WorldWideScience

Sample records for burkholderia cenocepacia respiratory

  1. Investigation of the multifaceted iron acquisition strategies of Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, J; Whelan, N; Wright, C; Sá-Correia, I; McClean, S; Thomas, M; Callaghan, Máire

    2015-04-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is a bacterial pathogen which causes severe respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis (CF). These studies were aimed at gaining an insight into the iron acquisition strategies of B. cenocepacia. In iron restricted conditions, genes associated with the synthesis and utilisation of ornibactin (pvdA, orbA, orb F) were significantly upregulated compared to the expression of pyochelin associated genes (pchD, fptA). In the absence of alternative iron sources, B. cenocepacia J2315 and 715j utilised ferritin and haemin, but not transferrin or lactoferrin for growth. Significantly, mutants unable to produce ornibactin, (715j-orbI) or ornibactin and pyochelin, (715j-pobA), utilised haemin and ferritin more efficiently than the wild-type. Moreover, both mutants were also able to utilise lactoferrin for growth (P ≤ 0.01) and additionally 715j-pobA utilised transferrin (P ≤ 0.01), potentially facilitating adaptation to the host environment. Furthermore, B. cenocepacia increased ornibactin gene expression in response to pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P ≤ 0.01), demonstrating the capacity to compete for iron in co-colonised niches. Pyoverdine also significantly diminished the growth of B. cenocepacia (P < 0.001) which was related to its iron chelating activity. In a study of three B. cenocepacia sequential clonal isolates obtained from a CF patient over a 3.5 year period, ornibactin upregulation in response to pyoverdine was less pronounced in the last isolate compared to the earlier isolates, as was growth in the presence of haemin and ferritin, indicating alternative iron acquisition mechanism(s) may dominate as chronic infection progresses. These data demonstrate the multifaceted iron acquisition strategies of B. cenocepacia and their capacity to be differentially activated in the presence of P. aeruginosa and during chronic infection.

  2. Burkholderia cenocepacia zinc metalloproteases influence resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Cora; Sokol, Pamela A

    2009-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia secretes two zinc-dependent metalloproteases, designated ZmpA and ZmpB. Previously, ZmpA and ZmpB have been shown to cleave several proteins important in host defence. In this study, the ability of ZmpA and ZmpB to digest and inactivate antimicrobial peptides involved in innate immunity was examined. ZmpB but not ZmpA cleaved beta-defensin-1. ZmpA but not ZmpB cleaved the cathelicidin LL-37. Both enzymes cleaved elafin and secretory leukocyte inhibitor, which are antimicrobial peptides as well as neutrophil elastase inhibitors. Both ZmpA and ZmpB cleaved protamine, a fish antimicrobial peptide, and a zmpA zmpB mutant was more sensitive to protamine killing than the parental strain. ZmpA or ZmpB cleavage of elafin inactivated its anti-protease activity. The effect of ZmpA and ZmpB on the neutrophil proteases elastase and cathepsin G was also examined but neither enzyme was active against these host proteases. These studies suggest that ZmpA and ZmpB may influence the resistance of B. cenocepacia to host antimicrobial peptides as well as alter the host protease/anti-protease balance in chronic respiratory infections.

  3. Clinafloxacin for Treatment of Burkholderia cenocepacia Infection in a Cystic Fibrosis Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwan, Akshu; Nicolau, David P; Wungwattana, Minkey; Zuckerman, Jonathan B; Waters, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infection with Burkholderia cenocepacia is associated with accelerated decline in lung function and increased mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (A. M. Jones, M. E. Dodd, J. R. W. Govan, V. Barcus, C. J. Doherty, J. Morris, and A. K. Webb, Thorax 59:948-951, 2004, http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/thx.2003.017210). B. cenocepacia often possesses innate resistance to multiple antimicrobial classes, making eradication uncommon in established infection (P. B. Davis, Am J Respir Crit Care Med 173:475-482, 2006, http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200505-840OE). We report the use of clinafloxacin in a CF patient with advanced B. cenocepacia infection, present pharmacokinetic (PK) data, and discuss the potential therapeutic role of clinafloxacin in patients with this condition.

  4. Interactions of Burkholderia cenocepacia and other Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria with epithelial and phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldías, M Soledad; Valvano, Miguel A

    2009-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is a member of the B. cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of opportunistic bacteria that infect the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and are extraordinarily resistant to almost all clinically useful antibiotics. Infections in CF patients with Bcc bacteria generally lead to a more rapid decline in lung function, and in some cases to the 'cepacia syndrome', a virtually deadly exacerbation of the lung infection with systemic manifestations. These characteristics of Bcc bacteria contribute to higher morbidity and mortality in infected CF patients. In the last 10 years considerable progress has been made in understanding the interactions between Bcc bacteria and mammalian host cells. Bcc isolates can survive either intracellularly within eukaryotic cells or extracellularly in host tissues. They survive within phagocytes and respiratory epithelial cells, and they have the ability to breach the respiratory epithelium layer. Survival and persistence of Bcc bacteria within host cells and tissues are believed to play a key role in pulmonary infection and to contribute to the persistent inflammation observed in patients with CF. This review summarizes recent findings concerning the interaction between Bcc bacteria and epithelial and phagocytic cells.

  5. The CRP/FNR family protein Bcam1349 is a c-di-GMP effector that regulates biofilm formation in the respiratory pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; O'Connell, Aileen; Nilsson, Martin

    2011-01-01

    to control a wide range of functions in bacteria, but little is known about these regulatory mechanisms in B. cenocepacia. Here we investigated the role that c-di-GMP plays in the regulation of biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia. Elevated intracellular levels of c-di-GMP promoted wrinkly...... colony, pellicle and biofilm formation in B. cenocepacia. A screen for transposon mutants unable to respond to elevated levels of c-di-GMP led to the identification of the mutant bcam1349 that did not display increased biofilm and pellicle formation with excessive c-di-GMP levels, and displayed a biofilm...... larvae infection model. Taken together, these findings suggest that the Bcam1349 protein is a transcriptional regulator that binds c-di-GMP and regulates biofilm formation and virulence in B. cenocepacia in response to the level of c-di-GMP....

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain 869T2, a Plant-Beneficial Endophytic Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ying-Ning; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-11-12

    An endophytic bacterium, Burkholderia cenocepacia 869T2, isolated from vetiver grass, has shown its abilities for both in planta biocontrol and plant growth promotion. Its draft genome sequence was determined to provide insights into those metabolic pathways involved in plant-beneficial activity. This is the first genome report for endophytic B. cenocepacia.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-2, a Methyl Parathion- and p-Nitrophenol-Degrading Bacterium, Isolated from Agricultural Soils in Morelos, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Fernández López, Maikel Gilberto; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, M Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Villalobos-López, Miguel A; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2016-04-28

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that belongs to Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2 was isolated from agricultural soils in Morelos, Mexico, and previously has shown its abilities for bioremediation. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-2.

  8. Discovery of new diketopiperazines inhibiting Burkholderia cenocepacia quorum sensing in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffone, Viola C.; Chiarelli, Laurent R.; Makarov, Vadim; Brackman, Gilles; Israyilova, Aygun; Azzalin, Alberto; Forneris, Federico; Riabova, Olga; Savina, Svetlana; Coenye, Tom; Riccardi, Giovanna; Buroni, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, an opportunistic respiratory pathogen particularly relevant for cystic fibrosis patients, is difficult to eradicate due to its high level of resistance to most clinically relevant antimicrobials. Consequently, the discovery of new antimicrobials as well as molecules capable of inhibiting its virulence is mandatory. In this regard quorum sensing (QS) represents a good target for anti-virulence therapies, as it has been linked to biofilm formation and is important for the production of several virulence factors, including proteases and siderophores. Here, we report the discovery of new diketopiperazine inhibitors of the B. cenocepacia acyl homoserine lactone synthase CepI, and report their anti-virulence properties. Out of ten different compounds assayed against recombinant CepI, four were effective inhibitors, with IC50 values in the micromolar range. The best compounds interfered with protease and siderophore production, as well as with biofilm formation, and showed good in vivo activity in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. These molecules were also tested in human cells and showed very low toxicity. Therefore, they could be considered for in vivo combined treatments with established or novel antimicrobials, to improve the current therapeutic strategies against B. cenocepacia. PMID:27580679

  9. Differential roles of RND efflux pumps in antimicrobial drug resistance of sessile and planktonic Burkholderia cenocepacia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buroni, Silvia; Matthijs, Nele; Spadaro, Francesca; Van Acker, Heleen; Scoffone, Viola C; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Coenye, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is notorious for causing respiratory tract infections in people with cystic fibrosis. Infections with this organism are particularly difficult to treat due to its high level of intrinsic resistance to most antibiotics. Multidrug resistance in B. cenocepacia can be ascribed to different mechanisms, including the activity of efflux pumps and biofilm formation. In the present study, the effects of deletion of the 16 operons encoding resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia strain J2315 were investigated by determining the MICs of various antibiotics and by investigating the antibiofilm effect of these antibiotics. Finally, the expression levels of selected RND genes in treated and untreated cultures were investigated using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Our data indicate that the RND-3 and RND-4 efflux pumps are important for resistance to various antimicrobial drugs (including tobramycin and ciprofloxacin) in planktonic B. cenocepacia J2315 populations, while the RND-3, RND-8, and RND-9 efflux systems protect biofilm-grown cells against tobramycin. The RND-8 and RND-9 efflux pumps are not involved in ciprofloxacin resistance. Results from the RT-qPCR experiments on the wild-type strain B. cenocepacia J2315 suggest that there is little regulation at the level of mRNA expression for these efflux pumps under the conditions tested.

  10. Burkholderia cenocepacia Differential Gene Expression during Host–Pathogen Interactions and Adaptation to the Host Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Grady, Eoin P.; Sokol, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are important in medical, biotechnological, and agricultural disciplines. These bacteria naturally occur in soil and water environments and have adapted to survive in association with plants and animals including humans. All Bcc species are opportunistic pathogens including Burkholderia cenocepacia that causes infections in cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease patients. The adaptation of B. cenocepacia to the host environment was assessed in a rat chronic respiratory infection model and compared to that of high cell-density in vitro grown cultures using transcriptomics. The distribution of genes differentially expressed on chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was relatively proportional to the size of each genomic element, whereas the proportion of plasmid-encoded genes differentially expressed was much higher relative to its size and most genes were induced in vivo. The majority of genes encoding known virulence factors, components of types II and III secretion systems and chromosome 2-encoded type IV secretion system were similarly expressed between in vitro and in vivo environments. Lower expression in vivo was detected for genes encoding N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase CepI, orphan LuxR homolog CepR2, zinc metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB, LysR-type transcriptional regulator ShvR, nematocidal protein AidA, and genes associated with flagellar motility, Flp type pilus formation, and type VI secretion. Plasmid-encoded type IV secretion genes were markedly induced in vivo. Additional genes induced in vivo included genes predicted to be involved in osmotic stress adaptation or intracellular survival, metal ion, and nutrient transport, as well as those encoding outer membrane proteins. Genes identified in this study are potentially important for virulence during host–pathogen interactions and may be associated with survival and adaptation to the host environment during chronic lung infections. PMID:22919581

  11. The genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, an epidemic pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Matthew T G; Seth-Smith, Helena M B; Crossman, Lisa C;

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients cause major complications in the treatment of this common genetic disease. Burkholderia cenocepacia infection is particularly problematic since this organism has high levels of antibiotic resistance, making it difficult to eradica...

  12. Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-1, a Rhizosphere-Inhabiting Bacterium with Potential in Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Rojas-Espinoza, Luis Enrique; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, María Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is considered an opportunistic pathogen from humans and may cause disease in plants. A bioprospection from a plaguicide-contaminated agricultural field in Mexico identified several methyl parathion-degrading bacteria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-1, which gave us clues into ecological biodiversity.

  13. Burkholderia cenocepacia Strain CEIB S5-1, a Rhizosphere-Inhabiting Bacterium with Potential in Bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Rojas-Espinoza, Luis Enrique; Popoca-Ursino, Elida Carolina; Ortiz-Hernández, María Laura; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Ramos Quintana, Fernando; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2015-03-05

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is considered an opportunistic pathogen from humans and may cause disease in plants. A bioprospection from a plaguicide-contaminated agricultural field in Mexico identified several methyl parathion-degrading bacteria. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. cenocepacia strain CEIB S5-1, which gave us clues into ecological biodiversity.

  14. Identification of Burkholderia cenocepacia strain H111 virulence factors using nonmammalian infection hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwager, Stephan; Agnoli, Kirsty; Köthe, Manuela;

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia H111, a strain isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient, has been shown to effectively kill the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used the C. elegans model of infection to screen a mini-Tn5 mutant library of B. cenocepacia H111 for attenuated virulence....... Of the approximately 5,500 B. cenocepacia H111 random mini-Tn5 insertion mutants that were screened, 22 showed attenuated virulence in C. elegans. Except for the quorum-sensing regulator cepR, none of the mutated genes coded for the biosynthesis of classical virulence factors such as extracellular proteases...... or siderophores. Instead, the mutants contained insertions in metabolic and regulatory genes. Mutants attenuated in virulence in the C. elegans infection model were also tested in the Drosophila melanogaster pricking model, and those also attenuated in this model were further tested in Galleria mellonella. Six...

  15. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yee-Chin

    2016-08-22

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  16. Development of a multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat typing scheme for genetic fingerprinting of Burkholderia cenocepacia and application to nationwide epidemiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segonds, Christine; Thouverez, Michelle; Barthe, Antoine; Bossuet-Greif, Nadège; Tisseyre, Lenka; Plésiat, Patrick; Vergnaud, Gilles; Chabanon, Gérard; Pourcel, Christine

    2015-02-01

    Organisms of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are especially important pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF), with a propensity for patient-to-patient spread and long-term respiratory colonization. B. cenocepacia and Burkholderia multivorans account for the majority of infections in CF, and major epidemic clones have been recognized throughout the world. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) scheme for B. cenocepacia. Potential VNTR loci were identified upon analysis of the annotated genome sequences of B. cenocepacia strains AU1054, J2315, and MCO-3, and 10 of them were selected on the basis of polymorphisms and size. A collection of 100 B. cenocepacia strains, including epidemiologically related and unrelated strains, as well as representatives of the major epidemic lineages, was used to evaluate typeability, epidemiological concordance, and the discriminatory power of MLVA-10 compared with those of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Longitudinal stability was assessed by testing 39 successive isolates from 14 patients. Typeability ranged from 0.91 to 1, except for that of one marker, which was not amplified in 53% of the B. cenocepacia IIIA strains. The MLVA types were shown to be stable in chronically colonized patients and within outbreak-related strains, with excellent epidemiological concordance. Epidemic and/or globally distributed lineages (epidemic Edinburgh-Toronto electrophoretic type 12 [ET-12], sequence type 32 [ST-32], ST-122, ST-234, and ST-241) were successfully identified. Conversely, the discriminatory power of MLVA was lower than that of PFGE or MLST, although PFGE variations within the epidemic lineages sometimes masked their genetic relatedness. In conclusion, MLVA represents a promising cost-effective first-line tool in B. cenocepacia surveillance.

  17. Aerosol phage therapy efficacy in Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2014-07-01

    Phage therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment for highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). To address this hypothesis, experimental B. cenocepacia respiratory infections were established in mice using a nebulizer and a nose-only inhalation device. Following infection, the mice were treated with one of five B. cenocepacia-specific phages delivered as either an aerosol or intraperitoneal injection. The bacterial and phage titers within the lungs were assayed 2 days after treatment, and mice that received the aerosolized phage therapy demonstrated significant decreases in bacterial loads. Differences in phage activity were observed in vivo. Mice that received phage treatment by intraperitoneal injection did not demonstrate significantly reduced bacterial loads, although phage particles were isolated from their lung tissue. Based on these data, aerosol phage therapy appears to be an effective method for treating highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial respiratory infections, including those caused by BCC bacteria.

  18. Cyanide toxicity to Burkholderia cenocepacia is modulated by polymicrobial communities and environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P. Bernier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbes within polymicrobial communities can establish positive and negative interactions that have the potential to influence the overall behaviour of the community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc can co-exist in the lower airways, however several studies have shown that P. aeruginosa can effectively kill the Bcc in vitro, for which hydrogen cyanide was recently proposed to play a critical role. Here we show that modification of the environment (i.e. culture medium, long-term genetic adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis (CF lung, or the addition of another bacterial species to the community can alter the sensitivity of Burkholderia cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins. We specifically demonstrate that undefined rich media leads to higher susceptibility of B. cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins like cyanide as compared to a synthetic medium (SCFM, that mimics the CF lung nutritional content. Overall, our study shows that the polymicrobial environment can have profound effects on negative interactions mediated by P. aeruginosa against B. cenocepacia. In fact, evolved P. aeruginosa or the presence of other species such as Staphylococcus aureus can directly abolish the direct competition mediated by cyanide and consequently maintaining a higher level of species diversity within the community.

  19. Efflux pump genes of the resistance-nodulation-division family in Burkholderia cenocepacia genome

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    Manina Giulia

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia is recognized as opportunistic pathogen that can cause lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A hallmark of B. cenocepacia infections is the inability to eradicate the organism because of multiple intrinsic antibiotic resistance. As Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND efflux systems are responsible for much of the intrinsic multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, this study aims to identify RND genes in the B. cenocepacia genome and start to investigate their involvement into antimicrobial resistance. Results Genome analysis and homology searches revealed 14 open reading frames encoding putative drug efflux pumps belonging to RND family in B. cenocepacia J2315 strain. By reverse transcription (RT-PCR analysis, it was found that orf3, orf9, orf11, and orf13 were expressed at detectable levels, while orf10 appeared to be weakly expressed in B. cenocepacia. Futhermore, orf3 was strongly induced by chloramphenicol. The orf2 conferred resistance to fluoroquinolones, tetraphenylphosphonium, streptomycin, and ethidium bromide when cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli KAM3, a strain lacking the multidrug efflux pump AcrAB. The orf2-overexpressing E. coli also accumulate low concentrations of ethidium bromide, which was restored to wild type level in the presence of CCCP, an energy uncoupler altering the energy of the drug efflux pump. Conclusion The 14 RND pumps gene we have identified in the genome of B. cenocepacia suggest that active efflux could be a major mechanism underlying antimicrobial resistance in this microorganism. We have characterized the ORF2 pump, one of these 14 potential RND efflux systems. Its overexpression in E. coli conferred resistance to several antibiotics and to ethidium bromide but it remains to be determined if this pump play a significant role in the antimicrobial intrinsic resistance of B. cenocepacia. The characterization of antibiotic efflux pumps in B

  20. Burkholderia cenocepacia type VI secretion system mediates escape of type II secreted proteins into the cytoplasm of infected macrophages.

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    Roberto Rosales-Reyes

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that survives intracellularly in macrophages and causes serious respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. We have previously shown that bacterial survival occurs in bacteria-containing membrane vacuoles (BcCVs resembling arrested autophagosomes. Intracellular bacteria stimulate IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1-dependent manner and induce dramatic changes to the actin cytoskeleton and the assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex onto the BcCV membrane. A Type 6 secretion system (T6SS is required for these phenotypes but surprisingly it is not required for the maturation arrest of the BcCV. Here, we show that macrophages infected with B. cenocepacia employ the NLRP3 inflammasome to induce IL-1β secretion and pyroptosis. Moreover, IL-1β secretion by B. cenocepacia-infected macrophages is suppressed in deletion mutants unable to produce functional Type VI, Type IV, and Type 2 secretion systems (SS. We provide evidence that the T6SS mediates the disruption of the BcCV membrane, which allows the escape of proteins secreted by the T2SS into the macrophage cytoplasm. This was demonstrated by the activity of fusion derivatives of the T2SS-secreted metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB with adenylcyclase. Supporting this notion, ZmpA and ZmpB are required for efficient IL-1β secretion in a T6SS dependent manner. ZmpA and ZmpB are also required for the maturation arrest of the BcCVs and bacterial intra-macrophage survival in a T6SS-independent fashion. Our results uncover a novel mechanism for inflammasome activation that involves cooperation between two bacterial secretory pathways, and an unanticipated role for T2SS-secreted proteins in intracellular bacterial survival.

  1. Evaluation of combination therapy for Burkholderia cenocepacia lung infection in different in vitro and in vivo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackman, Gilles; Crabbé, Aurélie; Rigole, Petra; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Verstraete, Glenn; Cappoen, Davie; Vervaet, Chris; Cos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for life-threatening infections in cystic fibrosis patients. B. cenocepacia is extremely resistant towards antibiotics and therapy is complicated by its ability to form biofilms. We investigated the efficacy of an alternative antimicrobial strategy for B. cenocepacia lung infections using in vitro and in vivo models. A screening of the NIH Clinical Collection 1&2 was performed against B. cenocepacia biofilms formed in 96-well microtiter plates in the presence of tobramycin to identify repurposing candidates with potentiator activity. The efficacy of selected hits was evaluated in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic human lung epithelial cell culture model. The in vivo effect was evaluated in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella and in a murine B. cenocepacia lung infection model. The screening resulted in 60 hits that potentiated the activity of tobramycin against B. cenocepacia biofilms, including four imidazoles of which econazole and miconazole were selected for further investigation. However, a potentiator effect was not observed in the 3D organotypic human lung epithelial cell culture model. Combination treatment was also not able to increase survival of infected G. mellonella. Also in mice, there was no added value for the combination treatment. Although potentiators of tobramycin with activity against biofilms of B. cenocepacia were identified in a repurposing screen, the in vitro activity could not be confirmed nor in a more sophisticated in vitro model, neither in vivo. This stresses the importance of validating hits resulting from in vitro studies in physiologically relevant model systems. PMID:28248999

  2. Strains of Burkholderia cenocepacia genomovar IIIA possessing the cblA gene that are distinct from ET12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Jane F; O'Brien, Emily; Megson, Brian; Kaufmann, Mary E; Pitt, Tyrone L

    2009-05-01

    Three strains of Burkholderia cenocepacia genomovar IIIA that were polymerase chain reaction positive for cblA, bcrA, and the epidemic strain marker, but were distinct from representatives of ET12 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, are described. One of these strains was shown to express cable pili by electron microscopy.

  3. Kinetic characterization of an oxidative, cooperative HMG-CoA reductase from Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Benjamin H; Driver, Joseph; Peacock, Riley B; Dembinski, Holly E; Corson, Melissa H; Gordon, Samuel S; Watson, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is a key enzyme in endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in mammals and isoprenoid biosynthesis via the mevalonate pathway in other eukaryotes, archaea and some eubacteria. In most organisms that express this enzyme, it catalyzes the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of HMG-CoA to mevalonate. We have cloned and characterized the 6x-His-tagged HMGR from the opportunistic lung pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia. Kinetic characterization shows that the enzyme prefers NAD(H) over NADP(H) as a cofactor, suggesting an oxidative physiological role for the enzyme. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that the Burkholderia cenocepacia genome lacks the genes for the downstream enzymes of the mevalonate pathway. The enzyme exhibits positive cooperativity toward the substrates of the reductive reaction, but the oxidative reaction exhibits unusual double-saturation kinetics, distinctive among characterized HMG-CoA reductases. The unusual kinetics may arise from the presence of multiple active oligomeric states, each with different Vmax values.

  4. Biofilms produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia: influence of media and solid supports on composition of matrix exopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzoni, Elena; Ravalico, Fabio; Scaini, Denis; Delneri, Ambra; Rizzo, Roberto; Cescutti, Paola

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria usually grow forming biofilms, which are communities of cells embedded in a self-produced dynamic polymeric matrix, characterized by a complex three-dimensional structure. The matrix holds cells together and above a surface, and eventually releases them, resulting in colonization of other surfaces. Although exopolysaccharides (EPOLs) are important components of the matrix, determination of their structure is usually performed on samples produced in non-biofilm conditions, or indirectly through genetic studies. Among the Burkholderia cepacia complex species, Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and is generally more aggressive than other species. In the present investigation, B. cenocepacia strain BTS2, a CF isolate, was grown in biofilm mode on glass slides and cellulose membranes, using five growth media, one of which mimics the nutritional content of CF sputum. The structure of the matrix EPOLs was determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, while visualization of the biofilms on glass slides was obtained by means of confocal laser microscopy, phase-contrast microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results confirmed that the type of EPOLs biosynthesized depends both on the medium used and on the type of support, and showed that mucoid conditions do not always lead to significant biofilm production, while bacteria in a non-mucoid state can still form biofilm containing EPOLs.

  5. Comparative analysis of two phenotypically-similar but genomically-distinct Burkholderia cenocepacia-specific bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Karlene H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic analysis of bacteriophages infecting the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is an important preliminary step in the development of a phage therapy protocol for these opportunistic pathogens. The objective of this study was to characterize KL1 (vB_BceS_KL1 and AH2 (vB_BceS_AH2, two novel Burkholderia cenocepacia-specific siphoviruses isolated from environmental samples. Results KL1 and AH2 exhibit several unique phenotypic similarities: they infect the same B. cenocepacia strains, they require prolonged incubation at 30°C for the formation of plaques at low titres, and they do not form plaques at similar titres following incubation at 37°C. However, despite these similarities, we have determined using whole-genome pyrosequencing that these phages show minimal relatedness to one another. The KL1 genome is 42,832 base pairs (bp in length and is most closely related to Pseudomonas phage 73 (PA73. In contrast, the AH2 genome is 58,065 bp in length and is most closely related to Burkholderia phage BcepNazgul. Using both BLASTP and HHpred analysis, we have identified and analyzed the putative virion morphogenesis, lysis, DNA binding, and MazG proteins of these two phages. Notably, MazG homologs identified in cyanophages have been predicted to facilitate infection of stationary phase cells and may contribute to the unique plaque phenotype of KL1 and AH2. Conclusions The nearly indistinguishable phenotypes but distinct genomes of KL1 and AH2 provide further evidence of both vast diversity and convergent evolution in the BCC-specific phage population.

  6. Phenylalanine induces Burkholderia cenocepacia phenylacetic acid catabolism through degradation to phenylacetyl-CoA in synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium.

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    Yudistira, Harry; McClarty, Leigh; Bloodworth, Ruhi A M; Hammond, Sydney A; Butcher, Haley; Mark, Brian L; Cardona, Silvia T

    2011-09-01

    Synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium (SCFM) is rich in amino acids and supports robust growth of Burkholderia cenocepacia, a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Previous work demonstrated that B. cenocepacia phenylacetic acid (PA) catabolic genes are up-regulated during growth in SCFM and are required for full virulence in a Caenorhabditis elegans host model. In this work, we investigated the role of phenylalanine, one of the aromatic amino acids present in SCFM, as an inducer of the PA catabolic pathway. Phenylalanine degradation intermediates were used as sole carbon sources for growth and gene reporter experiments. In addition to phenylalanine and PA, phenylethylamine, phenylpyruvate, and 2-phenylacetamide were usable as sole carbon sources by wild type B. cenocepacia K56-2, but not by a PA catabolism-defective mutant. EMSA analysis showed that the binding of PaaR, the negative regulator protein of B. cenocepacia PA catabolism, to PA regulatory DNA could only be relieved by phenylacetyl-Coenzyme A (PA-CoA), but not by any of the putative phenylalanine degradation intermediates. Taken together, our results show that in B. cenocepacia, phenylalanine is catabolized to PA and induces PA catabolism through PA activation to PA-CoA. Thus, PaaR shares the same inducer with PaaX, the regulator of PA catabolism in Escherichia coli, despite belonging to a different protein family.

  7. Genetic relationships among Italian and Mexican maize-rhizosphere Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC populations belonging to Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 group

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    Bevivino Annamaria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A close association between maize roots and Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC bacteria has been observed in different locations globally. In this study we investigated by MultiLocus Restriction Typing (MLRT the genetic diversity and relationships among Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 populations associated with roots of maize plants cultivated in geographically distant countries (Italy and Mexico, in order to provide new insights into their population structure, evolution and ecology. Results The 31 B. cenocepacia IIIB and 65 BCC6 isolates gave rise to 29 and 39 different restriction types (RTs, respectively. Two pairs of isolates of B. cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6, recovered from both Italian and Mexican maize rhizospheres, were found to share the same RT. The eBURST (Based Upon Related Sequence Types analysis of MLRT data grouped all the B. cenocepacia IIIB isolates into four clonal complexes, with the RT-4-complex including the 42% of them, while the majority of the BCC6 isolates (94% were grouped into the RT-104-complex. These two main clonal complexes included RTs shared by both Italian and Mexican maize rhizospheres and a clear relationship between grouping and maize variety was also found. Grouping established by eBURST correlated well with the assessment using unweighted-pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA. The standardized index of association values obtained in both B. cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 suggests an epidemic population structure in which occasional clones emerge and spread. Conclusions Taken together our data demonstrate a wide dispersal of certain B. cenocepacia IIIB and BCC6 isolates in Mexican and Italian maize rhizospheres. Despite the clear relationship found between the geographic origin of isolates and grouping, identical RTs and closely related isolates were observed in geographically distant regions. Ecological factors and selective pressure may preferably promote some genotypes within

  8. Reciprocal regulation by the CepIR and CciIR quorum sensing systems in Burkholderia cenocepacia

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    Malott Rebecca J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia belongs to a group of closely related organisms called the B. cepacia complex (Bcc which are important opportunistic human pathogens. B. cenocepacia utilizes a mechanism of cell-cell communication called quorum sensing to control gene expression including genes involved in virulence. The B. cenocepacia quorum sensing network includes the CepIR and CciIR regulatory systems. Results Global gene expression profiles during growth in stationary phase were generated using microarrays of B. cenocepacia cepR, cciR and cepRcciIR mutants. This is the first time CciR was shown to be a global regulator of quorum sensing gene expression. CepR was primarily responsible for positive regulation of gene expression while CciR generally exerted negative gene regulation. Many of the genes that were regulated by both quorum sensing systems were reciprocally regulated by CepR and CciR. Microarray analysis of the cepRcciIR mutant suggested that CepR is positioned upstream of CciR in the quorum sensing hierarchy in B. cenocepacia. A comparison of CepIR-regulated genes identified in previous studies and in the current study showed a substantial amount of overlap validating the microarray approach. Several novel quorum sensing-controlled genes were confirmed using qRT-PCR or promoter::lux fusions. CepR and CciR inversely regulated flagellar-associated genes, the nematocidal protein AidA and a large gene cluster on Chromosome 3. CepR and CciR also regulated genes required for iron transport, synthesis of extracellular enzymes and surface appendages, resistance to oxidative stress, and phage-related genes. Conclusion For the first time, the influence of CciIR on global gene regulation in B. cenocepacia has been elucidated. Novel genes under the control of the CepIR and CciIR quorum sensing systems in B. cenocepacia have been identified. The two quorum sensing systems exert reciprocal regulation of many genes likely enabling fine

  9. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

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    Venturi Vittorio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic

  10. A Pipeline for Screening Small Molecules with Growth Inhibitory Activity against Burkholderia cenocepacia.

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    Carrie Selin

    Full Text Available Infections with the bacteria Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc are very difficult to eradicate in cystic fibrosis patients due the intrinsic resistance of Bcc to most available antibiotics and the emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains during antibiotic treatment. In this work, we used a whole-cell based assay to screen a diverse collection of small molecules for growth inhibitors of a relevant strain of Bcc, B. cenocepacia K56-2. The primary screen used bacterial growth in 96-well plate format and identified 206 primary actives among 30,259 compounds. From 100 compounds with no previous record of antibacterial activity secondary screening and data mining selected a total of Bce bioactives that were further analyzed. An experimental pipeline, evaluating in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, toxicity and in vivo antibacterial activity using C. elegans was used for prioritizing compounds with better chances to be further investigated as potential Bcc antibacterial drugs. This high throughput screen, along with the in vitro and in vivo analysis highlights the utility of this experimental method to quickly identify bioactives as a starting point of antibacterial drug discovery.

  11. The temperate Burkholderia phage AP3 of the Peduovirinae shows efficient antimicrobial activity against B. cenocepacia of the IIIA lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszniowski, Bartosz; Latka, Agnieszka; Maciejewska, Barbara; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Olszak, Tomasz; Briers, Yves; Holt, Giles S; Valvano, Miguel A; Lavigne, Rob; Smith, Darren L; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-02-01

    Burkholderia phage AP3 (vB_BceM_AP3) is a temperate virus of the Myoviridae and the Peduovirinae subfamily (P2likevirus genus). This phage specifically infects multidrug-resistant clinical Burkholderia cenocepacia lineage IIIA strains commonly isolated from cystic fibrosis patients. AP3 exhibits high pairwise nucleotide identity (61.7 %) to Burkholderia phage KS5, specific to the same B. cenocepacia host, and has 46.7-49.5 % identity to phages infecting other species of Burkholderia. The lysis cassette of these related phages has a similar organization (putative antiholin, putative holin, endolysin, and spanins) and shows 29-98 % homology between specific lysis genes, in contrast to Enterobacteria phage P2, the hallmark phage of this genus. The AP3 and KS5 lysis genes have conserved locations and high amino acid sequence similarity. The AP3 bacteriophage particles remain infective up to 5 h at pH 4-10 and are stable at 60 °C for 30 min, but are sensitive to chloroform, with no remaining infective particles after 24 h of treatment. AP3 lysogeny can occur by stable genomic integration and by pseudo-lysogeny. The lysogenic bacterial mutants did not exhibit any significant changes in virulence compared to wild-type host strain when tested in the Galleria mellonella moth wax model. Moreover, AP3 treatment of larvae infected with B. cenocepacia revealed a significant increase (P < 0.0001) in larvae survival in comparison to AP3-untreated infected larvae. AP3 showed robust lytic activity, as evidenced by its broad host range, the absence of increased virulence in lysogenic isolates, the lack of bacterial gene disruption conditioned by bacterial tRNA downstream integration site, and the absence of detected toxin sequences. These data suggest that the AP3 phage is a promising potent agent against bacteria belonging to the most common B. cenocepacia IIIA lineage strains.

  12. Survival dynamics of cystic fibrosis-related Gram-negative bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia) in Dead Sea and Atlantic Ocean waters.

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    Shteinberg, Michal; Kis-Papo, Tamar; Millar, Beverley C; Rendall, Jacqueline C; Downey, Damian G; Elborn, J Stuart; Moore, John E

    2015-09-01

    Clinical cystic fibrosis (CF) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=6) and Burkholderia cenocepacia (n=4) were inoculated in marine brines from the Dead Sea and the Atlantic Ocean and their survival was monitored over a 1 month duration. In Dead Sea samples, all P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia isolates were non-detectable by culture following 24 h incubation, including the non-selective enrichment samples. In the Atlantic Ocean brine, over a 1 month period, mean P. aeruginosa counts decreased by only 0.25 log10 units and mean B. cenocepacia counts decreased by approximately 4 log10 units (10,000 cfu/ml). This study demonstrated that Dead Sea brine exerted a lethal effect within 24 h on planktonic P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia. Thus, the Dead Sea effectively purges these organisms from its environment on a daily basis.

  13. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.

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    Wen-Li Du

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315. It comprises an extra replicon (c2 of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1, another extra replicon(c3 of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the

  14. Putrescine reduces antibiotic-induced oxidative stress as a mechanism of modulation of antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

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    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Valvano, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Communication of antibiotic resistance among bacteria via small molecules is implicated in transient reduction of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics, which could lead to therapeutic failures aggravating the problem of antibiotic resistance. Released putrescine from the extremely antibiotic-resistant bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia protects less-resistant cells from different species against the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B (PmB). Exposure of B. cenocepacia to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and expression of the oxidative stress response regulator OxyR. We evaluated whether putrescine alleviates antibiotic-induced oxidative stress. The accumulation of intracellular ROS, such as superoxide ion and hydrogen peroxide, was assessed fluorometrically with dichlorofluorescein diacetate, while the expression of OxyR and putrescine synthesis enzymes was determined in luciferase assays using chromosomal promoter-lux reporter system fusions. We evaluated wild-type and isogenic deletion mutant strains with defects in putrescine biosynthesis after exposure to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics. Exogenous putrescine protected against oxidative stress induced by PmB and other antibiotics, whereas reduced putrescine synthesis resulted in increased ROS generation and a parallel increased sensitivity to PmB. Of the 3 B. cenocepacia putrescine-synthesizing enzymes, PmB induced only BCAL2641, an ornithine decarboxylase. This study reveals BCAL2641 as a critical component of the putrescine-mediated communication of antibiotic resistance and as a plausible target for designing inhibitors that would block the communication of such resistance among different bacteria, ultimately reducing the window of therapeutic failure in treating bacterial infections.

  15. The exopolysaccharide gene cluster Bcam1330-Bcam1341 is involved in Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilm formation, and its expression is regulated by c-di-GMP and Bcam1349

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; McCarthy, Yvonne; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In Burkholderia cenocepacia, the second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) has previously been shown to positively regulate biofilm formation and the expression of cellulose and type-I fimbriae genes through binding to the transcriptional regulator Bcam1349. Here, we provide...... evidence that cellulose and type-I fimbriae are not involved in B. cenocepacia biofilm formation in flow chambers, and we identify a novel Bcam1349/c-di-GMP-regulated exopolysaccharide gene cluster which is essential for B. cenocepacia biofilm formation. Overproduction of Bcam1349 in trans promotes wrinkly...... matrix exopolysaccharide and to be essential for flow-chamber biofilm formation. We demonstrate that Bcam1349 binds to the promoter region of genes in the Bcam1330-Bcam1341 cluster and that this binding is enhanced by the presence of c-di-GMP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overproduction of both c...

  16. Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 trimeric autotransporter adhesin BcaA binds TNFR1 and contributes to induce airway inflammation.

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    Mil-Homens, Dalila; Pinto, Sandra N; Matos, Rute G; Arraiano, Cecília; Fialho, Arsenio M

    2017-04-01

    Chronic lung disease caused by persistent bacterial infections is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). CF pathogens acquire antibiotic resistance, overcome host defenses, and impose uncontrolled inflammation that ultimately may cause permanent damage of lungs' airways. Among the multiple CF-associated pathogens, Burkholderia cenocepacia and other Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria have become prominent contributors of disease progression. Here, we demonstrate that BcaA, a trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA) from the epidemic strain B. cenocepacia K56-2, is a tumor necrosis factor receptor 1-interacting protein able to regulate components of the tumor necrosis factor signaling pathway and ultimately leading to a significant production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8. Notably, this study is the first to demonstrate that a protein belonging to the TAA family is involved in the induction of the inflammatory response during B. cenocepacia infections, contributing to the success of the pathogen. Moreover, our results reinforce the relevance of the TAA BcaA as a multifunctional protein with a major role in B. cenocepacia virulence.

  17. High-resolution structure of the M14-type cytosolic carboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia refined exploiting PDB-REDO strategies

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    Rimsa, Vadim; Eadsforth, Thomas C. [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Joosten, Robbie P. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    The structure of a bacterial M14-family carboxypeptidase determined exploiting microfocus synchrotron radiation and highly automated refinement protocols reveals its potential to act as a polyglutamylase. A potential cytosolic metallocarboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been crystallized and a synchrotron-radiation microfocus beamline allowed the acquisition of diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit comprises a tetramer containing over 1500 amino acids, and the high-throughput automated protocols embedded in PDB-REDO were coupled with model–map inspections in refinement. This approach has highlighted the value of such protocols for efficient analyses. The subunit is constructed from two domains. The N-terminal domain has previously only been observed in cytosolic carboxypeptidase (CCP) proteins. The C-terminal domain, which carries the Zn{sup 2+}-containing active site, serves to classify this protein as a member of the M14D subfamily of carboxypeptidases. Although eukaryotic CCPs possess deglutamylase activity and are implicated in processing modified tubulin, the function and substrates of the bacterial family members remain unknown. The B. cenocepacia protein did not display deglutamylase activity towards a furylacryloyl glutamate derivative, a potential substrate. Residues previously shown to coordinate the divalent cation and that contribute to peptide-bond cleavage in related enzymes such as bovine carboxypeptidase are conserved. The location of a conserved basic patch in the active site adjacent to the catalytic Zn{sup 2+}, where an acetate ion is identified, suggests recognition of the carboxy-terminus in a similar fashion to other carboxypeptidases. However, there are significant differences that indicate the recognition of substrates with different properties. Of note is the presence of a lysine in the S1′ recognition subsite that suggests specificity towards an acidic substrate.

  18. Burkholderia cenocepacia BC2L-C is a super lectin with dual specificity and proinflammatory activity.

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    Ondřej Sulák

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lectins and adhesins are involved in bacterial adhesion to host tissues and mucus during early steps of infection. We report the characterization of BC2L-C, a soluble lectin from the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia, which has two distinct domains with unique specificities and biological activities. The N-terminal domain is a novel TNF-α-like fucose-binding lectin, while the C-terminal part is similar to a superfamily of calcium-dependent bacterial lectins. The C-terminal domain displays specificity for mannose and l-glycero-d-manno-heptose. BC2L-C is therefore a superlectin that binds independently to mannose/heptose glycoconjugates and fucosylated human histo-blood group epitopes. The apo form of the C-terminal domain crystallized as a dimer, and calcium and mannose could be docked in the binding site. The whole lectin is hexameric and the overall structure, determined by electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, reveals a flexible arrangement of three mannose/heptose-specific dimers flanked by two fucose-specific TNF-α-like trimers. We propose that BC2L-C binds to the bacterial surface in a mannose/heptose-dependent manner via the C-terminal domain. The TNF-α-like domain triggers IL-8 production in cultured airway epithelial cells in a carbohydrate-independent manner, and is therefore proposed to play a role in the dysregulated proinflammatory response observed in B. cenocepacia lung infections. The unique architecture of this newly recognized superlectin correlates with multiple functions including bacterial cell cross-linking, adhesion to human epithelia, and stimulation of inflammation.

  19. Nasal immunization with Burkholderia multivorans outer membrane proteins and the mucosal adjuvant adamantylamide dipeptide confers efficient protection against experimental lung infections with B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertot, Gustavo M; Restelli, Marcela A; Galanternik, Laura; Aranibar Urey, Rene C; Valvano, Miguel A; Grinstein, Saúl

    2007-06-01

    Chronic lung infection by opportunistic pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of gram-negative bacteria are promising vaccine antigen candidates. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity, protection, and cross-protection conferred by intranasal vaccination of mice with OMPs from B. multivorans plus the mucosal adjuvant adamantylamide dipeptide (AdDP). Robust mucosal and systemic immune responses were stimulated by vaccination of naive animals with OMPs from B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia plus AdDP. Using a mouse model of chronic pulmonary infection, we observed enhanced clearance of B. multivorans from the lungs of vaccinated animals, which correlated with OMP-specific secretory immunoglobulin A responses. Furthermore, OMP-immunized mice showed rapid resolution of the pulmonary infection with virtually no lung pathology after bacterial challenge with B. multivorans. In addition, we demonstrated that administration of B. multivorans OMP vaccine conferred protection against B. cenocepacia challenge in this mouse infection model, suggesting that OMPs provide cross-protection against the B. cepacia complex. Therefore, we concluded that mucosal immunity to B. multivorans elicited by intranasal vaccination with OMPs plus AdDP could prevent early steps of colonization and infection with B. multivorans and also ameliorate lung tissue damage, while eliciting cross-protection against B. cenocepacia. These results support the notion that therapies leading to increased mucosal immunity in the airways may help patients with cystic fibrosis.

  20. Induction of immune response to the 17 kDa OMPA Burkholderia cenocepacia polypeptide and protection against pulmonary infection in mice after nasal vaccination with an OMP nanoemulsion-based vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makidon, P E; Knowlton, J; Groom, J V; Blanco, L P; LiPuma, J J; Bielinska, A U; Baker, J R

    2010-05-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are opportunistic bacteria associated with life-threatening illness in persons with cystic fibrosis. Once Bcc colonization is established, these antimicrobial-resistant and biofilm-forming bacteria are difficult to eradicate and are associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality. At present, no vaccines are available to prevent the Bcc infection. There is currently a paucity of published information regarding the development of vaccines designed to prevent Burkholderia colonization. This work expands on the recent studies published by Bertot et al. [Infect Immun 75(6):2740-2752, 2007], where successful protective immune responses were generated in mice using a B. multivorans OMP-based vaccine. Here, we evaluate an experimental mucosal vaccine against Bcc using a novel mucosal adjuvant (nanoemulsion) and a novel B. cenocepacia-based OMP antigen. The OMP antigen derived from B. cenocepacia was mixed with either nanoemulsion or with PBS and delivered intranasally to CD-1 mice. Serum analysis showed robust IgG and mucosal secretory IgA immune responses in vaccinated versus control mice. The antibodies had cross-neutralizing activity against both B. cenocepacia and B. multivorans species. We found that immunized mice were protected against pulmonary colonization with B. cenocepacia. We have also identified that a 17 kDa OmpA-like protein highly conserved between Burkholderia and Ralstonia species as a new immunodominant epitope in mucosal immunization.

  1. The ornibactin biosynthesis and transport genes of Burkholderia cenocepacia are regulated by an extracytoplasmic function sigma factor which is a part of the Fur regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Kirsty; Lowe, Carolyn A; Farmer, Kate L; Husnain, Seyyed I; Thomas, Mark S

    2006-05-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia mutants that fail to produce the siderophore ornibactin were obtained following mutagenesis with mini-Tn5Tp. These mutants were shown to be growth restricted under conditions of iron depletion. In eight of the mutants, the transposon had integrated into one of two genes, orbI and orbJ, encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases. In the other mutant, the transposon had inserted into an open reading frame, orbS, located upstream from orbI. The polypeptide product of orbS exhibits a high degree of similarity to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor PvdS but possesses an N-terminal extension of approximately 29 amino acids that is not present in PvdS. Three predicted OrbS-dependent promoters were identified within the ornibactin gene cluster, based on their similarity to PvdS-dependent promoters. The iron-regulated activity of these promoters was shown to require OrbS. Transcription of the orbS gene was found to be under the control of an iron-regulated sigma(70)-dependent promoter. This promoter, but not the OrbS-dependent promoters, was shown to be a target for repression by the global regulator Fur. Our results demonstrate that production of ornibactin by B. cenocepacia in response to iron starvation requires transcription of an operon that is dependent on the Fur-regulated ECF sigma factor gene orbS. A mechanism is also proposed for the biosynthesis of ornibactin.

  2. The AHL- and BDSF-dependent quorum sensing systems control specific and overlapping sets of genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111.

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    Nadine Schmid

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111 involves two signalling systems that depend on different signal molecules, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs and the diffusible signal factor cis-2-dodecenoic acid (BDSF. Previous studies have shown that AHLs and BDSF control similar phenotypic traits, including biofilm formation, proteolytic activity and pathogenicity. In this study we mapped the BDSF stimulon by RNA-Seq and shotgun proteomics analysis. We demonstrate that a set of the identified BDSF-regulated genes or proteins are also controlled by AHLs, suggesting that the two regulons partially overlap. The detailed analysis of two mutually regulated operons, one encoding three lectins and the other one encoding the large surface protein BapA and its type I secretion machinery, revealed that both AHLs and BDSF are required for full expression, suggesting that the two signalling systems operate in parallel. In accordance with this, we show that both AHLs and BDSF are required for biofilm formation and protease production.

  3. Identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei adhesins for human respiratory epithelial cells

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    Hogan Robert J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei cause the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. A well-studied aspect of pathogenesis by these closely-related bacteria is their ability to invade and multiply within eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the means by which B. pseudomallei and B. mallei adhere to cells are poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to identify adherence factors expressed by these organisms. Results Comparative sequence analyses identified a gene product in the published genome of B. mallei strain ATCC23344 (locus # BMAA0649 that resembles the well-characterized Yersinia enterocolitica autotransporter adhesin YadA. The gene encoding this B. mallei protein, designated boaA, was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to significantly increase adherence to human epithelial cell lines, specifically HEp2 (laryngeal cells and A549 (type II pneumocytes, as well as to cultures of normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE. Consistent with these findings, disruption of the boaA gene in B. mallei ATCC23344 reduced adherence to all three cell types by ~50%. The genomes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and DD503 were also found to contain boaA and inactivation of the gene in DD503 considerably decreased binding to monolayers of HEp2 and A549 cells and to NHBE cultures. A second YadA-like gene product highly similar to BoaA (65% identity was identified in the published genomic sequence of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 (locus # BPSL1705. The gene specifying this protein, termed boaB, appears to be B. pseudomallei-specific. Quantitative attachment assays demonstrated that recombinant E. coli expressing BoaB displayed greater binding to A549 pneumocytes, HEp2 cells and NHBE cultures. Moreover, a boaB mutant of B. pseudomallei DD503 showed decreased adherence to these respiratory cells. Additionally, a B. pseudomallei strain lacking expression of both boaA and boaB was impaired in its ability to

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 mutants affected in homoserine lactone and diffusible signal factor-based quorum sensing systems suggests interplay between both types of systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Udine

    Full Text Available Many putative virulence factors of Burkholderia cenocepacia are controlled by various quorum sensing (QS circuits. These QS systems either use N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL or cis-2-dodecenoic acid ("Burkholderia diffusible signal factor", BDSF as signalling molecules. Previous work suggested that there is little cross-talk between both types of systems. We constructed mutants in B. cenocepacia strain J2315, in which genes encoding CepI (BCAM1870, CciI (BCAM0239a and the BDSF synthase (BCAM0581 were inactivated, and also constructed double (ΔcepIΔBCAM0581, ΔcciIΔBCAM0581 and ΔcepIΔcciI mutants and a triple (ΔcepIΔcciIΔBCAM0581 mutant. Subsequently we investigated phenotypic properties (antibiotic susceptibility, biofilm formation, production of AHL and BDSF, protease activity and virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans and measured gene expression in these mutants, and this in the presence and absence of added BDSF, AHL or both. The triple mutant was significantly more affected in biofilm formation, antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence in C. elegans, and protease production than either the single or double mutants. The ΔBCAM0581 mutant and the ΔcepIΔBCAM0581 and ΔcciIΔBCAM0581 double mutants produced significantly less AHL compared to the WT strain and the ΔcepI and ΔcciI single mutant, respectively. The expression of cepI and cciI in ΔBCAM0581, was approximately 3-fold and 7-fold (p<0.05 lower than in the WT, respectively. The observed differences in AHL production, expression of cepI and cciI and QS-controlled phenotypes in the ΔBCAM0581 mutant could (at least partially be restored by addition of BDSF. Our data suggest that, in B. cenocepacia J2315, AHL and BDSF-based QS systems co-regulate the same set of genes, regulate different sets of genes that are involved in the same phenotypes and/or that the BDSF system controls the AHL-based QS system. As the expression of the gene encoding the C6-HSL synthase CciI (and to a

  5. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Mott, Tiffany M; Muruato, Laura A; Sbrana, Elena; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain.

  6. Genetic Diversity of Burkholderia contaminans Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Martina, Pablo F.; Bettiol, Marisa; Vescina, Cecilia; Montanaro, Patricia; Mannino, Maria Constanza; Prieto, Claudia Inés; Vay, Carlos Alberto; Naumann, Dieter; Schmitt, Juergen; Yantorno, Osvaldo Miguel; Lagares, Antonio; Bosch, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    A total of 120 Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates collected during 2004?2010 from 66 patients in two cystic fibrosis reference centers in Argentina were analyzed. Burkholderia contaminans was the species most frequently recovered (57.6%), followed by Burkholderia cenocepacia (15%), a species distribution not reported so far. The recA-PCR-based techniques applied to the B. contaminans isolates revealed that 85% of the population carried the recA-ST-71 allele. Our results showed the utili...

  7. The promise of bacteriophage therapy for Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Dawn Semler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, increased attention has been given to evaluating the efficacy of phage therapy, especially in scenarios where the bacterial infectious agent of interest is highly antibiotic resistant. In this regard, phage therapy is especially applicable to infections caused by the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC since members of the BCC are antibiotic pan-resistant. Current studies in BCC phage therapy are unique from many other avenues of phage therapy research in that the research is not only comprised of phage isolation, in vitro phage characterization and in vivo infection model efficacy, but also adapting aerosol drug delivery techniques to aerosol phage formulation delivery and storage.

  8. In vivo bioluminescence imaging of Burkholderia mallei respiratory infection and treatment in the mouse model

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    Shane eMassey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent imaging (BLI technology is a powerful tool for monitoring infectious disease progression and treatment approaches. BLI is particularly useful for tracking fastidious intracellular pathogens that might be difficult to recover from certain organs. Burkholderia mallei, the causative agent of glanders, is a facultative intracellular pathogen and has been classified by the CDC as a Category B select agent due to its highly infectious nature and potential use as a biological weapon. Very little is known regarding pathogenesis or treatment of glanders. We investigated the use of bioluminescent reporter constructs to monitor the dynamics of infection as well as the efficacy of therapeutics for B. mallei in real time. A stable luminescent reporter B. mallei strain was created using the pUTmini-Tn5::luxKm2 plasmid and used to monitor glanders in the BALB/c murine model. Mice were infected via the intranasal route with 5x103 bacteria and monitored by BLI at 24, 48 and 72 h. We verified that our reporter construct maintained similar virulence and growth kinetics compared to wild-type B. mallei and confirmed that it maintains luminescent stability in the presence or absence of antibiotic selection. The luminescent signal was initially seen in the lungs, and progressed to the liver and spleen over the course of infection. We demonstrated that antibiotic treatment 24 h post-infection resulted in reduction of bioluminescence that can be attributed to decreased bacterial burden in target organs. These findings suggest that BLI can be used to monitor disease progression and efficacy of therapeutics during glanders infections. Finally, we report an alternative method to mini-Tn5::luxKm2 transposon using mini-Tn7-lux elements that insert site-specifically at known genomic attachment sites and that can also be used to tag bacteria.

  9. Polyphasic characterisation of Burkholderia cepacia complex species isolated from children with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicenzi, Fernando José; Pillonetto, Marcelo; de Souza, Helena Aguilar Peres Homem de Mello; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; Riedi, Carlos Antônio; Rosario-Filho, Nelson Augusto; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) pulmonary infections have high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to compare different methods for identification of Bcc species isolated from paediatric CF patients. Oropharyngeal swabs from children with CF were used to obtain isolates of Bcc samples to evaluate six different tests for strain identification. Conventional (CPT) and automatised (APT) phenotypic tests, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-recA, restriction fragment length polymorphism-recA, recAsequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) were applied. Bacterial isolates were also tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. PCR-recA analysis showed that 36 out of the 54 isolates were Bcc. Kappa index data indicated almost perfect agreement between CPT and APT, CPT and PCR-recA, and APT and PCR-recA to identify Bcc, and MALDI-TOF and recAsequencing to identify Bcc species. The recAsequencing data and the MALDI-TOF data agreed in 97.2% of the isolates. Based on recA sequencing, the most common species identified were Burkholderia cenocepacia IIIA (33.4%),Burkholderia vietnamiensis (30.6%), B. cenocepaciaIIIB (27.8%), Burkholderia multivorans (5.5%), and B. cepacia (2.7%). MALDI-TOF proved to be a useful tool for identification of Bcc species obtained from CF patients, although it was not able to identify B. cenocepacia subtypes. PMID:26814642

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsule Exacerbates Respiratory Melioidosis but Does Not Afford Protection against Antimicrobial Signaling or Bacterial Killing in Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Ipe, Deepak S; Batzloff, Michael; Sullivan, Matthew J; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael; Strong, Emily; Kyan, Stephanie; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James; Beacham, Ifor R; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-07-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often severe infection that regularly involves respiratory disease following inhalation exposure. Intranasal (i.n.) inoculation of mice represents an experimental approach used to study the contributions of bacterial capsular polysaccharide I (CPS I) to virulence during acute disease. We used aerosol delivery of B. pseudomallei to establish respiratory infection in mice and studied CPS I in the context of innate immune responses. CPS I improved B. pseudomallei survival in vivo and triggered multiple cytokine responses, neutrophil infiltration, and acute inflammatory histopathology in the spleen, liver, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, and olfactory mucosa (OM). To further explore the role of the OM response to B. pseudomallei infection, we infected human olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in vitro and measured bacterial invasion and the cytokine responses induced following infection. Human OECs killed >90% of the B. pseudomallei in a CPS I-independent manner and exhibited an antibacterial cytokine response comprising granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and several regulatory cytokines. In-depth genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of the OEC response by RNA-Seq revealed a network of signaling pathways activated in OECs following infection involving a novel group of 378 genes that encode biological pathways controlling cellular movement, inflammation, immunological disease, and molecular transport. This represents the first antimicrobial program to be described in human OECs and establishes the extensive transcriptional defense network accessible in these cells. Collectively, these findings show a role for CPS I in B. pseudomallei survival in vivo following inhalation infection and the antibacterial signaling network that exists in human OM and OECs.

  11. Genomic sequence and activity of KS10, a transposable phage of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

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    Shrivastava Savita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC is a versatile group of Gram negative organisms that can be found throughout the environment in sources such as soil, water, and plants. While BCC bacteria can be involved in beneficial interactions with plants, they are also considered opportunistic pathogens, specifically in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. These organisms also exhibit resistance to many antibiotics, making conventional treatment often unsuccessful. KS10 was isolated as a prophage of B. cenocepacia K56-2, a clinically relevant strain of the BCC. Our objective was to sequence the genome of this phage and also determine if this prophage encoded any virulence determinants. Results KS10 is a 37,635 base pairs (bp transposable phage of the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia. Genome sequence analysis and annotation of this phage reveals that KS10 shows the closest sequence homology to Mu and BcepMu. KS10 was found to be a prophage in three different strains of B. cenocepacia, including strains K56-2, J2315, and C5424, and seven tested clinical isolates of B. cenocepacia, but no other BCC species. A survey of 23 strains and 20 clinical isolates of the BCC revealed that KS10 is able to form plaques on lawns of B. ambifaria LMG 19467, B. cenocepacia PC184, and B. stabilis LMG 18870. Conclusion KS10 is a novel phage with a genomic organization that differs from most phages in that its capsid genes are not aligned into one module but rather separated by approximately 11 kb, giving evidence of one or more prior genetic rearrangements. There were no potential virulence factors identified in KS10, though many hypothetical proteins were identified with no known function.

  12. Susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to Burkholderia infection depends on prior diet and secreted bacterial attractants.

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    Vaughn S Cooper

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans may be killed by certain pathogenic bacteria and thus is a model organism for studying interactions between bacteria and animal hosts. However, growing nematodes on prey bacteria may influence their susceptibility to potential pathogens. A method of axenic nematode culture was developed to isolate and quantify interactions between C. elegans and potentially pathogenic strains of the Burkholderia cepacia complex. Studying these dynamics in liquid solution rather than on agar surfaces minimized nematode avoidance behavior and resolved more differences among isolates. Most isolates of B. cenocepacia, B. ambifaria and B. cepacia caused 60-80% mortality of nematodes after 7 days, whereas isolates of B. multivorans caused less mortality (<25% and supported nematode reproduction. However, some B. cenocepacia isolates recovered from chronic infections were much less virulent (5-28% mortality. As predicted, prior diet altered the outcome of interactions between nematodes and bacteria. When given the choice between Burkholderia and E. coli as prey on agar, axenically raised nematodes initially preferred most lethal Burkholderia isolates to E. coli as a food source, but this was not the case for nematodes fed E. coli, which avoided toxic Burkholderia. This food preference was associated with the cell-free supernatant and thus secreted compounds likely mediated bacterial-nematode interactions. This model, which isolates interactions between bacteria and nematodes from the effects of prior feeding, demonstrates that bacteria can influence nematode behavior and their susceptibility to pathogens.

  13. Role of lipase in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) invasion of lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, T; Markey, K; Murphy, P; McClean, S; Callaghan, M

    2007-12-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of ten closely related species associated with life-threatening infection in cystic fibrosis (CF). These bacteria are highly antibiotic resistant, with some strains transmissible, and in a subgroup of patients, they can cause a rapid and fatal necrotising pneumonia. The Bcc organisms produce a range of exoproducts with virulence potential, including exopolysaccharide, proteases and lipases. Many members of the Bcc are also capable of epithelial cell invasion, although the mechanism(s) involved are poorly understood. This study investigates a role for Bcc lipase in epithelial cell invasion by Bcc strains. Lipase activity was measured in eight species of the Bcc. Strains that produced high levels of lipase were predominantly from the B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia species. Pre-treatment of two epithelial cell lines with Bcc lipase significantly increased invasion by two B. multivorans strains and one B. cenocepacia strain and did not affect either plasma membrane or tight junction integrity. Inhibition of Bcc lipase production by the lipase inhibitor Orlistat significantly decreased invasion by both B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia strains in a concentration-dependent manner. This study demonstrates the extent of lipase production across the Bcc and establishes a potential role for lipase in Bcc epithelial cell invasion.

  14. Use of a Burkholderia cenocepacia ABTS Oxidizer in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) often use biological processes to generate electrons from organic material contained in the anode chamber and abiotic processes employing atmospheric oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. This study investigated the accumulation of an oxidant in bacterial cultures...

  15. Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are cyanogenic under biofilm and colonial growth conditions

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    Hoshino Saiko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is a collection of nine genotypically distinct but phenotypically similar species. They show wide ecological diversity and include species that are used for promoting plant growth and bio-control as well species that are opportunistic pathogens of vulnerable patients. Over recent years the Bcc have emerged as problematic pathogens of the CF lung. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is another important CF pathogen. It is able to synthesise hydrogen cyanide (HCN, a potent inhibitor of cellular respiration. We have recently shown that HCN production by P. aeruginosa may have a role in CF pathogenesis. This paper describes an investigation of the ability of bacteria of the Bcc to make HCN. Results The genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia has 3 putative HCN synthase encoding (hcnABC gene clusters. B. cenocepacia and all 9 species of the Bcc complex tested were able to make cyanide at comparable levels to P. aeruginosa, but only when grown surface attached as colonies or during biofilm growth on glass beads. In contrast to P. aeruginosa and other cyanogenic bacteria, cyanide was not detected during planktonic growth of Bcc strains. Conclusion All species in the Bcc are cyanogenic when grown as surface attached colonies or as biofilms.

  16. Identification and onion pathogenicity of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates from the onion rhizosphere and onion field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Janette L; Fasi, Anthony C; Ramette, Alban; Smith, James J; Hammerschmidt, Raymond; Sundin, George W

    2008-05-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex strains are genetically related but phenotypically diverse organisms that are important opportunistic pathogens in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF,) as well as pathogens of onion and banana, colonizers of the rhizospheres of many plant species, and common inhabitants of bulk soil. Genotypic identification and pathogenicity characterization were performed on B. cepacia complex isolates from the rhizosphere of onion and organic soils in Michigan. A total of 3,798 putative B. cepacia complex isolates were recovered on Pseudomonas cepacia azelaic acid tryptamine and trypan blue tetracycline semiselective media during the 2004 growing season from six commercial onion fields located in two counties in Michigan. Putative B. cepacia complex isolates were identified by hybridization to a 16S rRNA gene probe, followed by duplex PCR using primers targeted to the 16S rRNA gene and recA sequences and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the recA sequence. A total of 1,290 isolates, 980 rhizosphere and 310 soil isolates, were assigned to the species B. cepacia (160), B. cenocepacia (480), B. ambifaria (623), and B. pyrrocinia (27). The majority of isolates identified as B. cepacia (85%), B. cenocepacia (90%), and B. ambifaria (76%) were pathogenic in a detached onion bulb scale assay and caused symptoms of water soaking, maceration, and/or necrosis. A phylogenetic analysis of recA sequences from representative B. cepacia complex type and panel strains, along with isolates collected in this study, revealed that the B. cenocepacia isolates associated with onion grouped within the III-B lineage and that some strains were closely related to strain AU1054, which was isolated from a CF patient. This study revealed that multiple B. cepacia complex species colonize the onion rhizosphere and have the potential to cause sour skin rot disease of onion. In addition, the onion rhizosphere is a natural habitat and a potential environmental source

  17. Garlic revisited: antimicrobial activity of allicin-containing garlic extracts against Burkholderia cepacia complex.

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    Daynea Wallock-Richards

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activities of garlic and other plant alliums are primarily based on allicin, a thiosulphinate present in crushed garlic bulbs. We set out to determine if pure allicin and aqueous garlic extracts (AGE exhibit antimicrobial properties against the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, the major bacterial phytopathogen for alliums and an intrinsically multiresistant and life-threatening human pathogen. We prepared an AGE from commercial garlic bulbs and used HPLC to quantify the amount of allicin therein using an aqueous allicin standard (AAS. Initially we determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the AGE against 38 Bcc isolates; these MICs ranged from 0.5 to 3% (v/v. The antimicrobial activity of pure allicin (AAS was confirmed by MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC assays against a smaller panel of five Bcc isolates; these included three representative strains of the most clinically important species, B. cenocepacia. Time kill assays, in the presence of ten times MIC, showed that the bactericidal activity of AGE and AAS against B. cenocepacia C6433 correlated with the concentration of allicin. We also used protein mass spectrometry analysis to begin to investigate the possible molecular mechanisms of allicin with a recombinant form of a thiol-dependent peroxiredoxin (BCP, Prx from B. cenocepacia. This revealed that AAS and AGE modifies an essential BCP catalytic cysteine residue and suggests a role for allicin as a general electrophilic reagent that targets protein thiols. To our knowledge, we report the first evidence that allicin and allicin-containing garlic extracts possess inhibitory and bactericidal activities against the Bcc. Present therapeutic options against these life-threatening pathogens are limited; thus, allicin-containing compounds merit investigation as adjuncts to existing antibiotics.

  18. Garlic revisited: antimicrobial activity of allicin-containing garlic extracts against Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallock-Richards, Daynea; Doherty, Catherine J; Doherty, Lynsey; Clarke, David J; Place, Marc; Govan, John R W; Campopiano, Dominic J

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of garlic and other plant alliums are primarily based on allicin, a thiosulphinate present in crushed garlic bulbs. We set out to determine if pure allicin and aqueous garlic extracts (AGE) exhibit antimicrobial properties against the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), the major bacterial phytopathogen for alliums and an intrinsically multiresistant and life-threatening human pathogen. We prepared an AGE from commercial garlic bulbs and used HPLC to quantify the amount of allicin therein using an aqueous allicin standard (AAS). Initially we determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the AGE against 38 Bcc isolates; these MICs ranged from 0.5 to 3% (v/v). The antimicrobial activity of pure allicin (AAS) was confirmed by MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) assays against a smaller panel of five Bcc isolates; these included three representative strains of the most clinically important species, B. cenocepacia. Time kill assays, in the presence of ten times MIC, showed that the bactericidal activity of AGE and AAS against B. cenocepacia C6433 correlated with the concentration of allicin. We also used protein mass spectrometry analysis to begin to investigate the possible molecular mechanisms of allicin with a recombinant form of a thiol-dependent peroxiredoxin (BCP, Prx) from B. cenocepacia. This revealed that AAS and AGE modifies an essential BCP catalytic cysteine residue and suggests a role for allicin as a general electrophilic reagent that targets protein thiols. To our knowledge, we report the first evidence that allicin and allicin-containing garlic extracts possess inhibitory and bactericidal activities against the Bcc. Present therapeutic options against these life-threatening pathogens are limited; thus, allicin-containing compounds merit investigation as adjuncts to existing antibiotics.

  19. Disinfection of Burkholderia cepacia complex from non-touch taps in a neonatal nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsanas, Despina; Brett, Judith; Kidd, Tim J; Stuart, Rhonda L; Korman, Tony M

    2008-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) comprises nine closely related species or genomovars. It is an important causative agent of opportunistic infections and waterborne nosocomial infections. B. cepacia (formerly genomovar I) was identified from the blood culture of a baby in our neonatal unit (NU) in March 2005. B. cepacia was isolated four times from clinical specimens since the introduction of non-touch taps in the NU from 2000 to 2005 and only once from 1994 to 2000. Environmental samples were collected from the NU, including tap water from non-touch taps. Clinical and environmental isolates of Bcc were characterized using molecular identification and strain typing. A literature review was undertaken to delineate a method for eradication of Bcc. Several variations for hot water eradication of the organism from the taps were attempted. Genotyping and molecular analysis revealed that tap water isolates were B. cenocepacia which was a different species from the B. cepacia isolated from blood cultures of the neonate. However, B. cenocepacia has been known to cause nosocomial outbreaks and it was eventually eradicated from the NU by using repeated thermal shock (hot water at 65 degrees C for 10 min), changing taps and decolonizing sinks with hypochlorite. Molecular typing is useful in assisting the investigation of Bcc nosocomial infections.

  20. Burkholderia cepacia complex Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): antibiotics stimulate lytic phage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Fatima; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2015-02-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of at least 18 species of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that can cause chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Bcc organisms possess high levels of innate antimicrobial resistance, and alternative therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. One proposed alternative treatment is phage therapy, the therapeutic application of bacterial viruses (or bacteriophages). Recently, some phages have been observed to form larger plaques in the presence of sublethal concentrations of certain antibiotics; this effect has been termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). Those reports suggest that some antibiotics stimulate increased production of phages under certain conditions. The aim of this study is to examine PAS in phages that infect Burkholderia cenocepacia strains C6433 and K56-2. Bcc phages KS12 and KS14 were tested for PAS, using 6 antibiotics representing 4 different drug classes. Of the antibiotics tested, the most pronounced effects were observed for meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. When grown with subinhibitory concentrations of these three antibiotics, cells developed a chain-like arrangement, an elongated morphology, and a clustered arrangement, respectively. When treated with progressively higher antibiotic concentrations, both the sizes of plaques and phage titers increased, up to a maximum. B. cenocepacia K56-2-infected Galleria mellonella larvae treated with phage KS12 and low-dose meropenem demonstrated increased survival over controls treated with KS12 or antibiotic alone. These results suggest that antibiotics can be combined with phages to stimulate increased phage production and/or activity and thus improve the efficacy of bacterial killing.

  1. Nasal Immunization with Burkholderia multivorans Outer Membrane Proteins and the Mucosal Adjuvant Adamantylamide Dipeptide Confers Efficient Protection against Experimental Lung Infections with B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertot, Gustavo M.; Restelli, Marcela A.; Galanternik, Laura; Aranibar Urey, Rene C.; Valvano, Miguel A.; Grinstein, Saúl

    2007-01-01

    Chronic lung infection by opportunistic pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of gram-negative bacteria are promising vaccine antigen candidates. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity, protection, and cross-protection conferred by intranasal vaccination of mice with OMPs from B. multivorans plus the mucosal adjuvant adamantylamide dipeptide (AdDP). Robust mucosal and systemic immune responses were stimulated by vaccination of naive animals with OMPs from B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia plus AdDP. Using a mouse model of chronic pulmonary infection, we observed enhanced clearance of B. multivorans from the lungs of vaccinated animals, which correlated with OMP-specific secretory immunoglobulin A responses. Furthermore, OMP-immunized mice showed rapid resolution of the pulmonary infection with virtually no lung pathology after bacterial challenge with B. multivorans. In addition, we demonstrated that administration of B. multivorans OMP vaccine conferred protection against B. cenocepacia challenge in this mouse infection model, suggesting that OMPs provide cross-protection against the B. cepacia complex. Therefore, we concluded that mucosal immunity to B. multivorans elicited by intranasal vaccination with OMPs plus AdDP could prevent early steps of colonization and infection with B. multivorans and also ameliorate lung tissue damage, while eliciting cross-protection against B. cenocepacia. These results support the notion that therapies leading to increased mucosal immunity in the airways may help patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:17296759

  2. Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates survive intracellularly without replication within acidic vacuoles of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Julie; Thyssen, Sandra; Valvano, Miguel A

    2004-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex can survive intracellularly in murine macrophages and in free-living Acanthamoeba. In this work, we show that the clinical isolates B. vietnamiensis strain CEP040 and B. cenocepacia H111 survived but did not replicate within vacuoles of A. polyphaga. B. cepacia-containing vacuoles accumulated the fluid phase marker Lysosensor Blue and displayed strong blue fluorescence, indicating that they had low pH. In contrast, the majority of intracellular bacteria within amoebae treated with the V-ATPse inhibitor bafilomycin A1 localized in vacuoles that did not fluoresce with Lysosensor Blue. Experiments using bacteria fluorescently labelled with chloromethylfluorescein diacetate demonstrated that intracellular bacteria remained viable for at least 24 h. In contrast, Escherichia coli did not survive within amoebae after 2 h post infection. Furthermore, intracellular B. vietnamiensis CEP040 retained green fluorescent protein within the bacterial cytoplasm, while this protein rapidly escaped from the cytosol of phagocytized heat-killed bacteria into the vacuolar lumen. Transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed that intracellular Burkholderia cells were structurally intact. In addition, both Legionella pneumophila- and B. vietnamiensis-containing vacuoles did not accumulate cationized ferritin, a compound that localizes within the lysosome. Thus, our observations support the notion that B. cepacia complex isolates can use amoebae as a reservoir in the environment by surviving without intracellular replication within an acidic vacuole that is distinct from the lysosomal compartment.

  3. Trimeric autotransporter adhesins in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex: a multifunctional family of proteins implicated in virulence

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    Arsénio Mendes Fialho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs are multimeric surface proteins, involved in various biological traits of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria including adherence, biofilm formation, invasion, survival within eukaryotic cells, serum resistance and cytotoxicity. TAAs have a modular architecture composed by a conserved membrane-anchored C-terminal domain and a variable number of stalk and head domains. In this study, a bioinformatic approach has been used to analyze the distribution and architecture of TAAs among Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc genomes. Fifteen genomes were probed revealing a total of 74 encoding sequences. Compared with other bacterial species, the Bcc genomes contain a disproportionately large number of TAAs (two genes to up to 8 genes, such as in B.cenocepacia. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the TAAs grouped into at least eight distinct clusters. TAAs with serine-rich repeats are clearly well separated from others, thereby representing a different evolutionary lineage. Comparative gene mapping across Bcc genomes reveals that TAA genes are inserted within conserved synteny blocks. We further focused our analysis on the epidemic strain B. cenocepacia J2315 in which 7 TAAs were annotated. Among these, 3 TAA-encoding genes (BCAM019, BCAM0223 and BCAM0224 are organized into a cluster and are candidates for multifunctional virulence factors. Here we review the current insights into the functional role of BCAM0224 as a model locus.

  4. A sensor kinase recognizing the cell-cell signal BDSF (cis-2-dodecenoic acid) regulates virulence in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, Y.; Yang, Liang; Twomey, K.B.;

    2010-01-01

    the input domain of RpfC was active in BDSF signal perception when expressed in X. campestris. Mutation of BCAM0227 gave rise to reduced cytotoxicity to Chinese hamster ovary cells and reduced virulence to Wax moth larvae and in the agar-bead mouse model of pulmonary infection. The findings identify BCAM...

  5. Biofilm-grown Burkholderia cepacia complex cells survive antibiotic treatment by avoiding production of reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleen Van Acker

    Full Text Available The presence of persister cells has been proposed as a factor in biofilm resilience. In the present study we investigated whether persister cells are present in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc biofilms, what the molecular basis of antimicrobial tolerance in Bcc persisters is, and how persisters can be eradicated from Bcc biofilms. After treatment of Bcc biofilms with high concentrations of various antibiotics often a small subpopulation survived. To investigate the molecular mechanism of tolerance in this subpopulation, Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilms were treated with 1024 µg/ml of tobramycin. Using ROS-specific staining and flow cytometry, we showed that tobramycin increased ROS production in treated sessile cells. However, approximately 0.1% of all sessile cells survived the treatment. A transcriptome analysis showed that several genes from the tricarboxylic acid cycle and genes involved in the electron transport chain were downregulated. In contrast, genes from the glyoxylate shunt were upregulated. These data indicate that protection against ROS is important for the survival of persisters. To confirm this, we determined the number of persisters in biofilms formed by catalase mutants. The persister fraction in ΔkatA and ΔkatB biofilms was significantly reduced, confirming the role of ROS detoxification in persister survival. Pretreatment of B. cenocepacia biofilms with itaconate, an inhibitor of isocitrate lyase (ICL, the first enzyme in the glyoxylate shunt, reduced the persister fraction approx. 10-fold when the biofilms were subsequently treated with tobramycin. In conclusion, most Bcc biofilms contain a significant fraction of persisters that survive treatment with high doses of tobramycin. The surviving persister cells downregulate the TCA cycle to avoid production of ROS and at the same time activate an alternative pathway, the glyoxylate shunt. This pathway may present a novel target for combination therapy.

  6. Plant host and sugar alcohol induced exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdson, S Josefin; Brown, Alan R; Mewburn, Ben R; Clarke, David J; Fry, Stephen C; Campopiano, Dominic J; Govan, John R W

    2008-08-01

    The species that presently constitute the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have multiple roles; they include soil and water saprophytes, bioremediators, and plant, animal and human pathogens. Since the first description of pathogenicity in the Bcc was based on sour skin rot of onion bulbs, this study returned to this plant host to investigate the onion-associated phenotype of the Bcc. Many Bcc isolates, which were previously considered to be non-mucoid, produced copious amounts of exopolysaccharide (EPS) when onion tissue was provided as the sole nutrient. EPS production was not species-specific, was observed in isolates from both clinical and environmental sources, and did not correlate with the ability to cause maceration of onion tissue. Chemical analysis suggested that the onion components responsible for EPS induction were primarily the carbohydrates sucrose, fructose and fructans. Additional sugars were investigated, and all alcohol sugars tested were able to induce EPS production, in particular mannitol and glucitol. To investigate the molecular basis for EPS biosynthesis, we focused on the highly conserved bce gene cluster thought to be involved in cepacian biosynthesis. We demonstrated induction of the bce gene cluster by mannitol, and found a clear correlation between the inability of representatives of the Burkholderia cenocepacia ET12 lineage to produce EPS and the presence of an 11 bp deletion within the bceB gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase. Insertional inactivation of bceB in Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD results in loss of EPS production on sugar alcohol media. These novel and surprising insights into EPS biosynthesis highlight the metabolic potential of the Bcc and show that a potential virulence factor may not be detected by routine laboratory culture. Our results also highlight a potential hazard in the use of inhaled mannitol as an osmolyte to improve mucociliary clearance in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

  7. Investigating Burkholderia cepacia complex populations recovered from Italian maize rhizosphere by multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmastri, Claudia; Baldwin, Adam; Tabacchioni, Silvia; Bevivino, Annamaria; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Chiarini, Luigi; Dowson, Christopher

    2007-07-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) comprises at least nine closely related species of abundant environmental microorganisms. Some of these species are highly spread in the rhizosphere of several crop plants, particularly of maize; additionally, as opportunistic pathogens, strains of the BCC are capable of colonizing humans. We have developed and validated a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for the BCC. Although widely applied to understand the epidemiology of bacterial pathogens, MLST has seen limited application to the population analysis of species residing in the natural environment; we describe its novel application to BCC populations within maize rhizospheres. 115 BCC isolates were recovered from the roots of different maize cultivars from three different Italian regions over a 9-year period (1994-2002). A total of 44 sequence types (STs) were found of which 41 were novel when compared with existing MLST data which encompassed a global database of 1000 clinical and environmental strains representing nearly 400 STs. In this study of rhizosphere isolates approximately 2.5 isolates per ST was found, comparable to that found for the whole BCC population. Multilocus sequence typing also resolved inaccuracies associated with previous identification of the maize isolates based on recA gene restriction fragment length polymorphims and species-specific polymerase chain reaction. The 115 maize isolates comprised the following BCC species groups, B. ambifaria (39%), BCC6 (29%), BCC5 (10%), B. pyrrocinia (8%), B. cenocepacia IIIB (7%) and B. cepacia (6%), with BCC5 and BCC6 potentially constituting novel species groups within the complex. Closely related clonal complexes of strains were identified within B. cepacia, B. cenocepacia IIIB, BCC5 and BCC6, with one of the BCC5 clonal complexes being distributed across all three sampling sites. Overall, our analysis demonstrates that the maize rhizosphere harbours a massive diversity of novel BCC STs, so that their

  8. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  9. A predicted structure of the cytochrome c oxidase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd. Raih,Mohd. Firdaus; Sailan,Ahmad Tarmidi; Zamrod,Zulkeflie; Embi,Mohd. Noor; Mohamed, Rahmah

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chains of mitochondria and aerobic bacteria, catalyzes electron transfer from cytochrome c to molecular oxygen. The enzyme belongs to the haem-copper-containing oxidases superfamily. A recombinant plasmid carrying a 2.0 kb insert from a Burkholderia pseudomallei genomic library was subjected to automated DNA sequencing utilizing a primer walking strategy. Analysis of the 2002 bp insert revealed a 1536 bp open reading frame predicted...

  10. Use of the common marmoset to study Burkholderia mallei infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelesijevic, Tomislav; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Harvey, Stephen B; Mead, Daniel G; Shaffer, Teresa L; Estes, D Mark; Michel, Frank; Quinn, Frederick D; Hogan, Robert J; Lafontaine, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted bacterium that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir. The organism causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by B. mallei typically occurs via the respiratory or percutaneous route, and the most common manifestations are life-threatening pneumonia and bacteremia. Glanders is difficult to diagnose and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There is no vaccine to protect against B. mallei and there is concern regarding its use as a biothreat agent. Thus, experiments were performed to establish a non-human primate model of intranasal infection to study the organism and develop countermeasures. Groups of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were inoculated intranasally with B. mallei strain ATCC 23344 and monitored for clinical signs of illness for up to 13 days. We discovered that 83% of marmosets inoculated with doses of 2.5 X 10(4) to 2.5 X 10(5) bacteria developed acute lethal infection within 3-4 days. Signs of disease were severe and included lethargy, inappetence, conjunctivitis, mucopurulent and hemorrhagic nasal discharges, and increased respiratory effort with abdominal lifts. Burkholderia mallei was cultured from the lungs, spleen and liver of these animals, and pathologic examination of tissues revealed lesions characteristic of glanders. Challenge experiments also revealed that 91% of animals infected with doses ranging from 25 to 2.5 X 10(3) bacteria exhibited mild non-specific signs of illness and were culture negative. One marmoset inoculated with 2.5 X 10(3) organisms developed moderate signs of disease and reached humane end-points 8 days post-infection. The liver and spleen of this animal were colonized with the agent and pathological analysis of tissues showed nasal, splenic and hepatic lesions. Taken together, these data indicate that the marmoset is a suitable model to study respiratory infection by B. mallei.

  11. Use of the common marmoset to study Burkholderia mallei infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Jelesijevic

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted bacterium that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir. The organism causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by B. mallei typically occurs via the respiratory or percutaneous route, and the most common manifestations are life-threatening pneumonia and bacteremia. Glanders is difficult to diagnose and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There is no vaccine to protect against B. mallei and there is concern regarding its use as a biothreat agent. Thus, experiments were performed to establish a non-human primate model of intranasal infection to study the organism and develop countermeasures. Groups of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus were inoculated intranasally with B. mallei strain ATCC 23344 and monitored for clinical signs of illness for up to 13 days. We discovered that 83% of marmosets inoculated with doses of 2.5 X 10(4 to 2.5 X 10(5 bacteria developed acute lethal infection within 3-4 days. Signs of disease were severe and included lethargy, inappetence, conjunctivitis, mucopurulent and hemorrhagic nasal discharges, and increased respiratory effort with abdominal lifts. Burkholderia mallei was cultured from the lungs, spleen and liver of these animals, and pathologic examination of tissues revealed lesions characteristic of glanders. Challenge experiments also revealed that 91% of animals infected with doses ranging from 25 to 2.5 X 10(3 bacteria exhibited mild non-specific signs of illness and were culture negative. One marmoset inoculated with 2.5 X 10(3 organisms developed moderate signs of disease and reached humane end-points 8 days post-infection. The liver and spleen of this animal were colonized with the agent and pathological analysis of tissues showed nasal, splenic and hepatic lesions. Taken together, these data indicate that the marmoset is a suitable model to study respiratory infection by B

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1310 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1310 ref|YP_624641.1| acyltransferase 3 [Burkholderia cenocepacia AU 1...054] ref|YP_837010.1| acyltransferase 3 [Burkholderia cenocepacia HI2424] ref|ZP_01565190.1| acyltransferase 3 [Burkholder...ia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|ABF79668.1| acyltransferase 3 [Burkholderia cenocepacia AU 1054] gb|A...BK10117.1| acyltransferase 3 [Burkholderia cenocepacia HI2424] gb|EAV56867.1| acyltransferase 3 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] YP_624641.1 1e-65 56% ...

  13. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Dina A; Scarff, Jennifer M; Garcia, Preston P; Cassidy, Sara K B; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M; Inzana, Thomas J; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine.

  14. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina A Moustafa

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine.

  15. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic-Induced Cell Death in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleen Van Acker

    Full Text Available It was recently proposed that bactericidal antibiotics, besides through specific drug-target interactions, kill bacteria by a common mechanism involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. However, this mechanism involving the production of hydroxyl radicals has become the subject of a lot of debate. Since the contribution of ROS to antibiotic mediated killing most likely depends on the conditions, differences in experimental procedures are expected to be at the basis of the conflicting results. In the present study different methods (ROS specific stainings, gene-expression analyses, electron paramagnetic resonance, genetic and phenotypic experiments, detection of protein carbonylation and DNA oxidation to measure the production of ROS upon antibiotic treatment in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc bacteria were compared. Different classes of antibiotics (tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem were included, and both planktonic and biofilm cultures were studied. Our results indicate that some of the methods investigated were not sensitive enough to measure antibiotic induced production of ROS, including the spectrophotometric detection of protein carbonylation. Secondly, other methods were found to be useful only in specific conditions. For example, an increase in the expression of OxyR was measured in Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 after treatment with ciprofloxacin or meropenem (both in biofilms and planktonic cultures but not after treatment with tobramycin. In addition results vary with the experimental conditions and the species tested. Nevertheless our data strongly suggest that ROS contribute to antibiotic mediated killing in Bcc species and that enhancing ROS production or interfering with the protection against ROS may form a novel strategy to improve antibiotic treatment.

  16. 40 CFR 725.1075 - Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Burkholderia cepacia complex. 725.1075... Specific Microorganisms § 725.1075 Burkholderia cepacia complex. (a) Microorganism and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The microorganisms identified as the Burkholderia cepacia complex defined...

  17. The third replicon of members of the Burkholderia cepacia Complex, plasmid pC3, plays a role in stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Kirsty; Frauenknecht, Carmen; Freitag, Roman; Schwager, Stephan; Jenul, Christian; Vergunst, Annette; Carlier, Aurelien; Eberl, Leo

    2014-02-01

    The metabolically versatile Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) occupies a variety of niches, including the plant rhizosphere and the cystic fibrosis lung (where it is often fatal to the patient). Bcc members have multipartite genomes, of which the third replicon, pC3 (previously chromosome 3), has been shown to be a nonessential megaplasmid which confers virulence and both antifungal and proteolytic activity on several strains. In this study, pC3 curing was extended to cover strains of 16 of the 17 members of the Bcc, and the phenotypes conferred by pC3 were determined. B. cenocepacia strains H111, MCO-3, and HI2424 were previously cured of pC3; however, this had not proved possible in the epidemic strain K56-2. Here, we investigated the mechanism of this unexpected stability and found that efficient toxin-antitoxin systems are responsible for maintaining pC3 of strain K56-2. Identification of these systems allowed neutralization of the toxins and the subsequent deletion of K56-2pC3. The cured strain was found to exhibit reduced antifungal activity and was attenuated in both the zebrafish and the Caenorhabditis elegans model of infection. We used a PCR screening method to examine the prevalence of pC3 within 110 Bcc isolates and found that this replicon was absent in only four cases, suggesting evolutionary fixation. It is shown that plasmid pC3 increases the resistance of B. cenocepacia H111 to various stresses (oxidative, osmotic, high-temperature, and chlorhexidine-induced stresses), explaining the prevalence of this replicon within the Bcc.

  18. Evaluation of a latex agglutination assay for the identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Brea D; Elrod, Mindy G; Gee, Jay E; Chantratita, Narisara; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Cases of melioidosis and glanders are rare in the United States, but the etiologic agents of each disease (Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei, respectively) are classified as Tier 1 select agents because of concerns about their potential use as bioterrorism agents. A rapid, highly sensitive, and portable assay for clinical laboratories and field use is required. Our laboratory has further evaluated a latex agglutination assay for its ability to identify B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates. This assay uses a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes the capsular polysaccharide produced by B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, but is absent in closely related Burkholderia species. A total of 110 B. pseudomallei and B. mallei were tested, and 36 closely related Burkholderia species. The latex agglutination assay was positive for 109 of 110 (99.1% sensitivity) B. pseudomallei and B. mallei isolates tested.

  19. Burkholderia Vaccines: Are We Moving Forward?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leang-Chung eChoh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The genus Burkholderia consists of diverse species which includes both ‘friends’ and ‘foes’. Some of the ‘friendly’ Burkholderia spp. are extensively used in the biotechnological and agricultural industry for bioremediation and biocontrol. However, several members of the genus including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. cepacia, are known to cause fatal disease in both humans and animals. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively, while B. cepacia infection is lethal to cystic fibrosis patients. Due to the high rate of infectivity and intrinsic resistance to many commonly used antibiotics, together with high mortality rate, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are considered to be potential biological warfare agents. Treatments of the infections caused by these bacteria are often unsuccessful with frequent relapse of the infection. Thus, we are at a crucial stage of the need for Burkholderia vaccines. Although the search for a prophylactic therapy candidate continues, to date development of vaccines has not advanced beyond research to human clinical trials. In this article, we review the current research on development of safe vaccines with high efficacy against B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. cepacia. It can be concluded that further research will enable elucidation of the potential benefits and risks of Burkholderia vaccines.

  20. Natural Burkholderia mallei infection in Dromedary, Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernery, Ulrich; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Marina; Al-Salloom, Fajer; Johnson, Bobby; Kinne, Joerg; Jose, Shanti; Jose, Sherry; Tappendorf, Britta; Hornstra, Heidie; Scholz, Holger C

    2011-07-01

    We confirm a natural infection of dromedaries with glanders. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of a Burkholderia mallei strain isolated from a diseased dromedary in Bahrain revealed close genetic proximity to strain Dubai 7, which caused an outbreak of glanders in horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004.

  1. Burkholderia vaccines: are we moving forward?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choh, Leang-Chung; Ong, Guang-Han; Vellasamy, Kumutha M; Kalaiselvam, Kaveena; Kang, Wen-Tyng; Al-Maleki, Anis R; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2013-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia consists of diverse species which includes both "friends" and "foes." Some of the "friendly" Burkholderia spp. are extensively used in the biotechnological and agricultural industry for bioremediation and biocontrol. However, several members of the genus including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. cepacia, are known to cause fatal disease in both humans and animals. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively, while B. cepacia infection is lethal to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Due to the high rate of infectivity and intrinsic resistance to many commonly used antibiotics, together with high mortality rate, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are considered to be potential biological warfare agents. Treatments of the infections caused by these bacteria are often unsuccessful with frequent relapse of the infection. Thus, we are at a crucial stage of the need for Burkholderia vaccines. Although the search for a prophylactic therapy candidate continues, to date development of vaccines has not advanced beyond research to human clinical trials. In this article, we review the current research on development of safe vaccines with high efficacy against B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. cepacia. It can be concluded that further research will enable elucidation of the potential benefits and risks of Burkholderia vaccines.

  2. Burkholderia glumae en el cultivo de arroz en Costa Rica.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Quesada-Gonz\\u00E1lez; Fernando Garc\\u00EDa-Santamar\\u00EDa

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae en el cultivo de arroz en Costa Rica. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la presencia de Burkholderia glumae en arroz en Costa Rica. La bacteria Burkholderia glumae está asociada al cultivo del arroz en el que provoca la enfermedad llamada añublo bacterial. Bajo condiciones ambientales favorables, la densidad bacteriana aumenta, lo que provoca que, bajo un sistema de regulación denominado quorum sensing, se expresen sus mecanismos de virulencia mediante la ...

  3. Autotransporters and their role in the virulence of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie eLazar Adler

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are closely related Gram-negative bacteria responsible for the infectious diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Autotransporters (ATs comprise a large and diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins that includes virulence-associated invasins, adhesins, proteases and actin-nucleating factors. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome contains eleven predicted ATs, eight of which share homologues in the B. mallei ATCC 23344 genome. This review distils key findings from in silico, in vitro and in vivo studies on the ATs of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. To date, the best characterized of the predicted ATs of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei is BimA, a predicted trimeric AT mediating actin-based motility which varies in sequence and mode of action between Burkholderia species. Of the remaining eight predicted B. pseudomallei trimeric autotransporters, five of which are also present in B. mallei, two (BoaA and BoaB, have been implicated in bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Several predicted Burkholderia ATs are recognized by human humoral and cell-mediated immunity, indicating that they are expressed during infection and may be useful for diagnosis and vaccine-mediated protection. Further studies on the mode of secretion and functions of Burkholderia ATs will facilitate the rational design of control strategies.

  4. Multiplex qPCR for reliable detection and differentiation of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janse Ingmar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are two closely related species of highly virulent bacteria that can be difficult to detect. Pathogenic Burkholderia are endemic in many regions worldwide and cases of infection, sometimes brought by travelers from unsuspected regions, also occur elsewhere. Rapid, sensitive methods for identification of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are urgently needed in the interests of patient treatment and epidemiological surveillance. Methods Signature sequences for sensitive, specific detection of pathogenic Burkholderia based on published genomes were identified and a qPCR assay was designed and validated. Results A single-reaction quadruplex qPCR assay for the detection of pathogenic Burkholderia, which includes a marker for internal control of DNA extraction and amplification, was developed. The assay permits differentiation of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei strains, and probit analysis showed a very low detection limit. Use of a multicopy signature sequence permits detection of less than 1 genome equivalent per reaction. Conclusions The new assay permits rapid detection of pathogenic Burkholderia and combines enhanced sensitivity, species differentiation, and inclusion of an internal control for both DNA extraction and PCR amplification.

  5. Development of Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ediane Batista Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available B. mallei and B. pseudomallei are Gram-negative bacteria that cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Inhalational infection with either organism can result in severe and rapidly fatal pneumonia. Inoculation by the oral and cutaneous routes can also produce infection. chronic infection develops after recovery from acute infection with both agents, and control of infection with antibiotics requires prolonged treatment. Symptoms for both meliodosis and glanders are non-specific, making diagnosis difficult.B. pseudomallei can be located in the environment, but in the host, B. mallei and B. psedomallei are intracellular organisms. Thefection results in similar immune responses to both agents. Effective early innate immune responses are critical to controlling the early phase of the infection. Innate immune signaling molecules such as TLR, NOD, MyD88 and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN- and TNF-α play key roles in regulating control of infection. Neutrophils and monocytes are critical cells in the early infection for these microorganisms. Both monocytes and macrophages are necessary for limiting dissemination of B. pseudomallei. In contrast, the role of adaptive immune responses in controlling Burkholderia infection is less well understood. However, T cell responses are critical for vaccine protection from Burkholderia infection. At present, effective vaccines for prevention of glanders or meliodosis have not been developed, although recently progress of Burkholderia vaccines has received renewed attention.This review will summarize current and past approaches to develop Burkholderia mallei and pseudomalllei vaccines, with emphasis on immune mechanisms of protection and the challenges facing the field. At present, immunization with live attenuated bacteria provides the most effective and durable immunity, and it is important therefore to understand the immune correlates of protection induced by live attenuated vaccines.

  6. Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei on Environmental Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Alicia M; Rose, Laura J; Hodges, Lisa; Arduino, Matthew J

    2007-12-01

    The survival of the biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei on the surfaces of four materials was measured by culture and esterase activity analyses. The culture results demonstrated that this organism persisted for <24 h to <7 days depending on the material, bacterial isolate, and suspension medium. The persistence determined by analysis of esterase activity, as measured with a ScanRDI solid-phase cytometer, was always longer than the persistence determined by culture analysis.

  7. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei: the causative micro-organisms of glanders and melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Jacob

    2007-11-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are the causative micro-organisms of Glanders and Melioidosis, respectively. Although now rare in Western countries, both micro-organisms have recently gained much interest because of their unique potential as bioterrorism agents. This paper reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of Melioidosis and Glanders. Recent patents relating to these micro-organisms, especially potential vaccines, are presented. Continued research and development is urgently needed, especially in regard to rapid and accurate diagnosis of melioidosis and glanders, efficacious therapy and primary and secondary prevention.

  8. Development of Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ediane B; Dow, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative bacteria that cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Inhalational infection with either organism can result in severe and rapidly fatal pneumonia. Inoculation by the oral and cutaneous routes can also produce infection. Chronic infection may develop after recovery from acute infection with both agents, and control of infection with antibiotics requires prolonged treatment. Symptoms for both meliodosis and glanders are non-specific, making diagnosis difficult. B. pseudomallei can be located in the environment, but in the host, B. mallei and B. psedomallei are intracellular organisms, and infection results in similar immune responses to both agents. Effective early innate immune responses are critical to controlling the early phase of the infection. Innate immune signaling molecules such as TLR, NOD, MyD88, and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α play key roles in regulating control of infection. Neutrophils and monocytes are critical cells in the early infection for both microorganisms. Both monocytes and macrophages are necessary for limiting dissemination of B. pseudomallei. In contrast, the role of adaptive immune responses in controlling Burkholderia infection is less well understood. However, T cell responses are critical for vaccine protection from Burkholderia infection. At present, effective vaccines for prevention of glanders or meliodosis have not been developed, although recently development of Burkholderia vaccines has received renewed attention. This review will summarize current and past approaches to develop B. mallei and B. pseudomalllei vaccines, with emphasis on immune mechanisms of protection and the challenges facing the field. At present, immunization with live attenuated bacteria provides the most effective and durable immunity, and it is important therefore to understand the immune correlates of protection induced by live attenuated vaccines. Subunit

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Fenitrothion-Degrading Burkholderia sp. Strain YI23

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jong Sung; Choi, Beom Soon; Choi, Ah Young; Kim, Kyung Duk; Kim, Dong In; Choi, Ik Young; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia species are ubiquitous in soil environments. Many Burkholderia species isolated from various environments have the potential to biodegrade man-made chemicals. Burkholderia sp. strain YI23 was isolated from a golf course soil and identified as a fenitrothion-degrading bacterium. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain YI23.

  10. Draft Genomes for Eight Burkholderia mallei Isolates from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daligault, H. E.; Davenport, K. W.; Minogue, T. D.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Coyne, S. R.; Frey, K. G.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Koroleva, G. I.; Ladner, J. T.; Lo, C.-C.; Munk, C.; Wolcott, M. J.; Palacios, G. F.; Redden, C. L.; Rosenzweig, C. N.; Scholz, M. B.; Chain, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, is a Gram-negative, nonmotile, facultative intracellular pathogen. Although glanders has been eradicated from many parts of the world, the threat of B. mallei being used as a weapon is very real. Here we present draft genome assemblies of 8 Burkholderia mallei strains that were isolated in Turkey. PMID:26744368

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-3033 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-3033 ref|ZP_00977438.1| COG2207: AraC-type DNA-binding domain-containing proteins [Burkholder...ia cenocepacia PC184] ref|YP_623398.1| transcriptional regulator, AraC family [Burkholder...ia cenocepacia AU 1054] ref|YP_838462.1| transcriptional regulator, AraC family [Burkholderia cenocepaci...a HI2424] gb|ABF78425.1| transcriptional regulator, AraC family [Burkholderia cen...ocepacia AU 1054] gb|ABK11569.1| transcriptional regulator, AraC family [Burkholderia cenocepacia HI2424] gb

  12. Influence of neutrophil defects on Burkholderia cepacia complex pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Porter

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is a group of Gram-negative bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and have emerged as opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients. The primary patient populations infected with Bcc include individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF, as well as those with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD. While Bcc infection in CF is better characterized than in CGD, these two genetic diseases are not obviously similar and it is currently unknown if there is any commonality in host immune defects that is responsible for the susceptibility to Bcc. CF is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, resulting in manifestations in various organ systems, however the major cause of morbidity and mortality is currently due to bacterial respiratory infections. CGD, on the other hand, is a genetic disorder that is caused by defects in phagocyte NADPH oxidase. Because of the defect in CGD, phagocytes in these patients are unable to produce reactive oxygen species, which results in increased susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections. Despite this significant defect in microbial clearance, the spectrum of pathogens frequently implicated in infections in CGD is relatively narrow and includes some bacterial species that are considered almost pathognomonic for this disorder. Very little is known about the cause of the specific susceptibility to Bcc over other potential pathogens more prevalent in the environment, and a better understanding of specific mechanisms required for bacterial virulence has become a high priority. This review will summarize both the current knowledge and future directions related to Bcc virulence in immunocompromised individuals with a focus on the roles of bacterial factors and neutrophil defects in pathogenesis.

  13. Solution conformation and dynamics of exopolysaccharides from Burkholderia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol-Fachin, Laercio; Serrato, Rodrigo V; Verli, Hugo

    2010-09-03

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) from the Burkholderia genus are proposed to be involved in pathological conditions in humans, such as cystic fibrosis and septicemia, as well as in the stability of soil aggregates. Hence, considering that the conformational and dynamic aspects of such EPSs may influence their biological activity, the current work employs a series of molecular dynamics simulations on di-, oligo-, and polysaccharide fragments of three EPSs, from Burkholderia caribensis, Burkholderia cepacia, and Burkholderia pseudomallei, with previously determined NOE data, to obtain a conformational description of such EPSs at the atomic level. As the obtained results show good agreement with the experimental data, pointing to the adequacy of the employed methodology to accurately describe the dynamics of polysaccharides, the strategy was also employed to predict the conformational behavior of an additional compound, from Burkholderia tropica, for which NOE signals are not available. Taking into account the potential importance of EPSs on the interaction of Burkholderia bacteria with distinct environments, it may be expected that a greater understanding of their structural aspects may contribute to controlling their pathological roles and potential agricultural applications.

  14. Exploitation of host cells by Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Mark P; Galyov, Edouard E

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved mechanisms to enter and exit eukaryotic cells using the power of actin polymerisation and to subvert the activity of cellular enzymes and signal transduction pathways. The proteins deployed by bacteria to subvert cellular processes often mimic eukaryotic proteins in their structure or function. Studies on the exploitation of host cells by the facultative intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei are providing novel insights into the pathogenesis of melioidosis, a serious invasive disease of animals and humans that is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas. B. pseudomallei can invade epithelial cells, survive and proliferate inside phagocytes, escape from endocytic vesicles, form actin-based membrane protrusions and induce host cell fusion. Here we review current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes.

  15. Colonization or spontaneous resolution:Expanding the role for Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kushal Naha; Barkur Ananthakrishna Shastry; Kavitha Saravu

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old Asian Indian female presented with productive cough since the past one month and low grade fever since the past two weeks. She was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis and treated with antitubercular drugs. Subsequently, delayed cultures of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid grewBurkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei). On follow up the patient reported significant subjective improvement and ESR progressively returned to normal. In summary, this case report raises two distinct and equally intriguing roles forB. pseudomallei,i.e. respiratory colonization and spontaneously resolving pulmonary infection. The pathogenic potential ofB. pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is well known. Confirmation of either colonization or spontaneous resolution, would potentially spare many patients unnecessary and expensive therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics, and contribute to more rational usage of antibiotics, especially in co-infection withMycobacterium tuberculosis andB. pseudomallei-two bacterial diseases with closely similar clinical, radiologic and histopathologic features.

  16. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    10.1 Respiratory failure2003068 Evaluation of non-invasive ventilation in a-cute respiratory failure with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. GU Jianyong(顾俭勇), et al. Dept E-mergen, Zhongshan Hosp, Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Shanghai J Med 2002; 25 (12): 741 - 743.Objective:To observe the effect of non-invasive venti-lation(NIV) in acute respiratory failure with chronic

  17. Prevalence of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, G; Zheng, D; Cai, Q; Yuan, Z

    2010-01-01

    Melioidosis, an infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is now recognized as an important public health problem in Southeast Asia and tropical northern Australia. Although B. pseudomallei has been detected in various water and soil samples in southeast China, the enviromental distribution of B. pseudomallei in China is unclear. In the winter months of 2007, 154 and 130 soil and water samples, respectively, were collected from several locations in Guangxi, China. The samples were screened for B. pseudomallei by bacterial culture and identification and confirmed by PCR for species-specific 16S rDNA and flagellin genes. B. pseudomallei was detected in 8.4% of the soil samples but in none of the water samples. All positive samples were confined to a single low-lying region from rice paddy fields. Counts of B. pseudomallei ranged from 23 to 521 c.f.u./g soil. This is the first geographical distribution survey of B. pseudomallei in soil in Guangxi, China, and the data are of importance for further evaluating the impact of this pathogen on melioidosis in this region.

  18. Burkholderia pseudomallei musculoskeletal infections (melioidosis in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis, an infection due to gram negative Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important cause of sepsis in east Asia especially Thailand and northern Australia. It usually causes abscesses in lung, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle and parotids especially in patients with diabetes, chronic renal failure and thalassemia. Musculoskeletal melioidosis is not common in India even though sporadic cases have been reported mostly involving soft tissues. During a two-year-period, we had five patients with musculoskeletal melioidosis. All patients presented with multifocal osteomyelitis, recurrent osteomyelitis or septic arthritis. One patient died early because of septicemia and multi-organ failure. All patients were diagnosed on the basis of positive pus culture. All patients were treated by surgical debridement followed by a combination of antibiotics; (ceftazidime, amoxy-clavulanic acid, co-trimoxazole and doxycycline for six months except for one who died due to fulminant septicemia. All other patients recovered completely with no recurrences. With increasing awareness and better diagnostic facilities, probably musculoskeletal melioidosis will be increasingly diagnosed in future.

  19. Common duckweed (Lemna minor is a versatile high-throughput infection model for the Burkholderia cepacia complex and other pathogenic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euan L S Thomson

    Full Text Available Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc have emerged in recent decades as problematic pulmonary pathogens of cystic fibrosis (CF patients, with severe infections progressing to acute necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis. This study presents evidence that Lemna minor (Common duckweed is useful as a plant model for the Bcc infectious process, and has potential as a model system for bacterial pathogenesis in general. To investigate the relationship between Bcc virulence in duckweed and Galleria mellonella (Greater wax moth larvae, a previously established Bcc infection model, a duckweed survival assay was developed and used to determine LD50 values. A strong correlation (R(2 = 0.81 was found between the strains' virulence ranks in the two infection models, suggesting conserved pathways in these vastly different hosts. To broaden the application of the duckweed model, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC and five isogenic mutants with previously established LD50 values in the larval model were tested against duckweed, and a strong correlation (R(2 = 0.93 was found between their raw LD50 values. Potential virulence factors in B. cenocepacia K56-2 were identified using a high-throughput screen against single duckweed plants. In addition to the previously characterized antifungal compound (AFC cluster genes, several uncharacterized genes were discovered including a novel lysR regulator, a histidine biosynthesis gene hisG, and a gene located near the gene encoding the recently characterized virulence factor SuhB(Bc. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this model in therapeutic applications, duckweed was rescued from Bcc infection by treating with bacteriophage at 6-h intervals. It was observed that phage application became ineffective at a timepoint that coincided with a sharp increase in bacterial invasion of plant tissue. These results indicate that common duckweed can serve as an effective infection model for the investigation of bacterial

  20. Recent Advances in Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Christopher L.; Muruato, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei are Gram-negative organisms, which are etiological agents of glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Although only B. pseudomallei is responsible for a significant number of human cases, both organisms are classified as Tier 1 Select Agents and their diseases lack effective diagnosis and treatment. Despite a recent resurgence in research pertaining to these organisms, there are still a number of knowledge gaps. This article summarizes the latest research progress in the fields of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei pathogenesis, vaccines, and diagnostics. PMID:25932379

  1. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  2. Understanding the Pathogenicity of Burkholderia contaminans, an Emerging Pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunvar, Jaroslav; Kalferstova, Lucie; Bloodworth, Ruhi A. M.; Kolar, Michal; Degrossi, Jose; Lubovich, Silvina; Cardona, Silvia T.; Drevinek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial species from the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are feared opportunistic pathogens that lead to debilitating lung infections with a high risk of developing fatal septicemia in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, the pathogenic potential of other Bcc species is yet unknown. To elucidate clinical relevance of Burkholderia contaminans, a species frequently isolated from CF respiratory samples in Ibero-American countries, we aimed to identify its key virulence factors possibly linked with an unfavorable clinical outcome. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of two isolates of B. contaminans ST872 from sputum and blood culture of a female CF patient in Argentina. RNA-seq data showed significant changes in expression for quorum sensing-regulated virulence factors and motility and chemotaxis. Furthermore, we detected expression changes in a recently described low-oxygen-activated (lxa) locus which encodes stress-related proteins, and for two clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of antifungal and hemolytic compounds pyrrolnitrin and occidiofungin. Based on phenotypic assays that confirmed changes in motility and in proteolytic, hemolytic and antifungal activities, we were able to distinguish two phenotypes of B. contaminans that coexisted in the host and entered her bloodstream. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the sputum and bloodstream isolates (each representing a distinct phenotype) differed by over 1,400 mutations as a result of a mismatch repair-deficient hypermutable state of the sputum isolate. The inferred lack of purifying selection against nonsynonymous mutations and the high rate of pseudogenization in the derived isolate indicated limited evolutionary pressure during evolution in the nutrient-rich, stable CF sputum environment. The present study is the first to examine the genomic and transcriptomic differences between longitudinal isolates of B. contaminans. Detected activity of a number of putative virulence

  3. Pyrrolnitrin from Burkholderia cepacia: antibiotic activity against fungi and novel activities against streptomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Banna, N; Winkelmann, G

    1998-07-01

    A bacterial strain identified as Burkholderia cepacia NB-1 was isolated from water ponds in the botanical garden in Tübingen, Germany, and was found to produce a broad spectrum phenylpyrrole antimicrobial substance active against filamentous fungi, yeasts and Gram-positive bacteria. In batch culture containing glycerol and L-glutamic acid, the isolate NB-1 produced the antibiotic optimally late in the growth phase and accumulated a main portion in their cells. Isolation and purification of the antibiotic from Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia NB-1 by acetone extraction, gel filtration on Sephadex LH-20 and preparative HPLC yielded 0.54 mg l-1 of a pure substance. Spectroscopic data (HPLC, MS and NMR) confirmed that the compound was pyrrolnitrin [3-chloro-4-(2'-nitro-3'-chloro-phenyl) pyrrole]. Pyrrolnitrin has an inhibitory effect on the electron transport system, as demonstrated by isolated mitochondria from Neurospora crassa 74 A. This inhibition was relieved by N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (TMPD), indicating that pyrrolnitrin blocked the electron transfer between the dehydrogenases and the cytochrome components of the respiratory chain. Among Gram-positive bacteria, pyrrolnitrin was most active against certain Streptomyces species, especially S. antibioticus, which has not previously been described in the literature. In the presence of pyrrolnitrin, aerial mycelium and spore formation of Strep. antibioticus was suppressed, although growth continued via substrate mycelium. The new findings of inhibition of streptomycetes and their secondary metabolism by pyrrolnitrin may contribute to the fact that Pseudomonas species predominate in soil and compete even with antibiotic-producing Streptomyces.

  4. Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Donald E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of Burkholderia pseudomallei to survive in water likely contributes to its environmental persistence in endemic regions. To determine the physiological adaptations which allow B. pseudomallei to survive in aqueous environments, we performed microarray analyses of B. pseudomallei cultures transferred from Luria broth (LB to distilled water. Findings Increased expression of a gene encoding for a putative membrane protein (BPSL0721 was confirmed using a lux-based transcriptional reporter system, and maximal expression was noted at approximately 6 hrs after shifting cells from LB to water. A BPSL0721 deficient mutant of B. pseudomallei was able to survive in water for at least 90 days indicating that although involved, BPSL0721 was not essential for survival. BPSL2961, a gene encoding a putative phosphatidylglycerol phosphatase (PGP, was also induced when cells were shifted to water. This gene is likely involved in cell membrane biosynthesis. We were unable to construct a PGP mutant suggesting that the gene is not only involved in survival in water but is essential for cell viability. We also examined mutants of polyhydroxybutyrate synthase (phbC, lipopolysaccharide (LPS oligosaccharide and capsule synthesis, and these mutations did not affect survival in water. LPS mutants lacking outer core were found to lose viability in water by 200 days indicating that an intact LPS core provides an outer membrane architecture which allows prolonged survival in water. Conclusion The results from these studies suggest that B. pseudomallei survival in water is a complex process that requires an LPS molecule which contains an intact core region.

  5. Melioidosis caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei in drinking water, Thailand, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Aanensen, David; Ngamwilai, Sujittra; Saiprom, Natnaree; Rongkard, Patpong; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Kanoksil, Manas; Chantratita, Narisara; Day, Nicholas P J; Peacock, Sharon J

    2014-02-01

    We identified 10 patients in Thailand with culture-confirmed melioidosis who had Burkholderia pseudomallei isolated from their drinking water. The multilocus sequence type of B. pseudomallei from clinical specimens and water samples were identical for 2 patients. This finding suggests that drinking water is a preventable source of B. pseudomallei infection.

  6. Intrinsic Resistance of Burkholderia cepacia Complex to Benzalkonium Chloride

    OpenAIRE

    Youngbeom Ahn; Jeong Myeong Kim; Ohgew Kweon; Seong-Jae Kim; Jones, Richard C.; Kellie Woodling; Goncalo Gamboa da Costa; LiPuma, John J.; David Hussong; Marasa, Bernard S.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pharmaceutical products that are contaminated with Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) bacteria may pose serious consequences to vulnerable patients. Benzyldimethylalkylammonium chloride (BZK) cationic surfactants are extensively used in medical applications and have been implicated in the coselection of antimicrobial resistance. The ability of BCC to degrade BZK, tetradecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C14BDMA-Cl), dodecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C12BDMA-Cl), decyldimethyl...

  7. Burkholderia pseudomallei: A potential zoonosis in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is an underreported zoonosis in many countries where environmental conditions may be favorable for B. pseudomallei. This soil saprophyte is most often detected in tropical areas such as Southeast Asia and Northern Australia where the cas...

  8. Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria beyond legumes: Burkholderia in Rubiaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brecht Verstraete

    Full Text Available Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria not only occur in root nodules of legumes but are also found in leaves of certain Rubiaceae. The discovery of bacteria in plants formerly not implicated in endosymbiosis suggests a wider occurrence of plant-microbe interactions. Several ß-proteobacteria of the genus Burkholderia are detected in close association with tropical plants. This interaction has occurred three times independently, which suggest a recent and open plant-bacteria association. The presence or absence of Burkholderia endophytes is consistent on genus level and therefore implies a predictive value for the discovery of bacteria. Only a single Burkholderia species is found in association with a given plant species. However, the endophyte species are promiscuous and can be found in association with several plant species. Most of the endophytes are part of the plant-associated beneficial and environmental group, but others are closely related to B. glathei. This soil bacteria, together with related nodulating and non-nodulating endophytes, is therefore transferred to a newly defined and larger PBE group within the genus Burkholderia.

  9. Stress conditions triggering mucoid morphotype variation in Burkholderia species and effect on virulence in Galleria mellonella and biofilm formation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês N Silva

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc bacteria are opportunistic pathogens causing chronic respiratory infections particularly among cystic fibrosis patients. During these chronic infections, mucoid-to-nonmucoid morphotype variation occurs, with the two morphotypes exhibiting different phenotypic properties. Here we show that in vitro, the mucoid clinical isolate Burkholderia multivorans D2095 gives rise to stable nonmucoid variants in response to prolonged stationary phase, presence of antibiotics, and osmotic and oxidative stresses. Furthermore, in vitro colony morphotype variation within other members of the Burkholderia genus occurred in Bcc and non-Bcc strains, irrespectively of their clinical or environmental origin. Survival to starvation and iron limitation was comparable for the mucoid parental isolate and the respective nonmucoid variant, while susceptibility to antibiotics and to oxidative stress was increased in the nonmucoid variants. Acute infection of Galleria mellonella larvae showed that, in general, the nonmucoid variants were less virulent than the respective parental mucoid isolate, suggesting a role for the exopolysaccharide in virulence. In addition, most of the tested nonmucoid variants produced more biofilm biomass than their respective mucoid parental isolate. As biofilms are often associated with increased persistence of pathogens in the CF lungs and are an indicative of different cell-to-cell interactions, it is possible that the nonmucoid variants are better adapted to persist in this host environment.

  10. Stress conditions triggering mucoid morphotype variation in Burkholderia species and effect on virulence in Galleria mellonella and biofilm formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Inês N; Tavares, Andreia C; Ferreira, Ana S; Moreira, Leonilde M

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria are opportunistic pathogens causing chronic respiratory infections particularly among cystic fibrosis patients. During these chronic infections, mucoid-to-nonmucoid morphotype variation occurs, with the two morphotypes exhibiting different phenotypic properties. Here we show that in vitro, the mucoid clinical isolate Burkholderia multivorans D2095 gives rise to stable nonmucoid variants in response to prolonged stationary phase, presence of antibiotics, and osmotic and oxidative stresses. Furthermore, in vitro colony morphotype variation within other members of the Burkholderia genus occurred in Bcc and non-Bcc strains, irrespectively of their clinical or environmental origin. Survival to starvation and iron limitation was comparable for the mucoid parental isolate and the respective nonmucoid variant, while susceptibility to antibiotics and to oxidative stress was increased in the nonmucoid variants. Acute infection of Galleria mellonella larvae showed that, in general, the nonmucoid variants were less virulent than the respective parental mucoid isolate, suggesting a role for the exopolysaccharide in virulence. In addition, most of the tested nonmucoid variants produced more biofilm biomass than their respective mucoid parental isolate. As biofilms are often associated with increased persistence of pathogens in the CF lungs and are an indicative of different cell-to-cell interactions, it is possible that the nonmucoid variants are better adapted to persist in this host environment.

  11. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2004494 Respiratory control in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome. WANG Wei (王玮), et al. Instit Respir Dis, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Limy, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Intern Med 2004; 43 (9): 647-650.

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0109 ref|ZP_01563785.1| NADH:flavin oxidoreductase/NADH oxidase [Burkholderia... cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV58290.1| NADH:flavin oxidoreductase/NADH oxidase [Burkholderia cenocepacia ...MC0-3] gb|EAY65940.1| NADH:flavin oxidoreductase/NADH oxidase [Burkholderia cenocepacia PC184] ZP_01563785.1 4.6 26% ...

  13. [Respiratory distress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, D; Garfunkel, A; Elad, S; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Findler, M; Kaufman, E

    2002-01-01

    Dental treatment is usually conducted in the oral cavity and in very close proximity to the upper respiratory airway. The possibility of unintentionally compromising this airway is high in the dental environment. The accumulation of fluid (water or blood) near to the upper respiratory airway or the loosening of teeth fragmentations and fallen dental instruments can occur. Also, some of the drugs prescribed in the dental practice are central nervous system depressants and some are direct respiratory drive depressors. For this reason, awareness of the respiratory status of the dental patient is of paramount importance. This article focuses on several of the more common causes of respiratory distress, including airway obstruction, hyperventilation, asthma, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism and cardiac insufficiency. The common denominator to all these conditions described here is that in most instances the patient is conscious. Therefore, on the one hand, valuable information can be retrieved from the patient making diagnosis easier than when the patient is unconscious. On the other hand, the conscious patient is under extreme apprehension and stress under such situations. Respiratory depression which occurs during conscious sedation or following narcotic analgesic medication will not be dealt with in this article. Advanced pain and anxiety control techniques such as conscious sedation and general anesthesia should be confined only to operators who undergo special extended training.

  14. Architecture of Burkholderia cepacia complex σ70 gene family: evidence of alternative primary and clade-specific factors, and genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menard Aymeric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc groups bacterial species with beneficial properties that can improve crop yields or remediate polluted sites but can also lead to dramatic human clinical outcomes among cystic fibrosis (CF or immuno-compromised individuals. Genome-wide regulatory processes of gene expression could explain parts of this bacterial duality. Transcriptional σ70 factors are components of these processes. They allow the reversible binding of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to form the holoenzyme that will lead to mRNA synthesis from a DNA promoter region. Bcc genome-wide analyses were performed to investigate the major evolutionary trends taking place in the σ70 family of these bacteria. Results Twenty σ70 paralogous genes were detected in the Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (Bcen-J2315 genome, of which 14 were of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function group. Non-ECF paralogs were related to primary (rpoD, alternative primary, stationary phase (rpoS, flagellin biosynthesis (fliA, and heat shock (rpoH factors. The number of σ70 genetic determinants among this genome was of 2,86 per Mb. This number is lower than the one of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a species found in similar habitats including CF lungs. These two bacterial groups showed strikingly different σ70 family architectures, with only three ECF paralogs in common (fecI-like, pvdS and algU. Bcen-J2315 σ70 paralogs showed clade-specific distributions. Some paralogs appeared limited to the ET12 epidemic clone (ecfA2, particular Bcc species (sigI, the Burkholderia genus (ecfJ, ecfF, and sigJ, certain proteobacterial groups (ecfA1, ecfC, ecfD, ecfE, ecfG, ecfL, ecfM and rpoS, or were broadly distributed in the eubacteria (ecfI, ecfK, ecfH, ecfB, and rpoD-, rpoH-, fliA-like genes. Genomic instability of this gene family was driven by chromosomal inversion (ecfA2, recent duplication events (ecfA and RpoD, localized (ecfG and large scale deletions (sig

  15. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970318 A study on evoked potentials in cor pul-monale patients with chronic respiratory failure.QIAO Hui(乔慧), et al. Beijing Neurosurg Instit,Beijing, 100050. Chin J Geriatr 1997; 16(1): 43-45. Objective: Evoked protential was used to detect thechange of brain function in cor pulmonale patients with

  16. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    6.1 Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma2004073 A study on the heterogenous apoptosis of lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils from peripheral blood of asthmatic patients. LIU Chuntao (刘春涛), et al. West China Hosp, Sichuan Univ, Chengdu 610041. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2003; 26(10):610 - 614.

  17. Characterization of integrons in Burkholderia cepacia clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Furlanis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic pathogen able to colonize the airways of Cystic Fibrosis (CF patients, frequently developing chronic infections. In 20% of cases these infections cause severe and poorly controlled pathological situations because of the intrinsic antibiotic resistance expressed by the microorganism. CF patients are often subjected to antibiotic therapy: this facilitates the acquisition of antibiotic resistance determinants by the infecting bacteria. Integrons are mobile genetic elements that are widespread in bacterial populations and favor the acquisition of gene cassettes coding for these determinants.The presence of class 1 integrons was investigated by PCR with primers specific for the 5’ and 3’ ends in Burkholderia isolates recovered from patients in treatment at the CF center of Friuli Venezia Giulia. The same integron, carrying an uncommon allelic form (Ib of the aacA4 gene in its cassette array and conferring resistance to some aminoglycosides, was found in two independent isolates (different RAPD profiles infecting two different patients. In both isolates the integron was carried by plasmids and was still present 3 and 6 years later the first finding. Despite the exchange of integrons between bacterial pathogens is fully described, these items were not frequently found in Burkholderia isolates. Although the clinical relevance of the integron we identified is low (a single gene cassette encoding a widespread resistance,we feel concerned that these genetic elements begin to circulate in this bacterial species, as this could make more and more troublesome the treatment of infections notoriously difficult to eradicate.

  18. Biosynthesis of antifungal and antibacterial polyketides by Burkholderia gladioli in coculture with Rhizopus microsporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Claudia; Opel, Viktoria; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Fungi-bacteria interactions can impact the course of fungal infection and biotechnological use. The mucoralean fungus Rhizopus microsporus, traditionally used in food fermentations (tempe and sufu), is frequently accompanied by Burkholderia gladioli pv. cocovenenans. When producing tempe bongkrek, the bacterial contamination can lead to lethal food-related intoxications caused by the respiratory toxin bongkrekic acid. To unveil the metabolic potential of the fungus-associated bacterium, we sequenced its genome, assigned secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters and monitored the metabolic profile under various growth conditions. In addition to the bongkrekic acid biosynthesis gene cluster we found gene clusters coding for the biosynthesis of toxoflavin and a complex polyketide. The orphan polyketide synthase gene cluster was activated under conditions that emulate tempe production, which enabled isolation and structure elucidation of four members of the enacyloxin family of antibiotics, out of which one is new. Moreover, we found that the fungus positively influences the growth of the bacteria and dramatically increases bongkrekic acid production in stationary culture, which inhibits the growth of the fungus. These results showcase the context-dependent formation of antifungal and antibacterial agents at the fungal-bacterial interface, which may also serve as a model for scenarios observed in mixed infections.

  19. Accurate and rapid identification of the Burkholderia pseudomallei near-neighbour, Burkholderia ubonensis, using real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    Full Text Available Burkholderia ubonensis is an environmental bacterium belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc, a group of genetically related organisms that are associated with opportunistic but generally nonfatal infections in healthy individuals. In contrast, the near-neighbour species Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease that can be fatal in up to 95% of cases if left untreated. B. ubonensis is frequently misidentified as B. pseudomallei from soil samples using selective culturing on Ashdown's medium, reflecting both the shared environmental niche and morphological similarities of these species. Additionally, B. ubonensis shows potential as an important biocontrol agent in B. pseudomallei-endemic regions as certain strains possess antagonistic properties towards B. pseudomallei. Current methods for characterising B. ubonensis are laborious, time-consuming and costly, and as such this bacterium remains poorly studied. The aim of our study was to develop a rapid and inexpensive real-time PCR-based assay specific for B. ubonensis. We demonstrate that a novel B. ubonensis-specific assay, Bu550, accurately differentiates B. ubonensis from B. pseudomallei and other species that grow on selective Ashdown's agar. We anticipate that Bu550 will catalyse research on B. ubonensis by enabling rapid identification of this organism from Ashdown's-positive colonies that are not B. pseudomallei.

  20. Functional Characterization of OXA-57, a Class D β-Lactamase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Karen E.; Oyston, Petra C.; Crossett, Ben; Fairweather, Neil F.; Titball, Richard W.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Brown, Katherine A.

    2005-01-01

    Class D β-lactamase OXA-57 was identified in a range of isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis. Comparative kinetic analyses of wild-type and mutant forms of B. pseudomallei OXA-57 are reported. Implications of these data for β-lactam resistance and the proposed role of Ser-104 in β-lactam hydrolysis are discussed.

  1. Burkholderia bacteria infectiously induce the proto-farming symbiosis of Dictyostelium amoebae and food bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Susanne; Haselkorn, Tamara S; Bashir, Usman; Jimenez, Daniela; Brock, Debra A; Queller, David C; Strassmann, Joan E

    2015-09-01

    Symbiotic associations can allow an organism to acquire novel traits by accessing the genetic repertoire of its partner. In the Dictyostelium discoideum farming symbiosis, certain amoebas (termed "farmers") stably associate with bacterial partners. Farmers can suffer a reproductive cost but also gain beneficial capabilities, such as carriage of bacterial food (proto-farming) and defense against competitors. Farming status previously has been attributed to amoeba genotype, but the role of bacterial partners in its induction has not been examined. Here, we explore the role of bacterial associates in the initiation, maintenance, and phenotypic effects of the farming symbiosis. We demonstrate that two clades of farmer-associated Burkholderia isolates colonize D. discoideum nonfarmers and infectiously endow them with farmer-like characteristics, indicating that Burkholderia symbionts are a major driver of the farming phenomenon. Under food-rich conditions, Burkholderia-colonized amoebas produce fewer spores than uncolonized counterparts, with the severity of this reduction being dependent on the Burkholderia colonizer. However, the induction of food carriage by Burkholderia colonization may be considered a conditionally adaptive trait because it can confer an advantage to the amoeba host when grown in food-limiting conditions. We observed Burkholderia inside and outside colonized D. discoideum spores after fruiting body formation; this observation, together with the ability of Burkholderia to colonize new amoebas, suggests a mixed mode of symbiont transmission. These results change our understanding of the D. discoideum farming symbiosis by establishing that the bacterial partner, Burkholderia, is an important causative agent of the farming phenomenon.

  2. Respiratory Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  3. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    7.1 Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma2003306 Effects of vaccae on airway contraction and inflammation in asthmatic guinea pigs. ZHAO Xiao(赵晓燕), et al. Zhejiang Respir Drug Res Lab Med Sch, Zhejiang Univ, Hangzhou 310031. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2003;26(4):218-222.Objective: To study the effects of Mycobacterium vaccae(M. vaccae)on the lung function, airway hyper-

  4. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    7.1 Upper Respiratory Tract Diesase And Bronchial Asthma 2007072 Dysfunction of releasing adrenaline in asthmatic adrenaline medullary chromaffin cells due to functional redundancy primed by nerve growth factor. WANG Jun(汪俊), et al. Dept Resp Dis Xiangya Hosp Central South Univ, Changsha 410008. Chin J Tuberc Dis 2006;29(12):812-815. Objective To investigate the possible causes of the dysfunction of adrenaline release in asthma rats and to identify the role of nerve growth factor(NGF) in this process.

  5. Respiratory System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    8.1 Respiratory failure2007204 Comparison of the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers and low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. WANG Xiaozhi(王晓芝),et al. Dept Respir & Intensive Care Unit, Binzhou Med Coll, Binzhou 256603. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2007;30(1):44-47. Objective To compare the effects of BiPAP ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(LRM) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods A prospective, randomized comparison of BiPAP mechanical ventilation combined with lung recruitment maneuvers(test group) with low tidal volume A/C ventilation (control group) was conducted in 28 patients with ARDS. FiO2/PaO2 ratio, respiratory system compliance(Cs), central venous pressure (CVP), duration of ventilation support were recorded at 0 h, 48 h and 72 h separately. The ventilation associated lung injury and mortality at 28 d were also recorded. Results The FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (298±16) and (309±16) cm H2O, Cs were (38.4±2.2) and (42.0±1.3) ml/cm H2O, CVP were (13.8±0.8) and (11.6±0.7) cm H2O in the test group at 48 h and 72 h separately. In the control group, FiO2/PaO2 ratio were (212±12) and (246±17) cm H2O, Cs were (29.5±1.3) and (29.0±1.0) ml/cm H2O, CVP were 18.6±1.1 and (16.8±1.0) cm H2O. The results were better in the test group as compared with the control group (t=10.03-29. 68, all P<0.01). The duration of ventilation support in the test group was shorter than the control group [(14±3) d vs (19±3)d, t=4.80, P<0.01]. The mortality in 28 d and ventilation associated lung injury were similar in the two groups. Conclusion The results show that combination of LRM with BiPAP mode ventilation, as compared with the control group, contributes to the improved FiO2/PaO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, stable homodynamic and shorter duration of ventilation support in patients with ARDs.

  6. Burkholderia glumae EN EL CULTIVO DE ARROZ EN COSTA RICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Quesada-Gonz\\u00E1lez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae en el cultivo de arroz en Costa Rica. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la presencia de Burkholderia glumae en arroz en Costa Rica. La bacteria Burkholderia glumae está asociada al cultivo del arroz en el que provoca la enfermedad llamada añublo bacterial. Bajo condiciones ambientales favorables, la densidad bacteriana aumenta, lo que provoca que, bajo un sistema de regulación denominado quorum sensing, se expresen sus mecanismos de virulencia mediante la activación de genes responsables para la síntesis de la toxoflavina, que bloquea el flujo de nutrientes, para la biogénesis de flagelos y la respuesta quimiotáctica, y la producción de la enzima catalasa. Las plantas desarrollan la sintomatología que finalmente conlleva a un vaneamiento del grano provocando pérdidas económicas importantes. Se investigó la situación referente a la contaminación del grano de arroz causado por esta bacteria en Costa Rica durante los años 2009 y 2010, mediante un convenio entre la Corporación Nacional Arrocera y el Laboratorio de Fitopatología del Centro de Investigación en Protección de Cultivos de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Se usó la metodología de PCR de punto final recomendada por investigadores del Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical en Colombia y se reforzó la identificación, por medio de técnicas de microbiología convencional. Se obtuvieron resultados que indican la presencia de la bacteria en Costa Rica, la primera información sobre la prevalencia de un fitopatógeno bacteriano de gran importancia para el sector arrocero.

  7. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930118 Facial or nasal mask pressure supportventilation in managing acute exacerbation ofchronic respiratory failure in COPD patients.CHEN Rongchang(陈荣昌),et al.GuangzhouInstit Respir Dis,Guangzhou 510120.Chin Tu-berc & Respir Dis 1992;15(5)285-287.Eleven COPD patients(age:65±9 yrs)withacute exacerbation of chronic respiratory failure(PaCO2 11.3±1.1kPa)were treated with maskpressure support ventilation,another 10 similarpatients(age:68±12yrs)served as controls.Bi-PAP ventilator was used with the followingmodifications:(1)Non-rehreathing valve set-in proximal to mask;(2)5 LPM oxygen flow de-livered into mask to reduce the dead space ef-fect.Mask ventilation was given 2-3 hours ev-ery time and 1-2 times daily for 7 days.Syn-

  8. Capsule influences the deposition of critical complement C3 levels required for the killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei via NADPH-oxidase induction by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Michael E; Worth, Randall G; Wooten, R Mark

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and is a major mediator of sepsis in its endemic areas. Because of the low LD(50) via aerosols and resistance to multiple antibiotics, it is considered a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC and APHIS. B. pseudomallei is an encapsulated bacterium that can infect, multiply, and persist within a variety of host cell types. In vivo studies suggest that macrophages and neutrophils are important for controlling B. pseudomallei infections, however few details are known regarding how neutrophils respond to these bacteria. Our goal is to describe the capacity of human neutrophils to control highly virulent B. pseudomallei compared to the relatively avirulent, acapsular B. thailandensis using in vitro analyses. B. thailandensis was more readily phagocytosed than B. pseudomallei, but both displayed similar rates of persistence within neutrophils, indicating they possess similar inherent abilities to escape neutrophil clearance. Serum opsonization studies showed that both were resistant to direct killing by complement, although B. thailandensis acquired significantly more C3 on its surface than B. pseudomallei, whose polysaccharide capsule significantly decreased the levels of complement deposition on the bacterial surface. Both Burkholderia species showed significantly enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils after critical levels of C3 were deposited. Serum-opsonized Burkholderia induced a significant respiratory burst by neutrophils compared to unopsonized bacteria, and neutrophil killing was prevented by inhibiting NADPH-oxidase. In summary, neutrophils can efficiently kill B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis that possess a critical threshold of complement deposition, and the relative differences in their ability to resist surface opsonization may contribute to the distinct virulence phenotypes observed in vivo.

  9. Capsule influences the deposition of critical complement C3 levels required for the killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei via NADPH-oxidase induction by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Woodman

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis and is a major mediator of sepsis in its endemic areas. Because of the low LD(50 via aerosols and resistance to multiple antibiotics, it is considered a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC and APHIS. B. pseudomallei is an encapsulated bacterium that can infect, multiply, and persist within a variety of host cell types. In vivo studies suggest that macrophages and neutrophils are important for controlling B. pseudomallei infections, however few details are known regarding how neutrophils respond to these bacteria. Our goal is to describe the capacity of human neutrophils to control highly virulent B. pseudomallei compared to the relatively avirulent, acapsular B. thailandensis using in vitro analyses. B. thailandensis was more readily phagocytosed than B. pseudomallei, but both displayed similar rates of persistence within neutrophils, indicating they possess similar inherent abilities to escape neutrophil clearance. Serum opsonization studies showed that both were resistant to direct killing by complement, although B. thailandensis acquired significantly more C3 on its surface than B. pseudomallei, whose polysaccharide capsule significantly decreased the levels of complement deposition on the bacterial surface. Both Burkholderia species showed significantly enhanced uptake and killing by neutrophils after critical levels of C3 were deposited. Serum-opsonized Burkholderia induced a significant respiratory burst by neutrophils compared to unopsonized bacteria, and neutrophil killing was prevented by inhibiting NADPH-oxidase. In summary, neutrophils can efficiently kill B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis that possess a critical threshold of complement deposition, and the relative differences in their ability to resist surface opsonization may contribute to the distinct virulence phenotypes observed in vivo.

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 ref|ZP_01560354.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_5869 [Burkholderia... cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV62210.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_5869 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01560354.1 0.002 26% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-1691 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-1691 ref|YP_001773964.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03_6354 [Burkholderia... cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|ACA95469.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] YP_001773964.1 2e-67 45% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-1259 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-1259 ref|ZP_01559985.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV61841.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01559985.1 1e-19 42% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-09-0007 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-09-0007 ref|YP_621794.1| hypothetical protein Bcen_1918 [Burkholderia cen...ocepacia AU 1054] gb|ABF76821.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia AU 1054] YP_621794.1 1e-53 70% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-1684 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-1684 ref|YP_838849.1| Haemagluttinin domain protein [Burkholderia ceno...cepacia HI2424] gb|ABK11956.1| Haemagluttinin domain protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia HI2424] YP_838849.1 0.001 27% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 ref|ZP_01561792.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV60539.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01561792.1 0.004 27% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1290 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1290 ref|ZP_01562587.1| uracil-xanthine permease [Burkholderia cenocep...acia MC0-3] gb|EAV59325.1| uracil-xanthine permease [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01562587.1 2e-94 68% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0072 ref|ZP_01567096.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV54827.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01567096.1 3e-05 26% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-0284 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-0284 ref|YP_002233319.1| putative lipoprotein [Burkholderia cenocepaci...a J2315] emb|CAR54555.1| putative lipoprotein [Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315] YP_002233319.1 8e-96 64% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-0154 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-0154 ref|ZP_01567157.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV54750.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01567157.1 0.030 31% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0143 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0143 ref|ZP_01560289.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV62145.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01560289.1 0.001 27% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0763 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0763 ref|YP_623013.1| Haemagluttinin motif protein [Burkholderia cenoc...epacia AU 1054] gb|ABF78040.1| Haemagluttinin motif protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia AU 1054] YP_623013.1 3e-71 28% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2343 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2343 ref|YP_626365.1| Outer membrane autotransporter barrel [Burkholderia... cenocepacia AU 1054] gb|ABF81392.1| Outer membrane autotransporter barrel [Burkholderia cenocepacia AU 1054] YP_626365.1 6e-04 29% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0718 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0718 ref|YP_838849.1| Haemagluttinin domain protein [Burkholderia ceno...cepacia HI2424] gb|ABK11956.1| Haemagluttinin domain protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia HI2424] YP_838849.1 4e-85 26% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRE-01-0787 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0787 ref|YP_840388.1| PE-PGRS family protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia... HI2424] gb|ABK13495.1| PE-PGRS family protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia HI2424] YP_840388.1 7e-04 28% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0283 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0283 ref|YP_840388.1| PE-PGRS family protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia... HI2424] gb|ABK13495.1| PE-PGRS family protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia HI2424] YP_840388.1 2e-09 26% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0143 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0143 ref|ZP_01564992.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_7449 [Burkholder...ia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV57107.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_7449 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01564992.1 0.002 23% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-1085 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-1085 ref|ZP_01559985.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV61841.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01559985.1 2e-58 63% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-0739 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-0739 ref|YP_626364.1| PE-PGRS family protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia... AU 1054] gb|ABF81391.1| PE-PGRS family protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia AU 1054] YP_626364.1 5e-10 26% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0738 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0738 ref|ZP_01567160.1| Haemagluttinin motif [Burkholderia cenocepacia... MC0-3] gb|EAV54748.1| Haemagluttinin motif [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01567160.1 4e-24 29% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-08-0031 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-08-0031 ref|YP_838849.1| Haemagluttinin domain protein [Burkholderia ceno...cepacia HI2424] gb|ABK11956.1| Haemagluttinin domain protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia HI2424] YP_838849.1 3e-09 31% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1362 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1362 ref|ZP_01564035.1| 200 kDa antigen p200, putative [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV58079.1| 200 kDa antigen p200, putative [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01564035.1 7e-36 33% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-01-0065 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-01-0065 ref|ZP_01559985.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia c...enocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV61841.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01559985.1 8e-50 46% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-23-0023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-23-0023 ref|YP_840446.1| YadA C-terminal domain protein [Burkholderia cen...ocepacia HI2424] gb|ABK13553.1| YadA C-terminal domain protein [Burkholderia cenocepacia HI2424] YP_840446.1 1.0 31% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0179 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0179 ref|ZP_01560690.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2689 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV61335.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2689 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01560690.1 3e-07 28% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-2512 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-2512 ref|ZP_01560879.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2878 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV61524.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2878 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01560879.1 0.005 27% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2967 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2967 ref|ZP_01566576.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_1196 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV55453.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_1196 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01566576.1 4e-25 22% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-0851 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-0851 ref|ZP_01560690.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2689 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV61335.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2689 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01560690.1 0.039 33% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-03-0017 ref|ZP_01562088.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2302 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV60091.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2302 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01562088.1 4e-04 26% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-01-0052 ref|ZP_01564777.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_4887 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV57364.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_4887 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01564777.1 5e-05 28% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-0154 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-0154 ref|ZP_01560690.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2689 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV61335.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_2689 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01560690.1 0.039 33% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OCUN-01-1280 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OCUN-01-1280 ref|ZP_01566981.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_7238 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV54955.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_7238 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01566981.1 1.1 38% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3129 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3129 ref|ZP_01566576.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_1196 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV55453.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_1196 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01566576.1 2e-37 47% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0105 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0105 ref|ZP_01566576.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_1196 [Burkh...olderia cenocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV55453.1| hypothetical protein Bcenmc03DRAFT_1196 [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01566576.1 4e-12 21% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0227 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0227 ref|ZP_01566546.1| Collagen triple helix repeat [Burkholderia cen...ocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV55423.1| Collagen triple helix repeat [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01566546.1 2e-18 52% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-01-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-01-0025 ref|ZP_01566546.1| Collagen triple helix repeat [Burkholderia cen...ocepacia MC0-3] gb|EAV55423.1| Collagen triple helix repeat [Burkholderia cenocepacia MC0-3] ZP_01566546.1 8e-15 33% ...

  6. Exploring the HME and HAE1 efflux systems in the genus Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasca Maria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Burkholderia includes a variety of species with opportunistic human pathogenic strains, whose increasing global resistance to antibiotics has become a public health problem. In this context a major role could be played by multidrug efflux pumps belonging to Resistance Nodulation Cell-Division (RND family, which allow bacterial cells to extrude a wide range of different substrates, including antibiotics. This study aims to i identify rnd genes in the 21 available completely sequenced Burkholderia genomes, ii analyze their phylogenetic distribution, iii define the putative function(s that RND proteins perform within the Burkholderia genus and iv try tracing the evolutionary history of some of these genes in Burkholderia. Results BLAST analysis of the 21 Burkholderia sequenced genomes, using experimentally characterized ceoB sequence (one of the RND family counterpart in the genus Burkholderia as probe, allowed the assembly of a dataset comprising 254 putative RND proteins. An extensive phylogenetic analysis revealed the occurrence of several independent events of gene loss and duplication across the different lineages of the genus Burkholderia, leading to notable differences in the number of paralogs between different genomes. A putative substrate [antibiotics (HAE1 proteins/heavy-metal (HME proteins] was also assigned to the majority of these proteins. No correlation was found between the ecological niche and the lifestyle of Burkholderia strains and the number/type of efflux pumps they possessed, while a relation can be found with genome size and taxonomy. Remarkably, we observed that only HAE1 proteins are mainly responsible for the different number of proteins observed in strains of the same species. Data concerning both the distribution and the phylogenetic analysis of the HAE1 and HME in the Burkholderia genus allowed depicting a likely evolutionary model accounting for the evolution and spreading of HME and HAE

  7. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  8. Occupational Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Occupational Respiratory Disease Occupational Respiratory Disease Condition Occupational HealthPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share ...

  9. Inactivation of [Fe-S] metalloproteins mediates nitric oxide-dependent killing of Burkholderia mallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Jones-Carson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Much remains to be known about the mechanisms by which O(2-dependent host defenses mediate broad antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show herein that reactive nitrogen species (RNS generated by inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase (iNOS account for the anti-Burkholderia mallei activity of IFNgamma-primed macrophages. Inducible NOS-mediated intracellular killing may represent direct bactericidal activity, because B. mallei showed an exquisite sensitivity to NO generated chemically. Exposure of B. mallei to sublethal concentrations of NO upregulated transcription of [Fe-S] cluster repair genes, while damaging the enzymatic activity of the [Fe-S] protein aconitase. To test whether [Fe-S] clusters are critical targets for RNS-dependent killing of B. mallei, a mutation was constructed in the NO-induced, [Fe-S] cluster repair regulator iscR. Not only was the iscR mutant hypersusceptible to iNOS-mediated killing, but its aconitase pool was readily oxidized by NO donors as compared to wild-type controls. Although killed by authentic H(2O(2, which also oxidizes [Fe-S] clusters, B. mallei appear to be resilient to NADPH oxidase-mediated cytotoxicity. The poor respiratory burst elicited by this bacterium likely explains why the NADPH oxidase is nonessential to the killing of B. mallei while it is still confined within phagosomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these findings have revealed a disparate role for NADPH oxidase and iNOS in the innate macrophage response against the strict aerobe B. mallei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first instance in which disruption of [Fe-S] clusters is demonstrated as cause of the bactericidal activity of NO congeners.

  10. Profiling of Burkholderia cepacia secretome at mid-logarithmic and early-stationary phases of growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanitha Mariappan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia cepacia is a Gram-negative pathogen that causes serious respiratory infections in immunocompromised patients and individuals with cystic fibrosis. This bacterium is known to release extracellular proteins that may be involved in virulence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, B. cepacia grown to mid-logarithmic and early-stationary phases were investigated on their ability to invade and survive intracellularly in A549 lung epithelial cells in order to discern the fate of these bacteria in the pathogenesis of B. cepacia lung infections in in vitro condition. The early-stationary phase B. cepacia was demonstrated to be more invasive than mid-logarithmic phase. In addition, culture supernatants of B. cepacia obtained from these phases of growth were also demonstrated to cause different cytotoxic potency on the A549 human lung epithelial cells. Profiling of the supernatants using the gel-based proteomics approach identified 43 proteins that were commonly released in both the growth phases and 40 proteins newly-released at the early-stationary phase. The latter proteins may account for the higher cytotoxic activity of the early-stationary culture supernatant compared to that obtained at the mid-logarithmic phase. Among the newly-released proteins in the early-stationary phase supernatant were flagellar hook-associated domain protein (FliD, flagellar hook-associated protein (FlgK, TonB-dependent siderophore (Fiu, Elongation factor G (FusA, phosphoglycerate kinase (Pgk and sulfatase (AslA which are known for their virulence. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in the ability of B. cepacia to invade and survive intracellularly inside the epithelial cells at different phases of growth may improve our understanding of the varied disease progressions associated with B. cepacia infections. In addition, the identified culture supernatant proteins may be used as targets for the development of new strategies to

  11. BIOAUGMENTATION WITH BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA PR1301 FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot field study was conducted at the Moffett Federal Airfield, Mountain View, California, to determine whether effective in-situ aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of TCE could be accomplished through bioaugmentation with a genetically modified strain of Burkholderia cepacia ...

  12. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  13. Identification of Burkholderia spp. in the clinical microbiology laboratory: comparison of conventional and molecular methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van Pelt (Cindy); C.M. Verduin (Cees); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); M.C. Vos (Margreet); B. Tummler; C. Segonds; F. Reubsaet; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) predisposes patients to bacterial colonization and infection of the lower airways. Several species belonging to the genus Burkholderia are potential CF-related pathogens, but microbiological identification may be complicated. This situat

  14. Development of Galleria mellonella as an Alternative Infection Model for the Burkholderia cepacia Complex▿

    OpenAIRE

    Seed, Kimberley D.; Dennis, Jonathan J.

    2008-01-01

    Burkholderia is an important bacterial genus with a complex taxonomy that contains species of both ecological and pathogenic importance, including nine closely related species collectively termed the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). In order to more thoroughly investigate the virulence of this bacterial complex of microorganisms, alternative infection models would be useful. To this end, we have adapted and developed the use of the Galleria mellonella wax moth larvae as a host for examinin...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia cordobensis Type Strain LMG 27620, Isolated from Agricultural Soils in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Walter Omar; Mancini Villagra, Ulises M.; Wall, Luis Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Burkholderia are commonly found in diverse ecological niches in nature. We report here the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia cordobensis type strain LMG 27620, isolated from agricultural soil in Córdoba, Argentina. This strain harbors several genes involved in chitin utilization and phenol degradation, which make it an interesting candidate for biocontrol purposes and xenobiotic degradation in polluted environments. PMID:26494680

  16. Determining the Biochemical Properties of the Oxalate Biosynthetic Component (Obc)1 from Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Peter M.; Nakata, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Oxalic acid is produced by a variety of organisms ranging from simple microbes to complex animals. This acid has been proposed to fulfill various physiological and pathological functions which vary between organisms. In bacteria from the Burkholderia genus, oxalate secretion has been shown to be quorum sensing dependent and to support pathogenicity and cell viability. In light of the critical roles of oxalate in Burkholderia as well as other organisms, it is surprising that our understanding ...

  17. Type VI Secretion is a Major Virulence Determinant in Burkholderia Mallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    infections can also occur in felines , camels and goats. Humans are accidental hosts of B. mallei and the majority of cases have been the result of...occupational contact with infected horses. Whereas equines are generally infected orally , the primary route of infection in humans is contamination of skin...Effects of Burkholderia pseudomallei and other Burkholderia species on eukarotic cells in tissue culture. Microbios 96: 71–93. Holm, M.M., Vanlerberg, S.L

  18. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils.

  20. Isolation and Identification of Burkholderia glumae from Symptomless Rice Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A survey on isolation and detection of the casual organism of bacterial grain rot of rice was conducted during 1997-2006.In 2006,six pathogenic bacterial strains were isolated from two symptomiess seed samples of rice (Oryza sativa L.) originally produced in Hainan Province and then planted in Zhejiang Province,China.They were identified as Burkholderia glumae which is the causal organism of bacterial grain rot of rice by physiological characteristics,colony morphology,pathogenicity test,Biolog,fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis and RAPD-PCR compared with the four standard reference strains.It is confirmed that there is the infection of B.glumae in so-called 'health looking seeds'.

  1. Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulation of Virulence Gene Expression: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sílvia A.; Feliciano, Joana R.; Pita, Tiago; Guerreiro, Soraia I.; Leitão, Jorge H.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria emerged as opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. Their eradication is very difficult due to the high level of intrinsic resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Bcc bacteria have large and complex genomes, composed of two to four replicons, with variable numbers of insertion sequences. The complexity of Bcc genomes confers a high genomic plasticity to these bacteria, allowing their adaptation and survival to diverse habitats, including the human host. In this work, we review results from recent studies using omics approaches to elucidate in vivo adaptive strategies and virulence gene regulation expression of Bcc bacteria when infecting the human host or subject to conditions mimicking the stressful environment of the cystic fibrosis lung. PMID:28106859

  2. Glanders: off to the races with Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Gregory C; Estes, D Mark; Torres, Alfredo G

    2007-12-01

    Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of the disease known as glanders, is primarily a disease affecting horses and is transmitted to humans by direct contact with infected animals. The use of B. mallei as a biological weapon has been reported and currently, there is no vaccine available for either humans or animals. Despite the history and highly infective nature of B. mallei, as well as its potential use as a bio-weapon, B. mallei research to understand the pathogenesis and the host responses to infection remains limited. Therefore, this minireview will focus on current efforts to elucidate B. mallei virulence, the associated host immune responses elicited during infection and discuss the feasibility of vaccine development.

  3. Development of ceftazidime resistance in an acute Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarovich DS

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Derek S Sarovich,1,2,* Erin P Price,1,2,* Direk Limmathurotsakul,3 James M Cook,1 Alex T Von Schulze,1 Spenser R Wolken,1 Paul Keim,1 Sharon J Peacock,3,4 Talima Pearson1 1Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA; 2Tropical and Emerging Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Australia; 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterium that causes the disease melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. First-line antibiotic therapy for treating melioidosis is usually the synthetic β-lactam, ceftazidime (CAZ, as almost all B. pseudomallei strains are susceptible to this drug. However, acquired CAZ resistance can develop in vivo during treatment with CAZ, which can lead to mortality if therapy is not switched to a different drug in a timely manner. Serial B. pseudomallei isolates obtained from an acute Thai melioidosis patient infected by a CAZ susceptible strain, who ultimately succumbed to infection despite being on CAZ therapy for the duration of their infection, were analyzed. Isolates that developed CAZ resistance due to a proline to serine change at position 167 in the β-lactamase PenA were identified. Importantly, these CAZ resistant isolates remained sensitive to the alternative melioidosis treatments; namely, amoxicillin-clavulanate, imipenem, and meropenem. Lastly, real-time polymerase chain reaction-based assays capable of rapidly identifying CAZ resistance in B. pseudomallei isolates at the position 167 mutation site were developed. The ability to rapidly identify the emergence of CAZ resistant B. pseudomallei populations in melioidosis patients will allow timely alterations in treatment strategies

  4. Burkholderia glumae en el cultivo de arroz en Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Quesada-González

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la presencia de Burkholderia glumae en arroz en Costa Rica. La bacteria Burkholderia glumae está asociada al cultivo del arroz en el que provoca la enfermedad llamada añublo bacterial. Bajo condiciones ambientales favorables, la densidad bacteriana aumenta, lo que provoca que, bajo un sistema de regulación denominado quorum sensing, se expresen sus mecanismos de virulencia mediante la activación de genes responsables para la síntesis de la toxoflavina, que bloquea el flujo de nutrientes, para la biogénesis de flagelos y la respuesta quimiotáctica, y la producción de la enzima catalasa. Las plantas desarrollan la sintomatología que finalmente conlleva a un vaneamiento del grano provocando pérdidas económicas importantes. Se investigó la situación referente a la contaminación del grano de arroz causado por esta bacteria en Costa Rica durante los años 2009 y 2010, mediante un convenio entre la Corporación Nacional Arrocera y el Laboratorio de Fitopatología del Centro de Investigación en Protección de Cultivos de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Se usó la metodología de PCR de punto final recomendada por investigadores del Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical en Colombia y se reforzó la identificación, por medio de técnicas de microbiología convencional. Se obtuvieron resultados que indican la presencia de la bacteria en Costa Rica, la primera información sobre la prevalencia de un fitopatógeno bacteriano de gran importancia para el sector arrocero.

  5. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei stimulate differential inflammatory responses from human alveolar type II cells (ATII and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eLu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar type II pneumocytes (ATII and alveolar macrophages (AM play a crucial role in the lung’s innate immune response. Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP and Burkholderia mallei (BM are facultative Gram-negative bacilli that cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. The inhalation of these pathogens can cause lethal disease and death in humans. We sought to compare the pathogenesis of and host responses to BP and BM through contact with human primary ATII cells and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDM. We hypothesized that because BP and BM induce different disease outcomes, each pathogen would induce distinct, unique host immune responses from resident pulmonary cells. Our findings showed that BP adhered readily to ATII cells compared to BM. BP, but not BM, was rapidly internalized by macrophages where it replicated to high numbers. Further, BP induced significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from ATII cells (IL-6, IL-8 and macrophages (IL-6, TNFα at 6h post-infection compared to BM (p<0.05. Interestingly, BM induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in ATII cells and macrophages at 6h post-infection, with delayed induction of inflammatory cytokines at 24h post-infection. Because BP is flagellated and produces LPS, we confirmed that it stimulated both Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 and TLR5 via NF-κb activation while the non-flagellated BM stimulated only TLR4. These data show the differences in BP and BM pathogenicity in the lung when infecting human ATII cells and macrophages and demonstrate the ability of these pathogens to elicit distinct immune responses from resident lung cells which may open new targets for therapeutic intervention to fight against these pathogens.

  6. Oxalotrophy, a widespread trait of plant-associated Burkholderia species, is involved in successful root colonization of lupin and maize by Burkholderia phytofirmans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKost

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots and shoots harbour complex bacterial communities. Early seed and plantlet colonization plays a key role in determining which bacterial populations will successfully invade plant tissues, yet the mechanisms enabling plants to select for beneficial rather than harmful populations are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a role of oxalate as a determinant in this selection process, using members of the genus Burkholderia as model organisms. Oxalotrophy, i.e. the ability to use oxalate as a carbon source, was found to be a property strictly associated with plant-beneficial species of the Burkholderia genus, while plant pathogenic (B. glumae, B. plantarii or human opportunistic pathogens (Burkholderia cepacia complex strains were unable to degrade oxalate. We further show that oxalotrophy is required for successful plant colonization by the broad host endophyte Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN: an engineered Δoxc mutant, which lost the ability to grow on oxalate, was significantly impaired in early colonization of both lupin and maize compared with the wild-type. This work suggests that in addition to the role of oxalate in heavy metal tolerance of plants and in virulence of phytopathogenic fungi, it is also involved in specifically recruiting plant-beneficial members from complex bacterial communities.

  7. Respiratory Development and Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubarth, Lori Baas; Quinn, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory development is crucial for all newborn infants. Premature infants may be born at an early stage of development and lack sufficient surfactant production. This results in respiratory distress syndrome. This article reviews the normal fetal development of the lung as well as the disorder that develops because of an early birth.

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung condition that ...

  9. Unusual distribution of Burkholderia cepacia complex species in Danish cystic fibrosis clinics may stem from restricted transmission between patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Fenger, Mette G;

    2010-01-01

    Forty-four of 48 Burkholderia cepacia complex strains cultured from Danish cystic fibrosis patients were Burkholderia multivorans, a distribution of species that has not been reported before. Although cases of cross infections were demonstrated, no major epidemic clone was found. The species...... distribution may represent the sporadic acquisition of bacteria from the environment....

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1, a Methylarsenate-Reducing Bacterial Isolate from Florida Golf Course Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Pawitwar, Shashank S.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the environmental organoarsenical biocycle, we isolated a soil organism, Burkholderia sp. MR1, which reduces relatively nontoxic pentavalent methylarsenate to the more toxic trivalent methylarsenite, with the goal of identifying the gene for the reductase. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1, a Methylarsenate-Reducing Bacterial Isolate from Florida Golf Course Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawitwar, Shashank S.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; Yoshinaga, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the environmental organoarsenical biocycle, we isolated a soil organism, Burkholderia sp. MR1, which reduces relatively nontoxic pentavalent methylarsenate to the more toxic trivalent methylarsenite, with the goal of identifying the gene for the reductase. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. MR1. PMID:26044439

  12. A Possible Link between Infection with Burkholderia Bacteria and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Based on Epitope Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that purified polyclonal and monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibodies bind a 15-mer peptide ASPVTARVLWKASHV in ELISA and Dot blot. This 15-mer peptide partial sequence ARVLWKASH shares similarity with burkholderia bacterial cytochrome B 561 partial sequence ARVLWRATH. In this study, we show that purified anti-dsDNA antibodies react with burkholderia fungorum bacterial cell lysates in Western blot. We used anti-dsDNA antibodies to make an anti-dsDNA antibodies affinity column and used this column to purify the burkholderia fungorum bacterial protein. Purified anti-dsDNA antibodies bind specifically to purified bacterial antigen and purified bacterial antigen blocked the anti-dsDNA antibodies binding to dsDNA antigen. Sera with anti-dsDNA antibodies bind specifically to purified bacterial antigen. We obtained protein partial sequence of RAGTDEGFG which is shared with burkholderia bacterial transcription regulator protein sequence. Sera with anti-dsDNA antibodies bind to RAGTDEGFG peptide better than control groups. These data support our hypothesis that the origin of anti-dsDNA antibodies in SLE may be associated with burkholderia bacterial infection.

  13. Prevalence and Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Near-Neighbor Species in the Malabar Coastal Region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddayelachagiri, Bhavani V; Paul, Soumya; Nagaraj, Sowmya; Gogoi, Madhurjya; Sripathy, Murali H; Batra, Harsh V

    2016-09-01

    Accurate identification of pathogens with biowarfare importance requires detection tools that specifically differentiate them from near-neighbor species. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of a fatal disease melioidosis, is one such biothreat agent whose differentiation from its near-neighbor species is always a challenge. This is because of its phenotypic similarity with other Burkholderia species which have a wide spread geographical distribution with shared environmental niches. Melioidosis is a major public health concern in endemic regions including Southeast Asia and northern Australia. In India, the disease is still considered to be emerging. Prevalence surveys of this saprophytic bacterium in environment are under-reported in the country. A major challenge in this case is the specific identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei from the growing list of species of Burkholderia genus. The objectives of this study included examining the prevalence of B. pseudomallei and near-neighbor species in coastal region of South India and development of a novel detection tool for specific identification and differentiation of Burkholderia species. Briefly, we analyzed soil and water samples collected from Malabar coastal region of Kerala, South India for prevalence of B. pseudomallei. The presumptive Burkholderia isolates were identified using recA PCR assay. The recA PCR assay identified 22 of the total 40 presumptive isolates as Burkholderia strains (22.72% and 77.27% B. pseudomallei and non-pseudomallei Burkholderia respectively). In order to identify each isolate screened, we performed recA and 16S rDNA sequencing. This two genes sequencing revealed that the presumptive isolates included B. pseudomallei, non-pseudomallei Burkholderia as well as non-Burkholderia strains. Furthermore, a gene termed D-beta hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (bdha) was studied both in silico and in vitro for accurate detection of Burkholderia genus. The optimized bdha

  14. Burkholderia pseudomallei: First case of melioidosis in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pelerito

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacillus and the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infection associated with high mortality rate in humans. It can be naturally found as an environmental saprophyte in soil or stagnant water, and rice paddies that predominate in regions of endemicity such as Northeast Thailand. B. pseudomallei is a Biosafety Level 3 organism due to risks of aerosolization and severe disease and is now included in formal emergency preparedness plans and guidelines issued by various authorities in the United States and Europe. Here, we report the first case of imported melioidosis in Portugal. B. pseudomallei was isolated from the patient's blood as well as from a left gluteal abscess pus. The isolate strain showed the unusual resistance profile to first-line eradication therapy trimethroprim/sulfamethoxazole. Whole genome sequencing revealed its similarity with isolates from Southeast Asia, suggesting the Thai origin of this Portuguese isolate, which is in agreement with a recent patient's travel to Thailand.

  15. Genetic diversity and microevolution of Burkholderia pseudomallei in the environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narisara Chantratita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The soil dwelling Gram-negative pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis. The diversity and population structure of this organism in the environment is poorly defined. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We undertook a study of B. pseudomallei in soil sampled from 100 equally spaced points within 237.5 m(2 of disused land in northeast Thailand. B. pseudomallei was present on direct culture of 77/100 sampling points. Genotyping of 200 primary plate colonies from three independent sampling points was performed using a combination of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. Twelve PFGE types and nine sequence types (STs were identified, the majority of which were present at only a single sampling point. Two sampling points contained four STs and the third point contained three STs. Although the distance between the three sampling points was low (7.6, 7.9, and 13.3 meters, respectively, only two STs were present in more than one sampling point. Each of the three samples was characterized by the localized expansion of a single B. pseudomallei clone (corresponding to STs 185, 163, and 93. Comparison of PFGE and MLST results demonstrated that two STs contained strains with variable PFGE banding pattern types, indicating geographic structuring even within a single MLST-defined clone. CONCLUSIONS: We discuss the implications of this extreme structuring of genotype and genotypic frequency in terms of micro-evolutionary dynamics and ecology, and how our results may inform future sampling strategies.

  16. Mouse model of sublethal and lethal intraperitoneal glanders (Burkholderia mallei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, D L; Vogel, P; Brown, D R; Deshazer, D; Waag, D M

    2000-11-01

    Sixty male BALB/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with either a sublethal or a lethal dose of Burkholderia mallei China 7 strain, then killed at multiple time points postinoculation. Histopathologic changes were qualitatively similar in both groups and consisted of pyogranulomatous inflammation. In sublethal study mice, changes were first seen at 6 hours in mediastinal lymph nodes, then in spleen, liver, peripheral lymph nodes, and bone marrow at day 3. These changes generally reached maximal incidence and severity by day 4 but decreased by comparison in all tissues except the liver. Changes were first seen in lethal study mice also at 6 hours in mediastinal lymph nodes and in spleens. At day 1, changes were present in liver, peripheral lymph nodes, and bone marrow. The incidence and severity of these changes were maximal at day 2. In contrast to sublethal study mice, the incidence and severity of the changes did not decrease through the remainder of the study. The most significant difference between the two groups was the rapid involvement of the spleen in the lethal study mice. Changes indicative of impaired vascular perfusion were more frequently seen in the sublethal study mice. Our findings indicate that mice are susceptible to B. mallei infection and may serve as an appropriate model for glanders infection in a resistant host such as human beings. Additionally, by immunoelectron microscopy, we showed the presence of type I O-antigenic polysaccharide (capsular) antigen surrounding B. mallei.

  17. Incidence of Burkholderia mallei infection among indigenous equines in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Praveen; Singha, Harisankar; Goyal, Sachin K; Khurana, Sandip K; Tripathi, Badri Naryan; Dutt, Abha; Singh, Dabal; Sharma, Neeraj; Jain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders which is a highly contagious and fatal disease of equines. Considering the nature and severity of the disease in equines, and potential of transmission to human beings, glanders is recognised as a ‘notifiable’ disease in many countries. An increasing number of glanders outbreaks throughout the Asian continents, including India, have been noticed recently. In view of the recent re-emergence of the disease, the present study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of glanders among indigenous equines from different parts of India. Serum samples were analysed by complement fixation test (CFT) and ELISA for the detection of B mallei specific antibodies. A total of 7794 equines, which included 4720 horses, 1881 donkeys and 1193 mules were sampled from April 2011 to December 2014 from 10 states of India. Serologically, 36 equines (pony=7, mules=10, horses=19) were found to be positive for glanders by CFT and indirect-ELISA. The highest number of cases were detected in Uttar Pradesh (n=31) followed by Himachal Pradesh (n=4) and Chhattisgarh (n=1). Isolation of B mallei was attempted from nasal and abscess swabs collected from seropositive equines. Four isolates of B mallei were cultured from nasal swabs of two mules and two ponies. Identity of the isolates was confirmed by PCR and sequencing of fliP gene fragment. The study revealed circulation of B mallei in northern India and the need for continued surveillance to support the eradication. PMID:26457190

  18. Monitoring Therapeutic Treatments against Burkholderia Infections Using Imaging Techniques

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    Tiffany M. Mott

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, are Category B select agents with biothreat potential, and yet effective therapeutic treatments are lacking. In this study, we showed that CpG administration increased survival, demonstrating protection in the murine glanders model. Bacterial recovery from infected lungs, liver and spleen was significantly reduced in CpG-treated animals as compared with non-treated mice. Reciprocally, lungs of CpG-treated infected animals were infiltrated with higher levels of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes, as compared to control animals. Employing the B. mallei bioluminescent strain CSM001 and the Neutrophil-Specific Fluorescent Imaging Agent, bacterial dissemination and neutrophil trafficking were monitored in real-time using multimodal in vivo whole body imaging techniques. CpG-treatment increased recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs and reduced bioluminescent bacteria, correlating with decreased bacterial burden and increased protection against acute murine glanders. Our results indicate that protection of CpG-treated animals was associated with recruitment of neutrophils prior to infection and demonstrated, for the first time, simultaneous real time in vivo imaging of neutrophils and bacteria. This study provides experimental evidence supporting the importance of incorporating optimized in vivo imaging methods to monitor disease progression and to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic treatment during bacterial infections.

  19. Intrinsic Resistance of Burkholderia cepacia Complex to Benzalkonium Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Youngbeom; Kim, Jeong Myeong; Kweon, Ohgew; Kim, Seong-Jae; Jones, Richard C; Woodling, Kellie; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; LiPuma, John J; Hussong, David; Marasa, Bernard S; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2016-11-22

    Pharmaceutical products that are contaminated with Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) bacteria may pose serious consequences to vulnerable patients. Benzyldimethylalkylammonium chloride (BZK) cationic surfactants are extensively used in medical applications and have been implicated in the coselection of antimicrobial resistance. The ability of BCC to degrade BZK, tetradecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C14BDMA-Cl), dodecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C12BDMA-Cl), decyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C10BDMA-Cl), hexyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride, and benzyltrimethylammonium chloride was determined by incubation in 1/10-diluted tryptic soy broth (TSB) to determine if BCC bacteria have the ability to survive and inactivate these disinfectants. With BZK, C14BDMA-Cl, and C12BDMA-Cl, inhibition of the growth of 20 BCC strains was observed in disinfectant solutions that ranged from 64 to 256 µg/ml. The efflux pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone increased the sensitivity of bacteria to 64 µg/ml BZK. The 20 BCC strains grew well in 1/10-diluted TSB medium with BZK, C12BDMA-Cl, and C10BDMA-Cl; they absorbed and degraded the compounds in 7 days. Formation of benzyldimethylamine and benzylmethylamine as the initial metabolites suggested that the cleavage of the C alkyl-N bond occurred as the first step of BZK degradation by BCC bacteria. Proteomic data confirmed the observed efflux activity and metabolic inactivation via biodegradation in terms of BZK resistance of BCC bacteria, which suggests that the two main resistance mechanisms are intrinsic and widespread.

  20. Degradation of parabens by Pseudomonas beteli and Burkholderia latens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Aeshna; Chauhan, Sateesh; Dare, Manish; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2010-06-01

    p-Hydroxybenzoic acid esters (parabens) are commonly used antimicrobial preservatives in pharmaceutical formulations. Two microorganisms, isolated from non-sterile methyl paraben (MP) and propyl paraben (PP) solutions, were found to degrade the respective parabens. Identification by 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing revealed them to be Pseudomonas beteli and Burkholderia latens, respectively. The present work describes a previously unreported interaction of the parabens with P. beteli and B. latens. Degradation of MP at various concentrations by P. beteli, followed a logarithmic pattern, while that of PP by B. latens was found to be linear. It was subsequently observed that P. beteli could degrade only MP, while B. latens could degrade both the parabens. Absence of HPLC chromatogram peaks of expected degradation products indicated that the parabens were used up as a carbon source. The behaviour of pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger) of the pharmacopoeial preservative effectiveness test (PET), towards MP, showed that none had the ability to degrade the paraben. It was concluded that, for a paraben-preserved multi-dose ophthalmic formulation, the sole use of the four pathogens that are recommended by the pharmacopoeia for PET can falsely indicate the formulation to be effective against 'in-use' contamination.

  1. Evolving serodiagnostics by rationally designed peptide arrays: the Burkholderia paradigm in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Claudio; Gori, Alessandro; Gagni, Paola; Sola, Laura; Girelli, Daniela; Sottotetti, Samantha; Cariani, Lisa; Chiari, Marcella; Cretich, Marina; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    Efficient diagnosis of emerging and novel bacterial infections is fundamental to guide decisions on therapeutic treatments. Here, we engineered a novel rational strategy to design peptide microarray platforms, which combines structural and genomic analyses to predict the binding interfaces between diverse protein antigens and antibodies against Burkholderia cepacia complex infections present in the sera of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The predicted binding interfaces on the antigens are synthesized in the form of isolated peptides and chemically optimized for controlled orientation on the surface. Our platform displays multiple Burkholderia-related epitopes and is shown to diagnose infected individuals even in presence of superinfections caused by other prevalent CF pathogens, with limited cost and time requirements. Moreover, our data point out that the specific patterns determined by combined probe responses might provide a characterization of Burkholderia infections even at the subtype level (genomovars). The method is general and immediately applicable to other bacteria.

  2. Identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei Near-Neighbor Species in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Ginther

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of near-neighbor species are critical to the development of robust molecular diagnostic tools for biothreat agents. One such agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, a soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis, is lacking in this area because of its genomic diversity and widespread geographic distribution. The Burkholderia genus contains over 60 species and occupies a large range of environments including soil, plants, rhizospheres, water, animals and humans. The identification of novel species in new locations necessitates the need to identify the true global distribution of Burkholderia species, especially the members that are closely related to B. pseudomallei. In our current study, we used the Burkholderia-specific recA sequencing assay to analyze environmental samples from the Darwin region in the Northern Territory of Australia where melioidosis is endemic. Burkholderia recA PCR negative samples were further characterized using 16s rRNA sequencing for species identification. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that over 70% of the bacterial isolates were identified as B. ubonensis indicating that this species is common in the soil where B. pseudomallei is endemic. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis reveals many novel branches within the B. cepacia complex, one novel B. oklahomensis-like species, and one novel branch containing one isolate that is distinct from all other samples on the phylogenetic tree. During the analysis with recA sequencing, we discovered 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the reverse priming region of B. oklahomensis. A degenerate primer was developed and is proposed for future use. We conclude that the recA sequencing technique is an effective tool to classify Burkholderia and identify soil organisms in a melioidosis endemic area.

  3. Burkholderia, a Genus Rich in Plant-Associated Nitrogen Fixers with Wide Environmental and Geographic Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-De Los Santos, Paulina; Bustillos-Cristales, Rocío; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús

    2001-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises 19 species, including Burkholderia vietnamiensis which is the only known N2-fixing species of this bacterial genus. The first isolates of B. vietnamiensis were recovered from the rhizosphere of rice plants grown in a phytotron, but its existence in natural environments and its geographic distribution were not reported. In the present study, most N2-fixing isolates recovered from the environment of field-grown maize and coffee plants cultivated in widely separated regions of Mexico were phenotypically identified as B. cepacia using the API 20NE system. Nevertheless, a number of these isolates recovered from inside of maize roots, as well as from the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of maize and coffee plants, showed similar or identical features to those of B. vietnamiensis TVV75T. These features include nitrogenase activity with 10 different carbon sources, identical or very similar nifHDK hybridization patterns, very similar protein electrophoregrams, identical amplified 16S rDNA restriction (ARDRA) profiles, and levels of DNA-DNA reassociation higher than 70% with total DNA from strain TVV75T. Although the ability to fix N2 is not reported to be a common feature among the known species of the genus Burkholderia, the results obtained show that many diazotrophic Burkholderia isolates analyzed showed phenotypic and genotypic features different from those of the known N2-fixing species B. vietnamiensis as well as from those of B. kururiensis, a bacterium identified in the present study as a diazotrophic species. DNA-DNA reassociation assays confirmed the existence of N2-fixing Burkholderia species different from B. vietnamiensis. In addition, this study shows the wide geographic distribution and substantial capability of N2-fixing Burkholderia spp. for colonizing diverse host plants in distantly separated environments. PMID:11375196

  4. Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    1 Real - time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei Vipin K. Rastogi1, Tu-chen Cheng1, Lisa Collins1 and Jennifer Bagley2 1...A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Real - time PCR (RT-PCR) Assays for Burkholderia mallei and B.pseudomallei 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...risk. There is currently no real - time PCR assay for detection of both of these pathogens. Primers and probes corresponding to specific genomic regions

  5. Burkholderia pseudomallei is spatially distributed in soil in northeast Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Direk Limmathurotsakul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melioidosis is a frequently fatal infectious disease caused by the soil dwelling Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Environmental sampling is important to identify geographical distribution of the organism and related risk of infection to humans and livestock. The aim of this study was to evaluate spatial distribution of B. pseudomallei in soil and consider the implications of this for soil sampling strategies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A fixed-interval sampling strategy was used as the basis for detection and quantitation by culture of B. pseudomallei in soil in two environmental sites (disused land covered with low-lying scrub and rice field in northeast Thailand. Semivariogram and indicator semivariogram were used to evaluate the distribution of B. pseudomallei and its relationship with range between sampling points. B. pseudomallei was present on culture of 80/100 sampling points taken from the disused land and 28/100 sampling points from the rice field. The median B. pseudomallei cfu/gram from positive sampling points was 378 and 700 for the disused land and the rice field, respectively (p = 0.17. Spatial autocorrelation of B. pseudomallei was present, in that samples taken from areas adjacent to sampling points that were culture positive (negative for B. pseudomallei were also likely to be culture positive (negative, and samples taken from areas adjacent to sampling points with a high (low B. pseudomallei count were also likely to yield a high (low count. Ranges of spatial autocorrelation in quantitative B. pseudomallei count were 11.4 meters in the disused land and 7.6 meters in the rice field. CONCLUSIONS: We discuss the implications of the uneven distribution of B. pseudomallei in soil for future environmental studies, and describe a range of established geostatistical sampling approaches that would be suitable for the study of B. pseudomallei that take account of our findings.

  6. Intrinsic Resistance of Burkholderia cepacia Complex to Benzalkonium Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngbeom Ahn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical products that are contaminated with Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC bacteria may pose serious consequences to vulnerable patients. Benzyldimethylalkylammonium chloride (BZK cationic surfactants are extensively used in medical applications and have been implicated in the coselection of antimicrobial resistance. The ability of BCC to degrade BZK, tetradecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C14BDMA-Cl, dodecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C12BDMA-Cl, decyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C10BDMA-Cl, hexyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride, and benzyltrimethylammonium chloride was determined by incubation in 1/10-diluted tryptic soy broth (TSB to determine if BCC bacteria have the ability to survive and inactivate these disinfectants. With BZK, C14BDMA-Cl, and C12BDMA-Cl, inhibition of the growth of 20 BCC strains was observed in disinfectant solutions that ranged from 64 to 256 µg/ml. The efflux pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone increased the sensitivity of bacteria to 64 µg/ml BZK. The 20 BCC strains grew well in 1/10-diluted TSB medium with BZK, C12BDMA-Cl, and C10BDMA-Cl; they absorbed and degraded the compounds in 7 days. Formation of benzyldimethylamine and benzylmethylamine as the initial metabolites suggested that the cleavage of the C alkyl-N bond occurred as the first step of BZK degradation by BCC bacteria. Proteomic data confirmed the observed efflux activity and metabolic inactivation via biodegradation in terms of BZK resistance of BCC bacteria, which suggests that the two main resistance mechanisms are intrinsic and widespread.

  7. Recovery efficiencies for Burkholderia thailandensis from various aerosol sampling media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eDabisch

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia thailandensis is used in the laboratory as a surrogate of the more virulent B. pseudomallei. Since inhalation is believed to be a natural route of infection for B. pseudomallei, many animal studies with B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis utilize the inhalation route of exposure. The aim of the present study was to quantify the recovery efficiency of culturable B. thailandensis from several common aerosol sampling devices to ensure that collected microorganisms could be reliably recovered post-collection. The sampling devices tested included 25-mm gelatin filters, 25-mm stainless steel disks used in Mercer cascade impactors, and two types of glass impingers. The results demonstrate that while several processing methods tested resulted in significantly lower physical recovery efficiencies than other methods, it was possible to obtain culturable recovery efficiencies for B. thailandensis and physical recovery efficiencies for 1 μm fluorescent spheres of at least 0.95 from all of the sampling media tested given an appropriate sample processing procedure. The results of the present study also demonstrated that the bubbling action of liquid media in all-glass impingers (AGIs can result in physical loss of material from the collection medium, although additional studies are needed to verify the exact mechanisms involved. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that the collection mechanism as well as the post-collection processing method can significantly affect the recovery from and retention of culturable microorganisms in sampling media, potentially affecting the calculated airborne concentration and any subsequent estimations of risk or dose derived from such data.

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei virulence: definition, stability and association with clonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulett, G C; Currie, B J; Clair, T W; Mayo, M; Ketheesan, N; Labrooy, J; Gal, D; Norton, R; Smith, C A; Barnes, J; Warner, J; Hirst, R G

    2001-07-01

    Clinical presentations of melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei are protean, but the mechanisms underlying development of the different forms of disease remain poorly understood. In murine melioidosis, the level of virulence of B. pseudomallei is important in disease pathogenesis and progression. In this study, we used B. pseudomallei-susceptible BALB/c mice to determine the virulence of a library of clinical and environmental B. pseudomallei isolates from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Among 42 non-arabinose-assimilating (ara(-)) isolates, LD(50) ranged from 10 to > 10(6) CFU. There were numerous correlations between virulence and disease presentation in patients; however, this was not a consistent observation. Virulence did not correlate with isolate origin (i.e. clinical vs environmental), since numerous ara(-) environmental isolates were highly virulent. The least virulent isolate was a soil isolate from Papua New Guinea, which was arabinose assimilating (ara(+)). Stability of B. pseudomallei virulence was investigated by in vivo passage of isolates through mice and repetitive in vitro subculture. Virulence increased following in vivo exposure in only one of eight isolates tested. In vitro subculture on ferric citrate-containing medium caused attenuation of virulence, and this correlated with changes in colony morphology. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA typing demonstrated that selected epidemiologically related isolates that had variable clinical outcomes and different in vivo virulence were clonal strains. No molecular changes were observed in isolates after in vivo or in vitro exposure despite changes in virulence. These results indicate that virulence of selected B. pseudomallei isolates is variable, being dependent on factors such as iron bioavailability. They also support the importance of other variables such as inoculum size and host risk factors in determining the clinical severity of melioidosis.

  9. Respiratory Protection against Pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt, Burak; Akbaba, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    Although the respiratory (breathing) system tolerates exposure to a limited degree, some chemicals can impair or destroy portions of it. For many pesticides, the respiratory system is the quickest and most direct route into the circulatory system, allowing rapid transport throughout the body. Thus, it is important to follow the pesticide label and follow directions for control of exposure, especially when respiratory protection is specified. A respirator is a safety device covering at least t...

  10. Construction and characterization of stable, constitutively expressed, chromosomal green and red fluorescent transcriptional fusions in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Bangar, Hansraj; Saldanha, Roland; Pemberton, Adin; Aronow, Bruce; Dean, Gary E; Lamkin, Thomas J; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    Here, we constructed stable, chromosomal, constitutively expressed, green and red fluorescent protein (GFP and RFP) as reporters in the select agents, Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Using bioinformatic approaches and other experimental analyses, we identified P0253 and P1 as potent promoters that drive the optimal expression of fluorescent reporters in single copy in B. anthracis and Burkholderia spp. as well as their surrogate strains, respectively. In comparison, Y. pestis and its surrogate strain need two chromosomal copies of cysZK promoter (P2cysZK) for optimal fluorescence. The P0253-, P2cysZK-, and P1-driven GFP and RFP fusions were first cloned into the vectors pRP1028, pUC18R6KT-mini-Tn7T-Km, pmini-Tn7-gat, or their derivatives. The resultant constructs were delivered into the respective surrogates and subsequently into the select agent strains. The chromosomal GFP- and RFP-tagged strains exhibited bright fluorescence at an exposure time of less than 200 msec and displayed the same virulence traits as their wild-type parental strains. The utility of the tagged strains was proven by the macrophage infection assays and lactate dehydrogenase release analysis. Such strains will be extremely useful in high-throughput screens for novel compounds that could either kill these organisms, or interfere with critical virulence processes in these important bioweapon agents and during infection of alveolar macrophages.

  11. Enhanced biodegradation of anthracene in acidic soil by inoculated Burkholderia sp. VUN10013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somtrakoon, Khanitta; Suanjit, Sudarat; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Lee, Hung; Upatham, Suchart

    2008-08-01

    The ability of Burkholderia sp. VUN10013 to degrade anthracene in microcosms of two acidic Thai soils was studied. The addition of Burkholderia sp. VUN10013 (initial concentration of 10(5) cells g(-1) dry soil) to autoclaved soil collected from the Plew District, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand, supplemented with anthracene (50 mg kg(-1) dry soil) resulted in complete degradation of the added anthracene within 20 days. In contrast, under the same test conditions but using autoclaved soil collected from the Kitchagude District, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand, only approximately 46.3% of the added anthracene was degraded after 60 days of incubation. In nonautoclaved soils, without adding the VUN10013 inocula, 22.8 and 19.1% of the anthracene in Plew and Kitchagude soils, respectively, were degraded by indigenous bacteria after 60 days. In nonautoclaved soil inoculated with Burkholderia sp. VUN10013, the rate and extent of anthracene degradation were considerably better than those seen in autoclaved soils or in uninoculated nonautoclaved soils in that only 8.2 and 9.1% of anthracene remained in nonautoclaved Plew and Kitchagude soils, respectively, after 10 days of incubation. The results showed that the indigenous microorganisms in the pristine acidic soils have limited ability to degrade anthracene. Inoculation with the anthracene-degrading Burkholderia sp. VUN10013 significantly enhanced anthracene degradation in such acidic soils. The indigenous microorganisms greatly assisted the VUN10013 inoculum in anthracene degradation, especially in the more acidic Kitchagude soil.

  12. N-acylhomoserine-lactone-mediated communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia in mixed biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K.; Hentzer, Morten; Geisenberger, O.;

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are capable of forming mixed biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria employ quorum-sensing systems, which rely on N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to co- ordinate expression of virulence factors with the form...

  13. Molecular Characterization of Genetic Loci Required for Secretion of Exoproducts in Burkholderia pseudomallei

    OpenAIRE

    DeShazer, David; Brett, Paul J.; Mary N Burtnick; Woods, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Burkholderia pseudomallei secretes protease, lipase, and phospholipase C (PLC) into the extracellular milieu, but their mechanisms of secretion and roles in pathogenesis have not been elucidated. In this study, we isolated and characterized 29 transposon mutants unable to secrete protease, lipase, and PLC.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia gladioli Strain UCD-UG_CHAPALOTE (Phylum Proteobacteria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Cassandra L.; Shehata, Hanan R.; Johnston-Monje, David; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Burkholderia gladioli strain UCD-UG_CHAPALOTE. This strain is an endophyte isolated from surface sterilized seeds of an ancient Mexican landrace of corn, Chapalote. The genome contains 8,527,129 bp in 109 scaffolds. PMID:25614570

  15. The symbiotic role of O-antigen of Burkholderia symbiont in association with host Riptortus pedestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Park, Ha Young; Lee, Bok Luel

    2016-07-01

    Riptortus pedestris harboring Burkholderia symbiont is a useful symbiosis model to study the molecular interactions between insects and bacteria. We recently reported that the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen is absent in the Burkholderia symbionts isolated from Riptortus guts. Here, we investigated the symbiotic role of O-antigen comprehensively in the Riptortus-Burkholderia model. Firstly, Burkholderia mutant strains deficient of O-antigen biosynthesis genes were generated and confirmed for their different patterns of the lipopolysaccharide by electrophoretic analysis. The O-antigen-deficient mutant strains initially exhibited a reduction of infectivity, having significantly lower level of symbiont population at the second-instar stage. However, both the wild-type and O-antigen mutant symbionts exhibited a similar level of symbiont population from the third-instar stage, indicating that the O-antigen deficiency did not affect the bacterial persistence in the host midgut. Taken together, we showed that the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen of gut symbiont plays an exclusive role in the initial symbiotic association.

  16. A heterodimer comprised of two bovine lactoferrin antimicrobial peptides exhibits powerful bactericidal activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puknun, A.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Nazmi, K.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Tungpradabkul, S.; Wongratanacheewin, S.; Kanthawong, S.; Taweechaisupapong, S.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe infectious disease that is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of this disease, has developed resistance to an increasing list of antibiotics, demanding a search for novel agents. Lactoferricin and lactoferrampin ar

  17. Changes in agricultural management drive the diversity of Burkholderia species isolated from soil on PLAT medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salles, JF; Samyn, E; Vandamme, P; van Veen, JA; van Elsas, JD

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess the diversity of culturable Burkholderia populations in rhizosphere and bulk soil and to evaluate how different agricultural management regimes and land use history affect this diversity, four treatments were evaluated: permanent grassland; grassland converted into maize monocultu

  18. Changes in agricultural management drive the diversity of Burkholderia species isolated from soil on PCAT medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salles, J.F.; Samyn, E.; Vandamme, P.; Van Veen, J.A.; van Elsas, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In order to assess the diversity of culturable Burkholderia populations in rhizosphere and bulk soil and to evaluate how different agricultural management regimes and land use history affect this diversity, four treatments were evaluated: permanent grassland; grassland converted into maize

  19. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei cluster 1 type VI secretion system gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary N Burtnick

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes glanders in humans and animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1 expressed by this organism is essential for virulence in hamsters and is positively regulated by the VirAG two-component system. Recently, we have shown that T6SS-1 gene expression is up-regulated following internalization of this pathogen into phagocytic cells and that this system promotes multinucleated giant cell formation in infected tissue culture monolayers. In the present study, we further investigated the complex regulation of this important virulence factor. To assess T6SS-1 expression, B. mallei strains were cultured in various media conditions and Hcp1 production was analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Transcript levels of several VirAG-regulated genes (bimA, tssA, hcp1 and tssM were also determined using quantitative real time PCR. Consistent with previous observations, T6SS-1 was not expressed during growth of B. mallei in rich media. Curiously, growth of the organism in minimal media (M9G or minimal media plus casamino acids (M9CG facilitated robust expression of T6SS-1 genes whereas growth in minimal media plus tryptone (M9TG did not. Investigation of this phenomenon confirmed a regulatory role for VirAG in this process. Additionally, T6SS-1 gene expression was significantly down-regulated by the addition of iron and zinc to M9CG. Other genes under the control of VirAG did not appear to be as tightly regulated by these divalent metals. Similar results were observed for B. pseudomallei, but not for B. thailandensis. Collectively, our findings indicate that in addition to being positively regulated by VirAG, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei T6SS-1 gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

  20. Multilocus sequence typing and evolutionary relationships among the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Daniel; Randle, Gaynor; Simpson, Andrew J; Aanensen, David M; Pitt, Tyrone L; Kinoshita, Reimi; Spratt, Brian G

    2003-05-01

    A collection of 147 isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis was characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The 128 isolates of B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, were obtained from diverse geographic locations, from humans and animals with disease, and from the environment and were resolved into 71 sequence types. The utility of the MLST scheme for epidemiological investigations was established by analyzing isolates from captive marine mammals and birds and from humans in Hong Kong with melioidosis. MLST gave a level of resolution similar to that given by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and identified the same three clones causing disease in animals, each of which was also associated with disease in humans. The average divergence between the alleles of B. thailandensis and B. pseudomallei was 3.2%, and there was no sharing of alleles between these species. Trees constructed from differences in the allelic profiles of the isolates and from the concatenated sequences of the seven loci showed that the B. pseudomallei isolates formed a cluster of closely related lineages that were fully resolved from the cluster of B. thailandensis isolates, confirming their separate species status. However, isolates of B. mallei, the causative agent of glanders, recovered from three continents over a 30-year period had identical allelic profiles, and the B. mallei isolates clustered within the B. pseudomallei group of isolates. Alleles at six of the seven loci in B. mallei were also present within B. pseudomallei isolates, and B. mallei is a clone of B. pseudomallei that, on population genetics grounds, should not be given separate species status.

  1. Genetic diversity of Burkholderia (Proteobacteria) species from the Caatinga and Atlantic rainforest biomes in Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, A C; Santos, H R M; Gross, E; Corrêa, R X

    2013-03-11

    The genus Burkholderia (β-Proteobacteria) currently comprises more than 60 species, including parasites, symbionts and free-living organisms. Several new species of Burkholderia have recently been described showing a great diversity of phenotypes. We examined the diversity of Burkholderia spp in environmental samples collected from Caatinga and Atlantic rainforest biomes of Bahia, Brazil. Legume nodules were collected from five locations, and 16S rDNA and recA genes of the isolated microorganisms were analyzed. Thirty-three contigs of 16S rRNA genes and four contigs of the recA gene related to the genus Burkholderia were obtained. The genetic dissimilarity of the strains ranged from 0 to 2.5% based on 16S rDNA analysis, indicating two main branches: one distinct branch of the dendrogram for the B. cepacia complex and another branch that rendered three major groups, partially reflecting host plants and locations. A dendrogram designed with sequences of this research and those designed with sequences of Burkholderia-type strains and the first hit BLAST had similar topologies. A dendrogram similar to that constructed by analysis of 16S rDNA was obtained using sequences of the fragment of the recA gene. The 16S rDNA sequences enabled sufficient identification of relevant similarities and groupings amongst isolates and the sequences that we obtained. Only 6 of the 33 isolates analyzed via 16S rDNA sequencing showed high similarity with the B. cepacia complex. Thus, over 3/4 of the isolates have potential for biotechnological applications.

  2. Insecticide applications to soil contribute to the development of Burkholderia mediating insecticide resistance in stinkbugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tago, Kanako; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Nakaoka, Sinji; Katsuyama, Chie; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2015-07-01

    Some soil Burkholderia strains are capable of degrading the organophosphorus insecticide, fenitrothion, and establish symbiosis with stinkbugs, making the host insects fenitrothion-resistant. However, the ecology of the symbiotic degrading Burkholderia adapting to fenitrothion in the free-living environment is unknown. We hypothesized that fenitrothion applications affect the dynamics of fenitrothion-degrading Burkholderia, thereby controlling the transmission of symbiotic degrading Burkholderia from the soil to stinkbugs. We investigated changes in the density and diversity of culturable Burkholderia (i.e. symbiotic and nonsymbiotic fenitrothion degraders and nondegraders) in fenitrothion-treated soil using microcosms. During the incubation with five applications of pesticide, the density of the degraders increased from less than the detection limit to around 10(6)/g of soil. The number of dominant species among the degraders declined with the increasing density of degraders; eventually, one species predominated. This process can be explained according to the competitive exclusion principle using V(max) and K(m) values for fenitrothion metabolism by the degraders. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of representative strains isolated from the microcosms and evaluated their ability to establish symbiosis with the stinkbug Riptortus pedestris. The strains that established symbiosis with R. pedestris were assigned to a cluster including symbionts commonly isolated from stinkbugs. The strains outside the cluster could not necessarily associate with the host. The degraders in the cluster predominated during the initial phase of degrader dynamics in the soil. Therefore, only a few applications of fenitrothion could allow symbiotic degraders to associate with their hosts and may cause the emergence of symbiont-mediated insecticide resistance.

  3. Pathological findings and diagnostic implications of a rhesus macaque (Macacca mulatta) model of aerosol exposure to Burkholderia mallei (glanders).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, Samuel L; Facemire, Paul; Chuvala, Lara; Norwood, David; Wolcott, Mark; Huzella, Louis

    2015-06-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a Gram-negative bacillus that causes a pneumonic disease known as glanders in equids and humans, and a lymphatic infection known as farcy, primarily in equids. With the potential to infect humans by the respiratory route, aerosol exposure can result in severe, occasionally fatal, pneumonia. Today, glanders infections in humans are rare, likely due to less frequent contact with infected equids than in the past. Acutely ill humans often have non-specific clinical signs and in order to diagnose cases, especially in scenarios of multiple cases in an unexpected setting, rapid diagnostics for B. mallei may be critical. The pathogenesis of acute glanders in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was studied as an initial effort to improve diagnostic methods. In the study described here, the diagnostic techniques of PCR, culture and histopathology were compared. The results indicated that PCR may provide rapid, non-invasive diagnosis of glanders in some cases. As expected, PCR results were positive in lung tissue in 11/12 acutely infected rhesus macaques, but more importantly in terms of diagnostic algorithm development, PCR results were frequently positive in non-invasive samples such as broncho-alveolar lavage or nasal swabs (7/12) and occasionally in blood (3/12). However, conventional bacterial culture failed to recover bacteria in many of these samples. The study showed that the clinical presentation of aerosol-exposed rhesus macaques is similar to descriptions of human glanders and that PCR has potential for rapid diagnosis of outbreaks, if not individual cases.

  4. Porin involvement in cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Anuwat Aunkham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bps is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes frequently lethal melioidosis, with a particularly high prevalence in the north and northeast of Thailand. Bps is highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents and this resistance may result from the low drug permeability of outer membrane proteins, known as porins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Microbiological assays showed that the clinical Bps strain was resistant to most antimicrobial agents and sensitive only to ceftazidime and meropenem. An E. coli strain defective in most porins, but expressing BpsOmp38, exhibited considerably lower antimicrobial susceptibility than the control strain. In addition, mutation of Tyr119, the most prominent pore-lining residue in BpsOmp38, markedly altered membrane permeability, substitution with Ala (mutant BpsOmp38Y119A enhanced uptake of the antimicrobial agents, while substitution with Phe (mutant BpsOmp38Y119F inhibited uptake. Channel recordings of BpsOmp38 reconstituted in a planar black lipid membrane (BLM suggested that the higher permeability of BpsOmp38Y119A was caused by widening of the pore interior through removal of the bulky side chain. In contrast, the lower permeability of BpsOmp38Y119F was caused by introduction of the hydrophobic side chain (Phe, increasing the 'greasiness' of the pore lumen. Significantly, liposome swelling assays showed no permeation through the BpsOmp38 channel by antimicrobial agents to which Bps is resistant (cefoxitin, cefepime, and doripenem. In contrast, high permeability to ceftazidime and meropenem was observed, these being agents to which Bps is sensitive. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results, from both in vivo and in vitro studies, demonstrate that membrane permeability associated with BpsOmp38 expression correlates well with the antimicrobial susceptibility of the virulent bacterium B. pseudomallei, especially to carbapenems and cephalosporins. In addition, substitution of the residue

  5. Burkholderia pseudomallei genome plasticity associated with genomic island variation

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    Currie Bart J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil-dwelling saprophyte and the cause of melioidosis. Horizontal gene transfer contributes to the genetic diversity of this pathogen and may be an important determinant of virulence potential. The genome contains genomic island (GI regions that encode a broad array of functions. Although there is some evidence for the variable distribution of genomic islands in B. pseudomallei isolates, little is known about the extent of variation between related strains or their association with disease or environmental survival. Results Five islands from B. pseudomallei strain K96243 were chosen as representatives of different types of genomic islands present in this strain, and their presence investigated in other B. pseudomallei. In silico analysis of 10 B. pseudomallei genome sequences provided evidence for the variable presence of these regions, together with micro-evolutionary changes that generate GI diversity. The diversity of GIs in 186 isolates from NE Thailand (83 environmental and 103 clinical isolates was investigated using multiplex PCR screening. The proportion of all isolates positive by PCR ranged from 12% for a prophage-like island (GI 9, to 76% for a metabolic island (GI 16. The presence of each of the five GIs did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p > 0.05 for all five islands. The cumulative number of GIs per isolate for the 186 isolates ranged from 0 to 5 (median 2, IQR 1 to 3. The distribution of cumulative GI number did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p = 0.27. The presence of GIs was defined for the three largest clones in this collection (each defined as a single sequence type, ST, by multilocus sequence typing; these were ST 70 (n = 15 isolates, ST 54 (n = 11, and ST 167 (n = 9. The rapid loss and/or acquisition of gene islands was observed within individual clones. Comparisons were drawn between isolates obtained

  6. Burkholderia cepacia XXVI siderophore with biocontrol capacity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Santos-Villalobos, Sergio; Barrera-Galicia, Guadalupe Coyolxauhqui; Miranda-Salcedo, Mario Alberto; Peña-Cabriales, Juan José

    2012-08-01

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is the causal agent of anthracnose in mango. Burkholderia cepacia XXVI, isolated from mango rhizosphere and identified by 16S rDNA sequencing as a member of B. cepacia complex, was more effective than 6 other mango rhizosphere bacteria in inhibiting the model mango pathogen, C. gloeosporioides ATCC MYA 456. Biocontrol of this pathogen was demonstrated on Petri-dishes containing PDA by > 90 % reduction of surface colonization. The nature of the biocontrol metabolite(s) was characterized via a variety of tests. The inhibition was almost exclusively due to production of agar-diffusible, not volatile, metabolite(s). The diffusible metabolite(s) underwent thermal degradation at 70 and 121 °C (1 atm). Tests for indole acetic acid production and lytic enzyme activities (cellulase, glucanase and chitinase) by B. cepacia XXVI were negative, indicating that these metabolites were not involved in the biocontrol effect. Based on halo formation and growth inhibition of the pathogen on the diagnostic medium, CAS-agar, as well as colorimetric tests we surmised that strain XXVI produced a hydroxamate siderophore involved in the biocontrol effect observed. The minimal inhibitory concentration test showed that 0.64 μg ml(-1) of siderophore (Deferoxamine mesylate salt-equivalent) was sufficient to achieve 91.1 % inhibition of the pathogen growth on Petri-dishes containing PDA. The biocontrol capacity against C. gloeosporioides ATCC MYA 456 correlated directly with the siderophore production by B. cepacia XXVI: the highest concentration of siderophore production in PDB on day 7, 1.7 μg ml(-1) (Deferoxamine mesylate salt-equivalent), promoted a pathogen growth inhibition of 94.9 %. The growth of 5 additional strains of C. gloeosporioides (isolated from mango "Ataulfo" orchards located in the municipality of Chahuites, State of Oaxaca in Mexico) was also inhibited when confronted with B. cepacia XXVI. Results indicate that B. cepacia XXVI or its

  7. Respiratory medicine of reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Juergen

    2011-05-01

    Noninfectious and infectious causes have been implicated in the development of respiratory tract disease in reptiles. Treatment modalities in reptiles have to account for species differences in response to therapeutic agents as well as interpretation of diagnostic findings. Data on effective drugs and dosages for the treatment of respiratory diseases are often lacking in reptiles. Recently, advances have been made on the application of advanced imaging modalities, especially computed tomography for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of reptiles. This article describes common infectious and noninfectious causes of respiratory disease in reptiles, including diagnostic and therapeutic regimen.

  8. Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov., a nitrogen fixing species isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) with the ability to effectively nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Salazar-Salazar, Corelly; Méndez, Rafael Díaz; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hirsch, Ann M; Vásquez-Murrieta, María Soledad; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina

    2013-12-01

    During a survey of Burkholderia species with potential use in agrobiotechnology, a group of 12 strains was isolated from the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of tomato plants growing in Mexico (Nepantla, Mexico State). A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strains are related to Burkholderia kururiensis and Burkholderia mimosarum (97.4 and 97.1 %, respectively). However, they induced effective nitrogen-fixing nodules on roots of Phaseolus vulgaris. Based on polyphasic taxonomy, the group of strains represents a novel species for which the name Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov. is proposed. The type species is TNe-841(T) (= LMG 26416(T) = CIP 110324(T)).

  9. PCR-based identification of Burkholderia pseudomallei Identificação de Burkholderia pseudomallei baseada em PCR

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    Adam Merritt

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA amplification techniques are being used increasingly in clinical laboratories to confirm the identity of medically important bacteria. A PCR-based identification method has been in use in our centre for 10 years for Burkholderia pseudomallei and was used to confirm the identity of bacteria isolated from cases of melioidosis in Ceará since 2003. This particular method has been used as a reference standard for less discriminatory methods. In this study we evaluated three PCR-based methods of B. pseudomallei identification and used DNA sequencing to resolve discrepancies between PCR-based results and phenotypic identification methods. The established semi-nested PCR protocol for B. pseudomallei 16-23s spacer region produced a consistent negative result for one of our 100 test isolates (BCC #99, but correctly identified all 71 other B. pseudomallei isolates tested. Anomalous sequence variation was detected at the inner, reverse primer binding site for this method. PCR methods were developed for detection of two other B. pseudomallei bacterial metabolic genes. The conventional lpxO PCR protocol had a sensitivity of 0.89 and a specificity of 1.00, while a real-time lpxO protocol performed even better with sensitivity and specificity of 1.00, and 1.00. This method identified all B. pseudomallei isolates including the PCR-negative discrepant isolate. The phaC PCR protocol detected the gene in all B. pseudomallei and all but three B. cepacia isolates, making this method unsuitable for PCR-based identification of B. pseudomallei. This experience with PCR-based B. pseudomallei identification methods indicates that single PCR targets should be used with caution for identification of these bacteria, and need to be interpreted alongside phenotypic and alternative molecular methods such as gene sequencing.As técnicas de amplificação de DNA estão sendo cada vez mais utilizadas em laboratórios clínicos para a confirmação da identificação de bact

  10. Use of a safe, reproducible, and rapid aerosol delivery method to study infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in mice.

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    Eric R Lafontaine

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most common manifestation is severe pneumonia leading to fatal bacteremia. Glanders and melioidosis are difficult to diagnose and require prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There are no vaccines available to protect against either Burkholderia species, and there is concern regarding their use as biological warfare agents given that B. mallei has previously been utilized in this manner. Hence, experiments were performed to establish a mouse model of aerosol infection to study the organisms and develop countermeasures. Using a hand-held aerosolizer, BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with strains B. pseudomallei 1026b and B. mallei ATCC23344 and growth of the agents in the lungs, as well as dissemination to the spleen, were examined. Mice infected with 10(2, 10(3 and 10(4 organisms were unable to control growth of B. mallei in the lungs and bacteria rapidly disseminated to the spleen. Though similar results were observed in mice inoculated with 10(3 and 10(4 B. pseudomallei cells, animals infected with 10(2 organisms controlled bacterial replication in the lungs, dissemination to the spleen, and the extent of bacteremia. Analysis of sera from mice surviving acute infection revealed that animals produced antibodies against antigens known to be targets of the immune response in humans. Taken together, these data show that small volume aerosol inoculation of mice results in acute disease, dose-dependent chronic infection, and immune responses

  11. Use of a safe, reproducible, and rapid aerosol delivery method to study infection by Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Eric R; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Shaffer, Teresa L; Michel, Frank; Gao, Xiudan; Hogan, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiologic agent of melioidosis, is a saprophytic bacterium readily isolated from wet soils of countries bordering the equator. Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted clone of B. pseudomallei that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir and causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by these organisms typically occurs via percutaneous inoculation or inhalation of aerosols, and the most common manifestation is severe pneumonia leading to fatal bacteremia. Glanders and melioidosis are difficult to diagnose and require prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There are no vaccines available to protect against either Burkholderia species, and there is concern regarding their use as biological warfare agents given that B. mallei has previously been utilized in this manner. Hence, experiments were performed to establish a mouse model of aerosol infection to study the organisms and develop countermeasures. Using a hand-held aerosolizer, BALB/c mice were inoculated intratracheally with strains B. pseudomallei 1026b and B. mallei ATCC23344 and growth of the agents in the lungs, as well as dissemination to the spleen, were examined. Mice infected with 10(2), 10(3) and 10(4) organisms were unable to control growth of B. mallei in the lungs and bacteria rapidly disseminated to the spleen. Though similar results were observed in mice inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) B. pseudomallei cells, animals infected with 10(2) organisms controlled bacterial replication in the lungs, dissemination to the spleen, and the extent of bacteremia. Analysis of sera from mice surviving acute infection revealed that animals produced antibodies against antigens known to be targets of the immune response in humans. Taken together, these data show that small volume aerosol inoculation of mice results in acute disease, dose-dependent chronic infection, and immune responses that correlate

  12. Advances in respiratory therapy.

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    Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Bach, Jonathan F; Shaw, Scott P

    2007-09-01

    Effective respiratory therapy depends on obtaining a definitive diagnosis and following established recommendations for treatment. Unfortunately, many respiratory conditions are idiopathic in origin or are attributable to nonspecific inflammation. In some situations, disorders are controlled rather than cured. Recent advances in pulmonary therapeutics include the use of new agents to treat common diseases and application of local delivery of drugs to enhance drug effect and minimize side effects.

  13. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  14. Healthcare-associated respiratory tract infection and colonization in an intensive care unit caused by Burkholderia cepacia isolated in mouthwash

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    Jeannete Zurita

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Our findings strongly suggest that alcohol-free mouthwash solution intrinsically contaminated with B. cepacia was the source of these colonizations and infections involving adults in the ICU.

  15. Distinct human antibody response to the biological warfare agent Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, John J; Vigil, Adam; DeShazer, David; Waag, David M; Felgner, Philip; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2012-10-01

    The genetic similarity between Burkholderia mallei (glanders) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis) had led to the general assumption that pathogenesis of each bacterium would be similar. In 2000, the first human case of glanders in North America since 1945 was reported in a microbiology laboratory worker. Leveraging the availability of pre-exposure sera for this individual and employing the same well-characterized protein array platform that has been previously used to study a large cohort of melioidosis patients in southeast Asia, we describe the antibody response in a human with glanders. Analysis of 156 peptides present on the array revealed antibodies against 17 peptides with a > 2-fold increase in this infection. Unexpectedly, when the glanders data were compared with a previous data set from B. pseudomallei infections, there were only two highly increased antibodies shared between these two infections. These findings have implications in the diagnosis and treatment of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei infections.

  16. Workshop on treatment of and postexposure prophylaxis for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei Infection, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, Rebecca; Garges, Susan; Aurigemma, Rosemarie; Baccam, Prasith; Blaney, David D; Cheng, Allen C; Currie, Bart J; Dance, David; Gee, Jay E; Larsen, Joseph; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Morrow, Meredith G; Norton, Robert; O'Mara, Elizabeth; Peacock, Sharon J; Pesik, Nicki; Rogers, L Paige; Schweizer, Herbert P; Steinmetz, Ivo; Tan, Gladys; Tan, Patrick; Wiersinga, W Joost; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Smith, Theresa L

    2012-12-01

    The US Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise convened subject matter experts at the 2010 HHS Burkholderia Workshop to develop consensus recommendations for postexposure prophylaxis against and treatment for Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei infections, which cause melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Drugs recommended by consensus of the participants are ceftazidime or meropenem for initial intensive therapy, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for eradication therapy. For postexposure prophylaxis, recommended drugs are trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or co-amoxiclav. To improve the timely diagnosis of melioidosis and glanders, further development and wide distribution of rapid diagnostic assays were also recommended. Standardized animal models and B. pseudomallei strains are needed for further development of therapeutic options. Training for laboratory technicians and physicians would facilitate better diagnosis and treatment options.

  17. Properties of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Granules and Bioemulsifiers from Pseudomonas sp. and Burkholderia sp. Isolates Growing on Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Laís Postai; Castellane, Tereza Cristina Luque; Lopes, Erica Mendes; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes; Alves, Lúcia Maria Carareto

    2016-03-01

    A Burkholderia and Pseudomonas species designated as AB4 and AS1, respectively, were isolated from soil containing decomposing straw or sugar cane bagasse collected from Brazil. This study sought to evaluate the capacities of culture media, cell-free medium, and crude lysate preparations (containing PHB inclusion bodies) from bacterial cell cultures to stabilize emulsions with several hydrophobic compounds. Four conditions showed good production of bioemulsifiers (E24 ≥ 50 %), headed by substantially cell-free media from bacterial cell cultures in which bacterial isolates from Burkholderia sp. strain AB4 and Pseudomonas sp. strain AS1 were grown. Our results revealed that the both isolates (AB4 and AS1 strains) exhibited high emulsification indices (indicating usefulness in bioremediation) and good stabilities.

  18. Genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating "Burkholderia sprentiae" strain WSM5005(T.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wayne; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Rui, Tian; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ron; O'Hara, Graham; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Peters, Lin; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    "Burkholderia sprentiae" strain WSM5005(T) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated in Australia from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Klawer, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. Here we describe the features of "Burkholderia sprentiae" strain WSM5005(T), together with the genome sequence and its annotation. The 7,761,063 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 8 scaffolds of 236 contigs, contains 7,147 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  19. Genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating “Burkholderia sprentiae” strain WSM5005T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wayne; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Rui, Tian; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ron; O’Hara, Graham; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Peters, Lin; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sprentiae” strain WSM5005T is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated in Australia from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Klawer, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. Here we describe the features of “Burkholderia sprentiae” strain WSM5005T, together with the genome sequence and its annotation. The 7,761,063 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 8 scaffolds of 236 contigs, contains 7,147 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976894

  20. Study of class I integron in a Burkholderia cepacia complex strain isolated from blood colture

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    Linda Furlanis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc consists of several species that cause lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis but are also capable to colonize immunocompromised patients. Once established, the infection is usually difficult to eradicate, as Bcc is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Besides, the acquisition of additional resistance determinants by horizontal gene transfer makes very difficult the therapeutic approach to these infections. Among horizontally acquired DNAs, integrons have been frequently reported in many Gramnegative bacteria that affect human health, but they have not been found frequently in Burkholderia isolates until now. In the present work we report on a Bcc isolate, recovered from the blood of an immunocompromised patient, that carries a 2.3 kb class I integron already described in a Salmonella enterica isolate eight years ago, coding for aacA4, aadA1 and catB2 in its cassette array.

  1. Enhanced bioconversion of ethylene glycol to glycolic acid by a newly isolated Burkholderia sp. EG13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoxin; Ma, Zhengfei; Yang, Limin; Ma, Jiangquan

    2014-10-01

    Burkholderia sp. EG13 with high ethylene glycol-oxidizing activity was isolated from soil, which could be used for the synthesis of glycolic acid from the oxidation of ethylene glycol. Using the resting cells of Burkholderia sp. EG13 as biocatalysts, the optimum reaction temperature and pH were 30 °C and 6.0, respectively. After 24 h of biotransformation, the yield of glycolic acid from 200 mM ethylene glycol was 98.8 %. Furthermore, an integrated bioprocess for the production of glycolic acid which involved in situ product removal (ISPR) was investigated. Using fed-batch method with ISPR, a total of 793 mM glycolic acid has been accumulated in the reaction mixture after the 4th feed.

  2. Total protein extraction and 2-D gel electrophoresis methods for Burkholderia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velapatiño, Billie; Zlosnik, James E A; Hird, Trevor J; Speert, David P

    2013-10-15

    The investigation of the intracellular protein levels of bacterial species is of importance to understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of diseases caused by these organisms. Here we describe a procedure for protein extraction from Burkholderia species based on mechanical lysis using glass beads in the presence of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride in phosphate buffered saline. This method can be used for different Burkholderia species, for different growth conditions, and it is likely suitable for the use in proteomic studies of other bacteria. Following protein extraction, a two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis proteomic technique is described to study global changes in the proteomes of these organisms. This method consists of the separation of proteins according to their isoelectric point by isoelectric focusing in the first dimension, followed by separation on the basis of molecular weight by acrylamide gel electrophoresis in the second dimension. Visualization of separated proteins is carried out by silver staining.

  3. Plant host and sugar alcohol induced exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    OpenAIRE

    Bartholdson, S. Josefin; Brown, Alan R.; Mewburn, Ben R.; Clarke, David J.; Fry, Stephen C.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; John R W Govan

    2008-01-01

    The species that presently constitute the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have multiple roles; they include soil and water saprophytes, bioremediators, and plant, animal and human pathogens. Since the first description of pathogenicity in the Bcc was based on sour skin rot of onion bulbs, this study returned to this plant host to investigate the onion-associated phenotype of the Bcc. Many Bcc isolates, which were previously considered to be non-mucoid, produced copious amounts of exopolysa...

  4. Purification and sequence analysis of 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol oxygenase from Burkholderia sp. strain DNT.

    OpenAIRE

    Haigler, B E; Suen, W C; Spain, J C

    1996-01-01

    4-Methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC) is an intermediate in the degradation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene by Burkholderia sp. strain DNT. In the presence of NADPH and oxygen, MNC monooxygenase catalyzes the removal of the nitro group from MNC to form 2-hydroxy-5-methylquinone. The gene (dntB) encoding MNC monooxygenase has been previously cloned and characterized. In order to examine the properties of MNC monooxygenase and to compare it with other enzymes, we sequenced the gene encoding the MNC monooxygenas...

  5. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-23

    Wallqvist‡ Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent...ingestion, inhalation, or skin abrasion. Given their considerable antibiotic resistance, ability to infect via aerosol, and absence of vaccines, these... equine hosts. Thus, the genes retained in B. mallei share a high sequence similarity to genes common to B. pseudomallei (3), and many virulence

  6. Combining functional and structural genomics to sample the essential Burkholderia structome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Baugh

    Full Text Available The genus Burkholderia includes pathogenic gram-negative bacteria that cause melioidosis, glanders, and pulmonary infections of patients with cancer and cystic fibrosis. Drug resistance has made development of new antimicrobials critical. Many approaches to discovering new antimicrobials, such as structure-based drug design and whole cell phenotypic screens followed by lead refinement, require high-resolution structures of proteins essential to the parasite.We experimentally identified 406 putative essential genes in B. thailandensis, a low-virulence species phylogenetically similar to B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, using saturation-level transposon mutagenesis and next-generation sequencing (Tn-seq. We selected 315 protein products of these genes based on structure-determination criteria, such as excluding very large and/or integral membrane proteins, and entered them into the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infection Disease (SSGCID structure determination pipeline. To maximize structural coverage of these targets, we applied an "ortholog rescue" strategy for those producing insoluble or difficult to crystallize proteins, resulting in the addition of 387 orthologs (or paralogs from seven other Burkholderia species into the SSGCID pipeline. This structural genomics approach yielded structures from 31 putative essential targets from B. thailandensis, and 25 orthologs from other Burkholderia species, yielding an overall structural coverage for 49 of the 406 essential gene families, with a total of 88 depositions into the Protein Data Bank. Of these, 25 proteins have properties of a potential antimicrobial drug target i.e., no close human homolog, part of an essential metabolic pathway, and a deep binding pocket. We describe the structures of several potential drug targets in detail.This collection of structures, solubility and experimental essentiality data provides a resource for development of drugs against

  7. Type III Secretion: a Virulence Factor Delivery System Essential for the Pathogenicity of Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Ricky L; DeShazer, David

    2004-01-01

    By creating mutations in the Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 animal pathogen-like type III secretion system (TTSS), this study analyzes the correlation between type III secretion and the pathogenicity of ATCC 23344 in vivo. Mutagenesis demonstrated that a functional TTSS was required for the full pathogenicity of ATCC 23344 in the BALB/c mouse and Syrian hamster models of infection. However, vaccination with each mutant failed to elicit a protective immunity against challenge with wild-type AT...

  8. Mining Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions to Characterize Burkholderia mallei Infectivity Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Pieper, Rembert; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pathogenicity relies on protein virulence factors to control and promote bacterial internalization, survival, and replication within eukaryotic host cells. We recently used yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening to identify a small set of novel Burkholderia proteins that were shown to attenuate disease progression in an aerosol infection animal model using the virulent Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 strain. Here, we performed an extended analysis of primarily nine B. mallei virulence factors and their interactions with human proteins to map out how the bacteria can influence and alter host processes and pathways. Specifically, we employed topological analyses to assess the connectivity patterns of targeted host proteins, identify modules of pathogen-interacting host proteins linked to processes promoting infectivity, and evaluate the effect of crosstalk among the identified host protein modules. Overall, our analysis showed that the targeted host proteins generally had a large number of interacting partners and interacted with other host proteins that were also targeted by B. mallei proteins. We also introduced a novel Host-Pathogen Interaction Alignment (HPIA) algorithm and used it to explore similarities between host-pathogen interactions of B. mallei, Yersinia pestis, and Salmonella enterica. We inferred putative roles of B. mallei proteins based on the roles of their aligned Y. pestis and S. enterica partners and showed that up to 73% of the predicted roles matched existing annotations. A key insight into Burkholderia pathogenicity derived from these analyses of Y2H host-pathogen interactions is the identification of eukaryotic-specific targeted cellular mechanisms, including the ubiquitination degradation system and the use of the focal adhesion pathway as a fulcrum for transmitting mechanical forces and regulatory signals. This provides the mechanisms to modulate and adapt the host-cell environment for the successful establishment of host infections

  9. Burkholderia kirstenboschensis sp. nov. nodulates papilionoid legumes indigenous to South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Emma T; van Zyl, Elritha; Beukes, Chrizelle W; Avontuur, Juanita R; Chan, Wai Yin; Palmer, Marike; Mthombeni, Lunghile S; Phalane, Francina L; Sereme, T Karabo; Venter, Stephanus N

    2015-12-01

    Despite the diversity of Burkholderia species known to nodulate legumes in introduced and native regions, relatively few taxa have been formally described. For example, the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa is thought to represent one of the major centres of diversity for the rhizobial members of Burkholderia, yet only five species have been described from legumes occurring in this region and numerous are still awaiting taxonomic treatment. Here, we investigated the taxonomic status of 12 South African root-nodulating Burkholderia isolates from native papilionoid legumes (Hypocalyptus coluteoides, H. oxalidifolius, H. sophoroides and Virgilia oroboides). Analysis of four gene regions (16S rRNA, recA, atpD and rpoB) revealed that the isolates represent a genealogically unique and exclusive assemblage within the genus. Its distinctness was supported by all other aspects of the polyphasic approach utilized, including the genome-based criteria DNA-DNA hybridization (≥70.9%) and average nucleotide identities (≥96%). We accordingly propose the name B. kirstenboschensis sp. nov. for this taxon with isolate Kb15(T) (=LMG 28727(T); =SARC 695(T)) as its type strain. Our data showed that intraspecific genome size differences (≥0.81 Mb) and the occurrence of large DNA regions that are apparently unique to single individuals (16-23% of an isolate's genome) can significantly limit the value of data obtained from DNA-DNA hybridization experiments. Substitution of DNA-DNA hybridization with whole genome sequencing as a prerequisite for the description of Burkholderia species will undoubtedly speed up the pace at which their diversity are documented, especially in hyperdiverse regions such as the Cape Floristic Region.

  10. Evaluation of six commercial DNA extraction kits for recovery of Burkholderia pseudomallei DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maria Angela de Mello; Zimmermann, Pia; Messelhäußer, Ute; Sing, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Six commercially available DNA extraction kits, as well as thermal lysis and proteinase K DNA extraction were evaluated regarding bacterial inactivation, DNA yield and purity, and their use in a Burkholderia pseudomallei real-time PCR. While all methods successfully inactivated the bacteria, by measuring DNA purity and the level of detection by real-time PCR, the proteinase K method was the most sensitive.

  11. The Twin Arginine Translocation System Is Essential for Aerobic Growth and Full Virulence of Burkholderia thailandensis

    OpenAIRE

    Wagley, Sariqa; Hemsley, Claudia; Thomas, Rachael; Madeleine G Moule; Vanaporn, Muthita; Andreae, Clio; Robinson, Matthew; Goldman, Stan; Brendan W. Wren; Butler, Clive S.; Richard W Titball

    2014-01-01

    The twin arginine translocation (Tat) system in bacteria is responsible for transporting folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane, and in some bacteria, Tat-exported substrates have been linked to virulence. We report here that the Tat machinery is present in Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis, and we show that the system is essential for aerobic but not anaerobic growth. Switching off of the Tat system in B. thailandensis grown anaerobically resulted in filamen...

  12. Mining host-pathogen protein interactions to characterize Burkholderia mallei infectivity mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Memišević

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pathogenicity relies on protein virulence factors to control and promote bacterial internalization, survival, and replication within eukaryotic host cells. We recently used yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screening to identify a small set of novel Burkholderia proteins that were shown to attenuate disease progression in an aerosol infection animal model using the virulent Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 strain. Here, we performed an extended analysis of primarily nine B. mallei virulence factors and their interactions with human proteins to map out how the bacteria can influence and alter host processes and pathways. Specifically, we employed topological analyses to assess the connectivity patterns of targeted host proteins, identify modules of pathogen-interacting host proteins linked to processes promoting infectivity, and evaluate the effect of crosstalk among the identified host protein modules. Overall, our analysis showed that the targeted host proteins generally had a large number of interacting partners and interacted with other host proteins that were also targeted by B. mallei proteins. We also introduced a novel Host-Pathogen Interaction Alignment (HPIA algorithm and used it to explore similarities between host-pathogen interactions of B. mallei, Yersinia pestis, and Salmonella enterica. We inferred putative roles of B. mallei proteins based on the roles of their aligned Y. pestis and S. enterica partners and showed that up to 73% of the predicted roles matched existing annotations. A key insight into Burkholderia pathogenicity derived from these analyses of Y2H host-pathogen interactions is the identification of eukaryotic-specific targeted cellular mechanisms, including the ubiquitination degradation system and the use of the focal adhesion pathway as a fulcrum for transmitting mechanical forces and regulatory signals. This provides the mechanisms to modulate and adapt the host-cell environment for the successful establishment of

  13. Global analysis of the Burkholderia thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Jacobs, Michael; Armour, Christopher D; Radey, Mathew; Schneider, Emily; Phattarasokul, Somsak; Bunt, Richard; Greenberg, E Peter

    2014-04-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis contains three acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing circuits and has two additional LuxR homologs. To identify B. thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled genes, we carried out transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of quorum sensing mutants and their parent. The analyses were grounded in the fact that we identified genes coding for factors shown previously to be regulated by quorum sensing among a larger set of quorum-controlled genes. We also found that genes coding for contact-dependent inhibition were induced by quorum sensing and confirmed that specific quorum sensing mutants had a contact-dependent inhibition defect. Additional quorum-controlled genes included those for the production of numerous secondary metabolites, an uncharacterized exopolysaccharide, and a predicted chitin-binding protein. This study provides insights into the roles of the three quorum sensing circuits in the saprophytic lifestyle of B. thailandensis, and it provides a foundation on which to build an understanding of the roles of quorum sensing in the biology of B. thailandensis and the closely related pathogenic Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

  14. Biodegradation of PAHs by Burkholderia sp. VITRSB1 Isolated from Marine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Revathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs pollution to the environment is a major threat to the living organisms, and hence the degradation of these PAHs is necessary. Studies on PAHs degrading bacteria have focussed on terrestrial microbes and the potential of marine derived microbes is undermined. Herein we report the isolation and characterization of PAHs degrading Burkholderia sp. from lagoon sediments collected at the Southern coast of India. The strain was Gram negative, rod-shaped, motile, and ∼2–5 μm in length. Based on the phylogenetic data the strain was identified as Burkholderia and designated as VITRSB1. Initial PAHs degradation ability of the strain was assessed using basal salt medium supplemented with diesel, kerosene, toluene, aniline, naphthalene, and phenol. The strain was found to be effectively degrading kerosene, diesel, toluene, and aniline even at higher concentration (1%. However, naphthalene and aniline were degraded only at lower concentration (0.1% and phenol, camphor, and DAP inhibited the growth of the strain. Furthermore, the degraded end products of the PAHs were determined using FTIR. Notably, none of the end products were found to be toxic to the biosphere. Our results indicate that the isolated Burkholderia sp. could be a prospective candidate for the effective degradation of selective PAHs.

  15. Extreme antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slade A. Loutet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins are a group of naturally occurring antibiotics that can also possess immunomodulatory activities. They are considered a new source of antibiotics for treating infections by bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics. Members of the genus Burkholderia, which includes various human pathogens, are inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides. The resistance is several orders of magnitude higher than that of other Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review summarizes our current understanding of antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia. These bacteria possess major and minor resistance mechanisms that will be described in detail. Recent studies have revealed that many other emerging Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens may also be inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins and we propose that Burkholderia species are a model system to investigate the molecular basis of the resistance in extremely resistant bacteria. Understanding resistance in these types of bacteria will be important if antimicrobial peptides come to be used regularly for the treatment of infections by susceptible bacteria because this may lead to increased resistance in the species that are currently susceptible and may also open up new niches for opportunistic pathogens with high inherent resistance.

  16. Oxyfunctionalization of pyridine derivatives using whole cells of Burkholderia sp. MAK1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevičiūtė, Jonita; Vaitekūnas, Justas; Petkevičius, Vytautas; Gasparavičiūtė, Renata; Tauraitė, Daiva; Meškys, Rolandas

    2016-01-01

    Pyridinols and pyridinamines are important intermediates with many applications in chemical industry. The pyridine derivatives are in great demand as synthons for pharmaceutical products. Moreover, pyridines are used either as biologically active substances or as building blocks for polymers with unique physical properties. Application of enzymes or whole cells is an attractive strategy for preparation of hydroxylated pyridines since the methods for chemical synthesis of pyridinols, particularly aminopyridinols, are usually limited or inefficient. Burkholderia sp. MAK1 (DSM102049), capable of using pyridin-2-ol as the sole carbon and energy source, was isolated from soil. Whole cells of Burkholderia sp. MAK1 were confirmed to possess a good ability to convert different pyridin-2-amines and pyridin-2-ones into their 5-hydroxy derivatives. Moreover, several methylpyridines as well as methylated pyrazines were converted to appropriate N-oxides. In conclusion, regioselective oxyfunctionalization of pyridine derivatives using whole cells of Burkholderia sp. MAK1 is a promising method for the preparation of various pyridin-5-ols and pyridin-N-oxides. PMID:27982075

  17. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis ( Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D10 values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased ( Pbacteria were observed among different levels of NaCl and pH. D10 values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  18. Effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate) survival under combinations of pH and NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, Jeollabuk 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyoung-Hee [Department of Oral Microbiology, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeollabuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon, E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.k [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, Jeollabuk 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on Burkholderia thailandensis (Burkholderia pseudomallei surrogate; potential bioterrorism agent) survival under different levels of NaCl and pH. B. thailandensis in Luria Bertani broth supplemented with NaCl (0-3%), and pH-adjusted to 4-7 was treated with gamma irradiation (0-0.5 kGy). Surviving cell counts of bacteria were then enumerated on tryptic soy agar. Data for the cell counts were also used to calculate D{sub 10} values (the dose required to reduce 1 log CFU/mL of B. thailandensis). Cell counts of B. thailandensis were decreased (P<0.05) as irradiation dose increased, and no differences (P>=0.05) in cell counts of the bacteria were observed among different levels of NaCl and pH. D{sub 10} values ranged from 0.04 to 0.07 kGy, regardless of NaCl and pH level. These results indicate that low doses of gamma irradiation should be a useful treatment in decreasing the potential bioterrorism bacteria, which may possibly infect humans through foods.

  19. Volcanic Soils as Sources of Novel CO-Oxidizing Paraburkholderia and Burkholderia: Paraburkholderia hiiakae sp. nov., Paraburkholderia metrosideri sp. nov., Paraburkholderia paradisi sp. nov., Paraburkholderia peleae sp. nov., and Burkholderia alpina sp. nov. a Member of the Burkholderia cepacia Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn F.; King, Gary M.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that members of the Burkholderiales were important in the succession of aerobic, molybdenum-dependent CO oxidizing-bacteria on volcanic soils. During these studies, four isolates were obtained from Kilauea Volcano (Hawai‘i, USA); one strain was isolated from Pico de Orizaba (Mexico) during a separate study. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, the Pico de Orizaba isolate and the isolates from Kilauea Volcano were provisionally assigned to the genera Burkholderia and Paraburkholderia, respectively. Each of the isolates possessed a form I coxL gene that encoded the catalytic subunit of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH); none of the most closely related type strains possessed coxL or oxidized CO. Genome sequences for Paraburkholderia type strains facilitated an analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities and average nucleotide identities (ANI). ANI did not exceed 95% (the recommended cutoff for species differentiation) for any of the pairwise comparisons among 27 reference strains related to the new isolates. However, since the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity among this set of reference strains was 98.93%, DNA-DNA hybridizations (DDH) were performed for two isolates whose 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with their nearest phylogenetic neighbors were 98.96 and 99.11%. In both cases DDH values were <16%. Based on multiple variables, four of the isolates represent novel species within the Paraburkholderia: Paraburkholderia hiiakae sp. nov. (type strain I2T = DSM 28029T = LMG 27952T); Paraburkholderia paradisi sp. nov. (type strain WAT = DSM 28027T = LMG 27949T); Paraburkholderia peleae sp. nov. (type strain PP52-1T = DSM 28028T = LMG 27950T); and Paraburkholderia metrosideri sp. nov. (type strain DNBP6-1T = DSM 28030T = LMG 28140T). The remaining isolate represents the first CO-oxidizing member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex: Burkholderia alpina sp. nov. (type strain PO-04-17-38T = DSM 28031T = LMG 28138T

  20. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  1. Burkholderia thailandensis harbors two identical rhl gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of rhamnolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Donald E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhamnolipids are surface active molecules composed of rhamnose and β-hydroxydecanoic acid. These biosurfactants are produced mainly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and have been thoroughly investigated since their early discovery. Recently, they have attracted renewed attention because of their involvement in various multicellular behaviors. Despite this high interest, only very few studies have focused on the production of rhamnolipids by Burkholderia species. Results Orthologs of rhlA, rhlB and rhlC, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of rhamnolipids in P. aeruginosa, have been found in the non-infectious Burkholderia thailandensis, as well as in the genetically similar important pathogen B. pseudomallei. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, both Burkholderia species contain these three genes necessary for rhamnolipid production within a single gene cluster. Furthermore, two identical, paralogous copies of this gene cluster are found on the second chromosome of these bacteria. Both Burkholderia spp. produce rhamnolipids containing 3-hydroxy fatty acid moieties with longer side chains than those described for P. aeruginosa. Additionally, the rhamnolipids produced by B. thailandensis contain a much larger proportion of dirhamnolipids versus monorhamnolipids when compared to P. aeruginosa. The rhamnolipids produced by B. thailandensis reduce the surface tension of water to 42 mN/m while displaying a critical micelle concentration value of 225 mg/L. Separate mutations in both rhlA alleles, which are responsible for the synthesis of the rhamnolipid precursor 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxyalkanoic acid, prove that both copies of the rhl gene cluster are functional, but one contributes more to the total production than the other. Finally, a double ΔrhlA mutant that is completely devoid of rhamnolipid production is incapable of swarming motility, showing that both gene clusters contribute to this phenotype. Conclusions Collectively, these

  2. Draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sordidicola S170, a potential plant growth promoter isolated from coniferous forest soil in the Czech Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lladó, Salvador; Xu, Zhuofei; Sørensen, Søren Johannes;

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia species are key players in the accumulation of carbon from cellulose decomposition in coniferous forest ecosystems. We report here the draft genome of Burkholderia sordidicola strain S170, containing features associated with known genes involved in plant growth promotion, the biologi...

  3. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kênia KP Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Design: Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants: Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Intervention: Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Outcome measures: Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Results: Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8, showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14 and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25; it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96 compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. Conclusion: This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30 minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015020683. [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016 Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory

  4. Respiratory Issues in OI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory Issues in Osteogenesis Imperfecta 804 W. Diamond Ave., Ste. 210 Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (800) 981-2663 (301) 947-0083 Fax: (301) 947-0456 ... www.oif.org Email: bonelink@oif.org The Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation, Inc. is the only voluntary national health ...

  5. Obesity and respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Christopher; Liddicoat, Helen; Moonsie, Ian; Makker, Himender

    2010-10-20

    The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.

  6. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  7. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  8. Respiratory Resistance In Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael J.

    1975-01-01

    Patients' respiratory problems may interfere with their talking in therapy sessions. Interventions by the therapist must be based on an understanding of the underlying dynamics which produced the respiratory problem. (Author)

  9. American Association for Respiratory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NBRC Credentials Congress News & Highlights Clinician Training on Tobacco Dependence for Respiratory Therapists Increase your skill with ... 12 Dad’s Struggle with ALS Inspires Respiratory Therapy Student Read More Oct 12 RSV Experience Leads Member ...

  10. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    of our study was to compare the resulting imaging quality by the use of a time-based respiratory gating system in two groups administered either adenosine or dipyridamole as the pharmacological stress agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were randomized to adenosine or dipyridamole cardiac...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4......BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...

  11. Respiratory manifestations in amyloidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ling; CAI Bai-qiang; ZHONG Xu; ZHU Yuan-jue

    2005-01-01

    Background Amyloidosis is a collection of diseases in which different proteins are deposited. Amyloid deposits occur in systemic and organ-limited forms. In both systemic and localized forms of the disease, lung can be involved. The aim of this study was to explore the different respiratory manifestations of amyloidosis. Methods Chest radiology, clinical presentations, bronchoscopic/laryngoscopic findings and lung function data of 59 patients with amyloidosis involving respiratory tract collected during January 1986 to March 2005, were analysed.Results Of the 16 cases with localized respiratory tract amyloidosis, 8 had the lesions in the trachea and the bronchi, 2 in the larynx and the trachea, 5 in the larynx and/or the pharynx, and 1 in the lung parenchyma. Of 43 systemic amyloidosis with respiratory tract involvement, 3 had the lesions in bronchi, 13 in lung parenchyma, 33 in pleura, 8 in mediastina, 1 in nose and 1 in pharynx. Chest X-rays were normal in most cases of tracheobronchial amyloidosis. CT, unlike chest X-rays, showed irregular luminal narrowing, airway wall thickening with calcifications and soft tissue shadows in airway lumen. Localized lung parenchymal amyloidosis presented as multiple nodules. Multiple nodular opacities, patch shadows and reticular opacities were the main radiological findings in systemic amyloidosis with lung parenchymal involvement. In pleural amyloidosis, pleural effusions and pleural thickening were detected. Mediastinal and/or hilar adenopathy were also a form of lung involvement in systemic amyloidosis. The major bronchoscopic findings of tracheobronchial amyloidosis were narrowing of airway lumen, while nodular, 'tumour like' or 'bubble like' masses, with missing or vague cartilaginous rings, were detected in about half of the patients.Conclusions Localized respiratory tract amyloidosis mostly affects the trachea and the bronchi. Chest X-rays are not sensitive to detect these lesions. Systemic amyloidosis often involves

  12. Alteration in cell surface properties of Burkholderia spp. during surfactant-aided biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Sagarika; Mukherji, Suparna [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India). Centre for Environmental Science and Engineering (CESE)

    2012-04-15

    Chemical surfactants may impact microbial cell surface properties, i.e., cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and cell surface charge, and may thus affect the uptake of components from non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). This work explored the impact of Triton X-100, Igepal CA 630, and Tween 80 (at twice the critical micelle concentration, CMC) on the cell surface characteristics of Burkholderia cultures, Burkholderia cepacia (ES1, aliphatic degrader) and Burkholderia multivorans (NG1, aromatic degrader), when grown on a six-component model NAPL. In the presence of Triton X-100, NAPL biodegradation was enhanced from 21% to 60% in B. cepacia and from 18% to 53% in B. multivorans. CSH based on water contact angle (50-52 ) was in the same range for both strains while zeta potential at neutral pH was -38 and -31 mV for B. cepacia and B. multivorans, respectively. In the presence of Triton X-100, their CSH increased to greater than 75 and the zeta potential decreased. This induced a change in the mode of uptake and initiated aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation by B. multivorans and increased the rate of aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation in B. cepacia. Igepal CA 630 and Tween 80 also altered the cell surface properties. For B. cepacia grown in the presence of Triton X-100 at two and five times its CMC, CSH increased significantly in the log growth phase. Growth in the presence of the chemical surfactants also affected the abundance of chemical functional groups on the cell surface. Cell surface changes had maximum impact on NAPL degradation in the presence of emulsifying surfactants, Triton X-100 and Igepal CA630.

  13. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei O-antigen serotypes in near-neighbor species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Joshua K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and a CDC category B select agent with no available effective vaccine. Previous immunizations in mice have utilized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a potential vaccine target because it is known as one of the most important antigenic epitopes in B. pseudomallei. Complicating this strategy are the four different B. pseudomallei LPS O-antigen types: A, B, B2, and rough. Sero-crossreactivity is common among O-antigens of Burkholderia species. Here, we identified the presence of multiple B. pseudomallei O-antigen types and sero-crossreactivity in its near-neighbor species. Results PCR screening of O-antigen biosynthesis genes, phenotypic characterization using SDS-PAGE, and immunoblot analysis showed that majority of B. mallei and B. thailandensis strains contained the typical O-antigen type A. In contrast, most of B. ubonensis and B. thailandensis-like strains expressed the atypical O-antigen types B and B2, respectively. Most B. oklahomensis strains expressed a distinct and non-seroreactive O-antigen type, except strain E0147 which expressed O-antigen type A. O-antigen type B2 was also detected in B. thailandensis 82172, B. ubonensis MSMB108, and Burkholderia sp. MSMB175. Interestingly, B. thailandensis-like MSMB43 contained a novel serotype B positive O-antigen. Conclusions This study expands the number of species which express B. pseudomallei O-antigen types. Further work is required to elucidate the full structures and how closely these are to the B. pseudomallei O-antigens, which will ultimately determine the efficacy of the near-neighbor B serotypes for vaccine development.

  14. Identification and cloning of four riboswitches from Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyati-Othman, Noor; Fatah, Ahmad Luqman Abdul; Piji, Mohd Al Akmarul Fizree Bin Md; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Raih, Mohd Firdaus

    2015-09-01

    Structured RNAs referred as riboswitches have been predicted to be present in the genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain K96243. Four of the riboswitches were identified and analyzed through BLASTN, Rfam search and multiple sequence alignment. The RNA aptamers belong to the following riboswitch classifications: glycine riboswitch, cobalamin riboswitch, S-adenosyl-(L)-homocysteine (SAH) riboswitch and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch. The conserved nucleotides for each aptamer were identified and were marked on the secondary structure generated by RNAfold. These riboswitches were successfully amplified and cloned for further study.

  15. N-acylhomoserine-lactone-mediated communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia in mixed biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, K; Hentzer, Morten; Geisenberger, O

    2001-01-01

    were used to visualize AHL-mediated communication in mixed biofilms, which were cultivated either in artificial flow chambers or in alginate beads in mouse lung tissue. In both model systems B. cepacia was capable of perceiving the AHL signals produced by P. aeruginosa, while the latter strain did......Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia are capable of forming mixed biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria employ quorum-sensing systems, which rely on N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules, to co-ordinate expression of virulence factors...

  16. A rare case of community acquired Burkholderia cepacia infection presenting as pyopneumothorax in an immunocompetent individual

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suman S Karanth; Hariharan Regunath; Kiran Chawla; Mukhyaprana Prabhu

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia) infection is rarely reported in an immunocompetent host. It is a well known occurence in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease where it increases both morbidity and mortality. It has also been included in the list of organisms causing nosocomial infections in an immunocompetent host, most of them transmitted from the immunocompromised patient in which this organism harbors. We report a rare case of isolation of B. cepacia from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of an immunocompetent agriculturist who presented with productive cough and fever associated with a pyopneumothorax. This is the first case of community acquired infection reported in an immunocompetent person in India.

  17. Eradication of Burkholderia cepacia Using Inhaled Aztreonam Lysine in Two Patients with Bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Iglesias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are not many articles about the chronic bronchial infection/colonization in patients with underlying lung disease other than cystic fibrosis (CF, especially with non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFBQ. The prevalence of B. cepacia complex is not well known in NCFBQ. The vast majority of published clinical data on Burkholderia infection in individuals with CF is comprised of uncontrolled, anecdotal, and/or single center experiences, and no consensus has emerged regarding treatment. We present two cases diagnosed with bronchiectasis (BQ of different etiology, with early pulmonary infection by B. cepacia complex, which was eradicated with inhaled aztreonam lysine.

  18. A rare case of community acquired Burkholderia cepacia infection presenting as pyopneumothorax in an immunocompetent individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman S Karanth

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia infection is rarely reported in an immunocompetent host. It is a well known occurence in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease where it increases both morbidity and mortality. It has also been included in the list of organisms causing nosocomial infections in an immunocompetent host, most of them transmitted from the immunocompromised patient in which this organism harbors. We report a rare case of isolation of B. cepacia from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of an immunocompetent agriculturist who presented with productive cough and fever associated with a pyopneumothorax. This is the first case of community acquired infection reported in an immunocompetent person in India.

  19. A new bacterial disease of carnation in Portugal caused by Burkholderia andropogonis

    OpenAIRE

    Madalena Eloy; Leonor Cruz

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of a leaf spot disease of carnation caused by Burkholderia andropogonis is recorded for the first time in Portugal. Symptoms consisted of ‘eyespot’ lesions on all aerial plant parts, often bordered by water-soaked halos on the leaves. As the disease progressed lesions became dark brown and affected areas dried out. Phenotypic studies and Polymerase Chain Reaction using specific primers Pf/Pr targeted to 16S rDNA of B. andropogonis were used to identify the pathogen. Pathogenici...

  20. Investigating early stages of biocorrosion with XPS: AISI 304 stainless steel exposed to Burkholderia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Saastamoinen, Tuomas

    1999-04-01

    We have investigated the interactions of an exopolymer-producing bacteria, Burkholderia sp. with polished AISI 304 stainless steel substrates using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Steel coupons were exposed to the pure bacteria culture in a specially designed flowcell for 6 h during which the experiment was monitored in situ with an optical microscope. XPS results verified the formation of biofilm containing extracellular polymer on all the samples exposed to bacteria. Sputter results indicated that some ions needed for metabolic processes were trapped within the biofilm. Changes in the relative Fe concentration and Fe 2p peak shape indicated that also iron had accumulated into the biofilm.

  1. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechan

  2. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement......% of newly diagnosed patients with overt hypothyroidism, and demonstrated reversibility following treatment. The evidence for or against a direct effect on pulmonary function was ambiguous. However, each of the above mentioned areas were only dealt with in a limited number of studies. Therefore, we refrain...

  3. Respiratory active mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Peleato, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Enriquez, Jose Antonio

    2008-11-21

    The structural organization of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes as four big independently moving entities connected by the mobile carriers CoQ and cytochrome c has been challenged recently. Blue native gel electrophoresis reveals the presence of high-molecular-weight bands containing several respiratory complexes and suggesting an in vivo assembly status of these structures (respirasomes). However, no functional evidence of the activity of supercomplexes as true respirasomes has been provided yet. We have observed that (1) supercomplexes are not formed when one of their component complexes is absent; (2) there is a temporal gap between the formation of the individual complexes and that of the supercomplexes; (3) some putative respirasomes contain CoQ and cytochrome c; (4) isolated respirasomes can transfer electrons from NADH to O(2), that is, they respire. Therefore, we have demonstrated the existence of a functional respirasome and propose a structural organization model that accommodates these findings.

  4. Respiratory fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James B

    2011-02-01

    This article covers several aspects of respiratory fluid mechanics that have been actively investigated by our group over the years. For the most part, the topics involve two-phase flows in the respiratory system with applications to normal and diseased lungs, as well as therapeutic interventions. Specifically, the topics include liquid plug flow in airways and at airway bifurcations as it relates to surfactant, drug, gene, or stem cell delivery into the lung; liquid plug rupture and its damaging effects on underlying airway epithelial cells as well as a source of crackling sounds in the lung; airway closure from "capillary-elastic instabilities," as well as nonlinear stabilization from oscillatory core flow which we call the "oscillating butter knife;" liquid film, and surfactant dynamics in an oscillating alveolus and the steady streaming, and surfactant spreading on thin viscous films including our discovery of the Grotberg-Borgas-Gaver shock.

  5. [Asbestos and respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpereel, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Previous occupational asbestos exposure (more rarely environmental or domestic exposure) may induce various pleural and/or pulmonary, benign or malignant diseases, sometimes with a very long latency for malignant mesothelioma (MM). Asbestos has been widely extracted and used in Western countries and in emerging or developing countries, resulting in a peak of MM incidence in France around 2020 and likely in a world pandemic of asbestos-induced diseases. These patients have mostly benign respiratory diseases (pleural plugs) but may also be diagnosed with lung cancer or malignant pleural mesothelioma, and have a global poor outcome. New therapeutic tools (targeted therapies, immunotherapy…) with first promising results are developed. However, it is crucial to obtain a full ban of asbestos use worldwide, and to do a regular follow-up of asbestos-exposed subjects, mostly if they are already diagnosed with benign respiratory diseases. Finally, new cancers (larynx and ovary) were recently added to the list of asbestos-induced tumors.

  6. Respiratory diseases in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary diseases are one of the major indirect causes of maternal deaths. Pregnancy is a unique physiological state during which changes occur in all systems of the body to meet metabolic needs of both the mother and growing foetus. Enlarging uterus and increasing hormonal levels cause changes in volumes and mechanics of lungs. Understanding the basic physiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory changes during pregnancy along with the pathology of disease processes are vital in makin...

  7. Nanotechnology in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlor, Albert Joachim; Nguyen, Juliane; Bals, Robert; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2015-05-29

    Like two sides of the same coin, nanotechnology can be both boon and bane for respiratory medicine. Nanomaterials open new ways in diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases. Nanoparticle based drug delivery systems can help against diseases such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, nanoparticles can be loaded with DNA and act as vectors for gene therapy in diseases like cystic fibrosis. Even lung diagnostics with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profits from new nanoparticle based contrast agents. However, the risks of nanotechnology also have to be taken into consideration as engineered nanomaterials resemble natural fine dusts and fibers, which are known to be harmful for the respiratory system in many cases. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles in the respiratory tract can influence the immune system, can create oxidative stress and even cause genotoxicity. Another important aspect to assess the safety of nanotechnology based products is the absorption of nanoparticles. It was demonstrated that the amount of pulmonary nanoparticle uptake not only depends on physical and chemical nanoparticle characteristics but also on the health status of the organism. The huge diversity in nanotechnology could revolutionize medicine but makes safety assessment a challenging task.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Soil Bacterium Burkholderia terrae Strain BS001, Which Interacts with Fungal Surface Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazir, Rashid; Hansen, Martin A.; Sorensen, Soren

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia terrae BS001 is a soil bacterium which was originally isolated from the mycosphere of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria proxima. It exhibits a range of fungus-interacting traits which reveal its propensity to actively interact at fungal interfaces. Here, we present the approximatel...

  9. The cep quorum-sensing system of Burkholderia cepacia H111 controls biofilm formation and swarming motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, B.; Riedel, K.; Hentzer, Morten;

    2001-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa often co-exist as mixed biofilms in the lungs of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, the isolation of random mini-Tn5 insertion mutants of B. cepacia H111 defective in biofilm formation on an abiotic surface is reported. It is demons...

  10. South african papilionoid legumes are nodulated by diverse burkholderia with unique nodulation and nitrogen-fixation Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukes, Chrizelle W; Venter, Stephanus N; Law, Ian J; Phalane, Francina L; Steenkamp, Emma T

    2013-01-01

    The root-nodule bacteria of legumes endemic to the Cape Floristic Region are largely understudied, even though recent reports suggest the occurrence of nodulating Burkholderia species unique to the region. In this study, we considered the diversity and evolution of nodulating Burkholderia associated with the endemic papilionoid tribes Hypocalypteae and Podalyrieae. We identified distinct groups from verified rhizobial isolates by phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA housekeeping gene regions. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the nodulation and diazotrophy of these rhizobia we analysed the genes encoding NifH and NodA. The majority of these 69 isolates appeared to be unique, potentially representing novel species. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer determining the symbiotic ability of these Cape Floristic Region isolates indicate evolutionary origins distinct from those of nodulating Burkholderia from elsewhere in the world. Overall, our findings suggest that Burkholderia species associated with fynbos legumes are highly diverse and their symbiotic abilities have unique ancestries. It is therefore possible that the evolution of these bacteria is closely linked to the diversification and establishment of legumes characteristic of the Cape Floristic Region.

  11. Chronic suppurative joint effusion due to burkholderia pseudomallei: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi Deshmukh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative bacillus is the causative agent of Melioidosis, a glanders-like disease, primarily a disease of animals. Melioidosis has been only a rare and sporadic disease in humans outside its endemic region. Currently, diagnosis of B. pseudomallei in the clinical laboratory is very difficult, owing to low awareness of physicians to the nonspecific clinical manifestations, lack of responsiveness among microbiologists outside endemic areas, identification systems in the average sentinel laboratory, and the biosafety conditions necessary to process these organisms. We report a case of chronic left hip joint effusion in a known case of diabetes mellitus. Gram stain of computed tomography (CT-guided aspirate from the joint revealed Gram-negative bacilli along with pus cells. Culture was confirmed as Burkholderia pseudomallei on Vitek2C, which was sensitive to ceftazidime and trimethoprim/sulfmethoxazole. Unfortunately, patient could not be started on appropriate antibiotics due to delay in detection and patient succumbed to severe septicemia. This case is reported to highlight importance of automated identification and sensitivity especially in nonendemic areas and unusual antibiogram of this organism for which disc diffusion method is not standardized.

  12. Inhibition of Burkholderia multivorans Adhesion to Lung Epithelial Cells by Bivalent Lactosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinidad Velasco-Torrijos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc is an opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients which is inherently resistant to antimicrobial agents. The mechanisms of attachment and pathogenesis of Bcc, a group of 17 species, are poorly understood. The most commonly identified Bcc species in newly colonised patients, Burkholderia multivorans, continues to be acquired from the environment. Development of therapies which can prevent or reduce the risk of colonization on exposure to Bcc in the environment would be a better alternative to antimicrobial agents. Previously, it has been shown that Bcc strains bound to many glycolipid receptors on lung epithelia. Using a real-time PCR method to quantify the levels of binding of B. multivorans to the lung epithelial cells, we have examined glycoconjugate derivatives for their potential to inhibit host cell attachment. Bivalent lactosides previously shown to inhibit galectin binding significantly reduced the attachment of B. multivorans to CF lung epithelial cells at micromolar concentrations. This was in contrast to monosaccharides and lactose, which were only effective in the millimolar range. Development of glycoconjugate therapies such as these, which inhibit attachment to lung epithelial cells, represent an alternative means of preventing infection with inherently antimicrobially resistant pathogens such as B. multivorans.

  13. Genomovars of Burkholderia cepacia Complex from Rice Rhizosphere and Clinic in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is regarded as a genetically distinct but phenotypically similar bacteria group referring to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), which is found not only in clinic but also in rice growing environment. It is very important in microbial safety of rice for us to understand the genomovar status of Bcc. Genomovar analysis was performed among 87 Bcc isolates by means of Hae Ⅲ-recA RFLP assays and species-specific PCR tests. Three genomovars were found from the rice rhizosphere including Ⅰ, ⅢB and Ⅴ, and genomovar Ⅴ was predominant. Genomovars Ⅰ, ⅢA and ⅢB existed in the clinical samples, and genomovar ⅢA was the most popular. It showed that genomovar composition was different between the Bcc strains from the rice rhizosphere and clinical environment. Simultaneously, the results revealed the genetic diversity of Bcc strains from the rice rhizosphere, and genomovar Ⅲ referred as virulent species in clinic also existed in the rice rhizosphere.

  14. Use of a recombinant burkholderia intracellular motility a protein for immunodiagnosis of glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Subodh; Malik, Praveen; Verma, Shailendra Kumar; Pal, Vijai; Gautam, Vandana; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Rai, Ganga Prasad

    2011-09-01

    Glanders, caused by the Gram-negative, nonmotile bacterium Burkholderia mallei, is a contagious and highly fatal disease of equines. During the last decade, the number of glanders outbreaks has increased steadily. The disease also has high zoonotic significance and B. mallei is listed biological warfare agent. The complement fixation test (CFT) is a routinely used and internationally recognized test to screen equine sera for the glanders. However, discrepant results have been observed using the CFT. The low sensitivity and specificity of the CFT and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) have been linked to the use of crude test antigens. We expressed a novel recombinant Burkholderia intracellular motility A (rBimA) protein in Escherichia coli for the diagnosis of equine glanders. Purified rBimA was used in an indirect ELISA format. All of the 21 true-positive serum samples used in the study tested positive, whereas only 17 of the 1,524 potentially negative sera tested positive by indirect ELISA, thus exhibiting 100% sensitivity and 98.88% specificity. Also, rBimA protein did not react with melioidosis patient and normal healthy human serum samples, showing its high specificity. The developed assay can be used as a simple and rapid tool for diagnosis of glanders in equine serum samples. An Indian patent (1328/DEL/2010) has been filed for the reagent.

  15. A comparison of virulence of intraperitoneal infection of Burkholderia mallei strains in guinea-pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslampanah, M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Male guinea pigs show high susceptibility to Burkholderia mallei and have been used as animal models in glanders studies. The purpose of our study was to elucidate glanders comparative pathogenesis in guinea pigs. We present here the histological changes and bacterial isolation that develop over time in guinea pigs inoculated intraperitoneally (IP with two strain of B. mallei. Ten male guinea pigs were inoculated intraperitoneally with either the standard strain of Burkholderia mallei or B. mallei strain from Siberian tiger at the Tehran zoo individually, then euthanized at multiple time points post inoculation. Histopathologic changes were similar in both groups and consisted of pyogranulomatous inflammation. In the standard strain study guinea pigs, changes were first seen at 48 hours in liver and heart then in spleen, lung, and kidney at day 3. These changes generally reached maximal incidence and severity by day 3 but decreased by comparison in all tissues except the liver, lung and kidney. Changes were first seen in Siberian tiger strain study guinea pigs also at 48 hours in lung, liver and spleen. At day 3, changes were present in liver, spleen and mediastinal lymph nodes. These changes were maximal at day 4 and 5. In contrast there are differences in incidence and severity between the two strain study guinea pigs. Our findings based on histopathological study indicate that Siberian tiger strain has more severity in gross and necropsy examination but in pathologic lesion was qualitatively similar generally. Additionally, by bacterial isolation, we confirmed the presence of B. mallei.

  16. Maize responds to Azotobacter sp and Burkholderia sp inoculation at reduced dose of nitrogen fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Sánchez-Yáñez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The positive maize response to inoculation with plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB as Azotobacter sp and Burkholderia sp an endophytic type, are an alternative to reduced and optimize nitrogen fertilizer (NF dose, recommended for this plant, without adversely affect its growth. The aim of this study was to analyze maize respond to inoculation with Azotobacter sp and Burkholderia sp at the dose 50% of FN. Used an experimental design of randomized blocks. By response variables: percent germination (%, the shoot and root phenology: plant height (PH, root length (RL and biomass: shoot fresh weight (SFW and root fresh weight (RFW, the shoot dry weight (SDW and root dry weight (RDW. The results indicated a positive maize respond to PGPB inoculation at germination, seedling and flowering level, reached a RDW of 7.03 g, statistically significant value compared with 2.60 g of RDW non inoculated maize feed with NF dose recommended regard as relative control (RC. This suggests a synergistic interaction among these PGPB in synthesis of plant growth promoting substances (PGPS on maize, to optimize the reduced NF dose.

  17. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  18. Macroautophagy is essential for killing of intracellular Burkholderia pseudomallei in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchai, Darawan; Riyapa, Donporn; Buddhisa, Surachat; Utispan, Kusumawadee; Titball, Richard W; Stevens, Mark P; Stevens, Joanne M; Ogawa, Michinaga; Tanida, Isei; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Ato, Manabu; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils play a key role in the control of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the pathogen that causes melioidosis. Here, we show that survival of intracellular B. pseudomallei was significantly increased in the presence of 3-methyladenine or lysosomal cathepsin inhibitors. The LC3-flux was increased in B. pseudomallei-infected neutrophils. Concordant with this result, confocal microscopy analyses using anti-LC3 antibodies revealed that B. pseudomallei-containing phagosomes partially overlapped with LC3-positive signal at 3 and 6 h postinfection. Electron microscopic analyses of B. pseudomallei-infected neutrophils at 3 h revealed B. pseudomallei-containing phagosomes that occasionally fused with phagophores or autophagosomes. Following infection with a B. pseudomallei mutant lacking the Burkholderia secretion apparatus Bsa Type III secretion system, neither this characteristic structure nor bacterial escape into the cytosol were observed. These findings indicate that human neutrophils are able to recruit autophagic machinery adjacent to B. pseudomallei-containing phagosomes in a Type III secretion system-dependent manner.

  19. Burkholderia contaminans Biofilm Regulating Operon and Its Distribution in Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Olga L; Kunda, Marina S; Ryzhova, Natalia N; Aksenova, Ekaterina I; Semenov, Andrey N; Romanova, Yulia M; Gintsburg, Alexandr L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Burkholderia spp. is a principal cause of lung chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. A "lacking biofilm production" (LBP) strain B. contaminans GIMC4587:Bct370-19 has been obtained by insertion modification of clinical strain with plasposon mutagenesis. It has an interrupted transcriptional response regulator (RR) gene. The focus of our investigation was a two-component signal transduction system determination, including this RR. B. contaminans clinical and LBP strains were analyzed by whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics resources. A four-component operon (BiofilmReg) has a key role in biofilm formation. The relative location (i.e., by being separated by another gene) of RR and histidine kinase genes is unique in BiofilmReg. Orthologs were found in other members of the Burkholderiales order. Phylogenetic analysis of strains containing BiofilmReg operons demonstrated evidence for earlier inheritance of a three-component operon. During further evolution one lineage acquired a fourth gene, whereas others lost the third component of the operon. Mutations in sensor domains have created biodiversity which is advantageous for adaptation to various ecological niches. Different species Burkholderia and Achromobacter strains all demonstrated similar BiofilmReg operon structure. Therefore, there may be an opportunity to develop a common drug which is effective for treating all these causative agents.

  20. Research Status and Prospect ofBurkholderia glumae, the Pathogen Causing Bacterial Panicle Blight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Zhou-qi; ZHU Bo; XIE Guan-lin; LI Bin; HUANG Shi-wen

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial panicle blight caused by Burkholderia glumae is one of the most severe seed-borne bacterial diseases of rice in the world. Currently, this disease has affected many countries of Asia, Africa, South and North America. It is a typical example of the shifting from minor plant disease to major disease due to the changes of environmental conditions. Some virulent factors of B. glumae have been identified, including toxoflavins and lipases, whose productions are dependent on the TofI/TofR quorum-sensing system, and type III effectors. In spite of its economic significance, neither effective control measure for this disease nor resistant rice variety is currently available. In recent years, genomics, transcriptomics and other molecular methods have provided useful information for better understanding the molecular mechanisms underlyingB. glumaevirulence and the rice defence mechanisms against pathogens. For the prevention of this pathogen, our laboratory has developed a rapid and sensitive multiplex PCR assay for detecting and distinguishingB. glumae from otherBurkholderia species. This improved understanding ofB. glumae will shed new light on bacterial panicle blight disease management.

  1. Variable virulence factors in Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis associated with human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek S Sarovich

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative environmental bacterium that causes melioidosis, a potentially life-threatening infectious disease affecting mammals, including humans. Melioidosis symptoms are both protean and diverse, ranging from mild, localized skin infections to more severe and often fatal presentations including pneumonia, septic shock with multiple internal abscesses and occasionally neurological involvement. Several ubiquitous virulence determinants in B. pseudomallei have already been discovered. However, the molecular basis for differential pathogenesis has, until now, remained elusive. Using clinical data from 556 Australian melioidosis cases spanning more than 20 years, we identified a Burkholderia mallei-like actin polymerization bimA(Bm gene that is strongly associated with neurological disease. We also report that a filamentous hemagglutinin gene, fhaB3, is associated with positive blood cultures but is negatively correlated with localized skin lesions without sepsis. We show, for the first time, that variably present virulence factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of melioidosis. Collectively, our study provides a framework for assessing other non-ubiquitous bacterial virulence factors and their association with disease, such as candidate loci identified from large-scale microbial genome-wide association studies.

  2. Burkholderia cepacia complex: Virulence characteristics, importance and relationship with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo Coutinho Henrique

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background : Burkholderia cepacia has been described as a cause of opportunist infections in patients with immune deficiency because of the high transmission rates. Actually the B. cepacia is subdivided in nine different genomic species that show morphological similarity, called genomovars. High mortality rates have been associated with infections caused by genomovars in susceptible patients; antibiotics are not efficient because of the high resistance level and genomic mutability. Little is known about the epidemiological traits of this bacterium; therefore, their isolation remains a relevant technical problem.Aims : The objective of this review is to describe Burkholderia cepacia as a bacterial complex with high pathogenicity and variability of habitats. Materials and Methods : A systematic search was realized using the international bibliographic databanks SCIELO, HIGHWIRE, PUBMED, SCIRUS and LILACS to provide a useful and practical review for the health workers that do not know this microorganism. Conclusions : Today, B. cepacia complex is a very important problem for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and cystic fibrosis patients. The immunodeficiency caused by these diseases is a positive factor for this microorganism to infect and kill these patients. Therefore, this opportunistic pathogen should be pointed out as a risk to these patients, and hospitals all over the world must be prepared to detect and combat this bacterium.

  3. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabeticketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidityand mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requiresfocused clinical monitoring, careful interpretationof arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditionsthat can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions thatcompromise respiratory function caused by DKA can bedetected at presentation but are usually more prevalentduring treatment. These conditions include deficits ofpotassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic ornon-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not causedby DKA that can worsen respiratory function under theadded stress of DKA include infections of the respiratorysystem, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular diseaseand miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognitionand management of the conditions that can lead torespiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failureand improve mortality from DKA.

  4. Adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, S; Talboys, R; Paspula, C; Prempeh, E M; Fanous, R; Ail, D

    2017-01-01

    Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has now been described as a sequela to such diverse conditions as burns, amniotic fluid embolism, acute pancreatitis, trauma, sepsis and damage as a result of elective surgery in general. Patients with ARDS require immediate intubation, with the average patient now being ventilated for between 8 and 11 days. While the acute management of ARDS is conducted by the critical care team, almost any surgical patient can be affected by the condition and we believe that it is important that a broader spectrum of hospital doctors gain an understanding of the nature of the pathology and its current treatment.

  5. Screening a mushroom extract library for activity against Acinetobacter baumannii and Burkholderia cepacia and the identification of a compound with anti-Burkholderia activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rott Marc

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii and species within the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC are significant opportunistic bacterial pathogens of humans. These species exhibit a high degree of antibiotic resistance, and some clinical isolates are resistant to all currently available antimicrobial drugs used for treatment. Thus, new drugs are needed to treat infections by these species. Mushrooms could be a potential source for new drugs to treat A. baumannii and BCC infections. Methods The aim of this study was to screen a library of crude extracts from 330 wild mushrooms by disk diffusion assays for antibacterial activity against A. baumannii and Burkholderia cepacia in the hope of identifying a novel natural drug that could be used to treat infections caused by these species. Once positive hits were identified, the extracts were subjected to bioassay-guided separations to isolate and identify the active drug molecules. MICs were performed to gauge the in vitro activity of the purified compounds. Results Only three crude extracts (0.9% had activity against A. baumannii and B. cepacia. Compounds from two of these extracts had MICs greater than 128 μg/ml, and further analyses were not performed. From the third extract, prepared from Leucopaxillus albissimus, 2-aminoquinoline (2-AQ was isolated. This compound exhibited a modest MIC in vitro against strains from nine different BCC species, including multi-drug resistant clinical isolates (MIC = 8-64 μg/ml, and a weak MIC (128 μg/ml against A baumannii. The IC50 against a murine monocyte line was 1.5 mg/ml. Conclusion The small number of positive hits in this study suggests that finding a new drug from mushrooms to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections may be difficult. Although 2-AQ was identified in one mushroom, and it was shown to inhibit the growth of multi-drug resistant BCC isolates, the relatively high MICs (8-128 μg/ml for both A. baumannii and BCC strains suggests that 2-AQ

  6. Phenotypic Characterization of a Novel Virulence-Factor Deletion Strain of Burkholderia mallei That Provides Partial Protection against Inhalational Glanders in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel A; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Amemiya, Kei; Chua, Jennifer; Cote, Christopher K; Toothman, Ronald G; Dankmeyer, Jennifer L; Klimko, Christopher P; Wilhelmsen, Catherine L; Raymond, Jolynn W; Zavaljevski, Nela; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei (Bm) is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes in Bm, including BMAA0553, BMAA0728 (tssN), and BMAA1865. In the present study, we used recombinant allelic exchange to construct deletion mutants of BMAA0553 and tssN (ΔBMAA0553 and ΔTssN, respectively) and showed that both deletions completely abrogated virulence at doses of >100 times the LD50 of the wild-type Bm strain. Analysis of ΔBMAA0553- and ΔTssN-infected mice showed starkly reduced bacterial dissemination relative to wild-type Bm, and subsequent in vitro experiments characterized pathogenic phenotypes with respect to intracellular growth, macrophage uptake and phagosomal escape, actin-based motility, and multinucleated giant cell formation. Based on observed in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, we explored the use of ΔTssN as a candidate live-attenuated vaccine. Mice immunized with aerosolized ΔTssN showed a 21-day survival rate of 67% after a high-dose aerosol challenge with the wild-type Bm ATCC 23344 strain, compared to a 0% survival rate for unvaccinated mice. However, analysis of histopathology and bacterial burden showed that while the surviving vaccinated mice were protected from acute infection, Bm was still able to establish a chronic infection. Vaccinated mice showed a modest IgG response, suggesting a limited potential of ΔTssN as a vaccine candidate, but also showed prolonged elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, underscoring the role of cellular and innate immunity in mitigating acute infection in inhalational glanders.

  7. Phenotypic Characterization of a Novel Virulence-Factor Deletion Strain of Burkholderia mallei That Provides Partial Protection against Inhalational Glanders in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozue, Joel A.; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Amemiya, Kei; Chua, Jennifer; Cote, Christopher K.; Toothman, Ronald G.; Dankmeyer, Jennifer L.; Klimko, Christopher P.; Wilhelmsen, Catherine L.; Raymond, Jolynn W.; Zavaljevski, Nela; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei (Bm) is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes in Bm, including BMAA0553, BMAA0728 (tssN), and BMAA1865. In the present study, we used recombinant allelic exchange to construct deletion mutants of BMAA0553 and tssN (ΔBMAA0553 and ΔTssN, respectively) and showed that both deletions completely abrogated virulence at doses of >100 times the LD50 of the wild-type Bm strain. Analysis of ΔBMAA0553- and ΔTssN-infected mice showed starkly reduced bacterial dissemination relative to wild-type Bm, and subsequent in vitro experiments characterized pathogenic phenotypes with respect to intracellular growth, macrophage uptake and phagosomal escape, actin-based motility, and multinucleated giant cell formation. Based on observed in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, we explored the use of ΔTssN as a candidate live-attenuated vaccine. Mice immunized with aerosolized ΔTssN showed a 21-day survival rate of 67% after a high-dose aerosol challenge with the wild-type Bm ATCC 23344 strain, compared to a 0% survival rate for unvaccinated mice. However, analysis of histopathology and bacterial burden showed that while the surviving vaccinated mice were protected from acute infection, Bm was still able to establish a chronic infection. Vaccinated mice showed a modest IgG response, suggesting a limited potential of ΔTssN as a vaccine candidate, but also showed prolonged elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, underscoring the role of cellular and innate immunity in mitigating acute infection in inhalational glanders. PMID:26955620

  8. Phenotypic characterization of a novel virulence-factor deletion strain of Burkholderia mallei that provides partial protection against inhalational glanders in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel A. Bozue

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei (Bm is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen classified as a category B biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After respiratory exposure, Bm establishes itself within host macrophages before spreading into major organ systems, which can lead to chronic infection, sepsis, and death. Previously, we combined computational prediction of host-pathogen interactions with yeast two-hybrid experiments and identified novel virulence factor genes in Bm, including BMAA0553, BMAA0728 (tssN, and BMAA1865. In the present study, we used recombinant allelic exchange to construct deletion mutants of BMAA0553 and tssN (ΔBMAA0553 and ΔTssN, respectively and showed that both deletions completely abrogated virulence at doses of >100 times the LD50 of the wild-type Bm strain. Analysis of ΔBMAA0553- and ΔTssN-infected mice showed starkly reduced bacterial dissemination relative to wild-type Bm, and subsequent in vitro experiments characterized pathogenic phenotypes with respect to intracellular growth, macrophage uptake and phagosomal escape, actin-based motility, and multinucleated giant cell formation. Based on observed in vitro and in vivo phenotypes, we explored the use of ΔTssN as a candidate live-attenuated vaccine. Mice immunized with aerosolized ΔTssN showed a 21-day survival rate of 67% after a high-dose aerosol challenge with the wild-type Bm ATCC 23344 strain, compared to a 0% survival rate for unvaccinated mice. However, analysis of histopathology and bacterial burden showed that while the surviving vaccinated mice were protected from acute infection, Bm was still able to establish a chronic infection. Vaccinated mice showed a modest IgG response, suggesting a limited potential of ΔTssN as a vaccine candidate, but also showed prolonged elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, underscoring the role of cellular and innate immunity in mitigating acute infection in inhalational glanders.

  9. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA G4 PR1: ANALYSIS OF MICROBIAL ECOLOGY PARAMETERS FOR RISK ASSESSMENT (RESEARCH BRIEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The introduction of bacteria into aquifers for bioremediation purposes requires monitoring of the persistence and activity of microbial populations for efficacy and risk assessment purposes. Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR1 constitutively expresses a toluene ortho-monooxygenase (tom) ...

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  11. Respiratory Therapy and Respiratory Therapy Technician. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of respiratory therapy and respiratory therapy technician programs. An occupational description and program content are presented. The curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content,…

  12. Respiratory diseases of global consequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respiratory diseases are one of the two major categories of poultry diseases that cause the most severe economic losses globally (the other being enteric disease). The economic impact of respiratory disease is both direct, from the production losses caused by primary disease and indirect from preve...

  13. Indagine epidemiologica locale sulle infezioni sostenute da Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia e sensibilità agli antibiotici di questi microrganismi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Di Marcello

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this local surveillance study was to determine the distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia in our geographic area, their impact in the hospital and community acquired infections and their resistance to antimicrobial agents currently used in the treatment of infections due to these microrganisms. Materials and Methods: During the period January 2001 - June 2003, 14.200 clinical isolates were collected from urine,wounds, catheters, body fluids, blood, respiratory tract specimens. Bacterial identifications were performed according to the standard methods (Murray, 2003 and antibiotic susceptibility tests were carry out in microassay by the automated system MicroScan (Dade Behring, Milano, Italy.The following antimicrobial agents were tested: piperacillin (PIP, ticarcillin (TIC, piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (TTC, ceftazidime (CAZ, ceftriaxone (CRO, aztreonam (ATM, imipenem (IPM, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT, gentamicin (CN, amikacin (AK, tobramycin (TOB, ciprofloxacin (CIP. Results: A total of 994 Pseudomonadaceae were isolated from in- (67% and out-patients (33%.They were P.aeruginosa (81%, other Pseudomonas species as P.fluorescens and P.putida (8%, S.maltophilia (9% and B.cepacia (2%.The great majority of the strains were collected from respiratory tract specimens (70% and urine (15%.The divisions from which derived the greater quantity of isolates were pediatric (33.8%, intensive care (22.7% and pneumology (10% units.Antibiotics more active against P. aeruginosa were IPM, CAZ,AK and TZP. IPM was effective against B. cepacia also.The other drugs, except SXT, displayed against this microrganism high rates of resistance. Even S. maltophilia was not susceptible to much antimicrobial agents, whereas SXT was the drug more active against this germ. Conclusion: P. aeruginosa was the microrganism more frequently isolated among non-fermenting Gram

  14. Ventilation and respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel, Andrew William; Romer, Lee M

    2012-04-01

    During dynamic exercise, the healthy pulmonary system faces several major challenges, including decreases in mixed venous oxygen content and increases in mixed venous carbon dioxide. As such, the ventilatory demand is increased, while the rising cardiac output means that blood will have considerably less time in the pulmonary capillaries to accomplish gas exchange. Blood gas homeostasis must be accomplished by precise regulation of alveolar ventilation via medullary neural networks and sensory reflex mechanisms. It is equally important that cardiovascular and pulmonary system responses to exercise be precisely matched to the increase in metabolic requirements, and that the substantial gas transport needs of both respiratory and locomotor muscles be considered. Our article addresses each of these topics with emphasis on the healthy, young adult exercising in normoxia. We review recent evidence concerning how exercise hyperpnea influences sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and the effect this might have on the ability to perform muscular work. We also review sex-based differences in lung mechanics.

  15. Biodiesel production from Jatropha oil catalyzed by immobilized Burkholderia cepacia lipase on modified attapulgite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Qinghong; Yin, Xiulian; Zhao, Yuping; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Lipase from Burkholderia cepacia was immobilized on modified attapulgite by cross-linking reaction for biodiesel production with jatropha oil as feedstock. Effects of various factors on biodiesel production were studied by single-factor experiment. Results indicated that the best conditions for biodiesel preparation were: 10 g jatropha oil, 2.4 g methanol (molar ratio of oil to methanol is 1:6.6) being added at 3h intervals, 7 wt% water, 10 wt% immobilized lipase, temperature 35°C, and time 24h. Under these conditions, the maximum biodiesel yield reached 94%. The immobilized lipase retained 95% of its relative activity during the ten repeated batch reactions. The half-life time of the immobilized lipase is 731 h. Kinetics was studied and the Vmax of the immobilized lipases were 6.823 mmol L(-1). This immobilized lipase catalyzed process has potential industrial use for biodiesel production to replace chemical-catalyzed method.

  16. Biosurfactant Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia gladioli Isolated from Mangrove Sediments Using Alternative Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Maria Catter

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are surface-active agents produced by a variety of microorganisms. To make biosurfactant production economically feasible, several alternative carbon sources have been proposed. This study describes biosurfactant production by strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia gladioli isolated from mangrove sediments in Northeastern Brazil and cultured in mineral media enriched with waste cooking oil. The biosurfactants were tested for drop collapse, emulsion formation and stability and surface tension. P. aeruginosa performed better both at lowering the surface tension (from 69 to 28 mN/m and at forming stable emulsions (approximately 80% at 48 hours of culture. The strains tested in this study were found to be efficient biosurfactant producers when cultured on substrates enriched with vegetable oil. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v8i5.771

  17. Phylogenetic and degradation characterization of Burkholderia cepacia WZ1 degrading herbicide quinclorac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Zhenmei; Min, Hang; Wu, Shuwen; Ruan, Aidong

    2003-11-01

    Strain WZI capable of degrading quinclorac was isolated from a pesticide manufactory soil and considered to be Burkholderia cepacia, belonged to bacteria, Proteobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria, based on morphology, physio-biochemical properties, whole cell fatty acid analysis and a partial sequencing of 16S rDNA. Strain WZ1 decomposed 90% of quinclorac at original concentration of 1000 mg L(-1) within 11 days. GC/MS analysis showed that the strain degraded quinclorac to 3,7-dichloro-8-quinoline and the cracked residue 2-chloro, 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, indicating that the metabolic pathway was initiated by process of decarboxylation followed by cleavage of the aromatic ring. Stain WZ1 was also able to degrade some other herbicides and aromatic compounds, including 2,4,5-T, phenol, naphthalene and hydrochinone etc. This paper describes for the first time Phylogenetic and degradation characterization of a pure bacterium which, is able to mineralize quinclorac.

  18. Optimization of Lipase Production by Burkholderia sp. Using Response Surface Methodology

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    Shiow-Ling Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize the extracellular lipase production by Burkholderia sp. HL-10. Preliminary tests showed that olive oil, tryptone and Tween-80 exhibited significant effects on the lipase production. The optimum concentrations of these three components were determined using a faced-centered central composite design (FCCCD. The analysis of variance revealed that the established model was significant (p < 0.01. The optimized medium containing 0.65% olive oil (v/v, 2.42% tryptone (w/v and 0.15% Tween-80 (v/v resulted in a maximum activity of 122.3 U/mL, about three fold higher than that in basal medium. Approximately 99% of validity of the predicted value was achieved.

  19. Genome sequence of Burkholderia mimosarum strain LMG 23256(T), a Mimosa pigra microsymbiont from Anso, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Anne; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2014-06-15

    Burkholderia mimosarum strain LMG 23256(T) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Mimosa pigra (giant sensitive plant). LMG 23256(T) was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of the M. pigra growing in Anso, Taiwan. LMG 23256(T) is highly effective at fixing nitrogen with M. pigra. Here we describe the features of B. mimosarum strain LMG 23256(T), together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 8,410,967 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 268 scaffolds of 270 contigs containing 7,800 protein-coding genes and 85 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  20. Genome sequence of Burkholderia mimosarum strain LMG 23256T, a Mimosa pigra microsymbiont from Anso, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Anne; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mimosarum strain LMG 23256T is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Mimosa pigra (giant sensitive plant). LMG 23256T was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of the M. pigra growing in Anso, Taiwan. LMG 23256T is highly effective at fixing nitrogen with M. pigra. Here we describe the features of B. mimosarum strain LMG 23256T, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 8,410,967 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 268 scaffolds of 270 contigs containing 7,800 protein-coding genes and 85 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197434

  1. Ceftazidime resistance inBurkholderia pseudomallei:First report from India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bijayini Behera; TLVD Prasad Babu; A Kamalesh; Gangadhar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Melioidosis, a disease of public health importance in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia, of late has shown an increasing trend in India, particularly Southern India. We describe a case of a39-year-old diabetic patient with left elbow septic arthritis, multiple liver, splenic abscesses, pneumonia, pleural effusion, followed by sepsis syndrome. Blood cultures and culture of the joint aspirate yielded pure growth ofBurkholderia pseudomallei (B. pesudomallei), sensitive to carbapenem, co-trimoxazole and resistant to ceftazidime. The patient was successfully treated with imipenem- cilastin.He was discharged on co-trimoxazole to complete the24 weeks course and follow-up has continued to date. The patient continues to remain asymptomatic. The case re-emphasizes the need to monitor the trend ofB. pseudomallei in India, particularly the development of ceftazidime resistance, which incidentally is the drug of choice.

  2. Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene by Burkholderia cepacia G4 with poplar leaf homogenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun Won; Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    2014-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a chlorinated organic solvent, is one of the most common and widespread groundwater contaminants worldwide. Among the group of TCE-degrading aerobic bacteria, Burkholderia cepacia G4 is the best-known representative. This strain requires the addition of specific substrates, including toluene, phenol, and benzene, to induce the enzymes to degrade TCE. However, the substrates are toxic and introducing them into the soil can result in secondary contamination. In this study, poplar leaf homogenate containing natural phenolic compounds was tested for the ability to induce the growth of and TCE degradation by B. cepacia G4. The results showed that the G4 strain could grow and degrade TCE well with the addition of phytochemicals. The poplar leaf homogenate also functioned as an inducer of the toluene-ortho-monooxygenase (TOM) gene in B. cepacia G4.

  3. NLRC4 and TLR5 each contribute to host defense in respiratory melioidosis.

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    T Eoin West

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the tropical infection melioidosis. Pneumonia is a common manifestation of melioidosis and is associated with high mortality. Understanding the key elements of host defense is essential to developing new therapeutics for melioidosis. As a flagellated bacterium encoding type III secretion systems, B. pseudomallei may trigger numerous host pathogen recognition receptors. TLR5 is a flagellin sensor located on the plasma membrane. NLRC4, along with NAIP proteins, assembles a canonical caspase-1-dependent inflammasome in the cytoplasm that responds to flagellin (in mice and type III secretion system components (in mice and humans. In a murine model of respiratory melioidosis, Tlr5 and Nlrc4 each contributed to survival. Mice deficient in both Tlr5 and Nlrc4 were not more susceptible than single knockout animals. Deficiency of Casp1/Casp11 resulted in impaired bacterial control in the lung and spleen; in the lung much of this effect was attributable to Nlrc4, despite relative preservation of pulmonary IL-1β production in Nlrc4(-/- mice. Histologically, deficiency of Casp1/Casp11 imparted more severe pulmonary inflammation than deficiency of Nlrc4. The human NLRC4 region polymorphism rs6757121 was associated with survival in melioidosis patients with pulmonary involvement. Co-inheritance of rs6757121 and a functional TLR5 polymorphism had an additive effect on survival. Our results show that NLRC4 and TLR5, key components of two flagellin sensing pathways, each contribute to host defense in respiratory melioidosis.

  4. Characterization of the Burkholderia thailandensis SOS response by using whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Ricky L; Deshazer, David; Kenny, Tara A; Ulrich, Melanie P; Moravusova, Anna; Opperman, Timothy; Bavari, Sina; Bowlin, Terry L; Moir, Donald T; Panchal, Rekha G

    2013-10-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a well-characterized regulatory network encoded by most prokaryotic bacterial species and is involved in DNA repair. In addition to nucleic acid repair, the SOS response is involved in pathogenicity, stress-induced mutagenesis, and the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Using high-throughput sequencing technology (SOLiD RNA-Seq), we analyzed the Burkholderia thailandensis global SOS response to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin (CIP), and the DNA-damaging chemical, mitomycin C (MMC). We demonstrate that a B. thailandensis recA mutant (RU0643) is ∼4-fold more sensitive to CIP in contrast to the parental strain B. thailandensis DW503. Our RNA-Seq results show that CIP and MMC treatment (P SOS response were induced and include lexA, uvrA, dnaE, dinB, recX, and recA. At the genome-wide level, we found an overall decrease in gene expression, especially for genes involved in amino acid and carbohydrate transport and metabolism, following both CIP and MMC exposure. Interestingly, we observed the upregulation of several genes involved in bacterial motility and enhanced transcription of a B. thailandensis genomic island encoding a Siphoviridae bacteriophage designated E264. Using B. thailandensis plaque assays and PCR with B. mallei ATCC 23344 as the host, we demonstrate that CIP and MMC exposure in B. thailandensis DW503 induces the transcription and translation of viable bacteriophage in a RecA-dependent manner. This is the first report of the SOS response in Burkholderia spp. to DNA-damaging agents. We have identified both common and unique adaptive responses of B. thailandensis to chemical stress and DNA damage.

  5. Immobilization of Burkholderia sp. lipase on a ferric silica nanocomposite for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dang-Thuan; Chen, Ching-Lung; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-04-15

    In this work, lipase produced from an isolated strain Burkholderia sp. C20 was immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles to catalyze biodiesel synthesis. Core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by coating Fe(3)O(4) core with silica shell. The nanoparticles treated with dimethyl octadecyl [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl] ammonium chloride were used as immobilization supporters. The Burkholderia lipase was then bound to the synthesized nanoparticles for immobilization. The protein binding efficiency on alkyl-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) was estimated as 97%, while the efficiency was only 76% on non-modified Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2). Maximum adsorption capacity of lipase on alkyl-functionalized Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) was estimated as 29.45 mg g(-1) based on Langmuir isotherm. The hydrolytic kinetics (using olive oil as substrate) of the lipase immobilized on alkyl-grafted Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2) followed Michaelis-Menten model with a maximum reaction rate and a Michaelis constant of 6251 Ug(-1) and 3.65 mM, respectively. Physical and chemical properties of the nanoparticles and the immobilized lipase were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Moreover, the immobilized lipase was used to catalyze the transesterification of olive oil with methanol to produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), attaining a FAMEs conversion of over 90% within 30 h in batch operation when 11 wt% immobilized lipase was employed. The immobilized lipase could be used for ten cycles without significant loss in its transesterification activity.

  6. Comparison of the in vitro and in vivo susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei to Ceftazidime and Levofloxacin

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    Torres Alfredo G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia mallei is a zoonotic Gram negative bacterium which primarily infects solipeds but can cause lethal disease in humans if left untreated. The effect of two antibiotics with different modes of action on Burkholderia mallei strain ATCC23344 was investigated by using in vitro and in vivo studies. Results Determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs in vitro was done by the agar diffusion method and the dilution method. The MICs of levofloxacin and ceftazidime were in the similar range, 2.5 and 5.0 μg/ml, respectively. Intracellular susceptibility of the bacterium to these two antibiotics in J774A.1 mouse macrophages in vitro was also investigated. Macrophages treated with antibiotics demonstrated uptake of the drugs and reduced bacterial loads in vitro. The efficacy of ceftazidime and levofloxacin were studied in BALB/c mice as post-exposure treatment following intranasal B. mallei infection. Intranasal infection with 5 × 105 CFUs of B. mallei resulted in 90% death in non-treated control mice. Antibiotic treatments 10 days post-infection proved to be effective in vivo with all antibiotic treated mice surviving to day 34 post-infection. The antibiotics did not result in complete clearance of the bacterial infection and presence of the bacteria was found in lungs and spleens of the survivors, although bacterial burden recovered from levofloxacin treated animals appeared reduced compared to ceftazidime. Conclusion Both antibiotics demonstrated utility for the treatment of glanders, including the ability for intracellular penetration and clearance of organisms in vitro.

  7. Systematic review and consensus guidelines for environmental sampling of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Direk Limmathurotsakul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Tier 1 Select Agent and the cause of melioidosis, is a Gram-negative bacillus present in the environment in many tropical countries. Defining the global pattern of B. pseudomallei distribution underpins efforts to prevent infection, and is dependent upon robust environmental sampling methodology. Our objective was to review the literature on the detection of environmental B. pseudomallei, update the risk map for melioidosis, and propose international consensus guidelines for soil sampling. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An international working party (Detection of Environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei Working Party (DEBWorP was formed during the VIth World Melioidosis Congress in 2010. PubMed (January 1912 to December 2011 was searched using the following MeSH terms: pseudomallei or melioidosis. Bibliographies were hand-searched for secondary references. The reported geographical distribution of B. pseudomallei in the environment was mapped and categorized as definite, probable, or possible. The methodology used for detecting environmental B. pseudomallei was extracted and collated. We found that global coverage was patchy, with a lack of studies in many areas where melioidosis is suspected to occur. The sampling strategies and bacterial identification methods used were highly variable, and not all were robust. We developed consensus guidelines with the goals of reducing the probability of false-negative results, and the provision of affordable and 'low-tech' methodology that is applicable in both developed and developing countries. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proposed consensus guidelines provide the basis for the development of an accurate and comprehensive global map of environmental B. pseudomallei.

  8. Burkholderia pseudomallei known siderophores and hemin uptake are dispensable for lethal murine melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Kvitko

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a mostly saprophytic bacterium, but can infect humans where it causes the difficult-to-manage disease melioidosis. Even with proper diagnosis and prompt therapeutic interventions mortality rates still range from >20% in Northern Australia to over 40% in Thailand. Surprisingly little is yet known about how B. pseudomallei infects, invades and survives within its hosts, and virtually nothing is known about the contribution of critical nutrients such as iron to the bacterium's pathogenesis. It was previously assumed that B. pseudomallei used iron-acquisition systems commonly found in other bacteria, for example siderophores. However, our previous discovery of a clinical isolate carrying a large chromosomal deletion missing the entire malleobactin gene cluster encoding the bacterium's major high-affinity siderophore while still being fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model suggested that other iron-acquisition systems might make contributions to virulence. Here, we deleted the major siderophore malleobactin (mba and pyochelin (pch gene clusters in strain 1710b and revealed a residual siderophore activity which was unrelated to other known Burkholderia siderophores such as cepabactin and cepaciachelin, and not due to increased secretion of chelators such as citrate. Deletion of the two hemin uptake loci, hmu and hem, showed that Hmu is required for utilization of hemin and hemoglobin and that Hem cannot complement a Hmu deficiency. Prolonged incubation of a hmu hem mutant in hemoglobin-containing minimal medium yielded variants able to utilize hemoglobin and hemin suggesting alternate pathways for utilization of these two host iron sources. Lactoferrin utilization was dependent on malleobactin, but not pyochelin synthesis and/or uptake. A mba pch hmu hem quadruple mutant could use ferritin as an iron source and upon intranasal infection was lethal in an acute murine melioidosis model. These data suggest that B

  9. Transports of acetate and haloacetate in Burkholderia species MBA4 are operated by distinct systems

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    Su Xianbin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetate is a commonly used substrate for biosynthesis while monochloroacetate is a structurally similar compound but toxic and inhibits cell metabolism by blocking the citric acid cycle. In Burkholderia species MBA4 haloacetate was utilized as a carbon and energy source for growth. The degradation of haloacid was mediated by the production of an inducible dehalogenase. Recent studies have identified the presence of a concomitantly induced haloacetate-uptake activity in MBA4. This uptake activity has also been found to transport acetate. Since acetate transporters are commonly found in bacteria it is likely that haloacetate was transported by such a system in MBA4. Results The haloacetate-uptake activity of MBA4 was found to be induced by monochloroacetate (MCA and monobromoacetate (MBA. While the acetate-uptake activity was also induced by MCA and MBA, other alkanoates: acetate, propionate and 2-monochloropropionate (2MCPA were also inducers. Competing solute analysis showed that acetate and propionate interrupted the acetate- and MCA- induced acetate-uptake activities. While MCA, MBA, 2MCPA, and butyrate have no effect on acetate uptake they could significantly quenched the MCA-induced MCA-uptake activity. Transmembrane electrochemical potential was shown to be a driving force for both acetate- and MCA- transport systems. Conclusions Here we showed that acetate- and MCA- uptake in Burkholderia species MBA4 are two transport systems that have different induction patterns and substrate specificities. It is envisaged that the shapes and the three dimensional structures of the solutes determine their recognition or exclusion by the two transport systems.

  10. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Pieper, Rembert; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Townsend, Katherine; Yu, Chenggang; Yu, Xueping; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent. Given its genetic origin as a commensal soil organism, it is equipped with an extensive and varied set of adapted mechanisms to cope with and modulate host-cell environments. One essential virulence mechanism constitutes the specialized secretion systems that are designed to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert pathogen proteins directly into the host cell's cytosol. However, the secretion systems' proteins and, in particular, their host targets are largely uncharacterized. Here, we used a combined in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach to identify B. mallei proteins required for pathogenicity. We used bioinformatics tools, including orthology detection and ab initio predictions of secretion system proteins, as well as published experimental Burkholderia data to initially select a small number of proteins as putative virulence factors. We then used yeast two-hybrid assays against normalized whole human and whole murine proteome libraries to detect and identify interactions among each of these bacterial proteins and host proteins. Analysis of such interactions provided both verification of known virulence factors and identification of three new putative virulence proteins. We successfully created insertion mutants for each of these three proteins using the virulent B. mallei ATCC 23344 strain. We exposed BALB/c mice to mutant strains and the wild-type strain in an aerosol challenge model using lethal B. mallei doses. In each set of experiments, mice exposed to mutant strains survived for the 21-day duration of the experiment, whereas mice exposed to the wild-type strain rapidly died. Given their in vivo role in pathogenicity, and based on the yeast two-hybrid interaction data, these results point to the importance of these pathogen proteins in modulating host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin

  11. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei Bsa type III secretion system effectors using hypersecreting mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Broek, Charles W; Chalmers, Kevin J; Stevens, Mark P; Stevens, Joanne M

    2015-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals. One of the virulence factors critical for early stages of infection is the Burkholderia secretion apparatus (Bsa) Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS), a molecular syringe that injects bacterial proteins, called effectors, into eukaryotic cells where they subvert cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. Although the Bsa T3SS itself is known to be important for invasion, intracellular replication, and virulence, only a few genuine effector proteins have been identified and the complete repertoire of proteins secreted by the system has not yet been fully characterized. We constructed a mutant lacking bsaP, a homolog of the T3SS "gatekeeper" family of proteins that exert control over the timing and magnitude of effector protein secretion. Mutants lacking BsaP, or the T3SS translocon protein BipD, were observed to hypersecrete the known Bsa effector protein BopE, providing evidence of their role in post-translational control of the Bsa T3SS and representing key reagents for the identification of its secreted substrates. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ), a gel-free quantitative proteomics technique, was used to compare the secreted protein profiles of the Bsa T3SS hypersecreting mutants of B. pseudomallei with the isogenic parent strain and a bsaZ mutant incapable of effector protein secretion. Our study provides one of the most comprehensive core secretomes of B. pseudomallei described to date and identified 26 putative Bsa-dependent secreted proteins that may be considered candidate effectors. Two of these proteins, BprD and BapA, were validated as novel effector proteins secreted by the Bsa T3SS of B. pseudomallei.

  12. The multiple roles of hypothetical gene BPSS1356 in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hokchai Yam

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. It is able to adapt to harsh environments and can live intracellularly in its infected hosts. In this study, identification of transcriptional factors that associate with the β' subunit (RpoC of RNA polymerase was performed. The N-terminal region of this subunit is known to trigger promoter melting when associated with a sigma factor. A pull-down assay using histidine-tagged B. pseudomallei RpoC N-terminal region as bait showed that a hypothetical protein BPSS1356 was one of the proteins bound. This hypothetical protein is conserved in all B. pseudomallei strains and present only in the Burkholderia genus. A BPSS1356 deletion mutant was generated to investigate its biological function. The mutant strain exhibited reduced biofilm formation and a lower cell density during the stationary phase of growth in LB medium. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the ΔBPSS1356 mutant cells had a shrunken cytoplasm indicative of cell plasmolysis and a rougher surface when compared to the wild type. An RNA microarray result showed that a total of 63 genes were transcriptionally affected by the BPSS1356 deletion with fold change values of higher than 4. The expression of a group of genes encoding membrane located transporters was concurrently down-regulated in ΔBPSS1356 mutant. Amongst the affected genes, the putative ion transportation genes were the most severely suppressed. Deprivation of BPSS1356 also down-regulated the transcriptions of genes for the arginine deiminase system, glycerol metabolism, type III secretion system cluster 2, cytochrome bd oxidase and arsenic resistance. It is therefore obvious that BPSS1356 plays a multiple regulatory roles on many genes.

  13. Dysrhythmias of the respiratory oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydarfar, David; Buerkel, Daniel M.

    1995-03-01

    Breathing is regulated by a central neural oscillator that produces rhythmic output to the respiratory muscles. Pathological disturbances in rhythm (dysrhythmias) are observed in the breathing pattern of children and adults with neurological and cardiopulmonary diseases. The mechanisms responsible for genesis of respiratory dysrhythmias are poorly understood. The present studies take a novel approach to this problem. The basic postulate is that the rhythm of the respiratory oscillator can be altered by a variety of stimuli. When the oscillator recovers its rhythm after such perturbations, its phase may be reset relative to the original rhythm. The amount of phase resetting is dependent upon stimulus parameters and the level of respiratory drive. The long-range hypothesis is that respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli that impinge upon or arise within the respiratory oscillator with certain combinations of strength and timing relative to the respiratory cycle. Animal studies were performed in anesthetized or decerebrate preparations. Neural respiratory rhythmicity is represented by phrenic nerve activity, allowing use of open-loop experimental conditions which avoid negative chemical feedback associated with changes in ventilation. In animal experiments, respiratory dysrhythmias can be induced by stimuli having specific combinations of strength and timing. Newborn animals readily exhibit spontaneous dysrhythmias which become more prominent at lower respiratory drives. In human subjects, swallowing was studied as a physiological perturbation of respiratory rhythm, causing a pattern of phase resetting that is characterized topologically as type 0. Computational studies of the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol (BvP) equations, whose qualitative behavior is representative of many excitable systems, supports a unified interpretation of these experimental findings. Rhythmicity is observed when the BvP model exhibits recurrent periods of excitation alternating with

  14. Solubilization of insoluble inorganic phosphate by Burkholderia cepacia DA23 isolated from cultivated soil Solubilização de fosfato inorgânico insolúvel por Burkholderia cepacea DA23 isolada de solo cultivado

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    Ok-Ryul Song

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A mineral phosphate solubilizing bacterium, Burkholderia cepacia DA23 has been isolated from cultivated soils. Phosphate-solubilizing activities of the strain against three types of insoluble phosphate were quantitatively determined. When 3% of glucose concentration was used for carbon source, the strain had a marked mineral phosphate-solubilizing activity. Mineral phosphate solubilization was directly related to the pH drop by the strain. Analysis of the culture medium by high pressure liquid chromatography identified gluconic acid as the main organic acid released by Burkholderia cepacia DA23. Gluconic acid production was apparently the result of the glucose dehydrogenase activity and glucose dehydrogenase was affected by phosphate regulation.Uma bactéria capaz de solubilizar fosfato mineral, Burkholderia cepacea DA23, foi isolada de solo cultivado. A capacidade dessa bactéria solubilizar o fosfato de três tipos de fosfato insolúvel foi quantificada. Quando foi utilizada glicose a 3% como fonte de carbono, a bactéria apresentou uma intensa atividade solubilizante de fosfato, sendo a solubilização diretamente relacionada com a queda de pH causada pela bactéria. A análise do meio de cultura por cromatografia líquida de alta pressão indicou o ácido glicônico como principal ácido produzido por Burkholderia cepacea DA23. Aparentemente, a produção de ácido glicônico foi causada pela atividade da glicose desidrogenase. A enzima foi afetada pela regulação do fosfato.

  15. Respiratory function in handicapped children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, C; Fujita, M; Umemoto, H; Taneda, M; Sanae, N; Tazaki, T

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate respiratory function of severely handicapped children. Tidal volumes and respiratory rates were determined in a total of 130 children with different clinical motor abilities. Tidal volume of non-sitters (n = 39) was significantly lower than ambulators (n = 49) or sitters (n = 42) (p less than 0.01). There was no difference in respiratory rate among the three groups. Among 45 children whose vital capacity could be determined, the tidal volumes showed a significant correlation with vital capacity (r = 0.56, p less than 0.001). Among four children whose tidal volume was less than 200 ml and respiratory rate was more than 30 cpm, blood gas analysis revealed hypoxia in three of them. The tidal volumes, therefore, would be a useful guide to estimate respiratory functions. It was concluded that the respiratory function in a non-sitter with reduced tidal volume is impaired, and that preventive measures must be taken against respiratory infection.

  16. Unusual Multiple Production of N-Acylhomoserine Lactones a by Burkholderia sp. Strain C10B Isolated from Dentine Caries

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    Share Yuan Goh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria realize the ability to communicate by production of quorum sensing (QS molecules called autoinducers, which regulate the physiological activities in their ecological niches. The oral cavity could be a potential area for the presence of QS bacteria. In this study, we report the isolation of a QS bacterial isolate C10B from dentine caries. Preliminary screening using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 biosensor showed that isolate C10B was able to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs. This bacterium was further identified as a member of Burkholderia, an opportunistic pathogen. The isolated Burkholderia sp. was confirmed to produce N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL, N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL, N-decanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL and N-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL.

  17. Burkholderia xernovorans LB400 harbors a multi-replicon, 9.73-Mbp genome shaped for versatility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Denef, Vincent [University of California, Berkeley; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Vergez, Lisa [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Agullo, Loreine [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Reyes, Valeria Latorre [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Cordova, Macarena [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Gomez, Luis [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Gonzalez, Myriam [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lao, Victoria [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; LiPuma, John J [University of Michigan; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar [Cardiff University, Wales; Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Marx, Christopher J [Harvard University; Parnell, J Jacob [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Ramette, Alban [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Seeger, Michael [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Smith, Daryl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Spilker, Theodore [University of Michigan; Sul, Woo Jun [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tsoi, Tamara V [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2006-01-01

    Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (LB400), a well studied, effective polychlorinated biphenyl-degrader, has one of the two largest known bacterial genomes and is the first nonpathogenic Burkholderia isolate sequenced. From an evolutionary perspective, we find significant differences in functional specialization between the three replicons of LB400, as well as a more relaxed selective pressure for genes located on the two smaller vs. the largest replicon. High genomic plasticity, diversity, and specialization within the Burkholderia genus are exemplified by the conservation of only 44% of the genes between LB400 and Burkholderia cepacia complex strain 383. Even among four B. xenovorans strains, genome size varies from 7.4 to 9.73 Mbp. The latter is largely explained by our findings that >20% of the LB400 sequence was recently acquired by means of lateral gene transfer. Although a range of genetic factors associated with in vivo survival and intercellular interactions are present, these genetic factors are likely related to niche breadth rather than determinants of pathogenicity. The presence of at least eleven 'central aromatic' and twenty 'peripheral aromatic' pathways in LB400, among the highest in any sequenced bacterial genome, supports this hypothesis. Finally, in addition to the experimentally observed redundancy in benzoate degradation and formaldehyde oxidation pathways, the fact that 17.6% of proteins have a better LB400 paralog than an ortholog in a different genome highlights the importance of gene duplication and repeated acquirement, which, coupled with their divergence, raises questions regarding the role of paralogs and potential functional redundancies in large-genome microbes.

  18. A CpG oligonucleotide can protect mice from a low aerosol challenge dose of Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, David M; McCluskie, Michael J; Zhang, Ningli; Krieg, Arthur M

    2006-03-01

    Treatment with an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) containing CPG motifs (CpG ODN 7909) was found to protect BALB/c mice from lung infection or death after aerosol challenge with Burkholderia mallei. Protection was associated with enhanced levels of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-inducible protein 10, interleukin-12 (IL-12), IFN-gamma, and IL-6. Preexposure therapy with CpG ODNs may protect victims of a biological attack from glanders.

  19. A CpG Oligonucleotide Can Protect Mice from a Low Aerosol Challenge Dose of Burkholderia mallei

    OpenAIRE

    Waag, David M.; Michael J. McCluskie; Zhang, Ningli; Krieg, Arthur M.

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with an oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) containing CPG motifs (CpG ODN 7909) was found to protect BALB/c mice from lung infection or death after aerosol challenge with Burkholderia mallei. Protection was associated with enhanced levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducible protein 10, interleukin-12 (IL-12), IFN-γ, and IL-6. Preexposure therapy with CpG ODNs may protect victims of a biological attack from glanders.

  20. In vitro antibiotic susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei (causative agent of glanders) determined by broth microdilution and E-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, H S; England, M J; Waag, D M; Byrne, W R

    2001-07-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 28 antibiotics were determined for 11 strains of Burkholderia mallei by the broth microdilution method. The B. mallei strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones, doxycycline, piperacillin, ceftazidime, and imipenem. For comparison and evaluation, 17 antibiotic susceptibilities were also determined by the E-test. E-test values were always lower than the broth dilution values. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of specific B. mallei strains will provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents.

  1. Development of a Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Detection of Burkholderia mallei, a Potent Biological Warfare Agent

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the etiological agent of glanders, primarily a disease of equines. B. mallei is closely related to B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis. Therefore, detection of B. mallei and its differentiation from B. pseudomallei, has always been troublesome. In present investigation, a B. mallei specific DNA sequence was identified by performing BLASTn search using ~3000 ORFs of B. mallei NCTC 10229. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with internal amplification ...

  2. Evaluation of PCR, DNA hybridization and immunomagnetic separation — PCR for detection of Burkholderia mallei in artificially inoculated environmental samples

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Glanders is highly contagious disease of equines, caused by Burkholderia mallei. The disease though rare, can be transmitted to humans. Here, we report a strategy for rapid detection of B. mallei from environmental samples. Different bacteriological media were evaluated and brain heart infusion broth medium with selective supplements (BHIB-SS) of penicillin (200 U/ml) and crystal violet (1:10,00000) was found to support the maximum growth of B. mallei even in the presence of other bacteria li...

  3. Endophytic colonization of rice (Oryza sativa L.) by the diazotrophic bacterium Burkholderia kururiensis and its ability to enhance plant growth

    OpenAIRE

    Mattos, Katherine A; Vania L.M. Pádua; Alexandre Romeiro; Hallack,Leticia F.; Bianca C. Neves; Tecia M.U. Ulisses; Claudia F. Barros; Adriane R Todeschini; Previato, José O.; Lucia Mendonça-Previato

    2008-01-01

    Burkholderia kururiensis is a diazotrophic bacterium originally isolated from a polluted aquifer environment and presents a high level of similarity with the rice endophyte "B. brasilensis" species. This work assessed the ability of B. kururiensis to endophytically colonize rice plantlets by monitoring different tissues of root-inoculated plants for the presence of bacterial growth in different media, electron microscopy and by 16S rDNA analysis. Observations of roots, stems and leaves of ino...

  4. Strain Identification of Burkholderia cepacia Palleroni and Holmes and Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula Associated to Maize Crop by Polyphasic Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Annia Hernández Rodríguez; María Esther González Vega; Alberto Caballero Núñez; Ariel Medina Concepción; Madelaine Quiñónez Pantoja; Mayra Heydrich Pérez; Ana Niurka Hernández Lauzardo; Monica Höfte

    2004-01-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study, which included phenotypic characterization, the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted for the identification of Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains previously isolated from maize rhizosphere. Conventional methods were used (API 20 NE, BioMeuriux), specific hyper-immune antiserum against the species under study, and specific primers were designed out of subunits 16S of the ribosomal RNA of B....

  5. Genome Sequence Alterations Detected upon Passage of Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 in Culture and in Mammalian Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-05

    Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus . Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2002, 46(2):511-513. 39. Jones AL, Needham RH, Clancy A, Knoll KM, Rubens CE...Background Burkholderia mallei is a nonmotile, Gram-negative bacillus and the causative agent of a severe disease known as glan- ders. Humans are accidental...isolate, three in the human liver isolate, and five in the human blood isolate Table 1: Perfect simple sequence repeats (SSRs) identified in the B

  6. Exploration of the transcription factors that regulate the expression of the haloacid operon in Burkholderia caribensis MBA4

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Liyu; 鄧麗瑜

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial dehalogenase is a key enzyme involved in bioremediation of halogenated organic compounds. A dehalogenase, Deh4a, was isolated from the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia caribensis MBA4, which can utilize haloacetic acids as carbon source. The haloacid operon in MBA4 was identified and characterized. It is composed of the structural genes forDeh4a and a transporter Deh4p. Transcription of this operon is negatively regulated, but the mechanism and the relevant regulator are still p...

  7. Identification of volatile compounds produced by the bacterium Burkholderia tropica that inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Tinoco, Raunel; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    It has been documented that bacteria from the Burkholderia genera produce different kinds of compounds that inhibit plant pathogens, however in Burkholderia tropica, an endophytic diazotrophic and phosphate-solubilizing bacterium isolated from a wide diversity of plants, the capacity to produce antifungal compounds has not been evaluated. In order to expand our knowledge about Burkholderia tropica as a potential biological control agent, we analyzed 15 different strains of this bacterium to evaluate their capacities to inhibit the growth of four phytopathogenic fungi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolffsi. Diverse analytical techniques, including plant root protection and dish plate growth assays and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the fungal growth inhibition was intimately associated with the volatile compounds produced by B. tropica and, in particular, two bacterial strains (MTo293 and TTe203) exhibited the highest radial mycelial growth inhibition. Morphological changes associated with these compounds, such as disruption of fungal hyphae, were identified by using photomicrographic analysis. By using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique, 18 volatile compounds involved in the growth inhibition mechanism were identified, including α-pinene and limonene. In addition, we found a high proportion of bacterial strains that produced siderophores during growth with different carbon sources, such as alanine and glutamic acid; however, their roles in the antagonism mechanism remain unclear. PMID:23680857

  8. Respiratory Therapy Technology Program Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the respiratory therapy technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: Foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation; Admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning);…

  9. Urgencias respiratorias Respiratory emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Martínez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Las urgencias respiratorias en un paciente con cáncer pueden tener su origen en patologías de la vía aérea, del parénquima pulmonar o de los grandes vasos. La causa puede ser el propio tumor o complicaciones concomitantes. La obstrucción de la vía aérea debería ser inicialmente evaluada con procedimientos endoscópicos. En situaciones severas, la cirugía raramente es posible. El emplazamiento endobronquial de stents e isótopos radiactivos (braquiterapia, la ablación tumoral por láser o la terapia fotodinámica, pueden aliviar de forma rápida los síntomas y reestablecer el flujo aéreo. El manejo de la hemoptisis depende de la causa que la provoque y de la cuantía de la misma. La broncoscopia sigue siendo el procedimiento de primera línea en la mayor parte de los casos; aporta información diagnóstica y puede interrumpir el sangrado mediante lavados con suero helado, taponamiento endobronquial o inyecciones tópicas de adrenalina o trombina. La radioterapia externa sigue siendo un procedimiento extraordinariamente útil para tratar la hemoptisis de causa tumoral y en situaciones bien seleccionadas la terapia endobronquial con láser o braquiterapia y la embolización arterial bronquial pueden proporcionar un gran rendimiento paliativo. Las urgencias respiratorias por enfermedad del parénquima pulmonar en un paciente oncológico, pueden tener causa tumoral, iatrogénica o infecciosa. El reconocimiento precoz de cada una de ellas determina la administración del tratamiento específico y las posibilidades de éxito.Respiratory emergencies in a patient with cancer can have their origin in pathologies of the airway, of the pulmonary parenchyma or the large vessels. The cause can be the tumour itself or concomitant complications. Obstruction of the airway should be initially evaluated with endoscopic procedures. Surgery is rarely possible in serious situations. The endobronchial placement of stents or radioactive isotopes

  10. Production and characterization of chimeric monoclonal antibodies against Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei using the DHFR expression system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Yong Kim

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei (BP and B. mallei (BM are closely related gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacteria which cause life-threatening melioidosis in human and glanders in horse, respectively. Our laboratory has previously generated and characterized more than 100 mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against BP and BM, according to in vitro and in vivo assay. In this study, 3 MAbs (BP7 10B11, BP7 2C6, and BP1 7F7 were selected to develop into chimeric mouse-human monoclonal antibodies (cMAbs against BP and/or BM. For the stable production of cMAbs, we constructed 4 major different vector systems with a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR amplification marker, and optimized transfection/selection conditions in mammalian host cells with the single-gene and/or double-gene expression system. These 3 cMAbs were stably produced by the DHFR double mutant Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO-DG44 cells. By ELISA and Western blot analysis using whole bacterial antigens treated by heat (65°C/90 min, sodium periodate, and proteinase K, the cMAb BP7 10B11 (cMAb CK1 reacted with glycoproteins (34, 38, 48 kDa in BP; 28, 38, 48 kDa in BM. The cMAb BP7 2C6 (cMAb CK2 recognized surface-capsule antigens with molecular sizes of 38 to 52 kDa, and 200 kDa in BM. The cMAb CK2 was weakly reactive to 14∼28, 200 kDa antigens in BP. The cMAb BP1 7F7 (cMAb CK3 reacted with lipopolysaccharides (38∼52 kDa in BP; 38∼60 kDa in B. thailandensis. Western blot results with the outer surface antigens of the 3 Burkholderia species were consistent with results with the whole Burkholderia cell antigens, suggesting that these immunodominant antigens reacting with the 3 cMAbs were primarily present on the outer surface of the Burkholderia species. These 3 cMAbs would be useful for analyzing the role of the major outer surface antigens in Burkholderia infection.

  11. The Madagascar hissing cockroach as a novel surrogate host for Burkholderia pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher Nathan A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are gram-negative pathogens responsible for the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Both species cause disease in humans and animals and have been designated as category B select agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Burkholderia thailandensis is a closely related bacterium that is generally considered avirulent for humans. While it can cause disease in rodents, the B. thailandensis 50% lethal dose (LD50 is typically ≥ 104-fold higher than the B. pseudomallei and B. mallei LD50 in mammalian models of infection. Here we describe an alternative to mammalian hosts in the study of virulence and host-pathogen interactions of these Burkholderia species. Results Madagascar hissing cockroaches (MH cockroaches possess a number of qualities that make them desirable for use as a surrogate host, including ease of breeding, ease of handling, a competent innate immune system, and the ability to survive at 37°C. MH cockroaches were highly susceptible to infection with B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis and the LD50 was 50 for Escherichia coli in MH cockroaches was >105 cfu. B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1 mutants were all attenuated in MH cockroaches, which is consistent with previous virulence studies conducted in rodents. B. pseudomallei mutants deficient in the other five T6SS gene clusters, T6SS-2 through T6SS-6, were virulent in both MH cockroaches and hamsters. Hemocytes obtained from MH cockroaches infected with B. pseudomallei harbored numerous intracellular bacteria, suggesting that this facultative intracellular pathogen can survive and replicate inside of MH cockroach phagocytic cells. The hemolymph extracted from these MH cockroaches also contained multinuclear giant cells (MNGCs with intracellular B. pseudomallei, which indicates that infected hemocytes can

  12. A new bacterial disease of carnation in Portugal caused by Burkholderia andropogonis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalena Eloy

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of a leaf spot disease of carnation caused by Burkholderia andropogonis is recorded for the first time in Portugal. Symptoms consisted of ‘eyespot’ lesions on all aerial plant parts, often bordered by water-soaked halos on the leaves. As the disease progressed lesions became dark brown and affected areas dried out. Phenotypic studies and Polymerase Chain Reaction using specific primers Pf/Pr targeted to 16S rDNA of B. andropogonis were used to identify the pathogen. Pathogenicity tests on china pink plants, re-isolation of the pathogen from inoculated plants and further PCR testing confirmed the identification of the bacterium. Infected plants came from an open air nursery and the whole production was destroyed to avoid dissemination of the pathogen.A ocorrência da mancha bacteriana do craveiro causada por Burkholderia andropogonis é pela primeira vez assinalada em Portugal. Os sintomas observados consistiam em manchas em forma de olho-de-perdiz em todos os órgãos aéreos das plantas afectadas, frequentemente circundadas por halos hidrópicos nas folhas. À medida que a doença progredia, as lesões adquiriam uma coloração castanha escura, acabando os órgãos afectados por secar. A identificação do agente causal da doença baseou-se no estudo dos seus caracteres fenotípicos e na Reacção em Cadeia da Polimerase (PCR, utilizando os iniciadores específicos Pf/Pr dirigidos à região 16S rDNA de B. andropogonis. A identificação foi confirmada por ensaios de patogenicidade em cravinas, reisolamento do agente causal da doença a partir das plantas inoculadas e novos ensaios PCR. As plantas infectadas provinham de um viveiro ao ar livre e toda a produção foi destruída a fim de evitar a disseminação do patogéneo.

  13. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  14. Rapid identification of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei by intact cell Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation mass spectrometric typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karger Axel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia (B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are genetically closely related species. B. pseudomallei causes melioidosis in humans and animals, whereas B. mallei is the causative agent of glanders in equines and rarely also in humans. Both agents have been classified by the CDC as priority category B biological agents. Rapid identification is crucial, because both agents are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS has the potential of rapid and reliable identification of pathogens, but is limited by the availability of a database containing validated reference spectra. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid and reliable identification and differentiation of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and to build up a reliable reference database for both organisms. Results A collection of ten B. pseudomallei and seventeen B. mallei strains was used to generate a library of reference spectra. Samples of both species could be identified by MALDI-TOF MS, if a dedicated subset of the reference spectra library was used. In comparison with samples representing B. mallei, higher genetic diversity among B. pseudomallei was reflected in the higher average Eucledian distances between the mass spectra and a broader range of identification score values obtained with commercial software for the identification of microorganisms. The type strain of B. pseudomallei (ATCC 23343 was isolated decades ago and is outstanding in the spectrum-based dendrograms probably due to massive methylations as indicated by two intensive series of mass increments of 14 Da specifically and reproducibly found in the spectra of this strain. Conclusions Handling of pathogens under BSL 3 conditions is dangerous and cumbersome but can be minimized by inactivation of bacteria with ethanol, subsequent protein extraction under BSL 1 conditions and MALDI-TOF MS

  15. Early respiratory microbiota composition determines bacterial succession patterns and respiratory health in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesbroek, G.; Tsivtsivadze, E.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Montijn, R.; Veenhoven, R.H.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Bogaert, D.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Many bacterial pathogens causing respiratory infections in children are common residents of the respiratory tract. Insight into bacterial colonization patterns and microbiota stability at a young age might elucidate healthy or susceptible conditions for development of respiratory disease.

  16. Gene therapy and respiratory neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Carlos B

    2017-01-01

    Breathing is a life-sustaining behavior that in mammals is accomplished by activation of dedicated muscles responsible for inspiratory and expiratory forces acting on the lung and chest wall. Motor control is exerted by specialized pools of motoneurons in the medulla and spinal cord innervated by projections from multiple centers primarily in the brainstem that act in concert to generate both the rhythm and pattern of ventilation. Perturbations that prevent the accomplishment of the full range of motor behaviors by respiratory muscles commonly result in significant morbidity and increased mortality. Recent developments in gene therapy and novel targeting strategies have contributed to deeper understanding of the organization of respiratory motor systems. Gene therapy has received widespread attention and substantial progress has been made in recent years with the advent of improved tools for vector design. Genes can be delivered via a variety of plasmids, synthetic or viral vectors and cell therapies. In recent years, adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have become one of the most commonly used vector systems, primarily because of the extensive characterization conducted to date and the versatility in targeting strategies. Recent studies highlight the power of using AAV to selectively and effectively transduce respiratory motoneurons and muscle fibers with promising therapeutic effects. This brief review summarizes current evidence for the use of gene therapy in respiratory disorders with a primary focus on interventions that address motor control and neuroplasticity, including regeneration, in the respiratory system.

  17. Altered Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major respiratory complications of obesity include a heightened demand for ventilation, elevated work of breathing, respiratory muscle inefficiency and diminished respiratory compliance. The decreased functional residual capacity and expiratory reserve volume, with a high closing volume to functional residual capacity ratio of obesity, are associated with the closure of peripheral lung units, ventilation to perfusion ratio abnormalities and hypoxemia, especially in the supine position. Conventional respiratory function tests are only mildly affected by obesity except in extreme cases. The major circulatory complications are increased total and pulmonary blood volume, high cardiac output and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Patients with obesity commonly develop hypoventilation and sleep apnea syndromes with attenuated hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness. The final result is hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and progressively worsening disability. Obese patients have increased dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which are vital to quality of life. Decreased muscle, increased joint pain and skin friction are important determinants of decreased exercise capacity, in addition to the cardiopulmonary effects of obesity. The effects of obesity on mortality in heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have not been definitively resolved. Whether obesity contributes to asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness is uncertain. Weight reduction and physical activity are effective means of reversing the respiratory complications of obesity.

  18. Burkholderia Pseudomallei is genetically diverse in agricultural land in Northeast Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaporn Wuthiekanun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The soil-dwelling Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis. Extreme structuring of genotype and genotypic frequency has been demonstrated for B. pseudomallei in uncultivated land, but its distribution and genetic diversity in agricultural land where most human infections are probably acquired is not well defined. METHODS: Fixed-interval soil sampling was performed in a rice paddy in northeast Thailand in which 100 grams of soil was sampled at a depth of 30 cm from 10x10 sampling points each measuring 2.5 m by 2.5 m. Soil was cultured for the presence of B. pseudomallei and genotyping of colonies present on primary culture plates was performed using a combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: B. pseudomallei was cultured from 28/100 samples. Genotyping of 630 primary colonies drawn from 11 sampling points demonstrated 10 PFGE banding pattern types, which on MLST were resolved into 7 sequence types (ST. Overlap of genotypes was observed more often between sampling points that were closely positioned. Two sampling points contained mixed B. pseudomallei genotypes, each with a numerically dominant genotype and one or more additional genotypes present as minority populations. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic diversity and structuring of B. pseudomallei exists despite the effects of flooding and the physical and chemical processes associated with farming. These findings form an important baseline for future studies of environmental B. pseudomallei.

  19. Decoding the folding of Burkholderia glumae lipase: folding intermediates en route to kinetic stability.

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    Kris Pauwels

    Full Text Available The lipase produced by Burkholderia glumae folds spontaneously into an inactive near-native state and requires a periplasmic chaperone to reach its final active and secretion-competent fold. The B. glumae lipase-specific foldase (Lif is classified as a member of the steric-chaperone family of which the propeptides of α-lytic protease and subtilisin are the best known representatives. Steric chaperones play a key role in conferring kinetic stability to proteins. However, until present there was no solid experimental evidence that Lif-dependent lipases are kinetically trapped enzymes. By combining thermal denaturation studies with proteolytic resistance experiments and the description of distinct folding intermediates, we demonstrate that the native lipase has a kinetically stable conformation. We show that a newly discovered molten globule-like conformation has distinct properties that clearly differ from those of the near-native intermediate state. The folding fingerprint of Lif-dependent lipases is put in the context of the protease-prodomain system and the comparison reveals clear differences that render the lipase-Lif systems unique. Limited proteolysis unveils structural differences between the near-native intermediate and the native conformation and sets the stage to shed light onto the nature of the kinetic barrier.

  20. lux-Marking and application of carbofuran degrader Burkholderia cepacia PCL3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangklang, Pensri; Reungsang, Alissara

    2011-10-01

    A luxAB-mutant of the carbofuran degrading bacterium Burkholderia cepacia PCL3 was successfully constructed with the capability to emit a luminescence signal of 1.6×10(-3)RLUcfu(-1). The mutant has a growth pattern and carbofuran degradation ability similar to PCL3 wild-type. The luminescent emission by PCL3:luxAB1 directly correlated with the metabolic activity of the cells. The optimal pH, temperature and n-decanal concentration for luminescence emission are 7.0, 35°C and 0.01%, respectively. PCL3:luxAB1 was used to assess the toxicity of carbofuran and carbofuran phenol in basal salt medium (BSM) in which the different sensitivity of the cells is dependent on the biomass concentration. With the luciferase system, the degradative fraction of the augmented PCL3:luxAB1 and the difference between the active augmented PCL3:luxAB1 and indigenous microorganisms at the contaminated site could be indicated.

  1. Bioremediation of refinery wastewater using immobilised Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp and their transconjugants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi T. Ajao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available When oil spill occurs, it poses serious toxic hazards to all forms of life. Mixed culture of Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp isolated from refinery sludge using selective enrichment technique was used for bioremediation of refinery wastewater in a laboratoryscale bioreactor. Physicochemical parameters of both raw and treated water were as determined and compared with Federal Environ - mental Protection Agency (FEPA-limit, Abuja, Nigeria to asses the efficiency of the bioremediation process. Each of the bacterium was screened for the presence of plasmid DNA and for the involvement or otherwise of plasmid in the bioremediation of wastewater. The immobilised cells showed percentage decrease in chemical oxygen demand (97%, biochemical oxygen demand (94%, phenol (98%, total petroleum hydrocarbon (79%, oil and grease (90% of the refinery waste water after 20 days of treatment while their transconjugants showed the multiplicative effect by achieving the same percentage after 10 days of treatment. Therefore, the findings revealed that bioaugmentation of wastewater using transmissible catabolic plasmid will enhance efficiency of the bioremediation by spreading the plasmid among indigenous microbial community either through horizontal gene transfer or transformation.

  2. [GENOTYPING OF THE BURKHOLDERIA MALLEI STRAINS BASED ON DIFFERENT REGION ANALYSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondareva, O S; Savchenko, S S; Tkachenko, G A; Ledeneva, M L; Lemasova, L V; Antonov, V A

    2016-01-01

    Development of the genotyping methods of glanders agent is urgent due to its high pathogenicity, lack of effective preventive measures and threat of the use of Burkholderia mallei as a biological weapon. In this work we proposed a scheme for the typing of the B. mallei strains based on different region analysis (DFR). The choice of variable loci differentially presented in various strains of glanders agents was performed by analyzing annotated whole-genome sequences of the B. mallei strains. Primers and fluorescence probes were designed for 9 selected loci. The amplification conditions for different regions were optimized in two variants: with electrophoretic detection and hybridization-fluorescence detection in the strip format. The possibility of applying the DFR analysis to genetic characterization of strains was assessed in 14 B. mallei strains. The genetic profiles of the studied B. mallei strains revealed that the developed DFR-typing scheme was characterized by high discrimination power (Hunter-Gaston index value was 0.92), reproducibility, rapidity, easy interpretation, and applicability for epidemiological surveillance of glanders.

  3. Aerogenic vaccination with a Burkholderia mallei auxotroph protects against aerosol-initiated glanders in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Ricky L; Amemiya, Kei; Waag, David M; Roy, Chad J; DeShazer, David

    2005-03-14

    Burkholderia mallei is an obligate mammalian pathogen that causes the zoonotic disease glanders. Two live attenuated B. mallei strains, a capsule mutant and a branched-chain amino acid auxotroph, were evaluated for use as vaccines against aerosol-initiated glanders in mice. Animals were aerogenically vaccinated and serum samples were obtained before aerosol challenge with a high-dose (>300 times the LD50) of B. mallei ATCC 23344. Mice vaccinated with the capsule mutant developed a Th2-like Ig subclass antibody response and none survived beyond 5 days. In comparison, the auxotrophic mutant elicited a Th1-like Ig subclass antibody response and 25% of the animals survived for 1 month postchallenge. After a low-dose (5 times the LD50) aerosol challenge, the survival rates of auxotroph-vaccinated and unvaccinated animals were 50 and 0%, respectively. Thus, live attenuated strains that promote a Th1-like Ig response may serve as promising vaccine candidates against aerosol infection with B. mallei.

  4. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benanti, Erin L.; Nguyen, Catherine M.; Welch, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, while their close relative B. thailandensis is nonpathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection. PMID:25860613

  5. Evaluation of recombinant proteins of Burkholderia mallei for serodiagnosis of glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Vijai; Kumar, Subodh; Malik, Praveen; Rai, Ganga Prasad

    2012-08-01

    Glanders is a contagious disease caused by the Gram-negative bacillus Burkholderia mallei. The number of equine glanders outbreaks has increased steadily during the last decade. The disease must be reported to the Office International des Epizooties, Paris, France. Glanders serodiagnosis is hampered by the considerable number of false positives and negatives of the internationally prescribed tests. The major problem leading to the low sensitivity and specificity of the complement fixation test (CFT) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been linked to the test antigens currently used, i.e., crude preparations of whole cells. False-positive results obtained from other diagnostic tests utilizing crude antigens lead to financial losses to animal owners, and false-negative results can turn a risk into a possible threat. In this study, we report on the identification of diagnostic targets using bioinformatics tools for serodiagnosis of glanders. The identified gene sequences were cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins. The purified recombinant proteins of B. mallei were used in an indirect ELISA format for serodiagnosis of glanders. Two recombinant proteins, 0375H and 0375TH, exhibited 100% sensitivity and specificity for glanders diagnosis. The proteins also did not cross-react with sera from patients with the closely related disease melioidosis. The results of this investigation highlight the potential of recombinant 0375H and 0375TH proteins in specific and sensitive diagnosis of glanders.

  6. Degradation of 4-nitrocatechol by Burkholderia cepacia: a plasmid-encoded novel pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A; Samanta, S K; Jain, R K

    2000-05-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia RKJ200 (now described as Burkholderia cepacia) has been shown to utilize p-nitrophenol (PNP) as sole carbon and energy source. The present work demonstrates that RKJ200 utilizes 4-nitrocatechol (NC) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy, and is degraded with concomitant release of nitrite ions. Several lines of evidence, including thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, spectral analyses and quantification of intermediates by high performance liquid chromatography, have shown that NC is degraded via 1,2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) and hydroquinone (HQ) formation. Studies carried out on a PNP- derivative and a PNP+ transconjugant also demonstrate that the genes for the NC degradative pathway reside on the plasmid present in RKJ200; the same plasmid had earlier been shown to encode genes for PNP degradation, which is also degraded via HQ formation. It is likely, therefore, that the same sets of genes encode the further metabolism of HQ in NC and PNP degradation.

  7. Burkholderia pseudomallei is frequently detected in groundwater that discharges to major watercourses in northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anthony L; Warner, Jeffrey M

    2016-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the environmental bacterium that causes the serious disease melioidosis. Recently, a high prevalence of viable B. pseudomallei was reported from natural groundwater seeps around Castle Hill, a clinical focus of melioidosis in Townsville, Australia. This study sought to expand previous findings to determine the extent of B. pseudomallei in more diverse natural groundwater seeps in northern Queensland to ascertain if the presence of the organism in groundwater on Castle Hill was an isolated occurrence. Analysis of water samples (n = 26) obtained from natural groundwater seeps following an intensive rainfall event in the Townsville region determined the presence of B. pseudomallei DNA in duplicates of 18 samples (69.2 % [95 % CI, 51.5 to 87.0]). From 26 water samples, a single isolate of B. pseudomallei was recovered despite plating of both pre-enriched samples and original water samples onto selective media, indicating that the sensitivity of these molecular techniques far exceeds culture-based methods. Furthermore, the identification of new environments endemic for melioidosis may be more effectively determined by analysing surface groundwater seeps than by the analysis of random soil samples. This study suggests that a higher incidence of melioidosis following monsoonal rains may be partially the result of exposure to groundwater sources carrying B. pseudomallei, and that modifications to public health messages in endemic regions may be warranted. Moreover, these findings have implications for predictive models of melioidosis, effective models requiring consideration of topographical and surface hydrological data.

  8. Bacterial-Feeding Nematode Growth and Preference for Biocontrol Isolates of the Bacterium Burkholderia cepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, L K

    2000-12-01

    The potential of different bacterial-feeding Rhabditida to consume isolates of Burkholderia cepacia with known agricultural biocontrol ability was examined. Caenorhabditis elegans, Diploscapter sp., Oscheius myriophila, Pelodera strongyloides, Pristionchus pacificus, Zeldia punctata, Panagrellus redivivus, and Distolabrellus veechi were tested for growth on and preference for Escherichia coli OP50 or B. cepacia maize soil isolates J82, BcF, M36, Bc2, and PHQM100. Considerable growth and preference variations occurred between nematode taxa on individual bacterial isolates, and between different bacterial isolates on a given nematode. Populations of Diploscapter sp. and P. redivivus were most strongly suppressed. Only Z. punctata and P. pacificus grew well on all isolates, though Z. punctata preferentially accumulated on all isolates and P. pacificus had no preference. Oscheius myriophila preferentially accumulated on growth-supportive Bc2 and M36, and avoided less supportive J82 and PHQM100. Isolates with plant-parasitic nematicidal properties and poor fungicidal properties supported the best growth of three members of the Rhabditidae, C. elegans, O. myriophila, and P. strongyloides. Distolabrellus veechi avoided commercial nematicide M36 more strongly than fungicide J82.

  9. Susceptibility of Opportunistic Burkholderia glumae to Copper Surfaces Following Wet or Dry Surface Contact

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    Zhouqi Cui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae has been proposed to have a potential risk to vulnerable communities. In this work, we investigated the antibacterial activity and mechanism of copper surfaces against multi-drug resistant B. glumae from both patients and rice plants. The susceptibility of B. glumae to copper surfaces was noted by a significant decline in viable bacterial counts, relative to the slight reduction of stainless steel and polyvinylchloride, both of which were used as control surfaces. The mode of action of bacterial killing was determined by examing the mutagenicity, DNA damage, copper ions accumulation, and membrane damage in bacterial cells. The results indicated that the cells exposed to copper surfaces did not cause severe DNA lesions or increase the mutation frequencies, but resulted in a loss of cell membrane integrity within minutes. Furthermore, bacterial cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated significantly higher amounts of copper compared to control surfaces. Overall, this study showed that metallic copper had strong antibacterial effect against B. glumae by causing DNA and membrane damage, cellular accumulation of copper, and cell death following DNA degradation, which could be utilized to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination and infection.

  10. Susceptibility of opportunistic Burkholderia glumae to copper surfaces following wet or dry surface contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhouqi; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Yang, Chunlan; Fang, Yuan; Annam, Hussain; Li, Bin; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Guan-Lin; Sun, Guochang

    2014-07-09

    Burkholderia glumae has been proposed to have a potential risk to vulnerable communities. In this work, we investigated the antibacterial activity and mechanism of copper surfaces against multi-drug resistant B. glumae from both patients and rice plants. The susceptibility of B. glumae to copper surfaces was noted by a significant decline in viable bacterial counts, relative to the slight reduction of stainless steel and polyvinylchloride, both of which were used as control surfaces. The mode of action of bacterial killing was determined by examing the mutagenicity, DNA damage, copper ions accumulation, and membrane damage in bacterial cells. The results indicated that the cells exposed to copper surfaces did not cause severe DNA lesions or increase the mutation frequencies, but resulted in a loss of cell membrane integrity within minutes. Furthermore, bacterial cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated significantly higher amounts of copper compared to control surfaces. Overall, this study showed that metallic copper had strong antibacterial effect against B. glumae by causing DNA and membrane damage, cellular accumulation of copper, and cell death following DNA degradation, which could be utilized to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination and infection.

  11. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Genetic Characterisation of Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolated from Malaysian Patients

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    Yalda Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Ceftazidime (CAZ, the synthetic β-lactam, is normally used as the first-line antibiotic therapy for treatment of melioidosis. However, acquired CAZ resistance can develop in vivo during treatment with CAZ, leading to mortality if therapy is not switched to a different antibiotic(s in a timely manner. In this study, susceptibilities of 81 B. pseudomallei isolates to nine different antimicrobial agents were determined using the disk diffusion method, broth microdilution test and Etest. Highest percentage of susceptibility was demonstrated to CAZ, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, meropenem, imipenem, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Although these drugs demonstrated the highest percentage of susceptibility in B. pseudomallei, the overall results underline the importance of the emergence of resistance in this organism. PCR results showed that, of the 81 B. pseudomallei, six multidrug resistant (MDR isolates carried bpeB, amrB, and BPSS1119 and penA genes. Genotyping of the isolates using random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis showed six different PCR fingerprinting patterns generated from the six MDR isolates clusters (A and eight PCR fingerprinting patterns generated for the remaining 75 non-MDR isolates clusters (B.

  12. Neutrophil elastase causes tissue damage that decreases host tolerance to lung infection with burkholderia species.

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    Manoranjan Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Two distinct defense strategies can protect the host from infection: resistance is the ability to destroy the infectious agent, and tolerance is the ability to withstand infection by minimizing the negative impact it has on the host's health without directly affecting pathogen burden. Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects macrophages and causes melioidosis. We have recently shown that inflammasome-triggered pyroptosis and IL-18 are equally important for resistance to B. pseudomallei, whereas IL-1β is deleterious. Here we show that the detrimental role of IL-1β during infection with B. pseudomallei (and closely related B. thailandensis is due to excessive recruitment of neutrophils to the lung and consequent tissue damage. Mice deficient in the potentially damaging enzyme neutrophil elastase were less susceptible than the wild type C57BL/6J mice to infection, although the bacterial burdens in organs and the extent of inflammation were comparable between C57BL/6J and elastase-deficient mice. In contrast, lung tissue damage and vascular leakage were drastically reduced in elastase-deficient mice compared to controls. Bradykinin levels were higher in C57BL/6 than in elastase-deficient mice; administration of a bradykinin antagonist protected mice from infection, suggesting that increased vascular permeability mediated by bradykinin is one of the mechanisms through which elastase decreases host tolerance to melioidosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that absence of neutrophil elastase increases host tolerance, rather than resistance, to infection by minimizing host tissue damage.

  13. Bioactive and Structural Metabolites of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia Species Causal Agents of Cultivated Mushrooms Diseases1

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    Andolfi, Anna; Cimmino, Alessio; Cantore, Pietro Lo; Iacobellis, Nicola Sante; Evidente, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas tolaasii, P. reactans and Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola, are responsible of diseases on some species of cultivated mushrooms. The main bioactive metabolites produced by both Pseudomonas strains are the lipodepsipeptides (LDPs) tolaasin I and II and the so called White Line Inducing Principle (WLIP), respectively, LDPs which have been extensively studied for their role in the disease process and for their biological properties. In particular, their antimicrobial activity and the alteration of biological and model membranes (red blood cell and liposomes) was established. In the case of tolaasin I interaction with membranes was also related to the tridimensional structure in solution as determined by NMR combined with molecular dynamic calculation techniques. Recently, five news minor tolaasins, tolaasins A–E, were isolated from the culture filtrates of P. tolaasii and their chemical structure was determined by extensive use of NMR and MS spectroscopy. Furthermore, their antimicrobial activity was evaluated on target micro-organisms (fungi—including the cultivated mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, Lentinus edodes, and Pleurotus spp.—chromista, yeast and bacteria). The Gram positive bacteria resulted the most sensible and a significant structure-activity relationships was apparent. The isolation and structure determination of bioactive metabolites produced by B. gladioli pv. agaricicola are still in progress but preliminary results indicate their peptide nature. Furthermore, the exopolysaccharide (EPS) from the culture filtrates of B. gladioli pv. agaricicola, as well as the O-chain and lipid A, from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the three bacteria, were isolated and the structures determined. PMID:19787100

  14. Bioactive and structural metabolites of pseudomonas and burkholderia species causal agents of cultivated mushrooms diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Anna; Cimmino, Alessio; Cantore, Pietro Lo; Iacobellis, Nicola Sante; Evidente, Antonio

    2008-05-09

    Pseudomonas tolaasii, P. reactans and Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola, are responsible of diseases on some species of cultivated mushrooms. The main bioactive metabolites produced by both Pseudomonas strains are the lipodepsipeptides (LDPs) tolaasin I and II and the so called White Line Inducing Principle (WLIP), respectively, LDPs which have been extensively studied for their role in the disease process and for their biological properties. In particular, their antimicrobial activity and the alteration of biological and model membranes (red blood cell and liposomes) was established. In the case of tolaasin I interaction with membranes was also related to the tridimensional structure in solution as determined by NMR combined with molecular dynamic calculation techniques. Recently, five news minor tolaasins, tolaasins A-E, were isolated from the culture filtrates of P. tolaasii and their chemical structure was determined by extensive use of NMR and MS spectroscopy. Furthermore, their antimicrobial activity was evaluated on target micro-organisms (fungi-including the cultivated mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, Lentinus edodes, and Pleurotus spp.-chromista, yeast and bacteria). The Gram positive bacteria resulted the most sensible and a significant structure-activity relationships was apparent. The isolation and structure determination of bioactive metabolites produced by B. gladioli pv. agaricicola are still in progress but preliminary results indicate their peptide nature. Furthermore, the exopolysaccharide (EPS) from the culture filtrates of B. gladioli pv. agaricicola, as well as the O-chain and lipid A, from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the three bacteria, were isolated and the structures determined.

  15. Purification, biochemical characterization, and genetic cloning of the phytase produced by Burkholderia sp. strain a13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graminho, Eduardo Rezende; Takaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    A phytase-producing bacterium, Burkholderia sp. a13 (JCM 30421), was isolated from Lake Kasumigaura by enrichment cultivation using minimum medium containing phytic acid as the sole phosphorus source. The phytase production by strain a13 was induced by the presence of phytic acid and repressed by the addition of glucose. The purified enzyme had a molecular weight of 44 kDa and a phytase activity of 174 μmol min(-1) mg(-1). The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity, but the highest activity was observed with phytic acid. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and iodoacetic acid, indicating the requirement of a thiol group for the activity. Genetic cloning reveals that the mature portion of this enzyme consists of 428 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 46 kDa. The amino acid sequence showed the highest similarity to the phytase produced by Hafnia alvei with 48% identity; it also contained histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) motifs (RHGXRXP and HD), indicating the classification of this enzyme in the HAP phytase family. We have successfully expressed the cloned gene in Escherichia coli from its putative initiation codon, showing that the gene actually encodes the phytase.

  16. Bioleaching remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils using Burkholderia sp. Z-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhi; Chai, Liyuan; Wang, Yong; Liu, Yi; Xiao, Ruiyang

    2016-01-15

    Bioleaching is an environment-friendly and economical technology to remove heavy metals from contaminated soils. In this study, a biosurfactant-producing strain with capacity of alkaline production was isolated from cafeteria sewer sludge and its capability for removing Zn, Pb, Mn, Cd, Cu, and As was investigated. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rDNA gene sequences confirmed that the strain belonged to Burkholderia sp. and named as Z-90. The biosurfactant was glycolipid confirmed by thin layer chromatography and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Z-90 broth was then used for bioleaching remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils. The removal efficiency was 44.0% for Zn, 32.5% for Pb, 52.2% for Mn, 37.7% for Cd, 24.1% for Cu and 31.6% for As, respectively. Mn, Zn and Cd were more easily removed from soil than Cu, Pb and As, which was attributed to the presence of high acid-soluble fraction of Mn, Zn and Cd and high residual fraction of Cu, Pb and As. The heavy metal removal in soils was contributed to the adhesion of heavy metal-contaminated soil minerals with strain Z-90 and the formation of a metal complex with biosurfactant.

  17. Genomic islands as a marker to differentiate between clinical and environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Thanatchaporn Bartpho

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, as a saprophytic bacterium that can cause a severe sepsis disease named melioidosis, has preserved several extra genes in its genome for survival. The sequenced genome of the organism showed high diversity contributed mainly from genomic islands (GIs. Comparative genome hybridization (CGH of 3 clinical and 2 environmental isolates, using whole genome microarrays based on B. pseudomallei K96243 genes, revealed a difference in the presence of genomic islands between clinical and environmental isolates. The largest GI, GI8, of B. pseudomallei was observed as a 2 sub-GI named GIs8.1 and 8.2 with distinguishable %GC content and unequal presence in the genome. GIs8.1, 8.2 and 15 were found to be more common in clinical isolates. A new GI, GI16c, was detected on chromosome 2. Presences of GIs8.1, 8.2, 15 and 16c were evaluated in 70 environmental and 64 clinical isolates using PCR assays. A combination of GIs8.1 and 16c (positivity of either GI was detected in 70% of clinical isolates and 11.4% of environmental isolates (P0.05. Some virulence genes located in the absent GIs and the difference of GIs seems to contribute less to bacterial virulence. The PCR detection of 2 GIs could be used as a cost effective and rapid tool to detect potentially virulent isolates that were contaminated in soil.

  18. Interleukin 10 inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine responses and killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Bianca; Rinchai, Darawan; Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Nithichanon, Arnone; Biggart, Rachael; Hawrylowicz, Catherine M.; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2017-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic in northeastern Thailand and Northern Australia. Severe septicemic melioidosis is associated with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and is correlated with poor clinical outcomes. IL-10 is an immunoregulatory cytokine, which in other infections can control the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but its role in melioidosis has not been addressed. Here, whole blood of healthy seropositive individuals (n = 75), living in N. E. Thailand was co-cultured with B. pseudomallei and production of IL-10 and IFN-γ detected and the cellular sources identified. CD3− CD14+ monocytes were the main source of IL-10. Neutralization of IL-10 increased IFN-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α production and improved bacteria killing. IFN-γ production and microbicidal activity were impaired in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). In contrast, IL-10 production was unimpaired in individuals with DM, resulting in an IL-10 dominant cytokine balance. Neutralization of IL-10 restored the IFN-γ response of individuals with DM to similar levels observed in healthy individuals and improved killing of B. pseudomallei in vitro. These results demonstrate that monocyte derived IL-10 acts to inhibit potentially protective cell mediated immune responses against B. pseudomallei, but may also moderate the pathological effects of excessive cytokine production during sepsis. PMID:28216665

  19. Enhanced Polychlorinated Biphenyl Removal in a Switchgrass Rhizosphere by Bioaugmentation with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yi; Meggo, Richard; Hu, Dingfei; Schnoor, Jerald L; Mattes, Timothy E

    2014-10-01

    Phytoremediation makes use of plants and associated microorganisms to clean up soils and sediments contaminated with inorganic and organic pollutants. In this study, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) was used to test for its efficiency in improving the removal of three specific polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (PCB 52, 77 and 153) in soil microcosms. The congeners were chosen for their ubiquity, toxicity, and recalcitrance. After 24 weeks of incubation, loss of 39.9 ± 0.41% of total PCB molar mass was observed in switchgrass treated soil, significantly higher than in unplanted soil (29.5 ± 3.4%) (p<0.05). The improved PCB removal in switchgrass treated soils could be explained by phytoextraction processes and enhanced microbial activity in the rhizosphere. Bioaugmentation with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 was performed to further enhance aerobic PCB degradation. The presence of LB400 was associated with improved degradation of PCB 52, but not PCB 77 or PCB 153. Increased abundances of bphA (a functional gene that codes for a subunit of PCB-degrading biphenyl dioxygenase in bacteria) and its transcript were observed after bioaugmentation. The highest total PCB removal was observed in switchgrass treated soil with LB400 bioaugmentation (47.3 ± 1.22 %), and the presence of switchgrass facilitated LB400 survival in the soil. Overall, our results suggest the combined use of phytoremediation and bioaugmentation could be an efficient and sustainable strategy to eliminate recalcitrant PCB congeners and remediate PCB-contaminated soil.

  20. Landscape changes influence the occurrence of the melioidosis bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in soil in northern Australia.

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    Mirjam Kaestli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The soil-dwelling saprophyte bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a severe disease of humans and animals in southeast Asia and northern Australia. Despite the detection of B. pseudomallei in various soil and water samples from endemic areas, the environmental habitat of B. pseudomallei remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a large survey in the Darwin area in tropical Australia and screened 809 soil samples for the presence of these bacteria. B. pseudomallei were detected by using a recently developed and validated protocol involving soil DNA extraction and real-time PCR targeting the B. pseudomallei-specific Type III Secretion System TTS1 gene cluster. Statistical analyses such as multivariable cluster logistic regression and principal component analysis were performed to assess the association of B. pseudomallei with environmental factors. The combination of factors describing the habitat of B. pseudomallei differed between undisturbed sites and environmentally manipulated areas. At undisturbed sites, the occurrence of B. pseudomallei was found to be significantly associated with areas rich in grasses, whereas at environmentally disturbed sites, B. pseudomallei was associated with the presence of livestock animals, lower soil pH and different combinations of soil texture and colour. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study contributes to the elucidation of environmental factors influencing the occurrence of B. pseudomallei and raises concerns that B. pseudomallei may spread due to changes in land use.

  1. What drives the occurrence of the melioidosis bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in domestic gardens?

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    Mirjam Kaestli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is an often fatal infectious disease affecting humans and animals in tropical regions and is caused by the saprophytic environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Domestic gardens are not only a common source of exposure to soil and thus to B. pseudomallei, but they also have been found to contain more B. pseudomallei than other environments. In this study we addressed whether anthropogenic manipulations common to gardens such as irrigation or fertilizers change the occurrence of B. pseudomallei. We conducted a soil microcosm experiment with a range of fertilizers and soil types as well as a longitudinal interventional study over three years on an experimental fertilized field site in an area naturally positive for B. pseudomallei. Irrigation was the only consistent treatment to increase B. pseudomallei occurrence over time. The effects of fertilizers upon these bacteria depended on soil texture, physicochemical soil properties and biotic factors. Nitrates and urea increased B. pseudomallei load in sand while phosphates had a positive effect in clay. The high buffering and cation exchange capacities of organic material found in a commercial potting mix led to a marked increase in soil salinity with no survival of B. pseudomallei after four weeks in the potting mix sampled. Imported grasses were also associated with B. pseudomallei occurrence in a multivariate model. With increasing population density in endemic areas these findings inform the identification of areas in the anthropogenic environment with increased risk of exposure to B. pseudomallei.

  2. What drives the occurrence of the melioidosis bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in domestic gardens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Harrington, Glenda; Mayo, Mark; Chatfield, Mark D; Harrington, Ian; Hill, Audrey; Munksgaard, Niels; Gibb, Karen; Currie, Bart J

    2015-03-01

    Melioidosis is an often fatal infectious disease affecting humans and animals in tropical regions and is caused by the saprophytic environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Domestic gardens are not only a common source of exposure to soil and thus to B. pseudomallei, but they also have been found to contain more B. pseudomallei than other environments. In this study we addressed whether anthropogenic manipulations common to gardens such as irrigation or fertilizers change the occurrence of B. pseudomallei. We conducted a soil microcosm experiment with a range of fertilizers and soil types as well as a longitudinal interventional study over three years on an experimental fertilized field site in an area naturally positive for B. pseudomallei. Irrigation was the only consistent treatment to increase B. pseudomallei occurrence over time. The effects of fertilizers upon these bacteria depended on soil texture, physicochemical soil properties and biotic factors. Nitrates and urea increased B. pseudomallei load in sand while phosphates had a positive effect in clay. The high buffering and cation exchange capacities of organic material found in a commercial potting mix led to a marked increase in soil salinity with no survival of B. pseudomallei after four weeks in the potting mix sampled. Imported grasses were also associated with B. pseudomallei occurrence in a multivariate model. With increasing population density in endemic areas these findings inform the identification of areas in the anthropogenic environment with increased risk of exposure to B. pseudomallei.

  3. Exploring the Anti-Burkholderia cepacia Complex Activity of Essential Oils: A Preliminary Analysis

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    Isabel Maida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have checked the ability of the essential oils extracted from six different medicinal plants (Eugenia caryophyllata, Origanum vulgare, Rosmarinus officinalis, Lavandula officinalis, Melaleuca alternifolia, and Thymus vulgaris to inhibit the growth of 18 bacterial type strains belonging to the 18 known species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc. These bacteria are opportunistic human pathogens that can cause severe infection in immunocompromised patients, especially those affected by cystic fibrosis (CF, and are often resistant to multiple antibiotics. The analysis of the aromatograms produced by the six oils revealed that, in spite of their different chemical composition, all of them were able to contrast the growth of Bcc members. However, three of them (i.e., Eugenia caryophyllata, Origanum vulgare, and Thymus vulgaris were particularly active versus the Bcc strains, including those exhibiting a high degree or resistance to ciprofloxacin, one of the most used antibiotics to treat Bcc infections. These three oils are also active toward both environmental and clinical strains (isolated from CF patients, suggesting that they might be used in the future to fight B. cepacia complex infections.

  4. Strategies for PCR based detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei DNA in paraffin wax embedded tissues.

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    Hagen, R M; Gauthier, Y P; Sprague, L D; Vidal, D R; Zysk, G; Finke, E-J; Neubauer, H

    2002-12-01

    Recently, several cases of melioidosis imported to Europe have been reported. The diagnosis of the acute or chronic infection remains challenging. This report describes an optimised protocol for fast and reliable DNA preparation for use in two different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, namely: (1) a seminested PCR assay targeting a genus specific sequence of the ribosomal protein subunit 21 (rpsU) gene and (2) a nested PCR assay targeting the gene encoding the filament forming flagellin (fliC). Various strains of Burkholderia spp, strains of closely related genera, and spleen tissue samples of experimentally infected mice were investigated. The combination of PCR and sequencing of the amplicons resulted in high sensitivity and specificity. These procedures may allow rapid, sensitive, and reliable detection of B pseudomallei DNA in routinely formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded samples, thus providing a safe diagnostic tool and avoiding the cultivation of a risk group 3 agent. In addition, this method could be useful for retrospective histopathological investigations.

  5. Environmental Attributes Influencing the Distribution of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Northern Australia.

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    Anthony L Baker

    Full Text Available Factors responsible for the spatial and temporal clustering of Burkholderia pseudomallei in the environment remain to be elucidated. Whilst laboratory based experiments have been performed to analyse survival of the organism in various soil types, such approaches are strongly influenced by alterations to the soil micro ecology during soil sanitisation and translocation. During the monsoonal season in Townsville, Australia, B. pseudomallei is discharged from Castle Hill (an area with a very high soil prevalence of the organism by groundwater seeps and is washed through a nearby area where intensive sampling in the dry season has been unable to detect the organism. We undertook environmental sampling and soil and plant characterisation in both areas to ascertain physiochemical and macro-floral differences between the two sites that may affect the prevalence of B. pseudomallei. In contrast to previous studies, the presence of B. pseudomallei was correlated with a low gravimetric water content and low nutrient availability (nitrogen and sulphur and higher exchangeable potassium in soils favouring recovery. Relatively low levels of copper, iron and zinc favoured survival. The prevalence of the organism was found to be highest under the grasses Aristida sp. and Heteropogon contortus and to a lesser extent under Melinis repens. The findings of this study indicate that a greater variety of factors influence the endemicity of melioidosis than has previously been reported, and suggest that biogeographical boundaries to the organisms' distribution involve complex interactions.

  6. Screening for potential anti-infective agents towards Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Su Anne; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The established treatment for melioidosis is antibiotic therapy. However, a constant threat to this form of treatment is resistance development of the causative agent, Burkholderia pseudomallei, towards antibiotics. One option to circumvent this threat of antibiotic resistance is to search for new alternative anti-infectives which target the host innate immune system and/or bacterial virulence. In this study, 29 synthetic compounds were evaluated for their potential to increase the lifespan of an infected host. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was adopted as the infection model as its innate immune pathways are homologous to humans. Screens were performed in a liquid-based survival assay containing infected worms exposed to individual compounds and survival of untreated and compound-treated worms were compared. A primary screen identified nine synthetic compounds that extended the lifespan of B. pseudomallei-infected worms. Subsequently, a disc diffusion test was performed on these selected compounds to delineate compounds into those that enhanced the survival of worms via antimicrobial activity i.e. reducing the number of infecting bacteria, or into those that did not target pathogen viability. Out of the nine hits selected, two demonstrated antimicrobial effects on B. pseudomallei. Therefore, the findings from this study suggest that the other seven identified compounds are potential anti-infectives which could protect a host against B. pseudomallei infection without developing the risk of drug resistance.

  7. Survival and Intra-Nuclear Trafficking of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Strategies of Evasion from Immune Surveillance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Jamuna; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Thimma, Jaikumar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Kang, Wen-Tyng; Choh, Leang-Chung; Wong, Kum Thong

    2017-01-01

    Background During infection, successful bacterial clearance is achieved via the host immune system acting in conjunction with appropriate antibiotic therapy. However, it still remains a tip of the iceberg as to where persistent pathogens namely, Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei) reside/hide to escape from host immune sensors and antimicrobial pressure. Methods We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate post-mortem tissue sections of patients with clinical melioidosis to identify the localisation of a recently identified gut microbiome, B. pseudomallei within host cells. The intranuclear presence of B. pseudomallei was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of experimentally infected guinea pig spleen tissues and Live Z-stack, and ImageJ analysis of fluorescence microscopy analysis of in vitro infection of A549 human lung epithelial cells. Results TEM investigations revealed intranuclear localization of B. pseudomallei in cells of infected human lung and guinea pig spleen tissues. We also found that B. pseudomallei induced actin polymerization following infection of A549 human lung epithelial cells. Infected A549 lung epithelial cells using 3D-Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed the intranuclear localization of B. pseudomallei. Conclusion B. pseudomallei was found within the nuclear compartment of host cells. The nucleus may play a role as an occult or transient niche for persistence of intracellular pathogens, potentially leading to recurrrent episodes or recrudescence of infection. PMID:28045926

  8. Land use and soil type determine the presence of the pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei in tropical rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolzi, Olivier; Rochelle-Newall, Emma; Dittrich, Sabine; Auda, Yves; Newton, Paul N; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Knappik, Michael; Soulileuth, Bounsamai; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Dance, David A B; Pierret, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the bacterium that causes melioidosis in humans. While B. pseudomallei is known to be endemic in South East Asia (SEA), the occurrence of the disease in other parts of the tropics points towards a potentially large global distribution. We investigated the environmental factors that influence the presence (and absence) of B. pseudomallei in a tropical watershed in SEA. Our main objective was to determine whether there is a link between the presence of the organism in the hydrographic network and the upstream soil and land-use type. The presence of B. pseudomallei was determined using a specific quantitative real-time PCR assay following enrichment culture. Land use, soil, geomorphology, and environmental data were then analyzed using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) to compare the B. pseudomallei positive and negative sites. Soil type in the surrounding catchment and turbidity had a strong positive influence on the presence (acrisols and luvisols) or absence (ferralsols) of B. pseudomallei. Given the strong apparent links between soil characteristics, water turbidity, and the presence/absence of B. pseudomallei, actions to raise public awareness about factors increasing the risk of exposure should be undertaken in order to reduce the incidence of melioidosis in regions of endemicity.

  9. Real-time Fluorescence PCR Method for Detection of Burkholderia glumae from Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yuan; XU Li-hui; TIAN Wen-xiao; HUAI Yan; YU Shan-hong; LOU Miao-miao; XIE Guan-lin

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae causing seedling rot and grain rot of rice was listed as a plant quarantine disease of China in 2007. It's quite necessary to set up effective detection methods for the pathogen to manage further dispersal of this disease. The present study combined the real-time PCR method with classical PCR to increase the detecting efficiency, and to develop an accurate, rapid and sensitive method to detect the pathogen in the seed quarantine for effective management of the disease. The results showed that all the tested strains of B. glumae produced about 139 bp specific fragments by the real-time PCR and the general PCR methods, while others showed negative PCR result. The bacteria could be detected at the concentrations of 1×104 CFU/mL by general PCR method and at the concentrations below 100 CFU/mL by real-time fluorescence PCR method. B. glumae could be detected when the inoculated and healthy seeds were mixed with a proportion of 1:100.

  10. [Bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex: specific features of diagnostics, genome organization and metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaginian, I A; Chernukha, M Iu

    2003-01-01

    Modern data, related with the identification and typing of the complex B. cepacia bacteria, are analyzed in the article by using the poly-phase taxonomic approach. An optimal scheme for identifying and typing the complex B. cepacia bacteria, involving the microbiological and molecular-biological methods of laboratory diagnostics, is presented. The key and assumed factors of pathogenicity of the discussed bacteria are described. The possible phylogenetic relations of the complex B. cepacia bacteria with phytopathgens as well as with pathogenic bacteria of species Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Escherichia, B. mallei, B. pdeudomallei, P. seruginosa and E. coli are described. A possible role of genome alterations and mutations in the genome of the complex B. cepacia bacteria (with the latter genome having unusual properties, i.e. a big size, and a considerable quantity of insertion sequences) in creating the conditions for the "pulsing" evolution "jerks", i.e. for a rapid change-over from saprophytism in the soil to a pathogenic causative agent of a viral-and-bacteriological infection. Such mechanism can be regarded as a rapid and radical adaptation of a microorganism under the conditions of changing ecological niches.

  11. Osteopontin impairs host defense during established gram-negative sepsis caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerritje J W van der Windt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melioidosis, caused by infection with Burkholderia (B. pseudomallei, is a severe illness that is endemic in Southeast Asia. Osteopontin (OPN is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that is involved in several immune responses including induction of T-helper 1 cytokines and recruitment of inflammatory cells. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: OPN levels were determined in plasma from 33 melioidosis patients and 31 healthy controls, and in wild-type (WT mice intranasally infected with B. pseudomallei. OPN function was studied in experimental murine melioidosis using WT and OPN knockout (KO mice. Plasma OPN levels were elevated in patients with severe melioidosis, even more so in patients who went on to die. In patients who recovered plasma OPN concentrations had decreased after treatment. In experimental melioidosis in mice plasma and pulmonary OPN levels were also increased. Whereas WT and OPN KO mice were indistinguishable during the first 24 hours after infection, after 72 hours OPN KO mice demonstrated reduced bacterial numbers in their lungs, diminished pulmonary tissue injury, especially due to less necrosis, and decreased neutrophil infiltration. Moreover, OPN KO mice displayed a delayed mortality as compared to WT mice. OPN deficiency did not influence the induction of proinflammatory cytokines. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that sustained production of OPN impairs host defense during established septic melioidosis.

  12. In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola against Some Phytopathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem S. Elshafie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The trend to search novel microbial natural biocides has recently been increasing in order to avoid the environmental pollution from use of synthetic pesticides. Among these novel natural biocides are the bioactive secondary metabolites of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola (Bga. The aim of this study is to determine antifungal activity of Bga strains against some phytopathogenic fungi. The fungicidal tests were carried out using cultures and cell-free culture filtrates against Botrytis cinerea, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium expansum, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Phytophthora cactorum. Results demonstrated that all tested strains exert antifungal activity against all studied fungi by producing diffusible metabolites which are correlated with their ability to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. All strains significantly reduced the growth of studied fungi and the bacterial cells were more bioactive than bacterial filtrates. All tested Bulkholderia strains produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs, which inhibited the fungal growth and reduced the growth rate of Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani. GC/MS analysis of VOCs emitted by strain Bga 11096 indicated the presence of a compound that was identified as 1-methyl-4-(1-methylethenyl-cyclohexene, a liquid hydrocarbon classified as cyclic terpene. This compound could be responsible for the antifungal activity, which is also in agreement with the work of other authors.

  13. Burkholderia pseudomallei enhances maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Natasha L; Kloeze, Eveline; Govan, Brenda L; Körner, Heinrich; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2008-12-01

    T-cell activation is essential for protection against Burkholderia pseudomallei infection. Using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) isolated from partially resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible BALB/c mice, the degree of BMDC activation in the presence of B. pseudomallei was investigated. Maturation, cytokine production and internalization of B. pseudomallei by BMDC was assessed in response to infection with a highly virulent and a low-virulent clinical isolate. Maturation was determined by identifying the up-regulation of cell-surface markers CD11c and CD86. IL-1beta and IL-12p40 expression were assessed by reverse-transcriptase PCR. The uptake of B. pseudomallei by BMDC was measured using an internalization assay. This study demonstrated that B. pseudomallei isolates stimulate the maturation of BMDC to the same degree regardless of virulence. However, maturation of BMDC was significantly increased in BALB/c mice compared with C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, the uptake of B. pseudomallei by BMDC was significantly greater with the highly virulent isolate compared with the low-virulent isolate. Expression of IL-12 and IL-1beta following infection with B. pseudomallei was up-regulated. The differences observed may have implications in the development of an effective immune response to B. pseudomallei.

  14. Crystal structures of Cif from bacterial pathogens Photorhabdus luminescens and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allister Crow

    Full Text Available A pre-requisite for bacterial pathogenesis is the successful interaction of a pathogen with a host. One mechanism used by a broad range of Gram negative bacterial pathogens is to deliver effector proteins directly into host cells through a dedicated type III secretion system where they modulate host cell function. The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif family of effector proteins, identified in a growing number of pathogens that harbour functional type III secretion systems and have a wide host range, arrest the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, the crystal structures of Cifs from the insect pathogen/nematode symbiont Photorhabdus luminescens (a gamma-proteobacterium and human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei (a beta-proteobacterium are presented. Both of these proteins adopt an overall fold similar to the papain sub-family of cysteine proteases, as originally identified in the structure of a truncated form of Cif from Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, despite sharing only limited sequence identity. The structure of an N-terminal region, referred to here as the 'tail-domain' (absent in the EPEC Cif structure, suggests a surface likely to be involved in host-cell substrate recognition. The conformation of the Cys-His-Gln catalytic triad is retained, and the essential cysteine is exposed to solvent and addressable by small molecule reagents. These structures and biochemical work contribute to the rapidly expanding literature on Cifs, and direct further studies to better understand the molecular details of the activity of these proteins.

  15. Molecular phylogeny of Burkholderia pseudomallei from a remote region of Papua New Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Baker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The island of New Guinea is located midway between the world's two major melioidosis endemic regions of Australia and Southeast Asia. Previous studies in Papua New Guinea have demonstrated autochthonous melioidosis in Balimo, Western province. In contrast to other regions of endemicity, isolates recovered from both environmental and clinical sources demonstrate narrow genetic diversity over large spatial and temporal scales. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed molecular typing techniques to determine the phylogenetic relationships of these isolates to each other and to others worldwide to aid in understanding the origins of the Papua New Guinean isolates. Multi-locus sequence typing of the 39 isolates resolved three unique sequence types. Phylogenetic reconstruction and Structure analysis determined that all isolates were genetically closer to those from Australia than those from Southeast Asia. Gene cluster analysis however, identified a Yersinia-like fimbrial gene cluster predominantly found among Burkholderia pseudomallei derived from Southeast Asia. Higher resolution VNTR typing and phylogenetic reconstruction of the Balimo isolates resolved 24 genotypes with long branch lengths. These findings are congruent with long term persistence in the region and a high level of environmental stability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given that anthropogenic influence has been hypothesized as a mechanism for the dispersal of B. pseudomallei, these findings correlate with limited movement of the indigenous people in the region. The palaeogeographical and anthropogenic history of Australasia and the results from this study indicate that New Guinea is an important region for the further study of B. pseudomallei origins and dissemination.

  16. Respiratory psychophysiology and behavior modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, R

    2001-09-01

    This article was written as an introduction to a special issue of Behavior Modification dedicated to studies in the field of respiratory psychophysiology. Although the invited articles that constitute this special issue cover a fairly broad range of topics, priority was given to articles that focus on the role of respiration in panic disorder. Attention is directed to the fundamental role of breathing in applied psychophysiology and to the encouragement of research in the modification of breathing behavior. The connection between respiratory psychophysiology and behavior modification is explained by reference to (a) a recent article on Pavlovian and operant control of breathing behavior and (b) four published volumes of selected articles dedicated exclusively to the field of respiratory psychophysiology. The present special issue of Behavior Modification marks the fifth volume.

  17. Neck pain causes respiratory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapreli, Eleni; Vourazanis, Evangelos; Strimpakos, Nikolaos

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a presumptive mechanism for the development of changes in respiratory function due to chronic neck pain. The patient with neck pain presents a number of factors that could constitute a predisposition of leading to a respiratory dysfunction: (a) the decreased strength of deep neck flexors and extensors, (b) the hyperactivity and increased fatigability of superficial neck flexors, (c) the limitation of range of motion, (d) the decrease in proprioception and disturbances in neuromuscular control, (e) the existence of pain and (f) the psychosocial influence of dysfunction. The possible connection of neck pain and respiratory function could have a great impact on various clinical aspects notably patient assessment, rehabilitation and pharmacological prescription.

  18. Respiratory distress in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Suzanne; Moser, Chuanpit; Baack, Michelle

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory distress presents as tachypnea, nasal flaring, retractions, and grunting and may progress to respiratory failure if not readily recognized and managed. Causes of respiratory distress vary and may not lie within the lung. A thorough history, physical examination, and radiographic and laboratory findings will aid in the differential diagnosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, neonatal pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Strong evidence reveals an inverse relationship between gestational age and respiratory morbidity. (1)(2)(9)(25)(26) Expert opinion recommends careful consideration about elective delivery without labor at less than 39 weeks’ gestation. Extensive evidence, including randomized control trials, cohort studies, and expert opinion, supports maternal group B streptococcus screening, intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, and appropriate followup of high-risk newborns according to guidelines established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (4)(29)(31)(32)(34) Following these best-practice strategies is effective in preventing neonatal pneumonia and its complications. (31)(32)(34). On the basis of strong evidence, including randomized control trials and Cochrane Reviews, administration of antenatal corticosteroids (5) and postnatal surfactant (6) decrease respiratory morbidity associated with RDS. Trends in perinatal management strategies to prevent MAS have changed. There is strong evidence that amnioinfusion, (49) oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal suctioning at the perineum, (45) or intubation and endotracheal suctioning of vigorous infants (46)(47) do not decrease MAS or its complications. Some research and expert opinion supports endotracheal suctioning of nonvigorous meconium-stained infants (8) and induction of labor at 41 weeks’ gestation (7) to prevent MAS.

  19. Stem cells and respiratory diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Soraia Carvalho; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Garcia, Cristiane Sousa Nascimento Baez; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Investigacao]. E-mail: prmrocco@biof.ufrj.br

    2008-12-15

    Stem cells have a multitude of clinical implications in the lung. This article is a critical review that includes clinical and experimental studies of MedLine and SciElo database in the last 10 years, where we highlight the effects of stem cell therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome or more chronic disorders such as lung fibrosis and emphysema. Although, many studies have shown the beneficial effects of stem cells in lung development, repair and remodeling; some important questions need to be answered to better understand the mechanisms that control cell division and differentiation, therefore enabling the use of cell therapy in human respiratory diseases. (author)

  20. Development and validation of Burkholderia pseudomallei-specific real-time PCR assays for clinical, environmental or forensic detection applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin P Price

    Full Text Available The bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a rare but serious illness that can be fatal if untreated or misdiagnosed. Species-specific PCR assays provide a technically simple method for differentiating B. pseudomallei from near-neighbor species. However, substantial genetic diversity and high levels of recombination within this species reduce the likelihood that molecular signatures will differentiate all B. pseudomallei from other Burkholderiaceae. Currently available molecular assays for B. pseudomallei detection lack rigorous validation across large in silico datasets and isolate collections to test for specificity, and none have been subjected to stringent quality control criteria (accuracy, precision, selectivity, limit of quantitation (LoQ, limit of detection (LoD, linearity, ruggedness and robustness to determine their suitability for environmental, clinical or forensic investigations. In this study, we developed two novel B. pseudomallei specific assays, 122018 and 266152, using a dual-probe approach to differentiate B. pseudomallei from B. thailandensis, B. oklahomensis and B. thailandensis-like species; other species failed to amplify. Species specificity was validated across a large DNA panel (>2,300 samples comprising Burkholderia spp. and non-Burkholderia bacterial and fungal species of clinical and environmental relevance. Comparison of assay specificity to two previously published B. pseudomallei-specific assays, BurkDiff and TTS1, demonstrated comparable performance of all assays, providing between 99.7 and 100% specificity against our isolate panel. Last, we subjected 122018 and 266152 to rigorous quality control analyses, thus providing quantitative limits of assay performance. Using B. pseudomallei as a model, our study provides a framework for comprehensive quantitative validation of molecular assays and provides additional, highly validated B. pseudomallei assays for the scientific research community.

  1. Enzymatic activity of cell-free extracts from Burkholderia oxyphila OX-01 bio-converts (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin to (+)-taxifolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichiro; Matsuda, Motoki; Sonoki, Tomonori; Sato-Izawa, Kanna; Goodell, Barry; Jelison, Jody; Navarro, Ronald R; Murata, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Masaya

    2016-12-01

    This study characterized the enzymatic ability of a cell-free extract from an acidophilic (+)-catechin degrader Burkholderia oxyphila (OX-01). The crude OX-01 extracts were able to transform (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin into (+)-taxifolin via a leucocyanidin intermediate in a two-step oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation at the C-4 position was carried out anaerobically using H2O as an oxygen donor. The C-4 oxidation occurred only in the presence of the 2R-catechin stereoisomer, with the C-3 stereoisomer not affecting the reaction. These results suggest that the OX-01 may have evolved to target both (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin, which are major structural units in plants.

  2. Complex of Burkholderia cepacia lipase with transition state analogue of 1-phenoxy-2-acetoxybutane: biocatalytic, structural and modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luić, M; Tomić, S; Lescić, I; Ljubović, E; Sepac, D; Sunjić, V; Vitale, L; Saenger, W; Kojic-Prodić, B

    2001-07-01

    In a series of four racemic phenoxyalkyl-alkyl carbinols, 1-phenoxy-2-hydroxybutane (1) is enantioselectively acetylated by Burkholderia cepacia (formerly Pseudomonas cepacia) lipase with an E value > or = 200, whereas for the other three racemates E was found to be analogue with a tetrahedral P-atom, (R(P),S(P))-O-(2R)-(1-phenoxybut-2-yl)methylphosphonic acid chloride was prepared and crystallized in complex with B. cepacia lipase. The X-ray structure of the complex was determined, allowing to compare the conformation of the inhibitor with results of molecular modelling.

  3. Phosphorus uptake of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus is not effected by the biocontrol bacterium ¤Burkholderia cepacia¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskov, S.; Larsen, J.; Jakobsen, I.

    2002-01-01

    the amount of branched PLFAs suggesting a reduction in the population of Gram-positive bacteria in these cases. In conclusion, the B. cepacia seems to have no impact on neither mycorrhiza formation nor on the functioning of the AM fungus G. intraradices in terms of P transport, whereas our results suggest......The biocontrol bacterium Burkholderia cepacia is known to suppress a broad range of root pathogenic fungi, while its impact on other beneficial non-target organisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is unknown. Direct interactions between five B. cepacia strains and the AM fungus, Glomus...

  4. Respiratory Therapy Technology Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a respiratory therapy technology program. The guide contains four sections. The General Information section contains an introduction giving an overview and defining the purpose and objectives, a program…

  5. Health Instruction Packages: Respiratory Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavich, Margot; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach respiratory therapy students a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "Anatomy and Physiology of the Central Controls of Respiration" by Margot Lavich, describes the functions of the five centers of the brain that control respiration and…

  6. Respiratory Therapy Assistant. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judy A.

    This manual is one in a new series of self-contained materials for students enrolled in training with the allied health field. It includes competencies that are associated with the performance of skills by students beginning the study of respiratory therapy assistance. Intended to be used for individualized instruction under the supervision of an…

  7. [Respiratory function in glass blowers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, E; Butković, D; Mustajbegović, J

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic and acute respiratory symptoms and diseases and changes in lung function in a group of 80 glass blowers have been investigated. In addition a group of 80 not exposed workers was used as a control group for respiratory symptoms and diseases. In glass blowers, there was significant increase in prevalence of chronic bronchitis, nasal catarrh, and sinusitis than in the controls. Glass blowers exposed for more and less than 10 years had similar prevalences of respiratory symptoms. A large number of glass blowers complained of acute across-shift symptoms. Significant increase in FVC, FEF50 and FEF25 was documented at the end of the work shift. Comparison with predicted normal values showed that glass blowers had FVC and FEF25 significantly lower than predicted. RV and RV/TLC were significantly increased compared with the predicted normal values. DLCO was within the normal values in most glass blowers. It is concluded that work in the glass blower industry is likely to lead the development of chronic respiratory disorders.

  8. Nasopharyngeal colonization with respiratory pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory (otitis media, pneumonia) and invasive (sepsis, meningitis) infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The World Health Organization estimates that every year one million children under the age of five die of pneumonia, mainly in developing countries. Elderly are ano

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays an altered phenotype in vitro when grown in the presence of mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J E; Rendall, J C; Downey, D G

    2015-01-01

    D-mannitol has been approved in dry powder formulation as an effective antimucolytic agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. What is not known is the effect of adding a metabolisable sugar on the biology of chronic bacterial pathogens in the CF lung. Therefore, a series of simple in vitro experiments were performed to examine the effect of adding D-mannitol on the phenotype of the CF respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia. Clinical isolates (n = 86) consisting of P. aeruginosa (n = 51), B. cenocepacia (n = 26), P. putida (n = 4), Stenotrophomonas maltophila (n = 3) and Pseudomonas spp. (n = 2) were examined by supplementing basal nutrient agar with varying concentrations of D-mannitol (0-20% [w/v]) and subsequently examining for any change in microbial phenotype. The effect of supplementation with mannitol was four-fold, namely i) To increase the proliferation and increase in cell density of all CF organisms examined, with an optimal concentration of 2-4% (w/v) D-mannitol. No such increase in cell proliferation was observed when mannitol was substituted with sodium chloride. ii) Enhanced pigment production was observed in 2/51 (3.9%) of the P. aeruginosa isolates examined, in one of the P. putida isolates, and in 3/26 (11.5%) of the B. cenocepacia isolates examined. iii). When examined at 4.0% (w/v) supplementation with mannitol, 11/51 (21.6%) P. aeruginosa isolates and 3/26 (11.5%) B. cenocepacia isolates were seen to exhibit the altered adhesion phenotype. iv). With respect to the altered mucoid phenotype, 5/51 (9.8%) P. aeruginosa produced this phenotype when grown at 4% mannitol. Mucoid production was greatest at 4%, was poor at 10% and absent at 20% (w/v) mannitol. The altered mucoid phenotype was not observed in the B. cenocepacia isolates or any of the other clinical taxa examined. Due consideration therefore needs to be given, where there is altered physiology within the small airways, leading to a potentially altered

  10. Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COAL WORKERS' HEALTH SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Coal Mining-Related Respiratory Diseases Coal mining-related respiratory ...

  11. [Respiratory diseases in metallurgy production workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shliapnikov, D M; Vlasova, E M; Ponomareva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The authors identified features of respiratory diseases in workers of various metallurgy workshops. Cause-effect relationships are defined between occupational risk factors and respiratory diseases, with determining the affection level.

  12. Molecular detection of respiratory viruses: clinical impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) cause major morbidity in infants and children. Traditionally, respiratory viruses are detected with conventional tests (viral culture and direct immunofluorescence (DIF)), however nowadays viral diagnostics are being revolutionized by the increased implemen

  13. Activation of MAPK/ERK signaling by Burkholderia pseudomallei cycle inhibiting factor (Cif)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Wang, Mei; Casey, Patrick J.; Gan, Yunn-Hwen; Hagen, Thilo

    2017-01-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are virulence proteins secreted by the type III secretion system of some Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Burkholderia pseudomallei. Cif is known to function to deamidate Nedd8, leading to inhibition of Cullin E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL) and consequently induction of cell cycle arrest. Here we show that Cif can function as a potent activator of MAPK/ERK signaling without significant activation of other signaling pathways downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. Importantly, we found that the ability of Cif to activate ERK is dependent on its deamidase activity, but independent of Cullin E3 ligase inhibition. This suggests that apart from Nedd8, other cellular targets of Cif-dependent deamidation exist. We provide evidence that the mechanism involved in Cif-mediated ERK activation is dependent on recruitment of the Grb2-SOS1 complex to the plasma membrane. Further investigation revealed that Cif appears to modify the phosphorylation status of SOS1 in a region containing the CDC25-H and proline-rich domains. It is known that prolonged Cullin E3 ligase inhibition leads to cellular apoptosis. Therefore, we hypothesize that ERK activation is an important mechanism to counter the pro-apoptotic effects of Cif. Indeed, we show that Cif dependent ERK activation promotes phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein Bim, thereby potentially conferring a pro-survival signal. In summary, we identified a novel deamidation-dependent mechanism of action of the B. pseudomallei virulence factor Cif/CHBP to activate MAPK/ERK signaling. Our study demonstrates that bacterial proteins such as Cif can serve as useful molecular tools to uncover novel aspects of mammalian signaling pathways. PMID:28166272

  14. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN reduces damages to freezing temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan eSU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are known to improve plant tolerance to multiple stresses, including low temperatures. However, mechanisms underlying this protection are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the endophytic PGPR, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN (Bp PsJN, on Arabidopsis thaliana cold tolerance using photosynthesis parameters as physiological markers.Under standard conditions, our results indicated that Bp PsJN inoculation led to growth promotion of Arabidopsis plants without significant modification on photosynthesis parameters and chloroplast organization. However, bacterial colonization induced a cell wall strengthening in the mesophyllImpact of inoculation modes (either on seeds or by soil irrigation and their effects overnight at 0, -1 or -3°C, were investigated by following photosystem II (PSII activity and gas exchanges. Following low temperatures stress, a decrease of photosynthesis parameters was observed. In addition, during three consecutive nights or days at -1°C, PSII activity was monitored. Pigment contents, RuBisCO protein abundance, expression of several genes including RbcS, RbcL, CBF1, CBF2, CBF3, ICE1, COR15a, and COR78 were evaluated at the end of exposure. To assess the impact of the bacteria on cell ultrastructure under low temperatures, microscopic observations were achieved. Results indicated that freezing treatment induced significant changes in PSII activity as early as the first cold day, whereas the same impact on PSII activity was observed only during the third cold night. The significant effects conferred by PsJN were differential accumulation of pigments, and reduced expression of RbcL and COR78. Microscopical observations showed an alteration/disorganization in A. thaliana leaf mesophyll cells independently of the freezing treatments. The presence of bacteria during the three successive nights or days did not significantly improved A

  15. Characterization of ceftazidime resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of Burkholderia pseudomallei from Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek S Sarovich

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the serious human disease, melioidosis. There is no vaccine against melioidosis and it can be fatal if not treated with a specific antibiotic regimen, which typically includes the third-generation cephalosporin, ceftazidime (CAZ. There have been several resistance mechanisms described for B. pseudomallei, of which the best described are amino acid changes that alter substrate specificity in the highly conserved class A β-lactamase, PenA. In the current study, we sequenced penA from isolates sequentially derived from two melioidosis patients with wild-type (1.5 µg/mL and, subsequently, resistant (16 or ≥256 µg/mL CAZ phenotypes. We identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that directly increased CAZ hydrolysis. One SNP caused an amino acid substitution (C69Y near the active site of PenA, whereas a second novel SNP was found within the penA promoter region. In both instances, the CAZ resistance phenotype corresponded directly with the SNP genotype. Interestingly, these SNPs appeared after infection and under selection from CAZ chemotherapy. Through heterologous cloning and expression, and subsequent allelic exchange in the native bacterium, we confirmed the role of penA in generating both low-level and high-level CAZ resistance in these clinical isolates. Similar to previous studies, the amino acid substitution altered substrate specificity to other β-lactams, suggesting a potential fitness cost associated with this mutation, a finding that could be exploited to improve therapeutic outcomes in patients harboring CAZ resistant B. pseudomallei. Our study is the first to functionally characterize CAZ resistance in clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei and to provide proven and clinically relevant signatures for monitoring the development of antibiotic resistance in this important pathogen.

  16. Genotyping of Burkholderia mallei from an outbreak of glanders in Bahrain suggests multiple introduction events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger C Scholz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Glanders, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia mallei, is a highly infectious zoonotic disease of solipeds causing severe disease in animals and men. Although eradicated from many Western countries, it recently emerged in Asia, the Middle-East, Africa, and South America. Due to its rareness, little is known about outbreak dynamics of the disease and its epidemiology.We investigated a recent outbreak of glanders in Bahrain by applying high resolution genotyping (multiple locus variable number of tandem repeats, MLVA and comparative whole genome sequencing to B. mallei isolated from infected horses and a camel. These results were compared to samples obtained from an outbreak in the United Arab Emirates in 2004, and further placed into a broader phylogeographic context based on previously published B. mallei data. The samples from the outbreak in Bahrain separated into two distinct clusters, suggesting a complex epidemiological background and evidence for the involvement of multiple B. mallei strains. Additionally, the samples from Bahrain were more closely related to B. mallei isolated from horses in the United Arab Emirates in 2004 than other B. mallei which is suggestive of repeated importation to the region from similar geographic sources.High-resolution genotyping and comparative whole genome analysis revealed the same phylogenetic patterns among our samples. The close relationship of the Dubai/UAE B. mallei populations to each other may be indicative of a similar geographic origin that has yet to be identified for the infecting strains. The recent emergence of glanders in combination with worldwide horse trading might pose a new risk for human infections.

  17. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Rageh Al-Maleki

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV] to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk, ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis.

  18. Survival and susceptibility of Burkholderia cepacia complex in chlorhexidine gluconate and benzalkonium chloride.

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    Kim, Jeong Myeong; Ahn, Youngbeom; LiPuma, John J; Hussong, David; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2015-06-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) includes opportunistic pathogenic bacteria that have occasionally been recovered from various pharmaceutical products, including antiseptics and disinfectants. Plausible reasons for the contamination include intrinsic sources, such as inadequate process controls, especially for water or equipment used during product manufacture, or extrinsic sources, such as improper handling and dilution or distribution in contaminated containers. Because the survival of BCC in antiseptics is a concern to the public health and pharmaceutical industry, we determined minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 36 BCC strains against the antiseptics, following exposure to chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and benzalkonium chloride (BZK) solutions (1-500 µg/ml for each chemical). Susceptibility to CHX and BZK varied across the BCC strains and was recorded as mean 90.3 and 111.1 µg/ml, respectively, at initial inoculation, which was significantly higher than the 46.4 and 61.1 µg/ml levels measured for BCC incubated in water for 40 days. After determining antiseptic MICs of individual BCC strains, BCC recovery was measured on Tryptic Soy Agar (TSA), Reasoner's Second Agar (R2A) and diluted preparations of these media under their sub-MICs. The survival of BCC was monitored for 14 days (336 h) in sub-MICs diluted to less than their antiseptic susceptible concentration value. Diluted TSA and R2A media exhibited greater efficiency of recovery for most BCC strains from the CHX and BZK solutions than full strength TSA or R2A. For BCC survival in antiseptic solutions, the cell number of BCC decreased rapidly within the first 20 min in both antiseptics, but after this, recovery remained constant in CHX and increased in BZK over the 14 day incubation period. The results indicate that BCC in water can remain viable with low susceptibility to antiseptics for 14 days, which suggests the necessity for improved detection methods and control measures to monitor

  19. The effect of environmental conditions on biofilm formation of Burkholderia pseudomallei clinical isolates.

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    Nur Siti K Ramli

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, a Gram-negative saprophytic bacterium, is the causative agent of the potentially fatal melioidosis disease in humans. In this study, environmental parameters including temperature, nutrient content, pH and the presence of glucose were shown to play a role in in vitro biofilm formation by 28 B. pseudomallei clinical isolates, including four isolates with large colony variants (LCVs and small colony variants (SCVs morphotypes. Enhanced biofilm formation was observed when the isolates were tested in LB medium, at 30 °C, at pH 7.2, and in the presence of as little as 2 mM glucose respectively. It was also shown that all SVCs displayed significantly greater capacity to form biofilms than the corresponding LCVs when cultured in LB at 37 °C. In addition, octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C(8-HSL, a quorum sensing molecule, was identified by mass spectrometry analysis in bacterial isolates referred to as LCV CTH, LCV VIT, SCV TOM, SCV CTH, 1 and 3, and the presence of other AHL's with higher masses; decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C(10-HSL and dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C(12-HSL were also found in all tested strain in this study. Last but not least, we had successfully acquired two Bacillus sp. soil isolates, termed KW and SA respectively, which possessed strong AHLs degradation activity. Biofilm formation of B. pseudomallei isolates was significantly decreased after treated with culture supernatants of KW and SA strains, demonstrating that AHLs may play a role in B. pseudomallei biofilm formation.

  20. Environmental Free-Living Amoebae Isolated from Soil in Khon Kaen, Thailand, Antagonize Burkholderia pseudomallei

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    Noinarin, Parumon; Chareonsudjai, Pisit; Wangsomnuk, Pinich; Wongratanacheewin, Surasak

    2016-01-01

    Presence of Burkholderia pseudomallei in soil and water is correlated with endemicity of melioidosis in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. Several biological and physico-chemical factors have been shown to influence persistence of B. pseudomallei in the environment of endemic areas. This study was the first to evaluate the interaction of B. pseudomallei with soil amoebae isolated from B. pseudomallei-positive soil site in Khon Kaen, Thailand. Four species of amoebae, Paravahlkampfia ustiana, Acanthamoeba sp., Naegleria pagei, and isolate A-ST39-E1, were isolated, cultured and identified based on morphology, movement and 18S rRNA gene sequence. Co-cultivation combined with a kanamycin-protection assay of B. pseudomallei with these amoebae at MOI 20 at 30°C were evaluated during 0–6 h using the plate count technique on Ashdown’s agar. The fate of intracellular B. pseudomallei in these amoebae was also monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) observation of the CellTracker™ Orange-B. pseudomallei stained cells. The results demonstrated the ability of P. ustiana, Acanthamoeba sp. and isolate A-ST39-E1 to graze B. pseudomallei. However, the number of internalized B. pseudomallei substantially decreased and the bacterial cells disappeared during the observation period, suggesting they had been digested. We found that B. pseudomallei promoted the growth of Acanthamoeba sp. and isolate A-ST39-E1 in co-cultures at MOI 100 at 30°C, 24 h. These findings indicated that P. ustiana, Acanthamoeba sp. and isolate A-ST39-E1 may prey upon B. pseudomallei rather than representing potential environmental reservoirs in which the bacteria can persist. PMID:27898739

  1. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human memory T cell responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Patcharaporn Tippayawat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important cause of community-acquired lethal sepsis in endemic regions in southeast Asia and northern Australia and is increasingly reported in other tropical areas. In animal models, production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma is critical for resistance, but in humans the characteristics of IFN-gamma production and the bacterial antigens that are recognized by the cell-mediated immune response have not been defined. METHODS: Peripheral blood from 133 healthy individuals who lived in the endemic area and had no history of melioidosis, 60 patients who had recovered from melioidosis, and 31 other patient control subjects were stimulated by whole bacteria or purified bacterial proteins in vitro, and IFN-gamma responses were analyzed by ELISPOT and flow cytometry. FINDINGS: B. pseudomallei was a potent activator of human peripheral blood NK cells for innate production of IFN-gamma. In addition, healthy individuals with serological evidence of exposure to B. pseudomallei and patients recovered from active melioidosis developed CD4(+ (and CD8(+ T cells that recognized whole bacteria and purified proteins LolC, OppA, and PotF, members of the B. pseudomallei ABC transporter family. This response was primarily mediated by terminally differentiated T cells of the effector-memory (T(EMRA phenotype and correlated with the titer of anti-B. pseudomallei antibodies in the serum. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals living in a melioidosis-endemic region show clear evidence of T cell priming for the ability to make IFN-gamma that correlates with their serological status. The ability to detect T cell responses to defined B. pseudomallei proteins in large numbers of individuals now provides the opportunity to screen candidate antigens for inclusion in protein or polysaccharide-conjugate subunit vaccines against this important but neglected disease.

  2. Heat stable antimicrobial activity of Burkholderia gladioli OR1 against clinical drug resistant isolates

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    Bharti, Pratibha; Anand, Vivek; Chander, Jagdish; Singh, Inder Pal; Singh, Tej Vir; Tewari, Rupinder

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Drug resistant microbes are a serious challenge to human health. During the search for novel antibiotics/inhibitors from the agricultural soil, a bacterial colony was found to inhibit the growth of clinical isolates including Staphylococcus (resistant to amikacin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, clinafloxacin, erythromycin, gentamicin and methicillin) and Candida (resistant to fluconazole and itraconazole). The culture was identified as Burkholderia gladioli and produced at least five different antimicrobial compounds which were highly stable at high temperature (121°C) and in the broad pH range (3.0-11.0). We report here the antimicrobial activity of B. gladioli against drug resistant bacterial pathogens. Methods: The bacterial culture was identified using morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques. The antimicrobial activity of the identified organism against a range of microbial pathogens was checked by Kirby-Bauer's disc diffusion method. The antimicrobial compounds in the cell free supernatant were chloroform-extracted and separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Results: B. gladioli OR1 exhibited broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against drug resistant clinical isolates belonging to various genera of bacteria (Staphylococcus, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Acinetobacter and Citrobacter) and a fungus (Candida). Based on TLC profile and bioautography studies, the chloroform extract of B. gladioli OR1 consisted of at least three anti-staphylococcal and two anti-Candida metabolites. The antimicrobial activity was heat stable (121°C/20 min) as well as pH stable (3.0-11.0). Interpretation & conclusions: The bacterial soil isolate, B. gladioli OR1 possessed the ability to kill various drug resistant bacteria and a fungus. This organism produced many antimicrobial metabolites which might have the potential to be used as antibiotics in future. PMID:22771597

  3. Survey of Bartonella spp. in U.S. bed bugs detects Burkholderia multivorans but not Bartonella.

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    Virna L Saenz

    Full Text Available Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. have resurged in the United States and globally. Bed bugs are hematophagous ectoparasites of humans and other animals, including domestic pets, chickens, and bats, and their blood feeding habits contribute to their potential as disease vectors. Several species of Bartonella are re-emergent bacterial pathogens that also affect humans, domestic pets, bats and a number of other wildlife species. Because reports of both bed bugs and Bartonella have been increasing in the U.S., and because their host ranges can overlap, we investigated whether the resurgences of these medically important pathogens and their potential vector might be linked, by screening for Bartonella spp. in bed bugs collected from geographic areas where these pathogens are prevalent and from bed bugs that have been in culture in the laboratory for several years. We screened a total of 331 bed bugs: 316 bed bugs from 36 unique collections in 29 geographic locations in 13 states, 10 bed bugs from two colonies maintained in the laboratory for 3 yr, and 5 bed bugs from a colony that has been in culture since before the recent resurgence of bed bugs. Bartonella spp. DNA was screened using a polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer region. Bartonella DNA was not amplified from any bed bug, but five bed bugs from four different apartments of an elderly housing building in North Carolina contained DNA sequences that corresponded to Burkholderia multivorans, an important pathogen in nosocomial infections that was not previously linked to an arthropod vector.

  4. Copper as an antibacterial agent for human pathogenic multidrug resistant Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Muhammad; Wang, Fang; Lou, Miao-miao; Xie, Guan-lin; Li, Bin; Bo, Zhu; Zhang, Gou-qing; Liu, He; Wareth, Abdul

    2011-12-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related multidrug resistant bacterial species that are difficult to eradicate. Copper has recently gained attention as an antimicrobial agent because of its inhibitory effects on bacteria, yeast, and viruses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of copper surfaces and copper powder against members of the B. cepacia complex. The antibacterial activity of different copper surfaces was evaluated by incubating them with Bcc strain suspensions (5×10(7)cfu/ml). The bacterial survival counts were calculated and the data for various copper surfaces were compared to the data for stainless steel and polyvinylchloride, which were used as control surfaces. The antibacterial activity of copper powder was determined with the diffusimetrical technique and the zone of inhibition was evaluated with paper disks. A single cell gel electrophoresis assay, staining assays, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy were performed to determine the mechanism responsible for the bactericidal activity. The results showed a significant decrease in the viable bacterial count after exposure to copper surfaces. Moreover, the copper powder produced a large zone of inhibition and there was a significantly higher influx of copper ions into the bacterial cells that were exposed to copper surfaces compared to the controls. The present study demonstrates that metallic copper has an antibacterial effect against Bcc bacteria and that copper adversely affects the bacterial cellular structure, thus resulting in cell death. These findings suggest that copper could be utilized in health care facilities to reduce the bioburden of Bcc species, which may protect susceptible members of the community from bacterial infection.

  5. Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Morphotypes Show a Synchronized Metabolic Pattern after Acute Infection.

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    Philipp Gierok

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a water and soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. A characteristic feature of this bacterium is the formation of different colony morphologies which can be isolated from environmental samples as well as from clinical samples, but can also be induced in vitro. Previous studies indicate that morphotypes can differ in a number of characteristics such as resistance to oxidative stress, cellular adhesion and intracellular replication. Yet the metabolic features of B. pseudomallei and its different morphotypes have not been examined in detail so far. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the exometabolome of B. pseudomallei morphotypes and the impact of acute infection on their metabolic characteristics.We applied nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR in a metabolic footprint approach to compare nutrition uptake and metabolite secretion of starvation induced morphotypes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and E8. We observed gluconate production and uptake in all morphotype cultures. Our study also revealed that among all morphotypes amino acids could be classified with regard to their fast and slow consumption. In addition to these shared metabolic features, the morphotypes varied highly in amino acid uptake profiles, secretion of branched chain amino acid metabolites and carbon utilization. After intracellular passage in vitro or murine acute infection in vivo, we observed a switch of the various morphotypes towards a single morphotype and a synchronization of nutrient uptake and metabolite secretion.To our knowledge, this study provides first insights into the basic metabolism of B. pseudomallei and its colony morphotypes. Furthermore, our data suggest, that acute infection leads to the synchronization of B. pseudomallei colony morphology and metabolism through yet unknown host signals and bacterial mechanisms.

  6. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

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    Senanu M Spring-Pearson

    Full Text Available The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is 'open', with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order.

  7. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring-Pearson, Senanu M; Stone, Joshua K; Doyle, Adina; Allender, Christopher J; Okinaka, Richard T; Mayo, Mark; Broomall, Stacey M; Hill, Jessica M; Karavis, Mark A; Hubbard, Kyle S; Insalaco, Joseph M; McNew, Lauren A; Rosenzweig, C Nicole; Gibbons, Henry S; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is 'open', with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order.

  8. Characterization of BcaA, a putative classical autotransporter protein in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Campos, Cristine G; Borst, Luke; Cotter, Peggy A

    2013-04-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a tier 1 select agent, and the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease with effects ranging from chronic abscesses to fulminant pneumonia and septic shock, which can be rapidly fatal. Autotransporters (ATs) are outer membrane proteins belonging to the type V secretion system family, and many have been shown to play crucial roles in pathogenesis. The open reading frame Bp1026b_II1054 (bcaA) in B. pseudomallei strain 1026b is predicted to encode a classical autotransporter protein with an approximately 80-kDa passenger domain that contains a subtilisin-related domain. Immediately 3' to bcaA is Bp11026_II1055 (bcaB), which encodes a putative prolyl 4-hydroxylase. To investigate the role of these genes in pathogenesis, large in-frame deletion mutations of bcaA and bcaB were constructed in strain Bp340, an efflux pump mutant derivative of the melioidosis clinical isolate 1026b. Comparison of Bp340ΔbcaA and Bp340ΔbcaB mutants to wild-type B. pseudomallei in vitro demonstrated similar levels of adherence to A549 lung epithelial cells, but the mutant strains were defective in their ability to invade these cells and to form plaques. In a BALB/c mouse model of intranasal infection, similar bacterial burdens were observed after 48 h in the lungs and liver of mice infected with Bp340ΔbcaA, Bp340ΔbcaB, and wild-type bacteria. However, significantly fewer bacteria were recovered from the spleen of Bp340ΔbcaA-infected mice, supporting the idea of a role for this AT in dissemination or in survival in the passage from the site of infection to the spleen.

  9. Transport of nanoparticles and tobramycin-loaded liposomes in Burkholderia cepacia complex biofilms.

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    Anne-Sophie Messiaen

    Full Text Available Due to the intrinsic resistance of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc to many antibiotics and the production of a broad range of virulence factors, lung infections by these bacteria, primarily occurring in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, are very difficult to treat. In addition, the ability of Bcc organisms to form biofilms contributes to their persistence in the CF lung. As Bcc infections are associated with poor clinical outcome, there is an urgent need for new effective therapies to treat these infections. In the present study, we investigated whether liposomal tobramycin displayed an increased anti-biofilm effect against Bcc bacteria compared to free tobramycin. Single particle tracking (SPT was used to study the transport of positively and negatively charged nanospheres in Bcc biofilms as a model for the transport of liposomes. Negatively charged nanospheres became immobilized in close proximity of biofilm cell clusters, while positively charged nanospheres interacted with fiber-like structures, probably eDNA. Based on these data, encapsulation of tobramycin in negatively charged liposomes appeared promising for targeted drug delivery. However, the anti-biofilm effect of tobramycin encapsulated into neutral or anionic liposomes did not increase compared to that of free tobramycin. Probably, the fusion of the anionic liposomes with the negatively charged bacterial surface of Bcc bacteria was limited by electrostatic repulsive forces. The lack of a substantial anti-biofilm effect of tobramycin encapsulated in neutral liposomes could be further investigated by increasing the liposomal tobramycin concentration. However, this was hampered by the low encapsulation efficiency of tobramycin in these liposomes.

  10. Homology modeling and protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121: in silico insights.

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    Jain, Chakresh Kumar; Gupta, Money; Prasad, Yamuna; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The degradation of hydrocarbons plays an important role in the eco-balancing of petroleum products, pesticides and other toxic products in the environment. The degradation of hydrocarbons by microbes such as Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Burkhulderia, Gordonia sp. and Acinetobacter sp. has been studied intensively in the literature. The present study focused on the in silico protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase (ladA)-a protein involved in the alkane degradation pathway. We demonstrated the improvement in substrate binding energy with engineered ladA in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121. We identified an ortholog of ladA monooxygenase found in B. thailandensis MSMB121, and showed it to be an enzyme involved in an alkane degradation pathway studied extensively in Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. Homology modeling of the three-dimensional structure of ladA was performed with a crystal structure (protein databank ID: 3B9N) as a template in MODELLER 9v11, and further validated using PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D and WHATIF tools. Specific amino acids were substituted in the region corresponding to amino acids 305-370 of ladA protein, resulting in an enhancement of binding energy in different alkane chain molecules as compared to wild protein structures in the docking experiments. The substrate binding energy with the protein was calculated using Vina (Implemented in VEGAZZ). Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamics of different alkane chain molecules inside the binding pockets of wild and mutated ladA. Here, we hypothesize an improvement in binding energies and accessibility of substrates towards engineered ladA enzyme, which could be further facilitated for wet laboratory-based experiments for validation of the alkane degradation pathway in this organism.

  11. Survey of Bartonella spp. in U.S. bed bugs detects Burkholderia multivorans but not Bartonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Virna L; Maggi, Ricardo G; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Kim, Jung; Vargo, Edward L; Schal, Coby

    2013-01-01

    Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) have resurged in the United States and globally. Bed bugs are hematophagous ectoparasites of humans and other animals, including domestic pets, chickens, and bats, and their blood feeding habits contribute to their potential as disease vectors. Several species of Bartonella are re-emergent bacterial pathogens that also affect humans, domestic pets, bats and a number of other wildlife species. Because reports of both bed bugs and Bartonella have been increasing in the U.S., and because their host ranges can overlap, we investigated whether the resurgences of these medically important pathogens and their potential vector might be linked, by screening for Bartonella spp. in bed bugs collected from geographic areas where these pathogens are prevalent and from bed bugs that have been in culture in the laboratory for several years. We screened a total of 331 bed bugs: 316 bed bugs from 36 unique collections in 29 geographic locations in 13 states, 10 bed bugs from two colonies maintained in the laboratory for 3 yr, and 5 bed bugs from a colony that has been in culture since before the recent resurgence of bed bugs. Bartonella spp. DNA was screened using a polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer region. Bartonella DNA was not amplified from any bed bug, but five bed bugs from four different apartments of an elderly housing building in North Carolina contained DNA sequences that corresponded to Burkholderia multivorans, an important pathogen in nosocomial infections that was not previously linked to an arthropod vector.

  12. Molecular basis of rare aminoglycoside susceptibility and pathogenesis of Burkholderia pseudomallei clinical isolates from Thailand.

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    Lily A Trunck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei is intrinsically resistant to aminoglycosides and macrolides, mostly due to AmrAB-OprA efflux pump expression. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of aminoglycoside susceptibility exhibited by Thai strains 708a, 2188a, and 3799a. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: qRT-PCR revealed absence of amrB transcripts in 708a and greatly reduced levels in 2188a and 3799a. Serial passage on increasing gentamicin concentrations yielded 2188a and 3799a mutants that became simultaneously resistant to other aminoglycosides and macrolides, whereas such mutants could not be obtained with 708a. Transcript analysis showed that the resistance of the 2188a and 3799a mutants was due to upregulation of amrAB-oprA expression by unknown mechanism(s. Use of a PCR walking strategy revealed that the amrAB-oprA operon was missing in 708a and that this loss was associated with deletion of more than 70 kb of genetic material. Rescue of the amrAB-oprB region from a 708a fosmid library and sequencing showed the presence of a large chromosome 1 deletion (131 kb and 141 kb compared to strains K96243 and 1710b, respectively. This deletion not only removed the amrAB-oprA operon, but also the entire gene clusters for malleobactin and cobalamin synthesis. Other genes deleted included the anaerobic arginine deiminase pathway, putative type 1 fimbriae and secreted chitinase. Whole genome sequencing and PCR analysis confirmed absence of these genes from 708a. Despite missing several putative virulence genes, 708a was fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Strain 708a may be a natural candidate for genetic manipulation experiments that use Select Agent compliant antibiotics for selection and validates the use of laboratory-constructed Delta(amrAB-oprA mutants in such experiments.

  13. Extraction of lipase from Burkholderia cepacia by PEG/Phosphate ATPS and its biochemical characterization

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    Giovana da Silva Padilha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to study the partitioning of a lipase produced by Burkholderia cepacia in PEG/Phosphate aqueous two phase system (ATPS and its characterization. Lipase was produced by B. cepacia strains in a fermenter. Enzyme partitioning occurred at pH 6.0 and 8.0, using PEG 1500 and 6000 on two tie lines. Metal ions, pH and temperature effects on enzyme activity were evaluated. Five milliliter of 7.5% olive oil emulsion with 2.5% gumarabic in 0.1M sodium phosphate buffer at pH 8.0 and 37ºC were used for the activity determinations. Results showed that crude stratum from B. cepacia was partitioned by PEG1500/phosphate ATPS at pH 6.0 or 8.0 for, which the partitioning coefficients were 108-and 209-folds. Lipase presented optimal activity conditions at 37ºC and pH 8.0; it showed pH-stability for 4 h of incubation at different pH values at 37ºC. Metal ions such as Mn2+ , Co2+, I-and Ca2+ sustained enzymatic activities; however, it was inhibited by the presence of Fe2+, Hg2+ and Al3+ . Km and Vmax values were 0.258 U/mg and 43.90 g/L, respectively. A molecular weight of 33 kDa and an isoelectric point at pH 5.0 were determined by SDS-PAGE and IFS electrophoresis, respectively.

  14. Manganese scavenging and oxidative stress response mediated by type VI secretion system in Burkholderia thailandensis.

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    Si, Meiru; Zhao, Chao; Burkinshaw, Brianne; Zhang, Bing; Wei, Dawei; Wang, Yao; Dong, Tao G; Shen, Xihui

    2017-02-27

    Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a versatile protein export machinery widely distributed in Gram-negative bacteria. Known to translocate protein substrates to eukaryotic and prokaryotic target cells to cause cellular damage, the T6SS has been primarily recognized as a contact-dependent bacterial weapon for microbe-host and microbial interspecies competition. Here we report contact-independent functions of the T6SS for metal acquisition, bacteria competition, and resistance to oxidative stress. We demonstrate that the T6SS-4 in Burkholderia thailandensis is critical for survival under oxidative stress and is regulated by OxyR, a conserved oxidative stress regulator. The T6SS-4 is important for intracellular accumulation of manganese (Mn(2+)) under oxidative stress. Next, we identified a T6SS-4-dependent Mn(2+)-binding effector TseM, and its interacting partner MnoT, a Mn(2+)-specific TonB-dependent outer membrane transporter. Similar to the T6SS-4 genes, expression of mnoT is regulated by OxyR and is induced under oxidative stress and low Mn(2+) conditions. Both TseM and MnoT are required for efficient uptake of Mn(2+) across the outer membrane under Mn(2+)-limited and -oxidative stress conditions. The TseM-MnoT-mediated active Mn(2+) transport system is also involved in contact-independent bacteria-bacteria competition and bacterial virulence. This finding provides a perspective for understanding the mechanisms of metal ion uptake and the roles of T6SS in bacteria-bacteria competition.

  15. Drug susceptibility and biofilm formation of Burkholderia pseudomallei in nutrient-limited condition.

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    Anutrakunchai, C; Sermswan, R W; Wongratanacheewin, S; Puknun, A; Taweechaisupapong, S

    2015-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, which can form biofilms and microcolonies in vivo and in vitro. One of the hallmark characteristics of the biofilm-forming bacteria is that they can be up to 1,000 times more resistant to antibiotics than their free-living counterpart. Bacteria also become highly tolerant to antibiotics when nutrients are limited. One of the most important causes of starvation induced tolerance in vivo is biofilm growth. However, the effect of nutritional stress on biofilm formation and drug tolerance of B. pseudomallei has never been reported. Therefore, this study aims to determine the effect of nutrient-limited and enriched conditions on drug susceptibility of B. pseudomallei in both planktonic and biofilm forms in vitro using broth microdilution method and Calgary biofilm device, respectively. The biofilm formation of B. pseudomallei in nutrient-limited and enriched conditions was also evaluated by a modified microtiter-plate test. Six isolates of ceftazidime (CAZ)-susceptible and four isolates of CAZ-resistant B. pseudomallei were used. The results showed that the minimum bactericidal concentrations of CAZ against B. pseudomallei in nutrient-limited condition were higher than those in enriched condition. The drug susceptibilities of B. pseudomallei biofilm in both enriched and nutrient-limited conditions were more tolerant than those of planktonic cells. Moreover, the quantification of biofilm formation by B. pseudomallei in nutrient-limited condition was significantly higher than that in enriched condition. These data indicate that nutrient-limited condition could induce biofilm formation and drug tolerance of B. pseudomallei.

  16. An objective approach for Burkholderia pseudomallei strain selection as challenge material for medical countermeasures efficacy testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher E. Van Zandt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a rare disease of biodefense concern with high mortality and extreme difficulty in treatment. No human vaccines are available that protect against B. pseudomallei infection, and with the current limitations of antibiotic treatment, the development of new preventative and therapeutic interventions is crucial. Although clinical trials could be used to test the efficacy of new medical countermeasures (MCMs, the high mortality rates associated with melioidosis raises significant ethical issues concerning treating individuals with new compounds with unknown efficacies. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA has formulated a set of guidelines for the licensure of new MCMs to treat diseases in which it would be unethical to test the efficacy of these drugs in humans. The FDA Animal Rule 21 CFR 314 calls for consistent, well-characterized B. pseudomallei strains to be used as challenge material in animal models. In order to facilitate the efficacy testing of new MCMs for melioidosis using animal models, we intend to develop a well-characterized panel of strains for use. This panel will comprise of strains that were isolated from human cases, have a low passage history, are virulent in animal models, and are well characterized phenotypically and genotypically. We have reviewed published and unpublished data on various B. pseudomallei strains to establish an objective method for selecting the strains to be included in the panel of B. pseudomallei strains with attention to five categories: animal infection models, genetic characterization, clinical and passage history, and availability of the strain to the research community. We identified 109 strains with data in at least one of the five categories, scored each strain based on the gathered data and identified 6 strains as candidate for a B. pseudomallei strain panel.

  17. Structural characterization of an acidic exoheteropolysaccharide produced by the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Burkholderia tropica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Gorin, Philip A J; Cruz, Leonardo M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Choudhury, Biswa; Carlson, Russell W; Iacomini, Marcello

    2008-09-05

    An acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by the diazotrophic bacterium Burkholderia tropica, strain Ppe8, was isolated from the culture supernatant of bacteria grown in a synthetic liquid medium containing mannitol and glutamate. Monosaccharide composition showed Rha, Glc and GlcA in a 2.0:2.0:1.0 molar ratio, respectively. Further structural characterization was performed by a combination of NMR, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. Partial acid hydrolysis of EPS provided a mixture of acidic oligosaccharides that were characterized by ESI-MS, giving rise to ions with m/z 193 (GlcA-H)(-), 339 (GlcA,Rha-H)(-), 501 (GlcA,Rha,Glc-H)(-), 647 (GlcA,Rha2,Glc,-H)(-), 809 (GlcA,Rha2,Glc2,-H)(-) and 851 (GlcA,Rha2,Glc2,OAc-H)(-). Carboxyreduced EPS (EPS-CR) had Glc and Rha in a 3:2 ratio, present as d- and l-enantiomers, respectively. Methylation and NMR analysis of EPS and EPS-CR showed a main chain containing 2,4-di-O-Rhap, 3-O-Rhap and 4-O-Glcp. A GlcA side chain unit was found in the acidic EPS, substituting O-4 of α-l-Rhap units. This was observed as a non-reducing end unit of glucopyranose in the EPS-CR. Acetyl esters occured at O-2 of β-l-Rhap units. From the combined results herein, we determined the structure of the exocellular polysaccharide produced by B. tropica, Ppe8, as being a pentasaccharide repeating unit as shown.

  18. Atypical respiratory complications of dengue fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveen Kumar; AK Gadpayle; Deepshikha Trisal

    2013-01-01

    In last decade, dengue has emerged as one of the most important vector born disease.With increasing cases, uncommon presentations and complications are now commonly recognized. Here, we report two cases of rare pattern of respiratory involvement in dengue: acute respiratory distress syndrome and bronchiolitis with respiratory failure.

  19. [Chronic respiratory insufficiency and the elderly patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobarzan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Chronic respiratory failure is a complex entity of varied etiology and physio-pathological mechanisms. It is mainly characterised by the respiratory system's difficulty in ensuring correct aeration at rest, resulting initially in insufficient oxygenation of arterial blood. Treatment is adapted to each etiology and aims to compensate for respiratory failure and to ensure the oxygenation of the organism.

  20. Effects of Aging on the Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Relates alterations in respiratory system functions occurring with aging to changes in respiratory system structure during the course of life. Main alterations noted include loss of alveolar elastic recoil, alteration in chest wall structure and decreased respiratory muscle strength, and loss of surface area and changes in pulmonary circulation.…

  1. Polymorphisms within the prnD and pltC genes from pyrrolnitrin and pyoluteorin-producing Pseudomonas and Burkholderia spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (PRN) and pyoluteorin (PLT) are broad-spectrum antibiotics produced by several strains of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia species. Both antibiotics play an important role in the suppression of multiple plant pathogenic fungi. Primers were developed from conserved sequences and amplified pr

  2. Transcriptional responses of the bacterium Burkholderia terrae BS001 to the fungal host Lyophyllum sp strain Karsten under soil-mimicking conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ul Haq, Irshad; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the mycosphere isolate Burkholderia terrae BS001 was confronted with the soil fungus Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten on soil extract agar plates in order to examine its transcriptional responses over time. At the initial stages of the experiment (T1-day 3; T2-day 5), contact between bot

  3. The role of hydrophobicity and surface receptors at hyphae of Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten in the interaction with Burkholderia terrae BS001 : Implications for interactions in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vila, Taissa; Nazir, Rashid; Rozental, Sonia; dos Santos, Giulia M. P.; Calixto, Renata O.R.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana; Wick, Lukas Y.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The soil bacterium Burkholderia terrae strain BS001 can interact with varying soil fungi, using mechanisms that range from the utilization of carbon/energy sources such as glycerol to the ability to reach novel territories in soil via co-migration with growing fungal mycelia. Here, we investigate th

  4. Characterization of the papilionoid-Burkholderia interaction in the Fynbos biome: The diversity and distribution of beta-rhizobia nodulating Podalyria calyptrata (Fabaceae, Podalyrieae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Benny; Van Cauwenberghe, Jannick; Verstraete, Brecht; Chimphango, Samson; Stirton, Charles; Honnay, Olivier; Smets, Erik; Sprent, Janet; James, Euan K; Muasya, A Muthama

    2016-02-01

    The South African Fynbos soils are renowned for nitrogen-fixing Burkholderia associated with diverse papilionoid legumes of the tribes Crotalarieae, Hypocalypteae, Indigofereae, Phaseoleae and Podalyrieae. However, despite numerous rhizobial studies in the region, the symbiotic diversity of Burkholderia has not been investigated in relation to a specific host legume and its geographical provenance. This study analyzed the diversity of nodulating strains of Burkholderia from the legume species Podalyria calyptrata. Diverse lineages were detected that proved to be closely related to Burkholderia taxa, originating from hosts in other legume tribes. By analyzing the genetic variation of chromosomal (recA) and nodulation (nodA) sequence data in relation to the sampling sites we assessed the geographical distribution patterns of the P. calyptrata symbionts. Although we found a degree of genetically differentiated rhizobial populations, a correlation between genetic (recA and nodA) and geographic distances among populations was not observed, suggesting high rates of dispersal and rhizobial colonization within Fynbos soils.

  5. Bacteria-associated haemophagocytic syndrome and septic pulmonary embolism caused by Burkholderia cepacia complex in a woman with chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Michi; Sugawara, Kana; Tatsuzawa, Osamu; Kitagawa, Michihiro; Murashima, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Koushi

    2007-05-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections with certain types of bacteria and fungi. Presented herein is the case of a 29 year old woman with CGD who suffered from bacteria-associated haemophagocytic syndrome and a septic pulmonary embolism following a uterine infection and sepsis, caused by Burkholderia cepacia complex.

  6. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Yeop Lee

    Full Text Available Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs, including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX, as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX.

  7. Out of the ground: aerial and exotic habitats of the melioidosis bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei in grasses in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestli, Mirjam; Schmid, Michael; Mayo, Mark; Rothballer, Michael; Harrington, Glenda; Richardson, Leisha; Hill, Audrey; Hill, Jason; Tuanyok, Apichai; Keim, Paul; Hartmann, Anton; Currie, Bart J

    2012-08-01

    Melioidosis is an emerging infectious disease of humans and animals in the tropics caused by the soil bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Despite high fatality rates, the ecology of B.pseudomallei remains unclear. We used a combination of field and laboratory studies to investigate B.pseudomallei colonization of native and exotic grasses in northern Australia. Multivariable and spatial analyses were performed to determine significant predictors for B.pseudomallei occurrence in plants and soil collected longitudinally from field sites. In plant inoculation experiments, the impact of B.pseudomallei upon these grasses was studied and the bacterial load semi-quantified. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy were performed to localize the bacteria in plants. Burkholderia pseudomallei was found to inhabit not only the rhizosphere and roots but also aerial parts of specific grasses. This raises questions about the potential spread of B.pseudomallei by grazing animals whose droppings were found to be positive for these bacteria. In particular, B.pseudomallei readily colonized exotic grasses introduced to Australia for pasture. The ongoing spread of these introduced grasses creates new habitats suitable for B.pseudomallei survival and may be an important factor in the evolving epidemiology of melioidosis seen both in northern Australia and elsewhere globally.

  8. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230 from Karijini National Park, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O'Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Lobos, Elizabeth; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2014-06-15

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod isolated from acidic soil collected in 2001 from Karijini National Park, Western Australia, using Kennedia coccinea (Coral Vine) as a host. WSM2230 was initially effective in nitrogen-fixation with K. coccinea, but subsequently lost symbiotic competence. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2230, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,309,801 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 33 scaffolds of 33 contigs containing 5,590 protein-coding genes and 63 RNA-only encoding genes. The genome sequence of WSM2230 failed to identify nodulation genes and provides an explanation for the observed failure of the laboratory grown strain to nodulate. The genome of this strain is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  9. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 from Karijini National Park, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O'Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2014-06-15

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod that was trapped in 2001 from acidic soil collected from Karijini National Park (Australia) using Gastrolobium capitatum as a host. WSM2232 was effective in nitrogen fixation with G. capitatum but subsequently lost symbiotic competence during long-term storage. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 7,208,311 bp standard-draft genome is arranged into 72 scaffolds of 72 contigs containing 6,322 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes. The loss of symbiotic capability can now be attributed to the loss of nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes from the genome. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  10. Purification and Biochemical Characterization of D-hydantoinase and D-N-carbamoylase from Burkholderia cepecia, njut01

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家璜; 李苏平; 严明; 姚忠; 欧阳平凯

    2005-01-01

    Hydantoinase and N-carbamoylase play important roles in the production of optically pure amino acids from racemic 5-monosubstituted hydantoins. In this report, hydantoinase and the N-carbamoylase from Burkholderia cepecia, njut01 were purified to homogeneity by chromatography (Pharmacia Explorer 100 system). The substrate specificity, enantioselectivity, pH dependence of activity and temperature stability of the activity were characterized. The results show that the hydantoinase and N-carbamoylase induced from Burkholderia cepecia, njut01 are both strict D-stereo selective enzymes. They both hydrolyze substrates with side chains containing aliphatic and aromatic residues with higher activity and affinity toward aromatic than aliphatic substituted substrates. The hydantoinase is a homotetramer with subtmit molecular weight near 52,000 and is active between pH 6.5 and 10 with an optimum near pH 9.0. The enzyme is active at temperatures up to 60~C, however, it appears instable at higher temperatures. The subunit molecular weight of N-carbamoylase is about 35KD. The N-carbamoylase is active in the pH range from 6.0 to 9.5. The optira-pH is 7.2 and the optinfizing bioconversion temperature of the N-carbamyolase is 52℃.

  11. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  12. Immunoprophylaxis of bovine respiratory syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogan Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Respiratory Syndrome (BRS is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of infective agents, the environment and the individual immunological response of animals in the herd. Despite five decades of research on BRS, no clear understanding of how environmental factors influence pathogenic outcomes of the disease has been defined. As such, the development of immunoprophylaxis and vaccine programmes to prevent outbreaks of BRS in cattle has not been successful. The current paper discusses vaccination programmes for all categories of cattle and presents a review of existing vaccines being used for immunoprophylaxis of respiratory syndrome in cattle and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the currently used vaccines and vaccination programmes. Lastly, a discussion detailing the design of future perfect vaccines is presented.

  13. [Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and respiratory insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siirala, Waltteri; Korpela, Jaana; Vuori, Arno; Saaresranta, Tarja; Olkkola, Klaus T; Aantaa, Riku

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease causing degeneration of motor neurons, without any curative treatment. The most common cause of death is respiratory arrest due to atrophy of the respiratory musculature. ALS-associated respiratory insufficiency differs in mechanism from the more common causes of dyspnea, such as diseases of pulmonary or cardiac origin. Recognizing the respiratory insufficiency can be challenging for a clinician. It should be possible to predict the development of respiratory insufficiency in order to avoid leaving the treatment decisions concerning respiratory insufficiency to emergency services. Noninvasive ventilatory support can be used to alleviate the patient's dyspnea. It is actually recommended as the first-line treatment of ALS-associated respiratory insufficiency.

  14. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-04-18

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea.

  15. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e......Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence...... of specific IgE testing, but availability is limited. Treatment options for HDM allergy are limited and include HDM avoidance, which is widely recommended as a strategy, although evidence for its efficacy is variable. Clinical efficacy of pharmacotherapy is well documented; however, symptom relief does...... not extend beyond the end of treatment. Finally, allergen immunotherapy has a poor but improving evidence base (notably on sublingual tablets) and its benefits last after treatment ends. This review identifies needs for deeper physician knowledge on the extent and impact of HDM allergy in respiratory disease...

  16. Deployment-related Respiratory Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael J; Rawlins, Frederic A; Forbes, Damon A; Skabelund, Andrew J; Lucero, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Military deployment to Southwest Asia since 2003 in support of Operations Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn has presented unique challenges from a pulmonary perspective. Various airborne hazards in the deployed environment include suspended geologic dusts, burn pit smoke, vehicle exhaust emissions, industrial air pollution, and isolated exposure incidents. These exposures may give rise to both acute respiratory symptoms and in some instances development of chronic lung disease. While increased respiratory symptoms during deployment are well documented, there is limited data on whether inhalation of airborne particulate matter is causally related to an increase in either common or unique pulmonary diseases. While disease processes such as acute eosinophilic pneumonia and exacerbation of preexisting asthma have been adequately documented, there is significant controversy surrounding the potential effects of deployment exposures and development of rare pulmonary disorders such as constrictive bronchiolitis. The role of smoking and related disorders has yet to be defined. This article presents the current evidence for deployment-related respiratory symptoms and ongoing Department of Defense studies. Further, it also provides general recommendations for evaluating pulmonary health in the deployed military population.

  17. Adenosine improves cardiomyocyte respiratory efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babsky, A M; Doliba, M M; Doliba, N M; Osbakken, M D

    1998-01-01

    The role of adenosine on the regulation of mitochondrial function has been studied. In order to evaluate this the following experiments were done in isolated rat cardiomyocites and mitochondria using polarographic techniques. Cardiomyocyte oxygen consumption (MVO2) and mitochondrial respiratory function (State 3 and State 4, respiratory control index, and ADP/O ratio) were evaluated after exposure to adenosine. Cardiomyocyte MVO2 was significantly lower in cells previously exposed to adenosine (10 microM, 15 min or 30 min cell incubation) than in cells not exposed to adenosine (control). Addition of dipyridamole (10 microM) or 8-(p-Sulfophenyl) theophylline (50 microM) to cardiomyocytes before adenosine incubation prevented the adenosine-induced changes in MVO2. Mitochondria obtained from isolated perfused beating heart previously perfused with adenosine (10 microM, 30 min heart perfusion) also resulted in significant increases in ADP/O and respiratory control index compared to matching control. Mitochondria isolated from cardiomyocytes previously exposed to adenosine (10 microM, 15 min or 30 min cell incubation) resulted in a significant increase in mitochondrial ADP/O ratio compared to control. Adenosine-induced decrease in cardiomyocyte MVO2 may be related to an increase in efficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and more economical use of oxygen, which is necessary for survival under ischemic stress.

  18. Respiratory failure in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevransky, Jonathan E; Haponik, Edward F

    2003-02-01

    Elderly individuals comprise an increasing proportion of the population and represent a progressively expanding number of patients admitted to the ICU. Because of underlying pulmonary disease, loss of muscle mass, and other comorbid conditions, older persons are at increased risk of developing respiratory failure. Recognition of this vulnerability and the adoption of proactive measures to prevent decompensation requiring intrusive support are major priorities together with clear delineation of patients' wishes regarding the extent of support desired should clinical deterioration occur. Further, the development of coordinated approaches to identify patients at risk for respiratory failure and strategies to prevent the need for intubation, such as the use of NIV in appropriate patients, are crucial. As soon as endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are implemented strategies that facilitate the liberation of elderly patients from the ventilator are especially important. The emphasis on a team approach, which characterizes geriatric medicine, is essential in coordinating the skills of multiple health care professionals in this setting. Respiratory failure can neither be effectively diagnosed nor managed in isolation. Integration with all other aspects of care is essential. Patient vulnerability to nosocomial complications and the "cascade effect" of these problems such as the effects of medications and invasive supportive procedures all impact on respiratory care of elderly patients. For example, prolonged mechanical ventilation may be required long after resolution of the underlying cause of respiratory failure because of unrecognized and untreated delirium or residual effects of small doses of sedative and/or analgesic agents or other medications in elderly patients with altered drug metabolism. The deleterious impact of the foreign and sometimes threatening ICU environment and/or sleep deprivation on the patient's course are too often overlooked because

  19. Purification and characterization of toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia G4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, L M; Wackett, L P

    1995-10-31

    Recent in vivo studies indicate that ring monooxygenation is a widespread mechanism by which bacteria metabolize aromatic hydrocarbons and obtain carbon and energy. In this study, toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) cepacia G4 was purified to homogeneity and found to be a three-component enzyme system. The reconstituted enzyme system oxidized toluene to o-cresol and o-cresol to 3-methylcatechol, an important intermediate for growth of the bacterium on toluene. Steady-state kinetic parameters measured for the water-soluble substrate o-cresol were a Km of 0.8 microM and a Vmax of 131 nmol min-1 (mg of hydroxylase protein)-1. The three protein components were (1) a 40 kDa polypeptide containing one FAD and a [2Fe2S] cluster, (2) a 10.4 kDa polypeptide that contained no identifiable metals or organic cofactors, and (3) a 211 kDa alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component containing five to six iron atoms. The 40 kDa flavo-iron-sulfur protein oxidized NADH and transferred electrons to cytochrome c, dyes, and the alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component. It is analogous to other NADH oxidoreductase components found in a wide range of bacterial mono- and dioxygenases. The 10.4 kDa component, added to the other two components and NADH, increased toluene oxidation rates 10-fold. The alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component was indicated to contain the site for toluene binding and hydroxylation by the following observations: (1) tight binding to a toluene affinity column; (2) oxidation of toluene after reduction of the protein with dithionite and adding O2; (3) H2O2-dependent toluene oxidation and catalase activity; and (4) spectroscopic studies of the iron atoms in the component. The alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component had no significant absorbance in the visible region. EPR spectroscopy yielded a signal at g = 16 upon addition of > 2 equiv of electrons per 2 Fe atoms. Taken with the quantitation of five to six iron atoms, the data suggest that the alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2

  20. Tandem repeat regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome and their application for high resolution genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Steven P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The facultative, intracellular bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. We identified and categorized tandem repeat arrays and their distribution throughout the genome of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 in order to develop a genetic typing method for B. pseudomallei. We then screened 104 of the potentially polymorphic loci across a diverse panel of 31 isolates including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis in order to identify loci with varying degrees of polymorphism. A subset of these tandem repeat arrays were subsequently developed into a multiple-locus VNTR analysis to examine 66 B. pseudomallei and 21 B. mallei isolates from around the world, as well as 95 lineages from a serial transfer experiment encompassing ~18,000 generations. Results B. pseudomallei contains a preponderance of tandem repeat loci throughout its genome, many of which are duplicated elsewhere in the genome. The majority of these loci are composed of repeat motif lengths of 6 to 9 bp with 4 to 10 repeat units and are predominately located in intergenic regions of the genome. Across geographically diverse B. pseudomallei and B.mallei isolates, the 32 VNTR loci displayed between 7 and 28 alleles, with Nei's diversity values ranging from 0.47 and 0.94. Mutation rates for these loci are comparable (>10-5 per locus per generation to that of the most diverse tandemly repeated regions found in other less diverse bacteria. Conclusion The frequency, location and duplicate nature of tandemly repeated regions within the B. pseudomallei genome indicate that these tandem repeat regions may play a role in generating and maintaining adaptive genomic variation. Multiple-locus VNTR analysis revealed extensive diversity within the global isolate set containing B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, and it detected genotypic differences within clonal lineages of both species that were

  1. Burkholderia type VI secretion systems have distinct roles in eukaryotic and bacterial cell interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Schwarz

    Full Text Available Bacteria that live in the environment have evolved pathways specialized to defend against eukaryotic organisms or other bacteria. In this manuscript, we systematically examined the role of the five type VI secretion systems (T6SSs of Burkholderia thailandensis (B. thai in eukaryotic and bacterial cell interactions. Consistent with phylogenetic analyses comparing the distribution of the B. thai T6SSs with well-characterized bacterial and eukaryotic cell-targeting T6SSs, we found that T6SS-5 plays a critical role in the virulence of the organism in a murine melioidosis model, while a strain lacking the other four T6SSs remained as virulent as the wild-type. The function of T6SS-5 appeared to be specialized to the host and not related to an in vivo growth defect, as ΔT6SS-5 was fully virulent in mice lacking MyD88. Next we probed the role of the five systems in interbacterial interactions. From a group of 31 diverse bacteria, we identified several organisms that competed less effectively against wild-type B. thai than a strain lacking T6SS-1 function. Inactivation of T6SS-1 renders B. thai greatly more susceptible to cell contact-induced stasis by Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Serratia proteamaculans-leaving it 100- to 1000-fold less fit than the wild-type in competition experiments with these organisms. Flow cell biofilm assays showed that T6S-dependent interbacterial interactions are likely relevant in the environment. B. thai cells lacking T6SS-1 were rapidly displaced in mixed biofilms with P. putida, whereas wild-type cells persisted and overran the competitor. Our data show that T6SSs within a single organism can have distinct functions in eukaryotic versus bacterial cell interactions. These systems are likely to be a decisive factor in the survival of bacterial cells of one species in intimate association with those of another, such as in polymicrobial communities present both in the environment and in many infections.

  2. Air pollution and multiple acute respiratory outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustini, Annunziata; Stafoggia, Massimo; Colais, Paola; Berti, Giovanna; Bisanti, Luigi; Cadum, Ennio; Cernigliaro, Achille; Mallone, Sandra; Scarnato, Corrado; Forastiere, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Short-term effects of air pollutants on respiratory mortality and morbidity have been consistently reported but usually studied separately. To more completely assess air pollution effects, we studied hospitalisations for respiratory diseases together with out-of-hospital respiratory deaths. A time-stratified case-crossover study was carried out in six Italian cities from 2001 to 2005. Daily particulate matter (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm (PM10)) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) associations with hospitalisations for respiratory diseases (n = 100 690), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 38 577), lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) among COPD patients (n = 9886) and out-of-hospital respiratory deaths (n = 5490) were estimated for residents aged ≥35 years. For an increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, we found an immediate 0.59% (lag 0-1 days) increase in hospitalisations for respiratory diseases and a 0.67% increase for COPD; the 1.91% increase in LRTI hospitalisations lasted longer (lag 0-3 days) and the 3.95% increase in respiratory mortality lasted 6 days. Effects of NO2 were stronger and lasted longer (lag 0-5 days). Age, sex and previous ischaemic heart disease acted as effect modifiers for different outcomes. Analysing multiple rather than single respiratory events shows stronger air pollution effects. The temporal relationship between the pollutant increases and hospitalisations or mortality for respiratory diseases differs.

  3. Improvement in the accuracy of respiratory-gated radiation therapy using a respiratory guiding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong-Hee; Kim, Dong-Su; Kim, Tae-Ho; Suh, Tae-Suk; Yoon, Jai-Woong

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) depends on the respiratory regularity because external respiratory signals are used for gating the radiation beam at particular phases. Many studies have applied a respiratory guiding system to improve the respiratory regularity. This study aims to evaluate the effect of an in-house-developed respiratory guiding system to improve the respiratory regularity for RGRT. To verify the effectiveness of this system, we acquired respiratory signals from five volunteers. The improvement in respiratory regularity was analyzed by comparing the standard deviations of the amplitudes and the periods between free and guided breathing. The reduction in residual motion at each phase was analyzed by comparing the standard deviations of sorted data within each corresponding phase bin as obtained from free and guided breathing. The results indicate that the respiratory guiding system improves the respiratory regularity, and that most of the volunteers showed significantly less average residual motion at each phase. The average residual motion measured at phases of 40, 50, and 60%, which showed lower variation than other phases, were, respectively, reduced by 41, 45, and 44% during guided breathing. The results show that the accuracy of RGRT can be improved by using the in-house-developed respiratory guiding system. Furthermore, this system should reduce artifacts caused by respiratory motion in 4D CT imaging.

  4. Respiratory muscle weakness in peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakgazi, Ahmet Z; Höke, Ahmet

    2010-12-01

    Common peripheral neuropathies do not usually cause diaphragmatic weakness and subsequent respiratory compromise. However, respiratory involvement is relatively common in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Experience in GBS has led to a standardized approach to manage respiratory problems in peripheral neuropathies. Diaphragmatic weakness is not common in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and extremely rare in multifocal motor neuropathy. The linkage has been described between certain subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease such as CMT2C and CMT4B1 and diaphragmatic weakness. A correlation usually has not been found between electrophysiologic findings and clinical respiratory signs or spirometric abnormalities in peripheral neuropathies except in amplitudes of evoked phrenic nerve responses. Careful and frequent assessment of respiratory function by a qualified team of healthcare professionals and physicians is essential. Criteria established for mechanical ventilation in GBS cases may be applied to other peripheral neuropathies with respiratory compromise as necessary.

  5. Respiratory Distress Syndrome and its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Kale Cekinmez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome in premature babies is one of the most common and most important health problems in newborns. Respiratory distress syndrome of newborn is a syndrome in premature infants caused by developmental insufficiency of surfactant production and structural immaturity in the lungs. Respiratory distress syndrome begins shortly after birth and is manifest by tachypnea, tachycardia, chest wall retractions, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring and cyanosis during breathing efforts. Respiratory distress syndrome or complications caused by respiratory distress syndrome are the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in premature infants. This article briefly reviews respiratory distress syndrome and its complications. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(4.000: 615-630

  6. Respiratory distress of the term newborn infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Martin O; Kotecha, Sarah J; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory distress is recognised as any signs of breathing difficulties in neonates. In the early neonatal period respiratory distress is common, occurring in up to 7% of newborn infants, resulting in significant numbers of term-born infants being admitted to neonatal units. Many risk factors are involved; the increasing number of term infants delivered by elective caesarean section has also increased the incidence. Additionally the risk decreases with each advancing week of gestation. At 37 weeks, the chances are three times greater than at 39-40 weeks gestation. Multiple conditions can present with features of respiratory distress. Common causes in term newborn infants include transient tachypnoea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia, meconium aspiration syndrome, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate and pneumothorax. Early recognition of respiratory distress and initiation of appropriate treatment is important to ensure optimal outcomes. This review will discuss these common causes of respiratory distress in term-born infants.

  7. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaudi, L R [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Rossi, E [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Mantaras, M C [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Perrone, M S [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Siri, L Nicola [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display.

  8. Research progress in quorum sensing and quorum quenching of the rice pathogen Burkholderia plantarii%水稻病原菌 Burkholderia plantarii群体感应和群体淬灭研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MATSUMOTO Haruna; 王蒙岑; 桂文君; 郭逸蓉; 朱国念

    2016-01-01

    植物伯克霍尔德菌 Burkholderia plantarii 是引起水稻秧苗细菌性立枯病的重要病原菌之一,其侵染性、繁殖力及适应性均很强,严重威胁中国水稻生产。文章围绕 B. plantarii 的发生、危害及致病机理,着重论述了细菌群体感应系统(quorum sensing,QS)的生理功能及其在B. plantarii 致病力调控方面的最新研究进展,并进一步从根际微生物互作角度,综述了种间信号分子对病原菌群体淬灭(quorum quenching)的作用机制,同时结合种间信号分子的独特性,展望了其在新型微生物杀菌剂研发中的重要性和应用潜力。%Burkholderia plantarii is a causal agent of bacterial seedling blight of rice. This pathogen is of strong infectivity, reproductive capacity and adapt ability, and thus poses a serious threat to rice production. Hereby, the occurrence, damage and pathogenic mechanism of B. plantarii are introduced. Research progress of physiological traits and the regulation of pathogenicity controlled by bacterial quorum sensing (QS) in B. plantarii are also discussed. Moreover, from the point of view of microbial interaction in rhizosphere, the mechanisms of quorum quenching by interspecific signaling molecules against bacterial pathogens are summarized. According to the characteristics of the interspecies signaling molecules, their importance and application potential in development of novel bactericides are also previewed.

  9. Dental considerations in patients with respiratory problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Claramunt Lozano, Ariadna; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia; Gavaldá Esteve, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Many respiratory disorders can compromise routine dental care and require special treatment for the affected patients. Patients often visit the dental clinic with respiratory problems already diagnosed by other specialists. The dental professional therefore must provide correct dental care in the context of such a diagnosis. The present study offers a literature review of those respiratory disorders which can have implications for dental care. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (CO...

  10. Respiratory Disease: Diagnostic Approaches in the Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Joanne; Arroyo, Luis G

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of the upper and lower respiratory tract of horses requires strategic selection of possible diagnostic tests based on location of suspected pathologic lesions and purpose of testing and must also include consideration of patient status. This article discusses the various diagnostic modalities that may be applied to the respiratory system of horses under field conditions, indications for use, and aspects of sample collection, handling, and laboratory processing that can impact test results and ultimately a successful diagnosis in cases of respiratory disease.

  11. Respiratory Distress Syndrome and its Complications

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome in premature babies is one of the most common and most important health problems in newborns. Respiratory distress syndrome of newborn is a syndrome in premature infants caused by developmental insufficiency of surfactant production and structural immaturity in the lungs. Respiratory distress syndrome begins shortly after birth and is manifest by tachypnea, tachycardia, chest wall retractions, expiratory grunting, nasal flaring and cyanosis during breathing effor...

  12. Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy for a patient with severe respiratory dysfunction and annuloaortic ectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, Masakazu; Ohzeki, Hajime; Namura, Osamu; Hayashi, Jun-ichi

    2003-08-01

    A 23-year-old man with Marfan syndrome, who had undergone surgery for pectus excavatum and scoliosis and who had severe respiratory dysfunction, was referred for surgical repair of annuloaortic ectasia. The preoperative pulmonary function test revealed severe obstructive and restrictive respiratory dysfunction, with forced expiratory volume in one second of 650 ml and vital capacity of 1,220 ml. These parameters improved after 4 months respiratory physiotherapy. A modified Bentall's procedure was performed after respiratory physiotherapy. A tracheostomy made on the 7th postoperative day (POD) appeared to improve respiratory condition and he was weaned off mechanical ventilation on the 14th POD. The lower limits of pulmonary function for open heart surgery have not been established clearly; however, our case will help elucidate these limits of respiratory function for open heart surgery. Preoperative respiratory physiotherapy improved parameters of pulmonary function test and may decrease the morbidity of postoperative pulmonary complications in a patient with severe respiratory dysfunction.

  13. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV): A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik

    2000-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in calves during the first year of life. The study of the virus has been difficult because of its lability and very poor growth in cell culture. However, during the last decade, the introduction of new...... complex and unpredictable which makes the diagnosis and subsequent therapy very difficult. BRSV is closely related to human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young children. In contrast to BRSV, the recent knowledge of HRSV is regularly extensively...

  14. Emergency thyroidectomy: Due to acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfu Bayhan

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Respiratory failure due to giant nodular goiter is a life-threatening situation and should be treated immediately by performing awake endotracheal intubation following emergency total thyroidectomy.

  15. Respiratory monitoring with an acceleration sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Tomohiro; Takegawa, Hideki; Ageishi, Tatsuya; Takashina, Masaaki; Numasaki, Hodaka; Matsumoto, Masao; Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Yamadaoka 1-7, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Respiratory gating radiotherapy is used to irradiate a local area and to reduce normal tissue toxicity. There are certain methods for the detection of tumor motions, for example, using internal markers or an external respiration signal. However, because some of these respiratory monitoring systems require special or expensive equipment, respiratory monitoring can usually be performed only in limited facilities. In this study, the feasibility of using an acceleration sensor for respiratory monitoring was evaluated. The respiratory motion was represented by means of a platform and measured five times with the iPod touch (registered) at 3, 4 and 5 s periods of five breathing cycles. For these three periods of the reference waveform, the absolute means {+-} standard deviation (SD) of displacement were 0.45 {+-} 0.34 mm, 0.33 {+-} 0.24 mm and 0.31 {+-} 0.23 mm, respectively. On the other hand, the corresponding absolute means {+-} SD for the periods were 0.04 {+-} 0.09 s, 0.04 {+-} 0.02 s and 0.06 {+-} 0.04 s. The accuracy of respiratory monitoring using the acceleration sensor was satisfactory in terms of the absolute means {+-} SD. Using the iPod touch (registered) for respiratory monitoring does not need special equipment and makes respiratory monitoring easier. For these reasons, this system is a viable alternative to other respiratory monitoring systems.

  16. Effect of Azospirillum brasilense and Burkholderia unamae Bacteria on Maize Photosynthetic Activity Evaluated Using the Photoacoustic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Delgado, F.; Marín, E.; Calderón, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the photosynthetic process of maize plants ( Zea mays), which were grown using seeds inoculated with plant growth promoting bacteria Azospirillum brasilense and Burkholderia unamae, was monitored. Photothermal and photobaric signals obtained by a time-resolved photoacoustic measurement configuration were used for measuring the oxygen evolution rate in situ. A frequency-resolved configuration of the method was utilized to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficient and the thermal diffusivity of the maize leaves. The latter parameters, which can be used as indicators of the photosynthetic activity of maize, are found to vary according to the plant-microbe interaction. Treatment with plant growth promoting bacteria induced a decrease in the oxygen diffusion coefficient of about 20 %.

  17. Biodiesel synthesis and conformation of lipase from Burkholderia cepacia in room temperature ionic liquids and organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Chen, Dawei; Yan, Yunjun; Peng, Cheng; Xu, Li

    2011-11-01

    Biodiesel synthesis and conformation of Burkholderia cepacia lipase (BCL) were studied in 19 different room temperature ionic liquids (RTLLs) with a range of cation and anion structures. Overall, anion selection had a greater influence on biodiesel conversion than cation choice. RTILs containing Tf2N- and PF6- anions were suitable reaction media, while RTIL of [OmPy][BF4] was the best reaction medium with a biodiesel yield of 82.2±1.2%. RTILs with strong water miscible properties showed very low biodiesel yields. Conformational analysis by FT-IR revealed that higher biodiesel conversion in RTILs was correlated with a low tendency in α-helix content of BCL. An ultrasound-assisted biocatalysis process in RTILs was used to improve mass transfer rate, leading to 83% reduction of the reaction time for biodiesel production.

  18. Enhancing plant disease suppression by Burkholderia vietnamiensis through chromosomal integration of Bacillus subtilis chitinase gene chi113.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinjian; Huang, Yujie; Harvey, Paul R; Ren, Yan; Zhang, Guangzhi; Zhou, Hongzi; Yang, Hetong

    2012-02-01

    Burkholderia vietnamiensis P418 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria. A chitinase gene from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and stably integrated into the chromosome of using the transposon delivery vector, pUTkm1. Chitinase activity was detected in recombinant P418-37 but not in wild type P418. Recombinant P418-37 retained the in vitro growth rate, N(2)-fixation and phosphate and potassium-solubilizing characteristics of the wild type. P418-37 significantly (P Bipolaris sorokiniana, Verticillium dahliae and Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici compared with P418. In planta disease suppression assays indicated that P418-37 significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced suppression of wheat sheath blight (R. cerealis), cotton Fusarium wilt (F. oxysporium f.sp. vasinfectum) and tomato gray mould (Botrytis cinerea), relative to the wild type.

  19. Identification and Antagonism Study of a Novel Chitinase-producing Bacterium Burkholderia Sp.C3 against Phytopathogenic Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金虹; TAO Yong

    2006-01-01

    Through a modified agar well diffusion assay, antagonism of a novel chitinase-producing strain C3 against the phytopathogenic fungi including Phoma wasabiae Yokogi,Heterostrophus, Exserohilum Turcicum, Curwularia (Walk) Boed, Thantephorus cucumris, Fusarium graminearum was tested. The data showed that the crude cxtracts of strain C3 had stable antifungal activity in the range of pH 5.0 to pH 8.0. The active components were heat labile and sensitive to proteinase K. A series of experiments supported that the compound responsible for inhibitory activity appeared to be ehitinase. The 16s rDNA analysis indicated that C3 was subject to genus Burkholderia. Pbenotypic characterization of C3 was also consisted with the result of molecular identification.

  20. Fucose-binding lectin from opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia ambifaria binds to both plant and human oligosaccharidic epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audfray, Aymeric; Claudinon, Julie; Abounit, Saïda; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Larson, Göran; Smith, David F; Wimmerová, Michaela; Le Pendu, Jacques; Römer, Winfried; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2012-02-03

    Burkholderia ambifaria is generally associated with the rhizosphere of plants where it has biocontrol effects on other microorganisms. It is also a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of closely related bacteria that cause lung infections in immunocompromised patients as well as in patients with granulomatous disease or cystic fibrosis. Our previous work indicated that fucose on human epithelia is a frequent target for lectins and adhesins of lung pathogens (Sulák, O., Cioci, G., Lameignère, E., Balloy, V., Round, A., Gutsche, I., Malinovská, L., Chignard, M., Kosma, P., Aubert, D. F., Marolda, C. L., Valvano, M. A., Wimmerová, M., and Imberty, A. (2011) PLoS Pathog. 7, e1002238). Analysis of the B. ambifaria genome identified BambL as a putative fucose-binding lectin. The 87-amino acid protein was produced recombinantly and demonstrated to bind to fucosylated oligosaccharides with a preference for αFuc1-2Gal epitopes. Crystal structures revealed that it associates as a trimer with two fucose-binding sites per monomer. The overall fold is a six-bladed β-propeller formed by oligomerization as in the Ralstonia solanacearum lectin and not by sequential domains like the fungal fucose lectin from Aleuria aurantia. The affinity of BambL for small fucosylated glycans is very high as demonstrated by microcalorimetry (K(D) < 1 μM). Plant cell wall oligosaccharides and human histo-blood group oligosaccharides H-type 2 and Lewis Y are bound with equivalent efficiency. Binding to artificial glycosphingolipid-containing vesicles, human saliva, and lung tissues confirmed that BambL could recognize a wide spectrum of fucosylated epitopes, albeit with a lower affinity for biological material from nonsecretor individuals.

  1. φX216, a P2-like bacteriophage with broad Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei strain infectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvitko Brian H

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are closely related Category B Select Agents of bioterrorism and the causative agents of the diseases melioidosis and glanders, respectively. Rapid phage-based diagnostic tools would greatly benefit early recognition and treatment of these diseases. There is extensive strain-to-strain variation in B. pseudomallei genome content due in part to the presence or absence of integrated prophages. Several phages have previously been isolated from B. pseudomallei lysogens, for example φK96243, φ1026b and φ52237. Results We have isolated a P2-like bacteriophage, φX216, which infects 78% of all B. pseudomallei strains tested. φX216 also infects B. mallei, but not other Burkholderia species, including the closely related B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. The nature of the φX216 host receptor remains unclear but evidence indicates that in B. mallei φX216 uses lipopolysaccharide O-antigen but a different receptor in B. pseudomallei. The 37,637 bp genome of φX216 encodes 47 predicted open reading frames and shares 99.8% pairwise identity and an identical strain host range with bacteriophage φ52237. Closely related P2-like prophages appear to be widely distributed among B. pseudomallei strains but both φX216 and φ52237 readily infect prophage carrying strains. Conclusions The broad strain infectivity and high specificity for B. pseudomallei and B. mallei indicate that φX216 will provide a good platform for the development of phage-based diagnostics for these bacteria.

  2. Effects of the inoculation of Burkholderia vietnamensis and related endophytic diazotrophic bacteria on grain yield of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Munusamy; Balandreau, Jacques; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Weon, Hang-Yeon; Lakshminarasimhan, Cunthipuram

    2008-01-01

    During a survey of endophytic diazotrophic bacteria associated with different rice varieties in Tamilnadu, some "endophytes" were obtained. Thirteen bacterial isolates from surface-sterilized roots and shoots were obtained in pure culture, which produced indole acetic acid (IAA) and reduced acetylene to ethylene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification confirmed the presence of nif-H gene in all the isolates. Morphological, biochemical, and molecular characteristics indicated that all of them belonged to the genus Burkholderia One of them, MGK3, was consistently more active in reducing acetylene, and 16S rDNA sequences of isolate MGK3 confirmed its identification as Burkholderia vietnamiensis. Colonization of rice root was confirmed by strain MGK3 marked with gusA gene. The inoculated roots showed a blue color, which was most intense at the points of lateral root emergence and at the root tip. Transverse sections of roots, 15 days after inoculation, revealed beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity within many of the cortical intercellular spaces next to the stele and within the aerenchyma. Nitrogen fixation was quantified by using (15)N isotope dilution method with two different cultivars grown in pot and field experiments. Higher nitrogen fixation was observed in variety Ponni than in ADT-43, where nearly 42% (field) and 40% (pot) of the nitrogen was derived from the atmosphere (% Ndfa). Isolate MGK3 was used to inoculate rice seedlings in a comparison with four other diazotrophs, viz., Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus LMG7603, Herbaspirillum seropedicae LMG6513, Azospirillum lipoferum 4B LMG4348, and B. vietnamiensis LMG10929. They were used to conduct two pot and four field inoculation experiments. MGK3 alone, and combined with other diazotrophs, performed best under both pot and field conditions: combined inoculation produced yield increases between 9.5 and 23.6%, while MGK3 alone increased yield by 5.6 to 12.16% over the uninoculated control treatment.

  3. Dermoid cyst with respiratory manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calle-Cabanillas MI, Ibañez-Muñoz C, Pérez-Sáez J, Navazo-Eguía AI, Clemente-García A, Sánchez-Hernández JM.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermoid cysts are congenital tumors caused by entrapment of ectoderm during embryogenesis. The most common localization are the gonads and less than 10% are in the head and neck. They are slow growing and generally observed between the second and third decades of life, being unusual in chilhood. Description: We report a case of a 5 year old male with recurrent respiratory infections, mouth breathing and snoring with apneas and daytime sleepiness. On physical examination tonsillar hypertrophy and a 4 cm sublingual tumor are detected. As complementary tests are performed overnight polysomnography with AHI of 18.3 / h and ultrasonography, reported as cystic mass with multiple rounded echogenic structures inside. Results: The patient was diagnosed with severe OSA and tonsillectomy and intraorally enucleation of tumor (as diagnosis and treatment were performed; with histopathological diagnosis of dermoid cyst. In the postoperative control we check the resolution of respiratory events and snoring. Discussion: Dermoid cysts of the oral cavity (where sublingual localization is the most common represent only 0,01% of all cysts and 1,6% of all dermoid cysts. Usually present as slow-growing asymptomatic mass, even if they reach large size can compromise swallowing, speech or breathing and eventually cause, as in our case, a severe OSA. The surgical treatment allows to confirm the diagnosis an avoid the risk of infectious complications and eventual malignant transformation.

  4. The respiratory proteins of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, Thorsten; Hankeln, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    For a long time, respiratory proteins have been considered unnecessary in most insects because the tracheal system was thought to be sufficient for oxygen supply. Only a few species that survive under hypoxic conditions were known exceptions. However, recently it has become evident that (1) intracellular hemoglobins belong to the standard repertoire of insects and (2) that hemocyanin is present in many "lower" insects. Intracellular hemoglobins have been identified in Drosophila, Anopheles, Apis and many other insects. In all investigated species, hemoglobin is mainly expressed in the fat body and the tracheal system. The major Drosophila hemoglobin binds oxygen with high affinity. This hemoglobin type possibly functions as a buffer system for oxygen supply at low partial pressures and/or for the protection from an excess of oxygen. Similar hemoglobins, present in much higher concentrations, store oxygen in specialized tracheal organs of the botfly and some backswimmers. The extracellular hemoglobins in the hemolymph of chironomid midges are evolutionary derivatives of the intracellular insect hemoglobins, which emerged in response to the hypoxic environment of the larvae. In addition, several hemoglobin variants of unknown functions have been discovered in insect genomes. Hemocyanins transport oxygen in the hemolymph of stoneflies, but also in the Entognatha and most hemimetabolan taxa. Apparently, hemocyanin has been lost in Holometabola. At present, no physiological or morphological character is known that could explain the presence or loss of hemocyanins in distinct taxa. Nevertheless, the occurrence of respiratory proteins in insects adds further complexity to our view on insect respiration.

  5. Equal virulence of rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in infants hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van J.C.; Goossens, L.K.; Hendrix, R.; Palen, van der J.A.M.; Lusthusz, A.; Thio, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus (RV) are predominant viruses associated with lower respiratory tract infection in infants. We compared the symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection caused by RSV and RV in hospitalized infants. RV showed the same symptoms as RSV, so on clinical g

  6. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...

  7. Mitochondrial Cristae Shape Determines Respiratory Chain Supercomplexes Assembly and Respiratory Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Cogliati, Sara; Frezza, Christian; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Varanita, Tatiana; Quintana-Cabrera, Ruben; Corrado, Mauro; Cipolat, Sara; Costa, Veronica; Casarin, Alberto; Gomes, Ligia C.; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Salviati, Leonardo; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose A.; Scorrano, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Summary Respiratory chain complexes assemble into functional quaternary structures called supercomplexes (RCS) within the folds of the inner mitochondrial membrane, or cristae. Here, we investigate the relationship between respiratory function and mitochondrial ultrastructure and provide evidence that cristae shape determines the assembly and stability of RCS and hence mitochondrial respiratory efficiency. Genetic and apoptotic manipulations of cristae structure affect assembly and activity o...

  8. Postperfusion lung syndrome: Respiratory mechanics, respiratory indices and biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postperfusion lung syndrome is rare but lethal. Secondary inflammatory response was the popularly accepted theory for the underlying etiology. Respiratory index (RI and arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen can be reliable indices for the diagnosis of this syndrome as X-ray appearance is always insignificant at the early stage of the onset. Evaluations of extravascular lung water content and pulmonary compliance are also helpful in the definite diagnosis. Multiorgan failure and triple acid-base disturbances that might develop secondary to postperfusion lung syndrome are responsible for the poor prognosis and increased mortality rather than postperfusion lung syndrome itself. Mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume (TV and proper positive end-expiratory pressure can be an effective treatment strategy. Use of ulinastatin and propofol may benefit the patients through different mechanisms.

  9. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, N. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-13

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the third quarter of the third year, F344 rats vaccinated with adjuvanted NLP formulations were challenged with F. tularensis SCHU S4 at Battelle. Preliminary data indicate that up to 65% of females vaccinated intranasally with an NLP-based formulation survived this challenge, compared to only 20% survival of naïve animals. In addition, NLPs were successfully formulated with Burkholderia protein antigens. IACUC approval for immunological assessments in BALB/c mice was received and we anticipate that these assessments will begin by March 2015, pending ACURO approval.

  10. A Guide for Respiratory Therapy Curriculum Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Respiratory Therapy, Dallas, TX.

    The document presents educational criterion upon which curriculum builders can create a competency-based program of respiratory therapy education. The 11 modules presented supplement and compliment the document Delineation of Roles and Functions of Respiratory Therapy Personnel (CE 005 945) which is listed as appendix D but not included as such.…

  11. Expanding the Respiratory Therapy Curriculum. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Mary; Allenbaugh, Patricia

    This project was conducted to upgrade Seattle Central Community College's four-quarter respiratory care program to a two-year associate degree program in respiratory therapy. The program needed to include a developmental pathway for entry of nontraditional students and also a college-level prerequisite entry pathway for traditional students. In…

  12. Respiratory health effects in pig farmers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes a cross-sectional study of risk factors of chronic respiratory health effects in pig farmers working in the South of the Netherlands. The study population comprised 100 pig farmers with and 100 pig farmers without chronic respiratory symptoms. Base-line lung function, non-speci

  13. Maximal respiratory pressure in healthy Japanese children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Miki; Okuno, Yukako; Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Kawamura, Kenta; Shoji, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Normal values for respiratory muscle pressures during development in Japanese children have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate respiratory muscle pressures in Japanese children aged 3–12 years. [Subjects and Methods] We measured respiratory muscle pressure values using a manovacuometer without a nose clip, with subjects in a sitting position. Data were collected for ages 3–6 (Group I: 68 subjects), 7–9 (Group II: 86 subjects), and 10–12 (Group III: 64 subjects) years. [Results] The values for respiratory muscle pressures in children were significantly higher with age in both sexes, and were higher in boys than in girls. Correlation coefficients were significant at values of 0.279 to 0.471 for each gender relationship between maximal respiratory pressure and age, height, and weight, respectively. [Conclusion] In this study, we showed pediatric respiratory muscle pressure reference value for each age. In the present study, values for respiratory muscle pressures were lower than Brazilian studies. This suggests that differences in respiratory muscle pressures vary with ethnicity. PMID:28356644

  14. Revised approach for identification of isolates within the Burkholderia cepacia complex and description of clinical isolates not assigned to any of the known genomovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Jane F; Arif, Nazia; Hennessy, Daneeta; Kaufmann, Mary E; Pitt, Tyrone L

    2007-09-01

    One hundred thirty-eight clinical isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) were identified using a modified strategy that involved PCR detection of the cblA gene for the ET12 lineage simultaneously with detection of the Bcc recA PCR product; recA sequence cluster analysis also was part of the strategy. Four strains could not be assigned to any of the known genomovars.

  15. Symbiotic Burkholderia Species Show Diverse Arrangements of nif/fix and nod Genes and Lack Typical High-Affinity Cytochrome cbb3 Oxidase Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Sofie E; Briscoe, Leah; Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Agapakis, Christina M; de-Los Santos, Paulina Estrada; Seshadri, Rekha; Reeve, Wayne; Weinstock, George; O'Hara, Graham; Howieson, John G; Hirsch, Ann M

    2016-08-01

    Genome analysis of fourteen mimosoid and four papilionoid beta-rhizobia together with fourteen reference alpha-rhizobia for both nodulation (nod) and nitrogen-fixing (nif/fix) genes has shown phylogenetic congruence between 16S rRNA/MLSA (combined 16S rRNA gene sequencing and multilocus sequence analysis) and nif/fix genes, indicating a free-living diazotrophic ancestry of the beta-rhizobia. However, deeper genomic analysis revealed a complex symbiosis acquisition history in the beta-rhizobia that clearly separates the mimosoid and papilionoid nodulating groups. Mimosoid-nodulating beta-rhizobia have nod genes tightly clustered in the nodBCIJHASU operon, whereas papilionoid-nodulating Burkholderia have nodUSDABC and nodIJ genes, although their arrangement is not canonical because the nod genes are subdivided by the insertion of nif and other genes. Furthermore, the papilionoid Burkholderia spp. contain duplications of several nod and nif genes. The Burkholderia nifHDKEN and fixABC genes are very closely related to those found in free-living diazotrophs. In contrast, nifA is highly divergent between both groups, but the papilionoid species nifA is more similar to alpha-rhizobia nifA than to other groups. Surprisingly, for all Burkholderia, the fixNOQP and fixGHIS genes required for cbb3 cytochrome oxidase production and assembly are missing. In contrast, symbiotic Cupriavidus strains have fixNOQPGHIS genes, revealing a divergence in the evolution of two distinct electron transport chains required for nitrogen fixation within the beta-rhizobia.

  16. Role of phosphate solubilizing Burkholderia spp. for successful colonization and growth promotion of Lycopodium cernuum L. (Lycopodiaceae) in lateritic belt of Birbhum district of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ranjan; Barman, Soma; Mukherjee, Rajib; Mandal, Narayan C

    2016-02-01

    Profuse growth of Lycpodium cernuum L. was found in phosphate deficient red lateritic soil of West Bengal, India. Interaction of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) with Lycopodium rhizoids were described earlier but association of PGPR with their rhizoids were not studied. Three potent phosphate solubilizing bacterial strains (P4, P9 and P10) associated with L. cernuum rhizoids were isolated and identified by 16S rDNA homologies on Ez-Taxon database as Burkholderia tropica, Burkholderia unamae and Burkholderia cepacia respectively. Day wise kinetics of phosphate solubilization against Ca3(PO4)2 suggested P4 (580.56±13.38 μg ml(-1)) as maximum mineral phosphate solubilizer followed by P9 (517.12±17.15 μg ml(-1)) and P10 (485.18±14.23 μg ml(-1)) at 28 °C. Release of bound phosphates by isolated strains from ferric phosphate (FePO4), aluminum phosphate (AlPO4) and four different complex rock phosphates indicated their very good phosphate solubilizng efficacy. Nitrogen independent solubilizition also supports their nitrogen fixing capabilities. Inhibition of P solubilization by calcium salts and induction by EDTA suggested pH dependent chelation of metal cations by all of the isolates. Rhizoidal colonization potentials of Burkholderia spp. were confirmed by in planta experiment and also using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Increases of total phosphate content in Lycopodium plants upon soil treatment with these isolates were also recorded. In addition siderophore production on CAS agar medium, tryptophan dependent IAA production and antifungal activities against pathogenic fungi by rhizospheric isolates deep-rooted that they have definite role in nutrient mobilization for successful colonization of L. cernuum in nutrient deficient lateritic soil.

  17. [Hot topics in respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza-Galvao, M Luiza; García-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Sanz, Francisco; Blanquer, José

    2011-01-01

    We review the most interesting articles on respiratory infections published in the last trimester of 2009 and in 2010. Notable publications in bronchiectasis were the Guidelines of the British Thoracic Society, as well as several articles on the natural course of the process, the impact of exacerbations on the course of the disease, and treatment with inhaled antibiotics. Other notable publications were the SEPAR-SEIMC consensus document for the management of tuberculosis and articles on the use of interferon-gamma in the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection. The new recommendations of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery on community-acquired pneumonia have recently been published. Equally important are studies on the viral etiology of community-acquired pneumonia, the impact of corticosteroid treatment in pneumonia, the duration of antibiotic therapy and preventive measures in both community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia.

  18. The respiratory system in equations

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    The book proposes an introduction to the mathematical modeling of the respiratory system. A detailed introduction on the physiological aspects makes it accessible to a large audience without any prior knowledge on the lung. Different levels of description are proposed, from the lumped models with a small number of parameters (Ordinary Differential Equations), up to infinite dimensional models based on Partial Differential Equations. Besides these two types of differential equations, two chapters are dedicated to resistive networks, and to the way they can be used to investigate the dependence of the resistance of the lung upon geometrical characteristics. The theoretical analysis of the various models is provided, together with state-of-the-art techniques to compute approximate solutions, allowing comparisons with experimental measurements. The book contains several exercises, most of which are accessible to advanced undergraduate students.

  19. Perioperative modifications of respiratory function.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, Michelle

    2012-01-31

    Postoperative pulmonary complications contribute considerably to morbidity and mortality, especially after major thoracic or abdominal surgery. Clinically relevant pulmonary complications include the exacerbation of underlying chronic lung disease, bronchospasm, atelectasis, pneumonia and respiratory failure with prolonged mechanical ventilation. Risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications include patient-related risk factors (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tobacco smoking and increasing age) as well as procedure-related risk factors (e.g., site of surgery, duration of surgery and general vs. regional anaesthesia). Careful history taking and a thorough physical examination may be the most sensitive ways to identify at-risk patients. Pulmonary function tests are not suitable as a general screen to assess risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. Strategies to reduce the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications include smoking cessation, inspiratory muscle training, optimising nutritional status and intra-operative strategies. Postoperative care should include lung expansion manoeuvres and adequate pain control.

  20. Pulmonary agenesis and respiratory failure in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinamarco, Paula Vanessa Valverde; Ponce, Cesar Cilento

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis (PA) is a rare congenital anomaly, which may be unilateral or bilateral. Unilateral PA may be associated with nonspecific respiratory symptoms. We report the case of 5-month-old infant who presented a normal development until the age of 4 months when a respiratory infection caused an acute respiratory distress syndrome with a fatal outcome. The autopsy findings depicted the right lung agenesis without any other concomitant malformation. Although respiratory symptoms represent frequent complaints in pediatrics, the aim of this study is not only to draw attention to the unilateral pulmonary agenesis as a possible underlying malformation in children who present recurrent and severe respiratory symptoms, but also to report a case diagnosed at autopsy.