccharides (38∼52 kDa in BP; 38∼60 kDa in B. thailandensis. Western blot results with the outer surface antigens of the 3 Burkholderia species were consistent with results with the whole Burkholderia cell antigens, suggesting that these immunodominant antigens reacting with the 3 cMAbs were primarily present on the outer surface of the Burkholderia species. These 3 cMAbs would be useful for analyzing the role of the major outer surface antigens in Burkholderia infection.

  16. Production and characterization of chimeric monoclonal antibodies against Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei using the DHFR expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Yong; Tsai, Shien; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Wear, Douglas J; Izadjoo, Mina J

    2011-05-09

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP) and B. mallei (BM) are closely related gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacteria which cause life-threatening melioidosis in human and glanders in horse, respectively. Our laboratory has previously generated and characterized more than 100 mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against BP and BM, according to in vitro and in vivo assay. In this study, 3 MAbs (BP7 10B11, BP7 2C6, and BP1 7F7) were selected to develop into chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibodies (cMAbs) against BP and/or BM. For the stable production of cMAbs, we constructed 4 major different vector systems with a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) amplification marker, and optimized transfection/selection conditions in mammalian host cells with the single-gene and/or double-gene expression system. These 3 cMAbs were stably produced by the DHFR double mutant Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO)-DG44 cells. By ELISA and Western blot analysis using whole bacterial antigens treated by heat (65°C/90 min), sodium periodate, and proteinase K, the cMAb BP7 10B11 (cMAb CK1) reacted with glycoproteins (34, 38, 48 kDa in BP; 28, 38, 48 kDa in BM). The cMAb BP7 2C6 (cMAb CK2) recognized surface-capsule antigens with molecular sizes of 38 to 52 kDa, and 200 kDa in BM. The cMAb CK2 was weakly reactive to 14∼28, 200 kDa antigens in BP. The cMAb BP1 7F7 (cMAb CK3) reacted with lipopolysaccharides (38∼52 kDa in BP; 38∼60 kDa in B. thailandensis). Western blot results with the outer surface antigens of the 3 Burkholderia species were consistent with results with the whole Burkholderia cell antigens, suggesting that these immunodominant antigens reacting with the 3 cMAbs were primarily present on the outer surface of the Burkholderia species. These 3 cMAbs would be useful for analyzing the role of the major outer surface antigens in Burkholderia infection.

  17. Role of Burkholderia pseudomallei Sigma N2 in Amino Acids Utilization and in Regulation of Catalase E Expression at the Transcriptional Level

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    Duong Thi Hong Diep

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis. The complete genome sequences of this pathogen have been revealed, which explain some pathogenic mechanisms. In various hostile conditions, for example, during nitrogen and amino acid starvation, bacteria can utilize alternative sigma factors such as RpoS and RpoN to modulate genes expression for their adaptation and survival. In this study, we demonstrate that mutagenesis of rpoN2, which lies on chromosome 2 of B. pseudomallei and encodes a homologue of the sigma factor RpoN, did not alter nitrogen and amino acid utilization of the bacterium. However, introduction of B. pseudomallei rpoN2 into E. coli strain deficient for rpoN restored the ability to utilize amino acids. Moreover, comparative partial proteomic analysis of the B. pseudomallei wild type and its rpoN2 isogenic mutant was performed to elucidate its amino acids utilization property which was comparable to its function found in the complementation assay. By contrast, the rpoN2 mutant exhibited decreased katE expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Our finding indicates that B. pseudomallei RpoN2 is involved in a specific function in the regulation of catalase E expression.

  18. Paravertebral Abscess Caused by Bukholderia Pseudomallei in

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    S Ahmad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A 53-year-old Malay man was admitted with intestinal obstruction, fever and lower limb weakness. Initial clinical impression was myelitis causing paralytic ilues and paraperesis. Blood culture showed Burkholderia pseudomallei infection and subsequent MRI showed paravertebral abscess. This case highlights a rare manifestation of melioidosis involving the spine and difficulties in establishing the diagnosis.

  19. Production of a Recombinant Vaccine Candidate against Burkholderia pseudomallei Exploiting the Bacterial N-Glycosylation Machinery

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    Fatima eGarcia-Quintanilla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines developing immune responses towards surface carbohydrates conjugated to proteins are effective in preventing infection and death by bacterial pathogens. Traditional production of these vaccines utilizes complex synthetic chemistry to acquire and conjugate the glycan to a protein. However, glycoproteins produced by bacterial protein glycosylation systems are significantly easier to produce, and could possible be used as vaccine candidates. In this work we functionally expressed the B. pseudomallei O polysaccharide (OPS II, the C. jejuni oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase, and a suitable glycoprotein (AcrA in a designer E. coli strain with a higher efficiency for production of glycoconjugates. We were able to produce and purify the OPS II-AcrA glycoconjugate, and MS analysis confirmed correct glycan was produced and attached. We observed the attachment of the O-acetylated deoxyhexose directly to the acceptor protein, which expands the range of substrates utilized by the OTase PglB. Injection of the glycoprotein into mice generated an IgG immune response against B. pseudomallei, and this response was partially protective against an intranasal challenge. Our experiments show that bacterial engineered glycoconjugates can be utilized as vaccine candidates against B. pseudomallei. Additionally, our new E. coli strain SDB1 is more efficient in glycoprotein production, and could have additional applications in the future.

  20. Population-Sequencing as a Biomarker of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei Evolution through Microbial Forensic Analysis

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    John P. Jakupciak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genomics projects are identifying biomarkers to detect human disease. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are two closely related select agents that cause melioidosis and glanders. Accurate characterization of metagenomic samples is dependent on accurate measurements of genetic variation between isolates with resolution down to strain level. Often single biomarker sensitivity is augmented by use of multiple or panels of biomarkers. In parallel with single biomarker validation, advances in DNA sequencing enable analysis of entire genomes in a single run: population-sequencing. Potentially, direct sequencing could be used to analyze an entire genome to serve as the biomarker for genome identification. However, genome variation and population diversity complicate use of direct sequencing, as well as differences caused by sample preparation protocols including sequencing artifacts and mistakes. As part of a Department of Homeland Security program in bacterial forensics, we examined how to implement whole genome sequencing (WGS analysis as a judicially defensible forensic method for attributing microbial sample relatedness; and also to determine the strengths and limitations of whole genome sequence analysis in a forensics context. Herein, we demonstrate use of sequencing to provide genetic characterization of populations: direct sequencing of populations.

  1. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsule Exacerbates Respiratory Melioidosis but Does Not Afford Protection against Antimicrobial Signaling or Bacterial Killing in Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells.

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    Dando, Samantha J; Ipe, Deepak S; Batzloff, Michael; Sullivan, Matthew J; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael; Strong, Emily; Kyan, Stephanie; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James; Beacham, Ifor R; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-07-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often severe infection that regularly involves respiratory disease following inhalation exposure. Intranasal (i.n.) inoculation of mice represents an experimental approach used to study the contributions of bacterial capsular polysaccharide I (CPS I) to virulence during acute disease. We used aerosol delivery of B. pseudomallei to establish respiratory infection in mice and studied CPS I in the context of innate immune responses. CPS I improved B. pseudomallei survival in vivo and triggered multiple cytokine responses, neutrophil infiltration, and acute inflammatory histopathology in the spleen, liver, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, and olfactory mucosa (OM). To further explore the role of the OM response to B. pseudomallei infection, we infected human olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in vitro and measured bacterial invasion and the cytokine responses induced following infection. Human OECs killed >90% of the B. pseudomallei in a CPS I-independent manner and exhibited an antibacterial cytokine response comprising granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and several regulatory cytokines. In-depth genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of the OEC response by RNA-Seq revealed a network of signaling pathways activated in OECs following infection involving a novel group of 378 genes that encode biological pathways controlling cellular movement, inflammation, immunological disease, and molecular transport. This represents the first antimicrobial program to be described in human OECs and establishes the extensive transcriptional defense network accessible in these cells. Collectively, these findings show a role for CPS I in B. pseudomallei survival in vivo following inhalation infection and the antibacterial signaling network that exists in human OM and OECs. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. A genomic survey of positive selection in Burkholderia pseudomallei provides insights into the evolution of accidental virulence.

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    Tannistha Nandi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain environmental microorganisms can cause severe human infections, even in the absence of an obvious requirement for transition through an animal host for replication ("accidental virulence". To understand this process, we compared eleven isolate genomes of Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp, a tropical soil microbe and causative agent of the human and animal disease melioidosis. We found evidence for the existence of several new genes in the Bp reference genome, identifying 282 novel genes supported by at least two independent lines of supporting evidence (mRNA transcripts, database homologs, and presence of ribosomal binding sites and 81 novel genes supported by all three lines. Within the Bp core genome, 211 genes exhibited significant levels of positive selection (4.5%, distributed across many cellular pathways including carbohydrate and secondary metabolism. Functional experiments revealed that certain positively selected genes might enhance mammalian virulence by interacting with host cellular pathways or utilizing host nutrients. Evolutionary modifications improving Bp environmental fitness may thus have indirectly facilitated the ability of Bp to colonize and survive in mammalian hosts. These findings improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of melioidosis, and establish Bp as a model system for studying the genetics of accidental virulence.

  3. Differential MicroRNA Analyses of Burkholderia pseudomallei- and Francisella tularensis-Exposed hPBMCs Reveal Potential Biomarkers

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    Regina Z. Cer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in the immune response against infectious agents suggests that miRNA might be exploitable as signatures of exposure to specific infectious agents. In order to identify potential early miRNA biomarkers of bacterial infections, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs were exposed to two select agents, Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 and Francisella tularensis SHU S4, as well as to the nonpathogenic control Escherichia coli DH5α. RNA samples were harvested at three early time points, 30, 60, and 120 minutes postexposure, then sequenced. RNAseq analyses identified 87 miRNAs to be differentially expressed (DE in a linear fashion. Of these, 31 miRNAs were tested using the miScript miRNA qPCR assay. Through RNAseq identification and qPCR validation, we identified differentially expressed miRNA species that may be involved in the early response to bacterial infections. Based upon its upregulation at early time points postexposure in two different individuals, hsa-mir-30c-5p is a miRNA species that could be studied further as a potential biomarker for exposure to these gram-negative intracellular pathogens. Gene ontology functional analyses demonstrated that programmed cell death is the first ranking biological process associated with miRNAs that are upregulated in F. tularensis-exposed hPBMCs.

  4. Redefining the PF06864 Pfam family based on Burkholderia pseudomallei PilO2(Bp S-SAD crystal structure.

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    Patricia Lassaux

    Full Text Available Type IV pili are surface-exposed filaments and bacterial virulence factors, represented by the Tfpa and Tfpb types, which assemble via specific machineries. The Tfpb group is further divided into seven variants, linked to heterogeneity in the assembly machineries. Here we focus on PilO2(Bp, a protein component of the Tfpb R64 thin pilus variant assembly machinery from the pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei. PilO2(Bp belongs to the PF06864 Pfam family, for which an improved definition is presented based on newly derived Hidden Markov Model (HMM profiles. The 3D structure of the N-terminal domain of PilO2(Bp (N-PilO2(Bp, here reported, is the first structural representative of the PF06864 family. N-PilO2(Bp presents an actin-like ATPase fold that is shown to be present in BfpC, a different variant assembly protein; the new HMM profiles classify BfpC as a PF06864 member. Our results provide structural insight into the PF06864 family and on the Type IV pili assembly machinery.

  5. Nasal-associated lymphoid tissue and olfactory epithelium as portals of entry for Burkholderia pseudomallei in murine melioidosis.

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    Owen, Suzzanne J; Batzloff, Michael; Chehrehasa, Fatemeh; Meedeniya, Adrian; Casart, Yveth; Logue, Carie-Anne; Hirst, Robert G; Peak, Ian R; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Beacham, Ifor R

    2009-06-15

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is generally considered to be acquired via inhalation of dust or water droplets from the environment. In this study, we show that infection of the nasal mucosa is potentially an important portal of entry in melioidosis. After intranasal inoculation of mice, infection was monitored by bioluminescence imaging and by immunohistological analysis of coronal sections. The bacterial loads in organ and tissue specimens were also monitored. Bioluminescence imaging showed colonization and replication in the nasal cavity, including the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Analysis of coronal sections and immunofluorescence microscopy further demonstrated the presence of infection in the respiratory epithelium and the olfactory epithelium (including associated nerve bundles), as well as in the NALT. Of significance, the olfactory epithelium and the brain were rapidly infected before bacteria were detected in blood, and a capsule-deficient mutant infected the brain without significantly infecting blood. These data suggest that the olfactory nerve is the route of entry into the brain and that this route of entry may be paralleled in cases of human neurologic melioidosis. This study focuses attention on the upper respiratory tract as a portal of entry, specifically focusing on NALT as a route for the development of systemic infection via the bloodstream and on the olfactory epithelium as a direct route to the brain.

  6. Structural characterization of the Ser324Thr variant of the catalase-peroxidase (KatG) from Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Deemagarn, Taweewat; Carpena, Xavier; Singh, Rahul; Wiseman, Ben; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2005-01-07

    The Ser315Thr variant of the catalase-peroxidase KatG from Mycobacterium tuberculosis imparts resistance to the pro-drug isonicotinic acid hydrazide (isoniazid) through a failure to convert it to the active drug, isonicotinoyl-NAD. The equivalent variant in KatG from Burkholderia pseudomallei, Ser324Thr, has been constructed, revealing catalase and peroxidase activities that are similar to those of the native enzyme. The other activities of the variant protein, including the NADH oxidase, the isoniazid hydrazinolysis and isonicotinoyl-NAD synthase activities are reduced by 60-70%. The crystal structure of the variant differs from that of the native enzyme in having the methyl group of Thr324 situated in the entrance channel to the heme cavity, in a modified water matrix in the entrance channel and heme cavity, in lacking the putative perhydroxy modification on the heme, in the multiple locations of a few side-chains, and in the presence of an apparent perhydroxy modification on the indole nitrogen atom of the active-site Trp111. The position of the methyl group of Thr324 creates a constriction or narrowing of the channel leading to the heme cavity, providing an explanation for the lower reactivity towards isoniazid and the slower rate of isonicotinoyl-NAD synthesis.

  7. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Sputum using Selective Enrichment Broth and Ashdown’s Medium at Kampong Cham Provincial Hospital, Cambodia [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4w7

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    Somary Nhem

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis infection, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is increasingly reported in Cambodia. We hypothesized that implementation of an enhanced sputum testing protocol in a provincial hospital diagnostic microbiology laboratory would increase detection of B. pseudomallei. We tested 241 sputum specimens that were deemed acceptable for culture, comparing culture in selective enrichment broth followed by sub-culture on Ashdown’s medium to standard culture methods. Two specimens (0.8% were positive for B. pseudomallei using the enhanced protocol whereas one specimen (0.4% was positive using standard methods. These findings demonstrate that B. pseudomallei is rarely detected in sputum at this hospital. The low frequency of B. pseudomallei in sputum specimens precludes drawing any conclusions about the relative benefits of an enhanced sputum testing protocol at this site. Promoting clinician awareness of the infection and encouraging utilization of diagnostic microbiology services are likely to be important factors in facilitating identification of melioidosis.

  8. Characterization of the mrgRS locus of the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei: temperature regulates the expression of a two-component signal transduction system

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    Dance David AB

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a saprophyte in tropical environments and an opportunistic human pathogen. This versatility requires a sensing mechanism that allows the bacterium to respond rapidly to altered environmental conditions. We characterized a two-component signal transduction locus from B. pseudomallei 204, mrgR and mrgS, encoding products with extensive homology with response regulators and histidine protein kinases of Escherichia coli, Bordetella pertussis, and Vibrio cholerae. Results The locus was present and expressed in a variety of B. pseudomallei human and environmental isolates but was absent from other Burkholderia species, B. cepacia, B. cocovenenans, B. plantarii, B. thailandensis, B. vandii, and B. vietnamiensis. A 2128 bp sequence, including the full response regulator mrgR, but not the sensor kinase mrgS, was present in the B. mallei genome. Restriction fragment length polymorphism downstream from mrgRS showed two distinct groups were present among B. pseudomallei isolates. Our analysis of the open reading frames in this region of the genome revealed that transposase and bacteriophage activity may help explain this variation. MrgR and MrgS proteins were expressed in B. pseudomallei 204 cultured at different pH, salinity and temperatures and the expression was substantially reduced at 25°C compared with 37°C or 42°C but was mostly unaffected by pH or salinity, although at 25°C and 0.15% NaCl a small increase in MrgR expression was observed at pH 5. MrgR was recognized by antibodies in convalescent sera pooled from melioidosis patients. Conclusion The results suggest that mrgRS regulates an adaptive response to temperature that may be essential for pathogenesis, particularly during the initial phases of infection. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are very closely related species that differ in their capacity to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Modifications in this region of the genome may

  9. Hydrological connectivity and Burkholderia pseudomallei prevalence in wetland environments: investigating rice-farming community's risk of exposure to melioidosis in North-East Thailand.

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    Chuah, C Joon; Tan, Esther K H; Sermswan, Rasana W; Ziegler, Alan D

    2017-06-01

    In our analysis of 136 water samples from wetland environments (rice paddies, natural wetland sites, man-made water bodies) in rural areas of North-East Thailand, Burkholderia pseudomallei was most prevalent in rice paddies (15 of the 30 positive sites). The high prevalence in the water of rice fields is indicative of the inherent vulnerability of farmers in rural agricultural areas in this area of Thailand and likely other locations in the tropics. Nearly all B. pseudomallei-positive sites were found within the vicinity of a large wetland associated with the Chi River, in the month of July 2014. Positive samples were found in water ranging in pH from 5.9 to 8.7, salinity ranging from 0.04 to 1.58 ppt, nitrate ranging from 0 to 10.8 ppm, and iron ranging from 0.003 to 1.519 ppm. Of these variables, only iron content was statistically higher in B. pseudomallei-positive versus B. pseudomallei-negative sites, suggesting that increasing concentrations of iron may encourage the growth of this bacterium, which is responsible for melioidosis. Our results, when combined with data from other published studies, support the notion that B. pseudomallei can exist in a wide range of environmental conditions. Thus, we argue that health safety education is a more appropriate means of addressing farmer vulnerability than chemical or physical alterations to fields at large scales. Further, it may be important to investigate melioidosis through transdisciplinary approaches that consider the complex social and ecological contexts in which the disease occurs.

  10. Survey of innate immune responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei in human blood identifies a central role for lipopolysaccharide.

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    Narisara Chantratita

    Full Text Available B. pseudomallei is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the tropical infection melioidosis. In northeast Thailand, mortality from melioidosis approaches 40%. As exemplified by the lipopolysaccharide-Toll-like receptor 4 interaction, innate immune responses to invading bacteria are precipitated by activation of host pathogen recognition receptors by pathogen associated molecular patterns. Human melioidosis is characterized by up-regulation of pathogen recognition receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In contrast to many gram-negative pathogens, however, the lipopolysaccharide of B. pseudomallei is considered only weakly inflammatory. We conducted a study in 300 healthy Thai subjects to investigate the ex vivo human blood response to various bacterial pathogen associated molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharide from several bacteria, and to two heat-killed B. pseudomallei isolates. We measured cytokine levels after stimulation of fresh whole blood with a panel of stimuli. We found that age, sex, and white blood cell count modulate the innate immune response to B. pseudomallei. We further observed that, in comparison to other stimuli, the innate immune response to B. pseudomallei is most highly correlated with the response to lipopolysaccharide. The magnitude of cytokine responses induced by B. pseudomallei lipopolysaccharide was significantly greater than those induced by lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli and comparable to many responses induced by lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota despite lower amounts of lipid A in the B. pseudomallei lipopolysaccharide preparation. In human monocytes stimulated with B. pseudomallei, addition of polymyxin B or a TLR4/MD-2 neutralizing antibody inhibited the majority of TNF-α production. Challenging existing views, our data indicate that the innate immune response to B. pseudomallei in human blood is largely driven by lipopolysaccharide, and that the response to B

  11. Nitric oxide from IFNγ-primed macrophages modulates the antimicrobial activity of β-lactams against the intracellular pathogens Burkholderia pseudomallei and Nontyphoidal Salmonella.

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    Jessica Jones-Carson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Our investigations show that nonlethal concentrations of nitric oxide (NO abrogate the antibiotic activity of β-lactam antibiotics against Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli and nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. NO protects B. pseudomallei already exposed to β-lactams, suggesting that this diatomic radical tolerizes bacteria against the antimicrobial activity of this important class of antibiotics. The concentrations of NO that elicit antibiotic tolerance repress consumption of oxygen (O2, while stimulating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 synthesis. Transposon insertions in genes encoding cytochrome c oxidase-related functions and molybdenum assimilation confer B. pseudomallei a selective advantage against the antimicrobial activity of the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem. Cumulatively, these data support a model by which NO induces antibiotic tolerance through the inhibition of the electron transport chain, rather than by potentiating antioxidant defenses as previously proposed. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of terminal oxidases and nitrate reductases tolerizes aerobic and anaerobic bacteria to β-lactams. The degree of NO-induced β-lactam antibiotic tolerance seems to be inversely proportional to the proton motive force (PMF, and thus the dissipation of ΔH+ and ΔΨ electrochemical gradients of the PMF prevents β-lactam-mediated killing. According to this model, NO generated by IFNγ-primed macrophages protects intracellular Salmonella against imipenem. On the other hand, sublethal concentrations of imipenem potentiate the killing of B. pseudomallei by NO generated enzymatically from IFNγ-primed macrophages. Our investigations indicate that NO modulates the antimicrobial activity of β-lactam antibiotics.

  12. Spectroscopic and kinetic investigation of the reactions of peroxyacetic acid with Burkholderia pseudomallei catalase-peroxidase, KatG.

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    Ivancich, Anabella; Donald, Lynda J; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Wiseman, Ben; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2013-10-15

    Catalase-peroxidases or KatGs can utilize organic peroxyacids and peroxides instead of hydrogen peroxide to generate the high-valent ferryl-oxo intermediates involved in the catalase and peroxidase reactions. In the absence of peroxidatic one-electron donors, the ferryl intermediates generated with a low excess (10-fold) of peroxyacetic acid (PAA) slowly decay to the ferric resting state after several minutes, a reaction that is demonstrated in this work by both stopped-flow UV-vis absorption measurements and EPR spectroscopic characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei KatG (BpKatG). EPR spectroscopy showed that the [Fe(IV)═O Trp330(•+)], [Fe(IV)═O Trp139(•)], and [Fe(IV)═O Trp153(•)] intermediates of the peroxidase-like cycle of BpKatG ( Colin, J. Wiseman, B. Switala, J. Loewen, P. C. Ivancich, A. ( 2009 ) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131 , 8557 - 8563 ), formed with a low excess of PAA at low temperature, are also generated with a high excess (1000-fold) of PAA at room temperature. However, under high excess conditions, there is a rapid conversion to a persistent [Fe(IV)═O] intermediate. Analysis of tryptic peptides of BpKatG by mass spectrometry before and after treatment with PAA showed that specific tryptophan (including W330, W139, and W153), methionine (including Met264 of the M-Y-W adduct), and cysteine residues are either modified with one, two, or three oxygen atoms or could not be identified in the spectrum because of other undetermined modifications. It was concluded that these oxidized residues were the source of electrons used to reduce the excess of PAA to acetic acid and return the enzyme to the ferric state. Treatment of BpKatG with PAA also caused a loss of catalase activity towards certain substrates, consistent with oxidative disruption of the M-Y-W adduct, and a loss of peroxidase activity, consistent with accumulation of the [Fe(IV)═O] intermediate and the oxidative modification of the W330, W139, and W153. PAA, but not H2O2 or tert

  13. Structural characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei adenylate kinase (Adk): Profound asymmetry in the crystal structure of the 'open' state

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    Buchko, G.W.; Robinson, H.; Abendroth, J.; Staker, B. L.; Myler, P. J.

    2010-04-16

    In all organisms adenylate kinases (Adks) play a vital role in cellular energy metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis. Due to differences in catalytic properties between the Adks found in prokaryotes and in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes, there is interest in targeting this enzyme for new drug therapies against infectious bacterial agents. Here we report the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure for the 220-residue Adk from Burkholderia pseudomallei (BpAdk), the etiological agent responsible for the infectious disease melioidosis. The general structure of apo BpAdk is similar to other Adk structures, composed of a CORE subdomain with peripheral ATP-binding (ATP{sub bd}) and LID subdomains. The two molecules in the asymmetric unit have significantly different conformations, with a backbone RMSD of 1.46 {angstrom}. These two BpAdk conformations may represent 'open' Adk sub-states along the preferential pathway to the 'closed' substrate-bound state.

  14. PacBio But Not Illumina Technology Can Achieve Fast, Accurate and Complete Closure of the High GC, Complex Burkholderia pseudomallei Two-Chromosome Genome

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    Jade L. L. Teng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although PacBio third-generation sequencers have improved the read lengths of genome sequencing which facilitates the assembly of complete genomes, no study has reported success in using PacBio data alone to completely sequence a two-chromosome bacterial genome from a single library in a single run. Previous studies using earlier versions of sequencing chemistries have at most been able to finish bacterial genomes containing only one chromosome with de novo assembly. In this study, we compared the robustness of PacBio RS II, using one SMRT cell and the latest P6-C4 chemistry, with Illumina HiSeq 1500 in sequencing the genome of Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterium which contains two large circular chromosomes, very high G+C content of 68–69%, highly repetitive regions and substantial genomic diversity, and represents one of the largest and most complex bacterial genomes sequenced, using a reference genome generated by hybrid assembly using PacBio and Illumina datasets with subsequent manual validation. Results showed that PacBio data with de novo assembly, but not Illumina, was able to completely sequence the B. pseudomallei genome without any gaps or mis-assemblies. The two large contigs of the PacBio assembly aligned unambiguously to the reference genome, sharing >99.9% nucleotide identities. Conversely, Illumina data assembled using three different assemblers resulted in fragmented assemblies (201–366 contigs, sharing only 92.2–100% and 92.0–100% nucleotide identities to chromosomes I and II reference sequences, respectively, with no indication that the B. pseudomallei genome consisted of two chromosomes with four copies of ribosomal operons. Among all assemblies, the PacBio assembly recovered the highest number of core and virulence proteins, and housekeeping genes based on whole-genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST. Most notably, assembly solely based on PacBio outperformed even hybrid assembly using both PacBio and Illumina

  15. Development of hydrolysis probe-based real-time PCR for identification of virulent gene targets of Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei--a retrospective study on archival cases of service members with melioidosis and glanders.

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    Zhang, Binxue; Wear, Douglas J; Kim, H S; Weina, Peter; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Izadjoo, Mina

    2012-02-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are two highly pathogenic bacteria responsible for melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Our laboratory developed hydrolysis probe-based real-time polymerase chain reaction assays targeting type three secretion system (TTS) and transposase family protein (TFP) of B. pseudomallei and B. malli, respectively. The assays were validated for target specificity, amplification sensitivity, and reproducibility. A bacterial DNA panel, composed of B. pseudomallei (13 strains), B. mallei (11 strains), Burkholderia species close neighbors (5 strains), and other bacterial species (17 strains), was prepared for specificity testing. Reference DNAs from B. pseudomallei and B. mallei bacterial cultures were used as controls for amplification, limit of detection, and reproducibility testing. The two TaqMan assays, Bp-TTS 1 and Bm-TFP, were optimized and applied in a retrospective study of archived cases from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. We tested 10 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks originally from autopsy specimens of patients who died of melioidosis or glanders during or after overseas tours in 1960s. Polymerase chain reaction results confirmed that DNA samples from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks of eight patients with melioidosis were positive for Bp-TTS 1 target and two patients with glanders were positive for Bm-TFP target.

  16. Burkholderia Vaccines: Are We Moving Forward?

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    Leang-Chung eChoh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Burkholderia consists of diverse species which includes both ‘friends’ and ‘foes’. Some of the ‘friendly’ Burkholderia spp. are extensively used in the biotechnological and agricultural industry for bioremediation and biocontrol. However, several members of the genus including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. cepacia, are known to cause fatal disease in both humans and animals. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively, while B. cepacia infection is lethal to cystic fibrosis patients. Due to the high rate of infectivity and intrinsic resistance to many commonly used antibiotics, together with high mortality rate, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are considered to be potential biological warfare agents. Treatments of the infections caused by these bacteria are often unsuccessful with frequent relapse of the infection. Thus, we are at a crucial stage of the need for Burkholderia vaccines. Although the search for a prophylactic therapy candidate continues, to date development of vaccines has not advanced beyond research to human clinical trials. In this article, we review the current research on development of safe vaccines with high efficacy against B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. cepacia. It can be concluded that further research will enable elucidation of the potential benefits and risks of Burkholderia vaccines.

  17. Burkholderia vaccines: are we moving forward?

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    Choh, Leang-Chung; Ong, Guang-Han; Vellasamy, Kumutha M.; Kalaiselvam, Kaveena; Kang, Wen-Tyng; Al-Maleki, Anis R.; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2013-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia consists of diverse species which includes both “friends” and “foes.” Some of the “friendly” Burkholderia spp. are extensively used in the biotechnological and agricultural industry for bioremediation and biocontrol. However, several members of the genus including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. cepacia, are known to cause fatal disease in both humans and animals. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively, while B. cepacia infection is lethal to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Due to the high rate of infectivity and intrinsic resistance to many commonly used antibiotics, together with high mortality rate, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are considered to be potential biological warfare agents. Treatments of the infections caused by these bacteria are often unsuccessful with frequent relapse of the infection. Thus, we are at a crucial stage of the need for Burkholderia vaccines. Although the search for a prophylactic therapy candidate continues, to date development of vaccines has not advanced beyond research to human clinical trials. In this article, we review the current research on development of safe vaccines with high efficacy against B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. cepacia. It can be concluded that further research will enable elucidation of the potential benefits and risks of Burkholderia vaccines. PMID:23386999

  18. Use of the phytopathogenic effect for studies of Burkholderia virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanova, E V; Ageeva, N P

    2015-02-01

    The phytopathogenic effect of the pseudomallei group Burkholderia is demonstrated on the Peireskia aculeata model. A method for evaluation of the effect is suggested. The effect correlates with the levels of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia thailandensis virulence for laboratory animals. P. aculeata can be used as a model for preliminary studies of the virulence of the above species.

  19. Systematic mutagenesis of genes encoding predicted autotransported proteins of Burkholderia pseudomallei identifies factors mediating virulence in mice, net intracellular replication and a novel protein conferring serum resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie R Lazar Adler

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the severe tropical disease melioidosis, which commonly presents as sepsis. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome encodes eleven predicted autotransporters, a diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins often associated with virulence. In a systematic study of these autotransporters, we constructed insertion mutants in each gene predicted to encode an autotransporter and assessed them for three pathogenesis-associated phenotypes: virulence in the BALB/c intra-peritoneal mouse melioidosis model, net intracellular replication in J774.2 murine macrophage-like cells and survival in 45% (v/v normal human serum. From the complete repertoire of eleven autotransporter mutants, we identified eight mutants which exhibited an increase in median lethal dose of 1 to 2-log10 compared to the isogenic parent strain (bcaA, boaA, boaB, bpaA, bpaC, bpaE, bpaF and bimA. Four mutants, all demonstrating attenuation for virulence, exhibited reduced net intracellular replication in J774.2 macrophage-like cells (bimA, boaB, bpaC and bpaE. A single mutant (bpaC was identified that exhibited significantly reduced serum survival compared to wild-type. The bpaC mutant, which demonstrated attenuation for virulence and net intracellular replication, was sensitive to complement-mediated killing via the classical and/or lectin pathway. Serum resistance was rescued by in trans complementation. Subsequently, we expressed recombinant proteins of the passenger domain of four predicted autotransporters representing each of the phenotypic groups identified: those attenuated for virulence (BcaA, those attenuated for virulence and net intracellular replication (BpaE, the BpaC mutant with defects in virulence, net intracellular replication and serum resistance and those displaying wild-type phenotypes (BatA. Only BcaA and BpaE elicited a strong IFN-γ response in a restimulation assay using whole blood from seropositive donors

  20. Burkholderia stagnalis sp. nov. and Burkholderia territorii sp. nov., two novel Burkholderia cepacia complex species from environmental and human sources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Smet, Birgit; Mayo, Mark; Peeters, Charlotte; Zlosnik, James E A; Spilker, Theodore; Hird, Trevor J; LiPuma, John J; Kidd, Timothy J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Ginther, Jennifer L; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Bell, Scott C; Jacobs, Jan A; Currie, Bart J; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nine Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were isolated during environmental surveys for the ecological niche of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the aetiological agent of melioidosis, in the Northern Territory of Australia...

  1. Efflux pump-mediated drug resistance in Burkholderia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podnecky, Nicole L.; Rhodes, Katherine A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2015-01-01

    Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA, and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance. PMID:25926825

  2. Molecular signatures and phylogenomic analysis of the genus Burkholderia: proposal for division of this genus into the emended genus Burkholderia containing pathogenic organisms and a new genus Paraburkholderia gen. nov. harboring environmental species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawana, Amandeep; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia contains large number of diverse species which include many clinically important organisms, phytopathogens, as well as environmental species. However, currently, there is a paucity of biochemical or molecular characteristics which can reliably distinguish different groups of Burkholderia species. We report here the results of detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of 45 sequenced species of the genus Burkholderia. In phylogenetic trees based upon concatenated sequences for 21 conserved proteins as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence based trees, members of the genus Burkholderia grouped into two major clades. Within these main clades a number of smaller clades including those corresponding to the clinically important Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei groups were also clearly distinguished. Our comparative analysis of protein sequences from Burkholderia spp. has identified 42 highly specific molecular markers in the form of conserved sequence indels (CSIs) that are uniquely found in a number of well-defined groups of Burkholderia spp. Six of these CSIs are specific for a group of Burkholderia spp. (referred to as Clade I in this work) which contains all clinically relevant members of the genus (viz. the BCC and the B. pseudomallei group) as well as the phytopathogenic Burkholderia spp. The second main clade (Clade II), which is composed of environmental Burkholderia species, is also distinguished by 2 identified CSIs that are specific for this group. Additionally, our work has also identified multiple CSIs that serve to clearly demarcate a number of smaller groups of Burkholderia spp. including 3 CSIs that are specific for the B. cepacia complex, 4 CSIs that are uniquely found in the B. pseudomallei group, 5 CSIs that are specific for the phytopathogenic Burkholderia spp. and 22 other CSI that distinguish two groups within Clade II. The described molecular markers provide highly specific means for

  3. Molecular signatures and phylogenomic analysis of the genus Burkholderia: proposal for division of this genus into the emended genus Burkholderia containing pathogenic organisms and a new genus Paraburkholderia gen. nov. harboring environmental species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawana, Amandeep; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Gupta, Radhey S

    2014-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia contains large number of diverse species which include many clinically important organisms, phytopathogens, as well as environmental species. However, currently, there is a paucity of biochemical or molecular characteristics which can reliably distinguish different groups of Burkholderia species. We report here the results of detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of 45 sequenced species of the genus Burkholderia. In phylogenetic trees based upon concatenated sequences for 21 conserved proteins as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence based trees, members of the genus Burkholderia grouped into two major clades. Within these main clades a number of smaller clades including those corresponding to the clinically important Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei groups were also clearly distinguished. Our comparative analysis of protein sequences from Burkholderia spp. has identified 42 highly specific molecular markers in the form of conserved sequence indels (CSIs) that are uniquely found in a number of well-defined groups of Burkholderia spp. Six of these CSIs are specific for a group of Burkholderia spp. (referred to as Clade I in this work) which contains all clinically relevant members of the genus (viz. the BCC and the B. pseudomallei group) as well as the phytopathogenic Burkholderia spp. The second main clade (Clade II), which is composed of environmental Burkholderia species, is also distinguished by 2 identified CSIs that are specific for this group. Additionally, our work has also identified multiple CSIs that serve to clearly demarcate a number of smaller groups of Burkholderia spp. including 3 CSIs that are specific for the B. cepacia complex, 4 CSIs that are uniquely found in the B. pseudomallei group, 5 CSIs that are specific for the phytopathogenic Burkholderia spp. and 22 other CSI that distinguish two groups within Clade II. The described molecular markers provide highly specific means for

  4. Antibodies from Patients with Melioidosis Recognize Burkholderia mallei but Not Burkholderia thailandensis Antigens in the Indirect Hemagglutination Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Tiyawisutsri, Rachaneeporn; Peacock, Sharon J.; Langa, Sayan; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Allen C Cheng; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Chaowagul, Wipada; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn

    2005-01-01

    The indirect hemagglutination assay routinely used to detect antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei was modified to detect cross-reactivity of antibodies to B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis antigens. We demonstrate a lack of cross-reactivity between B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis but marked cross-reactivity between B. pseudomallei and B. mallei.

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of BipD, a component of the Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roversi, Pietro; Johnson, Steven [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Field, Terry [Division of Microbiology, Institute for Animal Health, Compton Laboratory, Berkshire RG20 7NN (United Kingdom); Deane, Janet E. [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Galyov, Edouard E. [Division of Microbiology, Institute for Animal Health, Compton Laboratory, Berkshire RG20 7NN (United Kingdom); Lea, Susan M., E-mail: susan.lea@biop.ox.ac.uk [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-01

    A construct consisting of residues 10–310 of mature BipD, a component of the B. pseudomallei type III secretion system, has been crystallized. Native BipD crystals and SeMet and K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} derivative crystals have undergone preliminary crystallographic analysis. A construct consisting of residues 10–310 of BipD, a component of the Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system (T3SS), has been overexpressed as a GST fusion, cleaved from the GST tag and purified. Crystals were grown of native and selenomethionine-labelled BipD. The crystals grow in two different polymorphs from the same condition. The first polymorph belongs to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.98, b = 122.79, c = 49.17 Å, a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.4 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} (47% solvent content) and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The second polymorph belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 136.47, b = 89.84, c = 50.15 Å, and a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} (45% solvent content) for two molecules per asymmetric unit (analysis of the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a weak twofold non-crystallographic symmetry axis in this P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 form). The native crystals of both forms give diffraction data to 2.7 Å resolution, while the SeMet-labelled P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 crystals diffract to 3.3 Å resolution. A K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} derivative of the P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 form was also obtained and data were collected to 2.7 Å with radiation of wavelength λ = 0.933 Å. The Pt-derivative anomalous difference Patterson map revealed two self-peaks on the Harker sections.

  6. Efflux Pump-mediated Drug Resistance in Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Podnecky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in B. cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance.

  7. Delineating the importance of serum opsonins and the bacterial capsule in affecting the uptake and killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei by murine neutrophils and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Mulye

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infection of susceptible hosts by the encapsulated Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp causes melioidosis, with septic patients attaining mortality rates ≥ 40%. Due to its high infectivity through inhalation and limited effective therapies, Bp is considered a potential bioweapon. Thus, there is great interest in identifying immune effectors that effectively kill Bp. Our goal is to compare the relative abilities of murine macrophages and neutrophils to clear Bp, as well as determine the importance of serum opsonins and bacterial capsule. Our findings indicate that murine macrophages and neutrophils are inherently unable to clear either unopsonized Bp or the relatively-avirulent acapsular bacterium B. thailandensis (Bt. Opsonization of Bp and Bt with complement or pathogen-specific antibodies increases macrophage-uptake, but does not promote clearance, although antibody-binding enhances complement deposition. In contrast, complement opsonization of Bp and Bt causes enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils, which is linked with rapid ROS induction against bacteria exhibiting a threshold level of complement deposition. Addition of bacteria-specific antibodies enhances complement deposition, but antibody-binding alone cannot elicit neutrophil clearance. Bp capsule provides some resistance to complement deposition, but is not anti-phagocytic or protective against reactive oxygen species (ROS-killing. Macrophages were observed to efficiently clear Bp only after pre-activation with IFNγ, which is independent of serum- and/or antibody-opsonization. These studies indicate that antibody-enhanced complement activation is sufficient for neutrophil-clearance of Bp, whereas macrophages are ineffective at clearing serum-opsonized Bp unless pre-activated with IFNγ. This suggests that effective immune therapies would need to elicit both antibodies and Th1-adaptive responses for successful prevention/eradication of melioidosis.

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei-derived miR-3473 enhances NF-κB via targeting TRAF3 and is associated with different inflammatory responses compared to Burkholderia thailandensis in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yao; Chen, Hai; Hu, Yi; Li, Qian; Hu, Zhiqiang; Ma, Tengfei; Mao, Xuhu

    2016-11-28

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of melioidosis, a kind of tropical disease. Burkholderia thailandensis (Bt), with a high sequence similarity to Bp, is thought to be an avirulent organism. Since there are numerous similarities between Bp and Bt, their differences in pathogenesis of host response and related mechanism are still undermined. In recent years, microRNAs have been researched in many diseases, but seldom involved in bacterial infection, bacteria-host interaction or explaining the differences between virulent and avirulent species. We found that Bp and Bt had similar phenotypes in terms of intracellular replication, dissemination (reflected by multinucleated giant cell formation), TNF-α release and apoptosis in RAW264.7 macrophages or TC-1 pulmonary cell but in different level. Especially, at the late infection phases (after 12 h post infection), Bp showed faster intracellular growth, stronger cytotoxicity, and higher TNF-α release. After microRNA array analysis, we found some microRNAs were significantly expressed in macrophages treated by Bp. miR-3473 was one of them specifically induced, but not significantly changed in Bt-treated macrophages. In addition, TargetScan suggested that miR-3473 possibly target TRAF3 (TNF receptor-associated factor 3), a well-known negative regulator of the NF-κB pathway, which was probably involved in the TNF-α induction and apoptosis in cells with Bp infection. In vivo, it was found that miR-3473 expression of total lungs cells from Bp-treated was higher than that from Bt-treated mice. And miR-3473 inhibitor was able to decrease the TNF-α release of mice and prolong the survival of mice with Bp infection. In sum, miR-3473 plays an important role in the differential pathogenicity of Bp and Bt via miR-3473-TRAF3-TNF-α network, and regulates TNF-α release, cell apoptosis and animal survival after Bp treatment. In this study, we have found a specific microRNA is related to bacterial virulence and

  9. Using real-time PCR to specifically detect Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Melanie P; Norwood, David A; Christensen, Deanna R; Ulrich, Ricky L

    2006-05-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of human and animal glanders and is a category B biothreat agent. Rapid diagnosis of B. mallei and immediate prophylactic treatment are essential for patient survival. The majority of current bacteriological and immunological techniques for identifying B. mallei from clinical samples are time-consuming, and cross-reactivity with closely related organisms (i.e. Burkholderia pseudomallei) is a problem. In this investigation, two B. mallei-specific real-time PCR assays targeting the B. mallei bimA(ma) gene (Burkholderia intracellular motility A; BMAA0749), which encodes a protein involved in actin polymerization, were developed. The PCR primer and probe sets were tested for specificity against a collection of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei isolates obtained from numerous clinical and environmental (B. pseudomallei only) sources. The assays were also tested for cross-reactivity using template DNA from 14 closely related Burkholderia species. The relative limit of detection for the assays was found to be 1 pg or 424 genome equivalents. The authors also analysed the applicability of assays to detect B. mallei within infected BALB/c mouse tissues. Beginning 1 h post aerosol exposure, B. mallei was successfully identified within the lungs, and starting at 24 h post exposure, in the spleen and liver. Surprisingly, B. mallei was not detected in the blood of acutely infected animals. This investigation provides two real-time PCR assays for the rapid and specific identification of B. mallei.

  10. In Vitro Susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei in Comparison to Those of Other Pathogenic Burkholderia spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, D. J.; Russell, P.; Rogers, D.; Eley, S M; Titball, R W

    1999-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities of isolates of Burkholderia mallei to 16 antibiotics were assessed and compared with the susceptibilities of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia cepacia. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of B. mallei resembled that of B. pseudomallei more closely than that of B. cepacia, which corresponds to their similarities in terms of biochemistry, antigenicity, and pathogenicity. Ceftazidime, imipenem, doxycycline, and ciprofloxacin were active agai...

  11. Characterization of integrons in Burkholderia cepacia clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Furlanis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the airways of Cystic Fibrosis (CF patients, frequently developing chronic infections. In 20% of cases these infections cause severe and poorly controlled pathological situations because of the intrinsic antibiotic resistance expressed by the microorganism. CF patients are often subjected to antibiotic therapy: this facilitates the acquisition of antibiotic resistance determinants by the infecting bacteria. Integrons are mobile genetic elements that are widespread in bacterial populations and favor the acquisition of gene cassettes coding for these determinants.The presence of class 1 integrons was investigated by PCR with primers specific for the 5’ and 3’ ends in Burkholderia isolates recovered from patients in treatment at the CF center of Friuli Venezia Giulia. The same integron, carrying an uncommon allelic form (Ib of the aacA4 gene in its cassette array and conferring resistance to some aminoglycosides, was found in two independent isolates (different RAPD profiles infecting two different patients. In both isolates the integron was carried by plasmids and was still present 3 and 6 years later the first finding. Despite the exchange of integrons between bacterial pathogens is fully described, these items were not frequently found in Burkholderia isolates. Although the clinical relevance of the integron we identified is low (a single gene cassette encoding a widespread resistance,we feel concerned that these genetic elements begin to circulate in this bacterial species, as this could make more and more troublesome the treatment of infections notoriously difficult to eradicate.

  12. Molecular Signatures and Phylogenomic Analysis of the Genus Burkholderia: Proposal for Division of this Genus into the Emended Genus Burkholderia Containing Pathogenic Organisms and a New Genus Paraburkholderia gen. nov. Harboring Environmental Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman eSawana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Burkholderia contains large number of diverse species which are not reliably distinguished by the available biochemical or molecular characteristics. We report here results of detailed phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of 45 sequenced species of the genus Burkholderia. In phylogenetic trees based upon concatenated sequences for 21 conserved proteins as well as 16S rRNA gene sequences, Burkholderia species grouped into two major clades. Within these main clades a number of smaller clades were also clearly distinguished. Our comparative analysis of protein sequences from Burkholderia spp. has identified 42 highly specific molecular markers in the form of conserved sequence indels (CSIs that are uniquely found in different clades of Burkholderia spp. Six of these CSIs are specific for a group of Burkholderia spp. (referred to as Clade I which contains all clinically relevant members of the genus as well as the phytopathogenic Burkholderia species. The second main clade (Clade II composed of the environmental Burkholderia species, is also distinguished by 2 of the identified CSIs. Additionally, our work has also identified 3 CSIs that are specific for the Burkholderia cepacia complex, 4 CSIs that are uniquely found in the Burkholderia pseudomallei group, 5 CSIs that are specific for the phytopathogenic Burkholderia spp. and 22 other CSI that distinguish two groups within Clade II. The described molecular markers provide highly specific means for the demarcation of different groups of Burkholderia spp. and for development of novel diagnostic assays for the clinically important members of the group. Based upon the results from different lines of studies, a division of the genus Burkholderia into two genera is proposed. In this new proposal, the emended genus Burkholderia will contain only the clinically relevant and phytopathogenic Burkholderia species, whereas all other Burkholderia spp. are transferred to a new genus

  13. The BpeAB-OprB efflux pump of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b does not play a role in quorum sensing, virulence factor production, or extrusion of aminoglycosides but is a broad-spectrum drug efflux system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mima, Takehiko; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2010-08-01

    Most Burkholderia pseudomallei strains are intrinsically aminoglycoside resistant, mainly due to AmrAB-OprA-mediated efflux. Rare naturally occurring or genetically engineered mutants lacking this pump are aminoglycoside susceptible despite the fact that they also encode and express BpeAB-OprB, which was reported to mediate efflux of aminoglycosides in the Singapore strain KHW. To reassess the role of BpeAB-OprB in B. pseudomallei aminoglycoside resistance, we used mutants overexpressing or lacking this pump in either AmrAB-OprA-proficient or -deficient strain 1026b backgrounds. Our data show that BpeAB-OprB does not mediate efflux of aminoglycosides but is a multidrug efflux system which extrudes macrolides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, acriflavine, and, to a lesser extent, chloramphenicol. Phylogenetically, BpeAB-OprB is closely related to Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM, which has a similar substrate spectrum. AmrAB-OprA is most closely related to MexXY, the only P. aeruginosa efflux pump known to extrude aminoglycosides. Since BpeAB-OprB in strain KHW was also implicated in playing a major role in export of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing molecules and in expression of diverse virulence factors, we explored whether this was also true in the strain 1026b background. The results showed that BpeAB-OprB was not required for AHL export, and mutants lacking this efflux system exhibited normal swimming motility and siderophore production, which were severely impaired in KHW bpeAB-oprB mutants. Biofilm formation was impaired in 1026b Delta(amrRAB-oprA) and Delta(amrRAB-oprA) Delta(bpeAB-oprB) mutants. At present, we do not know why our BpeAB-OprB susceptibility and virulence factor expression results with 1026b and its derivatives are different from those previously published for Singapore strain KHW.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of burkholderia species by multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina; Vinuesa, Pablo; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Hirsch, Ann M; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús

    2013-07-01

    Burkholderia comprises more than 60 species of environmental, clinical, and agro-biotechnological relevance. Previous phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA, gyrB, rpoB, and acdS gene sequences as well as genome sequence comparisons of different Burkholderia species have revealed two major species clusters. In this study, we undertook a multilocus sequence analysis of 77 type and reference strains of Burkholderia using atpD, gltB, lepA, and recA genes in combination with the 16S rRNA gene sequence and employed maximum likelihood and neighbor-joining criteria to test this further. The phylogenetic analysis revealed, with high supporting values, distinct lineages within the genus Burkholderia. The two large groups were named A and B, whereas the B. rhizoxinica/B. endofungorum, and B. andropogonis groups consisted of two and one species, respectively. The group A encompasses several plant-associated and saprophytic bacterial species. The group B comprises the B. cepacia complex (opportunistic human pathogens), the B. pseudomallei subgroup, which includes both human and animal pathogens, and an assemblage of plant pathogenic species. The distinct lineages present in Burkholderia suggest that each group might represent a different genus. However, it will be necessary to analyze the full set of Burkholderia species and explore whether enough phenotypic features exist among the different clusters to propose that these groups should be considered separate genera.

  15. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Caused by Burkhoderia pseudomallei in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lin Lee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan is a well-known disease entity, commonly associated with a single pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae. Melioidosis is an endemic disease in Taiwan that can manifest as multiple abscesses in sites including the liver. We report three cases of liver abscesses caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. The first patient was a 54-year-old diabetic woman, who presented with liver abscess and a left subphrenic abscess resulting from a ruptured splenic abscess, co-infected with K. pneumoniae and B. pseudomallei. The second patient, a 58-year-old diabetic man, developed bacteremic pneumonia over the left lower lung due to B. pseudomallei with acute respiratory distress syndrome, and relapsed 5 months later with bacteremic abscesses of the liver, spleen, prostate and osteomyelitis, due to lack of compliance with prescribed antibiotic therapy. The third patient was a 61-year-old diabetic man with a history of travel to Thailand, who presented with jaundice and fever of unknown origin. Liver and splenic abscesses due to B. pseudomallei were diagnosed. A high clinical alertness to patients' travel history, underlying diseases, and the presence of concomitant splenic abscess is essential to early detection of the great mimicker, melioidosis. The treatment of choice is intravenous ceftazidime for at least 14 days or more. An adequate duration of maintenance oral therapy, with amoxicillin-clavulanate or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for 12-20 weeks, is necessary to prevent relapse. Liver abscess in Taiwan is most commonly due to K. pneumoniae, but clinicians should keep in mind that this may be a presenting feature of melioidosis.

  16. Identification of Burkholderia spp. in the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory: Comparison of Conventional and Molecular Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, Cindy; Verduin, Cees M.; Goessens, Wil H. F.; Vos, Margreet C.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Segonds, Christine; Reubsaet, Frans; Verbrugh, Henri; van Belkum, Alex

    1999-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) predisposes patients to bacterial colonization and infection of the lower airways. Several species belonging to the genus Burkholderia are potential CF-related pathogens, but microbiological identification may be complicated. This situation is not in the least due to the poorly defined taxonomic status of these bacteria, and further validation of the available diagnostic assays is required. A total of 114 geographically diverse bacterial isolates, previously identified in reference laboratories as Burkholderia cepacia (n = 51), B. gladioli (n = 14), Ralstonia pickettii (n = 6), B. multivorans (n = 2), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n = 3), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 11), were collected from environmental, clinical, and reference sources. In addition, 27 clinical isolates putatively identified as Burkholderia spp. were recovered from the sputum of Dutch CF patients. All isolates were used to evaluate the accuracy of two selective growth media, four systems for biochemical identification (API 20NE, Vitek GNI, Vitek NFC, and MicroScan), and three different PCR-based assays. The PCR assays amplify different parts of the ribosomal DNA operon, either alone or in combination with cleavage by various restriction enzymes (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism [RFLP] analysis). The best system for the biochemical identification of B. cepacia appeared to be the API 20NE test. None of the biochemical assays successfully grouped the B. gladioli strains. The PCR-RFLP method appeared to be the optimal method for accurate nucleic acid-mediated identification of the different Burkholderia spp. With this method, B. gladioli was also reliably classified in a separate group. For the laboratory diagnosis of B. cepacia, we recommend parallel cultures on blood agar medium and selective agar plates. Further identification of colonies with a Burkholderia phenotype should be performed with the API 20NE test. For final confirmation of species identities, PCR

  17. Molecular and Physical Characterization of Burkholderia mallei O Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Burtnick, Mary N.; Brett, Paul J; Woods, Donald E

    2002-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been previously shown to cross-react with polyclonal antibodies raised against B. pseudomallei LPS; however, we observed that B. mallei LPS does not react with a monoclonal antibody (Pp-PS-W) specific for B. pseudomallei O polysaccharide (O-PS). In this study, we identified the O-PS biosynthetic gene cluster from B. mallei ATCC 23344 and subsequently characterized the molecular structure of the O-PS produced by this organism.

  18. Skin infection caused by Burkholderia thailandensis: Case report with review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdelRahman Mohammad Zueter, Mahmoud Abumarzouq, Chan Yean Yean, Azian Harun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia thailandensis is genetically closed to Burkholderia pseudomallei, which causes melioidosis. The bacterium inhabits the environments of tropical regions including those in Southeast Asia and the Northern part of Australia. B. thailandensis is considered avirulent and extremely uncommon to cause disease. We report the first case of foot abscess with skin cellulitis and ankle swelling caused by B. thailandensis in Malaysia. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(2: 92-95

  19. Comparative Genomics of Burkholderia singularis sp. nov., a Low G+C Content, Free-Living Bacterium That Defies Taxonomic Dissection of the Genus Burkholderia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Peter; Peeters, Charlotte; De Smet, Birgit; Price, Erin P.; Sarovich, Derek S.; Henry, Deborah A.; Hird, Trevor J.; Zlosnik, James E. A.; Mayo, Mark; Warner, Jeffrey; Baker, Anthony; Currie, Bart J.; Carlier, Aurélien

    2017-01-01

    Four Burkholderia pseudomallei-like isolates of human clinical origin were examined by a polyphasic taxonomic approach that included comparative whole genome analyses. The results demonstrated that these isolates represent a rare and unusual, novel Burkholderia species for which we propose the name B. singularis. The type strain is LMG 28154T (=CCUG 65685T). Its genome sequence has an average mol% G+C content of 64.34%, which is considerably lower than that of other Burkholderia species. The reduced G+C content of strain LMG 28154T was characterized by a genome wide AT bias that was not due to reduced GC-biased gene conversion or reductive genome evolution, but might have been caused by an altered DNA base excision repair pathway. B. singularis can be differentiated from other Burkholderia species by multilocus sequence analysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and a distinctive biochemical profile that includes the absence of nitrate reduction, a mucoid appearance on Columbia sheep blood agar, and a slowly positive oxidase reaction. Comparisons with publicly available whole genome sequences demonstrated that strain TSV85, an Australian water isolate, also represents the same species and therefore, to date, B. singularis has been recovered from human or environmental samples on three continents. PMID:28932212

  20. Bacterial genome adaptation to niches: Divergence of the potential virulence genes in three Burkholderia species of different survival strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Sarria Saul H; Ulrich Ricky L; Yu Yan; Schell Mark A; Kim H Stanley; Nierman William C; DeShazer David

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Two closely related species Burkholderia mallei (Bm) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) are serious human health hazards and are potential bio-warfare agents, whereas another closely related species Burkholderia thailandensis (Bt) is a non-pathogenic saprophyte. To investigate the genomic factors resulting in such a dramatic difference, we first identified the Bm genes responsive to the mouse environment, and then examined the divergence of these genes in Bp and Bt. Result...

  1. Identification of Burkholderia spp. in the clinical microbiology laboratory: comparison of conventional and molecular methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van Pelt (Cindy); C.M. Verduin (Cees); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); M.C. Vos (Margreet); B. Tummler; C. Segonds; F. Reubsaet; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) predisposes patients to bacterial colonization and infection of the lower airways. Several species belonging to the genus Burkholderia are potential CF-related pathogens, but microbiological identification may be complicated. This

  2. Phylogeographic, genomic, and meropenem susceptibility analysis of Burkholderia ubonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Burkholderia ubonensis is commonly co-isolated from environmental specimens harbouring the melioidosis pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. B. ubonensis has been reported in northern Australia and Thailand but not North America, suggesting similar geographic distribution to B. pseudomallei. Unlike most other Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc species, B. ubonensis is considered non-pathogenic, although its virulence potential has not been tested. Antibiotic resistance in B. ubonensis, particularly towards drugs used to treat the most severe B. pseudomallei infections, has also been poorly characterised. This study examined the population biology of B. ubonensis, and includes the first reported isolates from the Caribbean. Phylogenomic analysis of 264 B. ubonensis genomes identified distinct clades that corresponded with geographic origin, similar to B. pseudomallei. A small proportion (4% of strains lacked the 920kb chromosome III replicon, with discordance of presence/absence amongst genetically highly related strains, demonstrating that the third chromosome of B. ubonensis, like other Bcc species, probably encodes for a nonessential pC3 megaplasmid. Multilocus sequence typing using the B. pseudomallei scheme revealed that one-third of strains lack the "housekeeping" narK locus. In comparison, all strains could be genotyped using the Bcc scheme. Several strains possessed high-level meropenem resistance (≥32 μg/mL, a concern due to potential transmission of this phenotype to B. pseudomallei. In silico analysis uncovered a high degree of heterogeneity among the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen cluster loci, with at least 35 different variants identified. Finally, we show that Asian B. ubonensis isolate RF23-BP41 is avirulent in the BALB/c mouse model via a subcutaneous route of infection. Our results provide several new insights into the biology of this understudied species.

  3. Phylogeographic, genomic, and meropenem susceptibility analysis of Burkholderia ubonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Erin P; Sarovich, Derek S; Webb, Jessica R; Hall, Carina M; Jaramillo, Sierra A; Sahl, Jason W; Kaestli, Mirjam; Mayo, Mark; Harrington, Glenda; Baker, Anthony L; Sidak-Loftis, Lindsay C; Settles, Erik W; Lummis, Madeline; Schupp, James M; Gillece, John D; Tuanyok, Apichai; Warner, Jeffrey; Busch, Joseph D; Keim, Paul; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M

    2017-09-01

    The bacterium Burkholderia ubonensis is commonly co-isolated from environmental specimens harbouring the melioidosis pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. B. ubonensis has been reported in northern Australia and Thailand but not North America, suggesting similar geographic distribution to B. pseudomallei. Unlike most other Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species, B. ubonensis is considered non-pathogenic, although its virulence potential has not been tested. Antibiotic resistance in B. ubonensis, particularly towards drugs used to treat the most severe B. pseudomallei infections, has also been poorly characterised. This study examined the population biology of B. ubonensis, and includes the first reported isolates from the Caribbean. Phylogenomic analysis of 264 B. ubonensis genomes identified distinct clades that corresponded with geographic origin, similar to B. pseudomallei. A small proportion (4%) of strains lacked the 920kb chromosome III replicon, with discordance of presence/absence amongst genetically highly related strains, demonstrating that the third chromosome of B. ubonensis, like other Bcc species, probably encodes for a nonessential pC3 megaplasmid. Multilocus sequence typing using the B. pseudomallei scheme revealed that one-third of strains lack the "housekeeping" narK locus. In comparison, all strains could be genotyped using the Bcc scheme. Several strains possessed high-level meropenem resistance (≥32 μg/mL), a concern due to potential transmission of this phenotype to B. pseudomallei. In silico analysis uncovered a high degree of heterogeneity among the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen cluster loci, with at least 35 different variants identified. Finally, we show that Asian B. ubonensis isolate RF23-BP41 is avirulent in the BALB/c mouse model via a subcutaneous route of infection. Our results provide several new insights into the biology of this understudied species.

  4. Divergent homologs of the predicted small RNA BpCand697 in Burkholderia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiri, Nadzirah; Mohd-Padil, Hirzahida; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    The small RNA (sRNA) gene candidate, BpCand697 was previously reported to be unique to Burkholderia spp. and is encoded at 3' non-coding region of a putative AraC family transcription regulator gene. This study demonstrates the conservation of BpCand697 sequence across 32 Burkholderia spp. including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, B. thailandensis and Burkholderia sp. by integrating both sequence homology and secondary structural analyses of BpCand697 within the dataset. The divergent sequence of BpCand697 was also used as a discriminatory power in clustering the dataset according to the potential virulence of Burkholderia spp., showing that B. thailandensis was clearly secluded from the virulent cluster of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. Finally, the differential co-transcript expression of BpCand697 and its flanking gene, bpsl2391 was detected in Burkholderia pseudomallei D286 after grown under two different culture conditions using nutrient-rich and minimal media. It is hypothesized that the differential expression of BpCand697-bpsl2391 co-transcript between the two standard prepared media might correlate with nutrient availability in the culture media, suggesting that the physical co-localization of BpCand697 in B. pseudomallei D286 might be directly or indirectly involved with the transcript regulation of bpsl2391 under the selected in vitro culture conditions.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Multihost Pathogenicity of Clinical and Environmental Strains of Burkholderia cenocepacia ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springman, A. Cody; Jacobs, Janette L.; Somvanshi, Vishal S.; Sundin, George W.; Mulks, Martha H.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Viswanathan, Poorna; Gray, R. Lucas; LiPuma, John J.; Ciche, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of 54 clinical and agricultural isolates of Burkholderia cenocepacia was analyzed for genetic relatedness by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pathogenicity by using onion and nematode infection models, antifungal activity, and the distribution of three marker genes associated with virulence. The majority of clinical isolates were obtained from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Michigan, and the agricultural isolates were predominantly from Michigan onion fields. MLST analysis resolved 23 distinct sequence types (STs), 11 of which were novel. Twenty-six of 27 clinical isolates from Michigan were genotyped as ST-40, previously identified as the Midwest B. cenocepacia lineage. In contrast, the 12 agricultural isolates represented eight STs, including ST-122, that were identical to clinical isolates of the PHDC lineage. In general, pathogenicity to onions and the presence of the pehA endopolygalacturonase gene were detected only in one cluster of related strains consisting of agricultural isolates and the PHDC lineage. Surprisingly, these strains were highly pathogenic in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infection model, killing nematodes faster than the CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 on slow-kill medium. The other strains displayed a wide range of pathogenicity to C. elegans, notably the Midwest clonal lineage which displayed high, moderate, and low virulence. Most strains displayed moderate antifungal activity, although strains with high and low activities were also detected. We conclude that pathogenicity to multiple hosts may be a key factor contributing to the potential of B. cenocepacia to opportunistically infect humans both by increasing the prevalence of the organism in the environment, thereby increasing exposure to vulnerable hosts, and by the selection of virulence factors that function in multiple hosts. PMID:19542323

  6. The clinical course of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria respiratory infection in cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Correia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, a group of nine related species, are opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, associated with a poor prognosis and patient-to-patient transmissibility. The pulmonary deterioration in Bcc-colonised/ infected patients has a heterogeneous pattern leading, sometimes, to a fulminant development – the cepacia syndrome.To evaluate the relationship between colonisation/ infection by the different Bcc species and the clinical course, the authors carried out a retrospective study of 31 CF patients with Bcc bacteria isolations followed at Hospital de Santa Maria from January 1995 to March 2006. Patients were categorised into two groups: Group I, with intermittent isolations and Group II with chronic isolations. The prevalence of Bcc species was as follows: B. cepacia 57%, B. cenocepacia 43%, B. multivorans 7%, B. stabilis 13%. Three of the patients died of cepacia syndrome. The species B. cepacia and B. stabilis, usually less frequent in CF populations of Europe and America, were isolated in a considerable percentage of the patients examined. No correlation could be established between the species and the clinical outcome.Deteriorated but not stable patients from group II, whose lung function and pulmonary exacerbationcaused hospitalisation could be retrospectively analysed, exhibited significant differences in the number of hospitalisations and pulmonary function (FEV1 in the year prior to and the years following Bcc isolation.Based on the available data, it is not currently possible to outline preventive measures through the molecular characterisation of Bcc isolates, reinforcing the notion that the recommended control measures must be followed. Resumo: O complexo Burkholderia cepacia (Bcc é um grupo constituído por nove espécies de bactérias patogénicas oportunistas na fibrose quística (FQ, associadas a prognóstico mais reservado e a infecção cruzada entre

  7. A Unique Set of the Burkholderia Collagen-Like Proteins Provides Insight into Pathogenesis, Genome Evolution and Niche Adaptation, and Infection Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth A Bachert

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, classified as category B priority pathogens, are significant human and animal pathogens that are highly infectious and broad-spectrum antibiotic resistant. Currently, the pathogenicity mechanisms utilized by Burkholderia are not fully understood, and correct diagnosis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei infection remains a challenge due to limited detection methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of a set of 13 novel Burkholderia collagen-like proteins (Bucl that were identified among B. pseudomallei and B. mallei select agents. We infer that several Bucl proteins participate in pathogenesis based on their noncollagenous domains that are associated with the components of a type III secretion apparatus and membrane transport systems. Homology modeling of the outer membrane efflux domain of Bucl8 points to a role in multi-drug resistance. We determined that bucl genes are widespread in B. pseudomallei and B. mallei; Fischer's exact test and Cramer's V2 values indicate that the majority of bucl genes are highly associated with these pathogenic species versus nonpathogenic B. thailandensis. We designed a bucl-based quantitative PCR assay which was able to detect B. pseudomallei infection in a mouse with a detection limit of 50 CFU. Finally, chromosomal mapping and phylogenetic analysis of bucl loci revealed considerable genomic plasticity and adaptation of Burkholderia spp. to host and environmental niches. In this study, we identified a large set of phylogenetically unrelated bucl genes commonly found in Burkholderia select agents, encoding predicted pathogenicity factors, detection targets, and vaccine candidates.

  8. A Unique Set of the Burkholderia Collagen-Like Proteins Provides Insight into Pathogenesis, Genome Evolution and Niche Adaptation, and Infection Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachert, Beth A; Choi, Soo J; Snyder, Anna K; Rio, Rita V M; Durney, Brandon C; Holland, Lisa A; Amemiya, Kei; Welkos, Susan L; Bozue, Joel A; Cote, Christopher K; Berisio, Rita; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, classified as category B priority pathogens, are significant human and animal pathogens that are highly infectious and broad-spectrum antibiotic resistant. Currently, the pathogenicity mechanisms utilized by Burkholderia are not fully understood, and correct diagnosis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei infection remains a challenge due to limited detection methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of a set of 13 novel Burkholderia collagen-like proteins (Bucl) that were identified among B. pseudomallei and B. mallei select agents. We infer that several Bucl proteins participate in pathogenesis based on their noncollagenous domains that are associated with the components of a type III secretion apparatus and membrane transport systems. Homology modeling of the outer membrane efflux domain of Bucl8 points to a role in multi-drug resistance. We determined that bucl genes are widespread in B. pseudomallei and B. mallei; Fischer's exact test and Cramer's V2 values indicate that the majority of bucl genes are highly associated with these pathogenic species versus nonpathogenic B. thailandensis. We designed a bucl-based quantitative PCR assay which was able to detect B. pseudomallei infection in a mouse with a detection limit of 50 CFU. Finally, chromosomal mapping and phylogenetic analysis of bucl loci revealed considerable genomic plasticity and adaptation of Burkholderia spp. to host and environmental niches. In this study, we identified a large set of phylogenetically unrelated bucl genes commonly found in Burkholderia select agents, encoding predicted pathogenicity factors, detection targets, and vaccine candidates.

  9. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. © 2013 The Authors. Microbiology Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. CD4+ T cell epitopes of FliC conserved between strains of Burkholderia: implications for vaccines against melioidosis and cepacia complex in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musson, Julie A; Reynolds, Catherine J; Rinchai, Darawan; Nithichanon, Arnone; Khaenam, Prasong; Favry, Emmanuel; Spink, Natasha; Chu, Karen K Y; De Soyza, Anthony; Bancroft, Gregory J; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M; Robinson, John H

    2014-12-15

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis characterized by pneumonia and fatal septicemia and prevalent in Southeast Asia. Related Burkholderia species are strong risk factors of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). The B. pseudomallei flagellar protein FliC is strongly seroreactive and vaccination protects challenged mice. We assessed B. pseudomallei FliC peptide binding affinity to multiple HLA class II alleles and then assessed CD4 T cell immunity in HLA class II transgenic mice and in seropositive individuals in Thailand. T cell hybridomas were generated to investigate cross-reactivity between B. pseudomallei and the related Burkholderia species associated with Cepacia Complex CF. B. pseudomallei FliC contained several peptide sequences with ability to bind multiple HLA class II alleles. Several peptides were shown to encompass strong CD4 T cell epitopes in B. pseudomallei-exposed individuals and in HLA transgenic mice. In particular, the p38 epitope is robustly recognized by CD4 T cells of seropositive donors across diverse HLA haplotypes. T cell hybridomas against an immunogenic B. pseudomallei FliC epitope also cross-reacted with orthologous FliC sequences from Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia, important pathogens in CF. Epitopes within FliC were accessible for processing and presentation from live or heat-killed bacteria, demonstrating that flagellin enters the HLA class II Ag presentation pathway during infection of macrophages with B. cenocepacia. Collectively, the data support the possibility of incorporating FliC T cell epitopes into vaccination programs targeting both at-risk individuals in B. pseudomallei endemic regions as well as CF patients. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Distinct human antibody response to the biological warfare agent Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, John J; Vigil, Adam; DeShazer, David; Waag, David M; Felgner, Philip; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2012-10-01

    The genetic similarity between Burkholderia mallei (glanders) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis) had led to the general assumption that pathogenesis of each bacterium would be similar. In 2000, the first human case of glanders in North America since 1945 was reported in a microbiology laboratory worker. Leveraging the availability of pre-exposure sera for this individual and employing the same well-characterized protein array platform that has been previously used to study a large cohort of melioidosis patients in southeast Asia, we describe the antibody response in a human with glanders. Analysis of 156 peptides present on the array revealed antibodies against 17 peptides with a > 2-fold increase in this infection. Unexpectedly, when the glanders data were compared with a previous data set from B. pseudomallei infections, there were only two highly increased antibodies shared between these two infections. These findings have implications in the diagnosis and treatment of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei infections.

  12. Structural flexibility in the Burkholderia mallei genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierman, William C; DeShazer, David; Kim, H Stanley; Tettelin, Herve; Nelson, Karen E; Feldblyum, Tamara; Ulrich, Ricky L; Ronning, Catherine M; Brinkac, Lauren M; Daugherty, Sean C; Davidsen, Tanja D; Deboy, Robert T; Dimitrov, George; Dodson, Robert J; Durkin, A Scott; Gwinn, Michelle L; Haft, Daniel H; Khouri, Hoda; Kolonay, James F; Madupu, Ramana; Mohammoud, Yasmin; Nelson, William C; Radune, Diana; Romero, Claudia M; Sarria, Saul; Selengut, Jeremy; Shamblin, Christine; Sullivan, Steven A; White, Owen; Yu, Yan; Zafar, Nikhat; Zhou, Liwei; Fraser, Claire M

    2004-09-28

    The complete genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 provides insight into this highly infectious bacterium's pathogenicity and evolutionary history. B. mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, has come under renewed scientific investigation as a result of recent concerns about its past and potential future use as a biological weapon. Genome analysis identified a number of putative virulence factors whose function was supported by comparative genome hybridization and expression profiling of the bacterium in hamster liver in vivo. The genome contains numerous insertion sequence elements that have mediated extensive deletions and rearrangements of the genome relative to Burkholderia pseudomallei. The genome also contains a vast number (>12,000) of simple sequence repeats. Variation in simple sequence repeats in key genes can provide a mechanism for generating antigenic variation that may account for the mammalian host's inability to mount a durable adaptive immune response to a B. mallei infection.

  13. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Dina A; Scarff, Jennifer M; Garcia, Preston P; Cassidy, Sara K B; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M; Inzana, Thomas J; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine.

  14. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina A Moustafa

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine.

  15. Mechanisms of Disease: Host-Pathogen Interactions between Burkholderia Species and Lung Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Jonathan; Bell, Rachel E.; Clark, Graeme C.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia species can cause a range of severe, often fatal, respiratory diseases. A variety of in vitro models of infection have been developed in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism by which Burkholderia spp. gain entry to and interact with the body. The majority of studies have tended to focus on the interaction of bacteria with phagocytic cells with a paucity of information available with regard to the lung epithelium. However, the lung epithelium is becoming more widely recognized as an important player in innate immunity and the early response to infections. Here we review the complex relationship between Burkholderia species and epithelial cells with an emphasis on the most pathogenic species, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. The current gaps in knowledge in our understanding are highlighted along with the epithelial host-pathogen interactions that offer potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26636042

  16. Communication systems in the genus Burkholderia: global regulators and targets for novel antipathogenic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Pamela A; Malott, Rebecca J; Riedel, Kathrin; Eberl, Leo

    2007-10-01

    The genus Burkholderia not only contains the primary pathogens Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei but also several species that have emerged as opportunistic pathogens in persons suffering from cystic fibrosis or chronic granulomatous disease and immunocompromised individuals. Burkholderia species utilize quorum-sensing (QS) systems that rely on N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules to express virulence factors and other functions in a population-density-dependent manner. Most Burkholderia species employ the CepIR QS system, which relies on N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone. However, some strains harbour multiple QS systems and produce numerous AHLs. QS systems have been demonstrated to be essential for full virulence in various infection models and, thus, these regulatory systems represent attractive targets for the development of novel therapeutics.

  17. Unusual distribution of Burkholderia cepacia complex species in Danish cystic fibrosis clinics may stem from restricted transmission between patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Fenger, Mette G

    2010-01-01

    Forty-four of 48 Burkholderia cepacia complex strains cultured from Danish cystic fibrosis patients were Burkholderia multivorans, a distribution of species that has not been reported before. Although cases of cross infections were demonstrated, no major epidemic clone was found. The species...

  18. Assessment of a DNA Vaccine Encoding Burkholderia pseudomallei Bacterioferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    determining the immune responses in melioidosis, rheumatic fever , poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis and Q fever ...Research Group at James Cook University. He graduated with his MD at the Vinnitsa Medical Institute in 1985, and completed his PhD at the University of

  19. Burkholderia humi sp. nov., Burkholderia choica sp. nov., Burkholderia telluris sp. nov., Burkholderia terrestris sp. nov. and Burkholderia udeis sp. nov.: Burkholderia glathei-like bacteria from soil and rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Peter; De Brandt, Evie; Houf, Kurt; Salles, Joana Falcão; Dirk van Elsas, Jan; Spilker, Theodore; Lipuma, John J

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of partial gyrB gene sequences revealed six taxa in a group of 17 Burkholderia glathei-like isolates which were further examined by (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridizations, determination of the DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and an analysis of cell and colony morphology and more than 180 biochemical characteristics. The results demonstrated that one taxon consisting of three human clinical isolates represented Burkholderia zhejiangensis, a recently described methyl-parathion-degrading bacterium isolated from a wastewater-treatment system in China. The remaining taxa represented five novel species isolated from soil or rhizosphere soil samples, and could be distinguished by both genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. We therefore propose to formally classify these bacteria as Burkholderia humi sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22934(T) = CCUG 63059(T)), Burkholderia choica sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22940(T) = CCUG 63063(T)), Burkholderia telluris sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22936(T) = CCUG 63060(T)), Burkholderia udeis sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 27134(T) = CCUG 63061(T)) and Burkholderia terrestris sp. nov. (type strain, LMG 22937(T) = CCUG 63062(T)).

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Clinical Isolates of Burkholderia mallei Obtained from Nasal Swabs of Glanderous Equines in India.

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    Singha, Harisankar; Malik, Praveen; Saini, Sheetal; Khurana, Sandip K; Elschner, Mandy C; Mertens, Katja; Barth, Stefanie A; Tripathi, Bhupendra N; Singh, Raj K

    2017-04-06

    Burkholderia mallei is a Gram-negative coccobacillus which causes glanders-a fatal disease of equines that may occasionally be transmitted to humans. Several cases of outbreaks have been reported from India since 2006. This paper presents draft genome sequences of two B. mallei strains isolated from equines affected by glanders in India. Copyright © 2017 Singha et al.

  1. Genetic and phenotypic diversity in Burkholderia: contributions by prophage and phage-like elements

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    Ulrich Ricky L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia species exhibit enormous phenotypic diversity, ranging from the nonpathogenic, soil- and water-inhabiting Burkholderia thailandensis to the virulent, host-adapted mammalian pathogen B. mallei. Genomic diversity is evident within Burkholderia species as well. Individual isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, for example, carry a variety of strain-specific genomic islands (GIs, including putative pathogenicity and metabolic islands, prophage-like islands, and prophages. These GIs may provide some strains with a competitive advantage in the environment and/or in the host relative to other strains. Results Here we present the results of analysis of 37 prophages, putative prophages, and prophage-like elements from six different Burkholderia species. Five of these were spontaneously induced to form bacteriophage particles from B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis strains and were isolated and fully sequenced; 24 were computationally predicted in sequenced Burkholderia genomes; and eight are previously characterized prophages or prophage-like elements. The results reveal numerous differences in both genome structure and gene content among elements derived from different species as well as from strains within species, due in part to the incorporation of additional DNA, or 'morons' into the prophage genomes. Implications for pathogenicity are also discussed. Lastly, RNAseq analysis of gene expression showed that many of the genes in ϕ1026b that appear to contribute to phage and lysogen fitness were expressed independently of the phage structural and replication genes. Conclusions This study provides the first estimate of the relative contribution of prophages to the vast phenotypic diversity found among the Burkholderiae.

  2. Comparative analysis of the Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 essential genome reveals cell envelope functions that are uniquely required for survival in species of the genus Burkholderia.

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    Gislason, April S; Turner, Keith; Domaratzki, Mike; Cardona, Silvia T

    2017-11-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that have large and dynamic genomes. In this work, we identified the essential genome of B. cenocepacia K56-2 using high-density transposon mutagenesis and insertion site sequencing (Tn-seq circle). We constructed a library of one million transposon mutants and identified the transposon insertions at an average of one insertion per 27 bp. The probability of gene essentiality was determined by comparing of the insertion density per gene with the variance of neutral datasets generated by Monte Carlo simulations. Five hundred and eight genes were not significantly disrupted, suggesting that these genes are essential for survival in rich, undefined medium. Comparison of the B. cenocepacia K56-2 essential genome with that of the closely related B. cenocepacia J2315 revealed partial overlapping, suggesting that some essential genes are strain-specific. Furthermore, 158 essential genes were conserved in B. cenocepacia and two species belonging to the Burkholderia pseudomallei complex, B. pseudomallei K96243 and Burkholderia thailandensis E264. Porins, including OpcC, a lysophospholipid transporter, LplT, and a protein involved in the modification of lipid A with aminoarabinose were found to be essential in Burkholderia genomes but not in other bacterial essential genomes identified so far. Our results highlight the existence of cell envelope processes that are uniquely essential in species of the genus Burkholderia for which the essential genomes have been identified by Tn-seq.

  3. Host-pathogen interactions between Burkholderia species and lung epithelial cells

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    Jonathan eDavid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Burkholderia species can cause a range of severe, often fatal, respiratory diseases. A variety of in vitro models of infection have been developed in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism by which Burkholderia spp. gain entry to and interact with the body. The majority of studies have tended to focus on the interaction of bacteria with phagocytic cells with a paucity of information available with regard to the lung epithelium. However, the lung epithelium is becoming more widely recognised as an important player in innate immunity and the early response to infections. Here we review the complex relationship between Burkholderia species and epithelial cells with an emphasis on the most pathogenic species, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. The current gaps in knowledge in our understanding are highlighted along with the epithelial host-pathogen interactions that offer potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Clinical guideline for diagnosis and management of melioidosis

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    Inglis Timothy J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is an emerging infection in Brazil and neighbouring South American countries. The wide range of clinical presentations include severe community-acquired pneumonia, septicaemia, central nervous system infection and less severe soft tissue infection. Diagnosis depends heavily on the clinical microbiology laboratory for culture. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the bacterial cause of melioidosis, is easily cultured from blood, sputum and other clinical samples. However, B. pseudomallei can be difficult to identify reliably, and can be confused with closely related bacteria, some of which may be dismissed as insignificant culture contaminants. Serological tests can help to support a diagnosis of melioidosis, but by themselves do not provide a definitive diagnosis. The use of a laboratory discovery pathway can help reduce the risk of missing atypical B. pseudomallei isolates. Recommended antibiotic treatment for severe infection is either intravenous Ceftazidime or Meropenem for several weeks, followed by up to 20 weeks oral treatment with a combination of trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and doxycycline. Consistent use of diagnostic microbiology to confirm the diagnosis, and rigorous treatment of severe infection with the correct antibiotics in two stages; acute and eradication, will contribute to a reduction in mortality from melioidosis.

  5. Burkholderia Hep_Hag autotransporter (BuHA proteins elicit a strong antibody response during experimental glanders but not human melioidosis

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    Foster Simon J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial biothreat agents Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are the cause of glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Genomic and epidemiological studies have shown that B. mallei is a recently emerged, host restricted clone of B. pseudomallei. Results Using bacteriophage-mediated immunoscreening we identified genes expressed in vivo during experimental equine glanders infection. A family of immunodominant antigens were identified that share protein domain architectures with hemagglutinins and invasins. These have been designated Burkholderia Hep_Hag autotransporter (BuHA proteins. A total of 110/207 positive clones (53% of a B. mallei expression library screened with sera from two infected horses belonged to this family. This contrasted with 6/189 positive clones (3% of a B. pseudomallei expression library screened with serum from 21 patients with culture-proven melioidosis. Conclusion Members of the BuHA proteins are found in other Gram-negative bacteria and have been shown to have important roles related to virulence. Compared with other bacterial species, the genomes of both B. mallei and B. pseudomallei contain a relative abundance of this family of proteins. The domain structures of these proteins suggest that they function as multimeric surface proteins that modulate interactions of the cell with the host and environment. Their effect on the cellular immune response to B. mallei and their potential as diagnostics for glanders requires further study.

  6. A comparison of the immunological potency of Burkholderia lipopolysaccharides in endotoxemic BALB/c mice.

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    Hsueh, Pei-Tan; Liu, Chiu-Lin; Wang, Hsuan-Han; Ni, Wei-Fen; Chen, Ya-Lei; Liu, Jong-Kang

    2016-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide is one of the virulence factors of the soil-borne pathogens Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans, which cause septic melioidosis (often in B. pseudomallei infections but rarely in B. thailandensis infections) or cepacia syndromes (commonly in B. cenocepacia infections but rarely in B. multivorans infections). The inflammatory responses in Burkholderia LPS-induced endotoxemia were evaluated in this study. Prior to induction, the conserved structures and functions of each purified LPS were determined using electrophoretic phenotypes, the ratios of 3-hydroxytetradecanoic to 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid and endotoxin units. In an in vitro assay, cytokine expression of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 and Toll/IL-1 receptor domain containing adapter-inducing INF-β-dependent signaling-dependent signaling differed when stimulated by different LPS. Endotoxemia was induced in mice by s.c. injection as evidenced by increasing serum concentrations of 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid and the septic prognostic markers CD62E and ICAM-1. During endotoxemia, splenic CD11b(+) I-A(+) , CD11b(+) CD80(+) , CD11b(+) CD86(+) and CD11b(+) CD11c(+) subpopulations increased. After induction with B. pseudomallei LPS, there were significant increases in splenic CD49b NK cells and CD14 macrophages. The inflamed CD11b(+) CCR2(+) , CD11b(+) CD31(+) , CD11b(+) CD14(+) , resident CD11b(+) CX3 CR1(+) and progenitor CD11b(+) CD34(+) cells showed delayed increases in bone marrow. B. multivorans LPS was the most potent inducer of serum cytokines and chemokines, whereas B. cenocepacia LPS induced relatively low concentrations of the chemokines MIP-1α and MIP-1β. Endotoxin activities did not correlate with the virulence of Burkholderia strains. Thus factors other than LPS and/or other mechanisms of low activity LPS must mediate the pathogenicity of highly virulent Burkholderia strains. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons

  7. Profile of Neonatal Sepsis due to Burkholderia capacia Complex.

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    Chandrasekaran, Aparna; Subburaju, Nivedhana; Mustafa, Muzamil; Putlibai, Sulochana

    2016-12-15

    We report the result of retrospective record review of the clinical profile of 59 neonates who presented to a tertiary-care extramural neonatal unit with Burkholderia cepacia complex infection. Among the 3265 admissions over 45 months, incidence of Burkholderia sepsis was 18 per 1000 admissions. Case fatality rate was 17%. Most (95%) isolates were sensitive to cotrimoxazole.

  8. Gene and protein expression in response to different growth temperatures and oxygen availability in Burkholderia thailandensis.

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    Clelia Peano

    Full Text Available Burkholderia thailandensis, although normally avirulent for mammals, can infect macrophages in vitro and has occasionally been reported to cause pneumonia in humans. It is therefore used as a model organism for the human pathogen B. pseudomallei, to which it is closely related phylogenetically. We characterized the B. thailandensis clinical isolate CDC2721121 (BtCDC272 at the genome level and studied its response to environmental cues associated with human host colonization, namely, temperature and oxygen limitation. Effects of the different growth conditions on BtCDC272 were studied through whole genome transcription studies and analysis of proteins associated with the bacterial cell surface. We found that growth at 37°C, compared to 28°C, negatively affected cell motility and flagella production through a mechanism involving regulation of the flagellin-encoding fliC gene at the mRNA stability level. Growth in oxygen-limiting conditions, in contrast, stimulated various processes linked to virulence, such as lipopolysaccharide production and expression of genes encoding protein secretion systems. Consistent with these observations, BtCDC272 grown in oxygen limitation was more resistant to phagocytosis and strongly induced the production of inflammatory cytokines from murine macrophages. Our results suggest that, while temperature sensing is important for regulation of B. thailandensis cell motility, oxygen limitation has a deeper impact on its physiology and constitutes a crucial environmental signal for the production of virulence factors.

  9. DNA binding site analysis of Burkholderia thailandensis response regulators.

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    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L; Hickmott, Alexana J; Maity, Tuhin S; Bulyk, Martha L; Dunbar, John; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth

    2012-07-01

    Bacterial response regulators (RR) that function as transcription factors in two component signaling pathways are crucial for ensuring tight regulation and coordinated expression of the genome. Currently, consensus DNA binding sites in the promoter for very few bacterial RRs have been identified. A systematic method to characterize these DNA binding sites for RRs would enable prediction of specific gene expression patterns in response to extracellular stimuli. To identify RR DNA binding sites, we functionally activated RRs using beryllofluoride and applied them to a protein-binding microarray (PBM) to discover DNA binding motifs for RRs expressed in Burkholderia, a Gram-negative bacterial genus. We identified DNA binding motifs for conserved RRs in Burkholderia thailandensis, including KdpE, RisA, and NarL, as well as for a previously uncharacterized RR at locus BTH_II2335 and its ortholog in the human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei at locus BPSS2315. We further demonstrate RR binding of predicted genomic targets for the two orthologs using gel shift assays and reveal a pattern of RR regulation of expression of self and other two component systems. Our studies illustrate the use of PBMs to identify DNA binding specificities for bacterial RRs and enable prediction of gene regulatory networks in response to two component signaling. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Involvement of the efflux pumps in chloramphenicol selected strains of Burkholderia thailandensis: proteomic and mechanistic evidence.

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    Fabrice V Biot

    Full Text Available Burkholderia is a bacterial genus comprising several pathogenic species, including two species highly pathogenic for humans, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. B. thailandensis is a weakly pathogenic species closely related to both B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. It is used as a study model. These bacteria are able to exhibit multiple resistance mechanisms towards various families of antibiotics. By sequentially plating B. thailandensis wild type strains on chloramphenicol we obtained several resistant variants. This chloramphenicol-induced resistance was associated with resistance against structurally unrelated antibiotics including quinolones and tetracyclines. We functionally and proteomically demonstrate that this multidrug resistance phenotype, identified in chloramphenicol-resistant variants, is associated with the overexpression of two different efflux pumps. These efflux pumps are able to expel antibiotics from several families, including chloramphenicol, quinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim and some β-lactams, and present a partial susceptibility to efflux pump inhibitors. It is thus possible that Burkholderia species can develop such adaptive resistance mechanisms in response to antibiotic pressure resulting in emergence of multidrug resistant strains. Antibiotics known to easily induce overexpression of these efflux pumps should be used with discernment in the treatment of Burkholderia infections.

  11. Plant-associated symbiotic Burkholderia species lack hallmark strategies required in mammalian pathogenesis.

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    Angus, Annette A; Agapakis, Christina M; Fong, Stephanie; Yerrapragada, Shailaja; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina; Yang, Paul; Song, Nannie; Kano, Stephanie; Caballero-Mellado, Jésus; de Faria, Sergio M; Dakora, Felix D; Weinstock, George; Hirsch, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia is a diverse and dynamic genus, containing pathogenic species as well as species that form complex interactions with plants. Pathogenic strains, such as B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, can cause serious disease in mammals, while other Burkholderia strains are opportunistic pathogens, infecting humans or animals with a compromised immune system. Although some of the opportunistic Burkholderia pathogens are known to promote plant growth and even fix nitrogen, the risk of infection to infants, the elderly, and people who are immunocompromised has not only resulted in a restriction on their use, but has also limited the application of non-pathogenic, symbiotic species, several of which nodulate legume roots or have positive effects on plant growth. However, recent phylogenetic analyses have demonstrated that Burkholderia species separate into distinct lineages, suggesting the possibility for safe use of certain symbiotic species in agricultural contexts. A number of environmental strains that promote plant growth or degrade xenobiotics are also included in the symbiotic lineage. Many of these species have the potential to enhance agriculture in areas where fertilizers are not readily available and may serve in the future as inocula for crops growing in soils impacted by climate change. Here we address the pathogenic potential of several of the symbiotic Burkholderia strains using bioinformatics and functional tests. A series of infection experiments using Caenorhabditis elegans and HeLa cells, as well as genomic characterization of pathogenic loci, show that the risk of opportunistic infection by symbiotic strains such as B. tuberum is extremely low.

  12. Plant-associated symbiotic Burkholderia species lack hallmark strategies required in mammalian pathogenesis.

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    Annette A Angus

    Full Text Available Burkholderia is a diverse and dynamic genus, containing pathogenic species as well as species that form complex interactions with plants. Pathogenic strains, such as B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, can cause serious disease in mammals, while other Burkholderia strains are opportunistic pathogens, infecting humans or animals with a compromised immune system. Although some of the opportunistic Burkholderia pathogens are known to promote plant growth and even fix nitrogen, the risk of infection to infants, the elderly, and people who are immunocompromised has not only resulted in a restriction on their use, but has also limited the application of non-pathogenic, symbiotic species, several of which nodulate legume roots or have positive effects on plant growth. However, recent phylogenetic analyses have demonstrated that Burkholderia species separate into distinct lineages, suggesting the possibility for safe use of certain symbiotic species in agricultural contexts. A number of environmental strains that promote plant growth or degrade xenobiotics are also included in the symbiotic lineage. Many of these species have the potential to enhance agriculture in areas where fertilizers are not readily available and may serve in the future as inocula for crops growing in soils impacted by climate change. Here we address the pathogenic potential of several of the symbiotic Burkholderia strains using bioinformatics and functional tests. A series of infection experiments using Caenorhabditis elegans and HeLa cells, as well as genomic characterization of pathogenic loci, show that the risk of opportunistic infection by symbiotic strains such as B. tuberum is extremely low.

  13. The art of persistence-the secrets to Burkholderia chronic infections.

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    Lewis, Eric R G; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    The Gram-negative proteobacteria genus Burkholderia encompasses multiple bacterial species that are pathogenic to humans and other vertebrates. Two pathogenic species of interest within this genus are Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bpm) and the B. cepacia complex (Bcc); the former is the causative agent of melioidosis in humans and other mammals, and the latter is associated with pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. One understudied and shared characteristic of these two pathogenic groups is their ability to persist and establish chronic infection within the host. In this review, we will explore the depth of knowledge about chronic infections caused by persistent Bpm and Bcc. We examine the host risk factors and immune responses associated with more severe chronic infections. We also discuss host adaptation and phenotypes associated with persistent Burkholderia species. Lastly, we survey how other intracellular bacteria associated with chronic infections are combatted and explore possible future applications to target Burkholderia Our goal is to highlight understudied areas that should be addressed for a more thorough understanding of chronic Burkholderia infections and how to combat them. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Functions of Burkholderia virulence factors: Input from proteomics and DNA microarray analyses

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    Kumutha Malar Vellasamy1

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia spp. consists of organisms that are extremely diverse and versatile with a natural habitat in the soil. Members of this genus, which include B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. cepacia, are capable of causing severe, life threatening opportunistic infection in patients who are immunocompromised. The underlying virulence mechanisms of the bacteria, their interactions with the host and the host defense mechanisms may be reflected by changes of the expression of proteins of both the pathogen as well as the host. In this article, we reviewed the current knowledge on interactions of Burkholderia spp. pathogens with their host mainly from the perspective of data that was generated from recent proteomics and DNA microarray investigations.

  15. Characterization of clinically-attenuated Burkholderia mallei by whole genome sequencing: candidate strain for exclusion from Select Agent lists.

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    Steven E Schutzer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia mallei is an understudied biothreat agent responsible for glanders which can be lethal in humans and animals. Research with this pathogen has been hampered in part by constraints of Select Agent regulations for safety reasons. Whole genomic sequencing (WGS is an apt approach to characterize newly discovered or poorly understood microbial pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed WGS on a strain of B. mallei, SAVP1, previously pathogenic, that was experimentally infected in 6 equids (4 ponies, 1 mule, 1 donkey, natural hosts, for purposes of producing antibodies. Multiple high inocula were used in some cases. Unexpectedly SAVP1 appeared to be avirulent in the ponies and mule, and attenuated in the donkey, but induced antibodies. We determined the genome sequence of SAVP1 and compared it to a strain that was virulent in horses and a human. In comparison, this phenotypic avirulent SAVP1 strain was missing multiple genes including all the animal type III secretory system (T3SS complex of genes demonstrated to be essential for virulence in mice and hamster models. The loss of these genes in the SAVP1 strain appears to be the consequence of a multiple gene deletion across insertion sequence (IS elements in the B. mallei genome. Therefore, the strain by itself is unlikely to revert naturally to its virulent phenotype. There were other genes present in one strain and not the other and vice-versa. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The discovery that this strain of B. mallei was both avirulent in the natural host ponies, and did not possess T3SS associated genes may be fortuitous to advance biodefense research. The deleted virulence-essential T3SS is not likely to be re-acquired naturally. These findings may provide a basis for exclusion of SAVP1 from the Select Agent regulation or at least discussion of what else would be required for exclusion. This exclusion could accelerate research by investigators not possessing BSL-3

  16. Macrophage and Galleria mellonella infection models reflect the virulence of naturally occurring isolates of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis

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    Michell Stephen L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a tropical disease of humans with a variable and often fatal outcome. In murine models of infection, different strains exhibit varying degrees of virulence. In contrast, two related species, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis, are highly attenuated in mice. Our aim was to determine whether virulence in mice is reflected in macrophage or wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella infection models. Results B. pseudomallei strains 576 and K96243, which have low median lethal dose (MLD values in mice, were able to replicate and induce cellular damage in macrophages and caused rapid death of G. mellonella. In contrast, B. pseudomallei strain 708a, which is attenuated in mice, showed reduced replication in macrophages, negligible cellular damage and was avirulent in G. mellonella larvae. B. thailandensis isolates were less virulent than B. pseudomallei in all of the models tested. However, we did record strain dependent differences. B. oklahomensis isolates were the least virulent isolates. They showed minimal ability to replicate in macrophages, were unable to evoke actin-based motility or to form multinucleated giant cells and were markedly attenuated in G. mellonella compared to B. thailandensis. Conclusions We have shown that the alternative infection models tested here, namely macrophages and Galleria mellonella, are able to distinguish between strains of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis and that these differences reflect the observed virulence in murine infection models. Our results indicate that B. oklahomensis is the least pathogenic of the species investigated. They also show a correlation between isolates of B. thailandensis associated with human infection and virulence in macrophage and Galleria infection models.

  17. Distinct colicin M-like bacteriocin-immunity pairs in Burkholderia.

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    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Mot, René

    2015-11-27

    The Escherichia coli bacteriocin colicin M (ColM) acts via degradation of the cell wall precursor lipid II in target cells. ColM producers avoid self-inhibition by a periplasmic immunity protein anchored in the inner membrane. In this study, we identified colM-like bacteriocin genes in genomes of several β-proteobacterial strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. Two selected Burkholderia ambifaria proteins, designated burkhocins M1 and M2, were produced recombinantly and showed antagonistic activity against Bcc strains. In their considerably sequence-diverged catalytic domain, a conserved aspartate residue equally proved pivotal for cytotoxicity. Immunity to M-type burkhocins is conferred upon susceptible strains by heterologous expression of a cognate gene located either upstream or downstream of the toxin gene. These genes lack homology with currently known ColM immunity genes and encode inner membrane-associated proteins of two distinct types, differing in predicted transmembrane topology and moiety exposed to the periplasm. The addition of burkhocins to the bacteriocin complement of Burkholderia reveals a wider phylogenetic distribution of ColM-like bacteriotoxins, beyond the γ-proteobacterial genera Escherichia, Pectobacterium and Pseudomonas, and illuminates the diversified nature of immunity-providing proteins.

  18. Burkholderia latens sp. nov., Burkholderia diffusa sp. nov., Burkholderia arboris sp. nov., Burkholderia seminalis sp. nov. and Burkholderia metallica sp. nov., novel species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

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    Vanlaere, Elke; Lipuma, John J; Baldwin, Adam; Henry, Deborah; De Brandt, Evie; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Speert, David; Dowson, Chris; Vandamme, Peter

    2008-07-01

    The taxonomic position of five recA gene clusters of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) isolates was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The levels of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequence similarity, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data and the intermediate DNA-DNA binding values demonstrated that these five clusters represented five novel species within the Bcc. Biochemical identification of these species is difficult, as is the case for most Bcc species. However, identification of these novel species can be accomplished through recA gene sequence analysis, MLST and BOX-PCR profiling and by recA RFLP analysis. For diagnostic laboratories, recA gene sequence analysis offers the best combination of accuracy and simplicity. Based on these results, we propose five novel Bcc species, Burkholderia latens sp. nov. (type strain FIRENZE 3(T) =LMG 24064(T) =CCUG 54555(T)), Burkholderia diffusa sp. nov. (type strain AU1075(T) =LMG 24065(T) =CCUG 54558(T)), Burkholderia arboris sp. nov. (type strain ES0263A(T) =LMG 24066(T) =CCUG 54561(T)), Burkholderia seminalis sp. nov. (type strain AU0475(T) =LMG 24067(T) =CCUG 54564(T)) and Burkholderia metallica sp. nov. (type strain AU0553(T) =LMG 24068(T) =CCUG 54567(T)). In the present study, we also demonstrate that Burkholderia ubonensis should be considered a member of the Bcc.

  19. Phylogenomic Study of Burkholderia glathei-like Organisms, Proposal of 13 Novel Burkholderia Species and Emended Descriptions of Burkholderia sordidicola, Burkholderia zhejiangensis, and Burkholderia grimmiae

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    Peeters, Charlotte; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Verheyde, Bart; De Brandt, Evie; Cooper, Vaughn S.; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Partial gyrB gene sequence analysis of 17 isolates from human and environmental sources revealed 13 clusters of strains and identified them as Burkholderia glathei clade (BGC) bacteria. The taxonomic status of these clusters was examined by whole-genome sequence analysis, determination of the G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and biochemical characterization. The whole-genome sequence-based phylogeny was assessed using the Genome Blast Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) method and an extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) approach. The results demonstrated that these 17 BGC isolates represented 13 novel Burkholderia species that could be distinguished by both genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. BGC strains exhibited a broad metabolic versatility and developed beneficial, symbiotic, and pathogenic interactions with different hosts. Our data also confirmed that there is no phylogenetic subdivision in the genus Burkholderia that distinguishes beneficial from pathogenic strains. We therefore propose to formally classify the 13 novel BGC Burkholderia species as Burkholderia arvi sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29317T = CCUG 68412T), Burkholderia hypogeia sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29322T = CCUG 68407T), Burkholderia ptereochthonis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29326T = CCUG 68403T), Burkholderia glebae sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29325T = CCUG 68404T), Burkholderia pedi sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29323T = CCUG 68406T), Burkholderia arationis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29324T = CCUG 68405T), Burkholderia fortuita sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29320T = CCUG 68409T), Burkholderia temeraria sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29319T = CCUG 68410T), Burkholderia calidae sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29321T = CCUG 68408T), Burkholderia concitans sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29315T = CCUG 68414T), Burkholderia turbans sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29316T = CCUG 68413T), Burkholderia catudaia sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29318T = CCUG 68411T) and Burkholderia peredens sp. nov. (type strain LMG 29314T = CCUG

  20. Influence of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis on anaerobic respiration, biofilm formation and motility in Burkholderia thailandensis.

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    Andreae, Clio A; Titball, Richard W; Butler, Clive S

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is closely related to Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. B. pseudomallei can survive and persist within a hypoxic environment for up to one year and has been shown to grow anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. Currently, little is known about the role of anaerobic respiration in pathogenesis of melioidosis. Using B. thailandensis as a model, a library of 1344 transposon mutants was created to identify genes required for anaerobic nitrate respiration. One transposon mutant (CA01) was identified with an insertion in BTH_I1704 (moeA), a gene required for the molybdopterin biosynthetic pathway. This pathway is involved in the synthesis of a molybdopterin cofactor required for a variety of molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductase. Disruption of molybdopterin biosynthesis prevented growth under anaerobic conditions, when using nitrate as the sole terminal electron acceptor. Defects in anaerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, motility and biofilm formation were observed for CA01. Mutant complementation with pDA-17:BTH_I1704 was able to restore anaerobic growth on nitrate, nitrate reductase activity and biofilm formation, but did not restore motility. This study highlights the potential importance of molybdoenzyme-dependent anaerobic respiration in the survival and virulence of B. thailandensis. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Burkholderia: an update on taxonomy and biotechnological potential as antibiotic producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoorter, Eliza; Bull, Matt J; Peeters, Charlotte; Coenye, Tom; Vandamme, Peter; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia is an incredibly diverse and versatile Gram-negative genus, within which over 80 species have been formally named and multiple other genotypic groups likely represent new species. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and core genome ribosomal multilocus sequence typing analysis indicates the presence of at least three major clades within the genus. Biotechnologically, Burkholderia are well-known for their bioremediation and biopesticidal properties. Within this review, we explore the ability of Burkholderia to synthesise a wide range of antimicrobial compounds ranging from historically characterised antifungals to recently described antibacterial antibiotics with activity against multiresistant clinical pathogens. The production of multiple Burkholderia antibiotics is controlled by quorum sensing and examples of quorum sensing pathways found across the genus are discussed. The capacity for antibiotic biosynthesis and secondary metabolism encoded within Burkholderia genomes is also evaluated. Overall, Burkholderia demonstrate significant biotechnological potential as a source of novel antibiotics and bioactive secondary metabolites.

  2. Quorum Sensing Influences Burkholderia thailandensis Biofilm Development and Matrix Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Boo Shan; Majerczyk, Charlotte D; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Chandler, Josephine R; Greenberg, E Peter; Parsek, Matthew R

    2016-10-01

    Members of the genus Burkholderia are known to be adept at biofilm formation, which presumably assists in the survival of these organisms in the environment and the host. Biofilm formation has been linked to quorum sensing (QS) in several bacterial species. In this study, we characterized Burkholderia thailandensis biofilm development under flow conditions and sought to determine whether QS contributes to this process. B. thailandensis biofilm formation exhibited an unusual pattern: the cells formed small aggregates and then proceeded to produce mature biofilms characterized by "dome" structures filled with biofilm matrix material. We showed that this process was dependent on QS. B. thailandensis has three acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) QS systems (QS-1, QS-2, and QS-3). An AHL-negative strain produced biofilms consisting of cell aggregates but lacking the matrix-filled dome structures. This phenotype was rescued via exogenous addition of the three AHL signals. Of the three B. thailandensis QS systems, we show that QS-1 is required for proper biofilm development, since a btaR1 mutant, which is defective in QS-1 regulation, forms biofilms without these dome structures. Furthermore, our data show that the wild-type biofilm biomass, as well as the material inside the domes, stains with a fucose-binding lectin. The btaR1 mutant biofilms, however, are negative for fucose staining. This suggests that the QS-1 system regulates the production of a fucose-containing exopolysaccharide in wild-type biofilms. Finally, we present data showing that QS ability during biofilm development produces a biofilm that is resistant to dispersion under stress conditions. The saprophyte Burkholderia thailandensis is a close relative of the pathogenic bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, which is contracted from its environmental reservoir. Since most bacteria in the environment reside in biofilms, B. thailandensis is an ideal model organism for

  3. Clinical characteristics of bacteraemia caused by burkholderia cepacia complex species and antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates in a medical centre in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ying-Chun; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Chien, Jung-Yien; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Yu, Chong-Jen; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2017-07-10

    This study investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes of bacteraemia due to Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) species among 54 patients without cystic fibrosis from January 2013 to February 2015. BCC isolates were identified to the species level by the Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS system and by sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA and recA genes. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. Sequencing of the recA gene in the 54 blood isolates revealed 37 (68.5%) isolates of B. cenocepacia, 9 (16.7%) B. cepacia, 4 (7.4%) isolates of B. multivorans and one isolate each of B. arboris, B. pseudomultivorans, B. seminalis, and B. vietnamiensis. The overall performance of the Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS system for correctly identifying the 54 BCC isolates to the species level was 79.6% that was better than that (16.7%) by 16S RNA sequencing analysis. Bacteraemic pneumonia (n=23, 42.6%) and catheter-related bacteraemia (n=21, 38.9%) were the most common types of infection. Higher rates of ceftazidime and meropenem resistance were found in B. cepacia isolates (33.3% and 22.2%, respectively) than in isolates of B. cenocepacia (21.6% and 10.8%, respectively) and other species (12.5% and 12.5%, respectively). Overall, the 30-day mortality rate was 38.9% (21/54). Bacteraemia caused by BCC species other than B. cenocepacia and B. cepacia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 20.005, P=0.024) and high SOFA score (aOR 1.412, P=0.003) were predictive of higher 30-day mortality. Different BCC complex species are associated with different outcomes of bacteraemia and exhibit different susceptibility patterns. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Genomic Patterns of Pathogen Evolution Revealed by Comparison of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the Causative Agent of Melioidosis, to Avirulent Burkholderia thailandensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-26

    10]. Like Bp, Bt is also a soil saprophyte , and until its classifi- cation as a distinct species in 1998 was considered to rep- resent a subtype of...islands in pathogenic and environmental microorganisms . Nat Rev Microbiol 2004, 2:414-424. 5. Chain PS, Carniel E, Larimer FW, Lamerdin J, Stoutland

  5. Burkholderia species infections in patients with cystic fibrosis in British Columbia, Canada. 30 years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlosnik, James E A; Zhou, Guohai; Brant, Rollin; Henry, Deborah A; Hird, Trevor J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Chilvers, Mark A; Wilcox, Pearce; Speert, David P

    2015-01-01

    We have been collecting Burkholderia species bacteria from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) for the last 30 years. During this time, our understanding of their multispecies taxonomy and infection control has evolved substantially. To evaluate the long-term (30 year) epidemiology and clinical outcome of Burkholderia infection in CF, and fully define the risks associated with infection by each species. Isolates from Burkholderia-positive patients (n=107) were speciated and typed annually for each infected patient. Microbiological and clinical data were evaluated by thorough review of patient charts, and statistical analyses performed to define significant epidemiological factors. Before 1995, the majority of new Burkholderia infections were caused by epidemic clones of Burkholderia cenocepacia. After implementation of new infection control measures in 1995, Burkholderia multivorans became the most prevalent species. Survival analysis showed that patients with CF infected with B. cenocepacia had a significantly worse outcome than those with B. multivorans, and a novel finding was that, after Burkholderia infection, the prognosis for females was significantly worse than for males. B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia have been the predominant Burkholderia species infecting people with CF in Vancouver. The implementation of infection control measures were successful in preventing new acquisition of epidemic strains of B. cenocepacia, leaving nonclonal B. multivorans as the most prevalent species. Historically, survival after infection with B. cenocepacia has been significantly worse than B. multivorans infection, and, of new significance, we show that females tend toward worse clinical outcomes.

  6. Pediatric melioidosis in Sarawak, Malaysia: Epidemiological, clinical and microbiological characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Mohan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a serious, and potentially fatal community-acquired infection endemic to northern Australia and Southeast Asia, including Sarawak, Malaysia. The disease, caused by the usually intrinsically aminoglycoside-resistant Burkholderia pseudomallei, most commonly affects adults with predisposing risk factors. There are limited data on pediatric melioidosis in Sarawak.A part prospective, part retrospective study of children aged <15 years with culture-confirmed melioidosis was conducted in the 3 major public hospitals in Central Sarawak between 2009 and 2014. We examined epidemiological, clinical and microbiological characteristics.Forty-two patients were recruited during the 6-year study period. The overall annual incidence was estimated to be 4.1 per 100,000 children <15 years, with marked variation between districts. No children had pre-existing medical conditions. Twenty-three (55% had disseminated disease, 10 (43% of whom died. The commonest site of infection was the lungs, which occurred in 21 (50% children. Other important sites of infection included lymph nodes, spleen, joints and lacrimal glands. Seven (17% children had bacteremia with no overt focus of infection. Delays in diagnosis and in melioidosis-appropriate antibiotic treatment were observed in nearly 90% of children. Of the clinical isolates tested, 35/36 (97% were susceptible to gentamicin. Of these, all 11 isolates that were genotyped were of a single multi-locus sequence type, ST881, and possessed the putative B. pseudomallei virulence determinants bimABp, fhaB3, and the YLF gene cluster.Central Sarawak has a very high incidence of pediatric melioidosis, caused predominantly by gentamicin-susceptible B. pseudomallei strains. Children frequently presented with disseminated disease and had an alarmingly high death rate, despite the absence of any apparent predisposing risk factor.

  7. Melioidosis: Clinical impact and public health threat in the tropics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramar Perumal Samy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This review briefly summarizes the geographical distribution and clinical impact of melioidosis, especially in the tropics. Burkholderia pseudomallei (a gram-negative bacterium is the major causative agent for melioidosis, which is prevalent in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, and Northern Australia. Melioidosis patients are increasingly being recognized in other parts of the world. The bacteria are intrinsically resistant to many antimicrobial agents, but prolonged treatment, especially with combinations of antibiotics, may be effective. Despite therapy, the overall case fatality rate of septicemia in melioidosis remains significantly high. Intracellular survival of the bacteria within macrophages may progress to chronic infections, and about 10% of patients suffer relapses. In the coming decades, melioidosis will increasingly afflict travelers throughout many global regions. Clinicians managing travelers returning from the subtropics or tropics with severe pneumonia or septicemia should consider acute melioidosis as a differential diagnosis. Patients with open skin wounds, diabetes, or chronic renal disease are at higher risk for melioidosis and should avoid direct contact with soil and standing water in endemic regions. Furthermore, there are fears that B. pseudomallei may be used as a biological weapon. Technological advancements in molecular diagnostics and antibiotic therapy are improving the disease outcomes in endemic areas throughout Asia. Research and development efforts on vaccine candidates against melioidosis are ongoing.

  8. Burkholderia humisilvae sp. nov., Burkholderia solisilvae sp. nov. and Burkholderia rhizosphaerae sp. nov., isolated from forest soil and rhizosphere soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jae-Chan; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2015-01-01

    .... On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the three strains were found to belong to the genus Burkholderia, showing the closest phylogenetic similarity to Burkholderia diazotrophica JPY461(T) (97.2-97.7...

  9. Discrimination of Pathogenic vs. Nonpathogenic Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei Using Proteomics Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    F. tularensis LVS and B. thailandensis E264. Working cultures were prepared by streaking cells from cryopreserved stocks onto chocolate agar (CA...Escherichia coli and Salmonella : cellular and molecular biology, 2nd ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC. 3. Haake, D.A. 2000. Spirochaetal lipoproteins and

  10. Screening and expression of selected taxonomically conserved and unique hypothetical proteins in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhir, Nor Azurah Mat; Nadzirin, Nurul; Mohamed, Rahmah; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Hypothetical proteins of bacterial pathogens represent a large numbers of novel biological mechanisms which could belong to essential pathways in the bacteria. They lack functional characterizations mainly due to the inability of sequence homology based methods to detect functional relationships in the absence of detectable sequence similarity. The dataset derived from this study showed 550 candidates conserved in genomes that has pathogenicity information and only present in the Burkholderiales order. The dataset has been narrowed down to taxonomic clusters. Ten proteins were selected for ORF amplification, seven of them were successfully amplified, and only four proteins were successfully expressed. These proteins will be great candidates in determining the true function via structural biology.

  11. Characterization of cellular immune response and innate immune signaling in human and nonhuman primate primary mononuclear cells exposed to Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shahabuddin; Amemiya, Kei; Bernhards, Robert C; Ulrich, Robert G; Waag, David M; Saikh, Kamal U

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei infection causes melioidosis and is often characterized by severe sepsis. Although rare in humans, Burkholderia mallei has caused infections in laboratory workers, and the early innate cellular response to B. mallei in human and nonhuman primates has not been characterized. In this study, we examined the primary cellular immune response to B. mallei in PBMC cultures of non-human primates (NHPs), Chlorocebus aethiops (African Green Monkeys), Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus macaque), and Macaca mulatta (Rhesus macaque) and humans. Our results demonstrated that B. mallei elicited strong primary pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) equivalent to the levels of B. pseudomallei in primary PBMC cultures of NHPs and humans. When we examined IL-1β and other cytokine responses by comparison to Escherichia coli LPS, African Green Monkeys appears to be most responsive to B. mallei than Cynomolgus or Rhesus. Characterization of the immune signaling mechanism for cellular response was conducted by using a ligand induced cell-based reporter assay, and our results demonstrated that MyD88 mediated signaling contributed to the B. mallei and B. pseudomallei induced pro-inflammatory responses. Notably, the induced reporter activity with B. mallei, B. pseudomallei, or purified LPS from these pathogens was inhibited and cytokine production was attenuated by a MyD88 inhibitor. Together, these results show that in the scenario of severe hyper-inflammatory responses to B. mallei infection, MyD88 targeted therapeutic intervention may be a successful strategy for therapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Combining functional and structural genomics to sample the essential Burkholderia structome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Baugh

    Full Text Available The genus Burkholderia includes pathogenic gram-negative bacteria that cause melioidosis, glanders, and pulmonary infections of patients with cancer and cystic fibrosis. Drug resistance has made development of new antimicrobials critical. Many approaches to discovering new antimicrobials, such as structure-based drug design and whole cell phenotypic screens followed by lead refinement, require high-resolution structures of proteins essential to the parasite.We experimentally identified 406 putative essential genes in B. thailandensis, a low-virulence species phylogenetically similar to B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, using saturation-level transposon mutagenesis and next-generation sequencing (Tn-seq. We selected 315 protein products of these genes based on structure-determination criteria, such as excluding very large and/or integral membrane proteins, and entered them into the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infection Disease (SSGCID structure determination pipeline. To maximize structural coverage of these targets, we applied an "ortholog rescue" strategy for those producing insoluble or difficult to crystallize proteins, resulting in the addition of 387 orthologs (or paralogs from seven other Burkholderia species into the SSGCID pipeline. This structural genomics approach yielded structures from 31 putative essential targets from B. thailandensis, and 25 orthologs from other Burkholderia species, yielding an overall structural coverage for 49 of the 406 essential gene families, with a total of 88 depositions into the Protein Data Bank. Of these, 25 proteins have properties of a potential antimicrobial drug target i.e., no close human homolog, part of an essential metabolic pathway, and a deep binding pocket. We describe the structures of several potential drug targets in detail.This collection of structures, solubility and experimental essentiality data provides a resource for development of drugs against

  13. Combining functional and structural genomics to sample the essential Burkholderia structome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Loren; Gallagher, Larry A; Patrapuvich, Rapatbhorn; Clifton, Matthew C; Gardberg, Anna S; Edwards, Thomas E; Armour, Brianna; Begley, Darren W; Dieterich, Shellie H; Dranow, David M; Abendroth, Jan; Fairman, James W; Fox, David; Staker, Bart L; Phan, Isabelle; Gillespie, Angela; Choi, Ryan; Nakazawa-Hewitt, Steve; Nguyen, Mary Trang; Napuli, Alberto; Barrett, Lynn; Buchko, Garry W; Stacy, Robin; Myler, Peter J; Stewart, Lance J; Manoil, Colin; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2013-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia includes pathogenic gram-negative bacteria that cause melioidosis, glanders, and pulmonary infections of patients with cancer and cystic fibrosis. Drug resistance has made development of new antimicrobials critical. Many approaches to discovering new antimicrobials, such as structure-based drug design and whole cell phenotypic screens followed by lead refinement, require high-resolution structures of proteins essential to the parasite. We experimentally identified 406 putative essential genes in B. thailandensis, a low-virulence species phylogenetically similar to B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, using saturation-level transposon mutagenesis and next-generation sequencing (Tn-seq). We selected 315 protein products of these genes based on structure-determination criteria, such as excluding very large and/or integral membrane proteins, and entered them into the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infection Disease (SSGCID) structure determination pipeline. To maximize structural coverage of these targets, we applied an "ortholog rescue" strategy for those producing insoluble or difficult to crystallize proteins, resulting in the addition of 387 orthologs (or paralogs) from seven other Burkholderia species into the SSGCID pipeline. This structural genomics approach yielded structures from 31 putative essential targets from B. thailandensis, and 25 orthologs from other Burkholderia species, yielding an overall structural coverage for 49 of the 406 essential gene families, with a total of 88 depositions into the Protein Data Bank. Of these, 25 proteins have properties of a potential antimicrobial drug target i.e., no close human homolog, part of an essential metabolic pathway, and a deep binding pocket. We describe the structures of several potential drug targets in detail. This collection of structures, solubility and experimental essentiality data provides a resource for development of drugs against infections and diseases

  14. Virulence of Burkholderia mallei quorum-sensing mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Kinman, Loren; Han, Tony; Bunt, Richard; Greenberg, E Peter

    2013-05-01

    Many Proteobacteria use acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum-sensing (QS) to activate specific sets of genes as a function of cell density. QS often controls the virulence of pathogenic species, and in fact a previous study indicated that QS was important for Burkholderia mallei mouse lung infections. To gain in-depth information on the role of QS in B. mallei virulence, we constructed and characterized a mutant of B. mallei strain GB8 that was unable to make acyl-homoserine lactones. The QS mutant showed virulence equal to that of its wild-type parent in an aerosol mouse infection model, and growth in macrophages was indistinguishable from that of the parent strain. Furthermore, we assessed the role of QS in B. mallei ATCC 23344 by constructing and characterizing a mutant strain producing AiiA, a lactonase enzyme that degrades acyl-homoserine lactones. Although acyl-homoserine lactone levels in cultures of this strain are very low, it showed full virulence. Contrary to the previous report, we conclude that QS is not required for acute B. mallei infections of mice. QS may be involved in some stage of chronic infections in the natural host of horses, or the QS genes may be remnants of the QS network in B. pseudomallei from which this host-adapted pathogen evolved.

  15. Evaluación de los sistemas comerciales automatizados VITEK 2 y API 20NE para la identificación de organismos del complejo Burkholderia cepacia aislados de muestras clínicas Evaluation of commercial systems VITEK 2 and API 20NE for identification of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Oderiz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Las especies del complejo Burkholderia cepacia (CBC son capaces de causar infecciones crónicas del tracto respiratorio en pacientes con fibrosis quística y en otros individuos inmunocomprometidos. La mayoría de estas especies exhiben alta resistencia a la terapia antibiótica, lo que genera la necesidad de una detección rápida y precisa para poder implementar estrategias de control adecuadas. En este trabajo se utilizó la técnica de reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR para amplificar el gen recA (PCR-recA, con el fin de identificar microorganismos pertenecientes al CBC. Con este método molecular como referencia, se evaluó la sensibilidad (S y la especificidad (E de dos sistemas de identificación comerciales automatizados, VITEK 2 y API 20NE (bioMérieux®, así como también el valor de las pruebas bioquímicas manuales más representativas para la identificación de estos microorganismos. El método VITEK 2 presentó una S del 71,1 % y una E del 100 %; para el método API 20NE, estos valores fueron 69,7 % y 90,2 %, respectivamente. En cuanto a las pruebas fenotípicas manuales, los resultados obtenidos fueron más heterogéneos, lo que posiblemente se deba a que estas bacterias podrían sufrir presión selectiva para sobrevivir en pacientes crónicos y perder factores fenotípicos característicos. La técnica de PCR-recA resultó de fácil implementación, por lo que cabe considerar a esta técnica de identificación como una opción viable, aun en laboratorios de diagnóstico clínico de mediana complejidad.Species belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC are capable of causing chronic respiratory tract infections in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis as wel as in immunocompromised individuals. Most of these species are highly resistant to antibiotic therapy, generating the need for their rapid and accurate detection for the proper treatment and clinical management of these patients. In this wok, the polymerase

  16. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benanti, Erin L; Nguyen, Catherine M; Welch, Matthew D

    2015-04-09

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, whereas their close relative B. thailandensis is non-pathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion, and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate, and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-obligate predatory bacterium Burkholderia casidae and uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    A novel predator bacterium Burkholderia casidae is disclosed. The invention is directed to the isolation and use of Burkholderia casidae to control microbial diseases of plants. The genetic, biochemical and physiological characteristics of Burkholderia casidae are described. Biocontrol compositions comprising Burkholderia casidae, and antimicrobial compounds and antimicrobial preparations prepared from Burkholderia casidae are also disclosed, as are methods for accomplishing all of the forego...

  18. Non-obligate predatory bacterium burkholderia casidaeand uses thereof

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    A novel predator bacterium Burkholderia casidae is disclosed. The invention is directed to the isolation and use of Burkholderia casidae to control microbial diseases of plants. The genetic, biochemical and physiological characteristics of Burkholderia casidae are described. Biocontrol compositions comprising Burkholderia casidae, and antimicrobial compounds and antimicrobial preparations prepared from Burkholderia casidae are also disclosed, as are methods for accomplishing all of the forego...

  19. Biochemical Characterization and Structural Basis of Reactivity and Regioselectivity Differences between Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia glumae 1,6-Didesmethyltoxoflavin N-Methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Michael K; Almabruk, Khaled H; Ealick, Steven E; Begley, Tadhg P; Philmus, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Burkholderia glumae converts the guanine base of guanosine triphosphate into an azapteridine and methylates both the pyrimidine and triazine rings to make toxoflavin. Strains of Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei have a gene cluster encoding seven putative biosynthetic enzymes that resembles the toxoflavin gene cluster. Four of the enzymes are similar in sequence to BgToxBCDE, which have been proposed to make 1,6-didesmethyltoxoflavin (1,6-DDMT). One of the remaining enzymes, BthII1283 in B. thailandensis E264, is a predicted S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent N-methyltransferase that shows a low level of sequence identity to BgToxA, which sequentially methylates N6 and N1 of 1,6-DDMT to form toxoflavin. Here we show that, unlike BgToxA, BthII1283 catalyzes a single methyl transfer to N1 of 1,6-DDMT in vitro. In addition, we investigated the differences in reactivity and regioselectivity by determining crystal structures of BthII1283 with bound S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) or 1,6-DDMT and SAH. BthII1283 contains a class I methyltransferase fold and three unique extensions used for 1,6-DDMT recognition. The active site structure suggests that 1,6-DDMT is bound in a reduced form. The plane of the azapteridine ring system is orthogonal to its orientation in BgToxA. In BthII1283, the modeled SAM methyl group is directed toward the p orbital of N1, whereas in BgToxA, it is first directed toward an sp(2) orbital of N6 and then toward an sp(2) orbital of N1 after planar rotation of the azapteridine ring system. Furthermore, in BthII1283, N1 is hydrogen bonded to a histidine residue whereas BgToxA does not supply an obvious basic residue for either N6 or N1 methylation.

  20. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  1. Bacterial genome adaptation to niches: Divergence of the potential virulence genes in three Burkholderia species of different survival strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarria Saul H

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two closely related species Burkholderia mallei (Bm and Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp are serious human health hazards and are potential bio-warfare agents, whereas another closely related species Burkholderia thailandensis (Bt is a non-pathogenic saprophyte. To investigate the genomic factors resulting in such a dramatic difference, we first identified the Bm genes responsive to the mouse environment, and then examined the divergence of these genes in Bp and Bt. Results The genes down-expressed, which largely encode cell growth-related proteins, are conserved well in all three species, whereas those up-expressed, which include potential virulence genes, are less well conserved or absent notably in Bt. However, a substantial number of up-expressed genes is still conserved in Bt. Bm and Bp further diverged from each other in a small number of genes resulting from unit number changes in simple sequence repeats (ssr in the homologs. Conclusion Our data suggest that divergent evolution of a small set of genes, rather than acquisition or loss of pathogenic islands, is associated with the development of different life styles in these bacteria of similar genomic contents. Further divergence between Bm and Bp mediated by ssr changes may reflect different adaptive processes of Bm and Bp fine-tuning into their host environments.

  2. A High-Throughput Pipeline for the Design of Real-Time PCR Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    Burkholderia mallei with respect to Burkholderia pseudomallei. B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are closely related pathogens that cause different diseases...identification of Burkholderia mallei and differentiation from Burkholderia pseudomallei and other closely related Burkholderiaceae. Diagn Microbiol...evolutionary relationships among the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei . J Clin Microbiol

  3. Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a common pathogen in Thailand that is resistant to the bactericidal effects of many antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookpranee, T; Sookpranee, M; Mellencamp, M A; Preheim, L C

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify newer antimicrobial agents that may be useful in the therapy of melioidosis. The in vitro susceptibilities of 199 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas pseudomallei to 22 antibiotics were determined by standard disk diffusion, and those to 13 antibiotics were determined by agar dilution. Over 90% of the isolates were susceptible to imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, piperacillin, ceftazidime, ticarcillin-clavulanate, ampicillin-sulbactam, and carumonam by both methods. Standard disk diffusion yielded unacceptably high false-susceptibility results with aztreonam, ciprofloxacin, and temafloxacin. Piperacillin, ceftazidime, imipenem, and ciprofloxacin were not bactericidal for three selected P. pseudomallei strains as determined by time-kill curve methods. Furthermore, addition of ciprofloxacin to piperacillin, ceftazidime, or imipenem did not enhance bactericidal activity. One hundred ninety-four strains showed weak beta-lactamase production that did not increase upon incubation with cefoxitin. These findings suggest that several newer antimicrobial agents may prove useful in the treatment of melioidosis. However, results of susceptibility studies involving P. pseudomallei and newer agents must be interpreted with caution.

  4. Burkholderia thailandensis harbors two identical rhl gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of rhamnolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Donald E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhamnolipids are surface active molecules composed of rhamnose and β-hydroxydecanoic acid. These biosurfactants are produced mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and have been thoroughly investigated since their early discovery. Recently, they have attracted renewed attention because of their involvement in various multicellular behaviors. Despite this high interest, only very few studies have focused on the production of rhamnolipids by Burkholderia species. Results Orthologs of rhlA, rhlB and rhlC, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of rhamnolipids in P. aeruginosa, have been found in the non-infectious Burkholderia thailandensis, as well as in the genetically similar important pathogen B. pseudomallei. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, both Burkholderia species contain these three genes necessary for rhamnolipid production within a single gene cluster. Furthermore, two identical, paralogous copies of this gene cluster are found on the second chromosome of these bacteria. Both Burkholderia spp. produce rhamnolipids containing 3-hydroxy fatty acid moieties with longer side chains than those described for P. aeruginosa. Additionally, the rhamnolipids produced by B. thailandensis contain a much larger proportion of dirhamnolipids versus monorhamnolipids when compared to P. aeruginosa. The rhamnolipids produced by B. thailandensis reduce the surface tension of water to 42 mN/m while displaying a critical micelle concentration value of 225 mg/L. Separate mutations in both rhlA alleles, which are responsible for the synthesis of the rhamnolipid precursor 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxyalkanoic acid, prove that both copies of the rhl gene cluster are functional, but one contributes more to the total production than the other. Finally, a double ΔrhlA mutant that is completely devoid of rhamnolipid production is incapable of swarming motility, showing that both gene clusters contribute to this phenotype. Conclusions Collectively, these

  5. Genus-wide acid tolerance accounts for the biogeographical distribution of soil Burkholderia populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Frey, Beat; Fierer, Noah; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-06-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia are highly versatile with respect to their ecological niches and lifestyles, ranging from nodulating tropical plants to causing melioidosis and fatal infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Despite the clinical importance and agronomical relevance of Burkholderia species, information about the factors influencing their occurrence, abundance and diversity in the environment is scarce. Recent findings have demonstrated that pH is the main predictor of soil bacterial diversity and community structure, with the highest diversity observed in neutral pH soils. As many Burkholderia species have been isolated from low pH environments, we hypothesized that acid tolerance may be a general feature of this genus, and pH a good predictor of their occurrence in soils. Using a combination of environmental surveys at trans-continental and local scales, as well as in vitro assays, we show that, unlike most bacteria, Burkholderia species have a competitive advantage in acidic soils, but are outcompeted in alkaline soils. Physiological assays and diversity analysis based on 16S rRNA clone libraries demonstrate that pH tolerance is a general phenotypic trait of the genus Burkholderia. Our results provide a basis for building a predictive understanding of the biogeographical patterns exhibited by Burkholderia sp. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Immune Recognition of the Epidemic Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen Burkholderia dolosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Damien; Weatherholt, Molly; Clark, Bradley; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Renaud, Diane; Scott, David; Skurnik, David; Priebe, Gregory P; Pier, Gerald; Gerard, Craig; Yoder-Himes, Deborah R

    2017-06-01

    Burkholderia dolosa caused an outbreak in the cystic fibrosis (CF) clinic at Boston Children's Hospital from 1998 to 2005 and led to the infection of over 40 patients, many of whom died due to complications from infection by this organism. To assess whether B. dolosa significantly contributes to disease or is recognized by the host immune response, mice were infected with a sequenced outbreak B. dolosa strain, AU0158, and responses were compared to those to the well-studied CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa In parallel, mice were also infected with a polar flagellin mutant of B. dolosa to examine the role of flagella in B. dolosa lung colonization. The results showed a higher persistence in the host by B. dolosa strains, and yet, neutrophil recruitment and cytokine production were lower than those with P. aeruginosa The ability of host immune cells to recognize B. dolosa was then assessed, B. dolosa induced a robust cytokine response in cultured cells, and this effect was dependent on the flagella only when bacteria were dead. Together, these results suggest that B. dolosa can be recognized by host cells in vitro but may avoid or suppress the host immune response in vivo through unknown mechanisms. B. dolosa was then compared to other Burkholderia species and found to induce similar levels of cytokine production despite being internalized by macrophages more than Burkholderia cenocepacia strains. These data suggest that B. dolosa AU0158 may act differently with host cells and is recognized differently by immune systems than are other Burkholderia strains or species. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Phylogenomic Study of Burkholderia glathei-like Organisms, Proposal of 13 Novel Burkholderia Species and Emended Descriptions of Burkholderia sordidicola, Burkholderia zhejiangensis, and Burkholderia grimmiae

    OpenAIRE

    Peeters, Charlotte; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Verheyde, Bart; De Brandt, Evie; Vaughn S Cooper; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Partial gyrB gene sequence analysis of 17 isolates from human and environmental sources revealed 13 clusters of strains and identified them as Burkholderia glathei Glade (BGC) bacteria. The taxonomic status of these clusters was examined by whole-genome sequence analysis, determination of the G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and biochemical characterization. The whole-genome sequence-based phylogeny was assessed using the Genome Blast Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) method and an extende...

  8. Identification of a Burkholderia mallei polysaccharide gene cluster by subtractive hybridization and demonstration that the encoded capsule is an essential virulence determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeShazer, D; Waag, D M; Fritz, D L; Woods, D E

    2001-05-01

    Little is known about the virulence factors of Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders. We employed subtractive hybridization to identify genetic determinants present in B. mallei but not in Burkholderia thailandensis, a non-pathogenic soil microbe. Three subtractive hybridization products were mapped to a genetic locus encoding proteins involved in the biosynthesis, export and translocation of a capsular polysaccharide. We identified an insertion sequence (IS 407 A) at one end of the capsule gene cluster and demonstrated that it was functional in B. mallei. Mutations were introduced in the B. mallei capsular gene cluster and the corresponding mutants were examined for their reactivity with antibodies raised against Burkholderia pseudomallei surface polysaccharides by immunoblotting and ELISA. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of a capsule on the surface of B. mallei ATCC 23344 (parental strain) but not on B. mallei DD3008 (capsule mutant) or B. thailandensis. Surprisingly, B. thailandensis also harboured a portion of the capsule gene cluster. ATCC 23344 was highly virulent in hamsters and mice, but DD3008 was avirulent in both animal models. The results presented here demonstrate that the capsular polysaccharide of B. mallei is required for production of disease in two animal models of glanders infection and is a major virulence factor. Copyright 2001 Crown Copyright.

  9. Immunoproteomic analysis of proteins expressed by two related pathogens, Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia, during human infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minu Shinoy

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes chronic infections in people with cystic fibrosis (CF. It is a highly antibiotic resistant organism and Bcc infections are rarely cleared from patients, once they are colonized. The two most clinically relevant species within Bcc are Burkholderia cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans. The virulence of these pathogens has not been fully elucidated and the virulence proteins expressed during human infection have not been identified to date. Furthermore, given its antibiotic resistance, prevention of infection with a prophylactic vaccine may represent a better alternative than eradication of an existing infection. We have compared the immunoproteome of two strains each from these two species of Bcc, with the aim of identifying immunogenic proteins which are common to both species. Fourteen immunoreactive proteins were exclusive to both B. cenocepacia strains, while 15 were exclusive to B. multivorans. A total of 15 proteins were immunogenic across both species. DNA-directed RNA polymerase, GroEL, 38kDa porin and elongation factor-Tu were immunoreactive proteins expressed by all four strains examined. Many proteins which were immunoreactive in both species, warrant further investigations in order to aid in the elucidation of the mechanisms of pathogenesis of this difficult organism. In addition, identification of some of these could also allow the development of protective vaccines which may prevent colonisation.

  10. Development of a real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, V; Saxena, A; Singh, S; Goel, A K; Kumar, J S; Parida, M M; Rai, G P

    2017-06-25

    Burkholderia mallei is the aetiological agent of glanders, a highly contagious and re-emerging zoonotic disease. Early diagnosis of glanders is critically important to ensure timely treatment with appropriate antibiotics in humans, and to prevent spread of infection in animals. Molecular detection of B. mallei has always been troublesome because of its genetic similarity with Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis. In present investigation, a set of six B. mallei-specific primers were designed and a simple, rapid, specific and sensitive real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed for detection of B. mallei. The LAMP assay could detect as low as 1 pg of B. mallei genomic DNA and 5.5 × 10(3)  CFU/ml of B. mallei in spiked human blood. The assay was highly specific for B. mallei as it did not cross-react with other bacterial strains used in the study. The established LAMP assay is field adaptable and can be a better and viable alternative to PCR-based techniques for detection of B. mallei in glanders endemic areas with resource-limited settings. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. PPO zoekt naar mogelijkheden aanpak Burkholderia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarswaard, A.; Dam, van M.F.N.

    2014-01-01

    In de bloemen- en knollenteelt van gladiool komt de afgelopen decennia met enige regelmaat de bacterieziekte Burkholderia voor. Vorig jaar startte PPO met een onderzoek naar de mogelijkheden om deze ziekte aan te pakken. Een tussenstand.

  12. The Organization of the Quorum Sensing luxI/R Family Genes in Burkholderia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Kumari Sonal; Hudaiberdiev, Sanjarbek; Gelencsér, Zsolt; Coutinho, Bruna Gonçalves; Venturi, Vittorio; Pongor, Sándor

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia genus of Proteobacteria are capable of living freely in the environment and can also colonize human, animal and plant hosts. Certain members are considered to be clinically important from both medical and veterinary perspectives and furthermore may be important modulators of the rhizosphere. Quorum sensing via N-acyl homoserine lactone signals (AHL QS) is present in almost all Burkholderia species and is thought to play important roles in lifestyle changes such as colonization and niche invasion. Here we present a census of AHL QS genes retrieved from public databases and indicate that the local arrangement (topology) of QS genes, their location within chromosomes and their gene neighborhoods show characteristic patterns that differ between the known Burkholderia clades. In sequence phylogenies, AHL QS genes seem to cluster according to the local gene topology rather than according to the species, which suggests that the basic topology types were present prior to the appearance of current Burkholderia species. The data are available at http://net.icgeb.org/burkholderia/. PMID:23820583

  13. CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides protect mice from Burholderia pseudomallei but not Francisella tularensis Schu 54 aersols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    including the biological warfare threat agents Burkholderia mallei [4] and Burkholderia pseudo- mallei [5]. Murine studies of the Francisella...PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 from Burkholderia mallei challenges [4]. Despite CpG ODN 10103’s...and B. mallei (unpublished data) suggest that, as with the CpG motifs used in other Burkholderia and F. tular- ensis murine studies [3-6], the

  14. Burkholderia humisilvae sp. nov., Burkholderia solisilvae sp. nov. and Burkholderia rhizosphaerae sp. nov., isolated from forest soil and rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Chan; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2015-09-01

    Strains Y-12(T) and Y-47(T) were isolated from mountain forest soil and strain WR43(T) was isolated from rhizosphere soil, at Daejeon, Korea. The three strains grew at 10-55 °C (optimal growth at 28-30 °C), at pH 3.0-8.0 (optimal growth at pH 6.0) and in the presence of 0-4.0% (w/v) NaCl, growing optimally in the absence of added NaCl. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the three strains were found to belong to the genus Burkholderia, showing the closest phylogenetic similarity to Burkholderia diazotrophica JPY461(T) (97.2-97.7%); the similarity between the three sequences ranged from 98.3 to 98.7%. Additionally, the three strains formed a distinct group in phylogenetic trees based on the housekeeping genes recA and gyrB. The predominant ubiquinone was Q-8, the major fatty acids were C16 : 0 and C17  : 0 cyclo and the DNA G+C content of the novel isolates was 61.6-64.4 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness among the three strains and the type strains of the closest species of the genus Burkholderia was less than 50%. On the basis of 16S rRNA, recA and gyrB gene sequence similarities, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, the three strains represent three novel species within the genus Burkholderia, for which the names Burkholderia humisilvae sp. nov. (type strain Y-12(T)= KACC 17601(T) = NBRC 109933(T) = NCAIM B 02543(T)), Burkholderia solisilvae sp. nov. (type strain Y-47(T) = KACC 17602(T)= NBRC 109934(T) = NCAIM B 02539(T)) and Burkholderia rhizosphaerae sp. nov. (type strain WR43(T) = KACC 17603(T) = NBRC 109935(T) = NCAIM B 02541(T)) are proposed.

  15. Choline Catabolism in Burkholderia thailandensis Is Regulated by Multiple Glutamine Amidotransferase 1-Containing AraC Family Transcriptional Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Adam M; Wargo, Matthew J

    2016-09-15

    regulation of these components can help us understand both the evolution of these systems and the potential roles these pathways have in the biology of each bacterium. Here, we describe the transcriptome response of Burkholderia thailandensis to the eukaryote-enriched molecule choline, identify the regulatory pathway governing choline catabolism, and compare the pathway to that previously described for Pseudomonas aeruginosa These data support a multitiered regulatory network in B. thailandensis, with conserved orthologs in the select agents Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, as well as the opportunistic lung pathogens in the Burkholderia cepacia clade. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Characterization of Burkholderia cepacia genomovar I as a potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of nine discrete genomic species ... evaluated by using dual culture and poison food tests. Genotype ..... population of Burkholderia cepacia: effect of seed treatment on disease ...

  17. PCR detection of Burkholderia multivorans in water and soil samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, C. (Charlotte); Daenekindt, S. (Stijn); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Although semi-selective growth media have been developed for the isolation of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria from the environment, thus far Burkholderia multivorans has rarely been isolated from such samples. Because environmental B. multivorans isolates mainly

  18. 40 CFR 725.1075 - Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Burkholderia cepacia complex. 725.1075... Specific Microorganisms § 725.1075 Burkholderia cepacia complex. (a) Microorganism and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The microorganisms identified as the Burkholderia cepacia complex defined as...

  19. Two Stable Variants of Burkholderia pseudomallei Strain MSHR5848 Express Broadly Divergent in vitro Phenotypes Associated with their Virulence Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-21

    epigenetic changes in response to an altered environment , or a combination of mechanisms, as will be discussed. In this paper, we characterized the...reasons including its large environmental range (ref – Limmathurotsakul, D. et al. Nature Microb Lett., 2016), the challenges involved in disease...in a particular environment (ref – Vial, L. 2010; van der Woude et al. 2004; Wisniewski-Dye, F.and Vial, L. 2008; Chantratita et al., 2007

  20. Burkholderia cordobensis sp. nov., from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Walter O; Peeters, Charlotte; Cnockaert, Margo; Snauwaert, Cindy; Wall, Luis G; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Vandamme, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Two Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from agricultural soils in Córdoba province in central Argentina. Their 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that they belong to the genus Burkholderia, with Burkholderia zhejiangensis as most closely related formally named species; this relationship was confirmed through comparative gyrB sequence analysis. Whole-cell fatty acid analysis supported their assignment to the genus Burkholderia. Burkholderia sp. strain YI23, for which a whole-genome sequence is available, represents the same taxon, as demonstrated by its highly similar 16S rRNA (100% similarity) and gyrB (99.1-99.7%) gene sequences. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and physiological and biochemical characterization further substantiated the genotypic and phenotypic distinctiveness of the Argentinian soil isolates, for which the name Burkholderia cordobensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain MMP81(T) ( = LMG 27620(T) = CCUG 64368(T)) as the type strain. © 2014 IUMS.

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0265 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0265 ref|YP_001062117.1| cytosine permease [Burkholderia pseudomallei ...668] ref|ZP_01765971.1| cytosine permease [Burkholderia pseudomallei 305] gb|ABN88339.1| cytosine permease [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 668] gb|EBA49758.1| cytosine permease [Burkholderia pseudomallei 305] YP_001062117.1 0.008 27% ...

  2. Cholesterol and host cell surface proteins contribute to cell-cell fusion induced by the Burkholderia type VI secretion system 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Liam; Haug, Maria; Klein, Kristina; Willmann, Matthias; Bohn, Erwin; Chiantia, Salvatore; Schwarz, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Following escape into the cytoplasm of host cells, Burkholderia pseudomallei and the related species Burkholderia thailandensis employ the type VI secretion system 5 (T6SS-5) to induce plasma membrane fusion with an adjacent host cell. This process leads to the formation of multinucleated giant cells and facilitates bacterial access to an uninfected host cell in a direct manner. Despite its importance in virulence, the mechanism of the T6SS-5 and the role of host cell factors in cell-cell fusion remain elusive. To date, the T6SS-5 is the only system of bacterial origin known to induce host-cell fusion. To gain insight into the nature of T6SS-5-stimulated membrane fusion, we investigated the contribution of cholesterol and proteins exposed on the host cell surface, which were shown to be critically involved in virus-mediated giant cell formation. In particular, we analyzed the effect of host cell surface protein and cholesterol depletion on the formation of multinucleated giant cells induced by B. thailandensis. Acute protease treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages during infection with B. thailandensis followed by agarose overlay assays revealed a strong reduction in the number of cell-cell fusions compared with EDTA treated cells. Similarly, proteolytic treatment of specifically infected donor cells or uninfected recipient cells significantly decreased multinucleated giant cell formation. Furthermore, modulating host cell cholesterol content by acute cholesterol depletion from cellular membranes by methyl- β-cyclodextrin treatment or exogenous addition of cholesterol impaired the ability of B. thailandensis to induce cell-cell fusions. The requirement of physiological cholesterol levels suggests that the membrane organization or mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer influence the fusion process. Altogether, our data suggest that membrane fusion induced by B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis involves a complex interplay between the T6SS-5 and the host cell.

  3. Cholesterol and host cell surface proteins contribute to cell-cell fusion induced by the Burkholderia type VI secretion system 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Whiteley

    Full Text Available Following escape into the cytoplasm of host cells, Burkholderia pseudomallei and the related species Burkholderia thailandensis employ the type VI secretion system 5 (T6SS-5 to induce plasma membrane fusion with an adjacent host cell. This process leads to the formation of multinucleated giant cells and facilitates bacterial access to an uninfected host cell in a direct manner. Despite its importance in virulence, the mechanism of the T6SS-5 and the role of host cell factors in cell-cell fusion remain elusive. To date, the T6SS-5 is the only system of bacterial origin known to induce host-cell fusion. To gain insight into the nature of T6SS-5-stimulated membrane fusion, we investigated the contribution of cholesterol and proteins exposed on the host cell surface, which were shown to be critically involved in virus-mediated giant cell formation. In particular, we analyzed the effect of host cell surface protein and cholesterol depletion on the formation of multinucleated giant cells induced by B. thailandensis. Acute protease treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages during infection with B. thailandensis followed by agarose overlay assays revealed a strong reduction in the number of cell-cell fusions compared with EDTA treated cells. Similarly, proteolytic treatment of specifically infected donor cells or uninfected recipient cells significantly decreased multinucleated giant cell formation. Furthermore, modulating host cell cholesterol content by acute cholesterol depletion from cellular membranes by methyl- β-cyclodextrin treatment or exogenous addition of cholesterol impaired the ability of B. thailandensis to induce cell-cell fusions. The requirement of physiological cholesterol levels suggests that the membrane organization or mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer influence the fusion process. Altogether, our data suggest that membrane fusion induced by B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis involves a complex interplay between the T6SS-5 and

  4. Burkholderia humi sp nov., Burkholderia choica sp nov., Burkholderia telluris sp nov., Burkholderia terrestris sp nov and Burkholderia udeis sp nov. : Burkholderia glathei-like bacteria from soil and rhizosphere soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandamme, Peter; De Brandt, Evie; Houf, Kurt; Salles, Joana Falcao; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of partial gyrB gene sequences revealed six taxa in a group of 17 Burkholderia glathei-like isolates which were further examined by (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridizations, determination of the DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid analysis and

  5. Natural Burkholderia mallei infection in Dromedary, Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernery, Ulrich; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Marina; Al-Salloom, Fajer; Johnson, Bobby; Kinne, Joerg; Jose, Shanti; Jose, Sherry; Tappendorf, Britta; Hornstra, Heidie; Scholz, Holger C

    2011-07-01

    We confirm a natural infection of dromedaries with glanders. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of a Burkholderia mallei strain isolated from a diseased dromedary in Bahrain revealed close genetic proximity to strain Dubai 7, which caused an outbreak of glanders in horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004.

  6. GENOME ANALYSIS OF BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA AC1100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholderia cepacia is an important organism in bioremediation of environmental pollutants and it is also of increasing interest as a human pathogen. The genomic organization of B. cepacia is being studied in order to better understand its unusual adaptive capacity and genome pl...

  7. Burkholderia in gladiolen: voortgezet diagnostisch onderzoek 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.; Hollinger, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 is middels een infectieproef bekend geworden dat de bacterie Burkholderia gladioli in staat is een ziekte bij gladiolen te veroorzaken waardoor de sier- en handelswaarde zeer negatief worden beïnvloed. In 2007 is in het kader van het voortgezet diagnostisch onderzoek nagegaan of de bacterie

  8. Burkholderia monticola sp. nov., isolated from mountain soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Inwoo; Seo, Boram; Lee, Imchang; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik

    2015-02-01

    An ivory/yellow, Gram-stain-negative, short-rod-shaped, aerobic bacterial strain, designated JC2948(T), was isolated from a soil sample taken from Gwanak Mountain, Republic of Korea. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain JC2948(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia. The test strain showed highest sequence similarities to Burkholderia tropica LMG 22274(T) (97.6 %), Burkholderia acidipaludis NBRC 101816(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia tuberum LMG 21444(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia sprentiae LMG 27175(T) (97.4 %), Burkholderia terricola LMG 20594(T) (97.3 %) and Burkholderia diazotrophica LMG 26031(T) (97.1 %). Based on average nucleotide identity (ANI) values, the new isolate represents a novel genomic species as it shows less than 90 % ANI values with other closely related species. Also, other phylosiological and biochemical comparisons allowed the phenotypic differentiation of strain JC2948(T) from other members of the genus Burkholderia. Therefore, we suggest that this strain should be classified as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Burkholderia. The name Burkholderia monticola sp. nov. (type strain, JC2948(T) = JCM 19904(T) = KACC 17924(T)) is proposed. © 2015 IUMS.

  9. Burkholderia megalochromosomata sp. nov., isolated from grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Inwoo; Seo, Boram; Lee, Imchang; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik

    2015-03-01

    A Gram-stain negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, obligate aerobic bacterial strain, JC2949(T), was isolated from grassland soil in Gwanak Mountain, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA sequences, indicated that strain JC2949(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, showing highest sequence similarities with Burkholderia grimmiae R27(T) (98.8 %), Burkholderia cordobensis LMG 27620(T) (98.6 %), Burkholderia jiangsuensis MP-1T(T) (98.6 %), Burkholderia zhejiangensis OP-1(T) (98.5 %), Burkholderia humi LMG 22934(T) (97.5 %), Burkholderia terrestris LMG 22937(T) (97.3 %), Burkholderia telluris LMG 22936(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia glathei ATCC 29195(T) (97.0 %). The major fatty acids of strain JC2949(T) were C18 : 1ω7c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. Its predominant polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unknown amino phospholipid. The dominant isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone Q-8. The pairwise average nucleotide identity values between strain JC2949(T) and the genomes of 30 other species of the genus Burkholderia ranged from 73.4-90.4 %, indicating that the isolate is a novel genomic species within this genus. Based on phenotypic and chemotaxonomic comparisons, it is clear that strain JC2949(T) represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia. We propose the name for this novel species to be Burkholderia megalochromosomata sp. nov. The type strain is JC2949(T) ( = KACC 17925(T) = JCM 19905(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  10. RecA gene sequence and Multilocus Sequence Typing for species-level resolution of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarini, S; Bevivino, A; Tabacchioni, S; Chiarini, L; Dalmastri, C

    2009-11-01

    To identify, by means of recA sequencing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) isolates of environmental and clinical origin, which failed to be identified by recA RFLP and species-specific PCR. By using recA sequence-based identification, 17 out of 26 BCC isolates were resolved at the level of species and lineage (ten Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIB, two Burkholderia arboris and five Burkholderia lata). By using MLST method, 24 BCC isolates were identified. MLST confirmed recA sequence results, and, furthermore, enabled to identify isolates of the BCC5 group, and showed relatedness with Burkholderia contaminans for one of the two isolates not identified. recA sequence-based identification allowed to resolve, at the level of species and lineage, 65.4%, of the BCC isolates examined, whilst MLST increased this percentage to 88.5%. BCC isolates previously not resolved by recA RFLP and species-specific PCR were successfully identified by means of recA sequencing and MLST, which represent the most appropriate methods to identify difficult strains for epidemiological purposes and cystic fibrosis patients management.

  11. Members of the genus Burkholderia: good and bad guys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Leo; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the 1990s several biocontrol agents on that contained Burkholderia strains were registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). After risk assessment these products were withdrawn from the market and a moratorium was placed on the registration of Burkholderia-containing products, as these strains may pose a risk to human health. However, over the past few years the number of novel Burkholderia species that exhibit plant-beneficial properties and are normally not isolated from infected patients has increased tremendously. In this commentary we wish to summarize recent efforts that aim at discerning pathogenic from beneficial Burkholderia strains. PMID:27303639

  12. Burkholderia thailandensis: Growth and Laboratory Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Erin C; Cotter, Peggy A

    2016-08-12

    Burkholderia thailandensis is a nonpathogenic Gram-negative bacterium found in tropical soils. Closely related to several human pathogens, its ease of genetic manipulation, rapid growth in the laboratory, and low virulence make B. thailandensis a commonly used model organism. This unit describes the fundamental protocols for in vitro growth and maintenance of B. thailandensis in the laboratory. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Structural flexibility in the Burkholderia mallei genome

    OpenAIRE

    William C. Nierman; DeShazer, David; Kim, H Stanley; Tettelin, Herve; Nelson, Karen E.; Feldblyum, Tamara; Ulrich, Ricky L.; Ronning, Catherine M.; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Davidsen, Tanja D.; DeBoy, Robert T.; Dimitrov, George; Dodson, Robert J.; Durkin, A. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 provides insight into this highly infectious bacterium's pathogenicity and evolutionary history. B. mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, has come under renewed scientific investigation as a result of recent concerns about its past and potential future use as a biological weapon. Genome analysis identified a number of putative virulence factors whose function was supported by comparative genome hybridization and expression prof...

  14. Innate immune response to Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal U Saikh; Mott, Tiffany M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Burkholderia mallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the highly contagious and often the fatal disease, glanders. With its high rate of infectivity via aerosol and recalcitrance toward antibiotics, this pathogen is considered a potential biological threat agent. This review focuses on the most recent literature highlighting host innate immune response to B. mallei. Recent findings Recent studies focused on elucidating host innate immune responses to the no...

  15. Draft Genomes for Eight Burkholderia mallei Isolates from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daligault, H E; Johnson, S L; Davenport, K W; Minogue, T D; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Coyne, S R; Frey, K G; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Lo, C-C; Munk, C; Wolcott, M J; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Rosenzweig, C N; Scholz, M B; Chain, P S

    2016-01-07

    Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, is a Gram-negative, nonmotile, facultative intracellular pathogen. Although glanders has been eradicated from many parts of the world, the threat of B. mallei being used as a weapon is very real. Here we present draft genome assemblies of 8 Burkholderia mallei strains that were isolated in Turkey. Copyright © 2016 Daligault et al.

  16. Burkholderia pyrrocinia in cystic fibrosis lung transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savi, D; De Biase, R Valerio; Amaddeo, A; Anile, M; Venuta, F; Ruberto, F; Simmonds, N; Cimino, G; Quattrucci, S

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Burkholderia species is typically considered a contraindication leading to transplantation in cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the risks posed by different Burkholderia species on transplantation outcomes are poorly defined. We present the case of a patient with CF who underwent lung transplantation due to a severe respiratory failure from chronic airways infection with Burkholderia pyrrocinia (B. cepacia genomovar IX) and pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The postoperative course was complicated by recurrent B. pyrrocinia infections, ultimately lea ding to uncontrollable sepsis and death. This is the first case report in CF of Burkholderia pyrrocinia infection and lung transplantation, providing further evidence of the high risk nature of the Burkholderia species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of the common marmoset to study Burkholderia mallei infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Jelesijevic

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted bacterium that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir. The organism causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by B. mallei typically occurs via the respiratory or percutaneous route, and the most common manifestations are life-threatening pneumonia and bacteremia. Glanders is difficult to diagnose and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There is no vaccine to protect against B. mallei and there is concern regarding its use as a biothreat agent. Thus, experiments were performed to establish a non-human primate model of intranasal infection to study the organism and develop countermeasures. Groups of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus were inoculated intranasally with B. mallei strain ATCC 23344 and monitored for clinical signs of illness for up to 13 days. We discovered that 83% of marmosets inoculated with doses of 2.5 X 10(4 to 2.5 X 10(5 bacteria developed acute lethal infection within 3-4 days. Signs of disease were severe and included lethargy, inappetence, conjunctivitis, mucopurulent and hemorrhagic nasal discharges, and increased respiratory effort with abdominal lifts. Burkholderia mallei was cultured from the lungs, spleen and liver of these animals, and pathologic examination of tissues revealed lesions characteristic of glanders. Challenge experiments also revealed that 91% of animals infected with doses ranging from 25 to 2.5 X 10(3 bacteria exhibited mild non-specific signs of illness and were culture negative. One marmoset inoculated with 2.5 X 10(3 organisms developed moderate signs of disease and reached humane end-points 8 days post-infection. The liver and spleen of this animal were colonized with the agent and pathological analysis of tissues showed nasal, splenic and hepatic lesions. Taken together, these data indicate that the marmoset is a suitable model to study respiratory infection by B

  18. Use of the common marmoset to study Burkholderia mallei infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelesijevic, Tomislav; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Harvey, Stephen B; Mead, Daniel G; Shaffer, Teresa L; Estes, D Mark; Michel, Frank; Quinn, Frederick D; Hogan, Robert J; Lafontaine, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted bacterium that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir. The organism causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by B. mallei typically occurs via the respiratory or percutaneous route, and the most common manifestations are life-threatening pneumonia and bacteremia. Glanders is difficult to diagnose and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There is no vaccine to protect against B. mallei and there is concern regarding its use as a biothreat agent. Thus, experiments were performed to establish a non-human primate model of intranasal infection to study the organism and develop countermeasures. Groups of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were inoculated intranasally with B. mallei strain ATCC 23344 and monitored for clinical signs of illness for up to 13 days. We discovered that 83% of marmosets inoculated with doses of 2.5 X 10(4) to 2.5 X 10(5) bacteria developed acute lethal infection within 3-4 days. Signs of disease were severe and included lethargy, inappetence, conjunctivitis, mucopurulent and hemorrhagic nasal discharges, and increased respiratory effort with abdominal lifts. Burkholderia mallei was cultured from the lungs, spleen and liver of these animals, and pathologic examination of tissues revealed lesions characteristic of glanders. Challenge experiments also revealed that 91% of animals infected with doses ranging from 25 to 2.5 X 10(3) bacteria exhibited mild non-specific signs of illness and were culture negative. One marmoset inoculated with 2.5 X 10(3) organisms developed moderate signs of disease and reached humane end-points 8 days post-infection. The liver and spleen of this animal were colonized with the agent and pathological analysis of tissues showed nasal, splenic and hepatic lesions. Taken together, these data indicate that the marmoset is a suitable model to study respiratory infection by B. mallei.

  19. Taxon K, a complex within the Burkholderia cepacia complex, comprises at least two novel species, Burkholderia contaminans sp. nov. and Burkholderia lata sp. nov

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanlaere, Elke; Baldwin, Adam; Gevers, Dirk; Henry, Deborah; De Brandt, Evie; LiPuma, John J; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Speert, David P; Dowson, Chris; Vandamme, Peter

    2009-01-01

    ... (also known as group K) within the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). For this purpose, a representative set of strains was examined by a traditional polyphasic taxonomic approach, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST...

  20. Burkholderia rhynchosiae sp. nov., isolated from Rhynchosia ferulifolia root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Cnockaert, Margo; Ardley, Julie K; Trengove, Robert D; Garau, Giovanni; Howieson, John G; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Two strains of Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from root nodules of the South African legume Rhynchosia ferulifolia and authenticated on this host. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, strains WSM3930 and WSM3937(T) belonged to the genus Burkholderia, with the highest degree of sequence similarity to Burkholderia terricola (98.84 %). Additionally, the housekeeping genes gyrB and recA were analysed since 16S rRNA gene sequences are highly similar between closely related species of the genus Burkholderia. The results obtained for both housekeeping genes, gyrB and recA, showed the highest degree of sequence similarity of the novel strains towards Burkholderia caledonica LMG 19076(T) (94.2 % and 94.5 %, respectively). Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles and respiratory quinone data supported the assignment of strains WSM3930 and WSM3937(T) to the genus Burkholderia. DNA-DNA hybridizations, and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strains WSM3930 and WSM3937(T) from the most closely related species of the genus Burkholderia with validly published names. We conclude, therefore, that these strains represent a novel species for which the name Burkholderia rhynchosiae sp. nov. is proposed, with strain WSM3937(T) ( = LMG 27174(T) = HAMBI 3354(T)) as the type strain.

  1. The complete genome of Burkholderia phenoliruptrix strain BR3459a, a symbiont of Mimosa flocculosa: highlighting the coexistence of symbiotic and pathogenic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuleta, Luiz Fernando Goda; Cunha, Claúdio de Oliveira; de Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; Ciapina, Luciane Prioli; Souza, Rangel Celso; Mercante, Fábio Martins; de Faria, Sergio Miana; Baldani, José Ivo; Straliotto, Rosangela; Hungria, Mariangela; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2014-06-28

    Burkholderia species play an important ecological role related to xenobiosis, the promotion of plant growth, the biocontrol of agricultural diseases, and symbiotic and non-symbiotic biological nitrogen fixation. Here, we highlight our study as providing the first complete genome of a symbiotic strain of B. phenoliruptrix, BR3459a (=CLA1), which was originally isolated in Brazil from nodules of Mimosa flocculosa and is effective in fixing nitrogen in association with this leguminous species. Genomic comparisons with other pathogenic and non-pathogenic Burkholderia strains grouped B. phenoliruptrix BR3459a with plant-associated beneficial and environmental species, although it shares a high percentage of its gene repertoire with species of the B. cepacia complex (Bcc) and "pseudomallei" group. The genomic analyses showed that the bce genes involved in exopolysaccharide production are clustered together in the same genomic region, constituting part of the Group III cluster of non-pathogenic bacteria. Regarding environmental stresses, we highlight genes that might be relevant in responses to osmotic, heat, cold and general stresses. Furthermore, a number of particularly interesting genes involved in the machinery of the T1SS, T2SS, T3SS, T4ASS and T6SS secretion systems were identified. The xenobiotic properties of strain BR3459a were also investigated, and some enzymes involved in the degradation of styrene, nitrotoluene, dioxin, chlorocyclohexane, chlorobenzene and caprolactam were identified. The genomic analyses also revealed a large number of antibiotic-related genes, the most important of which were correlated with streptomycin and novobiocin. The symbiotic plasmid showed high sequence identity with the symbiotic plasmid of B. phymatum. Additionally, comparative analysis of 545 housekeeping genes among pathogenic and non-pathogenic Burkholderia species strongly supports the definition of a new genus for the second branch, which would include BR3459a. The analyses

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1647 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1647 ref|YP_337232.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderia pseudomall...ei 1710b] ref|YP_001061795.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 668] ref|ZP_01769751.1| Rhs... element Vgr protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 305] ref|ZP_04520653.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderi...a pseudomallei MSHR346] ref|ZP_04892045.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderia ...pseudomallei 1655] ref|ZP_04893856.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pasteur 52237] ref|

  3. A census of RND superfamily proteins in the Burkholderia genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Elena; Fondi, Marco; Papaleo, Maria Cristiana; Maida, Isabel; Emiliani, Giovanni; Buroni, Silvia; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Fani, Renato

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the eight resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) families (a group of proteins mainly involved in multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacteria) in 26 Burkholderia genomes in order to gain knowledge regarding their presence and distribution, to obtain a platform for future experimental tests aimed to identify new molecular targets to be used in antimicrobial therapy against Burkholderia species and to refine the annotation of RND-like sequences in these genomes. A total of 417 coding sequences were retrieved and analyzed using different bioinformatics tools. A complex pattern of RND presence and distribution in the different Burkholderia species was disclosed and a core of proteins represented in all 26 genomes was identified. These 'core' proteins might represent useful targets of new synthetic antimicrobial compounds. Furthermore, the annotation of RND-like sequences in Burkholderia was refined.

  4. PCR detection of Burkholderia multivorans in water and soil samples

    OpenAIRE

    Peeters, C.; Daenekindt, S. (Stijn); Vandamme, Anne Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Background Although semi-selective growth media have been developed for the isolation of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria from the environment, thus far Burkholderia multivorans has rarely been isolated from such samples. Because environmental B. multivorans isolates mainly originate from water samples, we hypothesized that water rather than soil is its most likely environmental niche. The aim of the present study was to assess the occurrence of B. multivorans in water samples from Fland...

  5. VgrG-5 is a Burkholderia type VI secretion system-exported protein required for multinucleated giant cell formation and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Sandra; Singh, Pragya; Robertson, Johanna D; LeRoux, Michele; Skerrett, Shawn J; Goodlett, David R; West, T Eoin; Mougous, Joseph D

    2014-04-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) has emerged as a critical virulence factor for the group of closely related Burkholderia spp. that includes Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis. While the genomes of these bacteria, referred to as the Bptm group, appear to encode several T6SSs, we and others have shown that one of these, type VI secretion system 5 (T6SS-5), is required for virulence in mammalian infection models. Despite its pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the Bptm group, the effector repertoire of T6SS-5 has remained elusive. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to compare the secretome of wild-type B. thailandensis to that of a mutant harboring a nonfunctional T6SS-5. This analysis identified VgrG-5 as a novel secreted protein whose export depends on T6SS-5 function. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that VgrG-5 is a specialized VgrG protein that harbors a C-terminal domain (CTD) conserved among Bptm group species. We found that a vgrG-5 ΔCTD mutant is avirulent in mice and is unable to stimulate the fusion of host cells, a hallmark of the Bptm group previously shown to require T6SS-5 function. The singularity of VgrG-5 as a detected T6SS-5 substrate, taken together with the essentiality of its CTD for virulence, suggests that the protein is critical for the effector activity of T6SS-5. Intriguingly, we show that unlike the bacterial-cell-targeting T6SSs characterized so far, T6SS-5 localizes to the bacterial cell pole. We propose a model whereby the CTD of VgrG-5-, propelled by T6SS-5-, plays a key role in inducing membrane fusion, either by the recruitment of other factors or by direct participation.

  6. Gene Expression Profile of Human Cytokines in Response to B.pseudomallei Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-19

    responses 81 to an infection (6). Activation of leukocytes and cytokine networks are prominent 82 features of inflammation and the septic response (7...and of leukocyte Interleukin 8 mRNA 539 levels during septicemic and localized pseudomonas pseudomallei infection. 540 Infection and Immunity 60...which is chemotactic for T cells, eosnophils and basophils, plays an active role in recruiting leukocytes into inflammatory sites IFNγ Interferon

  7. Environmental Transmission of the Gut Symbiont Burkholderia to Phloem-Feeding Blissus insularis

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yao; Buss, Eileen A.; Boucias, Drion G.

    2016-01-01

    The plant-phloem-feeding Blissus insularis possesses specialized midgut crypts, which harbor a dense population of the exocellular bacterial symbiont Burkholderia. Most individual B. insularis harbor a single Burkholderia ribotype in their midgut crypts; however, a diverse Burkholderia community exists within a host population. To understand the mechanism underlying the consistent occurrence of various Burkholderia in B. insularis and their specific association, we investigated potential gut ...

  8. Eradication of Burkholderia cepacia Using Inhaled Aztreonam Lysine in Two Patients with Bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Iglesias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are not many articles about the chronic bronchial infection/colonization in patients with underlying lung disease other than cystic fibrosis (CF, especially with non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFBQ. The prevalence of B. cepacia complex is not well known in NCFBQ. The vast majority of published clinical data on Burkholderia infection in individuals with CF is comprised of uncontrolled, anecdotal, and/or single center experiences, and no consensus has emerged regarding treatment. We present two cases diagnosed with bronchiectasis (BQ of different etiology, with early pulmonary infection by B. cepacia complex, which was eradicated with inhaled aztreonam lysine.

  9. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Tiffany M; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4) CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  10. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M Mott

    Full Text Available In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001 deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis.Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001.Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  11. Burkholderia sprentiae sp. nov., isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Cnockaert, Margo; Ardley, Julie K; Maker, Garth; Yates, Ron; Howieson, John G; Vandamme, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Seven Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules and authenticated on this host. Based on the 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, they were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia, with the representative strain WSM5005(T) being most closely related to Burkholderia tuberum (98.08 % sequence similarity). Additionally, these strains formed a distinct group in phylogenetic trees based on the housekeeping genes gyrB and recA. Chemotaxonomic data including fatty acid profiles and analysis of respiratory quinones supported the assignment of the strains to the genus Burkholderia. Results of DNA-DNA hybridizations, and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of our strains from the closest species of the genus Burkholderia with a validly published name. Therefore, these strains represent a novel species for which the name Burkholderia sprentiae sp. nov. (type strain WSM5005(T) = LMG 27175(T) = HAMBI 3357(T)) is proposed.

  12. Burkholderia dilworthii sp. nov., isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Cnockaert, Margo; Ardley, Julie K; Van Wyk, Ben-Erik; Vandamme, Peter A; Howieson, John G

    2014-04-01

    Three strains of Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from Lebeckia ambigua root nodules and authenticated on this host. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, they were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia, with the representative strain WSM3556(T) being most closely related to Burkholderia caledonica LMG 23644(T) (98.70 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Burkholderia rhynchosiae WSM3937(T) (98.50 %). Additionally, these strains formed a distinct group in phylogenetic trees of the housekeeping genes gyrB and recA. Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles and analysis of respiratory quinones, supported the assignment of our strains to the genus Burkholderia. Results of DNA-DNA hybridizations, MALDI-TOF MS analysis and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of our strains from their nearest neighbour species. Therefore, these strains represent a novel species, for which the name Burkholderia dilworthii sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain WSM3556(T) ( = LMG 27173(T) = HAMBI 3353(T)).

  13. Infecção respiratória por bactérias do complexo cepacia: Evolução clínica em doentes com fibrose quística The clinical course of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria respiratory infection in cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Correia

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O complexo Burkholderia cepacia (Bcc é um grupo constituído por nove espécies de bactérias patogénicas oportunistas na fibrose quística (FQ, associadas a prognóstico mais reservado e a infecção cruzada entre os doentes. Existe grande heterogeneidade na deterioração pulmonar dos doentes colonizados/infectados com Bcc, evoluindo, por vezes, de forma fulminante - síndroma da cepacia. Com o objectivo de avaliar a relação entre a colonização/infecção com as diferentes espécies do Bcc e a evolução clínica, os autores analisaram, retrospectivamente, 31 doentes com FQ acompanhados no Hospital de Santa Maria com isolamentos entre Janeiro de 1995 e Março de 2006. Os doentes foram divididos nos grupos: Grupo I - isolamento intermitente (15 doentes e Grupo II - isolamento crónico (16 doentes. A prevalência das espécies do Bcc foi: B. cepacia 57%, B. cenocepacia 43%, B. multivorans 7%, B. stabilis 13%. Três doentes faleceram com síndroma da cepacia. As espécies B. cepacia e B. stabilis, pouco frequentes nas populações de FQ caracterizadas na Europa e na América do Norte, foram isoladas de uma percentagem importante dos doentes estudados, não tendo sido possível estabelecer uma correlação entre a espécie e a evolução clínica. Nos doentes deteriorados, mas não nos estáveis, do grupo II, em quem foi possível analisar retrospectivamente a função respiratória (FEV1 e os períodos de internamento por exacerbação pulmonar, encontraram-se algumas diferenças relevantes antes e após o isolamento de Bcc. Perante a incapacidade actual de orientar as medidas de profilaxia através da caracterização molecular dos isolados de Bcc, há que manter as medidas de controlo recomendadas.Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, a group of nine related species, are opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, associated with a poor prognosis and patient-to-patient transmissibility. The pulmonary

  14. Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species: antimicrobial resistance and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Iain J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-02-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species, namely, Burkholderia cepacia complex, collectively are a group of troublesome nonfermenters. Although not inherently virulent organisms, these environmental Gram negatives can complicate treatment in those who are immunocompromised, critically ill in the intensive care unit and those patients with suppurative lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis. Through a range of intrinsic antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, virulence factors, and the ability to survive in biofilms, these opportunistic pathogens are well suited to persist, both in the environment and the host. Treatment recommendations are hindered by the difficulties in laboratory identification, the lack of reproducibility of antimicrobial susceptibility testing, the lack of clinical breakpoints, and the absence of clinical outcome data. Despite trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole often being the mainstay of treatment, resistance is widely encountered, and alternative regimens, including combination therapy, are often used. This review will highlight the important aspects and unique challenges that these three nonfermenters pose, and, in the absence of clinical outcome data, our therapeutic recommendations will be based on reported antimicrobial susceptibility and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Protective cellular responses to Burkholderia mallei infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Caroline A; Lever, M Stephen; Griffin, Kate F; Bancroft, Gregory J; Lukaszewski, Roman A

    2010-10-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a Gram-negative bacillus causing the disease glanders in humans. During intraperitoneal infection, BALB/c mice develop a chronic disease characterised by abscess formation where mice normally die up to 70 days post-infection. Although cytokine responses have been investigated, cellular immune responses to B. mallei infection have not previously been characterised. Therefore, the influx and activation status of splenic neutrophils, macrophages and T cells was examined during infection. Gr-1+ neutrophils and F4/80+ macrophages infiltrated the spleen 5 h post-infection and an increase in activated macrophages, neutrophils and T cells occurred by 24 h post-infection. Mice depleted of Gr-1+ cells were acutely susceptible to B. mallei infection, succumbing to the infection 5 days post-infection. Mice depleted of both CD4 and CD8 T cells did not succumb to the infection until 14 days post-infection. Infected μMT (B cell) and CD28 knockout mice did not differ from wildtype mice whereas iNOS-2 knockout mice began to succumb to the infection 30 days post-infection. The data presented suggests that Gr-1+ cells, activated early in B. mallei infection, are essential for controlling the early, innate response to B. mallei infection and T cells or nitric oxide are important during the later stages of infection. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Innate immune response to Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikh, Kamal U; Mott, Tiffany M

    2017-06-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the highly contagious and often the fatal disease, glanders. With its high rate of infectivity via aerosol and recalcitrance toward antibiotics, this pathogen is considered a potential biological threat agent. This review focuses on the most recent literature highlighting host innate immune response to B. mallei. Recent studies focused on elucidating host innate immune responses to the novel mechanisms and virulence factors employed by B. mallei for survival. Studies suggest that pathogen proteins manipulate various cellular processes, including host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement. Immune-signaling molecules such as Toll-like receptors, nucleotode-binding oligomerization domain, myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88, and proinflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-α, play key roles in the induction of innate immune responses. Modifications in B. mallei lipopolysaccharide, in particular, the lipid A acyl groups, stimulate immune responses via Toll-like receptor4 activation that may contribute to persistent infection. Mortality is high because of septicemia and immune pathogenesis with B. mallei exposure. An effective innate immune response is critical to controlling the acute phase of the infection. Both vaccination and therapeutic approaches are necessary for complete protection against B. mallei.

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-01-0110 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-01-0110 ref|ZP_00896661.1| hypothetical protein Bpse110_02000926 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1106b] ref|YP_001074743.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106a] gb|A...BN93621.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106a] ZP_00896661.1 8e-07 27% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0333 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0333 ref|YP_109945.1| hypothetical protein BPSL3349 [Burkholderia pseu...domallei K96243] ref|ZP_02449621.1| hypothetical protein Bpse9_22577 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 91] emb|CAH3...7362.1| putative membrane protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243] YP_109945.1 7.2 42% ...

  19. Burkholderia contaminans Biofilm Regulating Operon and Its Distribution in Bacterial Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga L. Voronina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by Burkholderia spp. is a principal cause of lung chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A “lacking biofilm production” (LBP strain B. contaminans GIMC4587:Bct370-19 has been obtained by insertion modification of clinical strain with plasposon mutagenesis. It has an interrupted transcriptional response regulator (RR gene. The focus of our investigation was a two-component signal transduction system determination, including this RR. B. contaminans clinical and LBP strains were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics resources. A four-component operon (BiofilmReg has a key role in biofilm formation. The relative location (i.e., by being separated by another gene of RR and histidine kinase genes is unique in BiofilmReg. Orthologs were found in other members of the Burkholderiales order. Phylogenetic analysis of strains containing BiofilmReg operons demonstrated evidence for earlier inheritance of a three-component operon. During further evolution one lineage acquired a fourth gene, whereas others lost the third component of the operon. Mutations in sensor domains have created biodiversity which is advantageous for adaptation to various ecological niches. Different species Burkholderia and Achromobacter strains all demonstrated similar BiofilmReg operon structure. Therefore, there may be an opportunity to develop a common drug which is effective for treating all these causative agents.

  20. Burkholderia contaminans Biofilm Regulating Operon and Its Distribution in Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Olga L; Kunda, Marina S; Ryzhova, Natalia N; Aksenova, Ekaterina I; Semenov, Andrey N; Romanova, Yulia M; Gintsburg, Alexandr L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Burkholderia spp. is a principal cause of lung chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A "lacking biofilm production" (LBP) strain B. contaminans GIMC4587:Bct370-19 has been obtained by insertion modification of clinical strain with plasposon mutagenesis. It has an interrupted transcriptional response regulator (RR) gene. The focus of our investigation was a two-component signal transduction system determination, including this RR. B. contaminans clinical and LBP strains were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics resources. A four-component operon (BiofilmReg) has a key role in biofilm formation. The relative location (i.e., by being separated by another gene) of RR and histidine kinase genes is unique in BiofilmReg. Orthologs were found in other members of the Burkholderiales order. Phylogenetic analysis of strains containing BiofilmReg operons demonstrated evidence for earlier inheritance of a three-component operon. During further evolution one lineage acquired a fourth gene, whereas others lost the third component of the operon. Mutations in sensor domains have created biodiversity which is advantageous for adaptation to various ecological niches. Different species Burkholderia and Achromobacter strains all demonstrated similar BiofilmReg operon structure. Therefore, there may be an opportunity to develop a common drug which is effective for treating all these causative agents.

  1. Deciphering the role of RND efflux transporters in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bazzini

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 is representative of a highly problematic group of cystic fibrosis (CF pathogens. Eradication of B. cenocepacia is very difficult with the antimicrobial therapy being ineffective due to its high resistance to clinically relevant antimicrobial agents and disinfectants. RND (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division efflux pumps are known to be among the mediators of multidrug resistance in gram-negative bacteria. Since the significance of the 16 RND efflux systems present in B. cenocepacia (named RND-1 to -16 has been only partially determined, the aim of this work was to analyze mutants of B. cenocepacia strain J2315 impaired in RND-4 and RND-9 efflux systems, and assess their role in the efflux of toxic compounds. The transcriptomes of mutants deleted individually in RND-4 and RND-9 (named D4 and D9, and a double-mutant in both efflux pumps (named D4-D9, were compared to that of the wild-type B. cenocepacia using microarray analysis. Microarray data were confirmed by qRT-PCR, phenotypic experiments, and by Phenotype MicroArray analysis. The data revealed that RND-4 made a significant contribution to the antibiotic resistance of B. cenocepacia, whereas RND-9 was only marginally involved in this process. Moreover, the double mutant D4-D9 showed a phenotype and an expression profile similar to D4. The microarray data showed that motility and chemotaxis-related genes appeared to be up-regulated in both D4 and D4-D9 strains. In contrast, these gene sets were down-regulated or expressed at levels similar to J2315 in the D9 mutant. Biofilm production was enhanced in all mutants. Overall, these results indicate that in B. cenocepacia RND pumps play a wider role than just in drug resistance, influencing additional phenotypic traits important for pathogenesis.

  2. Burkholderia thailandensis oacA mutants facilitate the expression of Burkholderia mallei-like O polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; DeShazer, David; Woods, Donald E; Gherardini, Frank C

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that the O polysaccharides (OPS) expressed by Burkholderia mallei are similar to those produced by Burkholderia thailandensis except that they lack the 4-O-acetyl modifications on their 6-deoxy-α-l-talopyranosyl residues. In the present study, we describe the identification and characterization of an open reading frame, designated oacA, expressed by B. thailandensis that accounts for this phenomenon. Utilizing the B. thailandensis and B. mallei lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific monoclonal antibodies Pp-PS-W and 3D11, Western immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the LPS antigens expressed by the oacA mutant, B. thailandensis ZT0715, were antigenically similar to those produced by B. mallei ATCC 23344. In addition, immunoblot analyses demonstrated that when B. mallei ATCC 23344 was complemented in trans with oacA, it synthesized B. thailandensis-like LPS antigens. To elucidate the structure of the OPS moieties expressed by ZT0715, purified samples were analyzed via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As predicted, these studies demonstrated that the loss of OacA activity influenced the O acetylation phenotype of the OPS moieties. Unexpectedly, however, the results indicated that the O methylation status of the OPS antigens was also affected by the loss of OacA activity. Nonetheless, it was revealed that the LPS moieties expressed by the oacA mutant reacted strongly with the B. mallei LPS-specific protective monoclonal antibody 9C1-2. Based on these findings, it appears that OacA is required for the 4-O acetylation and 2-O methylation of B. thailandensis OPS antigens and that ZT0715 may provide a safe and cost-effective source of B. mallei-like OPS to facilitate the synthesis of glanders subunit vaccine candidates.

  3. Burkholderia thailandensis oacA Mutants Facilitate the Expression of Burkholderia mallei-Like O Polysaccharides▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Paul J.; Burtnick, Mary N.; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; DeShazer, David; Woods, Donald E.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the O polysaccharides (OPS) expressed by Burkholderia mallei are similar to those produced by Burkholderia thailandensis except that they lack the 4-O-acetyl modifications on their 6-deoxy-α-l-talopyranosyl residues. In the present study, we describe the identification and characterization of an open reading frame, designated oacA, expressed by B. thailandensis that accounts for this phenomenon. Utilizing the B. thailandensis and B. mallei lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific monoclonal antibodies Pp-PS-W and 3D11, Western immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the LPS antigens expressed by the oacA mutant, B. thailandensis ZT0715, were antigenically similar to those produced by B. mallei ATCC 23344. In addition, immunoblot analyses demonstrated that when B. mallei ATCC 23344 was complemented in trans with oacA, it synthesized B. thailandensis-like LPS antigens. To elucidate the structure of the OPS moieties expressed by ZT0715, purified samples were analyzed via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As predicted, these studies demonstrated that the loss of OacA activity influenced the O acetylation phenotype of the OPS moieties. Unexpectedly, however, the results indicated that the O methylation status of the OPS antigens was also affected by the loss of OacA activity. Nonetheless, it was revealed that the LPS moieties expressed by the oacA mutant reacted strongly with the B. mallei LPS-specific protective monoclonal antibody 9C1-2. Based on these findings, it appears that OacA is required for the 4-O acetylation and 2-O methylation of B. thailandensis OPS antigens and that ZT0715 may provide a safe and cost-effective source of B. mallei-like OPS to facilitate the synthesis of glanders subunit vaccine candidates. PMID:21115721

  4. Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria beyond legumes: Burkholderia in Rubiaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brecht Verstraete

    Full Text Available Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria not only occur in root nodules of legumes but are also found in leaves of certain Rubiaceae. The discovery of bacteria in plants formerly not implicated in endosymbiosis suggests a wider occurrence of plant-microbe interactions. Several ß-proteobacteria of the genus Burkholderia are detected in close association with tropical plants. This interaction has occurred three times independently, which suggest a recent and open plant-bacteria association. The presence or absence of Burkholderia endophytes is consistent on genus level and therefore implies a predictive value for the discovery of bacteria. Only a single Burkholderia species is found in association with a given plant species. However, the endophyte species are promiscuous and can be found in association with several plant species. Most of the endophytes are part of the plant-associated beneficial and environmental group, but others are closely related to B. glathei. This soil bacteria, together with related nodulating and non-nodulating endophytes, is therefore transferred to a newly defined and larger PBE group within the genus Burkholderia.

  5. Characterization of Burkholderia cepacia genomovar I as a potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Burkholderia cepacia genomovar I as a potential biocontrol agent of Ganoderma boninense in oil palm. ... to the species level based on Biolog® Identification System, and to carry out DNA fingerprinting for strain differentiation as well as differentiate between pathogenic and non-pathogenic human forms.

  6. Antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers targeted to an essential gene inhibit Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David E; Marshall-Batty, Kimberly R; Brinster, Lauren R; Zarember, Kol A; Shaw, Pamela A; Mellbye, Brett L; Iversen, Patrick L; Holland, Steven M; Geller, Bruce L

    2010-06-15

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic granulomatous disease and cystic fibrosis. Many Bcc strains are antibiotic resistant, which requires the exploration of novel antimicrobial approaches, including antisense technologies such as phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs). Peptide-conjugated PMOs (PPMOs) were developed to target acpP, which encodes an acyl carrier protein (AcpP) that is thought to be essential for growth. Their antimicrobial activities were tested against different strains of Bcc in vitro and in infection models. PPMOs targeting acpP were bactericidal against clinical isolates of Bcc (>4 log reduction), whereas a PPMO with a scrambled base sequence (scrambled PPMO) had no effect on growth. Human neutrophils were infected with Burkholderia multivorans and treated with AcpP PPMO. AcpP PPMO augmented killing, compared with neutrophils alone and compared with neutrophils alone plus scrambled PPMO. Mice with chronic granulomatous disease that were infected with B. multivorans were treated with AcpP PPMO, scrambled PPMO, or water at 0, 3, and 6 h after infection. Compared with water-treated control mice, the AcpP PPMO-treated mice showed an approximately 80% reduction in the risk of dying by day 30 of the experiment and relatively little pathology. AcpP PPMO is active against Bcc infections in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Efflux-mediated resistance to a benzothiadiazol derivative effective against Burkholderia cenocepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Camilla eScoffone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is a major concern for people suffering from Cystic Fibrosis as it contributes to serious respiratory tract infections. The lack of drugs effective against this opportunistic pathogen, along with the high level of resistance to multiple antibiotics, render the treatment of these infections particularly difficult.Here a new compound, belonging to the 2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-5-yl family (10126109, with a bactericidal effect and a MIC of 8 µg/ml against B. cenocepacia, is described. The compound is not cytotoxic and effective against B. cenocepacia clinical isolates and members of all the known Burkholderia cepacia complex species.Spontaneous mutants resistant to 10126109 were isolated and mutations in the MerR transcriptional regulator BCAM1948 were identified. In this way, a mechanism of resistance to this new molecule was described, which relies on the overexpression of the RND-9 efflux pump. Indeed, rnd-9 overexpression was confirmed by qRT-PCR, and RND-9 was identified in the membrane fractions of the mutant strains. Moreover, the increase in the MIC values of different drugs in the mutant strains, together with complementation experiments, suggested the involvement of RND-9 in the efflux of 10126109, thus indicating again the central role of efflux transporters in B. cenocepacia drug resistance.

  8. The epidemiology and clinical spectrum of melioidosis: 540 cases from the 20 year Darwin prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart J Currie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over 20 years, from October 1989, the Darwin prospective melioidosis study has documented 540 cases from tropical Australia, providing new insights into epidemiology and the clinical spectrum. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The principal presentation was pneumonia in 278 (51%, genitourinary infection in 76 (14%, skin infection in 68 (13%, bacteremia without evident focus in 59 (11%, septic arthritis/osteomyelitis in 20 (4% and neurological melioidosis in 14 (3%. 298 (55% were bacteremic and 116 (21% developed septic shock (58 fatal. Internal organ abscesses and secondary foci in lungs and/or joints were common. Prostatic abscesses occurred in 76 (20% of 372 males. 96 (18% had occupational exposure to Burkholderia pseudomallei. 118 (22% had a specific recreational or occupational incident considered the likely infecting event. 436 (81% presented during the monsoonal wet season. The higher proportion with pneumonia in December to February supports the hypothesis of infection by inhalation during severe weather events. Recurrent melioidosis occurred in 29, mostly attributed to poor adherence to therapy. Mortality decreased from 30% in the first 5 years to 9% in the last five years (p<0.001. Risk factors for melioidosis included diabetes (39%, hazardous alcohol use (39%, chronic lung disease (26% and chronic renal disease (12%. There was no identifiable risk factor in 20%. Of the 77 fatal cases (14%, 75 had at least one risk factor; the other 2 were elderly. On multivariate analysis of risk factors, age, location and season, the only independent predictors of mortality were the presence of at least one risk factor (OR 9.4; 95% CI 2.3-39 and age ≥ 50 years (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-2.3. CONCLUSIONS: Melioidosis should be seen as an opportunistic infection that is unlikely to kill a healthy person, provided infection is diagnosed early and resources are available to provide appropriate antibiotics and critical care.

  9. Passive Protection of Diabetic Rats with Antisera Specific for the Polysaccharide Portion of the Lipopolysaccharide Isolated from Pseudomonas pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry E Bryan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyclonal and monoclonal antisera raised to tetanus toxoid-conjugated polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide (lps and purified lps of Pseudomonas pseudomallei that reacted with a collection of 41 strains of this bacterium from 23 patients are described. The common antigen recognized by these sera was within the polysaccharide component of the lps of the cells. The sera were specific for P pseudomallei in that none of 37 strains of other bacteria, including 20 Gram-negative and three Gram-positive species, were recognized, although cross-reaction occurred using the anticonjugate serum with some strains of Pseudomonas cepacia serotype A, a closely related bacterium. Passive protection studies using a diabetic rat model of P pseudomallei infection showed that partially purified rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antisera were protective when the median lethal dose was raised by four to five orders of magnitude. The wide distribution of the polysaccharide antigen among isolates of P pseudomallei used in this study and the protective role of antibody to the conjugated polysaccharide antigen suggest potential as a vaccine.

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-08-0218 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-08-0218 ref|YP_001065129.1| hypothetical protein BURPS1106A_0848 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1106a] ref|YP_002895494.1| hypothetical protein GBP346_A0770 [Burkholderia pseudomallei M...SHR346] ref|ZP_04816118.1| hypothetical protein BURPS1106B_A0100 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106b] gb|ABN887...89.1| hypothetical protein BURPS1106A_0848 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106a] gb|A...CQ95167.1| hypothetical protein GBP346_A0770 [Burkholderia pseudomallei MSHR346] gb|EES26743.1| hypothetical

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-05-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-05-0010 ref|ZP_00895641.1| hypothetical protein Bpse110_02002081 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1106b] ref|ZP_01214082.1| hypothetical protein Bpse17_02000720 [Burkholderia pseudomallei... 1710a] ref|ZP_01318224.1| hypothetical protein Bpse1_03002406 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1655] ref|ZP_01324...763.1| hypothetical protein BpseP_03001411 [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pasteur] re...f|ZP_01330574.1| hypothetical protein BpseS_03001271 [Burkholderia pseudomallei S13] ref|ZP_01335179.1| hypo

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-07-0061 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-07-0061 ref|YP_333250.1| Fosmidomycin resistance protein [Burkholderia ps...eudomallei 1710b] ref|ZP_00894198.1| hypothetical protein Bpse110_02003548 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106b]... ref|ZP_01211041.1| hypothetical protein Bpse17_02003902 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1710a] ref|ZP_01317150.1...| hypothetical protein Bpse1_03003467 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1655] ref|ZP_013...22842.1| hypothetical protein BpseP_03003388 [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pasteur] ref|ZP_01328173.1| hypothet

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-15-0023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-15-0023 ref|ZP_01213942.1| hypothetical protein Bpse17_02000886 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1710a] ref|ZP_01319016.1| hypothetical protein Bpse1_03001622 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1...655] ref|ZP_01333599.1| hypothetical protein Bpse4_03003936 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 406e] ref|YP_00105901...0.1| amine ABC transporter, permease protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 668] gb|A...BN85112.1| amine ABC transporter, permease protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 668] gb|EDO84276.1| amine ABC

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0923 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0923 ref|YP_001066912.1| iron-sulfur cluster binding protein [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1106a] ref|ZP_02471985.1| iron-sulfur cluster binding protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei B...7210] ref|ZP_04813470.1| iron-sulfur cluster binding protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106b] gb|ABN90317.1...| iron-sulfur cluster binding protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106a] gb|EES240...95.1| iron-sulfur cluster binding protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106b] YP_001066912.1 3.0 32% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0586 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0586 ref|ZP_00892508.1| hypothetical protein Bpse110_02005257 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1106b] ref|ZP_01315437.1| hypothetical protein Bpse1_03005219 [Burkholderia pseudomallei ...1655] ref|ZP_01326482.1| hypothetical protein BpseS_03005487 [Burkholderia pseudomallei S13] ref|YP_00107577...5.1| hypothetical protein BURPS1106A_A1741 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106a] gb|A...BN93338.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1106a] ZP_00892508.1 2.7 33% ...

  16. An ancient but promiscuous host–symbiont association between Burkholderia gut symbionts and their heteropteran hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2011-01-01

    Here, we investigated 124 stinkbug species representing 20 families and 5 superfamilies for their Burkholderia gut symbionts, of which 39 species representing 6 families of the superfamilies Lygaeoidea and Coreoidea were Burkholderia-positive. Diagnostic PCR surveys revealed high frequencies of Burkholderia infection in natural populations of the stinkbugs, and substantial absence of vertical transmission of Burkholderia infection to their eggs. In situ hybridization confirmed localization of the Burkholderia in their midgut crypts. In the lygaeoid and coreoid stinkbugs, development of midgut crypts in their alimentary tract was coincident with the Burkholderia infection, suggesting that the specialized morphological configuration is pivotal for establishment and maintenance of the symbiotic association. The Burkholderia symbionts were easily isolated as pure culture on standard microbiological media, indicating the ability of the gut symbionts to survive outside the host insects. Molecular phylogenetic analysis showed that the gut symbionts of the lygaeoid and coreoid stinkbugs belong to a β-proteobacterial clade together with Burkholderia isolates from soil environments and Burkholderia species that induce plant galls. On the phylogeny, the stinkbug-associated, environmental and gall-forming Burkholderia strains did not form coherent groups, indicating host–symbiont promiscuity among these stinkbugs. Symbiont culturing revealed that slightly different Burkholderia genotypes often coexist in the same insects, which is also suggestive of host–symbiont promiscuity. All these results strongly suggest an ancient but promiscuous host–symbiont relationship between the lygaeoid/coreoid stinkbugs and the Burkholderia gut symbionts. Possible mechanisms as to how the environmentally transmitted promiscuous symbiotic association has been stably maintained in the evolutionary course are discussed. PMID:20882057

  17. Mining host-pathogen protein interactions to characterize Burkholderia mallei infectivity mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna Memišević; Nela Zavaljevski; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Keehwan Kwon; Rembert Pieper; David DeShazer; Jaques Reifman; Anders Wallqvist

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pathogenicity relies on protein virulence factors to control and promote bacterial internalization, survival, and replication within eukaryotic host cells. We recently used yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening to identify a small set of novel Burkholderia proteins that were shown to attenuate disease progression in an aerosol infection animal model using the virulent Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 strain. Here, we performed an extended analysis of primarily nine B. mallei virulence f...

  18. Vertical transmission explains the specific Burkholderia pattern in Sphagnum mosses at multi-geographic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragina, Anastasia; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Berg, Christian; Berg, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia is known for its versatile interactions with its hosts that can range from beneficial to pathogenic. A plant-beneficial-environmental (PBE) Burkholderia cluster was recently separated from the pathogen cluster, yet still little is known about burkholderial diversity, distribution, colonization, and transmission patterns on plants. In our study, we applied a combination of high-throughput molecular and microscopic methods to examine the aforementioned factors for Burkholderia communities associated with Sphagnum mosses – model plants for long-term associations – in Austrian and Russian bogs. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons libraries revealed that most of the Burkholderia are part of the PBE group, but a minor fraction was closely related to B. glathei and B. andropogonis from the pathogen cluster. Notably, Burkholderia showed highly similar composition patterns for each moss species independent of the geographic region, and Burkholderia-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization of Sphagnum gametophytes exhibited similar colonization patterns in different Sphagnum species at multi-geographic scales. To explain these patterns, we compared the compositions of the surrounding water, gametophyte-, and sporophyte-associated microbiome at genus level and discovered that Burkholderia were present in the Sphagnum sporophyte and gametophyte, but were absent in the flark water. Therefore, Burkholderia is a part of the core microbiome transmitted from the moss sporophyte to the gametophyte. This suggests a vertical transmission of Burkholderia strains, and thus underlines their importance for the plants themselves. PMID:24391630

  19. DBSecSys: a database of Burkholderia mallei secretion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Memišević, Vesna; Kumar, Kamal; Cheng, Li; Zavaljevski, Nela; DeShazer, David; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial pathogenicity represents a major public health concern worldwide. Secretion systems are a key component of bacterial pathogenicity, as they provide the means for bacterial proteins to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert themselves directly into the host cells’ cytosol. Burkholderia mallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that uses multiple secretion systems during its host infection life cycle. To date, the identities of secretion system proteins for B. mallei are not we...

  20. A gold nanoparticle-linked glycoconjugate vaccine against Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Anthony E; Judy, Barbara M; Qazi, Omar; Blumentritt, Carla A; Brown, Katherine A; Shaw, Andrew M; Torres, Alfredo G; Titball, Richard W

    2015-02-01

    Burkholderia mallei are Gram-negative bacteria, responsible for the disease glanders. B. mallei has recently been classified as a Tier 1 agent owing to the fact that this bacterial species can be weaponised for aerosol release, has a high mortality rate and demonstrates multi-drug resistance. Furthermore, there is no licensed vaccine available against this pathogen. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has previously been identified as playing an important role in generating host protection against Burkholderia infection. In this study, we present gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalised with a glycoconjugate vaccine against glanders. AuNPs were covalently coupled with one of three different protein carriers (TetHc, Hcp1 and FliC) followed by conjugation to LPS purified from a non-virulent clonal relative, B. thailandensis. Glycoconjugated LPS generated significantly higher antibody titres compared with LPS alone. Further, they improved protection against a lethal inhalation challenge of B. mallei in the murine model of infection. Burkholderia mallei is associated with multi-drug resistance, high mortality and potentials for weaponization through aerosol inhalation. The authors of this study present gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with a glycoconjugate vaccine against this Gram negative bacterium demonstrating promising results in a murine model even with the aerosolized form of B. Mallei. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Tomato Rhizosphere, an Environment Rich in Nitrogen-Fixing Burkholderia Species with Capabilities of Interest for Agriculture and Bioremediation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Onofre-Lemus, Janette; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia strains are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. Unfortunately, most of these strains belong to species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) involved in human infections, hampering potential applications. Novel diazotrophic Burkholderia species, phylogenetically distant from the Bcc species, have been discovered recently, but their environmental distribution and relevant features for agro-biotechnological applications are little known. In this work, the oc...

  2. Indagine epidemiologica locale sulle infezioni sostenute da Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia e sensibilità agli antibiotici di questi microrganismi.

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria Di Marcello; Vittoria Fabbrizi; Simona Roveta

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of this local surveillance study was to determine the distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia in our geographic area, their impact in the hospital and community acquired infections and their resistance to antimicrobial agents currently used in the treatment of infections due to these microrganisms. Materials and Methods: During the period January 2001 - June 2003, 14.200 clinical isolates were collected from urine,wounds, ...

  3. Understanding the Pathogenicity of Burkholderia contaminans, an Emerging Pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunvar, Jaroslav; Kalferstova, Lucie; Bloodworth, Ruhi A M; Kolar, Michal; Degrossi, Jose; Lubovich, Silvina; Cardona, Silvia T; Drevinek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial species from the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are feared opportunistic pathogens that lead to debilitating lung infections with a high risk of developing fatal septicemia in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, the pathogenic potential of other Bcc species is yet unknown. To elucidate clinical relevance of Burkholderia contaminans, a species frequently isolated from CF respiratory samples in Ibero-American countries, we aimed to identify its key virulence factors possibly linked with an unfavorable clinical outcome. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of two isolates of B. contaminans ST872 from sputum and blood culture of a female CF patient in Argentina. RNA-seq data showed significant changes in expression for quorum sensing-regulated virulence factors and motility and chemotaxis. Furthermore, we detected expression changes in a recently described low-oxygen-activated (lxa) locus which encodes stress-related proteins, and for two clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of antifungal and hemolytic compounds pyrrolnitrin and occidiofungin. Based on phenotypic assays that confirmed changes in motility and in proteolytic, hemolytic and antifungal activities, we were able to distinguish two phenotypes of B. contaminans that coexisted in the host and entered her bloodstream. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the sputum and bloodstream isolates (each representing a distinct phenotype) differed by over 1,400 mutations as a result of a mismatch repair-deficient hypermutable state of the sputum isolate. The inferred lack of purifying selection against nonsynonymous mutations and the high rate of pseudogenization in the derived isolate indicated limited evolutionary pressure during evolution in the nutrient-rich, stable CF sputum environment. The present study is the first to examine the genomic and transcriptomic differences between longitudinal isolates of B. contaminans. Detected activity of a number of putative virulence

  4. First Draft Genome for a Burkholderia mallei Isolate Originating from a Glanderous Mule from Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Girault, G.; Woudstra, C.; Martin, B.; Vorimore, F.; Lucia de Assis Santana, V.; Fach, P.; Madani, N.; Laroucau, K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia mallei is the etiological agent of glanders. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei strain 16-2438_BM#8 that was isolated from a mule found dead in Pernambuco, northeast Brazil. It is the first available genomic sequence from a strain isolated on the American continent.

  5. First Draft Genome for a Burkholderia mallei Isolate Originating from a Glanderous Mule from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, G; Woudstra, C; Martin, B; Vorimore, F; Lucia de Assis Santana, V; Fach, P; Madani, N; Laroucau, K

    2017-07-13

    Burkholderia mallei is the etiological agent of glanders. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia mallei strain 16-2438_BM#8 that was isolated from a mule found dead in Pernambuco, northeast Brazil. It is the first available genomic sequence from a strain isolated on the American continent. Copyright © 2017 Girault et al.

  6. Plant growth-promoting Burkholderia species isolated from annual ryegrass in Portuguese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, N; Dourado, A C; Kruz, S; Alves, P I L; Delgado-Rodríguez, A I; Pais, I; Semedo, J; Scotti-Campos, P; Sánchez, C; Borges, N; Carvalho, G; Barreto Crespo, M T; Fareleira, P

    2016-03-01

    To search for culturable Burkholderia species associated with annual ryegrass in soils from natural pastures in Portugal, with plant growth-promoting effects. Annual ryegrass seedlings were used to trap Burkholderia from two different soils in laboratory conditions. A combined approach using genomic fingerprinting and sequencing of 16S rRNA and recA genes resulted in the identification of Burkholderia strains belonging to the species Burkholderia graminis, Burkholderia fungorum and the Burkholderia cepacia complex. Most strains were able to solubilize mineral phosphate and to synthesize indole acetic acid; some of them could produce siderophores and antagonize the phytopathogenic oomycete, Phytophthora cinnamomi. A strain (G2Bd5) of B. graminis was selected for gnotobiotic plant inoculation experiments. The main effects were the stimulation of root growth and enhancement of leaf lipid synthesis and turnover. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser microscopy evidenced that strain G2Bd5 is a rhizospheric and endophytic colonizer of annual ryegrass. This work revealed that annual ryegrass can naturally associate with members of the genus Burkholderia. A novel plant growth promoting strain of B. graminis was obtained. The novel strain belongs to the plant-associated Burkholderia cluster and is a promising candidate for exploitation as plant inoculant in field conditions. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Burkholderia bacteria infectiously induce the proto-farming symbiosis of Dictyostelium amoebae and food bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Susanne; Haselkorn, Tamara S; Bashir, Usman; Jimenez, Daniela; Brock, Debra A; Queller, David C; Strassmann, Joan E

    2015-09-08

    Symbiotic associations can allow an organism to acquire novel traits by accessing the genetic repertoire of its partner. In the Dictyostelium discoideum farming symbiosis, certain amoebas (termed "farmers") stably associate with bacterial partners. Farmers can suffer a reproductive cost but also gain beneficial capabilities, such as carriage of bacterial food (proto-farming) and defense against competitors. Farming status previously has been attributed to amoeba genotype, but the role of bacterial partners in its induction has not been examined. Here, we explore the role of bacterial associates in the initiation, maintenance, and phenotypic effects of the farming symbiosis. We demonstrate that two clades of farmer-associated Burkholderia isolates colonize D. discoideum nonfarmers and infectiously endow them with farmer-like characteristics, indicating that Burkholderia symbionts are a major driver of the farming phenomenon. Under food-rich conditions, Burkholderia-colonized amoebas produce fewer spores than uncolonized counterparts, with the severity of this reduction being dependent on the Burkholderia colonizer. However, the induction of food carriage by Burkholderia colonization may be considered a conditionally adaptive trait because it can confer an advantage to the amoeba host when grown in food-limiting conditions. We observed Burkholderia inside and outside colonized D. discoideum spores after fruiting body formation; this observation, together with the ability of Burkholderia to colonize new amoebas, suggests a mixed mode of symbiont transmission. These results change our understanding of the D. discoideum farming symbiosis by establishing that the bacterial partner, Burkholderia, is an important causative agent of the farming phenomenon.

  8. Dual Infection by Burkholderia Cepaciaand Pseudomonas Putida in an Infective Endocarditis Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maria; Lalani, Farida Khurram; Ikram, Aamer; Zaman, Gohar; Ahmed, Parvez

    2017-06-01

    Infective endocarditis is rarely caused by Burkholderia cepacia. Pseudomonas putidahas not been reported to cause infective endocarditis so far. This is the first case of infective endocarditis being reported, that is caused by Pseudomonas putidaand Burkholderia cepaciain an immunocompetent host with no predisposing factors. Aortic valve replacement surgery was carried out and antibiotics were given, to which the patient responded well and recovered.

  9. Construction of a large-scale Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 transposon mutant library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, a pathogenic member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), has emerged as a significant threat towards cystic fibrosis patients, where infection often leads to the fatal clinical manifestation known as cepacia syndrome. Many studies have investigated the pathogenicity of B. cenocepacia as well as its ability to become highly resistant towards many of the antibiotics currently in use. In addition, studies have also been undertaken to understand the pathogen's capacity to adapt and survive in a broad range of environments. Transposon based mutagenesis has been widely used in creating insertional knock-out mutants and coupled with recent advances in sequencing technology, robust tools to study gene function in a genome-wide manner have been developed based on the assembly of saturated transposon mutant libraries. In this study, we describe the construction of a large-scale library of B. cenocepacia transposon mutants. To create transposon mutants of B. cenocepacia strain J2315, electrocompetent bacteria were electrotransformed with the EZ-Tn5 transposome. Tetracyline resistant colonies were harvested off selective agar and pooled. Mutants were generated in multiple batches with each batch consisting of ˜20,000 to 40,000 mutants. Transposon insertion was validated by PCR amplification of the transposon region. In conclusion, a saturated B. cenocepacia J2315 transposon mutant library with an estimated total number of 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed. This mutant library can now be further exploited as a genetic tool to assess the function of every gene in the genome, facilitating the discovery of genes important for bacterial survival and adaptation, as well as virulence.

  10. Stress conditions triggering mucoid morphotype variation in Burkholderia species and effect on virulence in Galleria mellonella and biofilm formation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês N Silva

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc bacteria are opportunistic pathogens causing chronic respiratory infections particularly among cystic fibrosis patients. During these chronic infections, mucoid-to-nonmucoid morphotype variation occurs, with the two morphotypes exhibiting different phenotypic properties. Here we show that in vitro, the mucoid clinical isolate Burkholderia multivorans D2095 gives rise to stable nonmucoid variants in response to prolonged stationary phase, presence of antibiotics, and osmotic and oxidative stresses. Furthermore, in vitro colony morphotype variation within other members of the Burkholderia genus occurred in Bcc and non-Bcc strains, irrespectively of their clinical or environmental origin. Survival to starvation and iron limitation was comparable for the mucoid parental isolate and the respective nonmucoid variant, while susceptibility to antibiotics and to oxidative stress was increased in the nonmucoid variants. Acute infection of Galleria mellonella larvae showed that, in general, the nonmucoid variants were less virulent than the respective parental mucoid isolate, suggesting a role for the exopolysaccharide in virulence. In addition, most of the tested nonmucoid variants produced more biofilm biomass than their respective mucoid parental isolate. As biofilms are often associated with increased persistence of pathogens in the CF lungs and are an indicative of different cell-to-cell interactions, it is possible that the nonmucoid variants are better adapted to persist in this host environment.

  11. Laboratory diagnosis of melioidosis: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna KP; Sridhar, Siddharth; Ho, Chi-Chun; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is an emerging, potentially fatal disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, which requires prolonged antibiotic treatment to prevent disease relapse. However, difficulties in laboratory diagnosis of melioidosis may delay treatment and affect disease outcomes. Isolation of B. pseudomallei from clinical specimens has been improved with the use of selective media. However, even with positive cultures, identification of B. pseudomallei can be difficult in clinical microbiology laboratories, especially in non-endemic areas where clinical suspicion is low. Commercial identification systems may fail to distinguish between B. pseudomallei and closely related species such as Burkholderia thailandensis. Genotypic identification of suspected isolates can be achieved by sequencing of gene targets such as groEL which offer higher discriminative power than 16S rRNA. Specific PCR-based identification of B. pseudomallei has also been developed using B. pseudomallei-specific gene targets such as Type III secretion system and Tat-domain protein. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, a revolutionary technique for pathogen identification, has been shown to be potentially useful for rapid identification of B. pseudomallei, although existing databases require optimization by adding reference spectra for B. pseudomallei. Despite these advances in bacterial identification, diagnostic problems encountered in culture-negative cases remain largely unresolved. Although various serological tests have been developed, they are generally unstandardized “in house” assays and have low sensitivities and specificities. Although specific PCR assays have been applied to direct clinical and environmental specimens, the sensitivities for diagnosis remain to be evaluated. Metabolomics is an uprising tool for studying infectious diseases and may offer a novel approach for exploring potential diagnostic biomarkers. The metabolomics profiles of B

  12. Burkholderia glumae EN EL CULTIVO DE ARROZ EN COSTA RICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Quesada-Gonz\\u00E1lez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae en el cultivo de arroz en Costa Rica. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la presencia de Burkholderia glumae en arroz en Costa Rica. La bacteria Burkholderia glumae está asociada al cultivo del arroz en el que provoca la enfermedad llamada añublo bacterial. Bajo condiciones ambientales favorables, la densidad bacteriana aumenta, lo que provoca que, bajo un sistema de regulación denominado quorum sensing, se expresen sus mecanismos de virulencia mediante la activación de genes responsables para la síntesis de la toxoflavina, que bloquea el flujo de nutrientes, para la biogénesis de flagelos y la respuesta quimiotáctica, y la producción de la enzima catalasa. Las plantas desarrollan la sintomatología que finalmente conlleva a un vaneamiento del grano provocando pérdidas económicas importantes. Se investigó la situación referente a la contaminación del grano de arroz causado por esta bacteria en Costa Rica durante los años 2009 y 2010, mediante un convenio entre la Corporación Nacional Arrocera y el Laboratorio de Fitopatología del Centro de Investigación en Protección de Cultivos de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Se usó la metodología de PCR de punto final recomendada por investigadores del Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical en Colombia y se reforzó la identificación, por medio de técnicas de microbiología convencional. Se obtuvieron resultados que indican la presencia de la bacteria en Costa Rica, la primera información sobre la prevalencia de un fitopatógeno bacteriano de gran importancia para el sector arrocero.

  13. Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum models demonstrate that root colonization is an intrinsic trait of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Quist, J Cristian; O'Sullivan, Louise A; Desert, Annaëlle; Fivian-Hughes, Amanda S; Millet, Coralie; Jones, T Hefin; Weightman, Andrew J; Rogers, Hilary J; Berry, Colin; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-02-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria possess biotechnologically useful properties that contrast with their opportunistic pathogenicity. The rhizosphere fitness of Bcc bacteria is central to their biocontrol and bioremediation activities. However, it is not known whether this differs between species or between environmental and clinical strains. We investigated the ability of 26 Bcc strains representing nine different species to colonize the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum (pea). Viable counts, scanning electron microscopy and bioluminescence imaging were used to assess root colonization, with Bcc bacteria achieving mean (±sem) levels of 2.49±0.23×10(6) and 5.16±1.87×10(6) c.f.u. per centimetre of root on the A. thaliana and P. sativum models, respectively. The A. thaliana rhizocompetence model was able to reveal loss of colonization phenotypes in Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 transposon mutants that had only previously been observed in competition experiments on the P. sativum model. Different Bcc species colonized each plant model at different rates, and no statistical difference in root colonization was observed between isolates of clinical or environmental origin. Loss of the virulence-associated third chromosomal replicon (>1 Mb DNA) did not alter Bcc root colonization on A. thaliana. In summary, Bcc bacteria possess intrinsic root colonization abilities irrespective of their species or source. As Bcc rhizocompetence does not require their third chromosomal replicon, the possibility of using synthetic biology approaches to engineer virulence-attenuated biotechnological strains is tractable.

  14. Burkholderia species associated with legumes of Chiapas, Mexico, exhibit stress tolerance and growth in aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León-Martínez, José A; Yañez-Ocampo, Gustavo; Wong-Villarreal, Arnoldo

    2017-08-29

    Leguminous plants have received special interest for the diversity of β-proteobacteria in their nodules and are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. In this study, 15 bacterial strains were isolated from the nodules of the following legumes: Indigofera thibaudiana, Mimosa diplotricha, Mimosa albida, Mimosa pigra, and Mimosa pudica, collected in 9 areas of Chiapas, Mexico. The strains were grouped into four profiles of genomic fingerprints through BOX-PCR and identified based on their morphology, API 20NE biochemical tests, sequencing of the 16S rRNA, nifH and nodC genes as bacteria of the Burkholderia genus, genetically related to Burkholderia phenoliruptrix, Burkholderia phymatum, Burkholderia sabiae, and Burkholderia tuberum. The Burkholderia strains were grown under stress conditions with 4% NaCl, 45°C, and benzene presence at 0.1% as the sole carbon source. This is the first report on the isolation of these nodulating species of the Burkholderia genus in legumes in Mexico. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The temperate Burkholderia phage AP3 of the Peduovirinae shows efficient antimicrobial activity against B. cenocepacia of the IIIA lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszniowski, Bartosz; Latka, Agnieszka; Maciejewska, Barbara; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Olszak, Tomasz; Briers, Yves; Holt, Giles S; Valvano, Miguel A; Lavigne, Rob; Smith, Darren L; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-02-01

    Burkholderia phage AP3 (vB_BceM_AP3) is a temperate virus of the Myoviridae and the Peduovirinae subfamily (P2likevirus genus). This phage specifically infects multidrug-resistant clinical Burkholderia cenocepacia lineage IIIA strains commonly isolated from cystic fibrosis patients. AP3 exhibits high pairwise nucleotide identity (61.7 %) to Burkholderia phage KS5, specific to the same B. cenocepacia host, and has 46.7-49.5 % identity to phages infecting other species of Burkholderia. The lysis cassette of these related phages has a similar organization (putative antiholin, putative holin, endolysin, and spanins) and shows 29-98 % homology between specific lysis genes, in contrast to Enterobacteria phage P2, the hallmark phage of this genus. The AP3 and KS5 lysis genes have conserved locations and high amino acid sequence similarity. The AP3 bacteriophage particles remain infective up to 5 h at pH 4-10 and are stable at 60 °C for 30 min, but are sensitive to chloroform, with no remaining infective particles after 24 h of treatment. AP3 lysogeny can occur by stable genomic integration and by pseudo-lysogeny. The lysogenic bacterial mutants did not exhibit any significant changes in virulence compared to wild-type host strain when tested in the Galleria mellonella moth wax model. Moreover, AP3 treatment of larvae infected with B. cenocepacia revealed a significant increase (P < 0.0001) in larvae survival in comparison to AP3-untreated infected larvae. AP3 showed robust lytic activity, as evidenced by its broad host range, the absence of increased virulence in lysogenic isolates, the lack of bacterial gene disruption conditioned by bacterial tRNA downstream integration site, and the absence of detected toxin sequences. These data suggest that the AP3 phage is a promising potent agent against bacteria belonging to the most common B. cenocepacia IIIA lineage strains.

  16. Exploring the HME and HAE1 efflux systems in the genus Burkholderia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Burkholderia includes a variety of species with opportunistic human pathogenic strains, whose increasing global resistance to antibiotics has become a public health problem. In this context a major role could be played by multidrug efflux pumps belonging to Resistance Nodulation Cell-Division (RND) family, which allow bacterial cells to extrude a wide range of different substrates, including antibiotics. This study aims to i) identify rnd genes in the 21 available completely sequenced Burkholderia genomes, ii) analyze their phylogenetic distribution, iii) define the putative function(s) that RND proteins perform within the Burkholderia genus and iv) try tracing the evolutionary history of some of these genes in Burkholderia. Results BLAST analysis of the 21 Burkholderia sequenced genomes, using experimentally characterized ceoB sequence (one of the RND family counterpart in the genus Burkholderia) as probe, allowed the assembly of a dataset comprising 254 putative RND proteins. An extensive phylogenetic analysis revealed the occurrence of several independent events of gene loss and duplication across the different lineages of the genus Burkholderia, leading to notable differences in the number of paralogs between different genomes. A putative substrate [antibiotics (HAE1 proteins)/heavy-metal (HME proteins)] was also assigned to the majority of these proteins. No correlation was found between the ecological niche and the lifestyle of Burkholderia strains and the number/type of efflux pumps they possessed, while a relation can be found with genome size and taxonomy. Remarkably, we observed that only HAE1 proteins are mainly responsible for the different number of proteins observed in strains of the same species. Data concerning both the distribution and the phylogenetic analysis of the HAE1 and HME in the Burkholderia genus allowed depicting a likely evolutionary model accounting for the evolution and spreading of HME and HAE1 systems in the

  17. Exploring the HME and HAE1 efflux systems in the genus Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasca Maria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Burkholderia includes a variety of species with opportunistic human pathogenic strains, whose increasing global resistance to antibiotics has become a public health problem. In this context a major role could be played by multidrug efflux pumps belonging to Resistance Nodulation Cell-Division (RND family, which allow bacterial cells to extrude a wide range of different substrates, including antibiotics. This study aims to i identify rnd genes in the 21 available completely sequenced Burkholderia genomes, ii analyze their phylogenetic distribution, iii define the putative function(s that RND proteins perform within the Burkholderia genus and iv try tracing the evolutionary history of some of these genes in Burkholderia. Results BLAST analysis of the 21 Burkholderia sequenced genomes, using experimentally characterized ceoB sequence (one of the RND family counterpart in the genus Burkholderia as probe, allowed the assembly of a dataset comprising 254 putative RND proteins. An extensive phylogenetic analysis revealed the occurrence of several independent events of gene loss and duplication across the different lineages of the genus Burkholderia, leading to notable differences in the number of paralogs between different genomes. A putative substrate [antibiotics (HAE1 proteins/heavy-metal (HME proteins] was also assigned to the majority of these proteins. No correlation was found between the ecological niche and the lifestyle of Burkholderia strains and the number/type of efflux pumps they possessed, while a relation can be found with genome size and taxonomy. Remarkably, we observed that only HAE1 proteins are mainly responsible for the different number of proteins observed in strains of the same species. Data concerning both the distribution and the phylogenetic analysis of the HAE1 and HME in the Burkholderia genus allowed depicting a likely evolutionary model accounting for the evolution and spreading of HME and HAE

  18. Exploring the HME and HAE1 efflux systems in the genus Burkholderia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Elena; Fondi, Marco; Papaleo, Maria Cristiana; Maida, Isabel; Buroni, Silvia; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Fani, Renato

    2010-06-03

    The genus Burkholderia includes a variety of species with opportunistic human pathogenic strains, whose increasing global resistance to antibiotics has become a public health problem. In this context a major role could be played by multidrug efflux pumps belonging to Resistance Nodulation Cell-Division (RND) family, which allow bacterial cells to extrude a wide range of different substrates, including antibiotics. This study aims to i) identify rnd genes in the 21 available completely sequenced Burkholderia genomes, ii) analyze their phylogenetic distribution, iii) define the putative function(s) that RND proteins perform within the Burkholderia genus and iv) try tracing the evolutionary history of some of these genes in Burkholderia. BLAST analysis of the 21 Burkholderia sequenced genomes, using experimentally characterized ceoB sequence (one of the RND family counterpart in the genus Burkholderia) as probe, allowed the assembly of a dataset comprising 254 putative RND proteins. An extensive phylogenetic analysis revealed the occurrence of several independent events of gene loss and duplication across the different lineages of the genus Burkholderia, leading to notable differences in the number of paralogs between different genomes. A putative substrate [antibiotics (HAE1 proteins)/heavy-metal (HME proteins)] was also assigned to the majority of these proteins. No correlation was found between the ecological niche and the lifestyle of Burkholderia strains and the number/type of efflux pumps they possessed, while a relation can be found with genome size and taxonomy. Remarkably, we observed that only HAE1 proteins are mainly responsible for the different number of proteins observed in strains of the same species. Data concerning both the distribution and the phylogenetic analysis of the HAE1 and HME in the Burkholderia genus allowed depicting a likely evolutionary model accounting for the evolution and spreading of HME and HAE1 systems in the Burkholderia genus. A

  19. Burkholderia cepacia lipase is a promising biocatalyst for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, Francesco; Natalello, Antonino; Castoldi, Simone; Lotti, Marina; Santambrogio, Carlo; Grandori, Rita

    2016-07-01

    Lipases resistant to inhibition and denaturation by methanol are valuable tools for biotechnological applications, in particular for biofuel production. Microbial lipases have attracted a great deal of interest because of their stability at high concentrations of organic solvents. Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) is tested here for robustness towards methanol in terms of conformational stability and catalytic activity in transesterification assays. This lipase turns out to be even more tolerant than the homologous and better characterized enzyme from Burkholderia glumae. BCL unfolding transition, as monitored by far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and intrinsic fluorescence, displays a Tm above 60°C in the presence of 50% methanol. The protein unfolds at low pH, and the organic solvent affects the nature of the denatured state under acidic conditions. The protein performs well in transesterification assays upon prolonged incubations at high methanol concentrations. BCL is highly tolerant to methanol and displays particularly high conformational stability under conditions employed for transesterification reactions. These features depict BCL as a promising enzyme for biofuel industry. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. PCR detection of Burkholderia multivorans in water and soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Charlotte; Daenekindt, Stijn; Vandamme, Peter

    2016-08-12

    Although semi-selective growth media have been developed for the isolation of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria from the environment, thus far Burkholderia multivorans has rarely been isolated from such samples. Because environmental B. multivorans isolates mainly originate from water samples, we hypothesized that water rather than soil is its most likely environmental niche. The aim of the present study was to assess the occurrence of B. multivorans in water samples from Flanders (Belgium) using a fast, culture-independent PCR assay. A nested PCR approach was used to achieve high sensitivity, and specificity was confirmed by sequencing the resulting amplicons. B. multivorans was detected in 11 % of the water samples (n = 112) and 92 % of the soil samples (n = 25) tested. The percentage of false positives was higher for water samples compared to soil samples, showing that the presently available B. multivorans recA primers lack specificity when applied to the analysis of water samples. The results of the present study demonstrate that B. multivorans DNA is commonly present in soil samples and to a lesser extent in water samples in Flanders (Belgium).

  1. An outbreak of Burkholderia stabilis colonization in a nasal ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Junyi; Wu, Wei; Lu, Yuan; Fan, Yanyan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe an outbreak of Burkholderia stabilis colonization among patients in a nasal ward. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used for the molecular typing of B. stabilis isolates. Microbiological records were reviewed to delineate the colonization outbreak period. One hundred seventy-one cultures of environment and equipment samples from the nasal ward were performed to trace the source of contamination. Infection control measures were taken in order to end the outbreak. All B. stabilis isolates were identified as a new MLST type, ST821. A total of 53 patients carried this B. stabilis in the nasal ward between March and September 2013, which was defined as the outbreak period. The source of the colonization was not determined because all environment cultures were negative for Burkholderia cepacia complex. No further B. stabilis carriers have been found in the ward since the implementation of interventions. Attention must be paid to asymptomatic colonization in order to identify outbreaks early. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Construction and evaluation of plasmid vectors optimized for constitutive and regulated gene expression in Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebre, Matthew D; Valvano, Miguel A

    2002-12-01

    Genetic studies with Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates are hampered by the limited availability of cloning vectors and by the inherent resistance of these isolates to the most common antibiotics used for genetic selection. Also, some of the promoters widely employed for gene expression in Escherichia coli are inefficient in B. cepacia. In this study, we have utilized the backbone of the vector pME6000, a derivative of the pBBR1 plasmid that was originally isolated from Bordetella bronchiseptica, to construct a set of vectors useful for gene expression in B. cepacia. These vectors contain either the constitutive promoter of the S7 ribosomal protein gene from Burkholderia sp. strain LB400 or the arabinose-inducible P(BAD) promoter from E. coli. Promoter sequences were placed immediately upstream of multiple cloning sites in combination with the minimal sequence of pME6000 required for plasmid maintenance and mobilization. The functionality of both vectors was assessed by cloning the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (e-gfp) and determining the levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein expression and fluorescence emission for a variety of clinical and environmental isolates of the B. cepacia complex. We also demonstrate that B. cepacia carrying these constructs can readily be detected intracellularly by fluorescence microscopy following the infection of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

  3. Type VI Secretion is a Major Virulence Determinant in Burkholderia Mallei

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schell, Mark A; Ulrich, Ricky L; Ribot, Wilson J; Brueggemann, Ernst E; Hines, Harry B; Chen, Dan; Lipscomb, Lyla; Kim, H. S; Mrazek, Jan; Nierman, William C; DeShazer, David

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted pathogen and a category B biothreat agent. Although the B. mallei VirAG two-component regulatory system is required for virulence in hamsters, the virulence genes it regulates are unknown...

  4. BIOAUGMENTATION WITH BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA PR1301 FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot field study was conducted at the Moffett Federal Airfield, Mountain View, California, to determine whether effective in-situ aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of TCE could be accomplished through bioaugmentation with a genetically modified strain of Burkholderia cepacia ...

  5. AQUIFER PROTIST RESPONSE AND THE POTENTIAL FOR TCE BIOREMEDIATION WITH BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 PR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The introduction of bacteria into the environment for bioremediation purposes (bioaugmentation) requires analysis and monitoring of the persistence and activity of microbial population for efficacy and risk assessment purposes. Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR123 and PR131 constitutive...

  6. Changes in agricultural management drive the diversity of Burkholderia species isolated from soil on PCAT medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salles, J.F.; Samyn, E.; Vandamme, P.A.; Veen, van J.A.; Elsas, van J.D.

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess the diversity of culturable Burkholderia populations in rhizosphere and bulk soil and to evaluate how different agricultural management regimes and land use history affect this diversity, four treatments were evaluated: permanent grassland; grassland converted into maize

  7. Changes in agricultural management drive the diversity of Burkholderia species isolated from soil on PLAT medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salles, JF; Samyn, E; Vandamme, P; van Veen, JA; van Elsas, JD

    In order to assess the diversity of culturable Burkholderia populations in rhizosphere and bulk soil and to evaluate how different agricultural management regimes and land use history affect this diversity, four treatments were evaluated: permanent grassland; grassland converted into maize

  8. Burkholderia susongensis sp. nov., a mineral-weathering bacterium isolated from weathered rock surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jia-Yu; Zang, Sheng-Gang; Sheng, Xia-Fang; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi; Wang, Qi

    2015-03-01

    A novel type of mineral-weathering bacterium was isolated from the weathered surface of rock (mica schist) collected from Susong (Anhui, China). Cells of strain L226(T) were Gram-stain-negative. The strain grew optimally at 30 °C, with 1 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7.0 in trypticase soy broth. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, strain L226(T) was shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia and the closest phylogenetic relatives were Burkholderia sprentiae WSM5005(T) (98.3 %), Burkholderia acidipaludis NBRC 101816(T) (98.2 %), Burkholderia tuberum STM678(T) (97.2 %) and Burkholderia diazotrophica JPY461(T) (97.1 %). The DNA G+C content was 63.5 mol% and the respiratory quinone was Q-8. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo and C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c. The polar lipid profile of strain L226(T) consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, unknown lipids and unidentified aminophospholipids. Based on the low level of DNA-DNA relatedness (ranging from 25.8 % to 34.4 %) to the tested type strains of species of the genus Burkholderia and unique phenotypic characteristics, it is suggested that strain L226(T) represents a novel species of the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia susongensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is L226(T) ( = CCTCC AB2014142(T) = JCM 30231(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  9. Crosstalk between sugarcane and a plant-growth promoting Burkholderia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat; Lonhienne, Thierry G. A.; Yeoh, Yun Kit; Donose, Bogdan C.; Webb, Richard I.; Parsons, Jeremy; Liao, Webber; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Hugenholtz, Philip; Schmidt, Susanne; Ragan, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species in the plant-beneficial-environmental clade of Burkholderia represent a substantial component of rhizosphere microbes in many plant species. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction, we combined functional studies with high-resolution dual transcriptome analysis of sugarcane and root-associated diazotrophic Burkholderia strain Q208. We show that Burkholderia Q208 forms a biofilm at the root surface and suppresses the virulence factors that typically trigger immune response in plants. Up-regulation of bd-type cytochromes in Burkholderia Q208 suggests an increased energy production and creates the microaerobic conditions suitable for BNF. In this environment, a series of metabolic pathways are activated in Burkholderia Q208 implicated in oxalotrophy, microaerobic respiration, and formation of PHB granules, enabling energy production under microaerobic conditions. In the plant, genes involved in hypoxia survival are up-regulated and through increased ethylene production, larger aerenchyma is produced in roots which in turn facilitates diffusion of oxygen within the cortex. The detected changes in gene expression, physiology and morphology in the partnership are evidence of a sophisticated interplay between sugarcane and a plant-growth promoting Burkholderia species that advance our understanding of the mutually beneficial processes occurring in the rhizosphere. PMID:27869215

  10. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils.

  11. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils. PMID:25989372

  12. Culturing and Characterization of Gut Symbiont Burkholderia spp. from the Southern Chinch Bug, Blissus insularis (Hemiptera: Blissidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Buss, Eileen A; Boucias, Drion G

    2016-06-01

    The phloem-feeding Southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis, harbors a high density of the exocellular bacterial symbiont Burkholderia in the lumen of specialized midgut crypts. Here we developed an organ culture method that initially involved incubating the B. insularis crypts in osmotically balanced insect cell culture medium. This approach enabled the crypt-inhabiting Burkholderia spp. to make a transition to an in vitro environment and to be subsequently cultured in standard bacteriological media. Examinations using ribotyping and BOX-PCR fingerprinting techniques demonstrated that most in vitro-produced bacterial cultures were identical to their crypt-inhabiting Burkholderia counterparts. Genomic and physiological analyses of gut-symbiotic Burkholderia spp. that were isolated individually from two separate B. insularis laboratory colonies revealed that the majority of individual insects harbored a single Burkholderia ribotype in their midgut crypts, resulting in a diverse Burkholderia community within each colony. The diversity was also exhibited by the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of these Burkholderia cultures. Access to cultures of crypt-inhabiting bacteria provides an opportunity to investigate the interaction between symbiotic Burkholderia spp. and the B. insularis host. Furthermore, the culturing method provides an alternative strategy for establishing in vitro cultures of other fastidious insect-associated bacterial symbionts. An organ culture method was developed to establish in vitro cultures of a fastidious Burkholderia symbiont associated with the midgut crypts of the Southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis The identities of the resulting cultures were confirmed using the genomic and physiological features of Burkholderia cultures isolated from B. insularis crypts, showing that host insects maintained the diversity of Burkholderia spp. over multiple generations. The availability of characterized gut-symbiotic Burkholderia cultures provides

  13. Isolation and Identification of Burkholderia glumae from Symptomless Rice Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey on isolation and detection of the casual organism of bacterial grain rot of rice was conducted during 1997–2006. In 2006, six pathogenic bacterial strains were isolated from two symptomless seed samples of rice (Oryza sativa L. originally produced in Hainan Province and then planted in Zhejiang Province, China. They were identified as Burkholderia glumae which is the causal organism of bacterial grain rot of rice by physiological characteristics, colony morphology, pathogenicity test, Biolog, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME analysis and RAPD-PCR compared with the four standard reference strains. It is confirmed that there is the infection of B. glumae in so-called ‘health looking seeds’.

  14. Burkholderia glumae en el cultivo de arroz en Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Quesada-González

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la presencia de Burkholderia glumae en arroz en Costa Rica. La bacteria Burkholderia glumae está asociada al cultivo del arroz en el que provoca la enfermedad llamada añublo bacterial. Bajo condiciones ambientales favorables, la densidad bacteriana aumenta, lo que provoca que, bajo un sistema de regulación denominado quorum sensing, se expresen sus mecanismos de virulencia mediante la activación de genes responsables para la síntesis de la toxoflavina, que bloquea el flujo de nutrientes, para la biogénesis de flagelos y la respuesta quimiotáctica, y la producción de la enzima catalasa. Las plantas desarrollan la sintomatología que finalmente conlleva a un vaneamiento del grano provocando pérdidas económicas importantes. Se investigó la situación referente a la contaminación del grano de arroz causado por esta bacteria en Costa Rica durante los años 2009 y 2010, mediante un convenio entre la Corporación Nacional Arrocera y el Laboratorio de Fitopatología del Centro de Investigación en Protección de Cultivos de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Se usó la metodología de PCR de punto final recomendada por investigadores del Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical en Colombia y se reforzó la identificación, por medio de técnicas de microbiología convencional. Se obtuvieron resultados que indican la presencia de la bacteria en Costa Rica, la primera información sobre la prevalencia de un fitopatógeno bacteriano de gran importancia para el sector arrocero.

  15. Genomic analysis and relatedness of P2-like phages of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Jonathan J

    2010-10-01

    first BCC-specific phages to be identified as P2-like. As KS14 has previously been shown to be active against Burkholderia cenocepacia in vivo, genomic characterization of these phages is a crucial first step in the development of these and similar phages for clinical use against the BCC.

  16. Draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sordidicola S170, a potential plant growth promoter isolated from coniferous forest soil in the Czech Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lladó, Salvador; Xu, Zhuofei; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia species are key players in the accumulation of carbon from cellulose decomposition in coniferous forest ecosystems. We report here the draft genome of Burkholderia sordidicola strain S170, containing features associated with known genes involved in plant growth promotion, the biologi......Burkholderia species are key players in the accumulation of carbon from cellulose decomposition in coniferous forest ecosystems. We report here the draft genome of Burkholderia sordidicola strain S170, containing features associated with known genes involved in plant growth promotion...

  17. PKC-η-MARCKS Signaling Promotes Intracellular Survival of Unopsonized Burkholderia thailandensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiya N. Micheva-Viteva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic Burkholderia rely on host factors for efficient intracellular replication and are highly refractory to antibiotic treatment. To identify host genes that are required by Burkholderia spp. during infection, we performed a RNA interference (RNAi screen of the human kinome and identified 35 host kinases that facilitated Burkholderia thailandensis intracellular survival in human monocytic THP-1 cells. We validated a selection of host kinases using imaging flow cytometry to assess efficiency of B. thailandensis survival in the host upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. We focused on the role of the novel protein kinase C isoform, PKC-η, in Burkholderia infection and characterized PKC-η/MARCKS signaling as a key event that promotes the survival of unopsonized B. thailandensis CDC2721121 within host cells. While infection of lung epithelial cells with unopsonized Gram-negative bacteria stimulated phosphorylation of Ser175/160 in the MARCKS effector domain, siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKC-η expression reduced the levels of phosphorylated MARCKS by >3-fold in response to infection with Bt CDC2721121. We compared the effect of the conventional PKC-α and novel PKC-η isoforms on the growth of B. thailandensis CDC2721121 within monocytic THP-1 cells and found that ≥75% knock-down of PRKCH transcript levels reduced intracellular bacterial load 100% more efficiently when compared to growth in cells siRNA-depleted of the classical PKC-α, suggesting that the PKC-η isoform can specifically mediate Burkholderia intracellular survival. Based on imaging studies of intracellular B. thailandensis, we found that PKC-η function stimulates phagocytic pathways that promote B. thailandensis escape into the cytoplasm leading to activation of autophagosome flux. Identification of host kinases that are targeted by Burkholderia during infection provides valuable molecular insights in understanding Burkholderia pathogenesis, and ultimately, in designing effective

  18. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yee-Chin

    2016-08-22

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  19. Candidate essential genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 identified by genome-wide TraDIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Chin Wong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  20. Increase in isolation of Burkholderia contaminans from Spanish patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Pascual, M J; Valdezate, S; Carrasco, G; Villalón, P; Garrido, N; Saéz-Nieto, J A

    2015-02-01

    Species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are associated with opportunistic infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. For years now, B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia have been the most frequently isolated species within the complex in such patients. However, between 2008 and 2012, the overall incidence of these species in Spain (17.7% and 12.5% respectively) was overtaken by that of B. contaminans (36.5%). The population structure of B. contaminans isolates from Spanish patients with cystic fibrosis was analysed using multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Three major known sequence types (ST102, ST404 and ST482) and a new one (ST771) were identified among 59 isolates. In addition, PFGE detected 17 pulsotypes. Susceptibility to antibiotics was examined using the Etest. Cotrimoxazole and ceftazidime were the most active antibiotics against B. contaminans, inhibiting growth in 88% and 86% of the isolates, respectively. In addition, this species showed less resistance to most of the antibiotics tested than did either B. multivorans or B. cenocepacia isolates recovered from similar Spanish patients. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploring the Anti-Burkholderia cepacia Complex Activity of Essential Oils: A Preliminary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Maida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have checked the ability of the essential oils extracted from six different medicinal plants (Eugenia caryophyllata, Origanum vulgare, Rosmarinus officinalis, Lavandula officinalis, Melaleuca alternifolia, and Thymus vulgaris to inhibit the growth of 18 bacterial type strains belonging to the 18 known species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc. These bacteria are opportunistic human pathogens that can cause severe infection in immunocompromised patients, especially those affected by cystic fibrosis (CF, and are often resistant to multiple antibiotics. The analysis of the aromatograms produced by the six oils revealed that, in spite of their different chemical composition, all of them were able to contrast the growth of Bcc members. However, three of them (i.e., Eugenia caryophyllata, Origanum vulgare, and Thymus vulgaris were particularly active versus the Bcc strains, including those exhibiting a high degree or resistance to ciprofloxacin, one of the most used antibiotics to treat Bcc infections. These three oils are also active toward both environmental and clinical strains (isolated from CF patients, suggesting that they might be used in the future to fight B. cepacia complex infections.

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-1988 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-1988 ref|ZP_01331076.1| hypothetical protein BpseS_03000920 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei S13] ref|ZP_01334471.1| hypothetical protein Bpse4_03003005 [Burkholderia pseudomallei 406e...] gb|EDO83829.1| Rhs element Vgr protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 406e] ZP_01331076.1 2e-07 26% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0923 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0923 ref|ZP_02498781.1| putative iron-sulfur binding protein [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 112] ref|ZP_04890952.1| iron-sulfur cluster binding protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 165...5] gb|EDU11936.1| iron-sulfur cluster binding protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei 1655] ZP_02498781.1 3.0 32% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0328 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0328 ref|YP_335893.1| cystine-binding periplasmic protein FliY [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1710b] gb|ABA52511.1| cystine-binding periplasmic protein FliY [Burkholderia pseudomalle...i 1710b] gb|EDO89624.1| ABC transporter, periplasmic-binding protein [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pasteur 52237] YP_335893.1 6e-07 39% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-20-0065 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-20-0065 ref|ZP_00892892.1| hypothetical protein Bpse110_02004856 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1106b] ref|ZP_01213659.1| hypothetical protein Bpse17_02001368 [Burkholderia pseudomallei... 1710a] ref|ZP_01320796.1| hypothetical protein BpseP_03005463 [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pasteur] ZP_00892892.1 2e-06 34% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-07-0003 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-07-0003 ref|ZP_00892892.1| hypothetical protein Bpse110_02004856 [Burkholder...ia pseudomallei 1106b] ref|ZP_01213659.1| hypothetical protein Bpse17_02001368 [Burkholderia pseudomallei... 1710a] ref|ZP_01320796.1| hypothetical protein BpseP_03005463 [Burkholderia pseudomallei Pasteur] ZP_00892892.1 1e-13 34% ...

  7. Oxalotrophy, a widespread trait of plant-associated Burkholderia species, is involved in successful root colonization of lupin and maize by Burkholderia phytofirmans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Thomas; Stopnisek, Nejc; Agnoli, Kirsty; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots and shoots harbor complex bacterial communities. Early seed and plantlet colonization plays a key role in determining which bacterial populations will successfully invade plant tissues, yet the mechanisms enabling plants to select for beneficial rather than harmful populations are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a role of oxalate as a determinant in this selection process, using members of the genus Burkholderia as model organisms. Oxalotrophy, i.e., the ability to use oxalate as a carbon source, was found to be a property strictly associated with plant-beneficial species of the Burkholderia genus, while plant pathogenic (B. glumae, B. plantarii) or human opportunistic pathogens (Burkholderia cepacia complex strains) were unable to degrade oxalate. We further show that oxalotrophy is required for successful plant colonization by the broad host endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN: an engineered Δoxc mutant, which lost the ability to grow on oxalate, was significantly impaired in early colonization of both lupin and maize compared with the wild-type. This work suggests that in addition to the role of oxalate in heavy metal tolerance of plants and in virulence of phytopathogenic fungi, it is also involved in specifically recruiting plant-beneficial members from complex bacterial communities.

  8. Oxalotrophy, a widespread trait of plant-associated Burkholderia species, is involved in successful root colonization of lupin and maize by Burkholderia phytofirmans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKost

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots and shoots harbour complex bacterial communities. Early seed and plantlet colonization plays a key role in determining which bacterial populations will successfully invade plant tissues, yet the mechanisms enabling plants to select for beneficial rather than harmful populations are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a role of oxalate as a determinant in this selection process, using members of the genus Burkholderia as model organisms. Oxalotrophy, i.e. the ability to use oxalate as a carbon source, was found to be a property strictly associated with plant-beneficial species of the Burkholderia genus, while plant pathogenic (B. glumae, B. plantarii or human opportunistic pathogens (Burkholderia cepacia complex strains were unable to degrade oxalate. We further show that oxalotrophy is required for successful plant colonization by the broad host endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN: an engineered Δoxc mutant, which lost the ability to grow on oxalate, was significantly impaired in early colonization of both lupin and maize compared with the wild-type. This work suggests that in addition to the role of oxalate in heavy metal tolerance of plants and in virulence of phytopathogenic fungi, it is also involved in specifically recruiting plant-beneficial members from complex bacterial communities.

  9. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of dengue and other etiologic agents among patients with acute febrile illness, Puerto Rico, 2012-2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay M Tomashek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Identifying etiologies of acute febrile illnesses (AFI is challenging due to non-specific presentation and limited availability of diagnostics. Prospective AFI studies provide a methodology to describe the syndrome by age and etiology, findings that can be used to develop case definitions and multiplexed diagnostics to optimize management. We conducted a 3-year prospective AFI study in Puerto Rico. Patients with fever ≤7 days were offered enrollment, and clinical data and specimens were collected at enrollment and upon discharge or follow-up. Blood and oro-nasopharyngeal specimens were tested by RT-PCR and immunodiagnostic methods for infection with dengue viruses (DENV 1-4, chikungunya virus (CHIKV, influenza A and B viruses (FLU A/B, 12 other respiratory viruses (ORV, enterovirus, Leptospira spp., and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Clinical presentation and laboratory findings of participants infected with DENV were compared to those infected with CHIKV, FLU A/B, and ORV. Clinical predictors of laboratory-positive dengue compared to all other AFI etiologies were determined by age and day post-illness onset (DPO at presentation. Of 8,996 participants enrolled from May 7, 2012 through May 6, 2015, more than half (54.8%, 4,930 had a pathogen detected. Pathogens most frequently detected were CHIKV (1,635, 18.2%, FLU A/B (1,074, 11.9%, DENV 1-4 (970, 10.8%, and ORV (904, 10.3%. Participants with DENV infection presented later and a higher proportion were hospitalized than those with other diagnoses (46.7% versus 27.3% with ORV, 18.8% with FLU A/B, and 11.2% with CHIKV. Predictors of dengue in participants presenting <3 DPO included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, headache, eye pain, nausea, and dizziness, while negative predictors were irritability and rhinorrhea. Predictors of dengue in participants presenting 3-5 DPO were leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, facial/neck erythema, nausea, eye pain, signs of poor circulation, and diarrhea; presence of

  10. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of dengue and other etiologic agents among patients with acute febrile illness, Puerto Rico, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomashek, Kay M; Lorenzi, Olga D; Andújar-Pérez, Doris A; Torres-Velásquez, Brenda C; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge Luis; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Rivera, Aidsa; Gonzalez-Zeno, Gladys E; Sharp, Tyler M; Galloway, Renee L; Glass Elrod, Mindy; Mathis, Demetrius L; Oberste, M Steven; Nix, W Allan; Henderson, Elizabeth; McQuiston, Jennifer; Singleton, Joseph; Kato, Cecilia; García Gubern, Carlos; Santiago-Rivera, William; Cruz-Correa, Jesús; Muns-Sosa, Robert; Ortiz-Rivera, Juan D; Jiménez, Gerson; Galarza, Ivonne E; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Margolis, Harold S; Alvarado, Luisa I

    2017-09-01

    Identifying etiologies of acute febrile illnesses (AFI) is challenging due to non-specific presentation and limited availability of diagnostics. Prospective AFI studies provide a methodology to describe the syndrome by age and etiology, findings that can be used to develop case definitions and multiplexed diagnostics to optimize management. We conducted a 3-year prospective AFI study in Puerto Rico. Patients with fever ≤7 days were offered enrollment, and clinical data and specimens were collected at enrollment and upon discharge or follow-up. Blood and oro-nasopharyngeal specimens were tested by RT-PCR and immunodiagnostic methods for infection with dengue viruses (DENV) 1-4, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), influenza A and B viruses (FLU A/B), 12 other respiratory viruses (ORV), enterovirus, Leptospira spp., and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Clinical presentation and laboratory findings of participants infected with DENV were compared to those infected with CHIKV, FLU A/B, and ORV. Clinical predictors of laboratory-positive dengue compared to all other AFI etiologies were determined by age and day post-illness onset (DPO) at presentation. Of 8,996 participants enrolled from May 7, 2012 through May 6, 2015, more than half (54.8%, 4,930) had a pathogen detected. Pathogens most frequently detected were CHIKV (1,635, 18.2%), FLU A/B (1,074, 11.9%), DENV 1-4 (970, 10.8%), and ORV (904, 10.3%). Participants with DENV infection presented later and a higher proportion were hospitalized than those with other diagnoses (46.7% versus 27.3% with ORV, 18.8% with FLU A/B, and 11.2% with CHIKV). Predictors of dengue in participants presenting dengue in participants presenting 3-5 DPO were leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, facial/neck erythema, nausea, eye pain, signs of poor circulation, and diarrhea; presence of rhinorrhea, cough, and red conjunctiva predicted non-dengue AFI. By enrolling febrile patients at clinical presentation, we identified unbiased predictors of laboratory

  11. Novel glycopolymer sensitizes Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates from cystic fibrosis patients to tobramycin and meropenem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya P Narayanaswamy

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc infection, associated with cystic fibrosis (CF is intrinsically multidrug resistant to antibiotic treatment making eradication from the CF lung virtually impossible. Infection with Bcc leads to a rapid decline in lung function and is often a contraindication for lung transplant, significantly influencing morbidity and mortality associated with CF disease. Standard treatment frequently involves antibiotic combination therapy. However, no formal strategy has been adopted in clinical practice to guide successful eradication. A new class of direct-acting, large molecule polycationic glycopolymers, derivatives of a natural polysaccharide poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine (PAAG, are in development as an alternative to traditional antibiotic strategies. During treatment, PAAG rapidly targets the anionic structural composition of bacterial outer membranes. PAAG was observed to permeabilize bacterial membranes upon contact to facilitate potentiation of antibiotic activity. Three-dimensional checkerboard synergy analyses were used to test the susceptibility of eight Bcc strains (seven CF clinical isolates to antibiotic combinations with PAAG or ceftazidime. Potentiation of tobramycin and meropenem activity was observed in combination with 8-128 μg/mL PAAG. Treatment with PAAG reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of tobramycin and meropenem below their clinical sensitivity breakpoints (≤4 μg/mL, demonstrating the ability of PAAG to sensitize antibiotic resistant Bcc clinical isolates. Fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC calculations showed PAAG was able to significantly potentiate antibacterial synergy with these antibiotics toward all Bcc species tested. These preliminary studies suggest PAAG facilitates a broad synergistic activity that may result in more positive therapeutic outcomes and supports further development of safe, polycationic glycopolymers for inhaled combination antibiotic therapy

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Burkholderia mallei Isolate Originating from a Glanderous Horse from the Kingdom of Bahrain

    OpenAIRE

    Elschner, Mandy C; Thomas, Prasad; Melzer, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a zoonotic agent causing glanders, a notifiable disease in equines. During the past decades glanders emerged, and the Kingdom of Bahrain reported outbreaks to the World Organization of Animal Health in 2010 and 2011. This paper presents the complete genome sequence of the Burkholderia mallei strain 11RR2811 Bahrain1.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a Burkholderia mallei Isolate Originating from a Glanderous Horse from the Kingdom of Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschner, Mandy C; Thomas, Prasad; Melzer, Falk

    2016-12-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a zoonotic agent causing glanders, a notifiable disease in equines. During the past decades glanders emerged, and the Kingdom of Bahrain reported outbreaks to the World Organization of Animal Health in 2010 and 2011. This paper presents the complete genome sequence of the Burkholderia mallei strain 11RR2811 Bahrain1. Copyright © 2016 Elschner et al.

  14. Burkholderia of Plant-Beneficial Group are Symbiotically Associated with Bordered Plant Bugs (Heteroptera: Pyrrhocoroidea: Largidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Kazutaka; Matsuura, Yu; Itoh, Hideomi; Navarro, Ronald; Hori, Tomoyuki; Sone, Teruo; Kamagata, Yoichi; Mergaert, Peter; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2015-01-01

    A number of phytophagous stinkbugs (order Heteroptera: infraorder Pentatomomorpha) harbor symbiotic bacteria in a specific midgut region composed of numerous crypts. Among the five superfamilies of the infraorder Pentatomomorpha, most members of the Coreoidea and Lygaeoidea are associated with a specific group of the genus Burkholderia, called the "stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)" group, which is not vertically transmitted, but acquired from the environment every host generation. A recent study reported that, in addition to these two stinkbug groups, the family Largidae of the superfamily Pyrrhocoroidea also possesses a Burkholderia symbiont. Despite this recent finding, the phylogenetic position and biological nature of Burkholderia associated with Largidae remains unclear. Based on the combined results of fluorescence in situ hybridization, cloning analysis, Illumina deep sequencing, and egg inspections by diagnostic PCR, we herein demonstrate that the largid species are consistently associated with the "plant-associated beneficial and environmental (PBE)" group of Burkholderia, which are phylogenetically distinct from the SBE group, and that they maintain symbiosis through the environmental acquisition of the bacteria. Since the superfamilies Coreoidea, Lygaeoidea, and Pyrrhocoroidea are monophyletic in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha, it is plausible that the symbiotic association with Burkholderia evolved at the common ancestor of the three superfamilies. However, the results of this study strongly suggest that a dynamic transition from the PBE to SBE group, or vice versa, occurred in the course of stinkbug evolution.

  15. A Possible Link between Infection with Burkholderia Bacteria and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Based on Epitope Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that purified polyclonal and monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibodies bind a 15-mer peptide ASPVTARVLWKASHV in ELISA and Dot blot. This 15-mer peptide partial sequence ARVLWKASH shares similarity with burkholderia bacterial cytochrome B 561 partial sequence ARVLWRATH. In this study, we show that purified anti-dsDNA antibodies react with burkholderia fungorum bacterial cell lysates in Western blot. We used anti-dsDNA antibodies to make an anti-dsDNA antibodies affinity column and used this column to purify the burkholderia fungorum bacterial protein. Purified anti-dsDNA antibodies bind specifically to purified bacterial antigen and purified bacterial antigen blocked the anti-dsDNA antibodies binding to dsDNA antigen. Sera with anti-dsDNA antibodies bind specifically to purified bacterial antigen. We obtained protein partial sequence of RAGTDEGFG which is shared with burkholderia bacterial transcription regulator protein sequence. Sera with anti-dsDNA antibodies bind to RAGTDEGFG peptide better than control groups. These data support our hypothesis that the origin of anti-dsDNA antibodies in SLE may be associated with burkholderia bacterial infection.

  16. Phylogenetically Diverse Burkholderia Associated with Midgut Crypts of Spurge Bugs, Dicranocephalus spp. (Heteroptera: Stenocephalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Matsuura, Yu; Dettner, Konrad; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2016-06-25

    Diverse phytophagous heteropteran insects, commonly known as stinkbugs, are associated with specific gut symbiotic bacteria, which have been found in midgut cryptic spaces. Recent studies have revealed that members of the stinkbug families Coreidae and Alydidae of the superfamily Coreoidea are consistently associated with a specific group of the betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia, called the "stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)" group, and horizontally acquire specific symbionts from the environment every generation. However, the symbiotic system of another coreoid family, Stenocephalidae remains undetermined. We herein investigated four species of the stenocephalid genus Dicranocephalus. Examinations via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the typical arrangement and ultrastructures of midgut crypts and gut symbionts. Cloning and molecular phylogenetic analyses of bacterial genes showed that the midgut crypts of all species are colonized by Burkholderia strains, which were further assigned to different subgroups of the genus Burkholderia. In addition to the SBE-group Burkholderia, a number of stenocephalid symbionts belonged to a novel clade containing B. sordidicola and B. udeis, suggesting a specific symbiont clade for the Stenocephalidae. The symbiotic systems of stenocephalid bugs may provide a unique opportunity to study the ongoing evolution of symbiont associations in the stinkbug-Burkholderia interaction.

  17. Burkholderia of Plant-Beneficial Group are Symbiotically Associated with Bordered Plant Bugs (Heteroptera: Pyrrhocoroidea: Largidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Kazutaka; Matsuura, Yu; Itoh, Hideomi; Navarro, Ronald; Hori, Tomoyuki; Sone, Teruo; Kamagata, Yoichi; Mergaert, Peter; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2015-01-01

    A number of phytophagous stinkbugs (order Heteroptera: infraorder Pentatomomorpha) harbor symbiotic bacteria in a specific midgut region composed of numerous crypts. Among the five superfamilies of the infraorder Pentatomomorpha, most members of the Coreoidea and Lygaeoidea are associated with a specific group of the genus Burkholderia, called the “stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)” group, which is not vertically transmitted, but acquired from the environment every host generation. A recent study reported that, in addition to these two stinkbug groups, the family Largidae of the superfamily Pyrrhocoroidea also possesses a Burkholderia symbiont. Despite this recent finding, the phylogenetic position and biological nature of Burkholderia associated with Largidae remains unclear. Based on the combined results of fluorescence in situ hybridization, cloning analysis, Illumina deep sequencing, and egg inspections by diagnostic PCR, we herein demonstrate that the largid species are consistently associated with the “plant-associated beneficial and environmental (PBE)” group of Burkholderia, which are phylogenetically distinct from the SBE group, and that they maintain symbiosis through the environmental acquisition of the bacteria. Since the superfamilies Coreoidea, Lygaeoidea, and Pyrrhocoroidea are monophyletic in the infraorder Pentatomomorpha, it is plausible that the symbiotic association with Burkholderia evolved at the common ancestor of the three superfamilies. However, the results of this study strongly suggest that a dynamic transition from the PBE to SBE group, or vice versa, occurred in the course of stinkbug evolution. PMID:26657305

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_006351 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... [Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243] ... Length = 185 ... Query: 3 ... RTFAYARVSKIDQTATNQLHEIEAAGFAVDKRRVVTESIS...GSVGASQRPGFSKLLDKMEE 62 ... RTFAYARVSKIDQTATNQLHEIEAAGFAVDKRRVVTESIS...GSVGASQRPGFSKLLDKMEE Sbjct: 1 ... RTFAYARVSKIDQTATNQLHEIEAAGFAVDKRRVVTESISGSVGASQRPGFSKLLDKMEE 60 ... Query: 123

  19. The tomato rhizosphere, an environment rich in nitrogen-fixing Burkholderia species with capabilities of interest for agriculture and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Onofre-Lemus, Janette; Estrada-de Los Santos, Paulina; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes

    2007-08-01

    Burkholderia strains are promising candidates for biotechnological applications. Unfortunately, most of these strains belong to species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) involved in human infections, hampering potential applications. Novel diazotrophic Burkholderia species, phylogenetically distant from the Bcc species, have been discovered recently, but their environmental distribution and relevant features for agro-biotechnological applications are little known. In this work, the occurrence of N2-fixing Burkholderia species in the rhizospheres and rhizoplanes of tomato plants field grown in Mexico was assessed. The results revealed a high level of diversity of diazotrophic Burkholderia species, including B. unamae, B. xenovorans, B. tropica, and two other unknown species, one of them phylogenetically closely related to B. kururiensis. These N2-fixing Burkholderia species exhibited activities involved in bioremediation, plant growth promotion, or biological control in vitro. Remarkably, B. unamae and B. kururiensis grew with aromatic compounds (phenol and benzene) as carbon sources, and the presence of aromatic oxygenase genes was confirmed in both species. The rhizospheric and endophyte nature of B. unamae and its ability to degrade aromatic compounds suggest that it could be used in rhizoremediation and for improvement of phytoremediation. B. kururiensis and other Burkholderia sp. strains grew with toluene. B. unamae and B. xenovorans exhibited ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) deaminase activity, and the occurrence of acdS genes encoding ACC deaminase was confirmed. Mineral phosphate solubilization through organic acid production appears to be the mechanism used by most diazotrophic Burkholderia species, but in B. tropica, there presumably exists an additional unknown mechanism. Most of the diazotrophic Burkholderia species produced hydroxamate-type siderophores. Certainly, the N2-fixing Burkholderia species associated with plants have great

  20. Comparative genome analysis of rice-pathogenic Burkholderia provides insight into capacity to adapt to different environments and hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young-Su; Lim, Jae Yun; Park, Jungwook; Kim, Sunyoung; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Cheong, Hoon; Kim, Sang-Mok; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu

    2015-05-06

    In addition to human and animal diseases, bacteria of the genus Burkholderia can cause plant diseases. The representative species of rice-pathogenic Burkholderia are Burkholderia glumae, B. gladioli, and B. plantarii, which primarily cause grain rot, sheath rot, and seedling blight, respectively, resulting in severe reductions in rice production. Though Burkholderia rice pathogens cause problems in rice-growing countries, comprehensive studies of these rice-pathogenic species aiming to control Burkholderia-mediated diseases are only in the early stages. We first sequenced the complete genome of B. plantarii ATCC 43733T. Second, we conducted comparative analysis of the newly sequenced B. plantarii ATCC 43733T genome with eleven complete or draft genomes of B. glumae and B. gladioli strains. Furthermore, we compared the genome of three rice Burkholderia pathogens with those of other Burkholderia species such as those found in environmental habitats and those known as animal/human pathogens. These B. glumae, B. gladioli, and B. plantarii strains have unique genes involved in toxoflavin or tropolone toxin production and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-mediated bacterial immune system. Although the genome of B. plantarii ATCC 43733T has many common features with those of B. glumae and B. gladioli, this B. plantarii strain has several unique features, including quorum sensing and CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) systems. The complete genome sequence of B. plantarii ATCC 43733T and publicly available genomes of B. glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3 enabled comprehensive comparative genome analyses among three rice-pathogenic Burkholderia species responsible for tissue rotting and seedling blight. Our results suggest that B. glumae has evolved rapidly, or has undergone rapid genome rearrangements or deletions, in response to the hosts. It also, clarifies the unique features of rice pathogenic Burkholderia species relative to other