WorldWideScience

Sample records for bunyaviridae

  1. Phylogenetic Relationship of Necoclí Virus to Other South American Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae: Hantavirus)

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya-Ruiz, Carolina; Cajimat, Maria N. B.; Milazzo, Mary Louise; DIAZ, FRANCISCO J.; Rodas, Juan David; Valbuena, Gustavo; Fulhorst, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    The results of a previous study suggested that Cherrie's cane rat (Zygodontomys cherriei) is the principal host of Necoclí virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) in Colombia. Bayesian analyses of complete nucleocapsid protein gene sequences and complete glycoprotein precursor gene sequences in this study confirmed that Necoclí virus is phylogenetically closely related to Maporal virus, which is principally associated with the delicate pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys delicatus) in western ...

  2. First detection of heartland virus (Bunyaviridae: Phlebovirus) from field collected arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Harry M; Godsey, Marvin S; Lambert, Amy; Panella, Nicholas A; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Harmon, Jessica R; Lash, R Ryan; Ashley, David C; Nicholson, William L

    2013-09-01

    Heartland virus (HRTV), the first pathogenic Phlebovirus (Family: Bunyaviridae) discovered in the United States, was recently described from two Missouri farmers. In 2012, we collected 56,428 ticks representing three species at 12 sites including both patients' farms. Amblyomma americanum and Dermacentor variabilis accounted for nearly all ticks collected. Ten pools composed of deplete nymphs of A. americanum collected at a patient farm and a nearby conservation area were reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction positive, and eight pools yielded viable viruses. Sequence data from the nonstructural protein of the Small segment indicates that tick strains and human strains are very similar, ≥ 97.6% sequence identity. This is the first study to isolate HRTV from field-collected arthropods and to implicate ticks as potential vectors. Amblyomma americanum likely becomes infected by feeding on viremic hosts during the larval stage, and transmission to humans occurs during the spring and early summer when nymphs are abundant and actively host seeking.

  3. Phylogenetic Relationship of Necoclí Virus to Other South American Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae: Hantavirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Ruiz, Carolina; Cajimat, Maria N B; Milazzo, Mary Louise; Diaz, Francisco J; Rodas, Juan David; Valbuena, Gustavo; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2015-07-01

    The results of a previous study suggested that Cherrie's cane rat (Zygodontomys cherriei) is the principal host of Necoclí virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) in Colombia. Bayesian analyses of complete nucleocapsid protein gene sequences and complete glycoprotein precursor gene sequences in this study confirmed that Necoclí virus is phylogenetically closely related to Maporal virus, which is principally associated with the delicate pygmy rice rat (Oligoryzomys delicatus) in western Venezuela. In pairwise comparisons, nonidentities between the complete amino acid sequence of the nucleocapsid protein of Necoclí virus and the complete amino acid sequences of the nucleocapsid proteins of other hantaviruses were ≥8.7%. Likewise, nonidentities between the complete amino acid sequence of the glycoprotein precursor of Necoclí virus and the complete amino acid sequences of the glycoprotein precursors of other hantaviruses were ≥11.7%. Collectively, the unique association of Necoclí virus with Z. cherriei in Colombia, results of the Bayesian analyses of complete nucleocapsid protein gene sequences and complete glycoprotein precursor gene sequences, and results of the pairwise comparisons of amino acid sequences strongly support the notion that Necoclí virus represents a novel species in the genus Hantavirus. Further work is needed to determine whether Calabazo virus (a hantavirus associated with Z. brevicauda cherriei in Panama) and Necoclí virus are conspecific.

  4. Isolation of Madre de Dios Virus (Orthobunyavirus; Bunyaviridae), an Oropouche Virus Species Reassortant, from a Monkey in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Hernandez, Rosa; Auguste, Albert J; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C; Montañez, Humberto; Liria, Jonathan; Lima, Anderson; Travassos da Rosa, Jorge Fernando Soares; da Silva, Sandro P; Vasconcelos, Janaina M; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Vianez, João L S G; Nunes, Marcio R T

    2016-08-03

    Oropouche virus (OROV), genus Orthobunyavirus, family Bunyaviridae, is an important cause of human illness in tropical South America. Herein, we report the isolation, complete genome sequence, genetic characterization, and phylogenetic analysis of an OROV species reassortant, Madre de Dios virus (MDDV), obtained from a sick monkey (Cebus olivaceus Schomburgk) collected in a forest near Atapirire, a small rural village located in Anzoategui State, Venezuela. MDDV is one of a growing number of naturally occurring OROV species reassortants isolated in South America and was known previously only from southern Peru.

  5. Development of FGI-106 as a broad-spectrum therapeutic with activity against members of the family Bunyaviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci R Smith

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Darci R Smith1, Monica Ogg1, Aura Garrison1, Abdul Yunus2, Anna Honko1, Josh Johnson1, Gene Olinger1, Lisa E Hensley1, Michael S Kinch1United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRII D, Fort Detrick, MD, USA; 2Functional Genetics, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, USAAbstract: The family Bunyaviridae is a diverse group of negative-strand RNA viruses that infect a wide range of arthropod vectors and animal hosts. Based on the continuing need for new therapeutics to treat bunyavirus infections, we evaluated the potential efficacy of FGI-106, a small-molecular compound that previously demonstrated activity against different RNA viruses. FGI-106 displayed substantial antiviral activity in cell-based assays of different bunyavirus family members, including Asian and South American hantaviruses (Hantaan virus and Andes virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, and Rift Valley fever virus. The pharmacokinetic profile of FGI-106 revealed sufficient exposure of the drug to critical target organs (lung, liver, kidney, and spleen, which are frequently the sites of bunyavirus replication. Consistent with these findings, FGI-106 treatment delivered via intraperitoneal injection prior to virus exposure was sufficient to delay the onset of Rift Valley fever virus infection in mouse-based models and to enhance survival in the face of an otherwise lethal infection. Altogether, these results suggest a potential opportunity for the use of FGI-106 to treat infections by members of the family Bunyaviridae.Keywords: Rift Valley fever virus, bunyavirus, hantavirus, antiviral, therapeutic

  6. Caracterização e relacionamento antigênico de três novos Bunyavirus no grupo Anopheles A (Bunyaviridae dos arbovirus Characterization and antigenic relationship of three new Bunyavirus in the Anopheles A serogroup (Bunyaviridae of arboviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos da Rosa

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available São descritos o isolamento e a caracterização de três novos arbovirus isolados na região da Usina Hidro-Elétrica de Tucuruí (UHE-TUC. Os três novos arbovirus pertencem ao grupo Anopheles A(ANA, gênero Bunyavirus (família Bunyaviridae. Os vírus Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipé (CPE e Arumateua (ART são relacionados entre si e com o vírus Trombetas (TBT, formando dentro do grupo ANA um complexo chamado Trombetas. Os arbovirus TUC, CPE e ART foram obtidos a partir de lotes de mosquitos Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus sp capturados em Tucuruí, nas proximidades da usina hidrelétrica de Tucuruí, Estado do Pará, nos meses de fevereiro, agosto e outubro de 1984, respectivamente. Até o final de 1990 os vírus TUC, CPE e ART foram isolados 12, 32 e 28 vezes respectivamente, sempre na região da UHE-TUC, exceção feita ao vírus TUC, do qual se obteve uma amostra procedente de Balbina, onde também foi construída uma hidroelétrica. Até o presente, esses vírus só foram isolados a partir de mosquitos do grupo An. (Nys. principalmente, a partir das espécies An. (Nys. nuneztovari e An. (Nys. triannulatus também consideradas vetores secundários da malária na Amazônia Brasileira. Testes sorológicos executados com soros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais silvestres foram negativos, com exceção de um soro de um carnívoro de espécie Nasua nasua que neutralizou a amostra TUC em títulos de 2.6 índice logaritmico de neutralização (ILN.The isolation and characterization of three new viruses obtained from the Tucuruí hydroelectric dam region is repeated. These three agents belong to the Anopheles A serogroup, genus Bunyavirus, Bunyaviridae. The Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipe (CPE and Arumateua (ART viruses have close relationships with each other and with Trombetas (TBT virus, an Anopheles A virus previously isolated in the Amazon Region of Brazil. These viruses form the "Trombetas complex". TUC, CPE and ART viruses were obtained from pools of

  7. 布尼亚病毒及其引发的疾病%Bunyaviridae and Its Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵惠训

    2011-01-01

    The bunyaviridae family comprises more than 300 viruses. Membership is usually based on antigenic interrelatedness or morphological similarity. Disease characterized by fever, headache, weakness, myalgia, pulmonary edema. The family is divided into 5 genera; 1. Orthobunyavirus: Bunyamwera, La Cross, Tahyna virus, transmitted mainly by mosquitoes. 2. Hantavirus; Hantaan virus, transmission does not require insects. 3. Nairovirus; Dugbe virus infection of cattle in West Africa, transmitted by ticks. 4. Phlebovirus;Sandfly fever, Rift valley fever, transmitted by sandflies. 5. Tospovirus; Tomato spotted wilt virus,only infect plant and non-vertebrate. Man is not known to be a natural or reservoir for any of these viruses. Virions are 80 ~ 120 nm in diameter, 5 ~ 10 nm projections visible on the surface. Genome consists of 3 pieces of negative stranded RNA. Virion has 2 surface glycoproteins Cl and C2, with HA and virus neutralization epitopes. Bunyaviridae is a family of negative stranded RNA viruses. Though generally found in arthropode or rodents, certain viruses in this family occasionally infect humans. Bunyaviridae are vector-borne viruses. With the exception of Hantaviruses transmission occurs via an arthropod vector. Hantaviruses are transmitted through contact with mice feces. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality, consequently handling of these viruses most occurs with a biosafe level 4 laboratory. Hantavirus or Hantavirus hemorrhagic fever, common in China, Korea, Scandinavia, Russia, and the American southwest, is associated with high fever, lung edema and pulmonary failture. Mortality is around 55% of laboratory diagnosis of bunya virus infections. Virus isolation-intra-cranialinoculation of suckling mice is thought to be the most sensitive system available for virus isolation. However sensitive cell culture systems are available such as Vero, Vero E6, A549 and mosquito cells. Once isolated the

  8. Sequence diversity of the nucleoprotein gene of iris yellow spot virus (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) isolates from the western region of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, H R; du Toit, L J; Schwartz, H F; Mohan, S K

    2006-05-01

    Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV), a tentative virus species in the genus Tospovirus and family Bunyaviridae, is considered a rapidly emerging threat to onion production in the western United States (US). The present study was undertaken to determine the sequence diversity of IYSV isolates from infected onion plants grown in California, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, Utah and Washington. Using primers derived from the small RNA of IYSV, the complete sequence of the nucleoprotein (NP) gene of each isolate was determined and the sequences compared. In addition, a shallot isolate of IYSV from Washington was included in the study. The US isolates of IYSV shared a high degree of sequence identity (95 to 99%) with one another and to previously reported isolates. Phylogenetic analyses showed that with the exception of one isolate from central Oregon and one isolate from California, all the onion and shallot isolates from the western US clustered together. This cluster also included onion and lisianthus isolates from Japan. A second distinct cluster consisted of isolates from Australia (onion), Brazil (onion), Israel (lisianthus), Japan (alstroemeria), The Netherlands (iris) and Slovenia (leek). The IYSV isolates evaluated in this study appear to represent two distinct groups, one of which largely represents isolates from the western US. Understanding of the population structure of IYSV would potentially provide insights into the molecular epidemiology of this virus.

  9. [Genetic characterization of the Uzun-Agach virus (UZAV, Bunyaviridae, Nairovirus), isolated from bat Myotis blythii oxygnathus Monticelli, 1885 (Chiroptera; Vespertilionidae) in Kazakhstan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'khovskiĭ, S V; L'vov, D K; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Deriabin, P G; Shchetinin, A M; Samokhvalov, E I; Aristova, V A; Gitel'man, A K; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome of Uzun-Agach virus (UZAV), isolated from the liver of Myotis blythii oxygnathus (Monticelli, 1885 (Chiroptera; Vespertilionidae)) bats in Alma-Ata district (Kazakhstan) in 1977 have been sequenced. Based on full-length genome comparison it is shown that UZAV is a new member of the Nairovirus genus (family Bunyaviridae). L-segment and M-segments of UZAV have 69,3% and 64,1% identity with Issyk-Kul virus (ISKV) that also was isolated from bats. S-segment of UZAV have 99,6% identity with the same of ISKV. This allow us to claim that UZAV is a reassortant virus that have S-segment derived from ISKV, and L- and M-segments from another virus that is phylogenetically related to ISKV, but divergent from it. The obtained data that the reassortment between ISKV and UZAV exists in nature suggest that they cocirculated in one ecological niche (bats of the Vespertilionidae family) and the areal of UZAV may coincide with the areal of ISKV.

  10. Bunyaviridae and Their Replication. Part 2. Replication of Bunyaviridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), sandfly fever Naples (SFN), and Uukuniemi (UUK) VIRION MORPHOLOGY AND STRUCTURE (14,16,142,144). Most viruses in the family...genera (ex- the phieboviruses, Punta Toro (PT) (152). sandfly fever cept for uukuviruses and phleboviruses which have the Sicilian (SFS), and RVFV (96...fragments may therefore rep- temperature -sensitive mutants of UUK, in which GI resent transmembrane regions of proteins, which could and G2 (but not N

  11. Caracterização e relacionamento antigênico de três novos Bunyavirus no grupo Anopheles A (Bunyaviridae dos arbovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos da Rosa

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available São descritos o isolamento e a caracterização de três novos arbovirus isolados na região da Usina Hidro-Elétrica de Tucuruí (UHE-TUC. Os três novos arbovirus pertencem ao grupo Anopheles A(ANA, gênero Bunyavirus (família Bunyaviridae. Os vírus Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipé (CPE e Arumateua (ART são relacionados entre si e com o vírus Trombetas (TBT, formando dentro do grupo ANA um complexo chamado Trombetas. Os arbovirus TUC, CPE e ART foram obtidos a partir de lotes de mosquitos Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus sp capturados em Tucuruí, nas proximidades da usina hidrelétrica de Tucuruí, Estado do Pará, nos meses de fevereiro, agosto e outubro de 1984, respectivamente. Até o final de 1990 os vírus TUC, CPE e ART foram isolados 12, 32 e 28 vezes respectivamente, sempre na região da UHE-TUC, exceção feita ao vírus TUC, do qual se obteve uma amostra procedente de Balbina, onde também foi construída uma hidroelétrica. Até o presente, esses vírus só foram isolados a partir de mosquitos do grupo An. (Nys. principalmente, a partir das espécies An. (Nys. nuneztovari e An. (Nys. triannulatus também consideradas vetores secundários da malária na Amazônia Brasileira. Testes sorológicos executados com soros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais silvestres foram negativos, com exceção de um soro de um carnívoro de espécie Nasua nasua que neutralizou a amostra TUC em títulos de 2.6 índice logaritmico de neutralização (ILN.

  12. Caracterização e relacionamento antigênico de três novos Bunyavirus no grupo Anopheles A (Bunyaviridae dos arbovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos da

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available São descritos o isolamento e a caracterização de três novos arbovirus isolados na região da Usina Hidro-Elétrica de Tucuruí (UHE-TUC. Os três novos arbovirus pertencem ao grupo Anopheles A(ANA, gênero Bunyavirus (família Bunyaviridae. Os vírus Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipé (CPE e Arumateua (ART são relacionados entre si e com o vírus Trombetas (TBT, formando dentro do grupo ANA um complexo chamado Trombetas. Os arbovirus TUC, CPE e ART foram obtidos a partir de lotes de mosquitos Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus sp capturados em Tucuruí, nas proximidades da usina hidrelétrica de Tucuruí, Estado do Pará, nos meses de fevereiro, agosto e outubro de 1984, respectivamente. Até o final de 1990 os vírus TUC, CPE e ART foram isolados 12, 32 e 28 vezes respectivamente, sempre na região da UHE-TUC, exceção feita ao vírus TUC, do qual se obteve uma amostra procedente de Balbina, onde também foi construída uma hidroelétrica. Até o presente, esses vírus só foram isolados a partir de mosquitos do grupo An. (Nys. principalmente, a partir das espécies An. (Nys. nuneztovari e An. (Nys. triannulatus também consideradas vetores secundários da malária na Amazônia Brasileira. Testes sorológicos executados com soros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais silvestres foram negativos, com exceção de um soro de um carnívoro de espécie Nasua nasua que neutralizou a amostra TUC em títulos de 2.6 índice logaritmico de neutralização (ILN.

  13. Spatial-temporal analysis of Cache Valley virus (Bunyaviridae: Orthobunyavirus) infection in anopheline and culicine mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the northeastern United States, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, Theodore G; Armstrong, Philip M; Anderson, John F; Main, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Cache Valley virus (CVV) is a mosquito-borne bunyavirus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus) that is enzootic throughout much of North and Central America. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have been incriminated as important reservoir and amplification hosts. CVV has been found in a diverse array of mosquito species, but the principal vectors are unknown. A 16-year study was undertaken to identify the primary mosquito vectors in Connecticut, quantify seasonal prevalence rates of infection, and define the spatial geographic distribution of CVV in the state as a function of land use and white-tailed deer populations, which have increased substantially over this period. CVV was isolated from 16 mosquito species in seven genera, almost all of which were multivoltine and mammalophilic. Anopheles (An.) punctipennis was incriminated as the most consistent and likely vector in this region on the basis of yearly isolation frequencies and the spatial geographic distribution of infected mosquitoes. Other species exhibiting frequent temporal and moderate spatial geographic patterns of virus isolation within the state included Ochlerotatus (Oc.) trivittatus, Oc. canadensis, Aedes (Ae.) vexans, and Ae. cinereus. New isolation records for CVV were established for An. walkeri, Culiseta melanura, and Oc. cantator. Other species from which CVV was isolated included An. quadrimaculatus, Coquillettidia perturbans, Culex salinarius, Oc. japonicus, Oc. sollicitans, Oc. taeniorhynchus, Oc. triseriatus, and Psorophora ferox. Mosquitoes infected with CVV were equally distributed throughout urban, suburban, and rural locales, and infection rates were not directly associated with the localized abundance of white-tailed deer, possibly due to their saturation throughout the region. Virus activity in mosquitoes was episodic with no consistent pattern from year-to-year, and fluctuations in yearly seasonal infection rates did not appear to be directly impacted by overall

  14. Uso de células de Aedes albopictus C6/36 na propagação e classificação de arbovírus das famílias Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae e Rhabdoviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available Colônias de células de mosquito Aedes albopictus C6/36 foram infectadas com 23 arbovirus, sendo 19 destes existentes no Brasil, pertencentes às famílias Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae e Rhabdoviridae. A Replicação virai foi detectada por imunofluorescência indireta com todos os vírus estudados enquanto que o efeito citopático foi observado durante a infecção por alguns destes. No teste de imunofluorescência indireta utilizou-se fluidos ascíticos imunes de camundongos, específicos para os vírus estudados. A replicação virai caracterizada por grande produção de antígeno recomenda a utilização de células C6/36 na propagação e em tentativas de isolamento desses arbovirus. A técnica de imunofluorescência ofereceu importantes subsídios na classificação e identificação de vírus que replicam nestas células.C6/36 Aedes albopictus cells were infected w ith Brazilian arbovirus from the families Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae and Rhabdoviridae. Replication was obtained with all the studied viruses and cytopathic effect was observed with some. Viral antigen was assayed in C6/36 cell cultures for antigen was assayed in C6/36 cells by an indirect immunofluorescence test using specific mouse immune ascitic fluid. Antigen production was detected in C6/36 cells infected with all the studied viruses. The author recommends the inoculation of C6/36 cell cultures for isolation of virus from the four studied families. The immunofluorescence technique is an important tool for classification and identification of virus growing in C6/36 cells.

  15. Uso de células de Aedes albopictus C6/36 na propagação e classificação de arbovírus das famílias Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae e Rhabdoviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available Colônias de células de mosquito Aedes albopictus C6/36 foram infectadas com 23 arbovirus, sendo 19 destes existentes no Brasil, pertencentes às famílias Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae e Rhabdoviridae. A Replicação virai foi detectada por imunofluorescência indireta com todos os vírus estudados enquanto que o efeito citopático foi observado durante a infecção por alguns destes. No teste de imunofluorescência indireta utilizou-se fluidos ascíticos imunes de camundongos, específicos para os vírus estudados. A replicação virai caracterizada por grande produção de antígeno recomenda a utilização de células C6/36 na propagação e em tentativas de isolamento desses arbovirus. A técnica de imunofluorescência ofereceu importantes subsídios na classificação e identificação de vírus que replicam nestas células.

  16. Genomic Characterization of the Genus Nairovirus (Family Bunyaviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jens H; Wiley, Michael R; Rodriguez, Sergio E; Bào, Yīmíng; Prieto, Karla; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P A; Guzman, Hilda; Savji, Nazir; Ladner, Jason T; Tesh, Robert B; Wada, Jiro; Jahrling, Peter B; Bente, Dennis A; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-06-10

    Nairovirus, one of five bunyaviral genera, includes seven species. Genomic sequence information is limited for members of the Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, Qalyub, Sakhalin, and Thiafora nairovirus species. We used next-generation sequencing and historical virus-culture samples to determine 14 complete and nine coding-complete nairoviral genome sequences to further characterize these species. Previously unsequenced viruses include Abu Mina, Clo Mor, Great Saltee, Hughes, Raza, Sakhalin, Soldado, and Tillamook viruses. In addition, we present genomic sequence information on additional isolates of previously sequenced Avalon, Dugbe, Sapphire II, and Zirqa viruses. Finally, we identify Tunis virus, previously thought to be a phlebovirus, as an isolate of Abu Hammad virus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate the need for reassignment of Sapphire II virus to Dera Ghazi Khan nairovirus and reassignment of Hazara, Tofla, and Nairobi sheep disease viruses to novel species. We also propose new species for the Kasokero group (Kasokero, Leopards Hill, Yogue viruses), the Ketarah group (Gossas, Issyk-kul, Keterah/soft tick viruses) and the Burana group (Wēnzhōu tick virus, Huángpí tick virus 1, Tǎchéng tick virus 1). Our analyses emphasize the sister relationship of nairoviruses and arenaviruses, and indicate that several nairo-like viruses (Shāyáng spider virus 1, Xīnzhōu spider virus, Sānxiá water strider virus 1, South Bay virus, Wǔhàn millipede virus 2) require establishment of novel genera in a larger nairovirus-arenavirus supergroup.

  17. Genomic Characterization of the Genus Nairovirus (Family Bunyaviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens H. Kuhn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nairovirus, one of five bunyaviral genera, includes seven species. Genomic sequence information is limited for members of the Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, Qalyub, Sakhalin, and Thiafora nairovirus species. We used next-generation sequencing and historical virus-culture samples to determine 14 complete and nine coding-complete nairoviral genome sequences to further characterize these species. Previously unsequenced viruses include Abu Mina, Clo Mor, Great Saltee, Hughes, Raza, Sakhalin, Soldado, and Tillamook viruses. In addition, we present genomic sequence information on additional isolates of previously sequenced Avalon, Dugbe, Sapphire II, and Zirqa viruses. Finally, we identify Tunis virus, previously thought to be a phlebovirus, as an isolate of Abu Hammad virus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate the need for reassignment of Sapphire II virus to Dera Ghazi Khan nairovirus and reassignment of Hazara, Tofla, and Nairobi sheep disease viruses to novel species. We also propose new species for the Kasokero group (Kasokero, Leopards Hill, Yogue viruses, the Ketarah group (Gossas, Issyk-kul, Keterah/soft tick viruses and the Burana group (Wēnzhōu tick virus, Huángpí tick virus 1, Tǎchéng tick virus 1. Our analyses emphasize the sister relationship of nairoviruses and arenaviruses, and indicate that several nairo-like viruses (Shāyáng spider virus 1, Xīnzhōu spider virus, Sānxiá water strider virus 1, South Bay virus, Wǔhàn millipede virus 2 require establishment of novel genera in a larger nairovirus-arenavirus supergroup.

  18. Aguacate virus, a new antigenic complex of the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Gustavo; da Rosa, Amelia Travassos; Savji, Nazir; Sze, Wilson; Wick, Ivan; Guzman, Hilda; Hutchison, Stephen; Tesh, Robert; Lipkin, W Ian

    2011-06-01

    Genomic and antigenic characterization of Aguacate virus, a tentative species of the genus Phlebovirus, and three other unclassified viruses, Armero virus, Durania virus and Ixcanal virus, demonstrate a close relationship to one another. They are distinct from the other nine recognized species within the genus Phlebovirus. We propose to designate them as a new (tenth) serogroup or species (Aguacate virus) within the genus. The four viruses were all isolated from phlebotomine sandflies (Lutzomyia sp.) collected in Central and South America. Aguacate virus appears to be a natural reassortant and serves as one more example of the high frequency of reassortment in this genus.

  19. Characterization of the Punta Toro species complex (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Michael R.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Guzman, Hilda; Quiroz, Evelia; Savji, Nazir; Carrera, Jean-Paul; Bussetti, Ana Valeria; Ladner, Jason T.; Ian Lipkin, W.; Tesh, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Punta Toro virus (PTV), a member of the PTV complex, is a relatively common causative agent of febrile illness in Panama that is often misdiagnosed as ‘dengue’ or ‘influenza’. Currently, only two named members make up this species complex, PTV and Buenaventura virus (BUEV). Genomic and antigenic characterization of 17 members of the PTV complex, nine of which were isolated from human acute febrile illness cases, reveals that this species complex is composed of six distant viruses. We propose to add four additional new viruses, designated Leticia virus, Cocle virus, Campana virus and Capira virus. PMID:25934793

  20. Hantaan Virus, Aetiological Agent of Korean Haemorrhagic Fever, Has Bunyaviridae-Like Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-03

    properties. This led us to use buoyant density centrifugation to re-examine Hantaan virus. Materials and Methods Virus and Antisera All work was done with...The density of sucrose measured by refractometry is in g/nil ( - - A). Presence (+ )or absence (0) of virus particles by electron microscopy is

  1. Pneumonitis in Syrian golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) infected with Rio Mamoré virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Eyzaguirre, Eduardo J; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2014-10-13

    Rio Mamoré virus is an etiological agent of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in South America. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Rio Mamoré virus strain HTN-007 in Syrian golden hamsters is pathogenic. None of 37 adult hamsters infected by intramuscular injection of HTN-007, including 10 animals killed on Day 42 or 43 post-inoculation, exhibited any symptom of disease. Histological abnormalities included severe or moderately severe pneumonitis in 6 (46.2%) of the 13 animals killed on Day 7 or 10 post-inoculation. The primary target of infection in lung was the endothelium of the microvasculature. Collectively, these results indicate that Rio Mamoré virus strain HTN-007 in adult Syrian golden hamsters can cause a nonlethal disease that is pathologically similar to hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

  2. Evidencia serológica de infección por hantavirus (bunyaviridae: hantavirus) en roedores del departamento de sucre, colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo Mejia, Stiven; Corrales Aldana, Homer; Perez Jimenez, Julia; Alvarez García, Lercy; Castellar Martínez, Anaís; Blanco Tuirán, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo Determinar la frecuencia de anticuerpos específicos a hantavirus en roedores del municipio de San Marcos, departamento de Sucre. Métodos Se capturaron 144 roedores con trampas Sherman® en áreas urbanas y rurales del municipio de San Marcos, desde diciembre de 2007 hasta julio de 2009. Los anticuerpos Ig G específicos contra el Virus Sin Nombre (VSN) fueron detectados en muestras de plasma mediante ELISA indirecto. Resultados La seroprevalencia de anticuerpos contra hantavirus fue de...

  3. Bunyaviridae RNA polymerases (L-protein have an N-terminal, influenza-like endonuclease domain, essential for viral cap-dependent transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Reguera

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are a large family of segmented RNA viruses which, like influenza virus, use a cap-snatching mechanism for transcription whereby short capped primers derived by endonucleolytic cleavage of host mRNAs are used by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L-protein to transcribe viral mRNAs. It was recently shown that the cap-snatching endonuclease of influenza virus resides in a discrete N-terminal domain of the PA polymerase subunit. Here we structurally and functionally characterize a similar endonuclease in La Crosse orthobunyavirus (LACV L-protein. We expressed N-terminal fragments of the LACV L-protein and found that residues 1-180 have metal binding and divalent cation dependent nuclease activity analogous to that of influenza virus endonuclease. The 2.2 A resolution X-ray crystal structure of the domain confirms that LACV and influenza endonucleases have similar overall folds and identical two metal binding active sites. The in vitro activity of the LACV endonuclease could be abolished by point mutations in the active site or by binding 2,4-dioxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid (DPBA, a known influenza virus endonuclease inhibitor. A crystal structure with bound DPBA shows the inhibitor chelating two active site manganese ions. The essential role of this endonuclease in cap-dependent transcription was demonstrated by the loss of transcriptional activity in a RNP reconstitution system in cells upon making the same point mutations in the context of the full-length LACV L-protein. Using structure based sequence alignments we show that a similar endonuclease almost certainly exists at the N-terminus of L-proteins or PA polymerase subunits of essentially all known negative strand and cap-snatching segmented RNA viruses including arenaviruses (2 segments, bunyaviruses (3 segments, tenuiviruses (4-6 segments, and orthomyxoviruses (6-8 segments. This correspondence, together with the well-known mapping of the conserved polymerase motifs to the central regions of the L-protein and influenza PB1 subunit, suggests that L-proteins might be architecturally, and functionally equivalent to a concatemer of the three orthomyxovirus polymerase subunits in the order PA-PB1-PB2. Furthermore, our structure of a known influenza endonuclease inhibitor bound to LACV endonuclease suggests that compounds targeting a potentially broad spectrum of segmented RNA viruses, several of which are serious or emerging human, animal and plant pathogens, could be developed using structure-based optimisation.

  4. [Genetic characterization of the Zaliv Terpeniya virus (ZTV, Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus, Uukuniemi serogroup) strains isolated from the ticks Ixodes (Ceratixodes) uriae White, 1852, obligate parasites of the Alcidae birds, in high latitudes of Northern Eurasia and the mosquitoes Culex modestus Ficalbi, 1889, in subtropics Transcaucasus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Shchetinin, A M; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Samokhvalov, E I; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained for the LEIV-13841Ka (ID GenBank KF767463-65) and LEIV-279Az (ID GenBank KF767460-62) virus strains, which were classified as different strains of the Zaliv Terpeniya virus (ZTV). LEIV-13841Ka was isolated from the ticks Ixodes (Ceratixodes) uriae White, 1852 collected on Ariy Kamen (Commander Islands) in 1986. LEIV-279Az was isolated from the mosquitoes Culex modestus Ficalbi, 1889, collected in heron colony (Ardea Linnaeus, 1758) in Azerbaijan (1969) and was initially identified as Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). According to the results obtained LEIV-279Az is ZTV strain as well. LEIV-13841Ka and LEIV-279Az RdRp sequences have high level of homology (99%) with previously sequenced ZTV/LEIV-271Ka. The L-segment nucleotide sequences are homological with ZTV/LEIV-271Ka on the level of 94% and 98% for LEIV-13841Ka and LEIV-279Az, respectively; M-segment--89% and 88%, respectively. Such homologies for the amino acid sequences of Gn/Gc polyprotein are 98.3% and 97.7%. NP proteins of ZTV/LEIV-13841Ka and LEIV-279Az have 88.7% and 84.6% homologies with ZTV/LEIV-271Ka both for amino acid and nucleotide sequences, respectively. Thus, for the very first time we demonstrated ZTV strain isolated from mosquitoes in subtropical Transcaucasia zone. Obtained results permit to expand suggested areal of ZTV and to fill up data upon the ecology of the Uukuniemi virus group.

  5. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is usually applied to disease caused by Arenaviridae (Lassa fever, Junin and Machupo), Bunyaviridae (Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, ... fever Dengue and severe dengue Ebola virus disease Lassa fever Marburg haemorrhagic fever Rift Valley fever Multimedia, features ...

  6. Severe Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever presented with massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage that recovered without antiviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharabaghi, Mehrnaz Asadi; Chinikar, Sadegh; Ghiasi, Seyyed Mojtaba;

    2011-01-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tickborne viral zoonosis with up to 50% mortality in humans caused by CCHF virus belonging to the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. The geographical distribution of CCHF cases corresponds closely with the distribution of principle tick vectors...

  7. Analysis of tomato spotted wilt virus genome transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippenberg, van I.C.

    2005-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is the type species of the genus Tospovirus within the Bunyaviridae, a family of segmented negative strand RNA viruses. Although much ground has been covered in the past two decades, many questions concerning the mechanism of replication and transcription of this imp

  8. Epidemiology and laboratory diagnosis of Hantavirus (HTV) infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.G. Clement; P. McKenna; J. Groen (Jan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); P. Colson; T. Vervoort; G. van der Groen (Guido); H.W. Lee

    1995-01-01

    textabstractHantavirus (HTV) is recently discovered "hemorrhagic fever virus" belonging to the Bunyaviridae family, which is spread throughout the world by wild rodents and/or laboratory rats. During an epidemic in the Belgian-French Ardennes in 1993, more than 200 acute cases were recorded of the m

  9. Molecular evolution of Puumala hantavirus in Fennoscandia: phylogenetic analysis of strains from two recolonization routes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asikainen, Kari; Hänninen, Tarja; Henttonen, Heikki;

    2000-01-01

    Like other members of the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, Puumala virus (PUUV) is thought to be co-evolving with its natural host, the bank vole Clethrionomys glareolus. To gain insight into the evolutionary history of PUUV in northern Europe during the last post-glacial period, we...

  10. Viral RNA silencing suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant-and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmissio

  11. Occurrence of Tomato spotted wilt virus in Stevia rebaudiana and Solanum tuberosum in Northern Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzivassiliou, E.K.; Peters, D.; Lolas, P.

    2007-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) was first reported in Greece during 1972 (3) and currently is widespread in the central and northern part of the country infecting several cultivated and wild plant species (1,2). In June 2006, virus-like symptoms similar to th

  12. Complete Genomic Sequence of Issyk-Kul Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Barry; Marston, Denise A; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2015-07-02

    Issyk-Kul virus (ISKV) is an ungrouped virus tentatively assigned to the Bunyaviridae family and is associated with an acute febrile illness in several central Asian countries. Using next-generation sequencing technologies, we report here the full-genome sequence for this novel unclassified arboviral pathogen circulating in central Asia.

  13. Morphologic differentiation of viruses beyond the family level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Cynthia S

    2014-12-09

    Electron microscopy has been instrumental in the identification of viruses by being able to characterize a virus to the family level. There are a few cases where morphologic or morphogenesis factors can be used to differentiate further, to the genus level. These include viruses in the families Poxviridae, Reoviridae, Retroviridae, Herpesviridae, Filoviridae, and Bunyaviridae.

  14. Heartland virus: a novel and emerging tick-borne encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Heartland virus (HRTV is a Bunyaviridae, phlebovirus that it has recently emerged as the causative agent of human disease characterized by thrombocytopenia and leukopenia in the United States and China. It seems to be the HRTV has been also reported in China, Japan and Korea. Recently the first fatal case of HRTV disease in an 80-year-old Tennessee resident was reported (1.

  15. 汉坦病毒及相关疾病流行病学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张云智; 张海林

    2011-01-01

    汉坦病毒属于布尼亚病毒科(Bunyaviridae)汉坦病毒属( Hantavirus,HV),该属病毒至少包括42个血清型或基因[1],主要引起肾综合症出血热(Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome,HFRS)和汉坦肺综合症(Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome,HPS),对人类健康危害极大.

  16. The fundamental role of endothelial cells in hantavirus pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jussi eHepojoki; Antti eVaheri; Tomas eStrandin

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus, a genus of rodent- and insectivore-borne viruses in the family Bunyaviridae, is a group of emerging zoonotic pathogens. Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in man, often with severe consequences. Vascular leakage is evident in severe hantavirus infections, and increased permeability contributes to the pathogenesis. This review summarizes the current knowledge on hantavirus interactions with hematopoietic and endothelial ...

  17. BLOOD-SUCKING MIDGES FROM THE GENUS Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) ACT AS FILED VECTORS OF HUMAN AND ANIMAL DISEASES (review)

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue and Shmallenberg diseases, the arboviral infections of ruminants, caused by Bluetongue virus (BTV) of Orbivirus genus (Reoviridae) and so-called Shmallenberg virus (SBV) preliminarily attributed as a member of Orthobunyavirus genus (Bunyaviridae), respectively, are mainly transmitted by blood-sucking midges from Culicoides genus. They are widely distributed, with a total of over 80 species documented in Russia (V.M. Glukhova, 1989), including the Far North territories. Of them, a t...

  18. Genetic Diversity of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Strains from Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Sadegh Chinikar; Saeid Bouzari; Mohammad Ali Shokrgozar; Ehsan Mostafavi; Tahmineh Jalali; Sahar Khakifirouz; Norbert Nowotny; Fooks, Anthony R.; Nariman Shah-Hosseini

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirus genus. It has a negative-sense, single stranded RNA genome approximately 19.2 kb, containing the Small, Medium, and Large segments. CCHFVs are relatively divergent in their genome sequence and grouped in seven distinct clades based on S-segment sequence analysis and six clades based on M-segment sequences. Our aim was to obtain new insights into the molecular epidemiology of CCHFV i...

  19. The role of platelets in the pathogenesis of viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Zapata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF are acute zoonotic diseases that, early on, seem to cause platelet destruction or dysfunction. Here we present the four major ways viruses affect platelet development and function and new evidence of molecular factors that are preferentially induced by the more pathogenic members of the families Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Arenaviridae, and Filoviridae. A systematic search was performed through the main medical electronic databases using as parameters all current findings concerning platelets in VHF. Additionally, the review contains information from conference proceedings.

  20. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Complicated by Orchitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edmond Puca; Arben Pilaca; Pellumb Pipero; Silva Bino; Majlinda Kote; Elton Rogozi; Entela Puca; Dhimiter Kraja

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a disease caused by viruses of the family Bunyaviridae,genus Hantavirus.HFRS from Dobrava virus (DOBV) is a seldom reported disease in Albania.Clinically HFRS is manifested as mild,moderate,or severe.Therefore,the number of cases of Hantavirus'infection may be underestimated,and should be included in the differential diagnosis of many acute infections,hematologic diseases,acute abdominal diseases and renal diseases complicated by acute renal failure.We report here an atypical presentation of HFRS from Dobrava virus complicated by orchitis with a positive outcome.

  1. Experimental infections of Oryzomys couesi with sympatric arboviruses from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, Eleanor R; Forrester, Naomi L; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P; Estrada-Franco, Jose G; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C

    2010-02-01

    Coues rice rat (Oryzomys couesi), a species abundant throughout Central America, was evaluated experimentally for the ability to serve as an amplifying host for three arboviruses: Patois (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus), Nepuyo (Orthobunyavirus), and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus subtype ID (Togaviridae, Alphavirus). These three viruses have similar ecologies and are known to co-circulate in nature. Animals from all three cohorts survived infection and developed viremia with no apparent signs of illness and long-lasting antibodies. Thus, O. couesi may play a role in the general maintenance of these viruses in nature.

  2. Radiological Findings and their Clinical Correlations in Nephropathia Epidemica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paakkala, A.; Mustonen, J. [Medical School, Univ. of Tampere, and Dept. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland)

    2007-04-15

    Nephropathia epidemica (NE) is a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Its course varies from asymptomatic to fatal. The etiologic agent, Puumala virus, belongs to the Hantavirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. Respiratory symptoms, from common cold to respiratory distress, occur in NE. Acute renal failure (ARF) is evident in over 90% of hospital-treated NE patients. In this review article, special attention is paid to radiological lung and renal involvement to investigate the occurrence and type of manifestations during the acute phase of infection and recovery.

  3. Diagnosis of hantavirus infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Salim; Guzmán, Camilo; Figueiredo, Luis Tadeu

    2015-08-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the Americas and hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Europe and Asia. The viruses are transmitted to humans mainly by inhalation of virus-contaminated aerosols of rodent excreta and secreta. Classic clinical hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome occurs in five phases: fever, hypotension, oliguria, polyuria, and convalescence. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome is a severe acute disease that is associated with respiratory failure, pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock. The diagnosis of hantavirus infections in humans is based on clinical and epidemiological information as well as laboratory tests. We review diagnosis for hantavirus infections based on serology, PCR, immunochemistry and virus culture.

  4. 汉坦病毒依赖RNA的RNA聚合酶研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张野; 李新红; 白雪帆

    2008-01-01

    @@ 汉坦病毒(Hantavirus,HV)属于布尼亚病毒科(Bunyaviridae)汉坦病毒属,是单链、分节段的负链RNA病毒,其基因组由大(Large,L)、中(Medium,M)、小(Small,S)3个片段组成,分别编码病毒依赖RNA的RNA聚合酶(L蛋白)、G1和G2糖蛋白、核衣壳蛋白(NP)[1,2].

  5. Imunoreakcije uzrokovane infekcijom virusima Hantaan i Andes u MRC-5 i HEK 293 stanicama

    OpenAIRE

    Cebalo, Ljiljana

    2007-01-01

    Hantavirusi (HTV), rod Hantavirus, obitelj Bunyaviridae prenose se s mišolikih glodavaca na ljude te u čovjeka uzrokuju dvije različite bolesti: hemoragijsku vrućicu s bubrežnim sindromom (HVBS) te hantavirusni plućni sindrom (HPS). Vrlo se malo zna o imunopatogenezi hantavirusnih infekcija, te osobito o tome zašto određeni hantavirusi uzrokuju pretežito bubrežne promjene, dok drugi poglavito zahvaćaju pluća. Cilj ovoga rada bio je istražiti određene nespecifične imunološke reakcije uzrokovan...

  6. Assessment of Recombination in the S-segment Genome of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Sadegh Chinikar; Nariman Shah-Hosseini; Saeid Bouzari; MohammadAli Shokrgozar; Ehsan Mostafavi; Tahmineh Jalali; Sahar Khakifirouz; Groschup, Martin H.; Matthias Niedrig

    2015-01-01

     Background: Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) belongs to genus Nairovirus and family Bunyaviridae. The main aim of this study was to investigate the extent of recombination in S-segment genome of CCHFV in Iran.Methods: Samples were isolated from Iranian patients and those available in GenBank, and analyzed by phyloge­netic and bootscan methods.Results: Through comparison of the phylogenetic trees based on full length sequences and partial fragments in the S-segment genome of CCHF...

  7. Experimental Infections of Oryzomys couesi with Sympatric Arboviruses from Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, Eleanor R.; Forrester, Naomi L.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Coues rice rat (Oryzomys couesi), a species abundant throughout Central America, was evaluated experimentally for the ability to serve as an amplifying host for three arboviruses: Patois (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus), Nepuyo (Orthobunyavirus), and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus subtype ID (Togaviridae, Alphavirus). These three viruses have similar ecologies and are known to co-circulate in nature. Animals from all three cohorts survived infection and developed viremia with no apparent signs of illness and long-lasting antibodies. Thus, O. couesi may play a role in the general maintenance of these viruses in nature. PMID:20134016

  8. Arbovirosis y operación ATALANTA: riesgo para viajeros y medidas de prevención y control

    OpenAIRE

    JF. Plaza Torres; R. Navarro Suay

    2014-01-01

    El término arbovirosis se utiliza para definir a un grupo de enfermedades producidas por virus, que tiene en común la utilización de artrópodos como vectores para su transmisión. Se han reconocido más de 500 arbovirus pertenecientes en su mayoría a 5 familias: Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Reoviridae y Rhabdoviridae. Pese a su naturaleza mayoritariamente zoonótica, al menos un 25% de ellas afectan al hombre, siendo responsables de enfermedades como la fiebre amarilla, dengue o la f...

  9. Characterization of the viral ribonucleic acids and structural polypeptides of Anopheles A, Bunyamwera, Group C, California, Capim, Guama, Patois, and Simbu bunyaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, H; Klimas, R; Kim, S; Cash, P; Bishop, D H

    1980-11-01

    Analyses of the viral ribonucleic acids and structural polypeptides of 17-22 of the 119 accepted or proposed members of the Bunyavirus genus of arboviruses (family Bunyaviridae), have shown that from the standpoint of their structural components these viruses are highly comparable to each other. The average molecular weights for the three viral RNA species (L, large, M, medium, S, small) of 17 bunyaviruses were 2.93 X 10(6) (L, range 2.7-3.1 X 10(6)), 2.0 X 10(6) (M, range 1.8-2.3 X 10(6)), and 0.435 X 10(6) (Sm range 0.28-0.50 X 10(6)). The average molecular weights of the three major virion polypeptides (glycoproteins G1 and G2, and nucleocapsid protein, N) of 22 bunyaviruses were 115 X 10(3) (G1, range 108-120 X 10(3)), 37 X 10(3) (G2, range 20-41 X 10(3)) and 22 X 10(3) (N, range 19-25 X 10(3)). These results indicate that the structural components of bunyaviruses are different from those reported for Phlebotomus fever, Uukuniemi, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and other members of the Bunyaviridae family that are not currently assigned to a genus.

  10. Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus nucleoprotein reveals endonuclease activity in bunyaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Ji, Wei; Deng, Maping; Sun, Yuna; Zhou, Honggang; Yang, Cheng; Deng, Fei; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong; Lou, Zhiyong; Rao, Zihe

    2012-01-01

    Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a virus with high mortality in humans, is a member of the genus Nairovirus in the family Bunyaviridae, and is a causative agent of severe hemorrhagic fever (HF). It is classified as a biosafety level 4 pathogen and a potential bioterrorism agent due to its aerosol infectivity and its ability to cause HF outbreaks with high case fatality (∼30%). However, little is known about the structural features and function of nucleoproteins (NPs) in the Bunyaviridae, especially in CCHFV. Here we report a 2.3-Å resolution crystal structure of the CCHFV nucleoprotein. The protein has a racket-shaped overall structure with distinct “head” and “stalk” domains and differs significantly with NPs reported so far from other negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Furthermore, CCHFV NP shows a distinct metal-dependent DNA-specific endonuclease activity. Single residue mutations in the predicted active site resulted in a significant reduction in the observed endonuclease activity. Our results present a new folding mechanism and function for a negative-strand RNA virus nucleoprotein, extend our structural insight into bunyavirus NPs, and provide a potential target for antiviral drug development to treat CCHFV infection. PMID:22421137

  11. RNA Encapsidation and Packaging in the Phleboviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Hornak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae represents the largest family of segmented RNA viruses, which infect a staggering diversity of plants, animals, and insects. Within the family Bunyaviridae, the Phlebovirus genus includes several important human and animal pathogens, including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV, Uukuniemi virus (UUKV, and the sandfly fever viruses. The phleboviruses have small tripartite RNA genomes that encode a repertoire of 5–7 proteins. These few proteins accomplish the daunting task of recognizing and specifically packaging a tri-segment complement of viral genomic RNA in the midst of an abundance of host components. The critical nucleation events that eventually lead to virion production begin early on in the host cytoplasm as the first strands of nascent viral RNA (vRNA are synthesized. The interaction between the vRNA and the viral nucleocapsid (N protein effectively protects and masks the RNA from the host, and also forms the ribonucleoprotein (RNP architecture that mediates downstream interactions and drives virion formation. Although the mechanism by which all three genomic counterparts are selectively co-packaged is not completely understood, we are beginning to understand the hierarchy of interactions that begins with N-RNA packaging and culminates in RNP packaging into new virus particles. In this review we focus on recent progress that highlights the molecular basis of RNA genome packaging in the phleboviruses.

  12. Tick-borne viruses: a review from the perspective of therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lani, Rafidah; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Haghani, Amin; Chang, Li-Yen; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2014-09-01

    Several important human diseases worldwide are caused by tick-borne viruses. These diseases have become important public health concerns in recent years. The tick-borne viruses that cause diseases in humans mainly belong to 3 families: Bunyaviridae, Flaviviridae, and Reoviridae. In this review, we focus on therapeutic approaches for several of the more important tick-borne viruses from these 3 families. These viruses are Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHF) and the newly discovered tick-borne phleboviruses, known as thrombocytopenia syndromevirus (SFTSV), Heartland virus and Bhanja virus from the family Bunyaviridae, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), Powassan virus (POWV), Louping-ill virus (LIV), Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV), Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV), and Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) from the Flaviviridae family. To date, there is no effective antiviral drug available against most of these tick-borne viruses. Although there is common usage of antiviral drugs such as ribavirin for CCHF treatment in some countries, there are concerns that ribavirin may not be as effective as once thought against CCHF. Herein, we discuss also the availability of vaccines for the control of these viral infections. The lack of treatment and prevention approaches for these viruses is highlighted, and we hope that this review may increase public health awareness with regard to the threat posed by this group of viruses.

  13. Storage of cellular 5' mRNA caps in P bodies for viral cap-snatching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, M A; Duran, W A; Hjelle, B L; Ye, C; Panganiban, A T

    2008-12-09

    The minus strand and ambisense segmented RNA viruses include multiple important human pathogens and are divided into three families, the Orthomyxoviridae, the Bunyaviridae, and the Arenaviridae. These viruses all initiate viral transcription through the process of "cap-snatching," which involves the acquisition of capped 5' oligonucleotides from cellular mRNA. Hantaviruses are emerging pathogenic viruses of the Bunyaviridae family that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cellular mRNAs can be actively translated in polysomes or physically sequestered in cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies) where they are degraded or stored for subsequent translation. Here we show that the hantavirus nucleocapsid protein binds with high affinity to the 5' cap of cellular mRNAs, protecting the 5' cap from degradation. We also show that the hantavirus nucleocapsid protein accumulates in P bodies, where it sequesters protected 5' caps. P bodies then serve as a pool of primers during the initiation of viral mRNA synthesis by the viral polymerase. We propose that minus strand segmented viruses replicating in the cytoplasm have co-opted the normal degradation machinery of P bodies for storage of cellular caps. Our data also indicate that modification of the cap-snatching model is warranted to include a role for the nucleocapsid protein in cap acquisition and storage.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Crimean- Congo hemorrhagic fever virus genome isolated from ticks of Hamadan province of Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahmasebi, F; Ghiasi, Seyed Mojtaba; Mostafavi, E;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a tick-borne member of the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. CCHFV has been isolated from at least 31 different tick species. The virus is transmitted through the bite of an infected tick, or by direct contact with CCHFV......-infected patients or the products of infected livestock. This study was undertaken to study the genetic relationship and distribution of CCHFV in the tick population of Hamadan province of Iran. METHOD: In this study, RT-PCR has been used for detection of the CCHFV genome. RESULTS: This genome was detected in 19.......2% of the ticks collected from livestock of different regions of the Hamadan province in western Iran. The infected species belonged to Hyalomma detritum, H. anatolicum, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Argas reflexus. With one exception, genetic analysis of the virus genome isolates showed high sequence identity...

  15. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of Dobrava-Belgrade virus L and S genetic segments isolated from an animal reservoir in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV is a member of the Bunyaviridae family, genus Hantavirus, possessing a single-stranded RNA genome consisting of three segments, designated L (large, M (medium and S (small. In this study, we present phylogenetic analysis of a newly detected DOBV strain isolated from Apodemus agrarius. Analysis was based on partial L and S segment sequences, in comparison to previously published DOBV sequences from Serbia and elsewhere. A phylogenetic tree based on partial S segment revealed local geographical clustering of DOBV sequences from Serbia, unrelated to host (rodent or human. The topology of the phylogenetic tree was confirmed with a high percent of completely or partially resolved quartets in likelihood-mapping analysis, whereas no evidence of possible recombination in the examined S segment data set was found.

  16. Molecular and biochemical studies of the evolution, infection and transmission of insect bunyaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D H; Beaty, B J

    1988-10-31

    Members of the Bunyaviridae family of RNA viruses (bunyaviruses, hantaviruses, nairoviruses, phleboviruses and uukuviruses) have been studied at the molecular and genetic level to understand the basis of their evolution and infection in vertebrate and invertebrate (arthropod) hosts. With the exception of the hantaviruses, these viruses infect and are transmitted by a variety of blood-sucking arthropods (mosquitoes, phlebotomines, gnats, ticks, etc.). The viruses are responsible for infection of various vertebrate species, occasionally causing human disease, morbidity and mortality (e.g. Rift Valley fever, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Korean haemorrhagic fever). Genetic and molecular analyses of bunyaviruses have established the coding assignments of the three viral RNA species and documented which viral gene products determine host range and virulence. Ecological studies, with molecular techniques, have provided evidence for bunyavirus evolution in nature through genetic drift (involving the accumulation of point mutations) and shift (RNA-segment reassortment).

  17. Assessment of Recombination in the S-segment Genome of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Chinikar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV belongs to genus Nairovirus and family Bunyaviridae. The main aim of this study was to investigate the extent of recombination in S-segment genome of CCHFV in Iran.Methods: Samples were isolated from Iranian patients and those available in GenBank, and analyzed by phyloge­netic and bootscan methods.Results: Through comparison of the phylogenetic trees based on full length sequences and partial fragments in the S-segment genome of CCHFV, genetic switch was evident, due to recombination event. Moreover, evidence of multi­ple recombination events was detected in query isolates when bootscan analysis was used by SimPlot software.Conclusion: Switch of different genomic regions between different strains by recombination could contribute to CCHFV diversification and evolution. The occurrence of recombination in CCHFV has a critical impact on epidemi­ological investigations and vaccine design. 

  18. Production of CCHF Virus-Like Particle by a Baculovirus-Insect Cell Expression System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-rui Zhou; Man-li Wang; Fei Deng; Tian-xian Li; Zhi-hong Hu; Hua-fin Wang

    2011-01-01

    Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever Virus(CCHFV)is a tick-born virus of the Nairovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae family,which is widespread and causes,high fatality. The nucleocapsid of CCHFV is comprised of N proteins that are encoded by the S segment. In this research,the N protein of CCHFV was expressed in insect cells using a recombinant baculovirus. Under an electron microscope,Virus-Like Particles (VLPs)with various size and morphology were observed in cytoplasmic vesicles in the infected cells.Sucrose-gradient purification of the cell lysate indicated that the VLPs were mainly located in the upper fraction after ultracentrifugation,which was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immuno-electron microscopy(IEM).

  19. 汉坦病毒感染的血清学分型研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世文; 解燕乡; 杭长寿

    2002-01-01

    @@ 汉坦病毒(HV)属布尼亚病毒科(Bunyaviridae)汉坦病毒属(Hantavirus),为分节段的单股负链RNA病毒,病毒基因组有3个片段组成,大(L)片段(6.5kb)编码病毒RNA依赖的RNA多聚酶,中(M)片段(3.6kb)编码病毒糖蛋白G1和G2的前体糖蛋白,小(S)(1.7~2.0kb)编码病毒的核衣壳蛋白(NP)[1].

  20. 螨类传播汉坦病毒的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张云

    2003-01-01

    @@ 肾综合征出血热(hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome,HFRS)在我国多称流行性出血热(epidemic hemorrhagic fever,EHF),是一种疫区分布广、发病率及病死率较高的自然疫源性疾病,其病原属布尼亚病毒科(Bunyaviridae)、汉坦病毒属(Hantavirus,HV).在中国流行的有由黑线姬鼠携带传播的汉滩病毒(Hantaan virus,HTNV)和由褐家鼠携带传播的汉城病毒(Seoul virus,SEOV).HFRS病原体的多型性及传播途径的多样化构成HFRS复杂多变的流行特征.

  1. Hantaviruses as emergent zoonoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS Ullmann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses belong to the Bunyaviridae family, which consists of vector-borne viruses. These viruses can provoke two infection types: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS - which occurs in the Old World - and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS - an emergent zoonosis that can be found in many countries of the western hemisphere. Rodents are hantavirus reservoirs and each species seems to host a different virus type. Humans acquire the infection by inhaling contaminated aerosol particles eliminated by infected animals. The factors involved in the emergence of hantavirus infections in the human population include ecological modifications and changes in human activities. The most important risk factor is contact between man and rodents, as a result of agricultural, forestry or military activities. Rodent control remains the primary strategy for preventing hantavirus diseases, including via health education and hygienic habits.

  2. Progress of epidemiology and vaccine research of epidemic hemorrhagic fever%流行性出血热流行病学及疫苗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗兆庄

    2002-01-01

    @@ 流行性出血热(epidemic hemorrhagic fever, EHF)是肾综合征出血热中的一种(hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, HFRS).HFRS由布尼亚病毒科(bunyaviridae) 汉坦病毒属(hantavirus,HV)中的汉坦病毒感染而引起的一种病情重、病死率高的自然疫源性急性传染病.当前该病的发生和流行,已成为全球性的公共卫生问题.自20世纪30年代以来国内外学者进行了大量的调查研究工作,取得一定的进展.

  3. Antibody levels to hantavirus in inhabitants of western Santa Catarina State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, William Marciel de; Machado, Alex Martins; Disner, Geonildo Rodrigo; Boff, Everton; Machado, Aline Rafaela da Silva Rodrigues; Padua, Michelly de; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes; Miranda, Gustavo Borba de

    2012-08-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is an infectious disease caused by hantaviruses of the family Bunyaviridae, and is transmitted by aerosols of excreta of infected rodents. The aim of the present study was to determine antibody levels to hantavirus in the population that lives at frontier of Brazil and Argentina. Participated of the study 405 individuals living in the municipalities of Bandeirante, Santa Helena, Princesa and Tunapolis, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. IgG antibodies to hantavirus were analyzed in sera by an ELISA that uses a recombinant N protein of Araraquara hantavirus as antigen. The results were also confirmed by immunofluorescent test. Eight individuals showed antibodies to hantavirus (1.97% positivity), with serum titers ranging from 100 to 800. Six seropositives were males, older than 30 years and farmers. Our results reinforce previous data on hantavirus circulation and human infections in the southern border of Brazil with Argentina.

  4. 汉坦病毒病原学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家亮; 李德新

    2005-01-01

    汉坦病毒(hantavirus,HV)属布尼亚病毒科(bunyaviridae)汉坦病毒属(genus hantavirus),是肾综合征出血热(hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome,HFRS)和汉坦病毒肺综合征(hantavirus pulmonary syndrome,HPS)的病原体。HFRS是一类以发热、出血和肾功能损伤为特征的急性传染病,病死率0.1%~10.0%;HPS主要引起急性发热,进行性呼吸衰竭,病死率高达40%~60%。HV流行广泛,危害严重,已成为一个全球性的公共问题。

  5. Schmallenberg virus infection of ruminants: challenges and opportunities for veterinarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claine F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available François Claine, Damien Coupeau, Laetitia Wiggers, Benoît Muylkens, Nathalie Kirschvink Veterinary Department, Faculty of Sciences, Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences (NARILIS, University of Namur (UNamur, Namur, Belgium Abstract: In 2011, European ruminant flocks were infected by Schmallenberg virus (SBV leading to transient disease in adult cattle but abortions and congenital deformities in calves, lambs, and goat kids. SBV belonging to the Simbu serogroup (family Bunyaviridae and genus Orthobunyavirus was first discovered in the same region where bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8 emerged 5 years before. Both viruses are transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp. and share several similarities. This paper describes the current knowledge of temporal and geographical spread, molecular virology, transmission and susceptible species, clinical signs, diagnosis, prevention and control, impact on ruminant health, and productivity of SBV infection in Europe, and compares SBV infection with BTV-8 infection in ruminants. Keywords: Schmallenberg virus, Europe, ruminants, review

  6. [Meningoencephalitis caused by Toscana virus in Czech travelers returning from the Mediterranean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelená, H; Kumštarová, R; Skárek, J; Bojar, M; Mifek, I

    2014-03-01

    Presented are case studies of 3 patients with aseptic meninogencephalitis occurring after returning from the Mediterranean tourist regions. None of the infectious agents common in aseptic neuroinfections in the Czech Republic was detected in the patients. Serological tests showed that in each case, the illness was caused by Toscana virus, a phlebovirus belonging to the family Bunyaviridae. The virus is transmitted by tiny biting insects of the genus Phlebotomus commonly present in the Mediterranean area. The course of the disease was mild to moderate and all the patients recovered without sequelae. These case reports document the fact that this arbovirus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with aseptic neuroinfections returning from endemic areas of this virus.

  7. Orthobunyavirus Antibodies Among Humans in Selected Parts of the Rift Valley and Northeastern Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, Collins; Venter, Marietjie; Swanepoel, Robert; Sang, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Ngari, Bunyamwera, Ilesha, and Germiston viruses are among the mosquito-borne human pathogens in the Orthobunyavirus genus, family Bunyaviridae, associated with febrile illness. Although the four orthobunyaviruses have been isolated from mosquito and/or tick vectors sampled from different geographic regions in Kenya, little is known of human exposure in such areas. We conducted a serologic investigation to determine whether orthobunyaviruses commonly infect humans in Kenya. Orthobunyavirus-specific antibodies were detected by plaque reduction neutralization tests in 89 (25.8%) of 345 persons tested. Multivariable analysis revealed age and residence in northeastern Kenya as risk factors. Implementation of acute febrile illness surveillance in northeastern Kenya will help to detect such infections. PMID:25988444

  8. Perspectives of antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway of insects with special reference to mosquito in the context of dengue infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probal Basu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference is a post-transcriptional sequence selective gene control mechanism. Antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway is one of the most momentous constituents of the insect innate immune system that can stymie versatile range of RNA virus like flavivirus. It has been demonstrated that RNA production by alphavirus replication is higher in proportion compared to flavivirus replication in mosquito cells. Studies demonstrated that infection by virus from Togaviridae and Bunyaviridae family of arbovirus to mosquito cells causes defect in RNAi response in-vitro but interestingly, it has also been stated that Dengue virus (DENV could be actively inhibited by RNA interference (RNAi. This article is an endeavor to review the perspectives of the functional significance of antiviral RNA interference as a potent agent of controlling dengue infection in the vector.

  9. Isolation of Toscana virus from the cerebrospinal fluid of a man with meningitis in Marseille, France, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougairede, Antoine; Bichaud, Laurence; Thiberville, Simon-Djamel; Ninove, Laetitia; Zandotti, Christine; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Brouqui, Philippe; Charrel, Remi N

    2013-09-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV; Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus) is an emerging arthropod-borne virus transmitted by phlebotomine sandflies. TOSV is a frequent cause of central nervous system infection during the warm season in several countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Here, we report a case of TOSV aseptic meningitis diagnosed in 2012 in Marseille, France. The virus strain was recovered in cell culture from the cerebrospinal fluid. New-generation sequencing based on Ion Torrent technology was used to determine its complete genome sequence. Phylogenetic analysis based on the partial L segment revealed that this isolate belongs to the lineage B together with other French, Spanish, and Moroccan strains. Although several cases of TOSV meningitis are reported in the literature, few of them are diagnosed by RT-PCR combined with virus isolation and further sequence characterization. This case report supports that virus isolation should be attempted whenever possible because this remains the gold standard technique for diagnosis of arthropod-borne viral infections.

  10. Hantaviral proteins: structure, functions and role in hantavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musalwa eMuyangwa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are the members of the family Bunyaviridae that are naturally maintained in the populations of small mammals, mostly rodents. Most of these viruses can easily infect humans through contact with aerosols or dust generated by contaminated animal waste products. Depending on the particular hantavirus involved, human infection could result in either Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS or in Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS. In the past few years, clinical cases of the hantavirus caused diseases have been on the rise. Understanding structure of the hantavirus genome and the functions of the key viral proteins is critical for the therapeutic agents’ research. This paper gives a brief overview of the current knowledge on the structure and properties of the hantavirus nucleoprotein and the glycoproteins.

  11. Searching for cellular partners of hantaviral nonstructural protein NSs: Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library and analysis of cellular interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomas Rönnberg

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae are negative-strand RNA viruses with a tripartite genome. The small (S segment encodes the nucleocapsid protein and, in some hantaviruses, also the nonstructural protein (NSs. The aim of this study was to find potential cellular partners for the hantaviral NSs protein. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library was performed followed by a search for potential NSs protein counterparts via analyzing a cellular interactome. The resulting interaction network was shown to form logical, clustered structures. Furthermore, several potential binding partners for the NSs protein, for instance ACBD3, were identified and, to prove the principle, interaction between NSs and ACBD3 proteins was demonstrated biochemically.

  12. Searching for cellular partners of hantaviral nonstructural protein NSs: Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library and analysis of cellular interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Tuomas; Jääskeläinen, Kirsi; Blot, Guillaume; Parviainen, Ville; Vaheri, Antti; Renkonen, Risto; Bouloy, Michele; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae) are negative-strand RNA viruses with a tripartite genome. The small (S) segment encodes the nucleocapsid protein and, in some hantaviruses, also the nonstructural protein (NSs). The aim of this study was to find potential cellular partners for the hantaviral NSs protein. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening of mouse cDNA library was performed followed by a search for potential NSs protein counterparts via analyzing a cellular interactome. The resulting interaction network was shown to form logical, clustered structures. Furthermore, several potential binding partners for the NSs protein, for instance ACBD3, were identified and, to prove the principle, interaction between NSs and ACBD3 proteins was demonstrated biochemically.

  13. The 3′ Untranslated Region of the Andes Hantavirus Small mRNA Functionally Replaces the Poly(A) Tail and Stimulates Cap-Dependent Translation Initiation from the Viral mRNA ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In the process of translation of eukaryotic mRNAs, the 5′ cap and the 3′ poly(A) tail interact synergistically to stimulate protein synthesis. Unlike its cellular counterparts, the small mRNA (SmRNA) of Andes hantavirus (ANDV), a member of the Bunyaviridae, lacks a 3′ poly(A) tail. Here we report that the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the ANDV SmRNA functionally replaces a poly(A) tail and synergistically stimulates cap-dependent translation initiation from the viral mRNA. Stimulation of translation by the 3′UTR of the ANDV SmRNA was found to be independent of viral proteins and of host poly(A)-binding protein. PMID:20660206

  14. Phleboviruses and the Type I Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Deborah Wuerth

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae contains a number of emerging virus species which pose a threat to both human and animal health. Most prominent members include Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV, sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV, Toscana virus (TOSV, Punta Toro virus (PTV, and the two new members severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV and Heartland virus (HRTV. The nonstructural protein NSs is well established as the main phleboviral virulence factor in the mammalian host. NSs acts as antagonist of the antiviral type I interferon (IFN system. Recent progress in the elucidation of the molecular functions of a growing list of NSs proteins highlights the astonishing variety of strategies employed by phleboviruses to evade the IFN system.

  15. Isolation of orbiviruses and uukuviruses from puffin ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S R; Nuttall, P A

    1985-03-01

    Two viruses were isolated from a pool of three female Ixodes uriae ticks found on a dead puffin (Fratercula arctica) on a beach at Arbroath, Scotland. Complement fixation tests showed that one of the viruses was an orbivirus belonging to the Kemerovo serogroup and was related to Cape Wrath virus. Cross-reactions did not occur in neutralisation tests with 4 Kemerovo group viruses previously isolated from I. uriae collected in British seabird colonies. The orbivirus was therefore named Arbroath virus. The other virus was of the Uukuniemi serogroup (family Bunyaviridae) and reacted in complement fixation and neutralisation tests with a virus isolated from I. uriae collected from a seabird colony at St Abb's Head, Scotland. Both the orbi- and the uukuviruses replicated in a tick (Rhipicephalus appendiculatus) cell line, RA-243.

  16. Sylvatic transmission of arboviruses among Bornean orangutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, N D; Kilbourn, A M; Karesh, W B; Rahman, H A; Bosi, E J; Cropp, B C; Andau, M; Spielman, A; Gubler, D J

    2001-01-01

    Wild populations of nonhuman primates live in regions of sylvatic arbovirus transmission. To assess the status of arbovirus transmission in Bornean forests and the susceptibility of wild orangutans to arboviral infection, blood samples of wild orangutans, semi-captive orangutans, and humans were examined. Samples were tested by plaque reduction neutralization test for antibodies to viruses representing three families (Flaviviridae, Alphaviridae, and Bunyaviridae), including dengue-2, Japanese encephalitis, Zika, Langat, Tembusu, Sindbis, Chikungunya, and Batai viruses. Both wild and semi-captive orangutan groups as well as local human populations showed serologic evidence of arbovirus infection. The presence of neutralizing antibodies among wild orangutans strongly suggests the existence of sylvatic cycles for dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and sindbis viruses in North Borneo. The present study demonstrates that orangutans are susceptible to arboviralinfections in the wild, although the impact of arboviral infections on this endangered ape remain unknown.

  17. Multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses using an oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Grubaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae, Alphavirus (Togaviridae, Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae, and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish

  18. RNA interference targets arbovirus replication in Culicoides cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Esther; Ratinier, Maxime; Watson, Mick; Shaw, Andrew E; McFarlane, Melanie; Varela, Mariana; Elliott, Richard M; Palmarini, Massimo; Kohl, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted to vertebrate hosts by biting arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, and midges. These viruses replicate in both arthropods and vertebrates and are thus exposed to different antiviral responses in these organisms. RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific RNA degradation mechanism that has been shown to play a major role in the antiviral response against arboviruses in mosquitoes. Culicoides midges are important vectors of arboviruses, known to transmit pathogens of humans and livestock such as bluetongue virus (BTV) (Reoviridae), Oropouche virus (Bunyaviridae), and likely the recently discovered Schmallenberg virus (Bunyaviridae). In this study, we investigated whether Culicoides cells possess an antiviral RNAi response and whether this is effective against arboviruses, including those with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes, such as BTV. Using reporter gene-based assays, we established the presence of a functional RNAi response in Culicoides sonorensis-derived KC cells which is effective in inhibiting BTV infection. Sequencing of small RNAs from KC and Aedes aegypti-derived Aag2 cells infected with BTV or the unrelated Schmallenberg virus resulted in the production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (viRNAs) of 21 nucleotides, similar to the viRNAs produced during arbovirus infections of mosquitoes. In addition, viRNA profiles strongly suggest that the BTV dsRNA genome is accessible to a Dicer-type nuclease. Thus, we show for the first time that midge cells target arbovirus replication by mounting an antiviral RNAi response mainly resembling that of other insect vectors of arboviruses.

  19. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by beta-galactosidase alpha-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion.

  20. Viral diseases of marine invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. T.

    1984-03-01

    Approximately 40 viruses are known from marine sponges; turbellarian and monogenetic flatworms; cephalopod, bivalve, and gastropod mollusks; nereid polychaetes; and isopod and decapod crustaceans. Most of the viruses can be tentatively assigned to the Herpesviridae, Baculoviridae, Iridoviridae, Adenoviridae, Papovaviridae, Reoviridae, “Birnaviridae”, Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, and Picornaviridae. Viruslike particles found in oysters might be representatives of the Togaviridae and Retroviridae. Enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses from crustaceans have developmental and morphological characteristics intermediate between families, and some show evidence of relationships to the Paramyxoviridae as well as the Bunyaviridae or Rhabdoviridae. Certain small viruses of shrimp cannot be assigned, even tentatively, to a particular family. Some viruses cause disease in wild and captive hosts, others are associated with disease states but may not be primary instigators, and many occur in apparently normal animals. The frequency of viral disease in natural populations of marine invertebrates is unknown. Several viruses that cause disease in captive animals, with or without experimental intervention, have also been found in diseased wild hosts, including herpeslike viruses of crabs and oysters, iridovirus of octopus, and reolike and bunyalike viruses of crabs. Iridolike viruses have been implicated in massive mortalities of cultured oysters. Baculoviruses, and IHHN virus, which is of uncertain affinities, cause economically damaging diseases in cultured penaeid shrimp. Double or multiple viral infection is common in crabs. For example, a reolike virus and associated rhabdolike virus act synergistically to cause paralytic and fatal disease in Callinectes sapidus. Information on host range, most susceptible stage, and viral latency is available only for viruses of shrimp. One baculovirus attacks five species of New World penaeid shrimp. IHHN virus infects three species of

  1. Bunyaviruses are common in male and female Ixodes scapularis ticks in central Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce M. Sakamoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The blacklegged tick Ixodes scapularis is widely distributed in the United States and transmits multiple pathogens to humans, wildlife and domestic animals. Recently, several novel viruses in the family Bunyaviridae (South Bay virus (SBV and Blacklegged tick phlebovirus (BTPV were identified infecting female I. scapularis ticks collected in New York State. We used metagenomic sequencing to investigate the distribution of viruses infecting male and female I. scapularis ticks collected in Centre County, Pennsylvania. We identified both SBV and BTPV in both male and female ticks from all collection locations. The role of male I. scapularis in pathogen epidemiology has been overlooked because they rarely bite and are not considered important pathogen vectors. However, males may act as reservoirs for pathogens that can then be transmitted to females during mating. Our data highlight the importance of examining all potential avenues of pathogen maintenance and transmission throughout the vector-pathogen life cycle in order to understand the epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens.

  2. Ultrastructural, Antigenic and Physicochemical Characterization of the Mojuí dos Campos (Bunyavirus Isolated from Bat in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanzeller Ana LM

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mojuí dos Campos virus (MDCV was isolated from the blood of an unidentified bat (Chiroptera captured in Mojuí dos Campos, Santarém, State of Pará, Brazil, in 1975 and considerated to be antigenically different from other 102 arboviruses belonging to several antigenic groups isolated in the Amazon region or another region by complement fixation tests. The objective of this work was to develop a morphologic, an antigenic and physicochemical characterization of this virus. MDCV produces cytopathic effect in Vero cells, 24 h post-infection (p.i, and the degree of cellular destruction increases after a few hours. Negative staining electron microscopy of the supernatant of Vero cell cultures showed the presence of coated viral particles with a diameter of around 98 nm. Ultrathin sections of Vero cells, and brain and liver of newborn mice infected with MDCV showed an assembly of the viral particles into the Golgi vesicles. The synthesis kinetics of the proteins for MDCV were similar to that observed for other bunyaviruses, and viral proteins could be detected as early as 6 h p.i. Our results reinforce the original studies which had classified MDCV in the family Bunyaviridae, genus Bunyavirus as an ungrouped virus, and it may represent the prototype of a new serogroup.

  3. Molecular detection of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus in ticks from southeastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehravaran, Ahmad; Moradi, Maryam; Telmadarraiy, Zakyeh; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Moradi, Ali Reza; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Shah-Hosseini, Nariman; Varaie, Fereshteh Sadat Rasi; Jalali, Tahmineh; Hekmat, Soheila; Ghiasi, Seyed Mojtaba; Chinikar, Sadegh

    2013-02-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a tick-borne member of the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. CCHF virus has been isolated from at least 31 different species of ticks. The virus is transmitted through the bite of an infected tick or by direct contact with CCHF virus-infected patients or the products of infected livestock. This study was conducted to determine the rate of CCHF virus infection in ticks in the district of Zahedan, in the province of Sistan and Baluchistan, southeastern Iran. A total of 140 ticks were collected from Sistan and Baluchistan. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for the detection of the CCHF virus genome in the tick population. This genome was detected in 4.3% of ticks collected from livestock of different regions of Zahedan. The infected tick genera belonged to Hyalomma and Haemaphysalis. Although in the epidemiology of CCHF virus Hyalomma ticks are considered to be the most important vectors and reservoirs, the virus has also been reported to occur in other genera of ticks, which conforms to the current data in our study from Sistan and Baluchistan. Given that animals are common hosts for Hyalomma and Haemaphysalis, regular monitoring programmes for livestock should be applied for CCHF virus control.

  4. [Inclusion Bodies are Formed in SFTSV-infected Human Macrophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cong; Song, Jingdong; Han, Ying; Li, Chuan; Qiu, Peihong; Liang, Mifang

    2016-01-01

    The severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is a new member in the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae identified in China. The SFTSV is also the causative pathogen of an emerging infectious disease: severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome. Using immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy, the intracellular distribution of nucleocapsid protein (NP) in SFTSV-infected THP-1 cells was investigated with serial doses of SFTSV at different times after infection. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the ultrafine intracellular structure of SFTSV-infected THP-1 cells at different times after infection. SFTSV NP could form intracellular inclusion bodies in infected THP-1 cells. The association between NP-formed inclusion bodies and virus production was analyzed: the size of the inclusion body formed 3 days after infection was correlated with the viral load in supernatants collected 7 days after infection. These findings suggest that the inclusion bodies formed in SFTSV-infected THP-1 cells could be where the SFTSV uses host-cell proteins and intracellular organelles to produce new viral particles.

  5. Evasion of antiviral immunity through sequestering of TBK1/IKKε/IRF3 into viral inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Qi, Xian; Qu, Bingqian; Zhang, Zerui; Liang, Mifang; Li, Chuan; Cardona, Carol J; Li, Dexin; Xing, Zheng

    2014-03-01

    Cells are equipped with pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like and RIG-I-like receptors that mount innate defenses against viruses. However, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade or thwart host antiviral responses. Viral inclusion bodies (IBs), which are accumulated aggregates of viral proteins, are commonly formed during the replication of some viruses in infected cells, but their role in viral immune evasion has rarely been explored. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging febrile illness caused by a novel phlebovirus in the Bunyaviridae. The SFTS viral nonstructural protein NSs can suppress host beta interferon (IFN-β) responses. NSs can form IBs in infected and transfected cells. Through interaction with tank-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), viral NSs was able to sequester the IKK complex, including IKKε and IRF3, into IBs, although NSs did not interact with IKKε or IRF3 directly. When cells were infected with influenza A virus, IRF3 was phosphorylated and active phosphorylated IRF3 (p-IRF3) was translocated into the nucleus. In the presence of NSs, IRF3 could still be phosphorylated, but p-IRF3 was trapped in cytoplasmic IBs, resulting in reduced IFN-β induction and enhanced viral replication. Sequestration of the IKK complex and active IRF3 into viral IBs through the interaction of NSs and TBK1 is a novel mechanism for viral evasion of innate immunity.

  6. Structural Differences Observed in Arboviruses of the Alphavirus and Flavivirus Genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod borne viruses have developed a complex life cycle adapted to alternate between insect and vertebrate hosts. These arthropod-borne viruses belong mainly to the families Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, and Bunyaviridae. This group of viruses contains many pathogens that cause febrile, hemorrhagic, and encephalitic disease or arthritic symptoms which can be persistent. It has been appreciated for many years that these viruses were evolutionarily adapted to function in the highly divergent cellular environments of both insect and mammalian phyla. These viruses are hybrid in nature, containing viral-encoded RNA and proteins which are glycosylated by the host and encapsulate viral nucleocapsids in the context of a host-derived membrane. From a structural perspective, these virus particles are macromolecular machines adapted in design to assemble into a packaging and delivery system for the virus genome and, only when associated with the conditions appropriate for a productive infection, to disassemble and deliver the RNA cargo. It was initially assumed that the structures of the virus from both hosts were equivalent. New evidence that alphaviruses and flaviviruses can exist in more than one conformation postenvelopment will be discussed in this review. The data are limited but should refocus the field of structural biology on the metastable nature of these viruses.

  7. A nosocomial transmission of crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever to an attending physician in north kordufan, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbashir Mustafa I

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF, a tick-borne disease caused by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV, is a member of the genus Nairovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. Recently, CCHFV has been reported as an important emerging infectious viral pathogen in Sudan. Sporadic cases and multiple CCHF outbreaks, associated with nosocomial chain of transmission, have been reported in the Kordufan region of Sudan. Aims To confirm CCHF in an index patient and attending physician in North Kordufan region, Sudan, and to provide some information on virus genetic lineages. Methods Antibody captured ELISA, reverse transcription PCR, partial S segment sequences of the virus and subsequent phylogenetic analysis were used to confirm the CCHFV infection and to determine the virus genetic lineages. Results CCHF was confirmed by monitoring specific IgM antibody and by detection of the viral genome using RT-PCR. Treatment with oral ribavirin, replacement with fluid therapy, blood transfusion and administration of platelets concentrate resulted in rapid improvement of the health condition of the female physician. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial S segment sequences of the 2 CCHFV indicates that both strains are identical and belong to Group III virus lineage, which includes viruses from Africa including, Sudan, Mauritania, South Africa and Nigeria. Conclusion Further epidemiologic studies including, CCHFV complete genome analysis and implementation of improved surveillance are urgently needed to better predict and respond to CCHF outbreaks in the Kordufan region, Sudan.

  8. Rapid detection of European orthobunyaviruses by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jeremy V; Nowotny, Norbert

    2016-10-01

    The development of reverse transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assays are described herein for the detection of two orthobunyaviruses (Bunyaviridae), which represent the two main serogroups found in mosquitoes in Central Europe. The RT-LAMP assays were optimized for the detection of Ťahyňa virus (a California encephalitis group virus found in Aedes sp or Ochlerotatus sp mosquitoes) and Batai virus (also called Čalovo virus, a Bunyamwera group virus found in Anopheles maculipennis s.l. mosquitoes) nucleic acid using endemic European virus isolates. The sensitivity of the RT-LAMP assays was determined to be comparable to that of conventional tests, with a limit of detectionisothermal conditions using very simple equipment. Furthermore, it was possible to proceed with the assays without nucleic acid extraction, albeit at a 100-fold loss of sensitivity. The RT-LAMP assays are a sensitive, cost-efficient method for both arbovirus surveillance as well as diagnostic laboratories to detect the presence of these endemic orthobunyaviruses.

  9. Modulation of La Crosse virus infection in Aedes albopictus mosquitoes following larval exposure to coffee extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Eastep

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito-borne La Crosse virus (LACV; Family Bunyaviridae may cause encephalitis, primarily in children, and is distributed throughout much of the eastern United States. No antivirals or vaccines are available for LACV, or most other mosquito-borne viruses, and prevention generally relies on mosquito control. We sought to determine whether coffee extracts could interfere with LACV replication and vector mosquito development. Both regular and decaffeinated coffee demonstrated significant reductions in LACV replication in direct antiviral assays. This activity was not due to the presence of caffeine, which did not inhibit the virus life cycle. Aedes albopictus (Skuse (Diptera: Culicidae mosquito larvae suffered near total mortality when reared in high concentrations of regular and decaffeinated coffee and in caffeine. Following larval exposure to sublethal coffee concentrations, adult Ae. albopictus mosquitoes had signficantly reduced whole-body LACV titers five days post-infection, compared to larvae reared in distilled water. These results suggest that it may be possible to both control mosquito populations and alter the vector competence of mosquitoes for arthropod-borne viruses by introducing antiviral compounds into the larval habitat.

  10. Diagnóstico virológico y molecular de virus transmitidos por roedores. Hantavirus y arenavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Levis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Los hantavirus (familia Bunyaviridae y arenavirus (familia Arenaviridae son virus de roedores; cada uno de ellos parece estar estrictamente asociado con una especie de roedor en la que causa una infección persistente y asintomática. En las Américas tienen como reservorios primarios a roedores de la sub-familia Sigmodontinae, y son causantes de síndrome pulmonar por Hantavirus (SPH y fiebres hemorrágicas, respectivamente (1,2. El número de estos virus identificados en los últimos años ha aumentado significativamente; actualmente, el género Hantavirus está compuesto por más de 28 tipos diferentes, mientras que al menos 23 arenavirus conforman el género Arenavirus. Entre los hantavirus asociados con SPH se destacan el virus Sin Nombre en Norteamérica, y los virus Andes, Laguna Negra, Caño Delgadito, Araraquara y Juquitiba, en el cono sur de América, entre otros (2. Los arenavirus asociados a fiebres hemorrágicas reconocidos en Sud América al presente son: Junín (Argentina, Guanarito (Venezuela, Sabiá (Brasil, y Machupo y Chapare (Bolivia (3.

  11. Adler hantavirus, a new genetic variant of Tula virus identified in Major's pine voles (Microtus majori) sampled in southern European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Evgeniy A; Witkowski, Peter T; Radosa, Lukas; Dzagurova, Tamara K; Okulova, Nataliya M; Yunicheva, Yulia V; Vasilenko, Ludmila; Morozov, Vyacheslav G; Malkin, Gennadiy A; Krüger, Detlev H; Klempa, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Although at least 30 novel hantaviruses have been recently discovered in novel hosts such as shrews, moles and even bats, hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) are primarily known as rodent-borne human pathogens. Here we report on identification of a novel hantavirus variant associated with a rodent host, Major's pine vole (Microtus majori). Altogether 36 hantavirus PCR-positive Major's pine voles were identified in the Krasnodar region of southern European Russia within the years 2008-2011. Initial partial L-segment sequence analysis revealed novel hantavirus sequences. Moreover, we found a single common vole (Microtusarvalis) infected with Tula virus (TULV). Complete S- and M-segment coding sequences were determined from 11 Major's pine voles originating from 8 trapping sites and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. The data obtained show that Major's pine vole is a newly recognized hantavirus reservoir host. The newfound virus, provisionally called Adler hantavirus (ADLV), is closely related to TULV. Based on amino acid differences to TULV (5.6-8.2% for nucleocapsid protein, 9.4-9.5% for glycoprotein precursor) we propose to consider ADLV as a genotype of TULV. Occurrence of ADLV and TULV in the same region suggests that ADLV is not only a geographical variant of TULV but a host-specific genotype. High intra-cluster nucleotide sequence variability (up to 18%) and geographic clustering indicate long-term presence of the virus in this region.

  12. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome in the New, and Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome in the Old World: paradi(se)gm lost or regained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Jan; Maes, Piet; Van Ranst, Marc

    2014-07-17

    Since the first clinical description in 1994 of the so-called "Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome" (HPS) as a "newly recognized disease", hantavirus infections have always been characterized as presenting in two distinct syndromes, the so-called "Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome" (HFRS) in the Old World, with the kidney as main target organ, in contrast to HPS in the New World, with the lung as main target organ. However, European literature mentions already since 1934 a mostly milder local HFRS form, aptly named "nephropathia epidemica" (NE), and caused by the prototype European hantavirus species Puumala virus (PUUV). Several NE reports dating from the 1980s and early 1990s described already non-cardiogenic HPS-like lung involvement, prior to any kidney involvement, and increasing evidence is now mounting that a considerable clinical overlap exists between HPS and HFRS. Moreover, growing immunologic insights point to common pathologic mechanisms, leading to capillary hyperpermeability, the cardinal feature of all hantavirus infections, both of the New and Old World. It is now perhaps time to reconsider the paradigm of two "different" syndromes caused by viruses of the same Hantavirus genus in the same Bunyaviridae family, and to agree on a common, more logical disease denomination, such as simply and briefly "Hantavirus fever".

  13. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Rothenberger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic “capping activity”. Hantaviruses therefore employ a “cap snatching” strategy acquiring short 5′ RNA sequences bearing 5′cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure–function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses.

  14. 中国汉坦病毒基因型及分布%Distribution and gene-typing of Hantaviruses in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海林; 张云智

    2011-01-01

    汉坦病毒(Harntavirus,HV)属于布尼亚病毒科(Bunyaviridae)汉坦病毒属(genus hantavirus).HV是人类疾病的重要病原体,人类感染HV后主要导致2种严重疾病,即肾综合征出血热(hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome,HFRS)和汉坦病毒肺综合征(hantavirus pulmonary syndrome,HPS).近几年HV的研究进展较快,世界HV分布区不断扩大,新型或新亚型病毒不断被发现,目前HV至少可分为40个血清型/基因型,并证实至少有22个型的HV可引起人类疾病,其中7个型引起HFRS,15个型引起HPS,尚有10多个型HV与人类疾病关系还不太清楚[1-2].

  15. Crystal Structure of Glycoprotein C from a Hantavirus in the Post-fusion Conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willensky, Shmuel; Bignon, Eduardo A.; Tischler, Nicole D.; Dessau, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging human pathogens and are the causative agents of serious diseases in humans with high mortality rates. Like other members in the Bunyaviridae family their M segment encodes two glycoproteins, GN and GC, which are responsible for the early events of infection. Hantaviruses deliver their tripartite genome into the cytoplasm by fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes in response to the reduced pH of the endosome. Unlike phleboviruses (e.g. Rift valley fever virus), that have an icosahedral glycoprotein envelope, hantaviruses display a pleomorphic virion morphology as GN and GC assemble into spikes with apparent four-fold symmetry organized in a grid-like pattern on the viral membrane. Here we present the crystal structure of glycoprotein C (GC) from Puumala virus (PUUV), a representative member of the Hantavirus genus. The crystal structure shows GC as the membrane fusion effector of PUUV and it presents a class II membrane fusion protein fold. Furthermore, GC was crystallized in its post-fusion trimeric conformation that until now had been observed only in Flavi- and Togaviridae family members. The PUUV GC structure together with our functional data provides intriguing evolutionary and mechanistic insights into class II membrane fusion proteins and reveals new targets for membrane fusion inhibitors against these important pathogens. PMID:27783673

  16. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioni Oliveira Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hantavirus is a genus of ribonucleic acid (RNA viruses included in the family Bunyaviridae. Hantaviruses are rodent-borne zoonoses that, in the last 18 years, became an emergent public health problem in the Americas, causing a severe cardiopulmonary syndrome. This disease has no specific treatment and has a high case fatality. The transmission of hantavirus to man occurs by inhaling aerosols of rodent excreta. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibodies to hantavirus in the population of the rural settlement of Tupã in the county of Marcelândia, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. METHODS: The participants of the serologic survey were visited at their homes and selected randomly among the settlement population. Blood samples of the participants were collected by venopuncture. The serum samples were tested by an IgG-ELISA using an N recombinant protein of Araraquara hantavirus as antigen, using the protocol previously established by Figueiredo et al. RESULTS: IgG antibodies to hantavirus were detected in 7 (13% of the 54 participants. The positivity was higher among men. It was observed that there was an association of seropositivity to hantavirus within the participants born in the south of Brazil. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that, in this rural area, everyone is exposed to the same risk of becoming infected with hantavirus, and, therefore, there is a need to intensify surveillance activities and education of the local people to prevent this viral infection.

  17. [Hantavirus as important emerging agents in South America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondoño, Andrés F; Levis, Silvana; Rodas, Juan D

    2011-01-01

    The dawning of the 20th century was marked by the emergence of new infectious disease agents and the appearance of others previously thought controlled. Both phenomena were possibly connected with ecological disturbances that led to the recognition of a dramatic climate change, of which the effects are only now becoming noticeable. Among the variety of agents to be considered, the many new viruses stand out, not only for their numerical proliferation, but also for their genetic versatility. It is this quality that provides them dexterity for evolving new strategies and adaptations to changing environmental conditions. Recently, some of the most ubiquitous and well-publicized viral agents in the American continents have been the rodent-borne viruses, and among these are the hantaviruses, etiological agents of pulmonary syndromes. Approximately 18 hantaviruses (belonging to the family Bunyaviridae), have been discovered in South America during the last 20 years, and although most of them cause persistent infections and subclinical infections in wild rodents (particularly members of the subfamily Sigmodontinae) and humans respectively; some others might also be highly lethal for humans. The goal herein is to review the state of the art regarding general aspects of hantaviruses and the diseases they cause around the world, highlighting the most recent findings in Colombia. Finally, the many unanswered questions will be recognized and highlighted concerning clinical importance and socio-economic impact of these agents on quality of public health in Colombia.

  18. Characterization of the large (L) RNA of peanut bud necrosis tospovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, S; Satyanarayana, T; Naidu, R A; Mushegian, A; Dawson, W O; Reddy, D V

    1998-01-01

    The nucleocapsids purified from peanut plants systemically infected with peanut bud necrosis virus (PBNV), a member of the genus Tospovirus, contained both viral(v) and viral complementary(vc) sense L RNAs. Defective forms of L RNA containing 'core polymerase region' were observed. The full length L RNA of PBNV was sequenced using overlapping cDNA clones. The 8911 nucleotide L RNA contains a single open reading frame (ORF) in the vc strand, and encodes a protein of 330 kDa. At the 5' and 3' termini of the v sense RNA there were 247 and 32 nt untranslated regions, respectively, containing an 18 nt complementary sequence with one mismatch. Comparisons of the predicted amino acid sequence of the L protein of PBNV with other members of Bunyaviridae suggest that the L protein of PBNV is a viral polymerase. The L protein had highest identity in the 'core-polymerase domain' with the corresponding regions of other tospoviruses, tomato spotted wilt virus and impatiens necrotic spot virus.

  19. Efficacy of a recombinant Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 with NSm deletion as a vaccine candidate in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartl, Hana M; Nfon, Charles K; Zhang, Shunzhen; Marszal, Peter; Wilson, William C; Morrill, John C; Bettinger, George E; Peters, Clarence J

    2014-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family and Phlebovirus genus, causes RVF, a disease of ruminants and man, endemic in Sub-Saharan African countries. However, outbreaks in Yemen and Saudi Arabia demonstrate the ability for RVFV to spread into virgin territory and thus the need exists to develop safe and efficacious vaccines that can be used outside the endemic zones. Commercial RVFV vaccines are available but have limitations that prevent their use in disease-free countries. Consequently, there are ongoing efforts to develop and/or improve RVFV vaccines with global acceptability. In this study a previously developed MP-12-derived vaccine candidate with a large deletion of the NSm gene in the pre Gn region of the M segment (arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384) developed by T. Ikegami, that was already shown to be safe in pregnant sheep causing neither abortion nor fetal malformation was further evaluated. This vaccine was tested for protection of sheep from viremia and fever following challenge with virulent RVFV ZH501 strain. A single vaccination with arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384 fully protected sheep when challenged four weeks post vaccination, thereby demonstrating that this vaccine is efficacious in protecting these animals from RVFV infection.

  20. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: Implications from other RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko eNishiyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae. Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the United States. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts phenotype and does not replicate at 41oC. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF.

  1. Systematic review of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome: virology, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shelan; Chai, Chengliang; Wang, Chengmin; Amer, Said; Lv, Huakun; He, Hongxuan; Sun, Jimin; Lin, Junfen

    2014-03-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) was firstly discovered in China in 2010, followed by several reports from many other countries worldwide. SFTS virus (SFTSV) has been identified as the causative agent of the disease and has been recognized as a public health threat. This novel Bunyavirus belongs to the Phlebovirus genus in the family Bunyaviridae. This review also describes the different aspects of virology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, and clinical symptoms on the basis of the published article surveillance data and phylogenetic analyses of viral sequences of large, medium, and small segments retrieved from database using mega 5.05, simplot 3.5.1, network 4.611, and epi information system 3.5.3 software. SFTS presents with fever, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and considerable changes in several serum biomarkers. The disease has 10~15% mortality rate, commonly because of multiorgan dysfunction. SFTSV is mainly reported in the rural areas of Central and North-Eastern China, with seasonal occurrence from May to September, mainly targeting those of ≥50 years of age. A wide range of domesticated animals, including sheep, goats, cattle, pigs, dogs, and chickens have been proven seropositive for SFTSV. Ticks, especially Haemaphysalis longicornis, are suspected to be the potential vector, which have a broad animal host range in the world. More studies are needed to elucidate the vector-animal-human ecological cycle, the pathogenic mechanisms in high level animal models and vaccine development.

  2. The full genome sequence of three strains of Jamestown Canyon virus and their pathogenesis in mice or monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Brian R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV, family Bunyaviridae, is a mosquito-borne pathogen endemic in the United States and Canada that can cause encephalitis in humans and is considered an emerging threat to public health. The virus is genetically similar to Inkoo virus circulating in Europe, suggesting that much of the northern hemisphere contains JCV or similar variants. Results We have completed the sequence of three isolates of JCV collected in geographically diverse locations over a 57 year time span. The nucleotide identity for the three strains is 90, 83, and 85% for the S, M, and L segments respectively whereas the percent identify for the predicted amino acid sequences of the N, NSS, M poly, GN, NSM, GC, and L proteins was 97, 91, 94, 98, 91, 94, and 97%, respectively. In Swiss Webster mice, each JCV isolate exhibits low neuroinvasiveness but high infectivity. Two of the three JCV isolates were highly neurovirulent after IC inoculation whereas one isolate, JCV/03/CT, exhibited low neurovirulence. In rhesus monkeys, JCV infection is accompanied by a low-titered viremia, lack of clinical disease, but a robust neutralizing antibody response. Conclusions The first complete sequence of JCV is reported for three separate isolates, and a relatively high level of amino acid sequence conservation was observed even for viruses isolated 57 years apart indicating that the virus is in relative evolutionary stasis. JCV is highly infectious for mice and monkeys, and these animals, especially mice, represent useful experimental hosts for further study.

  3. Hantaviral Infections: An ancient zoonosis as newly recognized in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Karakas; Mustafa A. Babayigit;

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus is rodent-borne, enveloped RNA virus and belonging to Bunyaviridae. It had been isolated from near Hantaan River in South Korea. Hantavirus is a zoonosis that affects thousands of individuals each year throughout the world. It is associated with two main clinical disorders in man: Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS and Hantavirus Pulmoner Syndrome (HPS. HFRS is occur in Asia and Europe, HPS is occur in the American continent. The type and severity of diseases are closely related with virus type. Although hantavirus infection in human have been reported in a wide geopraphical are including some of the neighbours of Turkey in Europe for years any hantavirus-related infection in human has not been reported from Turkey until 2009. The diagnosis of hantavirus-related infections is based upon clinical and epidemiological information and serological tests. It is particularly important to avoid to contact with rodents because of hantavirus-related infections result in high mortality rate and in view of the present situation of missing effective antiviral drugs. Even if there are available some vaccines that used in China and South Korea any of them approved by World Health Organization. This manuscript is prepared to notice the Hantavirus-related infection which is expected to increase in the near future in Turkey and review the control and prevention measures. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(1.000: 77-86

  4. Rift Valley fever virus incorporates the 78 kDa glycoprotein into virions matured in mosquito C6/36 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana M Weingartl

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae is a zoonotic arthropod-borne virus able to transition between distant host species, causing potentially severe disease in humans and ruminants. Viral proteins are encoded by three genomic segments, with the medium M segment coding for four proteins: nonstructural NSm protein, two glycoproteins Gn and Gc and large 78 kDa glycoprotein (LGp of unknown function. Goat anti-RVFV polyclonal antibody and mouse monoclonal antibody, generated against a polypeptide unique to the LGp within the RVFV proteome, detected this protein in gradient purified RVFV ZH501 virions harvested from mosquito C6/36 cells but not in virions harvested from the mammalian Vero E6 cells. The incorporation of LGp into the mosquito cell line - matured virions was confirmed by immune-electron microscopy. The LGp was incorporated into the virions immediately during the first passage in C6/36 cells of Vero E6 derived virus. Our data indicate that LGp is a structural protein in C6/36 mosquito cell generated virions. The protein may aid the transmission from the mosquitoes to the ruminant host, with a possible role in replication of RVFV in the mosquito host. To our knowledge, this is a first report of different protein composition between virions formed in insect C6/36 versus mammalian Vero E6 cells.

  5. Validation of an indirect ELISA based on a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of Rift Valley fever virus for the detection of IgG antibody in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paweska, Janusz T; Jansen van Vuren, Petrus; Swanepoel, Robert

    2007-12-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay (I-ELISA) based on the recombinant nucleocapsid protein (rNp) of Rift Valley fever virus was validated for the detection of specific IgG antibody in human sera. Validation data sets derived from testing sera collected in Africa (n=2967) were categorized according to the results of a virus neutralisation test. The assay had high intra- and inter-plate repeatability in routine runs. No detectable cross-reactions between IgG antibodies generated from mice experimentally infected with viruses representing genus Phlebovirus, Nairovirus, Orthobunyavirus and Bhanja virus of the family Bunyaviridae were observed. At a cut-off optimised by the two-graph receiver operating characteristics analysis at 95% accuracy level, the diagnostic sensitivity of the I-ELISA was 99.72% and diagnostic specificity 99.62% while estimates for the Youden's index (J) and efficiency (Ef) were 0.993 and 99.62%. When cut-off values determined by mean plus two and by mean plus three standard deviations derived from I-ELISA readings in an uninfected reference population were used, the diagnostic sensitivity was 100% but estimates of Y, Ef and other combined measures of diagnostic accuracy were lower. The I-ELISA based on rNp is highly sensitive, specific and robust and can be applied for diagnosis of infection of Rift Valley fever and disease-surveillance studies in humans.

  6. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Hedil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far.

  7. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome, an emerging tick-borne zoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; He, Biao; Huang, Si-Yang; Wei, Feng; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-08-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging haemorrhagic fever that was first described in rural areas of China. The causative agent, SFTS virus (SFTSV), is a novel phlebovirus in the Bunyaviridae family. Since the first report in 2010, SFTS has been found in 11 provinces of China, with about 2500 reported cases, and an average case-fatality rate of 7·3%. The disease was also reported in Japan and Korea in 2012; Heartland virus, another phlebovirus genetically closely related to SFTSV, was isolated from two patients in the USA. The disease has become a substantial risk to public health, not only in China, but also in other parts of the world. The virus could undergo rapid evolution by gene mutation, reassortment, and homologous recombination in tick vectors and vertebrate reservoir hosts. No specific treatment of SFTS is available, and avoiding tick bites is an important measure to prevent the infection and transmission of SFTSV. This Review provides information on the molecular characteristics and ecology of this emerging tick-borne virus and describes the epidemiology, clinical signs, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of human infection with SFTSV.

  8. Enveloped virus-like particles as vaccines against pathogenic arboviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijlman, Gorben P

    2015-05-01

    Arthropod-borne arboviruses form a continuous threat to human and animal health, but few arboviral vaccines are currently available. Advances in expression technology for complex, enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) create new opportunities to develop potent vaccines against pathogenic arboviruses. In this short review, I highlight the successes and challenges in eVLP production for members of the three major arbovirus families: Flaviviridae (e.g., dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis); Bunyaviridae (e.g., Rift Valley fever); and Togaviridae (e.g., chikungunya). The results from pre-clinical testing will be discussed as well as specific constraints to the large-scale manufacture and purification of eVLPs, which are complex assemblies of membranes and viral glycoproteins. Insect cells emerge as ideal substrates for correct arboviral glycoprotein folding and posttranslational modification to yield high quality eVLPs. Furthermore, baculovirus expression in insect cell culture is scalable and has a proven safety record in industrial human and veterinary vaccine manufacturing. In conclusion, eVLPs produced in insect cells using modern biotechnology have a realistic potential to be used in novel vaccines against arboviral diseases.

  9. Enzootic Arbovirus Surveillance in Forest Habitat and Phylogenetic Characterization of Novel Isolates of Gamboa Virus in Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Gillian; Loaiza, Jose R; Pongsiri, Montira J; Sanjur, Oris I; Pecor, James E; Auguste, Albert J; Kramer, Laura D

    2016-04-01

    Landscape changes occurring in Panama, a country whose geographic location and climate have historically supported arbovirus transmission, prompted the hypothesis that arbovirus prevalence increases with degradation of tropical forest habitats. Investigations at four variably degraded sites revealed a diverse array of potential mosquito vectors, several of which are known vectors of arbovirus pathogens. Overall, 675 pools consisting of 25,787 mosquitoes and representing 29 species from nine genera (collected at ground and canopy height across all habitats) were screened for cytopathic viruses on Vero cells. We detected four isolates of Gamboa virus (family:Bunyaviridae; genus:Orthobunyavirus) from pools of Aedeomyia squamipennis captured at canopy level in November 2012. Phylogenetic characterization of complete genome sequences shows the new isolates to be closely related to each other with strong evidence of reassortment among the M segment of Panamanian Gamboa isolates and several other viruses of this group. At the site yielding viruses, Soberanía National Park in central Panama, 18 mosquito species were identified, and the predominant taxa included A. squamipennis,Coquillettidia nigricans, and Mansonia titillans.

  10. Development of an algorithm for production of inactivated arbovirus antigens in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, C H; Russell, B J; Velez, J O; Laven, J J; Nicholson, W L; Bagarozzi, D A; Moon, J L; Bedi, K; Johnson, B W

    2014-11-01

    Arboviruses are medically important pathogens that cause human disease ranging from a mild fever to encephalitis. Laboratory diagnosis is essential to differentiate arbovirus infections from other pathogens with similar clinical manifestations. The Arboviral Diseases Branch (ADB) reference laboratory at the CDC Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) produces reference antigens used in serological assays such as the virus-specific immunoglobulin M antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Antigen production in cell culture has largely replaced the use of suckling mice; however, the methods are not directly transferable. The development of a cell culture antigen production algorithm for nine arboviruses from the three main arbovirus families, Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Bunyaviridae, is described here. Virus cell culture growth and harvest conditions were optimized, inactivation methods were evaluated, and concentration procedures were compared for each virus. Antigen performance was evaluated by the MAC-ELISA at each step of the procedure. The antigen production algorithm is a framework for standardization of methodology and quality control; however, a single antigen production protocol was not applicable to all arboviruses and needed to be optimized for each virus.

  11. Potential for La Crosse virus segment reassortment in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Sara M; Blitvich, Bradley J; Blair, Carol D; Geske, Dave; Beaty, Barry J; Black, William C

    2008-01-01

    The evolutionary success of La Crosse virus (LACV, family Bunyaviridae) is due to its ability to adapt to changing conditions through intramolecular genetic changes and segment reassortment. Vertical transmission of LACV in mosquitoes increases the potential for segment reassortment. Studies were conducted to determine if segment reassortment was occurring in naturally infected Aedes triseriatus from Wisconsin and Minnesota in 2000, 2004, 2006 and 2007. Mosquito eggs were collected from various sites in Wisconsin and Minnesota. They were reared in the laboratory and adults were tested for LACV antigen by immunofluorescence assay. RNA was isolated from the abdomen of infected mosquitoes and portions of the small (S), medium (M) and large (L) viral genome segments were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Overall, the viral sequences from 40 infected mosquitoes and 5 virus isolates were analyzed. Phylogenetic and linkage disequilibrium analyses revealed that approximately 25% of infected mosquitoes and viruses contained reassorted genome segments, suggesting that LACV segment reassortment is frequent in nature. PMID:19114023

  12. Potential for La Crosse virus segment reassortment in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geske Dave

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolutionary success of La Crosse virus (LACV, family Bunyaviridae is due to its ability to adapt to changing conditions through intramolecular genetic changes and segment reassortment. Vertical transmission of LACV in mosquitoes increases the potential for segment reassortment. Studies were conducted to determine if segment reassortment was occurring in naturally infected Aedes triseriatus from Wisconsin and Minnesota in 2000, 2004, 2006 and 2007. Mosquito eggs were collected from various sites in Wisconsin and Minnesota. They were reared in the laboratory and adults were tested for LACV antigen by immunofluorescence assay. RNA was isolated from the abdomen of infected mosquitoes and portions of the small (S, medium (M and large (L viral genome segments were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Overall, the viral sequences from 40 infected mosquitoes and 5 virus isolates were analyzed. Phylogenetic and linkage disequilibrium analyses revealed that approximately 25% of infected mosquitoes and viruses contained reassorted genome segments, suggesting that LACV segment reassortment is frequent in nature.

  13. Rodent Species Distribution and Hantavirus Seroprevalence in Residential and Forested areas of Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Nur Elfieyra Syazana; Ng, Yee Ling; Lee, Wei Bin; Tan, Cheng Siang; Khan, Faisal Ali Anwarali; Chong, Yee Ling

    2017-01-01

    Rodents belong to the order Rodentia, which consists of three families in Borneo (i.e., Muridae, Sciuridae and Hystricidae). These include rats, mice, squirrels, and porcupines. They are widespread throughout the world and considered pests that harm humans and livestock. Some rodent species are natural reservoirs of hantaviruses (Family: Bunyaviridae) that can cause zoonotic diseases in humans. Although hantavirus seropositive human sera were reported in Peninsular Malaysia in the early 1980s, information on their infection in rodent species in Malaysia is still lacking. The rodent populations in residential and forested areas in Sarawak were sampled. A total of 108 individuals from 15 species of rodents were collected in residential (n = 44) and forested ( n = 64) areas. The species diversity of rodents in forested areas was significantly higher (H = 2.2342) compared to rodents in residential areas (H = 0.64715) (p rodent populations in Sarawak, East Malaysia. The results suggested that hantavirus was not circulating in the studied rodent populations in Sarawak, or it was otherwise at a low prevalence that is below the detection threshold. It is important to remain vigilant because of the zoonotic potential of this virus and its severe disease outcome. Further studies, such as molecular detection of viral genetic materials, are needed to fully assess the risk of hantavirus infection in rodents and humans in this region of Malaysia.

  14. [Genetic characterisation of Powassan virus (POWV) isolated from Haemophysalis longicornis ticks in Primorye and two strains of Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus): Alma-Arasan virus (AAV) isolated from Ixodes persulcatus ticks in Kazakhstan and Malyshevo virus isolated from Aedes vexans nipponii mosquitoes in Khabarovsk kray].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Botikov, A G; Aristova, V A

    2014-01-01

    The complete genomes of the three tick-borne flaviviruses (genus Flavivirus, fam. Bunyaviridae) were sequenced: Povassan virus (POWV, strain LEIV-3070Prm, isolated from Haemophysalis logicornis in Primorsky Krai, Russia in 1977), Alma-Arasan virus (AAV, strain LEIV-1380Kaz, isolated from Ixodes persulcatus ticks in Kazakhstan in 1977) and Malyshevo virus (isolated from a pool of Aedes vexans nipponii mosquitoes, in the Khabarovsk Krai, Russia in 1978). It is shown that AAV and Malyshevo virus are the strains of Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and belong to Sibirian and Far-Eastern genotypes, respectively (GenBank ID: AAV KJ744033; strain Malyshevo KJ744034). Phylogenetically AAV is closest related (94,6% nt and 98,3% aa identity) to TBEV strains, isolated in Sibiria (Vasilchenko, Aino, Chita-653, Irkutsk-12). Malyshevo virus is closest related (96,4% nt and 98,3% nt identity) to strains of TBEV, isolated in Far Eastern part of Russia (1230, Spassk-72, Primorye-89). POWV LEIV-3070Prm has 99.7% identity with the prototype strain POWV LB, isolated in Canada and 99.5% of isolates with Far-Eastern strains of POWV (Spassk-9 and Nadezdinsk-1991).

  15. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in Kazakhstan (1948-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmakhanov, Talgat; Sansyzbaev, Yerlan; Atshabar, Bakhyt; Deryabin, Pavel; Kazakov, Stanislav; Zholshorinov, Aitmagambet; Matzhanova, Almagul; Sadvakassova, Alya; Saylaubekuly, Ratbek; Kyraubaev, Kakimzhan; Hay, John; Atkinson, Barry; Hewson, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a pathogenic and often fatal arboviral disease with a distribution spanning large areas of Africa, Europe and Asia. The causative agent is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus classified within the Nairovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. Cases of CCHF have been officially recorded in Kazakhstan since the disease was first officially reported in modern medicine. Serological surveillance of human and animal populations provide evidence that the virus was perpetually circulating in a local enzoonotic cycle involving mammals, ticks and humans in the southern regions of the country. Most cases of human disease were associated with agricultural professions such as farming, shepherding and fruit-picking; the typical route of infection was via tick-bite although several cases of contact transmission associated with caring for sick patients have been documented. In total, 704 confirmed human cases of CCHF have been registered in Kazakhstan from 1948-2013 with an overall case fatality rate of 14.8% for cases with a documented outcome. The southern regions of Kazakhstan should be considered endemic for CCHF with cases reported from these territories on an annual basis. Modern diagnostic technologies allow for rapid clinical diagnosis and for surveillance studies to monitor for potential expansion in known risk areas.

  16. Simultaneous Detection of Three Arboviruses Using a Triplex RT-PCR Enzyme Hybridization Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Dong; Shi-hong Fu; Li-hua Wang; Zhi Lv; Tai-yuan Li; Guo-dong Liang

    2012-01-01

    Arboviruses represent a serious problem to public health and agriculture worldwide.Fast,accurate identification of the viral agents of arbovirus-associated disease is essential for epidemiological surveillance and laboratory investigation.We developed a cost-effective,rapid,and highly sensitive one-step "triplex RT-PCR enzyme hybridization"assay for simultaneous detections of Japanese Encephallitis virus (JEV,Flaviviridae)Getah virus (GETV,Togaviridae),and Tahyna virus (TAHV,Bunyaviridae) using three pairs of primers to amplify three target sequences in one RT-PCR reaction.The analytical sensitivity of this assay was 1 PFU/mL for JEV,10PFU/mL for GETV,and 10 PFU/mL for TAHV.This assay is significantly more rapid and less expensive than the traditional serological detection and single RT-PCR reaction methods.When “triplex RT-PCR enzyme hybridization” was applied to 29 cerebrospinal fluid(CSF)samples that were JEV-positive by normal RT-PCR assay,all samples were strongly positive for JEV,but negative for GETV and TAHV,demonstrating a good sensitivity,specificity,and performance at CSF specimen detection.

  17. Tula hantavirus triggers pro-apoptotic signals of ER stress in Vero E6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Lankinen, Hilkka; Putkuri, Niina; Vapalahti, Olli; Vaheri, Antti

    2005-03-01

    Tula virus is a member of the Hantavirus genus of the family Bunyaviridae. Viruses of this family have an unusual pattern of intracellular maturation at the ER-Golgi compartment. We recently found that Tula virus, similar to several other hantaviruses, is able to induce apoptosis in cultured cells [Li, X.D., Kukkonen, S., Vapalahti, O., Plyusnin, A., Lankinen, H., Vaheri, A., 2004. Tula hantavirus infection of Vero E6 cells induces apoptosis involving caspase 8 activation. J. Gen. Virol. 85, 3261-3268.]. However, the cellular mechanisms remain to be clarified. In this study, we demonstrate that the progressive replication of Tula virus in Vero E6 cells initiates several death programs that are intimately associated with ER stress: (1) early activation of ER-resident caspase-12; (2) phosphorylation of Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and its downstream target transcriptional factor, c-jun; (3) induction of the pro-apoptotic transcriptional factor, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153, or C/EBP homologous protein (Gadd153/chop); and (4) changes in the ER-membrane protein BAP31 implying cross-talk with the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, we confirmed that a sustained ER stress was induced marked by an increased expression of an ER chaperone Grp78/BiP. Taken together, we have identified involvement of ER stress-mediated death program in Tula virus-infected Vero E6 cells which provides a new approach to understand the mechanisms in hantavirus-induced apoptosis.

  18. Development and evaluation of a real-time RT-qPCR for detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus representing different genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Kallio-Kokko, Hannimari; Ozkul, Aykut; Bodur, Hurrem; Korukruoglu, Gulay; Mousavi, Mehrdad; Pranav, Patel; Vaheri, Antti; Mirazimi, Ali; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a zoonotic disease caused by a nairovirus belonging to family Bunyaviridae. The CCHF virus (CCHFV) can be transmitted to humans by Hyalomma ticks as well as by direct contact with infected body fluids or tissues from viremic livestock or humans. Our aim was to set up a fast RT-qPCR for detection of the different CCHFV genotypes in clinical samples, including an inactivation step to make the sample handling possible in lower biosafety levels (BSL) than BSL-4. This method was evaluated against commercial reference assays and international External Quality Assessment (EQA) samples. The analytical limit of detection for the developed CCHFV-S RT-qPCR was 11 CCHFV genomes per reaction. After exclusion of four dubious samples, we studied 38 CCHFV-positive samples (using reference tests) of which 38 were found positive by CCHFV-S RT-qPCR, suggesting a sensitivity of 100%. CCHFV-S RT q-PCR detected all eight different CCHFV strains representing five different CCHFV genotypes. In conclusion, the CCHFV-S RT-qPCR described in this study was evaluated using various sources of CCHFV samples and shown to be an accurate tool to detect human CCHFV infection caused by different genotypes of the virus.

  19. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus-encoded ovarian tumor protease activity is dispensable for virus RNA polymerase function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Eric; Albariño, César G; Khristova, Marina L; Nichol, Stuart T

    2010-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne virus (genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae) associated with high case fatality disease outbreaks in regions of Africa, Europe, and Asia. The CCHFV genome consists of three negative-strand RNA segments, S, M, and L. The unusually large virus L polymerase protein and the need for biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment conditions for work with infectious virus have hampered the study of CCHFV replication. The L protein has an ovarian tumor (OTU) protease domain located in the N terminus, which has led to speculation that the protein may be autoproteolytically cleaved to generate the active virus L polymerase and additional functions. We report the successful development of efficient CCHFV helper virus-independent S, M, and L segment minigenome systems for analysis of virus RNA and protein features involved in replication. The virus RNA segment S, M, and L untranslated regions were found to be similar in support of replication of the respective minigenomes. In addition, the OTU domain located in the N terminus of the expressed virus L protein was shown to be a functional protease. However, no evidence of L protein autoproteolytic processing was found, and the OTU protease activity was dispensable for virus RNA replication. Finally, physiologically relevant doses of ribavirin inhibited CCHFV minigenome replication. These results demonstrated the utility of the minigenome system for use in BSL-2 laboratory settings to analyze CCHFV biology and in antiviral drug discovery programs for this important public health and bioterrorism threat.

  20. Molecular diagnostic and genetic characterization of highly pathogenic viruses: application during Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus outbreaks in Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippone, C; Marianneau, P; Murri, S; Mollard, N; Avsic-Zupanc, T; Chinikar, S; Desprès, P; Caro, V; Gessain, A; Berthet, N; Tordo, N

    2013-02-01

    Several haemorrhagic fevers are caused by highly pathogenic viruses that must be handled in Biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment. These zoonotic infections have an important impact on public health and the development of a rapid and differential diagnosis in case of outbreak in risk areas represents a critical priority. We have demonstrated the potential of a DNA resequencing microarray (PathogenID v2.0) for this purpose. The microarray was first validated in vitro using supernatants of cells infected with prototype strains from five different families of BSL-4 viruses (e.g. families Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Filoviridae, Flaviviridae and Paramyxoviridae). RNA was amplified based on isothermal amplification by Phi29 polymerase before hybridization. We were able to detect and characterize Nipah virus and Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in the brains of experimentally infected animals. CCHFV was finally used as a paradigm for epidemics because of recent outbreaks in Turkey, Kosovo and Iran. Viral variants present in human sera were characterized by BLASTN analysis. Sensitivity was estimated to be 10(5) -10(6) PFU/mL of hybridized cDNA. Detection specificity was limited to viral sequences having ~13-14% of global divergence with the tiled sequence, or stretches of ~20 identical nucleotides. These results highlight the benefits of using the PathogenID v2.0 resequencing microarray to characterize geographical variants in the follow-up of haemorrhagic fever epidemics; to manage patients and protect communities; and in cases of bioterrorism.

  1. Quantitative analysis of particles, genomes and infectious particles in supernatants of haemorrhagic fever virus cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedlund Kjell-Olof

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information on the replication of viral haemorrhagic fever viruses is not readily available and has never been analysed in a comparative approach. Here, we compared the cell culture growth characteristics of haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFV, of the Arenaviridae, Filoviridae, Bunyaviridae, and Flavivridae virus families by performing quantitative analysis of cell culture supernatants by (i electron microscopy for the quantification of virus particles, (ii quantitative real time PCR for the quantification of genomes, and (iii determination of focus forming units by coating fluorescent antibodies to infected cell monolayers for the quantification of virus infectivity. The comparative analysis revealed that filovirus and RVFV replication results in a surplus of genomes but varying degrees of packaging efficiency and infectious particles. More efficient replication and packaging was observed for Lassa virus, and Dengue virus resulting in a better yield of infectious particles while, YFV turned out to be most efficient with only 4 particles inducing one FFU. For Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV a surplus of empty shells was observed with only one in 24 particles equipped with a genome. The complete particles turned out to be extraordinarily infectious.

  2. Elevated Cytokines, Thrombin and PAI-1 in Severe HCPS Patients Due to Sin Nombre Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Bondu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sin Nombre Hantavirus (SNV, Bunyaviridae Hantavirus is a Category A pathogen that causes Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS with case fatality ratios generally ranging from 30% to 50%. HCPS is characterized by vascular leakage due to dysregulation of the endothelial barrier function. The loss of vascular integrity results in non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, shock, multi-organ failure and death. Using Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS measurements, we found that plasma samples drawn from University of New Mexico Hospital patients with serologically-confirmed HCPS, induce loss of cell-cell adhesion in confluent epithelial and endothelial cell monolayers grown in ECIS cultureware. We show that the loss of cell-cell adhesion is sensitive to both thrombin and plasmin inhibitors in mild cases, and to thrombin only inhibition in severe cases, suggesting an increasing prothrombotic state with disease severity. A proteomic profile (2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry of HCPS plasma samples in our cohort revealed robust antifibrinolytic activity among terminal case patients. The prothrombotic activity is highlighted by acute ≥30 to >100 fold increases in active plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1 which, preceded death of the subjects within 48 h. Taken together, this suggests that PAI-1 might be a response to the severe pathology as it is expected to reduce plasmin activity and possibly thrombin activity in the terminal patients.

  3. Risk assessment of human infection with a novel bunyavirus in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamano Matsui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the public health risk of human infection from a novel bunyavirus – severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV – in China.Methods: The likelihood of disease spread and the magnitude of public health impact were assessed to clarify overall risk. Literature about hazard, exposure and contextual factors associated with SFTSV infection was collected and reviewed. Information on SFTSV cases and the population in six provinces under surveillance was compared.Results: SFTSV is a member of the Phlebovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. A widely distributed tick species, Haemaphysalis longicornis, can act as the vector; thus the disease is likely to spread in China. Symptoms of SFTSV infection are nonspecific, but have led to multiorgan dysfunction in severe cases. High-risk populations include farmers and older females. Evidence of human-to-human transmission within family and hospital has been reported. The capacity for treatment and diagnosis of SFTSV are adequate in rural communities in China, and community awareness of the disease should be high. Discussion: There is a low to moderate public health risk related to SFTSV human infection in China. There is potential for an increase in the number of cases reported as awareness increases and when surveillance is expanded.

  4. Serological evidence of hantavirus infection in rural and urban regions in the state of Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Bosco Lima Gimaque

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus disease is caused by the hantavirus, which is an RNA virus belonging to the family Bunyaviridae. Hantavirus disease is an anthropozoonotic infection transmitted through the inhalation of aerosols from the excreta of hantavirus-infected rodents. In the county of Itacoatiara in the state of Amazonas (AM, Brazil, the first human cases of hantavirus pulmonary and cardiovascular syndrome were described in July 2004. These first cases were followed by two fatal cases, one in the municipality of Maués in 2005 and another in Itacoatiara in 2007. In this study, we investigated the antibody levels to hantavirus in a population of 1,731 individuals from four different counties of AM. Sera were tested by IgG/IgM- enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay using a recombinant nucleocapsid protein of the Araraquara hantavirus as an antigen. Ten sera were IgG positive to hantavirus (0.6%. Among the positive sera, 0.8% (1/122, 0.4% (1/256, 0.2% (1/556 and 0.9% (7/797 were from Atalaia do Norte, Careiro Castanho, Itacoatiara and Lábrea, respectively. None of the sera in this survey were IgM-positive. Because these counties are distributed in different areas of AM, we can assume that infected individuals are found throughout the entire state, which suggests that hantavirus disease could be a local emerging health problem.

  5. An efficient and high fidelity method for amplification, cloning and sequencing of complete tospovirus genomic RNA segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Spencer H; Adegbola, Raphael O; Adkins, Scott; Naidu, Rayapati A

    2017-04-01

    Tospoviruses (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) are responsible for major losses in an extensive range of crops worldwide. New species of these single-stranded, ambisense RNA viruses regularly emerge and have been shown to maintain heterogeneous populations with individual isolates having quite variable biological and virulence characteristics. Most tospovirus phylogenetic studies have focused on analysis of a single gene, most often the nucleocapsid protein gene. Complete genomic RNA segment amplification as a single fragment would facilitate more detailed analyses of genome-wide sequence variability, but obtaining such sequences for a large number of tospovirus isolates using traditional methods of amplification and cloning of small overlapping fragments is tedious, time consuming and expensive. In this study, protocols were optimized to amplify, clone and sequence full-length M- and S-RNA genome segments of Tomato spotted wilt virus and Impatiens necrotic spot virus. The strategy presented here is straightforward, scalable and offers several advantages over the previously commonplace and overlapping amplicon-based approach. Use of whole genome segments, instead of individual gene sequences or defined portions of genome segments, will facilitate a better understanding of the underlying molecular diversity of tospoviruses in mixed infections.

  6. Molecular Assay on Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Ticks (Ixodidae Collected from Kermanshah Province, Western Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mohammadian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF is a feverous and hemorrhagic disease endemic in some parts of Iran and caused by an arbovirus related to Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirusgenus. The main virus reser­voir in the nature is ticks, however small vertebrates and a wide range of domestic and wild animals are regarded as reservoir hosts. This study was conducted to determine the infection rate of CCHF virus in hard ticks of Sarpole-Zahab County, Kermanshah province, west of Iran.Methods: From total number of 851 collected ticks from 8 villages, 131 ticks were selected randomlyand investi­gated for detection of CCHF virus using RT-PCR.Results: The virus was found in 3.8% of the tested ticks. Hyalommaanatolicum, H.asiaticum and Rhipicephalus sanguineus species were found to have viral infection, with the highest infection rate (11.11% in Rh. sanguineus.Conclusion: These findings provide epidemiological evidence for planning control strategies of the disease in the study area.

  7. A preliminary study of viral metagenomics of French bat species in contact with humans: identification of new mammalian viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Dacheux

    Full Text Available The prediction of viral zoonosis epidemics has become a major public health issue. A profound understanding of the viral population in key animal species acting as reservoirs represents an important step towards this goal. Bats harbor diverse viruses, some of which are of particular interest because they cause severe human diseases. However, little is known about the diversity of the global population of viruses found in bats (virome. We determined the viral diversity of five different French insectivorous bat species (nine specimens in total in close contact with humans. Sequence-independent amplification, high-throughput sequencing with Illumina technology and a dedicated bioinformatics analysis pipeline were used on pooled tissues (brain, liver and lungs. Comparisons of the sequences of contigs and unassembled reads provided a global taxonomic distribution of virus-related sequences for each sample, highlighting differences both within and between bat species. Many viral families were present in these viromes, including viruses known to infect bacteria, plants/fungi, insects or vertebrates, the most relevant being those infecting mammals (Retroviridae, Herpesviridae, Bunyaviridae, Poxviridae, Flaviviridae, Reoviridae, Bornaviridae, Picobirnaviridae. In particular, we detected several new mammalian viruses, including rotaviruses, gammaretroviruses, bornaviruses and bunyaviruses with the identification of the first bat nairovirus. These observations demonstrate that bats naturally harbor viruses from many different families, most of which infect mammals. They may therefore constitute a major reservoir of viral diversity that should be analyzed carefully, to determine the role played by bats in the spread of zoonotic viral infections.

  8. Oropouche virus experimental infection in the golden hamster (Mesocrisetus auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alcir Humberto; Santos, Rodrigo Ivo; Arisi, Gabriel Maisonnave; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; Silva, Maria Lúcia; Rossi, Marcos Antônio; Lopes, Maria Beatriz Sampaio; Arruda, Eurico

    2011-01-01

    Oropouche virus (OROV), of the family Bunyaviridae, is the second most frequent arbovirus causing febrile disease in Brazil. In spite of this, little is known about pathogenesis of OROV infection. This report describes an experimental model of OROV in golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Following subcutaneous inoculation of OROV, over 50% of the animals developed disease characterized by lethargy, ruffled fur, shivering, paralysis, and approximately one third died. Animals were sacrificed on days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 11 post-inoculation to collect tissue samples from brain, heart, liver, lung, spleen, muscle and blood for virus titration, histology and OROV immunohistochemistry. OROV was detected in high titers in blood, liver and brain, but not in the other organs. Histopathology revealed meningoencephalitis and hepatitis, with abundant OROV antigen detected in liver and brain. Diffuse galectin-3 immunostaining in brain and liver supports microglial and Kupfer cells activation. This is the first description of an experimental model for OROV infection and should be helpful to study pathogenesis and possibly to test antiviral interventions such as drugs and vaccine candidates.

  9. Serologic survey of hantavirus in a rural population from the northern State of Mato Grosso, Brazil Pesquisa sorológica para hantavírus em uma população rural do norte do Estado do Mato Grosso, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioni Oliveira Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hantavirus is a genus of ribonucleic acid (RNA viruses included in the family Bunyaviridae. Hantaviruses are rodent-borne zoonoses that, in the last 18 years, became an emergent public health problem in the Americas, causing a severe cardiopulmonary syndrome. This disease has no specific treatment and has a high case fatality. The transmission of hantavirus to man occurs by inhaling aerosols of rodent excreta. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibodies to hantavirus in the population of the rural settlement of Tupã in the county of Marcelândia, State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. METHODS: The participants of the serologic survey were visited at their homes and selected randomly among the settlement population. Blood samples of the participants were collected by venopuncture. The serum samples were tested by an IgG-ELISA using an N recombinant protein of Araraquara hantavirus as antigen, using the protocol previously established by Figueiredo et al. RESULTS: IgG antibodies to hantavirus were detected in 7 (13% of the 54 participants. The positivity was higher among men. It was observed that there was an association of seropositivity to hantavirus within the participants born in the south of Brazil. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that, in this rural area, everyone is exposed to the same risk of becoming infected with hantavirus, and, therefore, there is a need to intensify surveillance activities and education of the local people to prevent this viral infection.INTRODUÇÃO: Hantavirus é um gênero de vírus RNA incluído na família Bunyaviridae. Hantaviroses são zoonoses transmitidas por roedores que nos últimos 18 anos tornou-se um problema emergente da saúde pública nas Américas causando uma síndrome cardiopulmonar. Esta doença não tem nenhum tratamento específico e apresenta alta letalidade. A transmissão do hantavirus ao homem ocorre pela inalação de aerossóis dos excrementos de roedores. O

  10. Temporal and geographic evidence for evolution of Sin Nombre virus using molecular analyses of viral RNA from Colorado, New Mexico and Montana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calisher Charles H

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All viruses in the family Bunyaviridae possess a tripartite genome, consisting of a small, a medium, and a large RNA segment. Bunyaviruses therefore possess considerable evolutionary potential, attributable to both intramolecular changes and to genome segment reassortment. Hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus are known to cause human hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome or hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The primary reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus is the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus, which is widely distributed in North America. We investigated the prevalence of intramolecular changes and of genomic reassortment among Sin Nombre viruses detected in deer mice in three western states. Methods Portions of the Sin Nombre virus small (S and medium (M RNA segments were amplified by RT-PCR from kidney, lung, liver and spleen of seropositive peromyscine rodents, principally deer mice, collected in Colorado, New Mexico and Montana from 1995 to 2007. Both a 142 nucleotide (nt amplicon of the M segment, encoding a portion of the G2 transmembrane glycoprotein, and a 751 nt amplicon of the S segment, encoding part of the nucleocapsid protein, were cloned and sequenced from 19 deer mice and from one brush mouse (P. boylii, S RNA but not M RNA from one deer mouse, and M RNA but not S RNA from another deer mouse. Results Two of 20 viruses were found to be reassortants. Within virus sequences from different rodents, the average rate of synonymous substitutions among all pair-wise comparisons (πs was 0.378 in the M segment and 0.312 in the S segment sequences. The replacement substitution rate (πa was 7.0 × 10-4 in the M segment and 17.3 × 10-4 in the S segment sequences. The low πa relative to πs suggests strong purifying selection and this was confirmed by a Fu and Li analysis. The absolute rate of molecular evolution of the M segment was 6.76 × 10-3 substitutions/site/year. The absolute age of the M segment

  11. Anticuerpos frente a virus West nile y otros virus transmitidos por artropodos en la poblacion del Delta del Ebro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano Alvaro

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: El virus West Nile (VWN es un Flavivirus que se transmite al hombre a través de distintas especies de mosquitos y produce brotes y casos esporádicos de enfermedad en distintas regiones del Viejo Mundo, incluída la Cuenca Mediterránea. Las zonas húmedas europeas que acogen aves migratorias procedentes de África constituyen áreas de alto riesgo para esta infección, así como para otras infecciones víricas transmitidas por artrópodos. MÉTODOS: Con objeto de investigar la prevalencia de la infección por el VWN y otros virus de transmisión similar en la población humana del Delta del Ebro, se estudiaron 1037 muestras de suero, obtenidas en 10 localidades de la zona, para presencia de anticuerpos frente a VWN y otros 12 virus transmitidos por artrópodos (3 Alfavirus, 8 Flaviviridae y 1 Bunyaviridae mediante titulación por inhibición de la hemaglutinación (IHA. En algunos casos se estudió la presencia de IgM específica por IHA tras fraccionar el suero por centrifugación en gradientes de sacarosa. RESULTADOS: En total, se encontró reactividad significativa frente a alguno de los virus probados en 130 casos (12.5%; 4.1% frente a Alfavirus, 8.0% frente a Flaviviridae y 0.4% frente a Bunyaviridae. El análisis de los títulos de anticuerpos reveló porcentajes significativos de muestras con títulos elevados frente a antígenos de VWN y otros. La distribución de la seroprevalencia fue muy desigual, concentrándose fundamentalmente en 3 localidades del interior del Delta (Ampolla, San Jaime y Montells, donde la prevalencia de anticuerpos frente a Flaviviridae llegó a alcanzar el 30% y se observaron niveles residuales de IgM frente a VWN en algunos sueros. CONCLUSIONES: Estos resultados y los obtenidos previamente en otras regiones de la Península Ibérica sugieren que el VWN circula en la población humana de las zonas de riesgo y produce brotes epidémicos periódicos. Habida cuenta del alto porcentaje de

  12. Diagnosis of hantavirus infection in humans and rodents in Ribeirão Preto, State of São Paulo, Brazil Diagnóstico de infecção por hantavírus em humanos e roedores em Ribeirão Preto, Estado de São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauciane Garcia de Figueiredo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hantavirus pulmonary and cardiovascular syndrome (HPCS is an emerging serious disease in the Americas. Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae are the causative agents of this syndrome and are mainly transmitted through inhalation of aerosols containing the excreta of wild rodents. In the Ribeirão Preto region (state of São Paulo, Brazil, HPCS has been reported since 1998, caused by the Araraquara virus (ARAV, for which Necromys lasiurus is the rodent reservoir. This study aimed to show diagnostic results relating to infection in humans and rodents, obtained at the Virology Research Center of the Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, between 2005 and 2008. METHODS: HPCS was diagnosed by means of ELISA and/or RT-PCR in 11 (21.2% out of 52 suspected cases, and 54.4% of these were fatal. Furthermore, 595 wild rodents (Necromys lasiurus, Akodon sp, Calomys tener and Oligoryzomys sp were caught between 2005 and 2008. RESULTS: Fifteen (2.5% of these rodents presented antibodies for hantavirus, as follows: Necromys lasiurus (4%, Calomys tener (1.9% and Akodon sp (1.5%. Nucleotide sequences obtained through RT-PCR from one HPCS patient and one Calomys tener rodent were compared with hantavirus sequences from GenBank, which showed that both were homologous with ARAV. CONCLUSIONS: This work corroborates previous studies showing that ARAV is the hantavirus causing HPCS in the Ribeirão Preto region. It also shows that rodents infected with hantavirus represent a constant risk of transmission of this virus to man.INTRODUÇÃO: A síndrome pulmonar e cardiovascular por hantavírus é uma doença grave emergente nas Américas. Os hantavírus, Bunyaviridae, são os agentes causadores desta síndrome, causadas, principalmente, pela inalação de aerossóis dos dejetos de roedores silvestres. Na região de Ribeirão Preto, a SPCVH, causada pelo vírus Araraquara, tem sido diagnosticada, desde 1998. O roedor-reservatório do ARAV é o

  13. Gene S characterization of Hantavirus species Seoul virus isolated from Rattus norvegicuson an Indonesian island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Perwitasari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Hantavirus hidup dan berkembang biak di tubuh hewan pengerat, salah satunya Rattus norvegicus yang banyak ditemukan di daerah kepulauan di Indonesia. Hantavirus spesies Seoul virus (SEOV adalah virus RNA negatif rantai tunggal yang termasuk dalam keluarga Bunyaviridae, mempunyai beberapa gen spesifik terutama gen S yang dapat dikembangkan untuk uji diagnostik. Tujuan penelitian ini ialah untuk mengetahui karakter dari gen S dari Hantavirus spesies Seoulvirus.Metode:Pada penelitian ini dilakukan sekuensing gen S yang berasal dari jaringan paru-paru rodensia.  Fragmen DNA yang disekuensing menggunakan primer DNA SEOS-28F danSEOS -360R,VNS-1501F dan VNS-CSR. Hasil sekuensing dianalisis menggunakan program seqscapedan dianalisis menggunakan program Bioedit dan Mega5. Analisis filogenetik untuk homologi nukleotida dan asam amino dari ketiga strain Kepulauan Seribu tersebut dibandingkan dengan spesies hantavirus lainnya yang diambil dari genebank. Hasil:Analisis Homologi nukleotida dan asam amino antara strain Kepulauan Seribu dengan SEOV menunjukkan homologi nukleotida tertinggi pada strain KS74 (88,4% dan terendah pada KS90 (87,2%, sedangkan homologi asam amino tertinggi adalah strain KS74 (91.3% dan terendah pada strain KS90 (89,5%. Kesimpulan:Karakter gen S virus yang ditemukan di Kepulauan Seribu sebanding dengan virus SEOV yang ditemukan di Singapura dan Korea.  (Health Science Indones 2014;1:1-6Kata kunci:Seoul virus, gen S, Kepulauan Seribu, IndonesiaAbstractBackground: Hantavirus lives and reproduces in the body of rodents. Rattus norvegicuswas one found in the Kepulauan Seribu islands of Indonesia. Hantavirus species Seoul virus (SEOV is a negative single chain RNA viruses included in the family Bunyaviridae. It has a few specific genes, especially genes S that can be developed for a diagnostic test. The aim of this study was to ascertain the character of gene S of hantavirus species Seoul virus. Methods: Gene

  14. Epidemia de febre do Oropouche em Serra Pelada, município de Curionópolis, Pará, 1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia P.A.T. Rosa

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available No final de novembro de 1994, o Instituto Evandro Chagas (IEC, Belém, Pará, foi notificado de um surto de doença febril na população do garimpo de Serra Pelada, município de Curionôpolis (5°35'S; 49°30'W, no Estado do Pará. Vinte amostras de soro de pessoas, com hemoscopia negativa para tnalária, foram recebidas para esclarecimento diagnóstico. Estudos laboratoriais comprovaram que os casos eram devido ao vírus Oropouche (grupo Simbu. gênero Bunyavirus, família Bunyaviridae. Esses achados, induziram d ida de um grupo de técnicos para realização de investigações ecoepidemíológicas entre 8 e 22 de dezembro. Foram coletadas 296 amostras de sangue, de 73 grupos familiares, sendo 54 para pequisa de vírus (casos febris e 242para sorologia, bem como, procedeu-se a coleta de artrópodes hematófagos. As amostras para pesquisa de vírus foram inoculadas em camundongos recém-nascidos e os soros testados por inibição da hemaglutinação (1H e MAC ELISA. Foram isoladas dez amostras do vírus Oropouche e obtidas seis soroconversões. Ademais, 245 (82,8% amostras foram positivas por sorologia e 71 (97,3% grupos familiares apresentaram pelo menos um membro positivo. Considerando a elevada positividade de anticoipos IH e IgM específica para Oropouche na população de Serra Pelada, concluímos que a epidemia foi extensa e apresentou taxa de ataque em torno de 83%, que correspondeu a infecção de cerca de 5.000 pessoas.In the final of November 1994, an outbreak of a febrile disease was observed in the Serra Pelada gold mine (5°35'S; 49°30'W in the Southeast region of Parã State. Twenty samples were collected and sent to the laboratory of Arbovirus of Instituto Evandro Chagas. The tests showed that the disease was caused by Oropouche virus (Bunyaviridae, Bunyavirus, Simbu serological group. Between 8-22 December 296 serum samples mere taken (54 from febrile patients, 16 paired samples and 242 from contacts and convalescent patients

  15. 施马伦贝格病毒%Schmallenberg Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱来华; 赵玉然; 王宫璞; 郑小龙; 王群; 肖西志; 邓明俊; 魏乃林; 于红光; 辛学谦; 孙涛

    2013-01-01

    施马伦贝格病毒病(Schmallenberg virus,SBV)是一种新发现的动物传染病,因于2011年底在德国施马伦贝格镇首次发现而临时得名,随后蔓延于西欧(包括比利时、法国、德国、荷兰、意大利、卢森堡、西班牙、英国和丹麦),并分别在奥地利、波兰、瑞典和芬兰等国的牛、山羊、绵羊中检测到抗体.遗传分析显示该病毒与布尼亚病毒科(Bunyaviridae)正布尼亚病毒属(Orthobunyavirus)西姆布血清群病毒(Simbu serogroup viruses)的亲缘关系最密切,西姆布血清群病毒是已知的反刍动物病原,可通过节肢动物媒介(蚊、蠓)传播.施马伦贝格病毒病有2种不同的临床症状:成年牛出现短暂轻微/温和的病症(产奶量减少、发热、腹泻)和新生哺乳动物(牛、羊)死产和先天缺陷.因为同群类似的病毒不是人畜共患病病原,也无该病毒致人发病的证据,但现阶段尚不能完全排除.尽管目前没有特效的药物和疫苗,但因已有类似病毒(赤羽病)的疫苗,疫苗接种应是控制该病的可能选项.因施马伦贝格病毒是一种新发现的病毒,许多方面尚不清楚,还有待于进一步研究.%Schmallenberg virus (SBV) infection is a new emerging livestock disease, provisionally named after Schmallenberg town in Germany where it was first identified in late 2011. So far the virus has been detected in Europe, including Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain, the UK and Denmark. Also, Austria, Poland, Sweden and Finland detected antibodies in cattle, sheep and goats, respectively. Genetic characterisation has shown that SBV is closest to the Simbu serogroup of the Bunyaviridae family, genus Orthobunyavirus that are known pathogens in ruminants, and are transmitted through arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes (Culicidae) or midges (Culicoides). The virus has been associated with two different profiles of clinical signs, brief mild/moderate disease (milk

  16. Novel camelid antibody fragments targeting recombinant nucleoprotein of Araucaria hantavirus: a prototype for an early diagnosis of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya S Pereira

    Full Text Available In addition to conventional antibodies, camelids produce immunoglobulins G composed exclusively of heavy chains in which the antigen binding site is formed only by single domains called VHH. Their particular characteristics make VHHs interesting tools for drug-delivery, passive immunotherapy and high-throughput diagnosis. Hantaviruses are rodent-borne viruses of the Bunyaviridae family. Two clinical forms of the infection are known. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS is present in the Old World, while Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS is found on the American continent. There is no specific treatment for HPS and its diagnosis is carried out by molecular or serological techniques, using mainly monoclonal antibodies or hantavirus nucleoprotein (N to detect IgM and IgG in patient serum. This study proposes the use of camelid VHHs to develop alternative methods for diagnosing and confirming HPS. Phage display technology was employed to obtain VHHs. After immunizing one Lama glama against the recombinant N protein (prNΔ₈₅ of a Brazilian hantavirus strain, VHH regions were isolated to construct an immune library. VHHs were displayed fused to the M13KO7 phage coat protein III and the selection steps were performed on immobilized prNΔ₈₅. After selection, eighty clones recognized specifically the N protein. These were sequenced, grouped based mainly on the CDRs, and five clones were analyzed by western blot (WB, surface plasmon resonance (SPR device, and ELISA. Besides the ability to recognize prNΔ85 by WB, all selected clones showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range. Additionaly, the clone KC329705 is able to detect prNΔ₈₅ in solution, as well as the native viral antigen. Findings support the hypothesis that selected VHHs could be a powerful tool in the development of rapid and accurate HPS diagnostic assays, which are essential to provide supportive care to patients and reduce the high mortality rate associated with

  17. Epidemiological study of Rift Valley fever virus in Kigoma, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifaro, Emmanuel G; Nkangaga, Japhet; Joshua, Gradson; Sallu, Raphael; Yongolo, Mmeta; Dautu, George; Kasanga, Christopher J

    2014-04-23

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an acute, zoonotic viral disease caused by a Phlebovirus, which belongs to the Bunyaviridae family. Among livestock, outbreaks of the disease are economically devastating. They are often characterised by large, sweeping abortion storms and have significant mortality in adult livestock. The aim of the current study was to investigate RVFV infection in the Kigoma region, which is nestled under the hills of the western arm of the Great Rift Valley on the edge of Lake Tanganyika, Tanzania. A region-wide serosurvey was conducted on non-vaccinated small ruminants (sheep and goats, n = 411). Sera samples were tested for the presence of anti-RVFV antibodies and viral antigen, using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The overall past infections were detected in 22 of the 411 animals, 5.4% (Confidence Interval (CI) 95% = 3.5% - 8.1%). The Kigoma rural area recorded the higher seroprevalence of 12.0% (CI 95% = 7.3% - 18.3%; p 0.05) and the Kasulu district at 0.8% (CI 95% = 0.0% - 4.2%; p > 0.05). The prevalence was 12.5% and 4.7% for sheep and goats, respectively. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicated that only eight samples were found to be positive (n = 63). This study has confirmed, for the first time, the presence of the RVFV in the Kigoma region four years after the 2007 epizootic in Tanzania. The study further suggests that the virus activity exists during the inter-epizootic period, even in regions with no history of RVFV.

  18. Serological survey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in cattle in Berat and Kolonje, Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTA LUGAJ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF is a tick-borne disease caused by the arbovirus Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus(CCHFV, which is a member of the Nairovirusgenus (family Bunyaviridae. The disease now occurs sporadically throughout much of Africa, Asia, andEurope and results in an approximately 30% fatality rate. Numerous genera of ixodid ticks serve both as vector and reservoir for CCHFV; however, ticks in the genus Hyalommaare particularlyimportant to the ecology of this virus.The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of CCHFV among the cattle in Berat and Kolonje regions in Albania. The data taken in this study indicates for the presence of CCHFV Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in these countries. The serum samples were conserved in -20°C and tested with immunological methods using indirect ELISA assay in Friedrich-Loeffler Institute (FLI, Greifswald Germany. Through this technique it was possible to identified IgG antibodies in infected serum samples. From these results in Berat-Terpanwe had an indication about the presence of IgG antibodies in 2 blood samples. 3 serum samples were equivocal and 45 serum samples were negative from the total of 50 serum samples in cattle. While in Kolonje-Erseke the results show the presence of IgG antibodies in 4 blood samples from 54 seum samples in cattle. Respectively the prevalence in these 2 countries in Albania is 4.4% and 8%. These results can clearly proved the presence of CCHFV in livestock in Albania.

  19. Analyses of Patois group bunyaviruses: evidence for naturally occurring recombinant bunyaviruses and existence of immune precipitable and nonprecipitable nonvirion proteins induced in bunyavirus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, H; Clerx-Van Haaster, C M; Bishop, D H

    1981-04-30

    Shark River (SR) and Pahayokee (PAH) bunyaviruses (Patois serogroup, Bunyavirus genus, family Bunyaviridae) have almost identical L and S RNA oligonucleotide fingerprints, but M RNA fingerprints that are different, suggesting that the two viruses may represent naturally occurring reassortant viruses. These observations are in agreement with serological studies (B. N. Fields, B. E. Henderson, P. H. Coleman, and T. H. Work, 1969, Amer. J. Epidemiol., 89, 222-226) which have distinguished these two viruses by neutralization of infectivity tests (presumably reflecting differences in M RNA gene products, J. R. Gentsch, E. J. Rozhon, R. A. Klimas, L. H. El Said, R. E. Shope, and D. H. L. Bishop, 1980, Virology102, 190-204), but not by complement fixation tests (which probably relate to the viral N polypeptide coded by the S RNA, J. Gentsch, L. R. Wynne, J. P. Clewley, R. E. Shope, and D. H. L. Bishop, 1977b, J. Virol. 24,893-902). The 3' terminal 11 nucleotides of PAH S RNA (3' (HO)OUCAUCAAAUGA ... 5') are identical in sequence to those of the S RNA species of snowshoe hare (SSH) and La Crosse (LAC) viruses, except for a position 7A residue which is a C residue in the SSH and LAC sequences. The major virion polypeptides of SR and PAH viruses include a nucleocapsid polypeptide (N, 22 x 10(3)) and two glycoproteins (PAH: G1 118 x 10(3), G2, 35 x 10(3); SR: G1 113 x 10(3), G2, 35 x 10(3)). In SR-infected cells several immune precipitable polypeptides have been detected. These include 11-, 54-, 64-, 93-, and 104 x 10(3)-dalton polypeptides. In addition, both SR and PAH viruses induce a 74 x 10(3)-dalton polypeptide (p74) that has not been detected in actinomycin D-treated infected cells, and is not immune precipitated from infected cell extracts.

  20. Epidemiologic relationship between Toscana virus infection and Leishmania infantum due to common exposure to Phlebotomus perniciosus sandfly vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Bichaud

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sand flies are recognised vectors of parasites in the genus Leishmania and a number of arthropod-borne viruses, in particular viruses within the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae. In southern France, Toscana phlebovirus (TOSV is recognized as a prominent cause of summer meningitis. Since Leishmania and TOSV have a common vector (Phlebotomus perniciosus, an epidemiologic link has been assumed for a long time. However, there is no scientific evidence of such a link between human leishmaniosis and phleboviral infections. To identify a possible link, we investigated the presence and distribution of antibodies against these two microorganisms (i in individuals and (ii at a spatial level in the city of Marseille (south-eastern France. Five hundred sera were selected randomly in the biobank of the Department of Parasitology of the Public Hospitals of Marseille. All sera were previously tested for IgG against Leishmania by Western Blotting, and TOSV IgG were detected by indirect immunofluorescence. The seropositivity rates were 21.4% for TOSV and 28% for Leishmania. Statistical analysis demonstrated that seropositivity for one pathogen was significantly associated with seropositivity to the other pathogen. This result provided the first robust evidence for the existence of an epidemiological relationship between Leishmania infantum and TOSV. Addresses of tested patients were geolocalized and integrated into Geographical Information System software, in order to test spatial relationship between the two pathogens. Spatial analysis did not allow to identify (i specific patterns for the spatial distribution of positive serological results for TOSV or Leishmania, and (ii a spatial relationship between Leishmania and TOSV positive serological results. This may reflect the fact that the sample studied was not powerful enough to demonstrate either a spatial clustering or co-location, i.e. that the actual risk exposure area is smaller than the mean of

  1. Role of insecticides in reducing thrips injury to plants and incidence of tomato spotted wilt virus in Virginia market-type peanut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, D Ames; Malone, S; Aref, S; Brandenburg, R L; Jordan, D L; Royals, B M; Johnson, P D

    2007-08-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Tospovirus, TSWV), transmitted by many thrips species, is a devastating pathogen of peanut, Arachis hypogaea L. TSWV has become a serious problem in the Virginia/Carolina peanut-growing region of the United States. During 2002, TSWV was present in 47% of the North Carolina hectarage and caused a 5% yield reduction in Virginia. Factors influencing levels of TSWV in runner market-type peanut cultivars, which are primarily grown in Alabama, Flordia, Georgia, and Texas, have been integrated into an advisory to help those peanut growers reduce losses. An advisory based on the southeast runner market-type version is currently under development for virginia market-type peanut cultivars that are grown primarily in the Virginia/ Carolina region. A version based on preliminary field experiments was released in 2003. One factor used in both advisories relates to insecticide use to reduce the vector populations and disease incidence. This research elucidated the influence of insecticides on thrips populations, thrips plant injury, incidence of TSWV, and pod yield in virginia market-type peanut. Eight field trials from 2003 to 2005 were conducted at two locations. In-furrow application of aldicarb and phorate resulted in significant levels of thrips control, significant reductions in thrips injury to seedlings, reduced incidence of TSWV, and significant increases in pod yield. Foliar application of acephate after aldicarb or phorate applied in the seed furrow further reduced thrips plant injury and incidence of TSWV and improved yield. These findings will be used to improve the current virginia market-type TSWV advisory.

  2. A geographical information system-based multicriteria evaluation to map areas at risk for Rift Valley fever vector-borne transmission in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, A; Ippoliti, C; Balenghien, T; Conte, A; Gely, M; Calistri, P; Goffredo, M; Baldet, T; Chevalier, V

    2013-11-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a severe mosquito-borne disease that is caused by a Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae) and affects domestic ruminants and humans. Recently, its distribution widened, threatening Europe. The probability of the introduction and large-scale spread of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in Europe is low, but localized RVF outbreaks may occur in areas where populations of ruminants and potential vectors are present. In this study, we assumed the introduction of the virus into Italy and focused on the risk of vector-borne transmission of RVFV to three main European potential hosts (cattle, sheep and goats). Five main potential mosquito vectors belonging to the Culex and Aedes genera that are present in Italy were identified in a literature review. We first modelled the geographical distribution of these five species based on expert knowledge and using land cover as a proxy of mosquito presence. The mosquito distribution maps were compared with field mosquito collections from Italy to validate the model. Next, the risk of RVFV transmission was modelled using a multicriteria evaluation (MCE) approach, integrating expert knowledge and the results of a literature review on host sensitivity and vector competence, feeding behaviour and abundance. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the robustness of the results with respect to expert choices. The resulting maps include (i) five maps of the vector distribution, (ii) a map of suitable areas for vector-borne transmission of RVFV and (iii) a map of the risk of RVFV vector-borne transmission to sensitive hosts given a viral introduction. Good agreement was found between the modelled presence probability and the observed presence or absence of each vector species. The resulting RVF risk map highlighted strong spatial heterogeneity and could be used to target surveillance. In conclusion, the geographical information system (GIS)-based MCE served as a valuable framework and a flexible tool for mapping the

  3. Landscape, Environmental and Social Predictors of Hantavirus Risk in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, Maria; Tambosi, Leandro Reverberi; Prado, Amanda; Pardini, Renata; D´Andrea, Paulo Sérgio; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is a disease caused by Hantavirus, which are negative-sense RNA viruses in the family Bunyaviridae that are highly virulent to humans. Numerous factors modify risk of Hantavirus transmission and consequent HPS risk. Human-driven landscape change can foster transmission risk by increasing numbers of habitat generalist rodent species that serve as the principal reservoir host. Climate can also affect rodent population dynamics and Hantavirus survival, and a number of social factors can influence probability of HPS transmission to humans. Evaluating contributions of these factors to HPS risk may enable predictions of future outbreaks, and is critical to development of effective public health strategies. Here we rely on a Bayesian model to quantify associations between annual HPS incidence across the state of São Paulo, Brazil (1993–2012) and climate variables (annual precipitation, annual mean temperature), landscape structure metrics (proportion of native habitat cover, number of forest fragments, proportion of area planted with sugarcane), and social factors (number of men older than 14 years and Human Development Index). We built separate models for the main two biomes of the state (cerrado and Atlantic forest). In both biomes Hantavirus risk increased with proportion of land cultivated for sugarcane and HDI, but proportion of forest cover, annual mean temperature, and population at risk also showed positive relationships in the Atlantic forest. Our analysis provides the first evidence that social, landscape, and climate factors are associated with HPS incidence in the Neotropics. Our risk map can be used to support the adoption of preventive measures and optimize the allocation of resources to avoid disease propagation, especially in municipalities that show medium to high HPS risk (> 5% of risk), and aimed at sugarcane workers, minimizing the risk of future HPS outbreaks. PMID:27780250

  4. Hantavirus infections in Europe and their impact on public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Voutilainen, Liina; Mustonen, Jukka; Sironen, Tarja; Vapalahti, Olli

    2013-01-01

    Hantaviruses (genus Hantavirus, family Bunyaviridae) are enveloped tri-segmented negative-stranded RNA viruses each carried by a specific rodent or insectivore host species. Several different hantaviruses known to infect humans circulate in Europe. The most common is Puumala (PUUV) carried by the bank vole; another two important, genetically closely related ones are Dobrava-Belgrade (DOBV) and Saaremaa viruses (SAAV) carried by Apodemus mice (species names follow the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses nomenclature). Of the two hantaviral diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantaviral cardiopulmonary syndrome, the European viruses cause only HFRS: DOBV with often severe symptoms and a high case fatality rate, and PUUV and SAAV more often mild disease. More than 10,000 HFRS cases are diagnosed annually in Europe and in increasing numbers. Whether this is because of increasing recognition by the medical community or due to environmental factors such as climate change, or both, is not known. Nevertheless, in large areas of Europe, the population has a considerable seroprevalence but only relatively few HFRS cases are reported. Moreover, no epidemiological data are available from many countries. We know now that cardiac, pulmonary, ocular and hormonal disorders are, besides renal changes, common during the acute stage of PUUV and DOBV infection. About 5% of hospitalized PUUV and 16%-48% of DOBV patients require dialysis and some prolonged intensive-care treatment. Although PUUV-HFRS has a low case fatality rate, complications and long-term hormonal, renal, and cardiovascular consequences commonly occur. No vaccine or specific therapy is in general use in Europe. We conclude that hantaviruses have a significant impact on public health in Europe.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Reassortment of Hantaan Virus Tripartite RNA Genomes in Nature, the Republic of Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Ah Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hantaan virus (HTNV, a negative sense tripartite RNA virus of the Family Bunyaviridae, is the most prevalent hantavirus in the Republic of Korea (ROK. It is the causative agent of Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS in humans and maintained in the striped field mouse, Apodemus agrarius, the primary zoonotic host. Clinical HFRS cases have been reported commonly in HFRS-endemic areas of Gyeonggi province. Recently, the death of a member of the ROK military from Gangwon province due to HFRS prompted an investigation of the epidemiology and distribution of hantaviruses in Gangwon and Gyeonggi provinces that border the demilitarized zone separating North and South Korea.To elucidate the geographic distribution and molecular diversity of HTNV, whole genome sequences of HTNV Large (L, Medium (M, and Small (S segments were acquired from lung tissues of A. agrarius captured from 2003-2014. Consistent with the clinical incidence of HFRS established by the Korea Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (KCDC, the prevalence of HTNV in naturally infected mice in Gangwon province was lower than for Gyeonggi province. Whole genomic sequences of 34 HTNV strains were identified and a phylogenetic analysis showed geographic diversity of the virus in the limited areas. Reassortment analysis first suggested an occurrence of genetic exchange of HTNV genomes in nature, ROK.This study is the first report to demonstrate the molecular prevalence of HTNV in Gangwon province. Whole genome sequencing of HTNV showed well-supported geographic lineages and the molecular diversity in the northern region of ROK due to a natural reassortment of HTNV genomes. These observations contribute to a better understanding of the genetic diversity and molecular evolution of hantaviruses. Also, the full-length of HTNV tripartite genomes will provide a database for phylogeographic analysis of spatial and temporal outbreaks of hantavirus infection.

  6. Research progress of VEGF pathway in the mechanism of hantavirus pathogenesis%血管内皮生长因子通路在汉坦病毒致病过程中的作用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶伟; 白露; 张芳琳; 徐志凯

    2011-01-01

    汉坦病毒( Hantavirus)属于布尼亚病毒科(Bunyaviridae),包括汉滩病毒(HTNV)、汉城病毒(SEOV)、多布拉伐病毒(DOBV)、辛诺柏病毒( SNV)、纽约病毒(NY-1)、安第斯山病毒(ANDV)、希望山病毒(PHV)和图拉病毒(TULV)等多个血清型[1].汉坦病毒感染人类可导致两类不同的急性传染病:一类是以发热、出血、急性肾功能损害和免疫功能紊乱为特征的肾综合征出血热 ( hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome,HFRS),主要由HTNV、SEOV、DOBV等引起;另一类是以肺浸润及肺间质水肿、呼吸窘迫、呼吸衰竭为特征的汉坦病毒肺综合征( hantavirus pulmonary syndrome,HPS),主要由SNV、NY-1等引起.汉坦病毒引起HFRS和HPS的确切致病机制尚未完全阐明.两类疾病的临床表现虽有不同,但其主要的病变特点均包括血管通透性增高、全身小血管损害等.

  7. Novel camelid antibody fragments targeting recombinant nucleoprotein of Araucaria hantavirus: a prototype for an early diagnosis of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Soraya S; Moreira-Dill, Leandro S; Morais, Michelle S S; Prado, Nidiane D R; Barros, Marcos L; Koishi, Andrea C; Mazarrotto, Giovanny A C A; Gonçalves, Giselle M; Zuliani, Juliana P; Calderon, Leonardo A; Soares, Andreimar M; Pereira da Silva, Luiz H; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Fernandes, Carla F C; Stabeli, Rodrigo G

    2014-01-01

    In addition to conventional antibodies, camelids produce immunoglobulins G composed exclusively of heavy chains in which the antigen binding site is formed only by single domains called VHH. Their particular characteristics make VHHs interesting tools for drug-delivery, passive immunotherapy and high-throughput diagnosis. Hantaviruses are rodent-borne viruses of the Bunyaviridae family. Two clinical forms of the infection are known. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS) is present in the Old World, while Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is found on the American continent. There is no specific treatment for HPS and its diagnosis is carried out by molecular or serological techniques, using mainly monoclonal antibodies or hantavirus nucleoprotein (N) to detect IgM and IgG in patient serum. This study proposes the use of camelid VHHs to develop alternative methods for diagnosing and confirming HPS. Phage display technology was employed to obtain VHHs. After immunizing one Lama glama against the recombinant N protein (prNΔ₈₅) of a Brazilian hantavirus strain, VHH regions were isolated to construct an immune library. VHHs were displayed fused to the M13KO7 phage coat protein III and the selection steps were performed on immobilized prNΔ₈₅. After selection, eighty clones recognized specifically the N protein. These were sequenced, grouped based mainly on the CDRs, and five clones were analyzed by western blot (WB), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device, and ELISA. Besides the ability to recognize prNΔ85 by WB, all selected clones showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range. Additionaly, the clone KC329705 is able to detect prNΔ₈₅ in solution, as well as the native viral antigen. Findings support the hypothesis that selected VHHs could be a powerful tool in the development of rapid and accurate HPS diagnostic assays, which are essential to provide supportive care to patients and reduce the high mortality rate associated with hantavirus

  8. La Crosse virus infectivity, pathogenesis, and immunogenicity in mice and monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Brian R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background La Crosse virus (LACV, family Bunyaviridae, was first identified as a human pathogen in 1960 after its isolation from a 4 year-old girl with fatal encephalitis in La Crosse, Wisconsin. LACV is a major cause of pediatric encephalitis in North America and infects up to 300,000 persons each year of which 70–130 result in severe disease of the central nervous system (CNS. As an initial step in the establishment of useful animal models to support vaccine development, we examined LACV infectivity, pathogenesis, and immunogenicity in both weanling mice and rhesus monkeys. Results Following intraperitoneal inoculation of mice, LACV replicated in various organs before reaching the CNS where it replicates to high titer causing death from neurological disease. The peripheral site where LACV replicates to highest titer is the nasal turbinates, and, presumably, LACV can enter the CNS via the olfactory neurons from nasal olfactory epithelium. The mouse infectious dose50 and lethal dose50 was similar for LACV administered either intranasally or intraperitoneally. LACV was highly infectious for rhesus monkeys and infected 100% of the animals at 10 PFU. However, the infection was asymptomatic, and the monkeys developed a strong neutralizing antibody response. Conclusion In mice, LACV likely gains access to the CNS via the blood stream or via olfactory neurons. The ability to efficiently infect mice intranasally raises the possibility that LACV might use this route to infect its natural hosts. Rhesus monkeys are susceptible to LACV infection and develop strong neutralizing antibody responses after inoculation with as little as 10 PFU. Mice and rhesus monkeys are useful animal models for LACV vaccine immunologic testing although the rhesus monkey model is not optimal.

  9. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  10. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus-infected hepatocytes induce ER-stress and apoptosis crosstalk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV is a widely distributed tick-borne member of the Nairovirus genus (Bunyaviridae with a high mortality rate in humans. CCHFV induces a severe disease in infected patients that includes, among other symptoms, massive liver necrosis and failure. The interaction between liver cells and CCHFV is therefore important for understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. Here, we described the in vitro CCHFV-infection and -replication in the hepatocyte cell line, Huh7, and the induced cellular and molecular response modulation. We found that CCHFV was able to infect and replicate to high titres and to induce a cytopathic effect (CPE. We also observed by flow cytometry and real time quantitative RT-PCR evidence of apoptosis, with the participation of the mitochondrial pathway. On the other hand, we showed that the replication of CCHFV in hepatocytes was able to interfere with the death receptor pathway of apoptosis. Furthermore, we found in CCHFV-infected cells the over-expression of PUMA, Noxa and CHOP suggesting the crosstalk between the ER-stress and mitochondrial apoptosis. By ELISA, we observed an increase of IL-8 in response to viral replication; however apoptosis was shown to be independent from IL-8 secretion. When we compared the induced cellular response between CCHFV and DUGV, a mild or non-pathogenic Nairovirus for humans, we found that the most striking difference was the absence of CPE and apoptosis. Despite the XBP1 splicing and PERK gene expression induced by DUGV, no ER-stress and apoptosis crosstalk was observed. Overall, these results suggest that CCHFV is able to induce ER-stress, activate inflammatory mediators and modulate both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways of apoptosis in hepatocyte cells, which may, in part, explain the role of the liver in the pathogenesis of CCHFV.

  11. First international external quality assessment of molecular detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Escadafal

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF is a zoonosis caused by a Nairovirus of the family Bunyaviridae. Infection is transmitted to humans mostly by Hyalomma ticks and also by direct contact with the blood or tissues of infected humans or viremic livestock. Clinical features usually include a rapid progression characterized by hemorrhage, myalgia and fever, with a lethality rate up to 30%. CCHF is one of the most widely distributed viral hemorrhagic fevers and has been reported in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, as well as parts of Europe. There is no approved vaccine or specific treatment against CCHF virus (CCHFV infections. In this context, an accurate diagnosis as well as a reliable surveillance of CCHFV infections is essential. Diagnostic techniques include virus culture, serology and molecular methods, which are now increasingly used. The European Network for the Diagnostics of "Imported" Viral Diseases organized the first international external quality assessment of CCHVF molecular diagnostics in 2011 to assess the efficiency and accurateness of CCHFV molecular methods applied by expert laboratories. A proficiency test panel of 15 samples was distributed to the participants including 10 different CCHFV preparations generated from infected cell cultures, a preparation of plasmid cloned with the nucleoprotein of CCHFV, two CCHFV RNA preparations and two negative controls. Forty-four laboratories worldwide participated in the EQA study and 53 data sets were received. Twenty data sets (38% met all criteria with optimal performance, 10 (19% with acceptable performance, while 23 (43% reported results showing a need for improvement. Differences in performance depended on the method used, the type of strain tested, the concentration of the sample tested and the laboratory performing the test. These results indicate that there is still a need for improving testing conditions and standardizing protocols for the molecular detection of Crimean

  12. Viral emergence and consequences for reproductive performance in ruminants: two recent examples (bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientara, Stéphan; Ponsart, Claire

    2014-12-01

    Viruses can emerge unexpectedly in different regions of the world and may have negative effects on reproductive performance. This paper describes the consequences for reproductive performance that have been reported after the introduction to Europe of two emerging viruses, namely the bluetongue (BTV) and Schmallenberg (SBV) viruses. Following the extensive spread of BTV in northern Europe, large numbers of pregnant cows were infected with BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8) during the breeding season of 2007. Initial reports of some cases of abortion and hydranencephaly in cattle in late 2007 were followed by quite exhaustive investigations in the field that showed that 10%-35% of healthy calves were infected with BTV-8 before birth. Transplacental transmission and fetal abnormalities in cattle and sheep had been previously observed only with strains of the virus that were propagated in embryonated eggs and/or cell culture, such as vaccine strains or vaccine candidate strains. After the unexpected emergence of BTV-8 in northern Europe in 2006, another arbovirus, namely SBV, emerged in Europe in 2011, causing a new economically important disease in ruminants. This new virus, belonging to the Orthobunyavirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, was first detected in Germany, in The Netherlands and in Belgium in 2011 and soon after in the UK, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Spain, Denmark and Switzerland. Adult animals show no or only mild clinical symptoms, whereas infection during a critical period of gestation can lead to abortion, stillbirth or the birth of severely malformed offspring. The impact of the disease is usually greater in sheep than in cattle. The consequences of SBV infection in domestic ruminants and more precisely the secondary effects on off-springs will be described.

  13. An unexpected recurrent transmission of Rift Valley fever virus in cattle in a temperate and mountainous area of Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronique Chevalier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever is an acute, zoonotic viral disease of domestic ruminants, caused by a phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae family. A large outbreak occurred in Madagascar in 2008-2009. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the point prevalence of antibodies against Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV in cattle in the Anjozorobe district, located in the wet and temperate highland region of Madagascar and yet heavily affected by the disease, and analyse environmental and trade factors potentially linked to RVFV transmission. A serological study was performed in 2009 in 894 bovines. For each bovine, the following variables were recorded: age, location of the night pen, minimum distance from the pen to the nearest water point and the forest, nearest water point type, and herd replacement practices. The serological data were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. The overall anti-RVFV IgG seroprevalence rate was 28% [CI95% 25-31]. Age was statistically linked to prevalence (p = 10(-4, being consistent with a recurrent RVFV circulation. Distance from the night pen to the nearest water point was a protective factor (p = 5.10(-3, which would be compatible with a substantial part of the virus transmission being carried out by nocturnal mosquito vectors. However, water point type did not influence the risk of infection: several mosquito species are probably involved. Cattle belonging to owners who purchase animals to renew the herd were significantly more likely to have seroconverted than others (p = 0.04: cattle trade may contribute to the introduction of the virus in this area. The minimum distance of the night pen to the forest was not linked to the prevalence. This is the first evidence of a recurrent transmission of RVFV in such an ecosystem that associates a wet, temperate climate, high altitude, paddy fields, and vicinity to a dense rain forest. Persistence mechanisms need to be further investigated.

  14. Development of a novel, single-cycle replicable rift valley Fever vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Murakami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae is an arbovirus that causes severe disease in humans and livestock in sub-Saharan African countries. Although the MP-12 strain of RVFV is a live attenuated vaccine candidate, neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence of MP-12 in mice may be a concern when vaccinating certain individuals, especially those that are immunocompromised. We have developed a novel, single-cycle replicable MP-12 (scMP-12, which carries an L RNA, M RNA mutant encoding a mutant envelope protein lacking an endoplasmic reticulum retrieval signal and defective for membrane fusion function, and S RNA encoding N protein and green fluorescent protein. The scMP-12 underwent efficient amplification, then formed plaques and retained the introduced mutation after serial passages in a cell line stably expressing viral envelope proteins. However, inoculation of the scMP-12 into naïve cells resulted in a single round of viral replication, and production of low levels of noninfectious virus-like particles. Intracranial inoculation of scMP-12 into suckling mice did not cause clinical signs or death, a finding which demonstrated that the scMP-12 lacked neurovirulence. Mice immunized with a single dose of scMP-12 produced neutralizing antibodies, whose titers were higher than in mice immunized with replicon particles carrying L RNA and S RNA encoding N protein and green fluorescent protein. Moreover, 90% of the scMP-12-immunized mice were protected from wild-type RVFV challenge by efficiently suppressing viremia and replication of the challenge virus in the liver and the spleen. These data demonstrated that scMP-12 is a safe and immunogenic RVFV vaccine candidate.

  15. Clinical features and factors associated with severity and fatality among patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome Bunyavirus infection in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baocheng Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2009, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV was identified as a novel member of the genus phlebovirus in the Bunyaviridae family in China. The detailed clinical features of cases with SFTSV infection have not been well described, and the risk factors for severity among patients and fatality among severe patients remain to be determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Clinical and laboratory features of 115 hospitalized patients with SFTSV infection during the period from June 2010 to December 2011 in Northeast China were retrospectively reviewed. We assessed the risk factors associated with severity in confirmed cases and fatality in severe cases by multivariate analysis. One hundred and three (89.6% of 115 patients presented with multiple organ dysfunction, and 22 (19.1% of 115 proceeded to the stage of life threatening multiple organ failure. Of the 115 patients, 14 fatalities (12.2% were reported. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the independent predictors of risk for severity were: albumin ≤ 30 g/l (OR, 8.09; 95% CI, 2.58-25.32, APTT ≥ 66 seconds (OR, 14.28; 95% CI, 3.28-62.24, sodium ≤ 130 mmol/l (OR, 5.44; 95% CI, 1.38-21.40, and presence of neurological manifestations (OR, 7.70; 95% CI, 1.91-31.12. Among patients with severe disease, presence of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR, 4.59; 95% CI, 1.48-14.19 and disseminated intravascular coagulation (HR, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.38-13.03 were independently associated with fatality. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SFTSV infection may present with more severe symptoms and laboratory abnormalities than hitherto reported. Due to infection with a novel bunyavirus, the patients may sufferer multiple organ dysfunction and die of multiple organ failure. In the clinical assessment of any case of SFTS, independent factors relating to prognosis need to be taken into account by clinicians.

  16. Formes hémorragiques graves de la fièvre de la vallée du Rift: à propos de 5 cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed Lemine Ould; Baba, Sidi El Wafi Ould; Fall-Malick, Fatimetou Zahra; Boushab, Boushab Mohamed; Ghaber, Sidi Mohamed; Mokhtar, Abdelwedoud

    2016-01-01

    La fièvre de la vallée du Rift (FVR) est une arbovirose due à un virus à ARN appartenant à la famille de Bunyaviridae (genre phlebovirus). C'est une zoonose touchant principalement les animaux mais pouvant aussi contaminer l'homme, soit directement par la manipulation des viandes ou avortons d'animaux malades ou indirectement par la piqure de moustiques infectées (Aèdes sp, anophèles sp, Culex sp). Dans la majorité des cas, l'infection humaine à FVR est asymptomatique, mais elle peut également se manifester par un syndrome fébrile modérée d’évolution favorable. Néanmoins, certains patients peuvent développer un syndrome hémorragique et/ou des lésions neurologiques d’évolution mortelle. Nous décrivons l’évolution de cinq cas de patients atteints de la FVR, admis dans le service de médecine interne du Centre Hospitalier National de Nouakchott (Mauritanie), le mois d'Octobre 2015 et présentant tous, un syndrome hémorragique dans un contexte fébrile. L’évolution n’était favorable que pour 2 des cinq patients. Les 3 autres sont décédés, deux dans un tableau de choc hémorragique et dans un état de choc septique. PMID:27642413

  17. [Hantavirus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strady, C; Jaussaud, R; Remy, G; Penalba, C

    2005-03-12

    Hantaviruses are cosmopolite anthropozoonosis considered as an emerging disease. Four pathogenic types for humans and part of the Bunyaviridae species are hosted by rodents and have been isolated: the Sin nombre virus responsible for the severe American respiratory form; the Hantaan and Seoul viruses responsible for hemorrhagic fevers with renal syndrome (HFRS) of severe to moderate expression in Asia and also in the Balkans; the Puumala virus responsible for HFRS of moderate expression or the socalled nephropathia epidemica in Europe. The Puumala virus is responsible for a minor form of the disease that is observed in areas of the Occidental sector of the ex-URSS, in Scandinavia and in the rest of Europe, notably in the North-East of France. The epidemic episodes occur every three years. They follow the proliferation of rodents, notably russet voles, the reservoir hosts, and their degree of infection. The concept of an occupation at risk in 20 to 49 year-old men (working in forests, agriculture, living near a forest, contact with wood) in an endemic area has not always been found. Its clinical form can vary greatly in its presentation. Basically it is a severe algic influenza syndrome accompanied by acute myopia in 38% of cases, but is nearly pathognomonic in the context. Respiratory involvement is frequent but benign. The initial syndrome can suggest an abdominal or urological surgical emergency, which is source of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. Early biological examination reveals thrombopenia and proteinuria. Then more or less severe acute kidney failure appears in slightly more than 50% of cases. Although it usually regresses with symptomatic treatment, after effects remain in some patients. The environmental changes, the geographical distribution depending on the biotope, the dynamics and behaviour of rodents and the viral circulation between them and its transmission to human beings and its risk factors must continue to be studied in order to gain

  18. The epidemic characteristics and changing trend of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Hubei Province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hui Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is caused by different hantaviruses within the Bunyaviridae family. HFRS is a fulminant, infectious disease that occurs worldwide and is endemic in all 31 provinces of China. Since the first HFRS case in Hubei Province was reported in 1957, the disease has spread across the province and Hubei has become one of the seriously affected areas in China with the greatest number of reported HFRS cases in the 1980's. However, the epidemic characteristics of HFRS in Hubei are still not entirely clear and long-term, systematic investigations of this epidemic area have been very limited. METHODS: The spatiotemporal distribution of HFRS was investigated using data spanning the years 1980 to 2009. The annual HFRS incidence, fatality rate and seasonal incidence between 1980 and 2009 were calculated and plotted. GIS-based spatial analyses were conducted to detect the spatial distribution and seasonal pattern of HFRS. A spatial statistical analysis, using Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic, was performed to identify clustering of HFRS. RESULTS: A total of 104,467 HFRS cases were reported in Hubei Province between 1980 and 2009. Incidence of and mortality due to HFRS declined after the outbreak in 1980s and HFRS cases have been sporadic in recent years. The locations and scale of disease clusters have changed during the three decades. The seasonal epidemic pattern of HFRS was characterized by the shift from the unimodal type (autumn/winter peak to the bimodal type. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic development has great influence on the transmission of hantaviruses to humans and new epidemic characteristics have emerged in Hubei Province. It is necessary to reinforce preventative measures against HFRS according to the newly-presented seasonal variation and to intensify these efforts especially in the urban areas of Hubei Province.

  19. Life-long shedding of Puumala hantavirus in wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, Liina; Sironen, Tarja; Tonteri, Elina; Bäck, Anne Tuiskunen; Razzauti, Maria; Karlsson, Malin; Wahlström, Maria; Niemimaa, Jukka; Henttonen, Heikki; Lundkvist, Åke

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge of viral shedding patterns and viraemia in the reservoir host species is a key factor in assessing the human risk of zoonotic viruses. The shedding of hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae) by their host rodents has widely been studied experimentally, but rarely in natural settings. Here we present the dynamics of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) shedding and viraemia in naturally infected wild bank voles (Myodes glareolus). In a monthly capture-mark-recapture study, we analysed 18 bank voles for the presence and relative quantity of PUUV RNA in the excreta and blood from 2 months before up to 8 months after seroconversion. The proportion of animals shedding PUUV RNA in saliva, urine and faeces peaked during the first month after seroconversion, but continued throughout the study period with only a slight decline. The quantity of shed PUUV in reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) positive excreta was constant over time. In blood, PUUV RNA was present for up to 7 months but both the probability of viraemia and the virus load declined with time. Our findings contradict the current view of a decline in virus shedding after the acute phase and a short viraemic period in hantavirus infection - an assumption widely adopted in current epidemiological models. We suggest the life-long shedding as a means of hantaviruses to survive over host population bottlenecks, and to disperse in fragmented habitats where local host and/or virus populations face temporary extinctions. Our results indicate that the kinetics of pathogens in wild hosts may differ considerably from those observed in laboratory settings.

  20. Planning for Rift Valley fever virus: use of geographical information systems to estimate the human health threat of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus-related transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sravan Kakani

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF virus is a mosquito-borne phlebovirus of the Bunyaviridae family that causes frequent outbreaks of severe animal and human disease in sub-Saharan Africa, Egypt and the Arabian Peninsula. Based on its many known competent vectors, its potential for transmission via aerosolization, and its progressive spread from East Africa to neighbouring regions, RVF is considered a high-priority, emerging health threat for humans, livestock and wildlife in all parts of the world. Introduction of West Nile virus to North America has shown the potential for “exotic” viral pathogens to become embedded in local ecological systems. While RVF is known to infect and amplify within domestic livestock, such as taurine cattle, sheep and goats, if RVF virus is accidentally or intentionally introduced into North America, an important unknown factor will be the role of local wildlife in the maintenance or propagation of virus transmission. We examined the potential impact of RVF transmission via white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus in a typical north-eastern United States urban-suburban landscape, where livestock are rare but where these potentially susceptible, ungulate wildlife are highly abundant. Model results, based on overlap of mosquito, human and projected deer densities, indicate that a significant proportion (497/1186 km2, i.e. 42% of the urban and peri-urban landscape could be affected by RVF transmission during the late summer months. Deer population losses, either by intervention for herd reduction or by RVF-related mortality, would substantially reduce these likely transmission zones to 53.1 km2, i.e. by 89%.

  1. Analysis of Arbovirus Isolates from Australia Identifies Novel Bunyaviruses Including a Mapputta Group Virus from Western Australia That Links Gan Gan and Maprik Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briese, Thomas; Williams, David T; Kapoor, Vishal; Diviney, Sinead M; Certoma, Andrea; Wang, Jianning; Johansen, Cheryl A; Chowdhary, Rashmi; Mackenzie, John S; Lipkin, W Ian

    2016-01-01

    The Mapputta group comprises antigenically related viruses indigenous to Australia and Papua New Guinea that are included in the family Bunyaviridae but not currently assigned to a specific genus. We determined and analyzed the genome sequences of five Australian viruses isolated from mosquitoes collected during routine arbovirus surveillance in Western Australia (K10441, SW27571, K13190, and K42904) and New South Wales (12005). Based on matching sequences of all three genome segments to prototype MRM3630 of Trubanaman virus (TRUV), NB6057 of Gan Gan virus (GGV), and MK7532 of Maprik virus (MPKV), isolates K13190 and SW27571 were identified as TRUV, 12005 as GGV, and K42904 as a Mapputta group virus from Western Australia linking GGV and MPKV. The results confirmed serum neutralization data that had linked SW27571 to TRUV. The fifth virus, K10441 from Willare, was most closely related to Batai orthobunyavirus, presumably representing an Australian variant of the virus. Phylogenetic analysis also confirmed the close relationship of our TRUV and GGV isolates to two other recently described Australian viruses, Murrumbidgee virus and Salt Ash virus, respectively. Our findings indicate that TRUV has a wide circulation throughout the Australian continent, demonstrating for the first time its presence in Western Australia. Similarly, the presence of a virus related to GGV, which had been linked to human disease and previously known only from the Australian southeast, was demonstrated in Western Australia. Finally, a Batai virus isolate was identified in Western Australia. The expanding availability of genomic sequence for novel Australian bunyavirus variants supports the identification of suitably conserved or diverse primer-binding target regions to establish group-wide as well as virus-specific nucleic acid tests in support of specific diagnostic and surveillance efforts throughout Australasia.

  2. Genetic Diversity of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Strains from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Chinikar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV is a member of the Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirus genus. It has a negative-sense, single stranded RNA genome approximately 19.2 kb, containing the Small, Medium, and Large segments. CCHFVs are relatively divergent in their genome sequence and grouped in seven distinct clades based on S-segment sequence analysis and six clades based on M-segment sequences. Our aim was to obtain new insights into the molecular epidemiology of CCHFV in Iran.Methods: We analyzed partial and complete nucleotide sequences of the S and M segments derived from 50 Iranian patients. The extracted RNA was amplified using one-step RT-PCR and then sequenced. The sequences were ana­lyzed using Mega5 software.Results: Phylogenetic analysis of partial S segment sequences demonstrated that clade IV-(Asia 1, clade IV-(Asia 2 and clade V-(Europe accounted for 80 %, 4 % and 14 % of the circulating genomic variants of CCHFV in Iran respectively. However, one of the Iranian strains (Iran-Kerman/22 was associated with none of other sequences and formed a new clade (VII. The phylogenetic analysis of complete S-segment nucleotide sequences from selected Ira­nian CCHFV strains complemented with representative strains from GenBank revealed similar topology as partial sequences with eight major clusters. A partial M segment phylogeny positioned the Iranian strains in either associa­tion with clade III (Asia-Africa or clade V (Europe.Conclusion: The phylogenetic analysis revealed subtle links between distant geographic locations, which we pro­pose might originate either from international livestock trade or from long-distance carriage of CCHFV by infected ticks via bird migration.

  3. Mini-genome rescue of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and research into the evolutionary patterns of its untranslated regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiuru; Xia, Han; Zhang, Yujiang; Yin, Shiyu; Zhang, Zhong; Tang, Shuang; Kou, Zheng; Yu, Jingfeng; Fan, Zhaojun; Li, Tianxian

    2013-10-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae, which are distributed widely in Africa, Europe and Asia with several genotypes. As a BSL-4 level pathogen, the requirement of high-level biosafety facilities severely constrains researches on live virus manipulation. In this study, we developed a helper-virus-independent mini-genome rescue system for the Chinese YL04057 strain. Based on the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-derived mini-genome plasmids, this polymerase I driven system permits easy observation and quantification. Unlike previous report, gradually reduced levels of activity of the CCHFV L, M and S untranslated regions (UTRs) were observed in our system. We also demonstrated that the UTRs at both ends were indispensable for mini-genome background expression. In addition, we phylogentically analyzed all six UTRs of CCHFV and showed that L-UTRs were clustered together approximately corresponding to their original geographical continents. The UTRs of M segment showed a similar branch structure to its open reading frames (ORFs), and nearly an identical tree was generated with 5' UTRs of S segment compared with its ORFs. However, the 3' UTRs of S segment formed new divergent groups. Compatibility tests of YL04057 strain nucleocapsid protein and L protein expression plasmids with Nigerian strain IbAr10200 mini-genomes revealed lower compatibility of L-UTRs without an obvious effect on M-UTRs. Moreover, we demonstrated that the L-UTRs could tolerate certain nucleotide mutations. This system may provide a foundation for future studies of the viral replication cycle, pathogenic mechanisms and evolutionary patterns of CCHFV.

  4. Serologic evidence of Jamestown Canyon and Keystone virus infection in vertebrates of the DelMarVa Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D M; LeDuc, J W; Bailey, C L; Dalrymple, J M; Gargan, T P

    1982-11-01

    Serological data accumulated during the past decade indicated that a variety of feral and domestic animals of the Delaware-Maryland-Virginia (DelMarVa) Peninsula were infected with Jamestown Canyon (JC) and/or Keystone (KEY) viruses (Bunyaviridae, California serogroup). Neutralizing (N) antibody to JC virus was most prevalent in white-tailed deer, sika deer, cottontail rabbits and horses. KEY virus N antibody was detected most frequently in gray squirrels and domestic goats. N antibody indicative of past infection by one or both viruses also was found in raccoons, horses and humans. JC and/or KEY virus N antibodies were not demonstrable in sera of several other species of small mammals and reptiles. Investigations were extended to evaluate the role of domestic goats as an amplifying host of JC and KEY viruses and to assess their potential as sentinels of virus transmission. Goats maintained in the Pocomoke Cypress Swamp during the summer season of 1978, acquired N antibodies to JC and KEY viruses. Following experimental inoculation with either JC or KEY virus, all goats developed N antibody despite the absence of a demonstrable viremia in most animals. Goats proved to be effective as sentinels for monitoring the transmission of JC and KEY viruses; however, the exceptionally low titers or absence of viremia following inoculation with these viruses would seem to preclude a potential virus-amplifying role for this species. Although findings implicated primarily gray squirrels and white-tailed deer as possible amplifying hosts of KEY and JC virus, respectively, further investigations will be required to clarify their role, particularly since both viruses may be maintained entirely by transovarial transmission.

  5. Purple coneflower viruses: species diversity and harmfulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunich A. A.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral diseases became an actual problem in medicinal plants cultivation. The number of viruses known to infect purple coneflower increased significantly in the last years in many countries. However, there is no any review about the viral diseases of this valuable medicinal crop. Therefore, the aim of this article is to summarize the main information about the viruses affecting purple coneflower plants (Echinacea purpurea L. Moench.. An analysis of the literature data showed that purple coneflower could be infected by 10 viruses. These viruses belong to the families Bromoviridae, Bunyaviridae, Secoviridae, Potyviridae, Vir­ga­vi­ri­dae, and almost all of them are considered to be highly harmful plant viruses. Additionally, four of them (TMV, TSWV, CMV, PVY are in the top 10 of the most economically important plant viruses in the world and occupy the first places. Such distribution and harmfulness of these viruses are explained by a wide range of sensitive host-plants, wild plants and weeds – reservoirs of an infection, and also a large number of vectors. The data from a few countries show that the viral diseases of purple coneflower are becoming more severe from year to year. The appearance of new viruses is registered on coneflower every year that complicates prognosis and risk estimation of epiphytoties in these regions which, for example, were revealed in Bulgaria, Lithuania and Ukraine. This review presents the detailed symptoms of the viral diseases in purple coneflower, the main properties of each virus and data about their harmful effect on the quality of raw material (the concentration of biologically active substances and heavy metals in plants.

  6. Human Seroprevalence indicating Hantavirus Infections in Tropical Rainforests of Côte d´Ivoire and Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Witkowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are members of the Bunyaviridae family carried by small mammals and causing human hemorrhagic fevers worldwide. In Western Africa, where a variety of hemorrhagic fever viruses occurs, indigenous hantaviruses have been molecularly found in animal reservoirs such as rodents, shrews, and bats since 2006. To investigate the human contact to hantaviruses carried by these hosts and to assess the public health relevance of hantaviruses for humans living in the tropical rainforest regions of Western and Central Africa, we performed a cross-sectional seroprevalence study in the region of Taï National Park in Côte d´Ivoire and the Bandundu region near the Salonga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Serum samples were initially screened with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using nucleoproteins of several hantaviruses as diagnostic antigens. Positive results were confirmed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence testing.Seroprevalence rates of 3.9% (27/687 and 2.4% (7/295, respectively, were found in the investigated regions in Côte d´Ivoire and the Democratic Republic of Congo. In Côte d´Ivoire, this value was significantly higher than the seroprevalence rates previously reported from the neighboring country Guinea as well as from South Africa. Our study indicates an exposure of humans to hantaviruses in West and Central African tropical rainforest areas. In order to pinpoint the possible existence and frequency of clinical disease caused by hantaviruses in this region of the world, systematic investigations of patients with fever and renal or respiratory symptoms are required.

  7. The importance of bank vole density and rainy winters in predicting nephropathia epidemica incidence in Northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hussein; Olsson, Gert; Ecke, Frauke; Evander, Magnus; Hjertqvist, Marika; Magnusson, Magnus; Löfvenius, Mikaell Ottosson; Hörnfeldt, Birger

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic hantaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Hantavirus) are rodent-borne viruses causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia. In Europe, there are more than 10,000 yearly cases of nephropathia epidemica (NE), a mild form of HFRS caused by Puumala virus (PUUV). The common and widely distributed bank vole (Myodes glareolus) is the host of PUUV. In this study, we aim to explain and predict NE incidence in boreal Sweden using bank vole densities. We tested whether the number of rainy days in winter contributed to variation in NE incidence. We forecast NE incidence in July 2013-June 2014 using projected autumn vole density, and then considering two climatic scenarios: 1) rain-free winter and 2) winter with many rainy days. Autumn vole density was a strong explanatory variable of NE incidence in boreal Sweden in 1990-2012 (R2 = 79%, p<0.001). Adding the number of rainy winter days improved the model (R2 = 84%, p<0.05). We report for the first time that risk of NE is higher in winters with many rainy days. Rain on snow and ground icing may block vole access to subnivean space. Seeking refuge from adverse conditions and shelter from predators, voles may infest buildings, increasing infection risk. In a rainy winter scenario, we predicted 812 NE cases in boreal Sweden, triple the number of cases predicted in a rain-free winter in 2013/2014. Our model enables identification of high risk years when preparedness in the public health sector is crucial, as a rainy winter would accentuate risk.

  8. Epidemiological study of Rift Valley fever virus in Kigoma, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel G. Kifaro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an acute, zoonotic viral disease caused by a  Phlebovirus, which belongs to the Bunyaviridae family. Among livestock, outbreaks of the disease are economically devastating. They are often characterised by large, sweeping abortion storms and have significant mortality in adult livestock. The aim of the current study was to investigate RVFV infection in the Kigoma region, which is nestled under the hills of the western arm of the Great Rift Valley on the edge of Lake Tanganyika, Tanzania. A region-wide serosurvey was conducted on non-vaccinated small ruminants (sheep and goats, n = 411. Sera samples were tested for the presence of anti-RVFV antibodies and viral antigen, using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The overall past infections were detected in 22 of the 411 animals, 5.4% (Confidence Interval (CI 95% = 3.5% – 8.1%. The Kigoma rural area recorded the higher seroprevalence of 12.0% (CI 95% = 7.3% – 18.3%; p < 0.0001, followed by Kibondo at 2.3% (CI 95% = 0.5% – 6.5%; p > 0.05 and the Kasulu district at 0.8% (CI 95% = 0.0% – 4.2%; p > 0.05. The prevalence was 12.5% and 4.7% for sheep and goats, respectively. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicated that only eight samples were found to be positive (n = 63. This study has confirmed, for the first time, the presence of the RVFV in the Kigoma region four years after the 2007 epizootic in Tanzania. The study further suggests that the virus activity exists during the inter-epizootic period, even in regions with no history of RVFV.

  9. Epizootic of ovine congenital malformations associated with Schmallenberg virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brom, R; Luttikholt, S J M; Lievaart-Peterson, K; Peperkamp, N H M T; Mars, M H; van der Poel, W H M; Vellema, P

    2012-02-01

    farms that had submitted lambs for post-mortem examination. This Schmallenberg virus was first reported in Germany and seems to be related to the Shamonda, Aino, and Akabane viruses, all of which belong to the Simbu serogroup of the genus Orthobunyavirus of the family Bunyaviridae. These preliminary findings suggest that the Schmallenberg virus is the most likely cause of this epizootic of ovine congenital malformations, which is the first such outbreak reported in Europe.

  10. Болезнь Шмалленберга: молекулярно-биологические особенности вируса и клиническая картина (обзор)

    OpenAIRE

    Спрыгин, А.; Кононов, А.; Бабин, Ю.; Мищенко, В.

    2012-01-01

    Вирус болезни Шмалленберга по генетической характеристике предварительно принадлежит к семейству Bunyaviridae, роду Orthobunyavirus, серогруппе Симбу. Вирусный геном представлен тремя сегментами: S (короткий), M (средний) и L (длинный), а передача вируса происходит через укусы насекомых, главным образом мокрецов Culicoides spp. Заболевание характеризуется желудочно-кишечными расстройствами, повышением температуры тела и снижениюем удоев у взрослых животных (коровы, овцы, козы), рождением моло...

  11. Functional analysis of Rift Valley fever virus NSs encoding a partial truncation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Head

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, belongs to genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, causes high rates of abortion and fetal malformation in infected ruminants as well as causing neurological disorders, blindness, or lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans. RVFV is classified as a category A priority pathogen and a select agent in the U.S., and currently there are no therapeutics available for RVF patients. NSs protein, a major virulence factor of RVFV, inhibits host transcription including interferon (IFN-β mRNA synthesis and promotes degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR. NSs self-associates at the C-terminus 17 aa., while NSs at aa.210-230 binds to Sin3A-associated protein (SAP30 to inhibit the activation of IFN-β promoter. Thus, we hypothesize that NSs function(s can be abolished by truncation of specific domains, and co-expression of nonfunctional NSs with intact NSs will result in the attenuation of NSs function by dominant-negative effect. Unexpectedly, we found that RVFV NSs truncated at aa. 6-30, 31-55, 56-80, 81-105, 106-130, 131-155, 156-180, 181-205, 206-230, 231-248 or 249-265 lack functions of IFN-β mRNA synthesis inhibition and degradation of PKR. Truncated NSs were less stable in infected cells, while nuclear localization was inhibited in NSs lacking either of aa.81-105, 106-130, 131-155, 156-180, 181-205, 206-230 or 231-248. Furthermore, none of truncated NSs had exhibited significant dominant-negative functions for NSs-mediated IFN-β suppression or PKR degradation upon co-expression in cells infected with RVFV. We also found that any of truncated NSs except for intact NSs does not interact with RVFV NSs even in the presence of intact C-terminus self-association domain. Our results suggest that conformational integrity of NSs is important for the stability, cellular localization and biological functions of RVFV NSs, and the co-expression of truncated NSs does not exhibit dominant-negative phenotype.

  12. Tahyna virus genetics, infectivity, and immunogenicity in mice and monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitehead Stephen S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tahyna virus (TAHV is a human pathogen of the California encephalitis virus (CEV serogroup (Bunyaviridae endemic to Europe, Asia, and Africa. TAHV maintains an enzootic life cycle with several species of mosquito vectors and hares, rabbits, hedgehogs, and rodents serving as small mammal amplifying hosts. Human TAHV infection occurs in summer and early fall with symptoms of fever, headache, malaise, conjunctivitis, pharyngitis, and nausea. TAHV disease can progress to CNS involvement, although unlike related La Crosse virus (LACV, fatalities have not been reported. Human infections are frequent with neutralizing antibodies present in 60-80% of the elderly population in endemic areas. Results In order to determine the genomic sequence of wild-type TAHV, we chose three TAHV isolates collected over a 26-year period from mosquitoes. Here we present the first complete sequence of the TAHV S, M, and L segments. The three TAHV isolates maintained a highly conserved genome with both nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity greater than 99%. In order to determine the extent of genetic relatedness to other members of the CEV serogroup, we compared protein sequences of TAHV with LACV, Snowshoe Hare virus (SSHV, Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV, and Inkoo virus (INKV. By amino acid comparison, TAHV was most similar to SSHV followed by LACV, JCV, and INKV. The sequence of the GN protein is most conserved followed by L, N, GC, NSS, and NSM. In a weanling Swiss Webster mouse model, all three TAHV isolates were uniformly neurovirulent, but only one virus was neuroinvasive. In rhesus monkeys, the virus was highly immunogenic even in the absence of viremia. Cross neutralization studies utilizing monkey immune serum demonstrated that TAHV is antigenically distinct from North American viruses LACV and JCV. Conclusions Here we report the first complete sequence of TAHV and present genetic analysis of new-world viruses, LACV, SSHV, and JCV with old

  13. [Prognostic factors in hantavirus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Selçuk

    2014-01-01

    The hantaviruses classified in Hantavirus genus of Bunyaviridae family, may cause two different types of clinical conditions, namely hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Mortality may reach up to 40% in these infections. Hantavirus subtypes (Sin Nombre, Hantaan, Seoul, Puumala, Dobrava, etc) with different virulences represent one of the most significant factors affecting the mortality. Additionally, many other factors including age, gender, humoral immune response, genetic factors, patient's clinical and laboratory findings, transfusion, mechanical ventilation requirement, antiviral treatment and immunotherapy administered to the patient are prognostically important. Increasing age had an unfavorable effect on mortality. While the disease is commonly observed in the male gender, mortality rate is higher in the female gender. The higher the emergent neutralizing antibody response, the virus spread, the number of the infected cells and the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated injury will be lower. The requirement for dialysis is reported to be higher with a poorer prognosis in individuals with HLA-B8, -DR3, -DQ2 alleles, and those with HLA-B27 allele usually experience a milder clinical course. Clinically, the risk of mortality increases in patients with multiple, central nervous system hemorrhage, sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and secondary infection. The presence of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the requirement for mechanical ventilation, the presence of dyspnea and hemoconcentration in HPS are reported to be the most important prognostic factors associated with death. The correlation of severity and the transfusion requirement with mortality was demonstrated. High serum levels of white blood cells, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine phophokinase (CPK), C-reactive protein (CRP), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), D-dimer and INR (International

  14. The L, M, and S Segments of Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Vaccine Independently Contribute to a Temperature-Sensitive Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Lokugamage, Nandadeva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever (RVF) is endemic to Africa, and the mosquito-borne disease is characterized by “abortion storms” in ruminants and by hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, and blindness in humans. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) has a tripartite negative-stranded RNA genome (L, M, and S segments). A live-attenuated vaccine for RVF, the MP-12 vaccine, is conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the United States. MP-12 is fully attenuated by the combination of the partially attenuated L, M, and S segments. Temperature sensitivity (ts) limits viral replication at a restrictive temperature and may be involved with viral attenuation. In this study, we aimed to characterize the ts mutations for MP-12. The MP-12 vaccine showed restricted replication at 38°C and replication shutoff (100-fold or greater reduction in virus titer compared to that at 37°C) at 39°C in Vero and MRC-5 cells. Using rZH501 reassortants with either the MP-12 L, M, or S segment, we found that all three segments encode a temperature-sensitive phenotype. However, the ts phenotype of the S segment was weaker than that of the M or L segment. We identified Gn-Y259H, Gc-R1182G, L-V172A, and L-M1244I as major ts mutations for MP-12. The ts mutations in the L segment decreased viral RNA synthesis, while those in the M segment delayed progeny production from infected cells. We also found that a lack of NSs and/or 78kD/NSm protein expression minimally affected the ts phenotype. Our study revealed that MP-12 is a unique vaccine carrying ts mutations in the L, M, and S segments. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral disease endemic to Africa, characterized by high rates of abortion in ruminants and severe diseases in humans. Vaccination is important to prevent the spread of disease, and a live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine is currently the only vaccine with a conditional license in the United States. This study determined the temperature

  15. NSs Virulence Factor of Rift Valley Fever Virus Engages the F-Box Proteins FBXW11 and β-TRCP1 To Degrade the Antiviral Protein Kinase PKR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainulainen, Markus; Lau, Simone; Samuel, Charles E.; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) is a relevant pathogen of both humans and livestock in Africa. The nonstructural protein NSs is a major virulence factor known to suppress the type I interferon (IFN) response by inhibiting host cell transcription and by proteasomal degradation of a major antiviral IFN effector, the translation-inhibiting protein kinase PKR. Here, we identified components of the modular SCF (Skp1, Cul1, F-box protein)-type E3 ubiquitin ligases as mediators of PKR destruction by NSs. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against the conserved SCF subunit Skp1 protected PKR from NSs-mediated degradation. Consequently, RVFV replication was severely reduced in Skp1-depleted cells when PKR was present. SCF complexes have a variable F-box protein subunit that determines substrate specificity for ubiquitination. We performed an siRNA screen for all (about 70) human F-box proteins and found FBXW11 to be involved in PKR degradation. The partial stabilization of PKR by FBXW11 depletion upregulated PKR autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of the PKR substrate eIF2α and caused a shutoff of host cell protein synthesis in RVFV-infected cells. To maximally protect PKR from the action of NSs, knockdown of structurally and functionally related FBXW1 (also known as β-TRCP1), in addition to FBXW11 deletion, was necessary. Consequently, NSs was found to interact with both FBXW11 and β-TRCP1. Thus, NSs eliminates the antiviral kinase PKR by recruitment of SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligases containing FBXW11 and β-TRCP1 as substrate recognition subunits. This antagonism of PKR by NSs is essential for efficient RVFV replication in mammalian cells. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever virus is a pathogen of humans and animals that has the potential to spread from Africa and the Arabian Peninsula to other regions. A major virulence mechanism is the proteasomal degradation of the antiviral kinase PKR by the viral protein NSs. Here, we

  16. Characterization of Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 strain encoding NSs of Punta Toro virus or sandfly fever Sicilian virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Lihoradova

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen which can cause hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate of abortion in ruminants. MP-12 strain, a live-attenuated candidate vaccine, is attenuated in the M- and L-segments, but the S-segment retains the virulent phenotype. MP-12 was manufactured as an Investigational New Drug vaccine by using MRC-5 cells and encodes a functional NSs gene, the major virulence factor of RVFV which 1 induces a shutoff of the host transcription, 2 inhibits interferon (IFN-β promoter activation, and 3 promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR. MP-12 lacks a marker for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA. Although MP-12 lacking NSs works for DIVA, it does not replicate efficiently in type-I IFN-competent MRC-5 cells, while the use of type-I IFN-incompetent cells may negatively affect its genetic stability. To generate modified MP-12 vaccine candidates encoding a DIVA marker, while still replicating efficiently in MRC-5 cells, we generated recombinant MP-12 encoding Punta Toro virus Adames strain NSs (rMP12-PTNSs or Sandfly fever Sicilian virus NSs (rMP12-SFSNSs in place of MP-12 NSs. We have demonstrated that those recombinant MP-12 viruses inhibit IFN-β mRNA synthesis, yet do not promote the degradation of PKR. The rMP12-PTNSs, but not rMP12-SFSNSs, replicated more efficiently than recombinant MP-12 lacking NSs in MRC-5 cells. Mice vaccinated with rMP12-PTNSs or rMP12-SFSNSs induced neutralizing antibodies at a level equivalent to those vaccinated with MP-12, and were efficiently protected from wild-type RVFV challenge. The rMP12-PTNSs and rMP12-SFSNSs did not induce antibodies cross-reactive to anti-RVFV NSs antibody and are therefore applicable to DIVA. Thus, rMP12-PTNSs is highly efficacious, replicates efficiently in MRC-5 cells, and encodes a DIVA marker, all of which

  17. Heat Shock Protein 70 Family Members Interact with Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus and Hazara Virus Nucleocapsid Proteins and Perform a Functional Role in the Nairovirus Replication Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surtees, Rebecca; Dowall, Stuart D.; Shaw, Amelia; Armstrong, Stuart; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W.; Mankouri, Jamel; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Nairovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family contains serious human and animal pathogens classified within multiple serogroups and species. Of these serogroups, the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) serogroup comprises sole members CCHFV and Hazara virus (HAZV). CCHFV is an emerging zoonotic virus that causes often-fatal hemorrhagic fever in infected humans for which preventative or therapeutic strategies are not available. In contrast, HAZV is nonpathogenic to humans and thus represents an excellent model to study aspects of CCHFV biology under conditions of more-accessible biological containment. The three RNA segments that form the nairovirus genome are encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein (N) to form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that are substrates for RNA synthesis and packaging into virus particles. We used quantitative proteomics to identify cellular interaction partners of CCHFV N and identified robust interactions with cellular chaperones. These interactions were validated using immunological methods, and the specific interaction between native CCHFV N and cellular chaperones of the HSP70 family was confirmed during live CCHFV infection. Using infectious HAZV, we showed for the first time that the nairovirus N-HSP70 association was maintained within both infected cells and virus particles, where N is assembled as RNPs. Reduction of active HSP70 levels in cells by the use of small-molecule inhibitors significantly reduced HAZV titers, and a model for chaperone function in the context of high genetic variability is proposed. These results suggest that chaperones of the HSP70 family are required for nairovirus replication and thus represent a genetically stable cellular therapeutic target for preventing nairovirus-mediated disease. IMPORTANCE Nairoviruses compose a group of human and animal viruses that are transmitted by ticks and associated with serious or fatal disease. One member is Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

  18. Oligomerization of Uukuniemi virus nucleocapsid protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Anna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uukuniemi virus (UUKV belongs to the Phlebovirus genus in the family Bunyaviridae. As a non-pathogenic virus for humans UUKV has served as a safe model bunyavirus in a number of studies addressing fundamental questions such as organization and regulation of viral genes, genome replication, structure and assembly. The present study is focused on the oligomerization of the UUKV nucleocapsid (N protein, which plays an important role in several steps of virus replication. The aim was to locate the domains involved in the N protein oligomerization and study the process in detail. Results A set of experiments concentrating on the N- and C-termini of the protein was performed, first by completely or partially deleting putative N-N-interaction domains and then by introducing point mutations of amino acid residues. Mutagenesis strategy was based on the computer modeling of secondary and tertiary structure of the N protein. The N protein mutants were studied in chemical cross-linking, immunofluorescence, mammalian two-hybrid, minigenome, and virus-like particle-forming assays. The data showed that the oligomerization ability of UUKV-N protein depends on the presence of intact α-helices on both termini of the N protein molecule and that a specific structure in the N-terminal region plays a crucial role in the N-N interaction(s. This structure is formed by two α-helices, rich in amino acid residues with aromatic (W7, F10, W19, F27, F31 or long aliphatic (I14, I24 side chains. Furthermore, some of the N-terminal mutations (e.g. I14A, I24A, F31A affected the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays. Conclusions UUKV-N protein has ability to form oligomers in chemical cross-linking and mammalian two-hybrid assays. In mutational analysis, some of the introduced single-point mutations abolished the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays, suggesting that especially the N

  19. Genomic analysis reveals Nairobi sheep disease virus to be highly diverse and present in both Africa, and in India in the form of the Ganjam virus variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pragya D; Vincent, Martin J; Khristova, Marina; Kale, Charuta; Nichol, Stuart T; Mishra, Akhilesh C; Mourya, Devendra T

    2011-07-01

    Nairobi sheep disease (NSD) virus, the prototype tick-borne virus of the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae is associated with acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis in sheep and goats in East and Central Africa. The closely related Ganjam virus found in India is associated with febrile illness in humans and disease in livestock. The complete S, M and L segment sequences of Ganjam and NSD virus and partial sequence analysis of Ganjam viral RNA genome S, M and L segments encoding regions (396 bp, 701 bp and 425 bp) of the viral nucleocapsid (N), glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and L polymerase (L) proteins, respectively, was carried out for multiple Ganjam virus isolates obtained from 1954 to 2002 and from various regions of India. M segments of NSD and Ganjam virus encode a large ORF for the glycoprotein precursor (GPC), (1627 and 1624 amino acids in length, respectively) and their L segments encode a very large L polymerase (3991 amino acids). The complete S, M and L segments of NSD and Ganjam viruses were more closely related to one another than to other characterized nairoviruses, and no evidence of reassortment was found. However, the NSD and Ganjam virus complete M segment differed by 22.90% and 14.70%, for nucleotide and amino acid respectively, and the complete L segment nucleotide and protein differing by 9.90% and 2.70%, respectively among themselves. Ganjam and NSD virus, complete S segment differed by 9.40-10.40% and 3.2-4.10 for nucleotide and proteins while among Ganjam viruses 0.0-6.20% and 0.0-1.4%, variation was found for nucleotide and amino acids. Ganjam virus isolates differed by up to 17% and 11% at the nucleotide level for the partial S and L gene fragments, respectively, with less variation observed at the deduced amino acid level (10.5 and 2%, S and L, respectively). However, the virus partial M gene fragment (which encodes the hypervariable mucin-like domain) of these viruses differed by as much as 56% at the nucleotide level. Phylogenetic

  20. Arbovirosis y operación ATALANTA: riesgo para viajeros y medidas de prevención y control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JF. Plaza Torres

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available El término arbovirosis se utiliza para definir a un grupo de enfermedades producidas por virus, que tiene en común la utilización de artrópodos como vectores para su transmisión. Se han reconocido más de 500 arbovirus pertenecientes en su mayoría a 5 familias: Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Reoviridae y Rhabdoviridae. Pese a su naturaleza mayoritariamente zoonótica, al menos un 25% de ellas afectan al hombre, siendo responsables de enfermedades como la fiebre amarilla, dengue o la fiebre de Chikungunya. Desde enero de 2009 un contingente militar se encuentra desplegado en el Golfo de Adén y en el Océano Indico integrado en la operación EU NAVFOR-ATALANTA de lucha contra la piratería y protección del tráfico mercante del Programa mundial de alimentos para Somalia. Las enfermedades transmitidas por vectores, en especial la malaria y diversas arbovirosis (dengue, Chikungunya, fiebre del Valle del Rift, fiebre del Nilo occidental se consideran un importante problema de salud pública en el area de operaciones (sobre todo en zonas rurales y/o costeras. Los vectores de estas enfermedades se encuentran ampliamente distribuidos por toda esta región, con tasas de infestación muy altas y que se incrementa de año en año. Por todo ello nos planteamos este trabajo cuyos objetivos son: conocer las características epidemiológicas de las principales arbovirosis que pueden afectar a las tropas españolas desplegadas en la operación Atalanta: fiebre del Valle del Rift, fiebre de O´nyong Nyong, fiebre del Nilo occidental, fiebre hemorrágica del Congo, fiebre amarilla, enfermedad de Sindbis, fiebre de Chikungunya y Dengue. Así mismo se pretende analizar las principales medidas para la prevención de estas enfermedades realizadas por el contingente español allí desplegado: educación sanitaria, control ambiental, protección frente a mosquitos.

  1. Isolation, Genetic Characterization, and Seroprevalence of Adana Virus, a Novel Phlebovirus Belonging to the Salehabad Virus Complex, in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Cigdem; Alwassouf, Sulaf; Piorkowski, Géraldine; Bichaud, Laurence; Tezcan, Seda; Dincer, Ender; Ergunay, Koray; Ozbel, Yusuf; Alten, Bulent; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new phlebovirus, Adana virus, was isolated from a pool of Phlebotomus spp. (Diptera; Psychodidae) in the province of Adana, in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. Genetic analysis based on complete coding of genomic sequences indicated that Adana virus belongs to the Salehabad virus species of the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. Adana virus is the third virus of the Salehabad virus species for which the complete sequence has been determined. To understand the epidemiology of Adana virus, a seroprevalence study using microneutralization assay was performed to detect the presence of specific antibodies in human and domestic animal sera collected in Adana as well as Mersin province, located 147 km west of Adana. The results demonstrate that the virus is present in both provinces. High seroprevalence rates in goats, sheep, and dogs support intensive exposure to Adana virus in the region, which has not been previously reported for any virus included in the Salehabad serocomplex; however, low seroprevalence rates in humans suggest that Adana virus is not likely to constitute an important public health problem in exposed human populations, but this deserves further studies. IMPORTANCE Until recently, in the genus Phlebovirus, the Salehabad virus species consisted of two viruses: Salehabad virus, isolated from sand flies in Iran, and Arbia virus, isolated from sand flies in Italy. Here we present the isolation and complete genome characterization of the Adana virus, which we propose to be included in the Salehabad virus species. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation and complete genome characterization, from sand flies in Turkey, of a Salehabad virus-related phlebovirus with supporting seropositivity in the Mediterranean, Aegean, and Central Anatolia regions, where phleboviruses have been circulating and causing outbreaks. Salehabad species viruses have generally been considered to be a group of viruses with little medical or

  2. Emerging and Reemeriging Human Bunyavirus Infections and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Laura J.; Anyamba, Assaf; LaBeaud, A. Desiree

    2013-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family includes a growing number of viruses that have contributed to the burden of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases around the globe. Many of these viruses cause severe clinical outcomes in human and animal populations, the results of which can be detrimental to public health and the economies of affected communities. The threat to endemic and non-native regions is particularly high, and national and international public health agencies are often on alert. Many of the bunyaviruses cause severe clinical disease including hemorrhage, organ failure, and death leading to their high-risk classification. Hantaviruses and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) (genus Phlebovirus) are National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Category A priority pathogens in the United States. Viral hemorrhagic fevers, a classification that includes many bunyaviruses, are immediately notifiable in the European Union. The emergence of new and reemerging bunyaviruses has resulted in numerous human and animal fatalities. Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in East Africa (1997/1998, 2006/2007), Sudan (2007), Southern Africa (2008-2010), Kenya (1997/1998, 2006/2007) (Anyamba et al., 2009, 2010; Breiman et al., 2010; Grobbelaar et al., 2011; Woods et al., 2002) and Saudi Arabia & Yemen (2000, 2010) (Food and Agriculture Organization, 2000; Hjelle and Glass, 2000; Madani et al., 2003) and the emergence of Sin Nombre virus (1993) (Hjelle and Glass, 2000) and most recently Schmallenberg virus (2011) (DEFRA, 2012) are prime examples of the devastating and worldwide toll bunyaviruses have on health and economies. Climate variability (precipitation and temperature in particular) greatly influence the ecological conditions that drive arboviral disease outbreaks across the globe. Several human and animal disease outbreaks have been influenced by changes in climate associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon including the bunyaviruses RVFV and Sin

  3. Hantavirus del nuevo mundo: Ecología y epidemiología de un virus emergente en latinoamérica The New-World Hantaviruses: Ecology and epidemiology of an emerging virus in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Puerta

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Los hantavirus son un grupo de patógenos emergentes (familia Bunyaviridae; género Hantavirus identificados como agentes etiológicos de la Fiebre Hemorrágica con Síndrome Renal (FHSR en Europa y Asia y el Síndrome Cardiopulmonar por Hantavirus (SCPH en las Américas. La FHSR está relacionada con roedores de las subfamilias Murinae y Arvicolinae y el SCPH con roedores de las subfamilias Sigmodontinae y Arvicolinae. Desde la identificación del SCPH en los EE.UU. en 1993, muchos casos de SCPH y un número cada vez mayor de hantavirus y sus roedores reservorios han sido identificados en Centro y Sud América. Estudios epidemiológicos han demostrado diferencias notables en las seroprevalencias de anticuerpos en humanos y roedores reservorios que oscilan entre el 1% y más del 40%. Hasta ahora han sido notificados en toda América más de 1500 casos de SCPH y aproximadamente más de 15 variantes de hantavirus genética y serológicamente distintos asociados a roedores sigmodontinos. Las formas clínicas leves-autolimitadas, moderadas y graves de la enfermedad, los antecedentes de transmisión persona a persona y una incidencia mayor de manifestaciones clínicas extrapulmonares que se diferencian de la enfermedad clásica descrita por primera vez en EE.UU., son aspectos importantes sobre la epidemiología de los hantavirus y el SCPH en Latinoamérica; sin embargo, la historia completa de los hantavirus está aún por escribirse, debido a la naturaleza dinámica de estos virus y sus patologías, y a la complejidad de los factores que intervienen en su aparición, establecimiento y diseminación en poblaciones humanas y animales. Latinoamérica continúa representando la porción del continente con una oportunidad única y desafiante para el estudio de la relación de los hantavirus con sus huéspedes reservorios naturales y las interacciones virus-roedor-humano. Probablemente más hantavirus podrían ser descritos en el futuro, y ser

  4. CONTROL OF VIRAL DISEASES TRANSMITTED IN A PERSISTENT MANNER BY THRIPS IN PEPPER (TOMATO SPOTTED WILT VIRUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanigliulo, A; Viggiano, A; Gualco, A; Crescenzi, A

    2014-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt disease is caused by Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) (Tospovirus, Bunyaviridae), a virus that severely damages and reduces the yield of many economically important plants worldwide and actually it is a major disease affecting the production of tomato and pepper in Italy. Due to the non-predictive nature of its outbreaks combined with the lack of forecasting, adoption of preventive measures have not always been practical, in fact the disease cycle has proven to be extremely difficult to break because of the wide and often overlapping host range of both the virus and the thrips vectors, which transmit the virus in a persistent, circulative, and propagative manner. Moreover recently, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of TSWV that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in Italy and also in Brazil, USA, Spain and Australia, and this occurrence raises the question on the importance of a new approach of integrated pest management for TSWV management, including both control of its insect vector and the induction of the plant's resistance against viral infection. In this perspective, a study was performed in 2012 and 2013 with the purpose of evaluating the efficacy of the insecticide Cyantraniliprole alone or combined with Acibenzolar-S-Methyl (ASM), inducer of systemic acquired resistance, in the control of tomato spotted wilt disease in pepper. The experiment was performed in laboratory, in a thermo-conditioned greenhouse, into separate insect-proof cages and consisted of 5 treatments and 2 applications (plus a pre-transplant application for treatments were ASM was used. Variables were the mode of application of ASM in pre-transplant (by foliar or by drench) and the duration of the exposure time of the treated plants to viruliferous insects. Pepper cv. Corno di Toro, devoid of any resistance to TSWV, was used. Plants were observed daily to record any symptom induced by

  5. Níveis de anticorpos para arbovírus em indivíduos da região de Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brasil Arbovirus antibody levels in the population of the Ribeirão Preto area, S.Paulo State (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de conhecer os níveis de anticorpos para arbovírus, foram estudados 302 indivíduos da região de Ribeirão Preto (Brasil, moradores em 3 tipos de locais com distintas formas de organização do espaço: próximos à área de paisagem natural; com paisagem modificada para a agropecuária; comunidades urbanas. Foram efetuados testes sorológicos de inibição da hemaglutinação, neutralização e fixação do complemento para 21 arbovírus. Os resultados mostraram que 19,9% dos indivíduos investigados apresentaram anticorpos, sugerindo infecções pregressas por vários arbovírus. A maior percentagem de habitantes que se infectaram por estes agentes foi observada em locais próximos à área de paisagem natural, 38,5%. O vesiculovírus Piry foi o agente para o qual se encontrou o maior número de soros reagentes, 12,5%. A maior ocorrência de portadores de anticorpos para o vírus Piry foi observada nos indivíduos: do sexo masculino; com idade superior a 40 anos; guardas-florestais, lavradores e profissionais com atividades ligadas ao rio.The area of Ribeirão Preto is located in the north of S.Paulo State - Brazil. The population is 611,742. The climate is sub-tropical warm and humid. The area of Ribeirão Preto is almost completely deforested and covered by extensive plantations of sugar cane and coffee and pasture. With the purpose of discovering the arbovirus antibody levels, a serologic survey was carried out among people of the Ribeirão Preto area living in different geographical environments. Fifty two inhabitants located close to natural landscap, 38 in places with landscape modified by agriculture and cattle raising, and 93 in urban communities were studied. Serologic tests for hemagglutination inhibition by 20 Togaviridae and Bunyaviridae arbovirus, and neutralization and complement fixation tests on Piry Rhabdoviridae were carried out. It was discovered that 19.9% of the sample population presented antibodies

  6. Arboviruses pathogenic for domestic and wild animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubálek, Zdenek; Rudolf, Ivo; Nowotny, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to provide an updated and concise systematic review on taxonomy, history, arthropod vectors, vertebrate hosts, animal disease, and geographic distribution of all arboviruses known to date to cause disease in homeotherm (endotherm) vertebrates, except those affecting exclusively man. Fifty arboviruses pathogenic for animals have been documented worldwide, belonging to seven families: Togaviridae (mosquito-borne Eastern, Western, and Venezuelan equine encephalilitis viruses; Sindbis, Middelburg, Getah, and Semliki Forest viruses), Flaviviridae (mosquito-borne yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, Murray Valley encephalitis, West Nile, Usutu, Israel turkey meningoencephalitis, Tembusu and Wesselsbron viruses; tick-borne encephalitis, louping ill, Omsk hemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur Forest disease, and Tyuleniy viruses), Bunyaviridae (tick-borne Nairobi sheep disease, Soldado, and Bhanja viruses; mosquito-borne Rift Valley fever, La Crosse, Snowshoe hare, and Cache Valley viruses; biting midges-borne Main Drain, Akabane, Aino, Shuni, and Schmallenberg viruses), Reoviridae (biting midges-borne African horse sickness, Kasba, bluetongue, epizootic hemorrhagic disease of deer, Ibaraki, equine encephalosis, Peruvian horse sickness, and Yunnan viruses), Rhabdoviridae (sandfly/mosquito-borne bovine ephemeral fever, vesicular stomatitis-Indiana, vesicular stomatitis-New Jersey, vesicular stomatitis-Alagoas, and Coccal viruses), Orthomyxoviridae (tick-borne Thogoto virus), and Asfarviridae (tick-borne African swine fever virus). They are transmitted to animals by five groups of hematophagous arthropods of the subphyllum Chelicerata (order Acarina, families Ixodidae and Argasidae-ticks) or members of the class Insecta: mosquitoes (family Culicidae); biting midges (family Ceratopogonidae); sandflies (subfamily Phlebotominae); and cimicid bugs (family Cimicidae). Arboviral diseases in endotherm animals may therefore be classified as: tick