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Sample records for bulky rhodium intercalators

  1. One-step synthesis of layered yttrium hydroxides in immiscible liquid-liquid systems: Intercalation of sterically-bulky hydrophobic organic anions and doping of europium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mebae; Fujihara, Shinobu

    2014-02-01

    Inorganic-organic layered rare-earth compounds were synthesized on the basis of a biphasic liquid-liquid system in one pot. Layered yttrium hydroxides (LYHs) were chosen as a host material for the intercalation of hydrophobic organic guest anions such as benzoate, sebacate, or laurate. In a typical synthesis, an organic phase dissolving carboxylic acid was placed in contact with an equal amount of an aqueous phase dissolving yttrium nitrate n-hydrate and urea. At elevated temperatures up to 80 °C, urea was hydrolyzed to release hydroxyl anions which were used to form yttrium hydroxide layers. LYHs were then precipitated with the intercalation of carboxylate anions delivered from the organic phase under the distribution law. The structure and the morphology of the LYHs could be modulated by the intercalated anions. Doped with Eu3+ ions, the LYHs exhibited red photoluminescence which was enhanced by the intercalated anions due to the antenna effect.

  2. One-step synthesis of layered yttrium hydroxides in immiscible liquid–liquid systems: Intercalation of sterically-bulky hydrophobic organic anions and doping of europium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Mebae; Fujihara, Shinobu, E-mail: shinobu@applc.keio.ac.jp

    2014-02-15

    Inorganic–organic layered rare-earth compounds were synthesized on the basis of a biphasic liquid–liquid system in one pot. Layered yttrium hydroxides (LYHs) were chosen as a host material for the intercalation of hydrophobic organic guest anions such as benzoate, sebacate, or laurate. In a typical synthesis, an organic phase dissolving carboxylic acid was placed in contact with an equal amount of an aqueous phase dissolving yttrium nitrate n-hydrate and urea. At elevated temperatures up to 80 °C, urea was hydrolyzed to release hydroxyl anions which were used to form yttrium hydroxide layers. LYHs were then precipitated with the intercalation of carboxylate anions delivered from the organic phase under the distribution law. The structure and the morphology of the LYHs could be modulated by the intercalated anions. Doped with Eu{sup 3+} ions, the LYHs exhibited red photoluminescence which was enhanced by the intercalated anions due to the antenna effect. - Graphical abstract: The Eu{sup 3+}-doped layered yttrium hydroxide exhibits intense red photoluminescence after intercalation of benzoate ions. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Immiscible biphasic liquid systems were introduced to synthesize layered yttrium hydroxides. • The temperature of the biphasic systems does not exceed 80 °C in one step of the synthesis. • Hydrophobic organic anions were intercalated between the hydroxide layers in one pot. • Structure and morphology of the hydroxides were modulated by changing the kind of organic anions. • Eu{sup 3+}-doping led to red luminescence from the hydroxides in association with the intercalated organic anions.

  3. Bulky aryloxo organotitanium chlorides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    In view of the proven ability of C5Me5 ligand (Cp*) in stabilizing organotitanium compounds, it is of interest to generate bulky aryloxide derivatives of Cp*TiCl3. Thus, the reaction of Cp*TiCl3 with various phenols in a 1:1 ratio in the presence of Et3N affords the aryloxides of the formula [(ArO)Cp*TiCl2] (Ar = 4-MeC6H4, ...

  4. Rhodium platings – experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rudolf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern rhodium plating solutions are based on either sulphate or phosphate. Although in theory there are four possible combinations, in practice only three different rhodium electrolytes are used. These are based on dilutions of rhodium sulphate or phosphate concentrates with added sulphuric or phosphoric acid. These processes are be discussed in this paper with a demonstration of Rh platings in the Slovenian firm Zlatarna Celje d.d.

  5. Hydrogen adsorption on rhodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, M.E.; Michri, A.A.; Kalish, T.V.; Pshenichnikov, A.G.; Kazarinov, V.E.

    1987-09-01

    Measurements of thermal desorption and electron work function were used to investigate the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption from the gas phase on rhodium single-crystal faces and on a polycrystalline rhodium sample at room temperatures over the pressure range from 1.3-10/sup -3/ to 1.3 x 10/sup -5/ Pa. It was found that dipoles oriented with their negative ends toward the gas phase (dipoles of type I) form more rapidly than dipoles having the opposite orientation (dipoles of type II). For formation of the latter, a mechanism is proposed according to which the rate-determining step of the overall process is the transition of reversibly adsorbed hydrogen to dipoles of type II (the spillover), which occurs at surface defects. It was shown that the kinetics of this process with respect to the individual defect obeys an equation which is zeroth order in theta/sub H/ and pressure.

  6. Rhodium Catalyzed Decarbonylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Suárez, Eduardo José; Kahr, Klara; Riisager, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Rhodium catalyzed decarbonylation has developed significantly over the last 50 years and resulted in a wide range of reported catalyst systems and reaction protocols. Besides experimental data, literature also includes mechanistic studies incorporating Hammett methods, analysis of kinetic isotope...... effects as well as computational studies of model systems, which give an indication of the scope of the process. In this chapter, fundamental applications of Rh-catalyzed decarbonylation reactions are surveyed and discussed, including cross-coupling reactions, tandem reactions, and alternative...

  7. Fast photoinduced electron transfer through DNA intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C J; Arkin, M R; Ghatlia, N D; Bossmann, S; Turro, N J; Barton, J K

    1994-06-07

    We report evidence for fast photoinduced electron transfer mediated by the DNA helix that requires metal complexes that are avid intercalators of DNA. Here the donor bis(phenanthroline)(dipyridophenazine)ruthenium(II) [Ru(phen)2dppz2+] and acceptor bis(9,10-phenanthrenequinone diimine)(phenanthroline)rhodium(III) [Rh(phi)2phen3+] intercalate into DNA with Kb > 10(6) M-1. Luminescence quenching experiments in the presence of two different lengths of DNA yield upward-curving Stern-Volmer plots and the loss of luminescence intensity far exceeds the change in emission lifetimes. In the presence of a nonintercalative electron acceptor, Ru(NH3)3+(6), Ru(phen)2dppz2+ luminescence is quenched much less efficiently compared to that found for the intercalative Rh(phi)2phen3+ quencher and follows linear Stern-Volmer kinetics; steady-state and time-resolved Stern-Volmer plots are comparable in scale. These experiments are consistent with a model involving fast long-range electron transfer between intercalators through the DNA helix.

  8. Quantification of Rhodium in a Series of Inorganic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analytical method for the quantification of rhodium using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and cobalt as internal standard was developed. Rhodium recovery was determined in different samples, which included a certified reference material (CRM), pure rhodium metal, inorganic ...

  9. «-Particle induced reactions on rhodium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by the stacked foil activation technique and high purity germanium (HPGe) 7-ray spectroscopy method up to 50 MeV. 2.1 Preparation of target stack spectroscopically pure (99.99%) rhodium foils of 14.88 mg/cm2 thickness were taken and a stack of ten such foils was prepared which was used as a target. The samples.

  10. Intercalated graphite electrical conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    For years NASA has wanted to reduce the weight of spacecraft and aircraft. Experiments are conducted to find a lightweight synthetic metal to replace copper. The subject of this paper, intercalated graphite, is such a material. Intercalated graphite is made by heating petroleum or coal to remove the hydrogen and to form more covalent bonds, thus increasing the molecular weight. The coal or petroleum eventually turns to pitch, which can then be drawn into a fiber. With continued heating the pitch-based fiber releases hydrogen and forms a carbon fiber. The carbon fiber, if heated sufficiently, becomes more organized in parallel layers of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms in the form of graphite. A conductor of intercalated graphite is potentially useful for spacecraft or aircraft applications because of its low weight.

  11. 103Rh NMR spectroscopy and its application to rhodium chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernsting, Jan Meine; Gaemers, Sander; Elsevier, Cornelis J

    2004-09-01

    Rhodium is used for a number of large processes that rely on homogeneous rhodium-catalyzed reactions, for instance rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of alkenes, carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid and hydrodesulfurization of thiophene derivatives (in crude oil). Many laboratory applications in organometallic chemistry and catalysis involve organorhodium chemistry and a wealth of rhodium coordination compounds is known. For these and other areas, 103Rh NMR spectroscopy appears to be a very useful analytical tool. In this review, most of the literature concerning 103Rh NMR spectroscopy published from 1989 up to and including 2003 has been covered. After an introduction to several experimental methods for the detection of the insensitive 103Rh nucleus, a discussion of factors affecting the transition metal chemical shift is given. Computational aspects and calculations of chemical shifts are also briefly addressed. Next, the application of 103Rh NMR in coordination and organometallic chemistry is elaborated in more detail by highlighting recent developments in measurement and interpretation of 103Rh NMR data, in relation to rhodium-assisted reactions and homogeneous catalysis. The dependence of the 103Rh chemical shift on the ligands at rhodium in the first coordination sphere, on the complex geometry, oxidation state, temperature, solvent and concentration is treated. Several classes of compounds and special cases such as chiral rhodium compounds are reviewed. Finally, a section on scalar coupling to rhodium is provided. 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Intercalating oleylamines in graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kaikun; Liang, Si; Zou, Lianfeng; Huang, Liwei; Park, Cheol; Zhu, Lisheng; Fang, Jiye; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Howard

    2012-02-07

    Graphite oxide has been synthesized from raw graphite particles and been treated with various mass amounts of oleylamine as intercalants to form intercalation compounds. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the inter-sheet distances strongly depend on the graphite oxide to oleylamine mass ratios. The equilibrium-like behavior implies diffusion-dominated oleylamine adsorption on graphite oxide in solution and excluded volume intercalations among oleylamine-adsorbed graphite oxide during restacking. The intercalation compounds are soluble in organic solvents, and their applications in the fabrication of transparent and conductive coatings have been demonstrated.

  13. Structural properties of small rhodium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soon, Yee Yeen; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    We report a systematic study of the structural properties of rhodium clusters at the atomistic level. A novel global-minimum search algorithm, known as parallel tempering multicanonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), is used to obtain the geometrical structures with lowest minima at the semi-empirical level where Gupta potential is used to describe the atomic interaction among the rhodium atoms. These structures are then re-optimized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with exchange-correlation energy approximated by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The structures are optimized for different spin multiplicities. The ones with lowest energies will be taken as ground-state structures. In most cases, we observe only minor changes in the geometry and bond length of the clusters as a result of DFT-level re-optimization. Only in some limited cases, the initial geometries obtained from the PTMBHGA are modified by the re-optimization. The variation of structural properties, such as ground-state geometry, symmetry and binding energy, with respect to the cluster size is studied and agreed well with other results available in the literature.

  14. Half-sandwich ruthenium, rhodium and iridium complexes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sandwich ruthenium, rhodium and iridium complexes of triazolopyridine ligand: Synthesis and structural studies. NARASINGA RAO PALEPU RAO MOHAN KOLLIPARA. Regular Article Volume 129 Issue 2 February 2017 pp 177-184 ...

  15. Magnetism in intercalated graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Sajid [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India); Nanda, B. R. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Using density functional calculations we explore the possibilities of inducing spin moments in otherwise non-magnetic electronic structure of graphene. Through intercalation of H, N, O and F atoms between two hexagonal stacked graphene layers, we show that unpaired electrons can be generated when the planar coordinates of the functional atoms coincide with the center of the graphene hexagon. The spin-half states are realized at the functional sites for certain values of interlayer separations. For oxygen and fluorine these interlayer separations represent the natural stable phases and for hydrogen and nitrogen they induce instability which can be overcome by applying external pressure. We attribute the formation of spin-half states to the one dimensional confinement potential exerted by the graphene layers on the valence electrons of the functional elements.

  16. A nine-atom rhodium-aluminum oxide cluster oxidizes five carbon monoxide molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Hua-Min; Yuan, Zhen; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-01-01

    ... catalysis is elusive. Here we report that a single atom of rhodium, a powerful noble metal catalyst, can promote the transfer of five oxygen atoms to oxidize carbon monoxide from a nine-atom rhodium-aluminum oxide cluster...

  17. Bulky waste quantities and treatment methods in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Petersen, Claus; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2012-01-01

    were identified of which ten were recyclable and constituted 50–60% of the total quantity. The others were combustible waste for incineration (30–40%) and non-combustible waste for landfilling (10%). The largest fractions by mass were combustible waste, bricks and tile, concrete, non-combustible waste....... In addition a sorting analysis was conducted on combustible waste, which is a major fraction of bulky waste in Denmark. The generation of bulky waste was found to be 150–250 kg capita−1 year−1, and 90% of the waste was collected at recycling centres; the rest through kerbside collection. Twelve main fractions......, wood, and metal scrap, which together made up more than 90% of the total waste amounts. The amount of combustible waste could be significantly reduced through better sorting. Many of the waste fractions consisted of composite products that underwent thorough separation before being recycled...

  18. Amine Transaminase Engineering for Spatially Bulky Substrate Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, Martin S; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Spurr, Paul; Hanlon, Steven P; Wirz, Beat; Iding, Hans; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2017-06-01

    Amine transaminase (ATA) catalyzing stereoselective amination of prochiral ketones is an attractive alternative to transition metal catalysis. As wild-type ATAs do not accept sterically hindered ketones, efforts to widen the substrate scope to more challenging targets are of general interest. We recently designed ATAs to accept aromatic and thus planar bulky amines, with a sequence-based motif that supports the identification of novel enzymes. However, these variants were not active against 2,2-dimethyl-1-phenyl-propan-1-one, which carries a bulky tert-butyl substituent adjacent to the carbonyl function. Here, we report a solution for this type of substrate. The evolved ATAs perform asymmetric synthesis of the respective R amine with high conversions by using either alanine or isopropylamine as amine donor. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Why apply for an intercalated research degree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Riaz; Fowler, Alex; Whitehurst, Katharine; Rajmohan, Shivanchan; Gundogan, Buket; Koshy, Kiron

    2017-07-01

    Intercalated degrees are commonly undertaken as part of the medical undergraduate course. In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of intercalation, along with alternatives that could be considered.

  20. Ca intercalated bilayer graphene as a thinnest limit of superconducting C6Ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanetani, Kohei; Sugawara, Katsuaki; Sato, Takafumi; Shimizu, Ryota; Iwaya, Katsuya; Hitosugi, Taro; Takahashi, Takashi

    2012-11-27

    Success in isolating a 2D graphene sheet from bulky graphite has triggered intensive studies of its physical properties as well as its application in devices. Graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) have provided a platform of exotic quantum phenomena such as superconductivity, but it is unclear whether such intercalation is feasible in the thinnest 2D limit (i.e., bilayer graphene). Here we report a unique experimental realization of 2D GIC, by fabricating calcium-intercalated bilayer graphene C(6)CaC(6) on silicon carbide. We have investigated the structure and electronic states by scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We observed a free-electron-like interlayer band at the Brillouin-zone center, which is thought to be responsible for the superconductivity in 3D GICs, in addition to a large π* Fermi surface at the zone boundary. The present success in fabricating Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene would open a promising route to search for other 2D superconductors as well as to explore its application in devices.

  1. Rhodium(0) metalloradicals in binuclear C-H activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puschmann, F.F.; Grützmacher, H.; de Bruin, B.

    2010-01-01

    A reactive rhodium(0) metalloradical capable of binuclear activation of an aromatic C-H bond of PPh3 is disclosed. Kinetic measurements and density functional theory calculations reveal a binuclear mechanism: two metalloradicals add to a 'double bond' of the aromatic substrate while approaching the

  2. Methane Steam Reforming Kinetics for a Rhodium-Based Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jon Geest; Jakobsen, M.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2010-01-01

    Methane steam reforming is the key reaction to produce synthesis gas and hydrogen at the industrial scale. Here the kinetics of methane steam reforming over a rhodium-based catalyst is investigated in the temperature range 500-800 A degrees C and as a function of CH4, H2O and H-2 partial pressures...

  3. Quantification of Rhodium in a Series of Inorganic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Department of Chemistry, University of the Free State, 205 Nelson Mandela Avenue, Bloemfontein, 9300, South Africa. Received ... detection (LOD) and robustness were all investigated to confirm the suitability of this newly developed analytical procedure for ... Rhodium has a number of interesting applications in industry,.

  4. Renewable Pentablock Copolymers Containing Bulky Natural Rosin for Tough Bioplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Anisur; Ganewatta, Mitra S.; Lokupitiya, Hasala N.; Liang, Yuan; Stefik, Morgan; Tang, Chuanbing

    Renewable polymers have received significant attention due to environmental concerns on petrochemical counterparts. One of the most abundant natural biomass is resin acids. However, most polymers derived from resin acids are low molecular weight and brittle because of the high chain entanglement molecular weight resulted from the bulky hydrophenanthrene pendant group. It is well established that the brittleness can be overcome by synthesizing multi-block copolymers with low entanglement molecular weight components. We investigated the effects of chain architecture and microdomain orientation on mechanical properties of both tri and pentablock copolymers. We synthesized rosin-containing A-B-A-B-A type pentablock and A-B-A type triblock copolymers to improve their mechanical properties. Pentablock copolymers showed higher strength and better toughness as compared to triblock copolymers, both superior to homopolymers. The greater toughness of pentablock copolymers is due to the presence of the rosin based midblock chains that act as bridging chains between two polynorbornene blocks.

  5. Inoperable bulky melanoma responds to neoadjuvant therapy with vemurafenib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaki, Niloofar; Cardona-Huerta, Servando; Martineau, Lea; Thummala, Suresh; Cheng, Shih-Tsung; Bunker, Steve R; Garcia-Kennedy, Richard; Wang, Wei; Minor, David; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Leong, Stanley P L

    2012-01-01

    A patient with a bulky inoperable stage IIIC melanoma involving the left axilla and neck from a primary of the left medial elbow received vemurafenib as neo-adjuvant treatment. Based on the molecular analysis, BRAF V600E mutation was present. After 4 months of vemurafinib treatment, the tumours shrank to less than 50% of original clinical size and allowed the surgeons to perform a left modified radical neck dissection and left radical axillary dissection. Pathological analysis of specimen revealed viable metastatic cells only in 1 of 40 nodes resected in the neck and axillary dissection, accounting for over 98% pathological response. Other lymph nodes had a mixture of foamy histiocytic inflammatory reaction fibrosis and islands of necrotic tissues. After recovery from surgery, vemurafenib was resumed and continued for 6 months. He remained disease free 6 months after surgery. PMID:23093505

  6. Interfacial bonding stabilizes rhodium and rhodium oxide nanoparticles on layered Nb oxide and Ta oxide supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Megan E; Binz, Jason M; Tanase, Mihaela; Shahri, Seyed Mehdi Kamali; Sharma, Renu; Rioux, Robert M; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2014-04-16

    Metal nanoparticles are commonly supported on metal oxides, but their utility as catalysts is limited by coarsening at high temperatures. Rhodium oxide and rhodium metal nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports are anomalously stable. To understand this, the nanoparticle-support interaction was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), and synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques. Nanosheets derived from the layered oxides KCa2Nb3O10, K4Nb6O17, and RbTaO3 were compared as supports to nanosheets of Na-TSM, a synthetic fluoromica (Na0.66Mg2.68(Si3.98Al0.02)O10.02F1.96), and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O. High surface area SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports were also used for comparison in the ITC experiments. A Born-Haber cycle analysis of ITC data revealed an exothermic interaction between Rh(OH)3 nanoparticles and the layered niobate and tantalate supports, with ΔH values in the range -32 kJ·mol(-1) Rh to -37 kJ·mol(-1) Rh. In contrast, the interaction enthalpy was positive with SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports. The strong interfacial bonding in the former case led to "reverse" ripening of micrometer-size Rh(OH)3, which dispersed as 0.5 to 2 nm particles on the niobate and tantalate supports. In contrast, particles grown on Na-TSM and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O nanosheets were larger and had a broad size distribution. ETEM, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and pair distribution function analyses were used to study the growth of supported nanoparticles under oxidizing and reducing conditions, as well as the transformation from Rh(OH)3 to Rh nanoparticles. Interfacial covalent bonding, possibly strengthened by d-electron acid/base interactions, appear to stabilize Rh(OH)3, Rh2O3, and Rh nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports.

  7. Hydrodesulfurization Properties of Rhodium Phosphide: Comparison with Rhodium Metal and Sulfide Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, John R.; Bowker, Richard H.; Gaudette, Amy F.; Smith, Mica C.; Moak, Cameron E.; Nam, Charles Y.; Pratum, Thomas K.; Bussell, Mark E.

    2010-12-15

    Silica-supported rhodium phosphide (Rh2P/SiO2) catalysts were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and chemisorption measurements. XRD and TEM analysis of a 5 wt.% Rh2P/SiO2 catalyst confirmed the presence of well-dispersed Rh2P crystallites on the silica support having an average crystallite size of 10 nm. NMR spectroscopy showed unsupported and silica-supported Rh2P to be metallic and XPS spectroscopy yielded a surface composition of Rh1.94P1.00 that is similar to that expected from the bulk stoichiometry. The 5 wt.% Rh2P/SiO2 catalyst exhibited a higher dibenzothiophene (DBT) hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activity than did Rh/SiO2 and sulfided Rh/SiO2 catalysts having a similar Rh loading and was also more active than a commercial NiAMo/Al2O3 catalyst. The Rh2P/SiO2 catalyst showed excellent stability over a 100 h DBT HDS activity measurement and was more S tolerant than the Rh/SiO2 catalyst. The Rh2P/SiO2 catalyst strongly favored the hydrogenation pathway for DBT HDS, while the Rh/SiO2 and sulfided Rh/SiO2 catalysts favored the direct desulfurization pathway.

  8. Sonochemical synthesis and application of rhodium-graphene nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sourov; Bag, Sourav; Bhar, Radhaballav; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2011-07-01

    Highly water dispersible rhodium-graphene nanocomposite have been successfully synthesized by the simple reduction of Rh3+ salt on poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide)/poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO/PPO/PEO) triblock copolymer or pluronic-stabilized graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets with borohydride. Rhodium nanoparticles, having average size of 1-3 nm, are homogeneously distributed through out the graphene sheets. Some porous structures of graphene sheets have also been observed after the reduction of pluronic-stabilized GO in the presence of metal ions. The material is very effective for hydrogenation of arenes, especially for benzene as the substrate material at the room temperature and 5 atm pressure of hydrogen.

  9. Kinetic and mechanistic investigation of the substitution reactions of four and five co-ordinated rhodium stibine complexes with a bulky phosphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennion, Clare; Jonasson, Klara J; Wendt, Ola F; Roodt, Andreas

    2013-10-21

    The substitution reaction of trans-[Rh(Cl)(CO)(SbPh3)2] (1) with tris(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)phosphite (2,4-TBPP) to form trans-[Rh(Cl)(CO)(2,4-TBPP)2] (4) in two consecutive steps has been investigated by UV-vis stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The experiments were performed in dichloromethane and in ethyl acetate, at 298 K and 268 K respectively for the first reaction step, and for the second reaction step over a temperature range from 278 to 313 K in both solvents. The first step is very fast (up to 1630 s(−1)) and on the limit of what is observable with the stopped-flow technique. Introduction of the five-coordinate complex trans-[Rh(Cl)(CO)(SbPh3)3] (2) in equilibrium with (1), by adding an excess SbPh3, led to a significant decrease in overall reaction rate for the formation of the intermediate trans-[Rh(Cl)(CO)(SbPh3)2(2,4-TBPP)] (3). Activation parameters for the second substitution reaction, in which 3 is converted to 4, has been determined as ΔH‡ = 22.85 ± 0.17 and 28.38 ± 0.10 kJ mol(−1) and ΔS‡ = −144.7 ± 0.6 and −100.9 ± 0.4 J mol(−1) K(−1) for CH2Cl2 and EtOAc respectively, supporting an associative pathway. A strongly coordinating solvent promotes both reactions. In all reaction steps a strong tendency for stibines to promote 5-coordinated, fairly stable intermediates is manifested.

  10. Surface science studies of Cobalt and Rhodium single crystal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ramsvik, Trond

    2001-01-01

    The main topic of this thesis is the investigation of small molecules adsorbed on the transition metals cobalt and rhodium surfaces by means of predominantly high-resolution core level photoemission and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The thesis can be divided into three parts where the following phenomena are examined: 1) internal molecular vibrations in the core level photoemission spectra 2) hybridisation and thermal decomposition of adsorbates 3) growth and...

  11. Scalar Relativistic Study of the Structure of Rhodium Acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily E. Edwards

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Rhodium acetate, related rhodium carboxylates, and rhodium amide complexes are powerful catalysts for carbene chemistry. They readily promote the decomposition of diazo compounds and transfer the resulting carbene to a variety of substrates. There have been several quantum chemistry studies of these compounds, particularly of the acetate. These have all used non-relativistic methods, and all have shown optimized Rh-Rh bond lengths significantly longer than the experimental value. In this study we have surveyed several scalar relativistic DFT methods using Gaussian, Slater, and numerical basis functions (in DGAUSS, ADF, and DMOL3. Several combinations of exchange-correlation functionals with relativistic and non-relativistic effective core potentials (ECP were investigated, as were non-relativistic and all electron scalar relativistic methods. The combination of the PW91 exchange and PW91 correlation functional with the Christiansen-Ermler ECP gave the best results: 2.3918 Å compared to the experimental value of 2.3855±0.0005 Å.

  12. Surgical Management of Bulky Mediastinal Metastases in Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Adwin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular thyroid adenoma and carcinoma are very common. Benign and malignant lesions are usually indistinguishable from cytology alone and often require confirmatory resection. The spread of follicular carcinoma is usually hematogenous and is treated with surgery and adjuvant radioactive iodine. Very rarely, metastases occur in the mediastinum. Patients usually present with severe compressive symptoms. With proper treatment and follow-up, the prognosis for these type of thyroid malignancies is excellent. In the case presented here, our patient presented to the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center with a progressively enlarging anterior neck swelling. The swelling had started 10 years before his presentation. We diagnosed him with an advanced thyroid malignancy with bulky mediastinal metastases. After extensive investigations and counseling, we chose to treat the patient with tumor excision and mediastinal metastases resection. Typically, mediastinal resection involves the removal of the sternum and use of an acrylic implant to recreate the sternum. In this case, the sternum and ribs were removed with subsequent myocutaneous flap coverage for the wound defect. Our experience represents an alternative treatment option in cases where implant use is unsuitable.

  13. Asymmetric ligand-exchange reaction of biphenol derivatives and chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenyl-rhodium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroko; Ito, Jun-ichi; Kikuchi, Makoto; Nishiyama, Hisao

    2008-09-01

    Chiral bis(oxazolinyl)phenyl-rhodium acetate complex can enantioselectively capture 1,1'-binaphthol derivatives by ligand-exchange reaction. The structure of the bis(oxazolinyl)phenyl-rhodium biphenol and binaphthol complexes were confirmed by X-ray analysis.

  14. Magnetism in intercalated compounds of layered manganese ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    dilation of the lattice. The host MnPS3 is a two-dimensional antiferromagnet. The intercalated compounds, however, show weak ferromagnetism at low temperatures. When the guest cations are hydrated ions, the intercalates are unstable, losing water to give Mn1–xG2xPS3. In order to keep the guest cations within the ...

  15. Modern induction chemotherapy before chemoradiation for bulky locally-advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer improves survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaya Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In patients with large tumors or bulky nodal NSCLC, carboplatin-based induction chemotherapy may be an important addition to definitive CCRT in the modern era. Our findings strongly support further investigation induction chemotherapy in this population.

  16. Fabrication of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugawara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have succeeded in fabricating Li-intercalated bilayer graphene on silicon carbide. The low-energy electron diffraction from Li-deposited bilayer graphene shows a sharp 3×3R30° pattern in contrast to Li-deposited monolayer graphene. This indicates that Li atoms are intercalated between two adjacent graphene layers and take the same well-ordered superstructure as in bulk C6Li. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has revealed that Li atoms are fully ionized and the π bands of graphene are systematically folded by the superstructure of intercalated Li atoms, producing a snowflake-like Fermi surface centered at the Γ point. The present result suggests a high potential of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene for application to a nano-scale Li-ion battery.

  17. Modifiers in rhodium catalysts for carbon monoxide hydrogenation: Structure-activity relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhore, N. A.

    1989-05-01

    This report is aimed at identifying interesting modified rhodium systems and elucidating structure-activity relationships in these systems with the overall goal of understanding the scientific issues in the catalytic conversion of syngas to oxygenates. Specific additives (sodium and molybdenum) are selected based on the scoping experiments. The effect of the additives on supported rhodium catalysts is then investigated. Throughout the investigation, experiments and analysis were performed on real systems instead of ideal systems. 374 refs., 82 figs., 57 tabs.

  18. Rhodium-Catalyzed Linear Codimerization and Cycloaddition of Ketenes with Alkynes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruyuki Kondo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel rhodium-catalyzed linear codimerization of alkyl phenyl ketenes with internal alkynes to dienones and a novel synthesis of furans by an unusual cycloaddition of diaryl ketenes with internal alkynes have been developed. These reactions proceed smoothly with the same rhodium catalyst, RhCl(PPh33, and are highly dependent on the structure and reactivity of the starting ketenes.

  19. Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0023 (NII) - Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium- Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts MATTHEW KANAN LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV...Effects on Rhodium- Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts Principal Investigator: Matthew W. Kanan Project Publications: 1. “An Electric Field–Induced Change...Interfacial Electric Field Effects on a Carbene Reaction Catalyzed by Rh Porphyrins ” Gorin, C. F.; Beh, E. S.; Bui, Q. M.; Dick, G. R.; Kanan, M

  20. Polymerization in Liquid Crystal Medium: Preparation of Polythiophene Derivatives Bearing a Bulky Pyrimidine Substituent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromasa Goto

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We carried out polycondensation of monomers bearing a bulky pyrimidine substituent in a liquid crystal solvent. The resultant polymers formed nematic liquid crystals. The polymers prepared in liquid crystals had higher coplanarity than the polymers prepared in toluene. This can be due to the fact that the ordered medium of the liquid crystal produces an aggregated structure with well-developed π-stacking between the main chains. The present results demonstrated that polymerization of bulky monomers is possible in liquid crystal solvents.

  1. Structure and transport behavior of In-filled cobalt rhodium antimonide skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eilertsen, James, E-mail: jamesseilertsen@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Berthelot, Romain; Sleight, Arthur W.; Subramanian, M.A. [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of indium icosahedral void-site filling on the transport properties of cobalt and rhodium antimonide solid solutions is investigated. Co{sub 4-x}Rh{sub x}Sb{sub 12} and indium-filled In{sub 0.1}Co{sub 4-x}Rh{sub x}Sb{sub 12} solid solutions were synthesized. Partial rhodium substitution produces a distinct clustering-induced lattice strain that is partly relieved upon indium substitution into the skutterudite icosahedral void-sites. Indium lowers the thermal conductivity of all samples near room temperature. A distinct increase in thermal conductivity is observed in all indium-filled rhodium substituted samples at elevated temperatures and is attributed to bipolar thermal conductivity. In addition, the indium-filled samples were subjected to a 6-day heat treatment at 673 K. Void-site filled indium was found to be metastable at this temperature, and was found to partially precipitate during the 6-day heat treatment; thereby presenting concerns over the long-term stability of thermoelectric devices based on indium-filled skutterudites. - Graphical Abstract: Strain in the cobalt rhodium skutterudite solid solutions decreases upon indium filling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unfilled and indium-filled cobalt and rhodium skutterudite solid solutions were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Indium filling stabilizes the cobalt and rhodium skutterudite solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermoelectric properties of all compositions are reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal conductivity of rhodium-rich compositions is strongly affected by indium filling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Void-site filled indium was found to be metastable.

  2. Bulky Monodentate Phosphoramidites in Palladium-Catalyzed Allylic Alkylation Reactions : Aspects of Regioselectivity and Enantioselectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele, Maarten D.K.; Kamer, Paul C.J.; Lutz, Martin; Spek, Anthony L.; Vries, Johannes G. de; Leeuwen, Piet W.N.M. van; Strijdonck, Gino P.F. van

    2004-01-01

    A series of bulky monodentate phosphoramidite ligands, based on biphenol, BINOL and TADDOL backbones, have been employed in the Pd-catalysed allylic alkylation reaction. Reaction of disodium diethyl 2-methyl malonate with monosubstituted allylic substrates in the presence of palladium complexes of

  3. Bulky Phosphinines: From a Molecular Design to an Application in Homogeneous Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weemers, J.J.M.; van der Graaff, W.N.P.; Pidko, E.A.; Lutz, M.; Müller, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The design and preparation of an asymmetrically substituted and bulky phosphinine was achieved by introducing sterically demanding substituents into specific positions of a rigid phosphorus-heterocyclic framework. Compound 5 shows, at the same time, axial chirality and a sufficiently high energy

  4. Readily Accessible Bulky Iron Catalysts exhibiting Site Selectivity in the Oxidation of Steroidal Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font, David; Canta, Mercè; Milan, Michela; Cussó, Olaf; Ribas, Xavi; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/166032646; Costas, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Bulky iron complexes are described that catalyze the site-selective oxidation of alkyl C-H bonds with hydrogen peroxide under mild conditions. Steric bulk at the iron center is introduced by appending trialkylsilyl groups at the meta-position of the pyridines in tetradentate aminopyridine ligands,

  5. Monitoring lipase-catalyzed interesterification for bulky fats modification with FT-IR/NIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Tinghong; Lai, Xuxin; Zhang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    This work demonstrates the application of FT-IR and FT-NIR spectroscopy to monitor the enzymatic interesterification process for bulky fat modification. The reaction was conducted between palm stearin and coconut oil (70/30, w/w) with the catalysis of Lipozyme TL IM at 70°C in a batch reactor...

  6. Bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells: a pooled analysis of 3,600 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricceri, Fulvio; Godschalk, Roger W; Peluso, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Bulky DNA adducts are markers of exposure to genotoxic aromatic compounds, which reflect the ability of an individual to metabolically activate carcinogens and to repair DNA damage. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) represent a major class of carcinogens that are capable of forming such add...

  7. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  8. Superconducting Calcium-Intercalated Bilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinokura, Satoru; Sugawara, Katsuaki; Takayama, Akari; Takahashi, Takashi; Hasegawa, Shuji

    2016-02-23

    We report the direct evidence for superconductivity in Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene C6CaC6, which is regarded as the thinnest limit of Ca-intercalated graphite. We performed the electrical transport measurements with the in situ 4-point-probe method in ultrahigh vacuum under zero- or nonzero-magnetic field for pristine bilayer graphene, Li-intercalated bilayer graphene (C6LiC6) and C6CaC6 fabricated on SiC substrate. We observed that the zero-resistance state occurs in C6CaC6 with the onset temperature (T(c)(onset)) of 4 K, while the T(c)(onset) is gradually decreased upon applying the magnetic field. This directly proves the superconductivity origin of the zero resistance in C6CaC6. On the other hand, both pristine bilayer graphene and C6LiC6 exhibit nonsuperconducting behavior, suggesting the importance of intercalated atoms and its species to drive the superconductivity.

  9. Direct hydrothermal synthesis of metal intercalated hexagonal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 115; Issue 5-6. Direct hydrothermal synthesis of metal intercalated hexagonal molybdates, M x + Mo 6 − x / 3 O 18 − x (OH) x . y H2O (M = Li, Rb, Cs, NH4). S Upreti A Ramanan. Volume 115 Issue 5-6 October-December 2003 pp 411-417 ...

  10. Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Hung-An [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, ToR, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the ToR-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[ToR] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 and [Rh(μ- Cl)(COE)]2 gives ToMRh(CO)2 (2.2) and ToMRhH(β3-C8H13) (3.1) respectively while Tl[ToM] with [Rh(μ-Cl)(CO)]2 affords ToPRh(CO)2 (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brønsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex ToMRh(H)2CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary

  11. Mechanism of Rhodium-Catalyzed C-H Functionalization: Advances in Theoretical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaotian; Li, Yingzi; Bai, Ruopeng; Lan, Yu

    2017-11-07

    Transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling has emerged as an effective strategy for chemical synthesis. Within this area, direct C-H bond transformation is one of the most efficient and environmentally friendly processes for the construction of new C-C or C-heteroatom bonds. Over the past decades, rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization has attracted considerable attention because of the versatility and wide use of rhodium catalysts in chemistry. A series of C-X (X = C, N, or O) bond formation reactions could be realized from corresponding C-H bonds using rhodium catalysts. Various experimental studies on rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization reactions have been reported, and in tandem, mechanistic and computational studies have also progressed significantly. Since 2012, our group has performed theoretical studies to reveal the mechanism of rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization reactions. We have studied the changes in the oxidation state of rhodium and compared the Rh(I)/Rh(III) catalytic cycle to the Rh(III)/Rh(V) catalytic cycle using density functional theory calculation. The development of advanced computational methods and improvements in computing power make theoretical calculation a powerful tool for the mechanistic study of rhodium chemistry. Computational study is able to not only provide mechanistic insights but also explain the origin of regioselectivity, enantioselectivity, and stereoselectivity in rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization reactions. This Account summarizes our computational work on rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization reactions. The mechanistic study under discussion is divided into three main parts: C-H bond cleavage step, transformation of the C-Rh bond, and regeneration of the active catalyst. In the C-H bond cleavage step, computational results of four possible mechanisms, including concerted metalation-deprotonation (CMD), oxidative addition (OA), Friedel-Crafts-type electrophilic aromatic substitution (SEAr), and

  12. Modelling informally collected quantities of bulky waste and reusable items in Austria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramusch, R., E-mail: roland.ramusch@boku.ac.at; Pertl, A.; Scherhaufer, S.; Schmied, E.; Obersteiner, G.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Informal collectors from Hungary collect bulky waste and reusable items in Austria. • Two methodologies were applied to estimate the informally collected quantities. • Both approaches lead to an estimation of roughly 100,000 t p.a. informally collected. • The formal Austrian system collects 72 kg/cap/yr of bulky waste, WEE & scrap metal. • Informal collection amounts to approx. 12 kg/cap/yr. - Abstract: Disparities in earnings between Western and Eastern European countries are the reason for a well-established informal sector actively involved in collection and transboundary shipment activities from Austria to Hungary. The preferred objects are reusable items and wastes within the categories bulky waste, WEEE and metals, intended to be sold on flea markets. Despite leading to a loss of recyclable resources for Austrian waste management, these informal activities may contribute to the extension of the lifetime of certain goods when they are reused in Hungary; nevertheless they are discussed rather controversially. The aim of this paper is to provide objective data on the quantities informally collected and transhipped. The unique activities of informal collectors required the development and implementation of a new set of methodologies. The concept of triangulation was used to verify results obtained by field visits, interviews and a traffic counting campaign. Both approaches lead to an estimation of approx. 100,000 t per year of reusable items informally collected in Austria. This means that in addition to the approx. 72 kg/cap/yr formally collected bulky waste, bulky waste wood, household scrap (excluding packaging) and WEEE, up to a further 12 kg/cap/yr might, in the case that informal collection is abandoned, end up as waste or in the second-hand sector.

  13. Initial Stages in the Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation of Primary Alcohols in Aqueous Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, J.; Monsted, L.; Monsted, O.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of the catalytic HID exchange in primary alcohol substrates derived from aldopentoses, promoted by a macrocyclic rhodium(III) complex, has been shown to occur by a reversible redox reaction that gives aldehyde and a rhodium hydride complex. Hydride exchange in the latter complex pro...

  14. Hydroformylation of methyl oleate catalyzed by rhodium complexes; Hidroformilacao do oleato de metila catalisada por complexos de rodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Ana Nery Furlan [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil). Centro Universitario Norte do Espirito Santo. Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Rosa, Ricardo Gomes da; Gregorio, Jose Ribeiro, E-mail: jrg@iq.ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we describe the hydroformylation of methyl oleate catalyzed by several rhodium complexes. Parameters including total pressure, phosphorous/rhodium and CO/H{sub 2} ratio, temperature and phosphorous ligands were scanned. Total conversion of the starting double bonds was achieved while maintaining excellent selectivity in aldehydes. (author)

  15. The UV Plasmonic Behavior of Distorted Rhodium Nanocubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Gutiérrez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For applications of surface-enhanced spectroscopy and photocatalysis, the ultraviolet (UV plasmonic behavior and charge distribution within rhodium nanocubes is explored by a detailed numerical analysis. The strongest plasmonic hot-spots and charge concentrations are located at the corners and edges of the nanocubes, exactly where they are the most spectroscopically and catalytically active. Because intense catalytic activity at corners and edges will reshape these nanoparticles, distortions of the cubical shape, including surface concavity, surface convexity, and rounded corners and edges, are also explored to quantify how significantly these distortions deteriorate their plasmonic and photocatalytic properties. The fact that the highest fields and highest carrier concentrations occur in the corners and edges of Rh nanocubes (NCs confirms their tremendous potential for plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy and catalysis. It is shown that this opportunity is fortuitously enhanced by the fact that even higher field and charge concentrations reside at the interface between the metal nanoparticle and a dielectric or semiconductor support, precisely where the most chemically active sites are located.

  16. Monodisperse Platinum and Rhodium Nanoparticles as Model Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Michael Edward [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Model heterogeneous catalysts have been synthesized and studied to better understand how the surface structure of noble metal nanoparticles affects catalytic performance. In this project, monodisperse rhodium and platinum nanoparticles of controlled size and shape have been synthesized by solution phase polyol reduction, stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Model catalysts have been developed using these nanoparticles by two methods: synthesis of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) in the presence of nanoparticles (nanoparticle encapsulation, NE) to form a composite of metal nanoparticles supported on SBA-15 and by deposition of the particles onto a silicon wafer using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer deposition. The particle shapes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and the sizes were determined by TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and in the case of NE samples, room temperature H2 and CO adsorption isotherms. Catalytic studies were carried out in homebuilt gas-phase reactors. For the nanoparticles supported on SBA-15, the catalysts are in powder form and were studied using the homebuilt systems as plug-flow reactors. In the case of nanoparticles deposited on silicon wafers, the same systems were operated as batch reactors. This dissertation has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies of model noble metal heterogeneous catalysts. Careful control of particle size and shape has been accomplished though solution phase synthesis of Pt and Rh nanoparticles in order to elucidate further structure-reactivity relationships in noble metal catalysis.

  17. Polyurethane foam for the extraction of rhodium and its separation from iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Bazi, S.J.; Chow, A. (Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1984-06-01

    The rate of reaction of rhodium with thiocyanate at 90 deg in the presence of lithium chloride or sufficient hydrochloric acid and the subsequent extraction of the metal from hydrochloric acid medium by polyether-type polyurethane foam was investigated. The effect of the chloride salts of different cations decreased in the order Li/sup +/ > Na/sup +/ > K/sup +/ indicating that Rh(SCN)/sub 6//sup 3 -/ is extracted through a simple solvent-extraction mechanism rather than the 'cation-chelation' mechanism. The separation of rhodium and iridium was also examined and the results indicated that in the presence of 5-fold excess of iridium, an average of 95 +- 2% iridium remained in the aqueous phase while an average of 93 +- 2% rhodium was retained by the foam.

  18. Complexation of diphenyl(phenylacetenyl)phosphine to rhodium(III) tetraphenyl porphyrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stulz, Eugen; Scott, Sonya M; Bond, Andrew D

    2003-01-01

    . In contrast to earlier reports, displacement of the methylide on rhodium in 5 could not be observed at any concentration, and the electronic spectra of 4 and 5 are almost identical. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed that all binding events are exothermic, and all are enthalpy driven......). The methylide on rhodium in 3 is not displaced, leading selectively to the mono-phosphine complex (DPAP)(Me)Rh(TPP) (5). The first and second association constants, as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry and UV-vis titrations, are in the range 10(4)-10(7) M(-1) (in CH(2)Cl(2)). Using LDI-TOF mass...

  19. Intercalation materials for lithium rechargeable batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahner, D.; Machill, S.; Schloerb, H.; Siury, K.; Kloss, M.; Plieth, W. [Dresden University of Technology, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Dresden (Germany)

    1996-07-20

    In this contribution an overview will be given about the intercalation materials both for the negative and positive electrode of lithium batteries in comparison with results of our own research. Besides lithium metal as a negative electrode, interest is focused on insertion materials based on aluminium alloys. In the case of the positive electrode metal-oxides, those based on manganese, nickel and cobalt are discussed

  20. Superconductivity in Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazin, I. I.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2010-10-01

    Recent observation of proximity effect [H.B. Heersche, P. Jarillo-Herrero, J.B. Oostinga, L.M.K. Vandersypen, and A.F. Morpurgo, Nature, bf 446 (2007) p. 05555.] has ignited interest in superconductivity in graphene and its derivatives. We consider Ca-intercalated graphene bilayer and argue that it is a superconductor, and likely with a sizeable T c . We find substantial and suggestive similarities between Ca-intercalated bilayer (C6CaC6), and CaC6, an established superconductor with T c = 11.5 K. In particular, the nearly free electron band, proven to be instrumental for superconductivity in intercalated graphites, does cross the chemical potential in (C6CaC6), despite the twice smaller doping level, satisfying the so-called "Cambridge criterion". Calculated properties of zone-center phonons are very similar to those of CaC6. This suggests that the critical temperature would probably be on the same scale as in CaC6.

  1. Superconducting Continuous Graphene Fibers via Calcium Intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingjun; Liang, Hui; Xu, Zhen; Xi, Jiabin; Chen, Genfu; Gao, Weiwei; Xue, Mianqi; Gao, Chao

    2017-04-25

    Superconductors are important materials in the field of low-temperature magnet applications and long-distance electrical power transmission systems. Besides metal-based superconducting materials, carbon-based superconductors have attracted considerable attention in recent years. Up to now, five allotropes of carbon, including diamond, graphite, C60, CNTs, and graphene, have been reported to show superconducting behavior. However, most of the carbon-based superconductors are limited to small size and discontinuous phases, which inevitably hinders further application in macroscopic form. Therefore, it raises a question of whether continuously carbon-based superconducting wires could be accessed, which is of vital importance from viewpoints of fundamental research and practical application. Here, inspired by superconducting graphene, we successfully fabricated flexible graphene-based superconducting fibers via a well-established calcium (Ca) intercalation strategy. The resultant Ca-intercalated graphene fiber (Ca-GF) shows a superconducting transition at ∼11 K, which is almost 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of early reported alkali metal intercalated graphite and comparable to that of commercial superconducting NbTi wire. The combination of lightness and easy scalability makes Ca-GF highly promising as a lightweight superconducting wire.

  2. Maternal diet and dioxin-like activity, bulky DNA adducts and micronuclei in mother-newborns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Marie, E-mail: mpedersen@creal.cat [Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Oester Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K (Denmark); Halldorsson, Thorhallur I., E-mail: lur@ssi.dk [Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland Reykjavik (Iceland); Center for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Autrup, Herman, E-mail: ha@mil.au.dk [School of Public Health, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Brouwer, Abraham, E-mail: Bram.Brouwer@bds.nl [BioDetection Systems B.V., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Besselink, Harrie, E-mail: Harrie.Besselink@bds.nl [BioDetection Systems B.V., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Loft, Steffen, E-mail: stl@sund.ku.dk [Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Oester Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K (Denmark); Knudsen, Lisbeth E., E-mail: liek@sund.ku.dk [Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, CSS, Oester Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K (Denmark)

    2012-06-01

    Maternal diet can contribute to carcinogenic exposures and also modify effects of environmental exposures on maternal and fetal genetic stability. In this study, associations between maternal diet and the levels of dioxin-like plasma activity, bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells and micronuclei (MN) in lymphocytes from mother to newborns were examined. From 98 pregnant women living in the greater area of Copenhagen, Denmark in 2006-2007, maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood were collected, together with information on health, environmental exposure and lifestyle. Maternal diet was estimated on the basis of maternal food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) completed by the end of pregnancy. Biomarkers were detected in paired blood samples through the dioxin-responsive chemical-activated luciferase expression (CALUX){sup Registered-Sign} bioassay, {sup 32}P-postlabelling technique and cytokinesis-block MN assay. Maternal preference for meats with dark surface were significantly associated with higher bulky DNA adducts in both maternal ({beta} 95%CI; 0.46 (0.08, 0.84)) and cord blood ({beta} 95%CI; 0.46 (0.05, 0.86)) before and after adjustment for potential confounders. No other significant associations between the 18 dietary variables and the biomarkers measured in maternal and fetal samples were identified. The present study suggests that maternal intake of meats with dark surface contributes to the bulky DNA adduct levels in maternal and umbilical cord blood. Relationship between food preparation and bulky DNA adducts appear to be captured by a FFQ while potential associations for other biomarkers might be more complex or need larger sample size.

  3. Bulky abdominal masses in pediatrics: iconographic essay; Massas abdominais volumosas em pediatria: ensaio iconografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Fabiano; Faria, Andreia V.; Kluge, Patricia D.; Volpato, Ricardo G.; Santos, Sergio L.M. dos; Caserta, Nelson M.G. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas]. E-mail: fabiano97@bol.com.br

    2005-04-15

    The ultrasound, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance findings of 19 patients with abdominal bulky masses diagnosed as hydronephrosis, Wilms' tumor, neuroblastoma, adrenal carcinoma, sarcoma, hemangioendothelioma, hepatoblastoma, mesenchymal hamartoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, choledochal cyst, splenic cyst, lymphoma, enteric cyst, teratoma, hydrometrocolpos and lipoma are presented. Imaging findings (including ultrasound, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) are important tools for the evaluation of abdominal masses in pediatric patients and can contribute to the diagnosis and evaluation of the extension of these diseases. (author)

  4. The cyclopentyl group, as a small but bulky terminal group, allows rapid and efficient active transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Junya; Makita, Yoshimasa; Kihara, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-02

    Secondary ammonium salts bearing a cyclopentyl terminal group rapidly formed pseudorotaxane with 1.5 equiv of DB24C8. Acylation of the pseudorotaxane with 50 equiv of benzoyl chloride in the presence of 50 equiv of triethylamine in toluene afforded rotaxane, the product of active transport, in 95% yield. The cyclopentyl group is small enough to allow rapid formation of pseudorotaxane, and bulky enough to facilitate the quantitative active transport by steric repulsion.

  5. Modelling informally collected quantities of bulky waste and reusable items in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramusch, R; Pertl, A; Scherhaufer, S; Schmied, E; Obersteiner, G

    2015-10-01

    Disparities in earnings between Western and Eastern European countries are the reason for a well-established informal sector actively involved in collection and transboundary shipment activities from Austria to Hungary. The preferred objects are reusable items and wastes within the categories bulky waste, WEEE and metals, intended to be sold on flea markets. Despite leading to a loss of recyclable resources for Austrian waste management, these informal activities may contribute to the extension of the lifetime of certain goods when they are reused in Hungary; nevertheless they are discussed rather controversially. The aim of this paper is to provide objective data on the quantities informally collected and transhipped. The unique activities of informal collectors required the development and implementation of a new set of methodologies. The concept of triangulation was used to verify results obtained by field visits, interviews and a traffic counting campaign. Both approaches lead to an estimation of approx. 100,000 t per year of reusable items informally collected in Austria. This means that in addition to the approx. 72 kg/cap/yr formally collected bulky waste, bulky waste wood, household scrap (excluding packaging) and WEEE, up to a further 12 kg/cap/yr might, in the case that informal collection is abandoned, end up as waste or in the second-hand sector. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Solid intercalation to produce polymer/clay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreyette, Shuaijin Chen

    A review of recent literature and current knowledge relating to the development in polymer/clay nanocomposites has been presented. A novel method, solid intercalation, to produce polymer/clay nanocomposites is described based on two polymers, polyethylene oxide and polystyrene with two clays, hydrophilic clay G105 and organoclay 1.28. The clays used in the solid intercalation are selected based on the nanostructure, microstructure and thermal stability results. The polymers are selected based on their potential applications. The structures of the resultant materials are analysed and the possible mechanisms of the solid intercalation in different polymer/clay systems are presented. The experiment results show that the organoclay is more promising in obtaining a good dispersion and expansion of the clay layers in polymer matrices, especially at high clay loading. Hydrophilic clay can be well dispersed and expanded in the polyethylene oxide/clay system for clay contents below 10 wt%. A comparison between solid intercalation and solution synthesis is made for the polyethylene oxide/clay system. The structure diagrams for the corresponding method are illustrated. The nanocomposites produced by solid intercalation are composed of isolated polymer and intercalated/exfoliated polymer/clay structures, while those produced by solution synthesis are mainly composed of intercalated structures. Studies of the processing conditions of solid intercalation of the PEO/G105 clay system were carried out. The results show that the moisture level is critical in producing the composites by solid intercalation. There are two possible mechanisms for producing the composites - the melt and flow of the polymer into the clay galleries or the formation of the polymer solution and flow into the clay galleries. The results also show that high pressure and temperature improve the melt and flow of the polymer in solid intercalation which encourages more intercalation to take place. The mechanical

  7. Charge carrier density in Li-intercalated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2012-05-01

    The electronic structures of bulk C 6Li, Li-intercalated free-standing bilayer graphene, and Li-intercalated bilayer and trilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) are studied using density functional theory. Our estimate of Young\\'s modulus suggests that Li-intercalation increases the intrinsic stiffness. For decreasing Li-C interaction, the Dirac point shifts to the Fermi level and the associated band splitting vanishes. For Li-intercalated bilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) the splitting at the Dirac point is tiny. It is also very small at the two Dirac points of Li-intercalated trilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1). For all the systems under study, a large enhancement of the charge carrier density is achieved by Li intercalation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Olefins hydro-formylation catalysed by rhodium complexes using ionic liquids; Hydroformylation des olefines par les complexes du rhodium dans les liquides ioniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favre, F.

    2000-10-26

    Biphasic long chain olefins hydro-formylation catalysed by rhodium complexes using ionic liquids allows a selective reaction and an easy separation of the products from the catalyst. This study reports the synthesis of ionic liquids that were used as the catalyst's solvent. Their physical and chemical properties (melting point, solubility of organic substrates) can be varied with the structure of the organic cation (imidazolium, pyridinium, pyrrolydinium) and with its substituents (nature, length, number). It depends also on the nature of the inorganic anion (hexa-fluoro-phosphate, tetrafluoroborate, tri-fluoro-acetate, triflate, bistriflylamidure...). The use of phosphorus ligands bearing ionic functions proved to be efficient to maintain the onerous rhodium catalyst in the ionic liquid phase. Phosphines, phosphites and phosphinites including anionic (sulfonate, carboxylate) or cationic (imidazolium, pyridinium, guanidinium, phosphonium) groups have been synthesised. Finally, the influences of the ligand and of the ionic liquid on the catalytic system performances are described. Selectivities in aldehydes and reaction rates proved to be highly dependent on the nature of the ligand and of the ionic liquid. The different possibilities of recycling the ionic phase containing the rhodium catalyst have been also studied. (author)

  9. The intercalation chemistry of layered iron chalcogenide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, Hector K.; Rodriguez, Efrain E.

    2016-10-01

    The iron chalcogenides FeSe and FeS are superconductors composed of two-dimensional sheets held together by van der Waals interactions, which makes them prime candidates for the intercalation of various guest species. We review the intercalation chemistry of FeSe and FeS superconductors and discuss their synthesis, structure, and physical properties. Before we review the latest work in this area, we provide a brief background on the intercalation chemistry of other inorganic materials that exhibit enhanced superconducting properties upon intercalation, which include the transition metal dichalcogenides, fullerenes, and layered cobalt oxides. From past studies of these intercalated superconductors, we discuss the role of the intercalates in terms of charge doping, structural distortions, and Fermi surface reconstruction. We also briefly review the physical and chemical properties of the host materials-mackinawite-type FeS and β-FeSe. The three types of intercalates for the iron chalcogenides can be placed in three categories: 1.) alkali and alkaline earth cations intercalated through the liquid ammonia technique; 2.) cations intercalated with organic amines such as ethylenediamine; and 3.) layered hydroxides intercalated during hydrothermal conditions. A recurring theme in these studies is the role of the intercalated guest in electron doping the chalcogenide host and in enhancing the two-dimensionality of the electronic structure by spacing the FeSe layers apart. We end this review discussing possible new avenues in the intercalation chemistry of transition metal monochalcogenides, and the promise of these materials as a unique set of new inorganic two-dimensional systems.

  10. Komplexe zouten van trans-1-2-diaminocyclohexaan met driewaardig rhodium en kobalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijkerk, Lucas

    1937-01-01

    Some complex salts of trans-I-2-díominocyclohexane with trivalent cobaltum and rhodium were prepared and their properties described in detail. Diaminocyclohexanwe as obtained by the following series of reactions: cyclohexanone --> cyclohexanone-I-oxalylicester --> cyclohexonone-I-carboxylicester-2

  11. Iridium(III) and Rhodium(III) compounds of dipyridyl-N-alkylimine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    compounds of this classes exhibited anticancer12 14 and. DNA intercalative properties.15,16 Owing to their wide applications, synthesis of iridium(III) and rhodium(III) complexes bearing η5-C5Me5 fragment have been a sub- ject of interest over the past years.16 19 Numerous stud- ies have been reported for their synthesis ...

  12. Amino acid based phosphoramidite ligands for the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuil, P.A.R.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2009-01-01

    Two sets of amino acid based phosphoramidite ligands with either a BINOL backbone (S-b-1a-e and Rb-1a) or a flexible biphenol backbone (2a-c and 2f) were synthesized and evaluated in the rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenation of different functionalized alkenes: dimethyl itaconate (3), methyl

  13. Synthesis of C60H2 by rhodium-catalyzed hydrogenation of C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, L.; Evans, T. P.; Bada, J. L.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Reduction of C60 with rhodium(0) on alumina and hydrogen in deuterated benzene (C6D6) at ambient temperature and pressure yields a mixture of hydrogenated compounds; C60H2 has been characterized as the major product in 14% yield based on 1H NMR.

  14. The Role of the Element Rhodium in the Hyperbolic Law of the Periodic Table of Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Khazan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of the element rhodium as an independent affirmation of calculations by the Hyperbolic Law and validity of all its relations is shown herein. The deviation in calculation by this method of the atomic mass of heaviest element is 0.0024%, and its coefficient of scaling 0.001-0.005%.

  15. Determination of phenolic compounds using spectral and color transitions of rhodium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatselou, Vasiliki; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Giokas, Dimosthenis L

    2016-08-17

    This work reports a new approach for the determination of phenolic compounds based on their interaction with citrate-capped rhodium nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds (i.e., catechins, gallates, cinnamates, and dihydroxybenzoic acids) were found to cause changes in the size and localized surface plasmon resonance of rhodium nanoparticles, and therefore, give rise to analyte-specific spectral and color transitions in the rhodium nanoparticle suspensions. Upon reaction with phenolic compounds (mainly dithydroxybenzoate derivatives, and trihydroxybenzoate derivatives), new absorbance peaks at 350 nm and 450 nm were observed. Upon reaction with trihydroxybenzoate derivatives, however, an additional absorbance peak at 580 nm was observed facilitating the speciation of phenolic compounds in the sample. Both absorbance peaks at 450 nm and 580 nm increased with increasing concentration of phenolic compounds over a linear range of 0-500 μM. Detection limits at the mid-micromolar levels were achieved, depending on the phenolic compound involved, and with satisfactory reproducibility (phenolic content and total catechin content were developed and applied in tea samples. The obtained results correlated favorably with commonly used methods (i.e., Folin-Ciocalteu and aluminum complexation assay). Not the least, the finding that rhodium nanoparticles can react with analytes and exhibit unique localized surface plasmon resonance bands in the visible region, can open new opportunities for developing new optical and sensing analytical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. State of supported rhodium nanoparticles for methane catalytic partial oxidation (CPO): FT-IR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchio, Elisabetta; Busca, Guido; Forzatti, Pio; Groppi, Gianpiero; Beretta, Alessandra

    2007-09-25

    The effect of pretreatments as well as of rhodium precursor and of the support over the morphology of Rh nanoparticles were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy of adsorbed CO. Over a Rh/alumina catalyst, both metallic Rh particles, characterized by IR bands in the range 2070-2060 cm-1 and 1820-1850 cm-1, and highly dispersed rhodium species, characterized by symmetric and asymmetric stretching bands of RhI(CO)2 gem-dicarbonyl species, are present. Their relative amount changes following pretreatments with gaseous mixtures, representative of the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) reaction process. The Rh metal particle fraction decreases with respect to the Rh highly dispersed fraction in the order CO approximately CO/H2 > CH4/H2O, CH4/O2 > CH4 > H2. The metal particle dimensions decrease in the order CH4/O2 > H2 > CH4/H2O > CO > CO/H2. Grafting from a carbonyl rhodium complex also increases the amount and the dimensions of Rh0 particles at the catalyst surface. Increasing the ratio (extended rhodium metal particles/highly dispersed Rh species) allows a shorter conditioning process. The surface reconstruction phenomena going on during catalytic activity are related to this effect.

  17. Ligand Fluorination to Optimize Preferential Oxidation (PROX) of Carbon Monoxide by Water-Soluble Rhodium Porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffinger, Justin C.; Uppaluri, ShriHarsha; Sun, Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic, low temperature preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide by aqueous [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (1[Rh(III)]) and [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-sulfonato-2,6-difluorophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (2[Rh(III)]) is reported. The PROX reaction occurs at ambient temperature in buffered (4 ≤ pH ≤ 13) aqueous solutions. Fluorination on the porphyrin periphery is shown to increase the CO PROX reaction rate, shift the metal centered redox potentials, and acidify ligated water molecules. Most importantly, β-fluorination increases the acidity of the rhodium hydride complex (pKa = 2.2 ± 0.2 for 2[Rh-D]); the dramatically increased acidity of the Rh(III) hydride complex precludes proton reduction and hydrogen activation near neutral pH, thereby permitting oxidation of CO to be unaffected by the presence of H2. This new fluorinated water-soluble rhodium porphyrin-based homogenous catalyst system permits preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen gas streams at 308 °K using dioxygen or a sacrificial electron acceptor (indigo carmine) as the terminal oxidant. PMID:21949596

  18. Double-spin-flip resonance of rhodium nuclei at positive and negative spin temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuoriniemi, J.T.; Knuuttila, T.A.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitive SQUID-NMR measurements were used to study the mutual interactions in the highly polarized nuclear-spin system of rhodium metal. The dipolar coupling gives rise to a weak double-spin-flip resonance. The observed frequency shifts allow deducing separately the dipolarlike contribution...

  19. bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline in cyclometallated rhodium(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    1,10-phenanthroline in cyclometallated rhodium(III) complexes –. 1. H and. 13. C NMR evidence. G A NAGANAGOWDA 1, K V RAMANATHAN 1, V GAYATHRI 2 and. N M NANJE GOWDA 1. 1Sophisticated Instruments Facility, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. 560 012, India. 2Department of Chemistry, Central College ...

  20. Morphological Evaluation of Variously Intercalated Pre-baked Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullah Hameed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of porous materials is enjoying tremendous popularity and attention of the advance scientific communities due to their excellent adsorptive and catalytic activities. Clays are one of the most important candidates in the porous community which shows the above mentioned activities after modifing with a different intercalating agent. The paper is focused on the infiuence of some inorganic intercalating agents (NaOH on the morphology of the variously intercalated clay samples. The alkali metal was used as the inorganic intercalating agent. The effect of intercalation temperature, intercalation agent concentration and intercalation time on the pre-baked clay morphology were also part of the study. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM study was performed to evaluate the morphological changes of the resultant intercalates. Different morphological properties were improved significantly in the case of the inorganically modified clay samples. Thus, such intercalations are suggested to be effective if the clays under study are to be used for different industrial process at elevated conditions.

  1. Lifestyle, Environmental, and Genetic Predictors of Bulky DNA Adducts in a Study Population Nested within a Prospective Danish Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, K. T.; Sørensen, M.; Autrup, H.

    2010-01-01

    Bulky DNA adducts are considered a potential biomarker of cancer risk. In this study, the association between various lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors and the levels of bulky DNA adducts in peripheral leukocytes was examined in a study group nested within a population-based prospective...... Danish cohort. At enrollment, blood samples were collected and information on lifestyle, including dietary and smoking habits, obtained. Previously, bulky DNA adducts were measured in 245 individuals who developed lung cancer and 255 control members of the cohort. Of these 500 individuals, data on 375...... individuals were included in this study, excluding 125 cases, which developed lung cancer within the first 3 yr after blood sampling. Bulky DNA adduct levels were measured by 32P-postlabeling technique and polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism and DNA repair genes were determined. Potential predictors...

  2. Catalytic Hydrodehalogenation of Some Organic Halides by Hydrogen Transfer from Lithium Formate in the Presence of Ruthenium and Rhodium Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Marčec, Radovan

    1990-01-01

    Organic halides react with lithium formate in the presence of ruthenium and rhodium phosphine complexes as homogeneous catalysts in refluxing dioxane producing the corresponding deha- logenated compounds in moderate yields.

  3. Accessing Low-Valent Inorganic Cations by Using an Extremely Bulky N-Heterocyclic Carbene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Matthew M D; Lummis, Paul A; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Rivard, Eric

    2017-08-22

    The extremely bulky N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC), ITr (ITr=[(HCNCPh3 )2 C:]) featuring sterically shielding umbrella-shaped trityl (CPh3 ) substituents was prepared. This NHC features the highest percent buried volume (%Vbur ) to date, and was used to form a thermally stable quasi one-coordinate thallium(I) cation [ITr-Tl]+ . This TlI adduct and the corresponding lithium complex [ITr⋅Li(OEt2 )]+ are versatile "all-in-one" transmetalation/ligation reagents for preparing low-coordinate inorganic species inaccessible by pre-existing routes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Bulky Polar Additives That Greatly Reduce the Viscosity of Concentrated Solutions of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Alyssa M; Weight, Alisha K; Love, Kevin; Bonificio, Amanda; Wescott, Charles R; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2017-05-01

    The viscosity of concentrated aqueous solutions of 3 clinical monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), Erbitux®, Herceptin®, and Rituxan®, has been reduced up to over 10-fold by adding certain bulky polar additives instead of saline at isotonic levels. Because these additives are also found not to compromise mAbs' stability against aggregation induced by stresses, a drug-delivery modality switch from intravenous infusions to more convenient and inexpensive parenteral options like subcutaneous injections may become possible. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Maternal diet and dioxin-like activity, bulky DNA adducts and micronuclei in mother-newborns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Autrup, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Maternal diet can contribute to carcinogenic exposures and also modify effects of environmental exposures on maternal and fetal genetic stability. In this study, associations between maternal diet and the levels of dioxin-like plasma activity, bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells and micronuclei...... (MN) in lymphocytes from mother to newborns were examined. From 98 pregnant women living in the greater area of Copenhagen, Denmark in 2006-2007, maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood were collected, together with information on health, environmental exposure and lifestyle. Maternal diet...

  6. Rhodium-catalyzed ortho C-H bond activation of arylamines for the synthesis of quinoline carboxylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadakh, Sunita K; Dey, Soumen; Sudalai, A

    2016-03-14

    The rhodium catalyzed annulation of anilines with alkynic esters allowing for the high-yield synthesis of quinoline carboxylates with excellent regioselectivity is described. This unprecedented reaction employs either formic acid as the C1 source and reductant or copper(ii) as the oxidant and is proposed to proceed via rhodacycle of in situ generated amide and enamine ester followed by ortho C-H activation of arylamines with rhodium as the catalyst.

  7. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-H Bond Functionalization with Amides by Double C-H/C-N Bond Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-02-19

    The first C-H bond functionalization with amides as the coupling partners via selective activation of the amide N-C bond using rhodium(I) catalysts under highly chemoselective conditions is reported. Notably, this report constitutes the first catalytic activation of the amide N-C(O) bond by rhodium. We expect that this concept will have broad implications for using amides as coupling partners for C-H activation beyond the work described herein.

  8. Comparison of lithium and sodium intercalation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujković Milica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low abundance of lithium in Earth’s crust and its high participation in overall cost of lithium-ion batteries incited intensive investigation of sodium-ion batteries, in hope that they may become similar in basic characteristics: specific energy and specific power. Furthermore, over the last years the research has been focused on the replacement of organic electrolytes of Li- and Na-ion batteries, by aqueous electrolytes, in order to simplify the production and improve safety of use. In this lecture, some recent results on the selected intercalation materials are presented: layered structure vanadium oxides, olivine and nasicon phosphates, potentially usable in both Li and Na aqueous rechargeable batteries. After their characterization by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, the electrochemical behavior was studied by both cyclic voltammetry and hronopotenciometry. By comparing intercalation kinetics and coulombic capacity of these materials in LiNO3 and NaNO3 solutions, it was shown that the following ones: Na1.2V3O8, Na2V6O16/C , NaFePO4/C and NaTi2(PO43/C may be used as electrode materials in aqueous alkali-ion batteries.

  9. Intercalation processes of copper complexes in DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The family of anticancer complexes that include the transition metal copper known as Casiopeínas® shows promising results. Two of these complexes are currently in clinical trials. The interaction of these compounds with DNA has been observed experimentally and several hypotheses regarding the mechanism of action have been developed, and these include the generation of reactive oxygen species, phosphate hydrolysis and/or base-pair intercalation. To advance in the understanding on how these ligands interact with DNA, we present a molecular dynamics study of 21 Casiopeínas with a DNA dodecamer using 10 μs of simulation time for each compound. All the complexes were manually inserted into the minor groove as the starting point of the simulations. The binding energy of each complex and the observed representative type of interaction between the ligand and the DNA is reported. With this extended sampling time, we found that four of the compounds spontaneously flipped open a base pair and moved inside the resulting cavity and four compounds formed stacking interactions with the terminal base pairs. The complexes that formed the intercalation pocket led to more stable interactions. PMID:25958394

  10. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nano- tubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties have been considered in this paper. The thermodynamic stability of BN nanotubes can be improved by the intercalation of cobalt or nickel. BN nanotubes can ...

  11. Polysulfide intercalated layered double hydroxides for metal capture applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Ma, Shulan

    2017-04-04

    Polysulfide intercalated layered double hydroxides and methods for their use in vapor and liquid-phase metal capture applications are provided. The layered double hydroxides comprise a plurality of positively charged host layers of mixed metal hydroxides separated by interlayer spaces. Polysulfide anions are intercalated in the interlayer spaces.

  12. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nanotubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties have been considered in this paper. The thermodynamic stability of BN nanotubes can be improved by the intercalation of cobalt or nickel. BN nanotubes can behave ...

  13. Electronic spectra of anions intercalated in layered double hydroxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transition metal complexes intercalated in layered double hydroxides have a different electronic structure as compared to their free state owing to their confinement within the interlayer gallery. UV–Vis absorptions of the intercalated complex anions show a significant shift as compared to their free state. The ligand to metal ...

  14. PYRENE INTERCALATING NUCLEIC ACIDS WITH A CARBON LINKER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Michael E.; Wamberg, Michael Chr.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2011-01-01

    geminally attached. Fluorescence studies of this intercalating nucleic acid with the pyrene moieties inserted as a bulge showed formation of an excimer band. When a mismatch was introduced at the site of the intercalator, an excimer band was formed for the destabilized duplexes whereas an exciplex band...

  15. The Relationship of the Chemical Bonding Topology of High Critical Temperature Copper Oxide Superconductors to that of the Chevrel Phases and the Ternary Lanthanide Rhodium Borides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-11

    to those of the ternary molybdenum chalcogenides and ternary lanthanide rhodium borides in which the conducting skeleton is constructed from metal...Bonding Topology of High Critical Temperature Copper Oxide Superconductors to That of The Chevrel Phases and the Ternary Lanthanide Rhodium Borides by R...REPORT NUMBER P Rhodium Borides 7 AUTHOR(s ) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMIER(*) f, % .0, R.B. King N00014-84-K-0365 S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND

  16. Quasi-freestanding graphene on Ni(111) by Cs intercalation

    KAUST Repository

    Alattas, Maha Hassan Mohssen

    2016-05-26

    A possible approach to achieve quasi-freestanding graphene on a substrate for technological purpose is the intercalation of alkali metal atoms. Cs intercalation between graphene and Ni(111) therefore is investigated using density functional theory, incorporating van der Waals corrections. It is known that direct contact between graphene and Ni(111) perturbs the Dirac states. We find that Cs intercalation restores the linear dispersion characteristic of Dirac fermions, which agrees with experiments, but the Dirac cone is shifted to lower energy, i.e., the graphene sheet is n-doped. Cs intercalation therefore decouples the graphene sheet from the substrate except for a charge transfer. On the other hand, the spin polarization of Ni(111) does not extend through the intercalated atoms to the graphene sheet, for which we find virtually spin-degeneracy.

  17. Quasi-freestanding graphene on Ni(111) by Cs intercalation

    KAUST Repository

    Alattas, Maha Hassan Mohssen

    2017-01-08

    It is of technological interest to achieve quasi-freestanding graphene on a substrate. A possible approach is the intercalation of alkali metal atoms. Cs intercalation between graphene and Ni(111) is investigated using density functional theory, incorporating van der Waals corrections. It is known that direct contact between graphene and Ni(111) perturbs the Dirac states. Cs intercalation restores the linear dispersion characteristic of Dirac fermions, which is in agreement with experiments1, but the Dirac cone is shifted to lower energy, i.e., the graphene sheet is n-doped. Cs intercalation therefore effectively decouples the graphene sheet from the substrate except for a charge transfer. On the other hand, the spin polarization of Ni(111) does not extend through the intercalated atoms to the graphene sheet, for which we find virtually spin-degeneracy.

  18. K-intercalated carbon systems: Effects of dimensionality and substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2012-06-01

    Density functional theory is employed to investigate the electronic properties of K-intercalated carbon systems. Young\\'s modulus indicates that the intercalation increases the intrinsic stiffness. For K-intercalated bilayer graphene on SiC(0001) the Dirac cone is maintained, whereas a trilayer configuration exhibits a small splitting at the Dirac point. Interestingly, in contrast to many other intercalated carbon systems, the presence of the SiC(0001) substrate does not suppress but rather enhances the charge carrier density. Reasonably high values are found for all systems, the highest carrier density for the bilayer. The band structure and electron-phonon coupling of free-standing K-intercalated bilayer graphene points to a high probability for superconductivity in this system. © 2012 Europhysics Letters Association.

  19. Bulky Uterus and Multiparity are Important Contributing Factors for Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding among Bangladeshi Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB is irregular uterine bleeding that occurs in the absence of recognizable pelvic pathology, general medical disease, or pregnancy. It reflects a disruption in the normal cyclic pattern of ovulatory hormonal stimulation to the endometrial lining. About 1–2% of women with improperly managed anovulatory bleeding eventually may develop endometrial cancer but determinants behind the disease are largely unknown. Objective: The present study aimed to find out the determinants of dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study 50 patients of dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB were recruited from different tertiary hospitals in Dhaka city. Clinical parameters have been recorded using a predesigned questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS for Windows version 16.0 and Microsoft Office Excel. Results: In the studied patients, about 38% were suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus, 12% from obesity and 18% from hypertension. Almost all the patients (96% were suffering from anemia. Histological findings have shown that endometrium of 63% patients were in proliferative phase, about 16% were in secretory phase and 11% patients were with cystic hyperplasia. Ultrasonographic results have shown that about 72% of the patients had bulky uterus. Ninety two percent patients carried more than two pregnancies, and 40% patients carried >5 pregnancies. Conclusion: Bulky uterus and multiple pregnancies may be associated with dysfunctional uterine bleeding in Bangladeshi women.

  20. Bulky Macroporous TiO2 Photocatalyst with Cellular Structure via Facile Wood-Template Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingfeng Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a bulky macroporous TiO2 particles with cellular structure prepared in the presence of wood slices as template. Firstly, TiO2 sol was coated onto the wood slices by repeated dip-coating process. Then, after calcinations at 550°C, the wood template could be removed, and the bulky TiO2 structure was obtained. The prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and transmission electron microscope (TEM techniques. XRD pattern confirmed the crystalline phase of the wood-templated TiO2 is anatase phase. And interestingly, from the observation of SEM image, the wood-templated TiO2 inherited the initial cellular structures of birch lumber (B. albosinensis Burk, and numerous macropores were observed in the sample. Meanwhile, the wood-templated TiO2 presented a superior photocatalytic ability to decompose Rhodamine B (RhB under ultraviolet irradiation.

  1. Engineering of an epoxide hydrolase for efficient bioresolution of bulky pharmaco substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xu-Dong; Yuan, Shuguang; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Jiahai

    2014-11-04

    Optically pure epoxides are essential chiral precursors for the production of (S)-propranolol, (S)-alprenolol, and other β-adrenergic receptor blocking drugs. Although the enzymatic production of these bulky epoxides has proven difficult, here we report a method to effectively improve the activity of BmEH, an epoxide hydrolase from Bacillus megaterium ECU1001 toward α-naphthyl glycidyl ether, the precursor of (S)-propranolol, by eliminating the steric hindrance near the potential product-release site. Using X-ray crystallography, mass spectrum, and molecular dynamics calculations, we have identified an active tunnel for substrate access and product release of this enzyme. The crystal structures revealed that there is an independent product-release site in BmEH that was not included in other reported epoxide hydrolase structures. By alanine scanning, two mutants, F128A and M145A, targeted to expand the potential product-release site displayed 42 and 25 times higher activities toward α-naphthyl glycidyl ether than the wild-type enzyme, respectively. These results show great promise for structure-based rational design in improving the catalytic efficiency of industrial enzymes for bulky substrates.

  2. High pressure measurement of the uniaxial stress of host layers on intercalants and staging transformation of intercalation compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Park, T R; Kim, H; Min, P

    2002-01-01

    A layered double-hydroxide intercalation compound was synthesized to measure the uniaxial stress the host layers exert on the intercalants. To measure the uniaxial stress, we employed the photoluminescence (PL) from the intercalated species, the Sm ion complex, as it is sensitive to the deformation of the intercalants. Of the many PL peaks the Sm ion complex produces, the one that is independent of the counter-cation environment was chosen for the measurement since the Sm ion complexes are placed under a different electrostatic environment after intercalation. The peak position of the PL was redshifted linearly with increasing hydrostatic pressure on the intercalated sample. Using this pressure-induced redshifting rate and the PL difference at ambient pressure between the pre-intercalation and the intercalated ions, we found that, in the absence of external pressure, the uniaxial stress exerted on the samarium ion complexes by the host layers was about 13.9 GPa at room temperature. Time-resolved PL data also ...

  3. Intercalated layered clay composites and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phukan, Anjali

    Supported inorganic reagents are rapidly emerging as new and environmentally acceptable reagents and catalysts. The smectite group of layered clay minerals, such as, Montmorillonite, provides promising character for adsorption, catalytic activity, supports etc. for their large surface area, swelling behavior and ion exchange properties. Aromatic compounds intercalated in layered clays are useful in optical molecular devices. Clay is a unique material for adsorption of heavy metals and various toxic substances. Clay surfaces are known to be catalytically active due to their surface acidity. Acid activated clays possess much improved surface areas and acidities and have higher pore volumes so that can absorb large molecules in the pores. The exchangeable cations in clay minerals play a key role in controlling surface acidity and catalytic activity. Recently, optically active metal-complex-Montmorillonite composites are reported to be active in antiracemization purposes. In view of the above, a research work, relating to the preparation of different modified clay composites and their catalytic applications were carried out. The different aspects and results of the present work have been reported in four major chapters. Chapter I: This is an introductory chapter, which contains a review of the literature regarding clay-based materials. Clay minerals are phyllosilicates with layer structure. Montmorillonite, a member of smectite group of clay, is 2:1 phyllosilicate, where a layer is composed of an octahedral sheet sandwiched by two tetrahedral sheets. Such clay shows cation exchange capacity (CEC) and is expressed in milli-equivalents per 100 gm of dry clay. Clays can be modified by interaction with metal ion, metal complexes, metal cluster and organic cations for various applications. Clays are also modified by treating with acid followed by impregnation with metal salts or ions. Montmorillonite can intercalate suitable metal complexes in excess of CEC to form double

  4. Intercalation compounds involving inorganic layered structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANTINO VERA R. L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional inorganic networks can shown intracrystalline reactivity, i.e., simple ions, large species as Keggin ions, organic species, coordination compounds or organometallics can be incorporated in the interlayer region. The host-guest interaction usually causes changes in their chemical, catalytic, electronic and optical properties. The isolation of materials with interesting properties and making use of soft chemistry routes have given rise the possibility of industrial and technological applications of these compounds. We have been using several synthetic approaches to intercalate porphyrins and phthalocyanines into inorganic materials: smectite clays, layered double hydroxides and layered niobates. The isolated materials have been characterized by elemental and thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, surface area measurements, scanning electronic microscopy, electronic and resonance Raman spectroscopies and EPR. The degree of layer stacking and the charge density of the matrices as well their acid-base nature were considered in our studies on the interaction between the macrocycles and inorganic hosts.

  5. Extraction of ruthenium thiocyanate and its separation from rhodium by polyurethane foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Bazi, S.J.; Chow, A. (Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1984-03-01

    Conditions for the formation and extraction of the thiocyanate complex of ruthenium are reported. Distribution coefficients of more than 10/sup 4/ and a capacity of about 0.24 mole per kg of foam were obtained. The effect of the chloride salts of various univalent cations on the extraction of Ru(SCN)/sub 6//sup 3 -/ indicated that the efficiency of ruthenium extraction depends on how well the cation fits into the polyether segment of the polyurethane foam, which agrees with the 'cation-chelation' mechanism. The separation of ruthenium and rhodium indicated that more than 95% of the rhodium remained in the aqueous phase and about 95% of the ruthenium was retained by the polyurethane foam and could be easily recovered.

  6. Renal intercalated cells and blood pressure regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Wall

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type B and non-A, non-B intercalated cells are found within the connecting tubule and the cortical collecting duct. Of these cell types, type B intercalated cells are known to mediate Cl⁻ absorption and HCO₃⁻ secretion largely through pendrin-dependent Cl⁻/HCO₃⁻ exchange. This exchange is stimulated by angiotensin II administration and is also stimulated in models of metabolic alkalosis, for instance after aldosterone or NaHCO₃ administration. In some rodent models, pendrin-mediated HCO₃⁻ secretion modulates acid-base balance. However, the role of pendrin in blood pressure regulation is likely of more physiological or clinical significance. Pendrin regulates blood pressure not only by mediating aldosterone-sensitive Cl⁻ absorption, but also by modulating the aldosterone response for epithelial Na⁺ channel (ENaC-mediated Na⁺ absorption. Pendrin regulates ENaC through changes in open channel of probability, channel surface density, and channels subunit total protein abundance. Thus, aldosterone stimulates ENaC activity through both direct and indirect effects, the latter occurring through its stimulation of pendrin expression and function. Therefore, pendrin contributes to the aldosterone pressor response. Pendrin may also modulate blood pressure in part through its action in the adrenal medulla, where it modulates the release of catecholamines, or through an indirect effect on vascular contractile force. This review describes how aldosterone and angiotensin II-induced signaling regulate pendrin and the contributory role of pendrin in distal nephron function and blood pressure.

  7. Effect of the intercalation conditions of a montmorillonite with octadecylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Santano, A; Trujillano, R; Belver, C; Gil, A; Vicente, M A

    2005-04-01

    Intercalation of montmorillonite with octadecylamine under several conditions is reported. Octadecylamine was protonated in situ with HCl to obtain octadecylammonium cations. Water and water/ethanol mixtures were used as reaction medium, and the ratios amine/clay and HCl/amine were also varied. Intercalation was successful when the amine/clay ratio was in the range 1-3 mmol/g; optimal results were obtained for an amine/clay ratio of 2.0 mmol/g. For a given amine/clay ratio, the HCl/amine ratio also influences the intercalation. Basal spacings of the intercalated solids were between 13.4-36.7 angstroms. The amount of organic matter incorporated into the solids also varied widely; up to 40 wt% is fixed. Specific surface area is very low in all the intercalated solids because of the blockage of the clay porosity by the organic molecules. Co-intercalation of octadecylammonium and of the inorganic polycation [Al13O4(OH)24(H2O)12]7+ was also considered, giving rise to intercalated solids with basal spacings between 17 and 22 A, also with a high fixation of organic matter.

  8. The effect of an intercalated BSc on subsequent academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesan, Nishanthan; Crichton, Siobhan; Sewell, Hannah; Howell, Simon

    2011-10-03

    The choice of whether to undertake an intercalated Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree is one of the most important decisions that students must make during their time at medical school. An effect on exam performance would improve a student's academic ranking, giving them a competitive edge when applying for foundation posts. Retrospective data analysis of anonymised student records. The effects of intercalating on final year exam results, Foundation Programme score, application form score (from white-space questions), quartile rank score, and success with securing Foundation School of choice were assessed using linear and ordered logistic regression models, adjusted for course type, year of graduation, graduate status and baseline (Year 1) performance. The study included 1158 students, with 54% choosing to do an intercalated BSc, and 9.8% opting to do so at an external institution. Doing an intercalated BSc was significantly associated with improved outcome in Year 5 exams (P = 0.004). This was irrespective of the year students chose to intercalate, with no significant difference between those that intercalated after years 2, 3 and 4 (p = 0.3096). There were also higher foundation application scores (P BSc leads to an improvement in subsequent exam results and develops the skills necessary to produce a strong foundation programme application. It also leads to greater success with securing preferred Foundation School posts in students. Differences between internally- and externally-intercalating students may be due to varying course structures or greater challenge in adjusting to a new study environment.

  9. Cyclotron production of no-carrier-added palladium-103 by bombardment of rhodium-103 target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunfu, Z; Yongxian, W; Yongping, Z; Xiuli, Z

    2001-10-01

    Electroplated rhodium foil was employed as the target for cyclotron production of palladium-103. An electrodissolution apparatus was found better than other dissolution methods in terms of personnel shielding and palladium-103 yield. The ion-exchange column chromatography method was simple and effective for the purification of palladium-103 and the final stripping agent of NH4Cl + NH3(1:1) was more efficient than other agents.

  10. Examining Rhodium Catalyst complexes for Use with Conducting Polymers Designed for Fuel Cells in Preparing Biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpio, M.M.; Kerr, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Biosensing devices are important because they can detect, record, and transmit information regarding the presence of, or physiological changes in, different chemical or biological materials in the environment. The goal of this research is to prepare a biosensing device that is effective, quick, and low cost. This is done by examining which chemicals will work best when placed in a biosensor. The first study involved experimenting on a rhodium catalyst complexed with ligands such as bipyridine and imidazole. The rhodium catalyst is important because it is reduced from RhIII to RhI, forms a hydride by reaction with water and releases the hydride to react with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to selectively produce 1,4-NADH, the reduced form of NAD+. The second study looked at different types of ketones and enzymes for the enzyme-substrate reaction converting a ketone into an alcohol. Preliminary results showed that the rhodium complexed with bipyridine was able to carry out all the reactions, while the rhodium complexed with imidazole was not able to produce and release hydrides. In addition, the most effective ketone to use is benzylacetone with the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from baker’s yeast. Future work includes experimenting with bis-imidazole, which mimics the structure of bipyridine to see if it has the capability to reduce and if the reduction rate is comparable to the bipyridine complex. Once all testing is completed, the fastest catalysts will be combined with polymer membranes designed for fuel cells to prepare biosensing devices that can be used in a variety of applications including ones in the medical and environmental fields.

  11. Dipolar cycloaddition of rhodium-generated carbonyl ylides with p-quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrung, M C; Kaliappan, K P

    2000-02-10

    [reaction: see text] The dipolar cycloaddition of carbonyl ylides generated by the rhodium-catalyzed decomposition of delta- and epsilon-carbonyl-alpha-diazoketones with p-quinones leads to both C=O and C=C addition products. The product ratio is solvent- and catalyst-dependent and has been optimized to favor formation of either product. The C=C addition products of naphthoquinones are used in the assembly of structures hybridizing the illudin and anthraquinone anticancer agents.

  12. Rhodium-Catalyzed Cyanation of C(sp(2))-H Bond of Alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, Manthena; Anbarasan, Pazhamalai

    2015-08-07

    Efficient and selective rhodium-catalyzed cyanation of chelation-assisted C-H bonds of alkenes has been accomplished using environmentally benign N-cyano-N-phenyl-p-methylbenzenesulfonamide (NCTS) as a cyanating reagent. The developed methodology tolerates various functional groups and allows the synthesis of diverse substituted acrylonitriles in good to excellent yields. Furthermore, the potential of the methodology was demonstrated through the formal synthesis of chlorpheniramine-based antagonist.

  13. Column preconcentration and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of rhodium in some food and standard samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Mohammad Ali; Pourmohammad, Fatemeh; Fazelirad, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method has been developed for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of rhodium after adsorption of its 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol/tetraphenylborate ion associated complex at the surface of alumina. Several factors affecting the extraction efficiency such as the pH, type of eluent, sample and eluent flow rates, sorption capacity of alumina and sample volume were investigated and optimized. The relative standard deviation for eight measurements of 0.1 ng/mL of rhodium was ±6.3%. In this method, the detection limit was 0.003 ng/mL in the original solution. The sorption capacity of alumina and the linear range for Rh(III) were evaluated as 0.8 mg/g and 0.015-0.45 ng/mL in the original solution, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of rhodium content in some food and standard samples with high recovery values. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Strain Lattice Imprinting in Graphene by C60 Intercalation at the Graphene/Cu Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monazami, Ehsan; Bignardi, Luca; Rudolf, Petra; Reinke, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Intercalation of C60 molecules at the graphene-substrate interface by annealing leads to amorphous and crystalline intercalated structures. A comparison of topography and electronic structure with wrinkles and moiré patterns confirms intercalation. The intercalated molecules imprint a local

  15. Synthesis and Electroluminescent Properties of Julolidine-π-Juloidine Type Materials with the Bulky Adamantane Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kum Hee; Yoon, Seung Soo [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seok Jae; Kim, Young Kwan [Hongik Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    A main problem of red emitting material, which contributes to their low EL performances, is the concentration quenching due to the effective self aggregation and the consequent formation of excimers. To avoid this drawback and thus improve the EL properties of red fluorescent OLED devices, many synthetic efforts have been conducted to develop new emitting materials with the structural motifs to suppress self-aggregation by the weakening intermolecular attractive interactions. Particularly, the introduction of bulky moieties in the emitters would provide the steric hindrance between emitting materials in solid state devices and thus reduce the self-aggregation. Nevertheless, EL performances of red materials still need to be improved for the practical applications. In conclusion, we designed and synthesized three julolidine-π-juloidine type emitting materials (1-3) with the bulky adamantane groups. To study their electroluminescent properties, the multilayered OLED devices with the structure of ITO/NPB (40 nm)/ADN : 1-3 (x%) (20 nm)/Alq{sub 3} (40 nm)/Liq (2 nm)/Al were fabricated. All devices using emitters 1-3 showed the efficient emissions, in which their EL performances depend on the structure of emitters sensitively. Particularly, a device using emitter 3 exhibited the efficient orange-red emission with the luminous and power efficiencies of 4.79 cd/A and 1.76 lm/W at 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The CIE coordinates of this device was (0.57, 0.42) at 7.0 V.

  16. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  17. Removal of cesium ions from clays by cationic surfactant intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Lee, Kune-Woo

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach to remediate cesium-contaminated clays based on intercalation of the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) into clay interlayers. Intercalation of DTAB was found to occur very rapidly and involved exchanging interlayer cations. The reaction yielded efficient cesium desorption (∼97%), including of a large amount of otherwise non-desorbable cesium ions by cation exchange with ammonium ions. In addition, the intercalation of DTAB afforded an expansion of the interlayers, and an enhanced desorption of Cs by cation exchange with ammonium ions even at low concentrations of DTAB. Finally, the residual intercalated surfactants were easily removed by a decomposition reaction with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of Cu 2+ /Fe 2+ catalysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intercalation of Carbon Nanotube Fibers to Improve their Conductivity Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed research will explore how NASA intercalation technology can be used to lower the resistivity of the new Rice-Teijin fiber make them viable for NASA...

  19. Lithium isotope effect accompanying electrochemical intercalation of lithium into graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Yanase, S; Oi, T

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been electrochemically intercalated from a 1:2 (v/v) mixed solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and methylethyl carbonate (MEC) containing 1 M LiClO sub 4 into graphite, and the lithium isotope fractionation accompanying the intercalation was observed. The lighter isotope was preferentially fractionated into graphite. The single-stage lithium isotope separation factor ranged from 1.007 to 1.025 at 25 C and depended little on the mole ratio of lithium to carbon of the lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GIC) formed. The separation factor increased with the relative content of lithium. This dependence seems consistent with the existence of an equilibrium isotope effect between the solvated lithium ion in the EC/MEC electrolyte solution and the lithium in graphite, and with the formation of a solid electrolyte interfaces on graphite at the early stage of intercalation. (orig.)

  20. Effect of Diffusion on Lithium Intercalation in Titanium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudriachova, Marina V.; Harrison, Nicholas M.; de Leeuw, Simon W.

    2001-02-01

    A new model of Li intercalation into rutile and anatase structured titania has been developed from first principles calculations. The model includes both thermodynamic and kinetic effects and explains the observed differences in intercalation behavior and their temperature dependence. The important role of strong local deformations of the lattice and elastic screening of interlithium interactions is demonstrated. In addition, a new phase of LiTiO2 is reported.

  1. Syntheses, structure and intercalation properties of low-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We reported18 the synthesis, characterization and intercalation chemistry of seven new phenylphos- phonates, A(HO3PC6H5)(H2O3PC6H5) (A = alkali metals, NH4 and ... tered, washed with n-hexane and finally air-dried. Similarly intercalates of thallium (1) phenylar- sonate, 1•(CH3(CH2)n–1NH2)x (n = 5, 8 and 16) were.

  2. Intercalation-driven reversible control of magnetism in bulk ferromagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Subho; Das, Bijoy; Knapp, Michael; Brand, Richard A; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Kruk, Robert; Hahn, Horst

    2014-07-16

    An extension in magnetoelectric effects is proposed to include reversible chemistry-controlled magnetization variations. This ion-intercalation-driven magnetic control can be fully reversible and pertinent to bulk material volumes. The concept is demonstrated for ferromagnetic iron oxide where the intercalated lithium ions cause valence change and partial redistribution of Fe(3+) cations yielding a large and fully reversible change in magnetization at room temperature. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Surface and interlayer base-characters in lepidocrocite titanate: The adsorption and intercalation of fatty acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maluangnont, Tosapol, E-mail: tosapol.ma@kmitl.ac.th [College of Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Catalytic Chemistry Research Unit, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Arsa, Pornanan [Catalytic Chemistry Research Unit, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Limsakul, Kanokporn; Juntarachairot, Songsit; Sangsan, Saithong [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Gotoh, Kazuma [Graduate School of Natural Science & Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sooknoi, Tawan, E-mail: kstawan@gmail.com [Catalytic Chemistry Research Unit, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand)

    2016-06-15

    While layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with positively-charged sheets are well known as basic materials, layered metal oxides having negatively-charged sheets are not generally recognized so. In this article, the surface and interlayer base-characters of O{sup 2−} sites in layered metal oxides have been demonstrated, taking lepidocrocite titanate K{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.4}Ti{sub 1.6}O{sub 4} as an example. The low basicity (0.04 mmol CO{sub 2}/g) and low desorption temperature (50–300 °C) shown by CO{sub 2}− TPD suggests that O{sup 2−} sites at the external surfaces is weakly basic, while those at the interlayer space are mostly inaccessible to CO{sub 2}. The liquid-phase adsorption study, however, revealed the uptake as much as 37% by mass of the bulky palmitic acid (C{sub 16} acid). The accompanying expansion of the interlayer space by ~0.1 nm was detected by PXRD and TEM. In an opposite manner to the external surfaces, the interlayer O{sup 2−} sites can deprotonate palmitic acid, forming the salt (i.e., potassium palmitate) occluded between the sheets. Two types of basic sites are proposed based on ultrafast {sup 1}H MAS NMR and FTIR results. The interlayer basic sites in lepidocrocite titanate leads to an application of this material as a selective and stable two-dimensional (2D) basic catalyst, as demonstrated by the ketonization of palmitic acid into palmitone (C{sub 31} ketone). Tuning of the catalytic activity by varying the type of metal (Zn, Mg, and Li) substituting at Ti{sup IV} sites was also illustrated. - Graphical abstract: Interlayer basic sites in lepidocrocite titanate, K{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.4}Ti{sub 1.6}O{sub 4}, lead to an intercalation of palmitic acid with a layer expansion. Display Omitted - Highlights: • K{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.4}Ti{sub 1.6}O{sub 4} intercalates palmitic acid, forming the occluded potassium salt. • The interlayer expansion is evidenced by PXRD patterns and TEM image. • Two types of basic sites are deduced from ultrafast

  4. Bulky α-diimine palladium complexes: highly efficient for direct C-H bond arylation of heteroarenes under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jia-Sheng; Li, Yan-Fang; Shen, Dong-Sheng; Ke, Zhuofeng; Liu, Feng-Shou

    2016-10-14

    Through the strategy to enhance the bulkiness on both the backbone and the N-aryl moieties, we designed and synthesized a type of bulky α-diimine palladium complex (i.e., {[Ar-N[double bond, length as m-dash]C(R)-C(R)[double bond, length as m-dash]N-Ar]PdCl2, (Ar = 2-benzhydryl-4,6-dimethylphenyl)}, C1, R = H; C2, R = An; C3, R = Ph). The structures of these palladium complexes were well characterized, while C1 and C3 were further characterized by X-ray diffraction. The catalytic performances of the precatalysts were screened for direct C-H bond arylation of heteroarenes. The bidentate N,N-palladium complex C3 with both a backbone and N-aryl bulkiness was found to be a highly efficient precatalyst under aerobic conditions. With a low palladium loading of 0.5-0.1 mol%, a variety of heteroarenes with challenging bulky steric aryl bromides as well as heteroaryl bromides are all applicable for this cross-coupling reaction.

  5. Discriminating Intercalative Effects of Threading Intercalator Nogalamycin, from Classical Intercalator Daunomycin, Using Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, T; Banerjee, S; Sett, S; Ghosh, S; Rakshit, T; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2016-01-01

    DNA threading intercalators are a unique class of intercalating agents, albeit little biophysical information is available on their intercalative actions. Herein, the intercalative effects of nogalamycin, which is a naturally-occurring DNA threading intercalator, have been investigated by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy (AFS). The results have been compared with those of the well-known chemotherapeutic drug daunomycin, which is a non-threading classical intercalator bearing structural similarity to nogalamycin. A comparative AFM assessment revealed a greater increase in DNA contour length over the entire incubation period of 48 h for nogalamycin treatment, whereas the contour length increase manifested faster in case of daunomycin. The elastic response of single DNA molecules to an externally applied force was investigated by the single molecule AFS approach. Characteristic mechanical fingerprints in the overstretching behaviour clearly distinguished the nogalamycin/daunomycin-treated dsDNA from untreated dsDNA-the former appearing less elastic than the latter, and the nogalamycin-treated DNA distinguished from the daunomycin-treated DNA-the classically intercalated dsDNA appearing the least elastic. A single molecule AFS-based discrimination of threading intercalation from the classical type is being reported for the first time.

  6. Dependence of the electron work function change of the rhodium (100) face on the order of oxygen and hydrogen adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, T.V.; Belyaeva, M.E.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown that the order of hydrogen and oxygen adsorption on rhodium determines the course of the adsorbates interaction. Changes in electron work function of the rhodium (100) face which occur as a function of time during hydrogen adsorption on a surface with preadsorbed oxygen was studied along with changes in the electron work function during adsorption of hydrogen and oxygen. The electron work function was determined by photoelectric emission. Gas adsorption occurred at room temperature, the gas phase composition was determined with an omegatron, and Auger spectroscopy was used to check the cleanliness of the original surface.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of photoactive azobenzene-based chromophores containing a bulky cholesteryl moiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Po-Chih; Lu, Ya-Ling; Li, Chung-Yuan

    2012-05-01

    This study describes the synthesis of a series of azobenzene-based chromophores bearing pendent bulky cholesteryl groups, using esterification reactions. The chromophores were composed of liquid crystalline mesophases with six or eleven methylene segments as spacers, and with electron-donating (sbnd OCH3) and electron-withdrawing (sbnd NO2) terminal groups. The target compounds were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing optical microscopy, absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopies. All the azobenzene derivatives with six or eleven methylene segments revealed chiral nematic phases. We investigated the effects of these photochromic compounds' structures on E/Z photoisomerization under UV irradiation. Chromophores containing the electron-withdrawing nitro-group (sbnd NO2) underwent a faster rate of Z to E isomerization in darkness than the electron-donating (sbnd OCH3) groups did; the isomerization process proceeded via a rotation mechanism. Self-assembled aggregates of C6 solution exhibited enhanced fluorescence in THF/water mixtures at 10% water fraction.

  8. Permeation of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles through intact and damaged human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, Marcella [University of Trieste, Clinical Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences (Italy); Crosera, Matteo; Bianco, Carlotta; Adami, Gianpiero; Montini, Tiziano; Fornasiero, Paolo [University of Trieste, Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences (Italy); Jaganjac, Morana [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Laboratory for Oxidative Stress, Department of Molecular Medicine (Croatia); Bovenzi, Massimo; Filon, Francesca Larese, E-mail: larese@units.it [University of Trieste, Clinical Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate percutaneous penetration of platinum and rhodium nanoparticles (PtNPs: 5.8 ± 0.9 nm, RhNPs: 5.3 ± 1.9 nm) through human skin. Salts compounds of these metals are sensitizers and some also carcinogenic agents. In vitro permeation experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells with intact and damaged skin. PtNPs and RhNPs, stabilized with polyvinylpyrrolidone, were synthesized by reduction of Na{sub 2}PtC{sub l6} and RhCl{sub 3}·3H{sub 2}O respectively. Suspensions with a concentration of 2.0 g/L of PtNPs and RhNPs were dispersed separately in synthetic sweat at pH 4.5 and applied as donor phases to the outer surface of the skin for 24 h. Measurements of the content of the metals in the receiving solution and in the skin were performed subsequently. Rhodium skin permeation was demonstrated through damaged skin, with a permeation flux of 0.04 ± 0.04 μg cm{sup −2} h{sup −1} and a lag time of 7.9 ± 1.1 h, while no traces of platinum were found in receiving solutions. Platinum and rhodium skin-analysis showed significantly higher concentrations of the metals in damaged skin. Rh and Pt applied as NPs can penetrate the skin barrier and Rh can be found in receiving solutions. These experiments pointed out the need for skin contamination prevention, since even a minor injury to the skin barrier can significantly increase penetration.

  9. Rhodium deposition onto a 4-mercaptopyridine SAM on Au(1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolova, M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Kayser, M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Kolb, D.M. [Institute of Electrochemistry, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany)]. E-mail: dieter.kolb@uni-ulm.de; Boyen, H.-G. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Ziemann, P. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Mayer, D. [BASF Electronic Materials GmbH, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Wirth, A. [BASF Electronic Materials GmbH, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2007-02-10

    The application of a recently developed method for the deposition of Pd and Pt on top of a SAM, has been successfully extended to Rh, thus proving the versatility of the new concept. Experimental evidence from cyclic voltammetry, in situ STM and ex situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy is presented for the deposition of monoatomic high rhodium islands onto a 4-mercaptopyridine self-assembled monolayer on a Au(1 1 1) electrode. By repetitive complexation of the Rh ions to the ring-nitrogen and reduction in a Rh-ion free solution, an almost completely covered SAM is obtained. The consequences of making contacts for molecular electronics are briefly discussed.

  10. Trans-Selective Rhodium Catalysed Conjugate Addition of Organoboron Reagents to Dihydropyranones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah J. Edwards

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The selective synthesis of 2,6-trans-tetrahydropyran derivatives employing the rhodium catalysed addition of organoboron reagents to dihydropyranone templates, derived from a zinc-catalysed hetero-Diels-Alder reaction, is reported. The addition of both arylboronic acids and potassium alkenyltrifluoroborates have been accomplished in high yields using commercially-available [Rh(cod(OH]2 catalyst. The selective formation of the 2,6-trans-tetrahydropyran stereoisomer is consistent with a mechanism involving alkene association and carbometalation on the less hindered face of the dihydropyranone.

  11. Investigating the Intercalation Chemistry of Alkali Ions in Fluoride Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Tanghong; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Lei; Bayliss, Ryan D.; Lin, Feng; Plews, Michael R.; Nordlund, Dennis; Doeff, Marca M.; Persson, Kristin A.; Cabana, Jordi (LBNL); (SLAC); (UIC); (UCB)

    2017-02-07

    Reversible intercalation reactions provide the basis for modern battery electrodes. Despite decades of exploration of electrode materials, the potential for materials in the nonoxide chemical space with regards to intercalation chemistry is vast and rather untested. Transition metal fluorides stand out as an obvious target. To this end, we report herein a new family of iron fluoride-based perovskite cathode materials AxK1–xFeF3 (A = Li, Na). By starting with KFeF3, approximately 75% of K+ ions were subsequently replaced by Li+ and Na+ through electrochemical means. X-ray diffraction and Fe X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the existence of intercalation of alkali metal ions in the perovskite structure, which is associated with the Fe2+/3+ redox couple. A computational study by density functional theory showed agreement with the structural and electrochemical data obtained experimentally, which suggested the possibility of fluoride-based materials as potential intercalation electrodes. This study increases our understanding of the intercalation chemistry of ternary fluorides, which could inform efforts toward the exploration of new electrode materials.

  12. Substrate-induced solvent intercalation for stable graphene doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ho; Yang, Jae Won; Jo, Sae Byeok; Kang, Boseok; Lee, Seong Kyu; Bong, Hyojin; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S; Cho, Kilwon

    2013-02-26

    Here, we report a substrate-induced intercalation phenomenon of an organic solvent at the interface between monolayer graphene and a target substrate. A simple dipping of the transferred chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene on the SiO₂ substrate into chloroform (CHCl₃, CF), a common organic solvent, induces a spontaneous formation of CF clusters beneath the basal plane of the graphene as well as inside the wrinkles. The microscopic and spectroscopic observations showed the doping behavior of monolayer graphene, which indicates the adsorption of CF to monolayer graphene. Interestingly, the intercalated organic solvent showed remarkable stability for over 40 days under ambient conditions. To reveal the underlying mechanism of the stable solvent intercalation, desorption energy of CF molecules at the graphene/substrate interface was measured using Arrhenius plots of the conductance change upon time and temperature. Two stages of solvent intercalations with high desorption energies (70 and 370 meV) were observed along with the consecutive shrinkage of the solvent clusters at the basal plane and the wrinkles, respectively. Moreover, the theoretical calculation based on density functional theory (DFT) also shows the strong intercalation energy of CF between monolayer graphene and the SiO₂ substrate, which results from the stabilization of the graphene-SiO₂ interactions. Furthermore, the thermal response of the conductance could be utilized to maintain a certain degree of p-doping of monolayer graphene, which provides the facile, sustainable, and controllable large-area doping method of graphene for future generation of printed flexible electronics.

  13. Tethered naphthalene diimide intercalators enhance DNA triplex stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianolio, D A; McLaughlin, L W

    2001-09-01

    Naphthalene diimides function as effective intercalators and when tethered to the 5'-terminus of a pyrimidine-rich oligonucleotide can contribute significantly to the overall stabilization of DNA triplexes. This stabilization can be further enhanced by alterations to the linker tethering the DNA sequence and the intercalator. Less flexible linkers, and particularly one with a phenyl ring present, appear to permit the stabilization afforded by the bound intercalator to be transferred more effectively to the three-stranded complex. The conjugate containing the phenyl linker exhibits a T(M) value that is increased by 28 degrees C relative to the unconjugated triplex. That the linker itself contributes to the observed stabilization is clear since introduction of the phenyl linker increases the observed T(M) by 11 degrees C relative to a simple flexible linker.

  14. Understanding Mn-Based Intercalation Cathodes from Thermodynamics and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Xie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of Mn-based intercalation compounds have been applied as the cathode materials of Li-ion batteries, such as LiMn2O4, LiNi1−x−yCoxMnyO2, etc. With open structures, intercalation compounds exhibit a wide variety of thermodynamic and kinetic properties depending on their crystal structures, host chemistries, etc. Understanding these materials from thermodynamic and kinetic points of view can facilitate the exploration of cathodes with better electrochemical performances. This article reviews the current available thermodynamic and kinetic knowledge on Mn-based intercalation compounds, including the thermal stability, structural intrinsic features, involved redox couples, phase transformations as well as the electrical and ionic conductivity.

  15. Intercalated europium metal in epitaxial graphene on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nathaniel A.; Hupalo, Myron; Keavney, David; Tringides, Michael C.; Vaknin, David

    2017-10-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) reveals the magnetic properties of intercalated europium metal under graphene on SiC(0001). The intercalation of Eu nanoclusters (average size 2.5 nm) between graphene and SiC substate are formed by deposition of Eu on epitaxially grown graphene that is subsequently annealed at various temperatures while keeping the integrity of the graphene layer. Using sum-rules analysis of the XMCD of Eu M4 ,5 edges at T =15 K, our samples show paramagnetic-like behavior with distinct anomaly at T ≈90 K, which may be related to the Nèel transition, TN=91 K, of bulk metal Eu. We find no evidence of ferromagnetism due to EuO or antiferromagnetism due to Eu2O3 , indicating that the graphene layer protects the intercalated metallic Eu against oxidation over months of exposure to atmospheric environment.

  16. Plaque pH changes following consumption of two types of plain and bulky bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Mortazavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consistency, backing process and content differences could influence cariogenic potential of foods. The aim was to compare plaque pH changes following consumption of two types of bread with different physical characteristics. Methods : In this clinical trial, interproximal plaque pH of 10 volunteers with high risk of dental caries (saliva Streptococcus mutans > 10 5 , high dental caries experience, and average DMFT =6.10 ± 1.56 was measured. Plain traditionally backed "Sangak bread" and soft bulky "Baguette bread" and %10 sucrose solution were tested in a cross over designed experiment. Baseline plaque pH was recorded and followed by 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 minutes intervals. Data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. Results: Sucrose solution caused the most pronounced pH and ∆pH drop from 7.15 ± 0.33 at baseline to 6.78 ± 0.29. Means plaque pH of 10% sucrose solution and Baguette were not statistically different at 1, 20 and 30 minutes (P > 0.05. Mean plaque pH of Sangak and Baguette showed significant differences at 0, 1, 20 and30 minutes (P < 0.05. Sucrose solution caused a dramatic plaque pH drop during first 10 minutes and then within 30 minutes returned to baseline pH. For two bread samples within first 10 minutes, pH increased and then started to decrease during tenth to fifteenth minutes. Conclusion: During all experiment phases, the mean pH of Baguette with less consistency and carbohydrate content and higher rate of starch gelatination was lower compared to Sangak.

  17. Reversibility of hydrogen chemisorption on a ceria-supported rhodium catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, S.; Calvino, J.J.; Cifredo, G.A.; Izquierdo, J.M. Rodriguez (Univ. de Cadiz, Perto Real (Spain)); Perrichon, V.; Laachir, A. (Inst. de Recherches sur la Catalyse (France))

    1992-09-01

    Cerium dioxide is an important component of the so-called three-way catalysts. This work reports on some new aspects of the chemistry of hydrogen-ceria systems. It is shown that, at room temperature, in the presence of highly dispersed rhodium, ceria chemisorbs large amounts of hydrogen. As deduced from magnetic measurements carried out in situ, this spillover process leads to the reduction of ceria to an extent of 21% of the total amount of cerium ions present in the sample, which is roughly equivalent to the complete surface reduction of the oxide. It is found that over a highly hydroxylated sample the reduction of ceria induced by the spillover process is partly reversible even at 295 K. If the sample is pumped off at 773 K, the initial oxidation state of ceria is almost completely recovered. Both the rate and extent of hydrogen chemisorption on ceria were found to be sensitive to the specific pretreatment applied to the catalyst. Over bare ceria, hydrogen chemisorption at 298 K was negligible, temperatures as high as 473 K being necessary to activate the process. In contrast to the rhodium-containing catalyst, over pure ceria the desorption of hydrogen leads to a much larger extent to water formation, thus revealing a deeper irreversible reduction of the oxide.

  18. The synthesis of rhodium/carbon dots nanoparticles and its hydrogenation application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Yao; Tan, Jing; Sang, Haitao; Zhang, Liqun; Yue, Dongmei

    2017-02-01

    Rhodium (Rh) nanoparticles have been widely used as potent hydrogenation catalysts. Herein, a new convenient method has been developed to synthesize rhodium nanoparticles, in which carbon dots (CDs) were used both as stabilizing and reducing agents. The fluorescent CDs were prepared by microwave-assisted heating method using chitosan as raw material and the presences of hydroxyl and carbonyl on the surface of CDs were supported by FTIR spectra. Subsequently, CDs could directly reduce Rh3+ to Rh0 without additional reducing and stabilizing agents by heating Rh3+ with CDs for 1 h at 120 °C. The resulting Rh nanoparticles have an average size of about 2.8 nm and the Rh/CDs nanoparticles also retain the fluorescent property of CDs. The hydrogenation activities of Rh/CDs nanoparticles were investigated. The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles had highly catalytic activity in the hydrogenation reaction of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and hydroxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (HTBN). Also, the presence of CDs could improve the fluorescent properties of rubbers after hydrogenation.

  19. Rhodium(III)-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation with vinyl esters as an acetylene equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicola J; Marsden, Stephen P; Raw, Steven A

    2014-09-19

    The behavior of electron-rich alkenes in rhodium-catalyzed C-H activation/annulation reactions is investigated. Vinyl acetate emerges as a convenient acetylene equivalent, facilitating the synthesis of sixteen 3,4-unsubstituted isoquinolones, as well as select heteroaryl-fused pyridones. The complementary regiochemical preferences of enol ethers versus enol esters/enamides is discussed.

  20. Pressure effect in syngas conversion to ethylene glycol. A behavior of rhodium-tributylphosphine-N-methylpyrrolidone system under 1000 atm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, K.; Matsuda, A.; Masuda, T.; Watanabe, E.; Wada, K.

    1987-05-01

    In syngas (CO+H/sub 2/) conversion to ethylene glycol (EG), rhodium catalyst modified by tributylphosphine (P/sup n/Bu/sub 3/) was found to be ca. 20 times more active under 1000 atm at 210/sup 0/C than under 500 atm. This unusual pressure effect was discussed on the basis of IR spectral data. 8 references, 2 figures.

  1. Carboxylated polymers functionalized by cyclodextrins for the stabilization of highly efficient rhodium(0) nanoparticles in aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Sébastien; Léger, Bastien; Herbois, Rudy; Ponchel, Anne; Tilloy, Sébastien; Wenz, Gerhard; Monflier, Eric

    2012-11-21

    Rhodium(0) nanoparticles stabilized by a polymer containing carboxylate and β-cyclodextrin moieties have high stability and catalytic activity for aqueous hydrogenation reactions of olefins and aromatic substrates. This catalytic system can be recycled and reused without loss of activity. These high catalytic performances can be attributed to conjugated electrostatic interactions (carboxylate groups) and steric interactions (polymer structure and β-cyclodextrin moiety).

  2. The Rôle of the Element Rhodium in the Hyperbolic Law of the Periodic Table of Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of the element rhodium as an independent affirmation of calculations by the Hyperbolic Law and validity of all its relations is shown herein. The deviation in cal- culation by this method of the atomic mass of heaviest element is 0.0024%, and its coefficient of scaling 0.001–0.005%

  3. Rhodium-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of α-amino acrylonitriles: an efficient approach to synthesizing chiral α-amino nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuxiu; You, Cai; Yang, Yusheng; Wang, Fangyuan; Li, Shuailong; Lv, Hui; Zhang, Xumu

    2017-01-19

    An efficient rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of α-amino acrylonitriles has been developed, affording α-acylamino nitriles with high yields and excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99% yield and >99% ee). This novel methodology provides an efficient and concise synthetic route to chiral α-amino nitriles, which are versatile intermediates in organic synthesis.

  4. A chelating tetrapeptide rhodium complex comprised of a histidylidene residue: biochemical tailoring of an NHC-Rh hydrosilylation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monney, Angèle; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-11-18

    Coupling of a histidinium salt with a MetAlaAla amino acid sequence followed by metallation with [RhCl(cod)](2) yields a rhodium(I) NHC complex with a pending peptide residue. Methionine chelation, induced by chloride abstraction from the metal coordination sphere, affords an efficient hydrosilylation catalyst precursor comprised of a peptidic macrocyclic chelate backbone.

  5. Rhodium(iii)-catalyzed sp(2) C-H bond addition to CF3-substituted unsaturated ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quanbin; Guo, Tenglong; Wu, Kaikai; Yu, Zhengkun

    2016-02-18

    Rhodium(iii)-catalyzed conjugate addition of aromatic and olefinic C-H bonds to CF3-substituted unsaturated ketones was efficiently achieved. Both arene and olefin substrates bearing a chelate assisted-directing group were coupled with a variety of β-trifluoromethyl-α,β-unsaturated ketones with excellent atom-economy, high yields, and broad substrate scopes.

  6. Investigation of the Electric and Magnetic Properties of Intercalated Graphites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    the two-zone vapor transport method. Employing this groth process. The structure of graphite intercalation the graphite temperature was maintained at...GIC such as CoCl2 , and NiCl2 were also reported by Ka- rnia et . 122,23, recently theme transitos wer also conimed by Elahy et &1 [241. The authors of...intercalating anhydrous FeC 3 into highly ordered pyrolytic graphite using the two-zone vapour transport method. Employing this growth process, the graphite

  7. Exposure to meat-derived carcinogens and bulky DNA adduct levels in normal-appearing colon mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vikki; Brunetti, Vanessa; Peacock, Sarah; Massey, Thomas E; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik J; Ashbury, Janet E; Vanner, Stephen J; King, Will D

    2017-09-01

    Meat consumption is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. This research investigated the relationship between meat-derived carcinogen exposure and bulky DNA adduct levels, a biomarker of DNA damage, in colon mucosa. Least squares regression was used to examine the relationship between meat-derived carcinogen exposure (PhIP and meat mutagenicity) and bulky DNA adduct levels in normal-appearing colon tissue measured using 32 P-postlabelling among 202 patients undergoing a screening colonoscopy. Gene-diet interactions between carcinogen exposure and genetic factors relevant to biotransformation and DNA repair were also examined. Genotyping was conducting using the MassARRAY ® iPLEX ® Gold SNP Genotyping assay. PhIP and higher meat mutagenicity exposures were not associated with levels of bulky DNA adducts in colon mucosa. The XPC polymorphism (rs2228001) was found to associate with bulky DNA adduct levels, whereby genotypes conferring lower DNA repair activity were associated with higher DNA adduct levels than the normal activity genotype. Among individuals with genotypes associated with lower DNA repair (XPD, rs13181 and rs1799179) or detoxification activity (GSTP1, rs1695), higher PhIP or meat mutagenicity exposures were associated with higher DNA adduct levels. Significant interactions between the XPC polymorphism (rs2228000) and both dietary PhIP and meat mutagenicity on DNA adduct levels was observed, but associations were inconsistent with the a priori hypothesized direction of effect. Exposure to meat-derived carcinogens may be associated with increased DNA damage occurring directly in the colon among genetically susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrochromic performance of RF sputtered WO3 thin films by Li ion intercalation and de-intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi, M.; Sivakumar, R.; Sivanantharaja, A.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2017-05-01

    Tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films were prepared by RF sputtering technique at room temperature and 300°C as substrate temperatures keeping the sputtering powers as 100, 150, 200 and 250 W. Films were subjected various characterization like structural by XRD, surface morphology by SEM, composition analysis by EDX, and optical band gap by UV-Vis-NIR spectrometer. Optimized films were used for iono-optical studies using Li ion as intercalation and de-intercalation. Electrochromic parameters were evolved and reported.

  9. Effect of oxygen intercalation on properties of sputtered CuYO2 for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    on intercalation of oxygen at high pressure, which reduced the transparency in the visible region. The Ca-doped CuYO2 films before oxygen intercalation show an average transmission of about 60% which reduces to about 45% upon oxygen intercalation. The tempera- ture dependence of the conductivity indicates ...

  10. Calcium intercalation into layered fluorinated sodium iron phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Albert L.; Kim, Soojeong; Pan, Baofei; Liao, Chen; Fister, Timothy T.; Ingram, Brian J.

    2017-11-01

    The energy density and cost of battery systems, relative to the current state-of-the art, can be improved by developing alternative chemistries utilizing multivalent working ions such as calcium. Many challenges must be overcome, such as the identification of cathode materials with high energy density and an electrolyte with a wide electrochemical stability window that can plate and strip calcium metal, before market implementation. Herein, the feasibility and cycling performance of Ca2+ intercalation into a desodiated layered Na2FePO4F host is described. This is the first demonstration of Ca2+ intercalation into a polyanionic framework, which implies that other polyanionic framework materials may be active for Ca2+ intercalation. Although substantial effort is expected in order to develop a high energy density cathode material, this study demonstrates the feasibility of Ca2+ intercalation into multiple host structures types, thereby extending opportunities for development of Ca insertion host structures, suggesting such a cathode material can be identified and developed.

  11. [Raman and infrared spectrograms of organic borate intercalated hydrotalcite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Yu; Bai, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Dong

    2013-03-01

    The pattern of X-ray diffraction, the Raman and infrared spectra of organic borate intercalated hydrotalcite were discussed. The well crystallized zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides (Zn-Al LDHs) intercalated by carbonate ions and borate ions were respectively prepared by co-precipitation method. Patterns of X-ray diffraction showed that the (003) reflection of borate-LDHs was sharp and symmetric and shifted to lower angle than that of carbonate-LDHs. The gallery height of borate-LDHs increased from 0. 28 nm to 0.42 nm after intercalation, indicating that interlayered carbonate ions were substituted by borate anions. The Raman and IR spectra showed that specific bands of carbonate ions in the borate-LDHs disappeared, but with the presence of B3O3(OH)4- X B4O5(OH)4(2-) and B(OH)4- in the interlayer galleries. The hydroxide interlayer anions had a significant influence on the band positions in Raman and infrared spectra of modes related to the hydroxyl group. Our results indicate that single phase and pure borate-pillared LDHs can be obtained using tributyl orthoborate as intercalating agents, and the change in the structure and nature of hydrotalcite can be detected precisely by Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Tethered naphthalene diimide-based intercalators for DNA triplex stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianolio, Diego A.; Segismundo, Joanna M.; McLaughlin, Larry W.

    2000-01-01

    The synthesis and triplex stabilizing properties of oligodeoxyribonucleotides functionalized at the 5′- and/or 3′-termini with a naphthalene diimide-based (NDI) intercalator is described. The NDI intercalator was prepared in a single step from the corresponding dianhydride and was attached to the 5′-terminus of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide following a reverse coupling procedure. The DMT protecting group was removed and the sequence phosphitylated to generate the phosphoramidite derivative on the 5′-terminus of the support-bound oligodeoxyribonucleotide. The NDI intercalator with a free hydroxyl was then added in the presence of tetrazole. Attachment of the NDI to the 3′-terminus relied upon a tethered amino group that could be functionalized first with the naphthalene dianhydride, which was subsequently converted to the diimide. Using both procedures, an oligonucleotide conjugate was prepared having the NDI intercalator at both the 5′- and 3′-termini. Thermal denaturation studies were used to determine the remarkable gain in stability for triplexes formed when the NDI-conjugated oligonucleotide was present as the third strand in the complex. PMID:10773082

  13. Preparation of intercalated polyaniline/clay nanocomposite and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intercalated composite of polyaniline and clay has been reported. The composite was prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline within the layers of `illite' clay. The composite was characterized for its structural, spectral, and microscopic properties. At higher level of loading the layered structure of composite breaks ...

  14. Intercalation of Si between MoS2 layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bremen, Rik; Yao, Qirong; Banerjee, Soumya; Cakir, Deniz; Oncel, Nuri; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.

    2017-01-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the growth of sub-monolayer amounts of silicon (Si) on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). At room temperature and low deposition rates we have found compelling evidence that the deposited Si atoms intercalate between the MoS2 layers. Our evidence

  15. Characterization of Intercalated Graphite Fibers for Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    remove. When SU8-5 does come off it is in chunks and would place excessive force on the fibers, snapping them off. 66 4.4.1.5 Fiber mounting with gold...Charge-transfer effects in graphite intercalates: Ab initio calculations and neutron -diffraction experiment”, Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 58, no. 15, pp

  16. Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Ferric Chloride Intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Rogers, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) was used as an activation agent to successfully intercalate ferric chloride (FeCl3) into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This reaction caused the hBN mass to increase by approx.100 percent, the lattice parameter c to decrease from 6.6585 to between 6.6565 and 6.6569 ?, the x-ray diffraction (XRD) (002) peak to widen from 0.01deg to 0.05deg of the full width half maximum value, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum's broad band (1277/cm peak) to change shape, and new FTIR bands to emerge at 3700 to 2700 and 1600/cm. This indicates hBN's structural and chemical properties are significantly changed. The intercalated product was hygroscopic and interacted with moisture in the air to cause further structural and chemical changes (from XRD and FTIR). During a 24-h hold at room temperature in air with 100 percent relative humidity, the mass increased another 141 percent. The intercalated product, hydrated or not, can be heated to 750 C in air to cause exfoliation. Exfoliation becomes significant after two intercalation-air heating cycles, when 20-nm nanosheets are commonly found. Structural and chemical changes indicated by XRD and FTIR data were nearly reversed after the product was placed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), resulting in purified, exfoliated, thin hBN products.

  17. Enantiospecific kinking of DNA by a partially intercalating metal complex

    KAUST Repository

    Reymer, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Opposite enantiomers of [Ru(phenanthroline) 3] 2+ affect the persistence length of DNA differently, a long speculated effect of helix kinking. Our molecular dynamics simulations confirm a substantial change of duplex secondary structure produced by wedge-intercalation of one but not the other enantiomer. This effect is exploited by several classes of DNA operative proteins. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  18. Electrochemical lithium intercalation into vanadium pentoxide xerogel film electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyun, Su Il; Bae, Joon Sung [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Daejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The lithium-ion transport in vanadium pentoxide xerogel film electrodes has been investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The oxide xerogel film electrodes were prepared by spin-coating a viscous gel on an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate. The spin-coated xerogel films were dried under vacuum at 130 and 270 C, respectively. The lithium intercalation into the xerogel film electrode dried at 270 C is limited by the interfacial reaction at the electrolyte/electrode interface rather than the lithium-ion transport in the oxide electrode. On the other hand, lithium intercalation into the film electrode dried at 130 C is largely limited by the lithium transport in the oxide film, and the chemical diffusivity of the lithium ion in the oxide film was determined to decrease from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -12} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} as the electrode potential of the oxide film fell from 3.0 to 2.2 V{sub Li/Li{sup +}}. The tranition of the diffusion-controlled intercalation to the interfacial reaction-controlled intercalation into the oxide xerogel film with decreasing drying temperature was explained in terms of the modification of the oxide lattice to a more open-structured lattice by structural modification of the oxide film by water molecules incorporated into the film. (orig.)

  19. Ionic liquid intercalated V2O5 nanorods: synthesis and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    owing to their unique periodic and elastic properties, resulting in structural flexibility that provides additional opportunities for nanoengineering. In recent days, the ... gained more interest. Nagaraju and Chandrappa11 have synthesized Na0.28V2O5 nanobelts via intercalation of sodium ions by the hydrothermal method.

  20. Intercalation of paracetamol into the hydrotalcite-like host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanda, František; Maryšková, Zuzana; Kovář, Petr

    2011-12-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are often used as host structures for intercalation of various anionic species. The product intercalated with the nonionic, water-soluble pharmaceuticals paracetamol, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)acetamide, was prepared by rehydration of the Mg-Al mixed oxide obtained by calcination of hydrotalcite-like precursor at 500 °C. The successful intercalation of paracetamol molecules into the interlayer space was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy measurements. Molecular simulations showed that the phenolic hydroxyl groups of paracetamol interact with hydroxide sheets of the host via the hydroxyl groups of the positively charged sites of Al-containing octahedra; the interlayer water molecules are located mostly near the hydroxide sheets. The arrangement of paracetamol molecules in the interlayer is rather disordered and interactions between neighboring molecules cause their tilting towards the hydroxide sheets. Dissolution tests in various media showed slower release of paracetamol intercalated in the hydrotalcite-like host in comparison with tablets containing the powdered pharmaceuticals.

  1. Modes of tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrinatomanganese(III) ion intercalation inside natural clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyoud, Ahed; Jondi, Waheed; Mansour, Waseem; Majeed Khan, M A; Hilal, Hikmat S

    2016-01-01

    Metalloporphyrin ions, with planar shape, have been known to intercalate horizontally and diagonally between montmorillonite layers. Perpendicular intercalation inside montmorillonite has not been reported earlier. This work aims at achieving perpendicular intercalation inside montmorillonite in natural clays. Possible intercalation inside other forms of natural clay will also be investigated. Natural clays were purified and characterized. The naked clay powder was then refluxed with tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrinatomanganese(III) ion (MnTPyP(+)) solution in methanol with continuous stirring for different times. Electronic absorption spectra, atomic absorption spectra, Fourier Transform infrared spectra, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were all used in clay characterization and in intercalation study. The natural clay involved different phases, namely montmorillonite, biotite, kaolinite, illite and traces of quartz. Montmorillonite clay allowed horizontal, diagonal and perpendicular intercalation of the metalloporphyrin ions. Biotite allowed only horizontal intercalation. The mode of intercalation was deduced by monitoring the clay inter-planar distance value change. Intercalation occurred inside both micro- and nano-size clay powders to different extents. The nano-powder (average size ~50 nm) showed uptake values up to 3.8 mg MnTPyP/g solid, whereas the micro-size powder (average size ~316 nm) exhibited lower uptake (2.4 mg MnTPyP/g solid). Non-expandable clay phases did not allow any intercalation. The intercalated MnTPyP(+) ions showed promising future supported catalyst applications. Depending on their phase, natural clays hosted metalloporphyrin ions. Montmorillonite can allow all three possible intercalation geometries, horizontal, diagonal and for the first time perpendicular. Biotite allows horizontal intercalation only. Non-expandable clays allow no intercalation. Graphical abstractMetalloporphyrin complexes can be intercalated into

  2. Reactivity and equilibrium thermodynamic studies of rhodium tetrakis(3,5-disulfonatomesityl)porphyrin species with H2, CO, and olefins in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xuefeng; Li, Shan; Wayland, Bradford B

    2006-11-27

    Aqueous (D2O) solutions of tetrakis(3,5-disulfonatomesityl)porphyrin rhodium(III) aquo/hydroxo complexes ([(TMPS)Rh(III)(D2O)2]-7 (1), [(TMPS)Rh(III)(OD)(D2O)]-8 (2), and [(TMPS)Rh(III)(OD)2]-9 (3)) react with hydrogen (D2) to form an equilibrium distribution with a rhodium hydride ([(TMPS)Rh-D(D2O)]-8 (4)) and a rhodium(I) complex ([(TMPS)Rh(I)(D2O)]-9 (5)). Equilibrium constants (298 K) are measured that define the distribution for all five of these (TMPS)Rh species in this system as a function of the dihydrogen (D2) and hydrogen ion (D+) concentrations. The hydride complex [(TMPS)Rh-D(D2O)]-8 is a weak acid in D2O (Ka(298 K) = 4.3 x 10(-8)). Steric demands of the TMPS porphyrin ligand prohibit formation of a Rh(II)-Rh(II)-bonded complex, related rhodium(I)-rhodium(III) adducts, and intermolecular association of alkyl complexes which are prominent features of the rhodium tetra(p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin ((TSPP)Rh) system. The rhodium(II) complex ([(TMPS)Rh(II)(D2O)]-8) reacts with water to form hydride and hydroxide complexes and is not observed in D2O. The (TMPS)Rh-OD and (TMPS)Rh-D bond dissociation free energies (BDFE) are virtually equal and have a value of approximately 60 kcal mol(-1). Reactions of [(TMPS)Rh-D(D2O)]-8 in water with CO and olefins produce rhodium formyl and alkyl complexes which have equilibrium thermodynamic values comparable to the values for the corresponding substrate reactions of [(TSPP)Rh-D(D2O)]-4.

  3. Model arenes hydrogenation with silica-supported rhodium nanoparticles:The role of the silica grains and of the solvent on catalytic activities

    OpenAIRE

    Barthe, Laurie; Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Roucoux, Alain; Philippot, Karine; Chaudret, Bruno; Hemati, Mehrdji

    2009-01-01

    Silica-supported rhodium-based nanoheterogeneous catalysts were easily prepared by impregnation with a pre-stabilized colloidal suspension. The resulting catalysts contain rhodium nanoparticles well-dispersed in the silica pores with a mean size of 5 nm. Influence of the silica grains size and of the solvent was investigated in arenes hydrogenation. It appeared that the size of the silica grains has a minimal influence on the reaction rate but the supported nanocatalysts displayed higher TOFs...

  4. Rhodium colloidal suspension deposition on porous silica particles by dry impregnation: Study of the influence of the reaction conditions on nanoparticles location and dispersion and catalytic reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Barthe, Laurie; Hemati, Mehrdji; Philippot, Karine; Chaudret, Bruno; Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Roucoux, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Rhodium composite nanomaterials were synthesized by an innovating process called dry impregnation in a fluidized bed. It consists in spraying an aqueous colloidal suspension of rhodium on silica porous particles. The use of this precursor solution containing preformed nanoparticles avoids calcination/activation step. Different composite nanomaterials were prepared displaying various metal loadings. The operating conditions were tuned to modify τs, the solvent vapour saturation rate value, in ...

  5. High-Density Chemical Intercalation of Zero-Valent Copper into Bi 2 Se 3 Nanoribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Koski, Kristie J.

    2012-05-09

    A major goal of intercalation chemistry is to intercalate high densities of guest species without disrupting the host lattice. Many intercalant concentrations, however, are limited by the charge of the guest species. Here we have developed a general solution-based chemical method for intercalating extraordinarily high densities of zero-valent copper metal into layered Bi 2Se 3 nanoribbons. Up to 60 atom % copper (Cu 7.5Bi 2Se 3) can be intercalated with no disruption to the host lattice using a solution disproportionation redox reaction. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Supercritical carbon dioxide as solvent and temporary protecting group for rhodium-catalyzed hydroaminomethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, K; Wisniewski, W; Mynott, R; Leitner, W; Kranemann, C L; Rische, L T; Eilbracht, P; Kluwer, S; Ernsting, J M; Elsevier, C J

    2001-11-05

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) acts simultaneously as solvent and temporary protecting group during homogeneously rhodium-catalyzed hydroaminomethylation of ethyl methallylic amine. Cyclic amines are formed as the major products in scCO,, whereas the cyclic amide is formed preferentially in conventional solvents. Multinuclear high-pressure NMR spectroscopy revealed that this selectivity switch is mainly due to reversible formation of the carbamic acid in the solvent CO2, which reduces the tendency for intramolecular ring closure at the Rh-acyl intermediate. These results substantiate the general concept of using scCO2 as a protective medium for amines in homogeneous catalysis and demonstrate for the first time its application for selectivity control.

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of organic monolayers adsorbed on the rhodium(111) crystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernota, Paul Davis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy studies were carried out on ordered overlayers on the (111) surface of rhodium. These adsorbates include carbon monoxide (CO), cyclohexane, cyclohexene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, para-xylene, and meta-xylene. Coadsorbate systems included: CO with ethylidyne, CO with para- and meta-xylene, and para-xylene with meta-xylene. In the case of CO, the structure of the low coverage (2x2) overlayer has been observed. The symmetry of the unit cell in this layer suggests that the CO is adsorbed in the 3-fold hollow sites. There were also two higher coverage surface structures with (√7x√7) unit cells. One of these is composed of trimers of CO and has three CO molecules in each unit cell. The other structure has an additional CO molecule, making a total of four. This extra CO sits on a top site.

  8. Ionic Liquids as Solvents for Rhodium and Platinum Catalysts Used in Hydrosilylation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Zielinski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of imidazolium and pyridinium based ionic liquids has been synthetized, and their ability to dissolve and activate the catalysts used in hydrosilylation reaction of 1-octane and 1,1,1,3,5,5,5-heptamethyltrisiloxane was investigated. An organometallic catalyst as well as inorganic complexes of platinum and rhodium dissolved in ionic liquids were used, forming liquid solutions not miscible with the substrates or with the products of the reaction. The results show that application of such a simple biphasic catalytic system enables reuse of ionic liquid phase with catalysts in multiple reaction cycles reducing the costs and decreasing the amount of catalyst needed per mole of product.

  9. Mapping of the radiation field of a mammography equipment using molybdenum and rhodium filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreira, Jacqueline S.; Campos, Daniela; Vivolo, Vitor, E-mail: jacsales@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The use of X rays for diagnostic radiology is very common and important to Medicine, including mammographic diagnosis focusing decreasing of the doses applied to the patients and preserving high quality of the diagnostic image. A quality control program of the irradiation systems it is very necessary. The Instruments Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN perform calibration in dosemeters used in radiation dosimetry (in diagnostic radiology) for many years. The objective of that paper is determining the point of greatest intensity of the beam issued by the mammography equipment. Exposures were made with filters Rhodium and Molybdenum. That mapping is important before applied a routine quality control program of the mammography equipment and the calibration of instruments in the diagnosis. (author)

  10. Water resistant rhodium plated reflectors for use in the DIRC BaBar Cherenkov detector

    CERN Document Server

    Benkebil, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G

    2000-01-01

    Early simulation studies showed that reflectors mounted on the photomultipliers would be useful for the DIRC BaBar Cherenkov detector, showing a gain between 20% and 30% in the number of Cherenkov photons. The proof of principle for these reflectors has been obtained during the beam test of a large-scale prototype of the DIRC detector. An extensive R and D has been conducted in order to test different metallization procedures. Indeed, the challenge was to find a metallization technique which can resist the pure de-ionized water (>15 M OMEGA) up to 10 yr. The chosen technology was rhodium plated reflectors. During the first BaBar cosmic run, the measured performance confirmed the results of the simulation, the prototype-II and the R and D.

  11. Gravimetric preparation and characterization of primary reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbach, Angela; Noordmann, Janine; Görlitz, Volker; Pape, Carola; Richter, Silke; Kipphardt, Heinrich; Kopp, Gernot; Jährling, Reinhard; Rienitz, Olaf; Güttler, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Gravimetrically prepared mono-elemental reference solutions having a well-known mass fraction of approximately 1 g/kg (or a mass concentration of 1 g/L) define the very basis of virtually all measurements in inorganic analysis. Serving as the starting materials of all standard/calibration solutions, they link virtually all measurements of inorganic analytes (regardless of the method applied) to the purity of the solid materials (high-purity metals or salts) they were prepared from. In case these solid materials are characterized comprehensively with respect to their purity, this link also establishes direct metrological traceability to The International System of Units (SI). This, in turn, ensures the comparability of all results on the highest level achievable. Several national metrology institutes (NMIs) and designated institutes (DIs) have been working for nearly two decades in close cooperation with commercial producers on making an increasing number of traceable reference solutions available. Besides the comprehensive characterization of the solid starting materials, dissolving them both loss-free and completely under strict gravimetric control is a challenging problem in the case of several elements like molybdenum and rhodium. Within the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), in the Joint Research Project (JRP) called SIB09 Primary standards for challenging elements, reference solutions of molybdenum and rhodium were prepared directly from the respective metals with a relative expanded uncertainty associated with the mass fraction of U rel(w) < 0.05 %. To achieve this, a microwave-assisted digestion procedure for Rh and a hotplate digestion procedure for Mo were developed along with highly accurate and precise inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) methods required to assist with the preparation and as dissemination tools.

  12. Ligand-induced fate of embryonic species in the shape-controlled synthesis of rhodium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacchi, Adam J; Schaak, Raymond E

    2015-02-24

    The shapes of noble metal nanoparticles directly impact their properties and applications, including in catalysis and plasmonics, and it is therefore important to understand how multiple distinct morphologies can be controllably synthesized. Solution routes offer powerful capabilities for shape-controlled nanoparticle synthesis, but the earliest stages of the reaction are difficult to interrogate experimentally and much remains unknown about how metal nanoparticle morphologies emerge and evolve. Here, we use a well-established polyol process to synthesize uniform rhodium nanoparticle cubes, icosahedra, and triangular plates using bromide, trifluoroacetate, and chloride ligands, respectively. In all of these systems, we identified rhodium clusters with diameters of 1-2 nm that form early in the reactions. The colloidally stable metal cluster intermediates served as a stock solution of embryonic species that could be transformed predictably into each type of nanoparticle morphology. The anionic ligands that were added to the embryonic species determined their eventual fate, e.g., the morphologies into which they would ultimately evolve. Extensive high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experiments revealed that the growth pathway-monomer addition, coalescence, or a combination of the two-was different for each of the morphologies, and was likely controlled by the interactions of each specific anionic adsorbate with the embryonic species. Similar phenomena were observed for related palladium and platinum nanoparticle systems. These studies provide important insights into how noble metal nanoparticles nucleate, the pathways by which they grow into several distinct morphologies, and the imperative role of the anonic ligand in controlling which route predominates in a particular system.

  13. Induced magnetism in transition metal intercalated graphitic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-10-26

    We investigate the structure, chemical bonding, electronic properties, and magnetic behavior of a three-dimensional graphitic network in aba and aaa stacking with intercalated transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). Using density functional theory, we find induced spin-polarization of the C atoms both when the graphene sheets are aba stacked (forming graphite) and aaa stacked (resembling bi-layer graphene). The magnetic moment induced by Mn, Fe, and Co turns out to vary from 1.38 μB to 4.10 μB, whereas intercalation of Ni and Cu does not lead to a magnetic state. The selective induction of spin-polarization can be utilized in spintronic and nanoelectronic applications.

  14. Electrochemical Doping of Halide Perovskites with Ion Intercalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Qinglong [Department; amp, Engineering; Chen, Mingming [Department; amp, Engineering; Li, Junqiang [Department; amp, Engineering; Wang, Mingchao; Zeng, Xiaoqiao [Chemical; Besara, Tiglet [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 E Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32310, United States; Lu, Jun [Chemical; Xin, Yan [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 E Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32310, United States; Shan, Xin [Department; amp, Engineering; Pan, Bicai [Key Laboratory; Wang, Changchun [State; Lin, Shangchao; Siegrist, Theo; Xiao, Qiangfeng [Department; Yu, Zhibin [Department; amp, Engineering

    2017-01-10

    Halide perovskites have recently been investigated for various solution-processed optoelectronic devices. The majority of studies have focused on using intrinsic halide perovskites, and the intentional incoporation of dopants has not been well explored. In this work, we discovered that small alkali ions, including lithium and sodium ions, could be electrochemically intercalated into a variety of halide and pseudohalide perovskites. The ion intercalation caused a lattice expansion of the perovskite crystals and resulted in an n-type doping of the perovskites. Such electrochemical doping improved the conductivity and changed the color of the perovskites, leading to an electrochromism with more than 40% reduction of transmittance in the 450–850 nm wavelength range. The doped perovskites exhibited improved electron injection efficiency into the pristine perovskite crystals, resulting in bright light-emitting diodes with a low turn-on voltage.

  15. Phase Separation Dynamics in Isotropic Ion-Intercalation Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries exhibit complex nonlinear dynamics, resulting from diffusion and phase transformations coupled to ion intercalation reactions. Using the recently developed Cahn-Hilliard reaction (CHR) theory, we investigate a simple mathematical model of ion intercalation in a spherical solid nanoparticle, which predicts transitions from solid-solution radial diffusion to two-phase shrinking-core dynamics. This general approach extends previous Li-ion battery models, which either neglect phase separation or postulate a spherical shrinking-core phase boundary, by predicting phase separation only under appropriate circumstances. The effect of the applied current is captured by generalized Butler-Volmer kinetics, formulated in terms of diffusional chemical potentials, and the model consistently links the evolving concentration profile to the battery voltage. We examine sources of charge/discharge asymmetry, such as asymmetric charge transfer and surface "wetting" by ions within the solid, which can lead to...

  16. Exfoliation and intercalation of montmorillonite by small peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Karin A.; Trusiak, Adrianna; Katz, Al; Alimova, Alexandra; Wei, Hui; Gottlieb, Paul; Steiner, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding structural changes in clay minerals induced by complexation with organic matter is relevant to soil science and agricultural applications. In this study, the effect of peptide storage in montmorillonite and the thermal stability of peptide-clay complexes was examined through characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy, UV absorption, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD analysis of small peptide-montmorillonite clay complexes produced profiles consisting of reflections associated with the smectite 001 reflection and related peaks similar to that produced by a mixed layer clay mineral structure. Shifts in higher order diffraction maxima were attributed to disorder caused by the intercalation with the peptides. Increasing peptide concentrations resulted in greater shifts towards smaller 2θ from 6.37° (1.39 nm) to 5.45° (1.62 nm) as the interlayer space expanded. The expansion was accompanied by broadening of the 001 reflection (FWHM increases from 0.51 to 1.22° 2θ). The XRD line broadening was interpreted as caused by poorer crystallinity resulting from intercalation and tactoid exfoliation. SEM images revealed montmorillonite platelets with upwardly rolled edges that tend toward cylindrical structures with the production of tubules. High-resolution TEM images revealed bending of montmorillonite platelets, confirming exfoliation. The distribution of basal spacings in the micrographs was determined from the spatial frequencies obtained by Fourier analysis of density profiles. The distribution indicated the presence of discrete coherent crystallite domains. XRD and TGA results indicated that higher peptide concentrations resulted in a greater fraction of intercalated peptides and that surface adsorption of peptides mediated intercalation. Therefore, higher peptide concentration led to more stable organoclay complexes. However, UV absorption and TGA found that peptide adsorption onto montmorillonite had a finite limit at

  17. Structure and Properties of Intercalated Graphite Fiber-Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-07

    trifluoride in a nitromethane solution MF5 to form NOZ. and MF6-. The adsorbed NO2 using the method described by Kuhn and Olah (4). captures electrons...polar chlorine - C8 4 4 3 aluminum chloride complex. In either case, the driving force for intercalation is Noteworthy is the close similarity between...electron transfer from graphite to the highly this compound’s X-ray pattern and the fourth electrophylic, positively charged chlorine , stage ccmpound

  18. Sequential rhodium/palladium catalysis: enantioselective formation of dihydroquinolinones in the presence of achiral and chiral ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Qureshi, Zafar; Sonaglia, Lorenzo; Lautens, Mark

    2014-12-08

    Compatible combinations of achiral and chiral ligands can be used in rhodium/palladium catalysis to achieve highly enantioselective domino reactions. The difference in rates of catalysis and minimal effects of ligand interference confer control in the domino sequence. The "all-in-one" 1,4-conjugate arylation and C-N cross-coupling through sequential Rh/Pd catalysis provides access to enantioenriched dihydroquinolinone building blocks. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Applying Adjacent Hyperbolas to Calculation of the Upper Limit of the Periodic Table of Elements, with Use of Rhodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the earlier study (Khazan A. Upper Limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table - Element No.155. 2nd ed., Svenska fysikarkivet, Stockholm, 2010 the author showed how Rhodium can be applied to the hyperbolic law of the Periodic Table of Elements in order to calculate, with high precision, all other elements conceivable in the Table. Here we obtain the same result, with use of fraction linear functions (adjacent hyperbolas.

  20. Applying Adjacent Hyperbolas to Calculation of the Upper Limit of the Periodic Table of Elements, with Use of Rhodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the earlier study (Khazan A. Upper Limit in Mendeleev’s Periodic Table — Ele- ment No. 155. 2nd ed., Svenska fysikarkivet, Stockholm, 2010 the author showed how Rhodium can be applied to the hyperbolic law of the Periodic Table of Elements in or- der to calculate, with high precision, all other elements conceivable in the Table. Here we obtain the same result, with use of fraction linear functions (adjacent hyperbolas.

  1. Redox-controlled potassium intercalation into two polyaromatic hydrocarbon solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, F. Denis; Pitcher, M. J.; Hiley, C. I.; Whitehead, G. F. S.; Kar, S.; Ganin, A. Y.; Antypov, D.; Collins, C.; Dyer, M. S.; Klupp, G.; Colman, R. H.; Prassides, K.; Rosseinsky, M. J.

    2017-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalation into polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been studied intensely after reports of superconductivity in a number of potassium- and rubidium-intercalated materials. There are, however, no reported crystal structures to inform our understanding of the chemistry and physics because of the complex reactivity of PAHs with strong reducing agents at high temperature. Here we present the synthesis of crystalline K2Pentacene and K2Picene by a solid-solid insertion protocol that uses potassium hydride as a redox-controlled reducing agent to access the PAH dianions, and so enables the determination of their crystal structures. In both cases, the inserted cations expand the parent herringbone packings by reorienting the molecular anions to create multiple potassium sites within initially dense molecular layers, and thus interact with the PAH anion π systems. The synthetic and crystal chemistry of alkali metal intercalation into PAHs differs from that into fullerenes and graphite, in which the cation sites are pre-defined by the host structure.

  2. Molecular Intercalation and Cohesion of Organic Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bruner, Christopher

    2013-01-17

    The phase separated bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer in BHJ polymer:fullerene organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) are mechanically weak with low values of cohesion. Improved cohesion is important for OPV device thermomechanical reliability. BHJ devices are investigated and how fullerene intercalation within the active layer affects cohesive properties in the BHJ is shown. The intercalation of fullerenes between the side chains of the polymers poly(3,3″′-didocecyl quaterthiophene) (PQT-12) and poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (pBTTT) is shown to enhance BHJ layer cohesion. Cohesion values range from ≈1 to 5 J m -2, depending on the polymer:fullerene blend, processing conditions, and composition. Devices with non-intercalated BHJ layers are found to have significantly reduced values of cohesion. The resulting device power conversion efficiencies (PCE) are also investigated and correlated with the device cohesion. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A mechanistic investigation into the elimination of phosphonium salts from rhodium-TRIPHOS complexes under methanol carbonylation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Gareth W; Clarke, Matthew L; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Williams, Bruce

    2008-09-28

    Phosphine modified rhodium complexes are currently the topic of considerable research as methanol carbonylation catalysts, but often suffer from poor stability. This paper reports on an investigation into how coordination mode affects the elimination of phosphonium salts from rhodium complexes, namely [trans-RhCl(CO)(PPh3)2] 1, [RhCl(CO)(dppe)] 2, [RhCl(CO)(dppb)]2 3, [Rh(TRIPHOS)(CO)2]Cl 4. These complexes are all potential pre-catalysts for methanol carbonylation. The reaction of these complexes with methyl iodide at 140 degrees C under both N2 and CO atmospheres has been studied and has revealed clear differences in the stability of the corresponding Rh(III) complexes. In contrast to both monomeric 2 and dimeric 3 that react cleanly with CH3I to give stable Rh(III) acetyl complexes, 4 forms a novel bidentate complex after the elimination of the one arm of the ligand as a quaternised phosphonium salt. The structure of this complex has been determined spectroscopically and using X-ray crystallography. The mechanism of formation of this novel complex has been investigated using 13CH3I and strong evidence that supports a dissociative mechanism as the means of phosphine loss from the rhodium centre is provided.

  4. Ge-intercalated graphene: The origin of the p-type to n-type transition

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2012-09-01

    Recently huge interest has been focussed on Ge-intercalated graphene. In order to address the effect of Ge on the electronic structure, we study Ge-intercalated free-standing C 6 and C 8 bilayer graphene, bulk C 6Ge and C 8Ge, as well as Ge-intercalated graphene on a SiC(0001) substrate, by density functional theory. In the presence of SiC(0001), there are three ways to obtain n-type graphene: i) intercalation between C layers; ii) intercalation at the interface to the substrate in combination with Ge deposition on the surface; and iii) cluster intercalation. All other configurations under study result in p-type states irrespective of the Ge coverage. We explain the origin of the different doping states and establish the conditions under which a transition occurs. © Copyright EPLA, 2012.

  5. Intercalation doping of narrow multilayer graphene interconnects with sub-100 nm widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Hisao; Matsumoto, Rika; Kajita, Akihiro; Sakai, Tadashi

    2017-07-01

    An intercalation process for narrow graphene interconnects with linewidths of graphene flakes of >5 µm size induced partial delamination of the graphene layers and insufficient intercalation in some graphene interconnects with linewidths of graphene layers and provided improved doping characteristics with a higher yield in narrow graphene interconnects with linewidths of graphene interconnects under suitable conditions was confirmed by Raman scattering spectroscopy. These results indicate that intercalation using MoCl5 is promising for the fabrication of narrow graphene interconnects.

  6. Structural effects on the electronic characteristics of intramolecularly intercalated alkali-rubrene complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tsung-Lung, E-mail: quantum@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chia-Yi University, 300 Hsueh-Fu Road, Chiayi, 60004, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lu, Wen-Cai, E-mail: wencailu@jlu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Fiber Materials and Modern Textile, Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong 266071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China)

    2016-11-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of neutral monolithium- and monosodium-rubrene (Li{sub 1} Rub and Na{sub 1} Rub) isomers are investigated and compared with monopotassium-rubrene (K{sub 1} Rub). Based on the alkali binding site, all isomers of these alkali-rubrene complexes can be subdivided into two types: intramolecularly intercalated and extramolecularly adsorbed. The minimum-energy Li{sub 1} Rub and Na{sub 1} Rub are intercalated structures, whereas the minimum-energy K{sub 1} Rub is adsorbed. The fact that the intercalated Li{sub 1} Rub and Na{sub 1} Rub structures are energetically favorable over the adsorbed ones can be explained by two energy rules. First, “double” proximity of the intercalating alkali element to a pair of phenyl side groups enormously reduces the total energy. Second, accommodation of a minuscule intercalant does not significantly deform the carbon frame and, thus, increases the energy only by a small amount. Additionally, the peculiar effects of intramolecular intercalation on the electronic structures of molecules are also studied in this simulation of monoalkali intercalation. In the monoalkali-intercalated rubrene complex, only one of the two pairs of phenyl groups of rubrene is intercalated, intentionally leaving another pair pristine, which facilitates the comparison of electronic structures between the intercalated and pristine pairs of phenyl side groups in a single molecule. The uniformity of chemical environments of the phenyl groups of the intercalated Li{sub 1} Rub/Na{sub 1} Rub is deteriorated by the incorporation of the intercalant, and leads to their spectral characteristics in contrast to K{sub 1} Rub. In particular, the introduction of the intercalant promotes the carbon 2p orbitals of the intercalated phenyl pair to take part in the electronic structures of the HOMO and LUMO peaks of Li{sub 1} Rub/Na{sub 1} Rub. The unpaired electron in the HOMO is delocalized over the backbone with higher probability of

  7. Tuning the Properties of Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells by Adjusting Fullerene Size to Control Intercalation

    KAUST Repository

    Cates, Nichole C.

    2009-12-09

    We demonstrate that intercalation of fullerene derivatives between the side chains of conjugated polymers can be controlled by adjusting the fullerene size and compare the properties of intercalated and nonintercalated poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (pBTTT):fullerene blends. The intercalated blends, which exhibit optimal solar-cell performance at 1:4 polymer:fullerene by weight, have better photoluminescence quenching and lower absorption than the nonintercalated blends, which optimize at 1:1. Understanding how intercalation affects performance will enable more effective design of polymer:fullerene solar cells. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  8. Mechanism of Si intercalation in defective graphene on SiC

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2012-10-01

    Previously reported experimental findings on Si-intercalated graphene on SiC(0001) seem to indicate the possibility of an intercalation process based on the migration of the intercalant through atomic defects in the graphene sheet. We employ density functional theory to show that such a process is in fact feasible and obtain insight into its details. By means of total energy and nudged elastic band calculations we are able to establish the mechanism on an atomic level and to determine the driving forces involved in the different steps of the intercalation process through atomic defects.

  9. Interlayer Structures and Dynamics of Arsenate and Arsenite Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxides: A First Principles Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yingchun Zhang; Xiandong Liu; Chi Zhang; Mengjia He; Xiancai Lu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, by using first principles simulation techniques, we explored the basal spacings, interlayer structures, and dynamics of arsenite and arsenate intercalated Layered double hydroxides (LDHs...

  10. Parametric normalization for full-energy peak efficiency of HPGe γ-ray spectrometers at different counting positions for bulky sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Nie; Bang-Fa, Ni; Wei-Zhi, Tian

    2013-02-01

    Application of effective interaction depth (EID) principle for parametric normalization of full energy peak efficiencies at different counting positions, originally for quasi-point sources, has been extended to bulky sources (within ∅30 mm×40 mm) with arbitrary matrices. It is also proved that the EID function for quasi-point source can be directly used for cylindrical bulky sources (within ∅30 mm×40 mm) with the geometric center as effective point source for low atomic number (Z) and low density (D) media and high energy γ-rays. It is also found that in general EID for bulky sources is dependent upon Z and D of the medium and the energy of the γ-rays in question. In addition, the EID principle was theoretically verified by MCNP calculations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased micronuclei and bulky DNA adducts in cord blood after maternal exposures to traffic-related air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.; Wichmann, J.; Autrup, H.

    2009-01-01

    umbilical cords, concurrently collected at the time of planned Caesarean section. Modeled residential traffic density, a proxy measure of traffic-related air pollution exposures, was validated by indoor levels of nitrogen dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in 42 non-smoking homes. DNA adduct......Exposure to traffic-related air pollution in urban environment is common and has been associated with adverse human health effects. In utero exposures that result in DNA damage may affect health later in life. Early effects of maternal and in utero exposures to traffic-related air pollution were...... for potential confounders and effect modifiers. For the first time increased bulky DNA adducts and MN in cord blood after maternal exposures to traffic-related air pollution are found, demonstrating that these transplacental environmental exposures induce DNA damage in newborns. Given that increased DNA damage...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of novel polyamide-ethers based on bis-imidazole containing bulky aryl pendant groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahdi Saadati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel polyamide-ethers (PAEs based on bis-imidazole containing bulky aryl pendant groups was prepared by direct polycondensation of a diamine, 4-(1-(4-(4-(2-(4-aminophenyl-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-1-ylphenoxyphenyl-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-ylbenzenamine (DABI, and various dicarboxylic acids. All the resulting polyamide-ethers were amorphous with inherent viscosities ranged from 0.52 to 0.61 dL/g and were readily soluble in many organic solvents which could be solution-cast into transparent and tough films. The glass transition temperatures (Tg of these polymers were affected considerably by their chemical structure and ranged from 230 to 310 ºC. They had useful levels of thermal stability associated with relatively high temperatures of 10% weight loss (T10 in the range of 329-399 ºC in air atmosphere.

  13. Intercalation of Si between MoS2 layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bremen, Rik; Yao, Qirong; Banerjee, Soumya; Cakir, Deniz; Oncel, Nuri; Zandvliet, Harold J W

    2017-01-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the growth of sub-monolayer amounts of silicon (Si) on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). At room temperature and low deposition rates we have found compelling evidence that the deposited Si atoms intercalate between the MoS2 layers. Our evidence relies on several experimental observations: (1) Upon the deposition of Si on pristine MoS2 the morphology of the surface transforms from a smooth surface to a hill-and-valley surface. The lattice constant of the hill-and-valley structure amounts to 3.16 Å, which is exactly the lattice constant of pristine MoS2. (2) The transitions from hills to valleys are not abrupt, as one would expect for epitaxial islands growing on-top of a substrate, but very gradual. (3) I(V) scanning tunneling spectroscopy spectra recorded at the hills and valleys reveal no noteworthy differences. (4) Spatial maps of dI/dz reveal that the surface exhibits a uniform work function and a lattice constant of 3.16 Å. (5) X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy measurements reveal that sputtering of the MoS2/Si substrate does not lead to a decrease, but an increase of the relative Si signal. Based on these experimental observations we have to conclude that deposited Si atoms do not reside on the MoS2 surface, but rather intercalate between the MoS2 layers. Our conclusion that Si intercalates upon the deposition on MoS2 is at variance with the interpretation by Chiappe et al. (Adv. Mater.2014, 26, 2096-2101) that silicon forms a highly strained epitaxial layer on MoS2. Finally, density functional theory calculations indicate that silicene clusters encapsulated by MoS2 are stable.

  14. Copper-Intercalated Birnessite as a Water Oxidation Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenuwara, Akila C; Shumlas, Samantha L; Attanayake, Nuwan H; Cerkez, Elizabeth B; McKendry, Ian G; Frazer, Laszlo; Borguet, Eric; Kang, Qing; Zdilla, Michael J; Sun, Jianwei; Strongin, Daniel R

    2015-11-24

    We report a synthetic method to increase the catalytic activity of birnessite toward water oxidation by intercalating copper in the interlayer region of the layered manganese oxide. Intercalation of copper, verified by XRD, XPS, ICP, and Raman spectroscopy, was accomplished by exposing a suspension of birnessite to a Cu(+)-bearing precursor molecule that underwent disproportionation in solution to yield Cu(0) and Cu(2+). Electrocatalytic studies showed that the Cu-modified birnessite exhibited an overpotential for water oxidation of ∼490 mV (at 10 mA/cm(2)) and a Tafel slope of 126 mV/decade compared to ∼700 mV (at 10 mA/cm(2)) and 240 mV/decade, respectively, for birnessite without copper. Impedance spectroscopy results suggested that the charge transfer resistivity of the Cu-modified sample was significantly lower than Cu-free birnessite, suggesting that Cu in the interlayer increased the conductivity of birnessite leading to an enhancement of water oxidation kinetics. Density functional theory calculations show that the intercalation of Cu(0) into a layered MnO2 model structure led to a change of the electronic properties of the material from a semiconductor to a metallic-like structure. This conclusion from computation is in general agreement with the aforementioned impedance spectroscopy results. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that Cu(0) coexisted with Cu(2+) in the prepared Cu-modified birnessite. Control experiments using birnessite that was decorated with only Cu(2+) showed a reduction in water oxidation kinetics, further emphasizing the importance of Cu(0) for the increased activity of birnessite. The introduction of Cu(0) into the birnessite structure also increased the stability of the electrocatalyst. At a working current of 2 mA, the Cu-modified birnessite took ∼3 times longer for the overpotential for water oxdiation to increase by 100 mV compared to when Cu was not present in the birnessite.

  15. Vapour Phase Hydrogenation of Phenol over Rhodium on SBA-15 and SBA-16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, mesoporous SBA-15 and SBA-16 were synthesised using classical methods, and their physicochemical properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, FTIR, TEM and N2 adsorption–desorption. Rhodium (Rh, 1 wt % was loaded on the mesoporous SBA-15 and SBA-16 by an impregnation method. The Rh surface coverage, dispersion and crystallite size were determined by room temperature H2 chemisorption on reduced samples. The catalytic activity of Rh supported on mesoporous SBA-15 and SBA-16 was evaluated for the first time in the hydrogenation of phenol in vapour phase in a temperature range between 130 and 270 °C at atmospheric pressure. The reaction over Rh/SBA-15 at 180 °C produced cyclohexanone as the major product (about 60% along with lower amounts of cyclohexanol (about 35% and cyclohexane (about 15%. The influences of temperature, H2/phenol ratio, contact time and the nature of the solvent on the catalytic performance were systematically investigated. The Rh/SBA-16 system offered lower phenol conversion compared to Rh/SBA-15, but both have a very high selectivity for cyclohexanone (above 60%.

  16. Reactivity Control of Rhodium Cluster Ions by Alloying with Tantalum Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-02-18

    Gas phase, bielement rhodium and tantalum clusters, RhnTam(+) (n + m = 6), were prepared by the double laser ablation of Rh and Ta rods in He carrier gas. The clusters were introduced into a reaction gas cell filled with nitric oxide (NO) diluted with He and were subjected to collisions with NO and He at room temperature. The product species were observed by mass spectrometry, demonstrating that the NO molecules were sequentially adsorbed on the RhnTam(+) clusters to form RhnTam(+)NxOx (x = 1, 2, 3, ...) species. In addition, oxide clusters, RhnTam(+)O2, were also observed, suggesting that the NO molecules were dissociatively adsorbed on the cluster, the N atoms migrated on the surface to form N2, and the N2 molecules were released from RhnTam(+)N2O2. The reactivity, leading to oxide formation, was composition dependent: oxide clusters were dominantly formed for the bielement clusters containing both Rh and Ta atoms, whereas such clusters were hardly formed for the single-element Rhn(+) and Tam(+) clusters. DFT calculations indicated that the Ta atoms induce dissociation of NO on the clusters by lowering the dissociation energy, whereas the Rh atoms enable release of N2 by lowering the binding energy of the N atoms on the clusters.

  17. Electrochemical behavior of rhodium acetamidate immobilized on a carbon paste electrode: a hydrazine sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Eric de S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of rhodium acetamidate immobilized in carbon paste electrode and the consequences for sensor construction were evaluated. The electrode showed good stability and redox properties. Two reversible redox couples with midpoint potentials between 0.15 and 0.55 V vs SCE were observed. However, peak resolution in voltammetric studies was very dependent on the supporting electrolyte. The correlation between coordinating power of the electrolyte and peak potential suggests that the electrolyte can coordinate through the axial position of the complexes. Furthermore, the axial position may be also the catalytic site, as a catalytical response was observed for hydrazine oxidation. A good linear response range for hydrazine was fit by the equation i = 23.13 (± 0.34 c , where i = current in mA and c = concentration in mol dm-3 in the range of 10-5 up to 10-2 mol dm-3. The low applied potential (<300 mV indicates a good device for hydrazine sensor, minimizing interference problems. The short response time (~1 s may be useful in flow injection analysis. Furthermore, this system was very stable presenting good repeatability even after 30 measurements with a variance of 0.5 %.

  18. Asymmetric Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of heterocycles via Rhodium-catalysed allylic arylation of racemates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Philipp; Palacin, Thomas; Sidera, Mireia; Fletcher, Stephen P.

    2017-06-01

    Using asymmetric catalysis to simultaneously form carbon-carbon bonds and generate single isomer products is strategically important. Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling is widely used in the academic and industrial sectors to synthesize drugs, agrochemicals and biologically active and advanced materials. However, widely applicable enantioselective Suzuki-Miyaura variations to provide 3D molecules remain elusive. Here we report a rhodium-catalysed asymmetric Suzuki-Miyaura reaction with important partners including aryls, vinyls, heteroaromatics and heterocycles. The method can be used to couple two heterocyclic species so the highly enantioenriched products have a wide array of cores. We show that pyridine boronic acids are unsuitable, but they can be halogen-modified at the 2-position to undergo reaction, and this halogen can then be removed or used to facilitate further reactions. The method is used to synthesize isoanabasine, preclamol, and niraparib--an anticancer agent in several clinical trials. We anticipate this method will be a useful tool in drug synthesis and discovery.

  19. Antiferro quadrupolar ordering in Fe intercalated few layers graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Jahid Akhtar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The π electron cloud above and below the honeycomb structure of graphene causes each carbon atom to carry a permanent electric quadrupole moment which can attach any cation to impart interesting physical properties. We have synthesized Fe intercalated graphene structures to investigate tunable magnetic properties as a result of this chemical modification. An interesting antiferro quadrupolar ordering is observed which arises due to a coupling between magnetic dipole moment of Fe and electric quadrupole moment on graphene surface. In contrast to antiferromagnetic Neel temperature (TN, here the ordering temperature (TQ increases from 35.5 K to 47.5 K as the magnetic field is raised upto 1 Tesla.

  20. Three-Dimensional Intercalated Porous Graphene on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Trung T.; Sporken, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional intercalated porous graphene has been formed on Si(111) by electron beam evaporation under appropriate conditions and its structural and electronic properties investigated in detail by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. The results show that the crystalline quality of the porous graphene depended not only on the substrate temperature but also on the SiC layer thickness during carbon atom deposition.

  1. DNA intercalator stimulates influenza transcription and virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poon Leo LM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influenza A virus uses its host transcription machinery to facilitate viral RNA synthesis, an event that is associated with cellular RNA polymerase II (RNAPII. In this study, various RNAPII transcription inhibitors were used to investigate the effect of RNAPII phosphorylation status on viral RNA transcription. A low concentration of DNA intercalators, such as actinomycin D (ActD, was found to stimulate viral polymerase activity and virus replication. This effect was not observed in cells treated with RNAPII kinase inhibitors. In addition, the loss of RNAPIIa in infected cells was due to the shift of nonphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIa to hyperphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIo.

  2. Intercalation of small hydrophobic molecules in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worcester, D.L.; Hamacher, K.; Kaiser, H.; Kulasekere, R.; Torbet, J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into lipid bilayers containing cholesterol has been studied using the 2XC diffractometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Locations of the compounds were determined by Fourier difference methods with data from both deuterated and undeuterated compounds introduced into the bilayers from the vapor phase. Data fitting procedures were developed for determining how well the compounds were localized. The compounds were found to be localized in a narrow region at the center of the hydrophobic layer, between the two halves of the bilayer. The structures are therefore intercalated structures with the long axis of the molecules in the plane of the bilayer.

  3. Resistivity of pristine and intercalated graphite fiber epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Hambourger, Paul D.; Slabe, Melissa E.

    1991-01-01

    Laminar composites were fabricated from pristine and bromine intercalated Amoco P-55, P-75, and P-100 graphite fibers and Hysol-Grafil EAG101-1 film epoxy. The thickness and r.f. eddy current resistivity of several samples were measured at grid points and averaged point by point to obtain final values. Although the values obtained this way have high precision (less than 3 percent deviation), the resistivity values appear to be 20 to 90 percent higher than resistivities measured on high aspect ratio samples using multi-point techniques, and by those predicted by theory. The temperature dependence of the resistivity indicates that the fibers are neither damaged nor deintercalated by the composite fabrication process. The resistivity of the composites is a function of sample thickness (i.e., resin content). Composite resistivity is dominated by fiber resistivity, so lowering the resistivity of the fibers, either through increased graphitization or intercalation, results in a lower composite resistivity. A modification of the simple rule of mixtures model appears to predict the conductivity of high aspect ratio samples measured along a fiber direction, but a directional dependence appears which is not predicted by the theory. The resistivity of these materials is clearly more complex than that of homogeneous materials.

  4. Ion transport and phase transformation in thin film intercalation electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunde, Fabian; Nowak, Susann; Muerter, Juliane; Hadjixenophontos, Efi; Berkemeier, Frank; Schmitz, Guido [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialwissenschaft

    2017-11-15

    Thin film battery electrodes of the olivine structure LiFePO{sub 4} and the spinel phase LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} are deposited through ion-beam sputtering. The intercalation kinetics is studied by cyclo-voltammetry using variation of the cycling rate over 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. The well-defined layer geometry allows a detailed quantitative analysis. It is shown that LiFePO{sub 4} clearly undergoes phase separation during intercalation, although the material is nano-confined and very high charging rates are applied. We present a modified Randles-Sevcik evaluation adapted to phase-separating systems. Both the charging current and the overpotential depend on the film thickness in a systematic way. The analysis yields evidence that the grain boundaries are important short circuit paths for fast transport. They increase the electrochemical active area with increasing layer thickness. Evidence is obtained that the grain boundaries in LiFePO{sub 4} have the character of an ion-conductor of vanishing electronic conductivity.

  5. Abl suppresses cell extrusion and intercalation during epithelium folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Jeanne N.; Martin, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires control over cell shape changes and rearrangements. In the Drosophila mesoderm, linked epithelial cells apically constrict, without cell extrusion or intercalation, to fold the epithelium into a tube that will then undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Apical constriction drives tissue folding or cell extrusion in different contexts, but the mechanisms that dictate the specific outcomes are poorly understood. Using live imaging, we found that Abelson (Abl) tyrosine kinase depletion causes apically constricting cells to undergo aberrant basal cell extrusion and cell intercalation. abl depletion disrupted apical–basal polarity and adherens junction organization in mesoderm cells, suggesting that extruding cells undergo premature EMT. The polarity loss was associated with abnormal basolateral contractile actomyosin and Enabled (Ena) accumulation. Depletion of the Abl effector Enabled (Ena) in abl-depleted embryos suppressed the abl phenotype, consistent with cell extrusion resulting from misregulated ena. Our work provides new insight into how Abl loss and Ena misregulation promote cell extrusion and EMT. PMID:27440923

  6. Electron Beam Irradiated Intercalated CNT Yarns For Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Deborah L.; Gaier, James R.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Lopez Calero, Johnny E.; Ramirez, Christopher; Meador, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-walled CNT yarns have been experimentally and commercially created to yield lightweight, high conductivity fibers with good tensile properties for application as electrical wiring and multifunctional tendons. Multifunctional tendons are needed as the cable structures in tensegrity robots for use in planetary exploration. These lightweight robust tendons can provide mechanical strength for movement of the robot in addition to power distribution and data transmission. In aerospace vehicles, such as Orion, electrical wiring and harnessing mass can approach half of the avionics mass. Use of CNT yarns as electrical power and data cables could reduce mass of the wiring by thirty to seventy percent. These fibers have been intercalated with mixed halogens to increase their specific electrical conductivity to that near copper. This conductivity, combined with the superior strength and fatigue resistance makes it an attractive alternative to copper for wiring and multifunctional tendon applications. Electron beam irradiation has been shown to increase mechanical strength in pristine CNT fibers through increased cross-linking. Both pristine and intercalated CNT yarns have been irradiated using a 5-megavolt electron beam for various durations and the conductivities and tensile properties will be discussed. Structural information obtained using a field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy will correlate microstructural details with bulk properties.

  7. Stochastics of diffusion induced damage in intercalation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barai, Pallab; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2016-10-01

    Fundamental understanding of the underlying diffusion-mechanics interplay in the intercalation electrode materials is critical toward improved life and performance of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles. Especially, diffusion induced microcrack formation in brittle, intercalation active materials, with emphasis on the grain/grain-boundary (GB) level implications, has been fundamentally investigated based on a stochastic modeling approach. Quasistatic damage evolution has been analyzed under lithium concentration gradient induced stress. Scaling of total amount of microcrack formation shows a power law variation with respect to the system size. Difference between the global and local roughness exponent indicates the existence of anomalous scaling. The deterioration of stiffness with respect to microcrack density displays two distinct regions of damage propagation; namely, diffused damage evolution and stress concentration driven localized crack propagation. Polycrystalline material microstructures with different grain sizes have been considered to study the diffusion-induced fracture in grain and GB regions. Intergranular crack paths are observed within microstructures containing softer GB region, whereas, transgranular crack paths have been observed in microstructures with relatively strong GB region. Increased tortuosity of the spanning crack has been attributed as the reason behind attaining increased fracture strength in polycrystalline materials with smaller grain sizes.

  8. Controlled Electrochemical Intercalation of Graphene/h-BN van der Waals Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S. Y. Frank; Elbaz, Giselle A.; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Yu, Cyndia; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Guo, Yinsheng; Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Min, Kyung-Ah; Hong, Suklyun; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Brus, Louis E.; Roy, Xavier; Kim, Philip

    2018-01-01

    Electrochemical intercalation is a powerful method for tuning the electronic properties of layered solids. In this work, we report an electro-chemical strategy to controllably intercalate lithium ions into a series of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures built by sandwiching graphene between hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We demonstrate that encapsulating graphene with h-BN eliminates parasitic surface side reactions while simultaneously creating a new hetero-interface that permits intercalation between the atomically thin layers. To monitor the electrochemical process, we employ the Hall effect to precisely monitor the intercalation reaction. We also simultaneously probe the spectroscopic and electrical transport properties of the resulting intercalation compounds at different stages of intercalation. We achieve the highest carrier density $> 5 \\times 10^{13} cm^{-2}$ with mobility $> 10^3 cm^2/(Vs)$ in the most heavily intercalated samples, where Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillations are observed at low temperatures. These results set the stage for further studies that employ intercalation in modifying properties of vdW heterostructures.

  9. Solid State Electrochemical Intercalation of Lithium and Sodium Ions into Polyparaphenylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, M.; Billaud, D.

    1996-11-01

    Polyparaphenylene powders are electrochemically intercalated with Li +and Na +ions in solid state cells operating with poly(ethyleneoxide) based electrolytes. The intercalation-deintercalation process proceeds in two reversible steps. The binders (PEO and PVDF) used in the composite polyparaphenylene electrode give rise to irreversible side reactions.

  10. Intercalation Study of Low-Molecular-Weight Hyperbranched Polyethyleneimine into Graphite Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Katsaros, Fotios; Sideratou, Zili; Kooi, Bart J.; Karakassides, Michael. A.; Siozios, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    We report for the first time the intercalation of low-molecular-weight hyperbranched polyethyleneimine (PEI) into graphite oxide (GO) for the facile, bulk synthesis of novel graphene-based hybrid (GO-PEI) materials exhibiting tailored interlayer galleries. The size of the intercalant as well as the

  11. Effect of oxygen intercalation on properties of sputtered CuYO2 for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... intercalation show an average transmission of about 60% which reduces to about 45% upon oxygen intercalation. The temperature dependence of the conductivity indicates semiconductor behaviour with low activation energy of 0.59 eV at room temperature. The positive sign of Seebeck coefficient (+274 VK-1) confirms ...

  12. Stabilization of chromosomes by DNA intercalators for flow karyotyping and identification by banding of isolated chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J. A.; Buys, C. H.; van der Veen, A. Y.; Mesa, J. R.; Yu, L. C.; Gray, J. W.; Osinga, J.; Stap, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of structurally unrelated DNA intercalators have been studied as stabilizers of mitotic chromosomes during isolation from rodent and human metaphase cells. Seven out of the nine intercalators tested were found to be useful as chromosome stabilizing agents. Chromosome suspensions prepared in

  13. Simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrzycka-Szelewa, Elżbieta; Lulewicz, Marta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2017-07-01

    In the present paper a fast, simple and sensitive analytical method for simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) was developed. Among six pairs of absorption atomic lines of Rh and Ru, which are close enough to enable their simultaneous detection, two pairs were selected for further studies. Best results were obtained for measurements of the resonance line of rhodium at 343.489 nm and the adjacent secondary line of ruthenium at 343.674 nm (23% intensity of this line). For evaluated lines, the absorbance values were obtained using three pixels. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1200 °C and 2600 °C, respectively. Under these conditions the limits of detection achieved for Rh and Ru were found to be 1.0 μg L- 1 and 1.9 μg L- 1, respectively. The characteristic mass was 12.9 pg for Rh and 71.7 pg for Ru. Repeatability of the results expressed as a relative standard deviation was typically below 6%. The trueness of the method was confirmed by analysis of the certified reference material - platinum ore (SARM 76). The recovery of Rh and Ru from the platinum ore was 93.0 ± 4.6% and 90.1 ± 2.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the direct simultaneous determination of trace amounts of rhodium and ruthenium in spiked river water, road runoff, and municipal sewage. Separation of interfering matrix on cation exchange resin was required before analysis of road dust and tunnel dust (CW-7) by HR-CS GFAAS.

  14. Rhodium fluorapatite catalyst for the synthesis of trisubstituted olefins via cross coupling of Baylis-Hillman adducts and arylboronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantam, M Lakshmi; Kumar, K B Shiva; Sreedhar, B

    2008-01-04

    Treatment of fluorapatite (prepared by incorporating basic species F(-) in apatite in situ by coprecipitation) with an aqueous solution of RhCl(3) resulted in rhodium-exchanged fluorapatite catalyst (RhFAP), which successfully promoted cross coupling of Baylis-Hillman adducts with arylboronic acids to yield trisubstituted olefins. A variety of arylboronic acids and Baylis-Hillman adducts were converted to the corresponding trisubstituted olefins, demonstrating the versatility of the reaction. The reaction is highly stereoselective. RhFAP was recovered quantitatively by simple filtration and reused with almost consistent activity.

  15. Synthesis and structural studies of Cp{sup *} rhodium and Cp{sup *} iridium complexes of picolinic hydrazine ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palepu, Narasinga Rao; Kollipara, Mohan Rao [Centre for Advanced Studies in Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong (India); Kaminsky Werner [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle (United States)

    2017-01-15

    A series of Cp{sup *}Rh and Cp{sup *}Ir complexes of picolinic hydrazine ligand are synthesized and characterized. Picolinic hydrazine has yielded only dinuclear complexes in the case of rhodium metal whereas both mono and dinuclear complexes with iridium metal. Iridium complexes are formed as quaternary salts by the migration of the N–H proton onto the adjacent amine group of the hydrazine after binding to the metal. Picolinic hydrazine acts as nitrogen and oxygen donor ligand in the form of bi and tetradentate bonding modes.

  16. Rhodium-Catalyzed Insertion Reaction of PhP Group of Pentaphenylcyclopentaphosphine with Acyclic and Cyclic Disulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisawa, Mieko; Sawahata, Kyosuke; Yamada, Tomoki; Sarkar, Debayan; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2018-02-16

    Organophosphorus compounds with a phosphorus atom attached to a phenyl group and two organothio/organoseleno groups were synthesized using the rhodium-catalyzed insertion reaction of the PhP group of pentaphenylcyclopentaphosphine (PhP) 5 with acyclic disulfides and diselenides. The method was applied to the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds containing the S-P-S group by the reaction of (PhP) 5 and cyclic disulfides such as 1,2-dithietes, 1,2-dithiocane, 1,4,5-dithiopane, and 1,2-dithiolanes.

  17. Effect of a bulky lateral substitution by chlorine atom and methoxy group on self-assembling properties of lactic acid derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanović, Maja, E-mail: maja.stojanovic@df.uns.ac.rs [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D.Obradovića 4, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Bubnov, Alexej [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Obadović, Dušanka Ž. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D.Obradovića 4, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Hamplová, Věra [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Cvetinov, Miroslav [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D.Obradovića 4, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Kašpar, Miroslav [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-01

    Several chiral liquid crystalline materials derived from the lactic acid have been studied with the aim to establish the effect of bulky lateral substituents on their self-assembling properties. A chlorine atom and methoxy group have been used as lateral substituents in ortho position to ether group position on phenyl ring far from the chiral centre. All the studied materials possess tilted ferroelectric smectic C* phase in a broad temperature range. In dependence on the molecular structure namely type of lateral substituent and length of the chiral chain, the cholesteric mesophase, orthogonal paraelectric smectic A* and crystal mesophases have been detected. Lateral chlorine substitution results in decrease of both the clearing point and crystallisation temperature as well as in a distinct increase of spontaneous polarization. Bulky methoxy substitution slightly suppresses the spontaneous polarisation but strongly increases the melting point that results in monotropic peculiarity of the SmC* phase. Mesomorphic, spontaneous, structural and dielectric properties of the substituted compounds were established and compared to those of the non-substituted ones in order to contribute to better understanding of the structure–property relationship for such chiral self-assembling materials. - Highlights: • Chiral liquid crystalline materials derived from the lactic acid have been studied. • Effect of bulky lateral substituents on self-assembling properties has been established. • Bulky methoxy substitution suppresses spontaneous polarisation but increases the melting point. • The compounds might have a strong potential for many advanced electro-optic applications.

  18. Dynamics of Intercalation/De-Intercalation of Rhodamine B during the Polymorphic Transformation of CdAl Layered Double Hydroxide to the Brucite-Like Cadmium Hydroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Saliba, Daniel

    2016-06-23

    Cadmium-Aluminum layered double hydroxide (CdAl LDH) is thermodynamically unstable and transforms to Cd(OH)2 and Al(OH)3 in a short period of time. We present a reaction-diffusion framework that enables us to use in situ steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy to study the kinetics of intercalation of a fluorescent probe (Rhodamine B (RhB)) during the formation of the CdAl LDH and its de-intercalation upon the conversion of the LDH phase to the β phase (Cd(OH)2). The method involves the diffusion of sodium hydroxide into a hydrogel gel matrix containing the aluminum and cadmium ions as well as the species we wish to incorporate in the interlayers of the LDH. The existence of RhB between the LDH layers and its expel during the transition into the β phase are proved via fluorescence microscopy, XRD and ssNMR. The activation energies of intercalation and de-intercalation of RhB are computed and show dependence on the cationic ratio of the corresponding LDH. We find that the energies of de- intercalation are systematically higher than those of intercalation proving that the dyes are stabilized due to the probe-brucite sheets interactions.

  19. Atomic force microscopy study of anion intercalation into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliata, D.; Haering, P.; Haas, O.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Siegenthaler, H. [University of Berne (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, we studied highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in perchloric acid, as a model to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation in graphite. Aim of the work is the local and time dependent investigation of dimensional changes of the host material during electrochemical intercalation processes on the nanometer scale. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, as in-situ tool of analysis during intercalation and expulsion of perchloric anions into the HOPG electrodes. According to the AFM measurements, the HOPG interlayer spacing increases by 32% when perchloric anions intercalate, in agreement with the formation of stage IV of graphite intercalation compounds. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  20. Thermal Stability of Modified i-Motif Oligonucleotides with Naphthalimide Intercalating Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sayed, Ahmed Ali; Pedersen, Erik B.; Khaireldin, Nahid Y.

    2016-01-01

    of naphthalimide (1H-benzo[de]isoquinoline-1,3(2H)-dione) as the intercalating nucleic acid. The stabilities of i-motif structures with inserted naphthalimide intercalating nucleotides were studied using UV melting temperatures (Tm) and circular dichroism spectra at different pH values and conditions (crowding......In continuation of our investigation of characteristics and thermodynamic properties of the i-motif 5′-d[(CCCTAA)3CCCT)] upon insertion of intercalating nucleotides into the cytosine-rich oligonucleotide, this article evaluates the stabilities of i-motif oligonucleotides upon insertion...... and non-crowding). This study indicated a positive effect of the naphthalimide intercalating nucleotides on the stabilities of the i-motif structures compared to the wild-type structure which is in contrast to a previous observation for a pyrene-intercalating nucleotide showing a decrease in Tm values....

  1. Interlayer Structure of Bioactive Molecule, 2-Aminoethanesulfonate, Intercalated into Calcium-Containing Layered Double Hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyun Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully intercalated 2-aminoethanesulfonate, a well-known biomolecule taurine, into calcium-containing layered double hydroxides via optimized solid phase intercalation. According to X-ray diffraction patterns and infrared spectroscopy, it was revealed that the intercalated taurine molecules were each directly coordinated to other calcium cation and arranged in a zig-zag pattern. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the particle size and morphology of the LDHs were not affected by the solid phase intercalation, and the surface of intercalates was covered by organic moieties. From ninhydrin amine detection tests, we confirmed that most of the taurine molecules were well stabilized between the calcium-containing LDH layers.

  2. First-Principles Study of Lithium and Sodium Atoms Intercalation in Fluorinated Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengya Rao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure evolution of fluorinated graphite (CFx upon the Li/Na intercalation has been studied by first-principles calculations. The Li/Na adsorption on single CF layer and intercalated into bulk CF have been calculated. The better cycling performance of Na intercalation into the CF cathode, comparing to that of Li intercalation, is attributed to the different strength and characteristics of the Li-F and Na-F interactions. The interactions between Li and F are stronger and more localized than those between Na and F. The strong and localized Coulomb attraction between Li and F atoms breaks the C−F bonds and pulls the F atoms away, and graphene sheets are formed upon Li intercalation.

  3. Li-intercalated bilayer SnS2: A potential superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. Y.; Xia, W.; Huang, G. Q.

    2017-12-01

    Electronic structure, lattice dynamics, and electron-phonon coupling of Li-intercalated bilayer SnS2 are systematically investigated via first-principles density functional theory. The energetically stable configuration for Li-intercalated bilayer SnS2 is /AB/ stacking, which is different from /AA/ stacking for pristine bilayer. There is a charge transfer from Li to bilayer SnS2 and the change of the band structure after Li intercalation can be explained well by a rigid band model, suggesting that the intercalated Li atoms mainly play a role of charge reservoir. Our calculations show that the softening of acoustic phonon near K bar high-symmetry point make a large contribution to electron-phonon interaction and the superconducting temperature Tc can achieve 14.0 K. Our study suggest that Li-intercalated SnS2, a potential material of lithium-ion battery, may meanwhile be a quasi two-dimensional superconductor.

  4. Reshaping the Energy Landscape Transforms the Mechanism and Binding Kinetics of DNA Threading Intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew G; Naufer, M Nabuan; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Williams, Mark C

    2018-01-05

    Molecules that bind DNA via threading intercalation show high binding affinity as well as slow dissociation kinetics, properties ideal for the development of anticancer drugs. To this end, it is critical to identify the specific molecular characteristics of threading intercalators that result in optimal DNA interactions. Using single-molecule techniques, we quantify the binding of a small metal-organic ruthenium threading intercalator (Δ,Δ-B) and compare its binding characteristics to a similar molecule with significantly larger threading moieties (Δ,Δ-P). The binding affinities of the two molecules are the same, while comparison of the binding kinetics reveals significantly faster kinetics for Δ,Δ-B. However, the kinetics is still much slower than that observed for conventional intercalators. Comparison of the two threading intercalators shows that the binding affinity is modulated independently by the intercalating section and the binding kinetics is modulated by the threading moiety. In order to thread DNA, Δ,Δ-P requires a "lock mechanism", in which a large length increase of the DNA duplex is required for both association and dissociation. In contrast, measurements of the force-dependent binding kinetics show that Δ,Δ-B requires a large DNA length increase for association but no length increase for dissociation from DNA. This contrasts strongly with conventional intercalators, for which almost no DNA length change is required for association but a large DNA length change must occur for dissociation. This result illustrates the fundamentally different mechanism of threading intercalation compared with conventional intercalation and will pave the way for the rational design of therapeutic drugs based on DNA threading intercalation.

  5. Effects of Bulky Substituents of Push-Pull Porphyrins on Photovoltaic Properties of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Kawamoto, Kyosuke; Sugiura, Kenichi; Fujimori, Yamato; Tsuji, Yukihiro; Kurotobi, Kei; Ito, Seigo; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2016-06-22

    To evaluate the effects of substituent bulkiness around a porphyrin core on the photovoltaic properties of porphyrin-sensitized solar cells, long alkoxy groups were introduced at the meso-phenyl group (ZnPBAT-o-C8) and the anchoring group (ZnPBAT-o-C8Cn, n = 4, 8) of an asymmetrically substituted push-pull porphyrin with double electron-donating diarylamino groups and a single electron-withdrawing carboxyphenylethynyl anchoring group. The spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of ZnPBAT-o-C8 and ZnPBAT-o-C8Cn were found to be superior to those of a push-pull porphyrin reference (YD2-o-C8), demonstrating their excellent light-harvesting and redox properties for dye-sensitized solar cells. A power conversion efficiency (η) of the ZnPBAT-o-C8-sensitized solar cell (η = 9.1%) is higher than that of the YD2-o-C8-sensitized solar cell (η = 8.6%) using iodine-based electrolyte due to the enhanced light-harvesting ability of ZnPBAT-o-C8. In contrast, the solar cells based on ZnPBAT-o-C8Cn, possessing the additional alkoxy chains in the anchoring group, revealed the lower η values of 7.3% (n = 4) and 7.0% (n = 8). Although ZnPBAT-o-C8Cn exhibited higher resistance at the TiO2-dye-electrolyte interface by virtue of the extra alkoxy chains, the reduced amount of the porphyrins on TiO2 by excessive addition of coadsorbent chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) for mitigating the aggregation on TiO2 resulted in the low η values. Meanwhile, the ZnPBAT-o-C8-sensitized solar cell showed the lower η value of 8.1% than the YD2-o-C8-sensitized solar cell (η = 9.8%) using cobalt-based electrolyte. The smaller η value of the ZnPBAT-o-C8-sensitized solar cell may be attributed to the insufficient blocking effect of the bulky substituents of ZnPBAT-o-C8 under the cobalt-based electrolyte conditions. Overall, the alkoxy chain length and substitution position around the porphyrin core are important factors to affect the cell performance.

  6. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinlan, M.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  7. Mild oxidation of methane to methanol or acetic acid on supported isolated rhodium catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Junjun; Li, Mengwei; Allard, Lawrence F.; Lee, Sungsik; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2017-11-01

    An efficient and direct method of catalytic conversion of methane to liquid methanol and other oxygenates would be of considerable practical value. However, it remains an unsolved problem in catalysis, as typically it involves expensive or corrosive oxidants or reaction media that are not amenable to commercialization. Although methane can be directly converted to methanol using molecular oxygen under mild conditions in the gas phase, the process is either stoichiometric (and therefore requires a water extraction step) or is too slow and low-yielding to be practical. Methane could, in principle, also be transformed through direct oxidative carbonylation to acetic acid, which is commercially obtained through methane steam reforming, methanol synthesis, and subsequent methanol carbonylation on homogeneous catalysts. However, an effective catalyst for the direct carbonylation of methane to acetic acid, which might enable the economical small-scale utilization of natural gas that is currently flared or stranded, has not yet been reported. Here we show that mononuclear rhodium species, anchored on a zeolite or titanium dioxide support suspended in aqueous solution, catalyse the direct conversion of methane to methanol and acetic acid, using oxygen and carbon monoxide under mild conditions. We find that the two products form through independent pathways, which allows us to tune the conversion: three-hour-long batch-reactor tests conducted at 150 degrees Celsius, using either the zeolite-supported or the titanium-dioxide-supported catalyst, yield around 22,000 micromoles of acetic acid per gram of catalyst, or around 230 micromoles of methanol per gram of catalyst, respectively, with selectivities of 60–100 per cent. We anticipate that these unusually high activities, despite still being too low for commercial application, may guide the development of optimized catalysts and practical processes for the direct conversion of methane to methanol, acetic acid and other

  8. Mild oxidation of methane to methanol or acetic acid on supported isolated rhodium catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Junjun; Li, Mengwei; Allard, Lawrence F; Lee, Sungsik; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2017-11-29

    An efficient and direct method of catalytic conversion of methane to liquid methanol and other oxygenates would be of considerable practical value. However, it remains an unsolved problem in catalysis, as typically it involves expensive or corrosive oxidants or reaction media that are not amenable to commercialization. Although methane can be directly converted to methanol using molecular oxygen under mild conditions in the gas phase, the process is either stoichiometric (and therefore requires a water extraction step) or is too slow and low-yielding to be practical. Methane could, in principle, also be transformed through direct oxidative carbonylation to acetic acid, which is commercially obtained through methane steam reforming, methanol synthesis, and subsequent methanol carbonylation on homogeneous catalysts. However, an effective catalyst for the direct carbonylation of methane to acetic acid, which might enable the economical small-scale utilization of natural gas that is currently flared or stranded, has not yet been reported. Here we show that mononuclear rhodium species, anchored on a zeolite or titanium dioxide support suspended in aqueous solution, catalyse the direct conversion of methane to methanol and acetic acid, using oxygen and carbon monoxide under mild conditions. We find that the two products form through independent pathways, which allows us to tune the conversion: three-hour-long batch-reactor tests conducted at 150 degrees Celsius, using either the zeolite-supported or the titanium-dioxide-supported catalyst, yield around 22,000 micromoles of acetic acid per gram of catalyst, or around 230 micromoles of methanol per gram of catalyst, respectively, with selectivities of 60-100 per cent. We anticipate that these unusually high activities, despite still being too low for commercial application, may guide the development of optimized catalysts and practical processes for the direct conversion of methane to methanol, acetic acid and other useful

  9. Thermodynamic properties of rhodium at high temperature and pressure by using mean field potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Priyank; Bhatt, Nisarg K.; Vyas, Pulastya R.; Gohel, Vinod B.

    2016-10-01

    The thermophysical properties of rhodium are studied up to melting temperature by incorporating anharmonic effects due to lattice ions and thermally excited electrons. In order to account anharmonic effects due to lattice vibrations, we have employed mean field potential (MFP) approach and for thermally excited electrons Mermin functional. The local form of the pseudopotential with only one effective adjustable parameter rc is used to construct MFP and hence vibrational free energy due to ions - Fion. We have studied equation of state at 300 K and further, to access the applicability of present conjunction scheme, we have also estimated shock-Hugoniot and temperature along principle Hugoniot. We have carried out the study of temperature variation of several thermophysical properties like thermal expansion (βP), enthalpy (EH), specific heats at constant pressure and volume (CP and CV), specific heats due to lattice ions and thermally excited electrons ( and , isothermal and adiabatic bulk moduli (BT and Bs) and thermodynamic Gruneisen parameter (γth) in order to examine the inclusion of anharmonic effects in the present study. The computed results are compared with available experimental results measured by using different methods and previously obtained theoretical results using different theoretical philosophy. Our computed results are in good agreement with experimental findings and for some physical quantities better or comparable with other theoretical results. We conclude that local form of the pseudopotential used accounts s-p-d hybridization properly and found to be transferable at extreme environment without changing the values of the parameter. Thus, even the behavior of transition metals having complexity in electronic structure can be well understood with local pseudopotential without any modification in the potential at extreme environment. Looking to the success of present scheme (MFP + pseudopotential) we would like to extend it further for the

  10. Electrochemical Techniques for Intercalation Electrode Materials in Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yujie; Gao, Tao; Fan, Xiulin; Han, Fudong; Wang, Chunsheng

    2017-04-18

    Understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of electrode materials is of great importance to develop new materials for high performance rechargeable batteries. Compared with computational understanding of physical and chemical properties of electrode materials, experimental methods provide direct and convenient evaluation of these properties. Often, the information gained from experimental work can not only offer feedback for the computational methods but also provide useful insights for improving the performance of materials. However, accurate experimental quantification of some properties can still be challenging. Among them, chemical diffusion coefficient is one representative example. It is one of the most crucial parameters determining the kinetics of intercalation compounds, which are by far the dominant electrode type used in rechargeable batteries. Therefore, it is of significance to quantitatively evaluate this parameter. For this purpose, various electrochemical techniques have been invented, for example, galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT), potentiostatic intermittent titration technique (PITT), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). One salient advantage of these electrochemical techniques over other characterization techniques is that some implicit thermodynamic and kinetic quantities can be linked with the readily measurable electrical signals, current, and voltage, with very high precision. Nevertheless, proper application of these techniques requires not just an understanding of the structure and chemistry of the studied materials but sufficient knowledge of the physical model for ion transport within solid host materials and the analysis method to solve for chemical diffusion coefficient. Our group has been focusing on using various electrochemical techniques to investigate battery materials, as well as developing models for studying some emerging materials. In this Account, the

  11. Leading research on supermetals. Part 1. Bulky material (iron system); Supermetal no sendo kenkyu. 1. Ogata sozai (tetsukei)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For further improvement of iron system materials, supermetals with ultimate characteristics were researched. Since their strength and toughness have been improved with grain refinement by thermomechanical treatment, improvement of single-phase steel is nearly completed, and the study on ultra-fine multi-phase steel is indispensable. Bulky materials are also restrained from grain refinement because of the capability of existing processing facilities. Making a breakthrough in such restraint requires a challenge to high-speed rolling, repeated shear deformation and ultra-high strain rate process beyond conventional technologies. Further improvement of microstructure and dynamic characteristics requires other energies such as magnetism as well as mechanical energy. {gamma}-{alpha} phase transition important for structure control of steel materials is dependent on magnetism. The study on structure control and characteristics improvement under ferromagnetic field is essential in the future. Material improvement such as reduction of impurities and circulating elements, environmental measures, and mechanical alloying remain as issues to be studied. 224 refs., 176 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. Total digestibility and in situ degradability of bulky diets with the inclusion of ionophores or probiotics for cattle and buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Maria Zeoula

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of ionophores (monensin and probiotic (Saccharomyces cerevisiae + selenium + chromium in diets with 80% forage were evaluated on the digestibility of nutrients. Three buffaloes, Murrah (Bubalus bubalis and three cattle, Holstein (Bos taurus, with an average weight of 520 ± 30 kg and 480 ± 182 kg, respectively, with rumen cannula, over experimental design with two 3 x 3 Latin squares in a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement, with the absence or presence of additives: ionophore or probiotic and two species, were used. The internal flow indicator of fecal dry matter (DM was the acid insoluble ash. DM, crude protein (CP and neutral detergent fiber (NDF ruminal degradability of Tifton 85 hay was conducted for cattle and buffaloes. A diet containing probiotics had higher dry matter and organic matter digestibility in buffalo and cattle, indicating a good performance in bulky diets. The potential and effective dry matter degradability in diet with probiotic in buffaloes, were smaller than diet with ionophore, suggesting that there was a better digestion of nutrients in the intestine of these animals. The potential and effective degradability of neutral detergent fiber and crude protein in the diet containing ionophores were superior than diet containing probiotic. Buffaloes showed higher capacity of dry matter and fiber digestion than cattle.

  13. Maghemite Intercalated Montmorillonite as New Nanofillers for Photopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyne Brendle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, maghemite intercalated montmorillonite (γFe2O3-MMT/polymer nanocomposites loaded with 1 or 2 wt.% of nanofillers were obtained by photopolymerization of difunctional acrylate monomers. The γFe2O3-MMT nanofillers were prepared by a new method based on the in situ formation of maghemite in the interlayer space of Fe-MMT using a three step process. X-ray diffraction (XRD, chemical analysis, TG/DTA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM characterization of these nanofillers indicated the efficiency of the synthesis. When following the kinetics of the photopolymerization of diacrylate-γFe2O3-MMT nanocomposites using FTIR spectroscopy no significant inhibition effect of the nanofillers was observed at a loading up to 2 wt.%. These innovative nanocomposites exhibit improved mechanical properties compared to the crude polymer.

  14. Morphology and Structure of Amino-fatty Acid Intercalated Montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Larry; Sumera, Florentino

    2015-04-01

    Natural clays and its modified forms have been studied for their wide range of applications, including polymer-layered silicate, catalysts and adsorbents. For nanocomposite production, montmorillonite (MMT) clays are often modified with organic surfactants to favor its intermixing with the polymer matrix. In the present study, Na+-montmorillonite (Na+-MMT) was subjected to organo-modification with a protonated 12-aminolauric acid (12-ALA). The amount of amino fatty acid surfactants loaded was 25, 50, 100 and 200% the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of Na+-MMT (25CEC-AMMT, 50CEC-AMMT, 100CEC-AMMT and 200CEC-AMMT). Fatty acid-derived surfactants are an attractive resource of intercalating agents for clays due to their renewability and abundance. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to determine the occurrence of intercalation of 12-ALA and their molecular structure in the clay's silicates. XRD analysis revealed that the interlayer spacing between the alumino-silicate layers increased from 1.25 nm to 1.82 nm with increasing ALA content. The amino fatty acid chains were considered to be in a flat monolayer structure at low surfactant loading, and a bilayered to a pseudotrilayered structure at high surfactant loading. On the other hand, FTIR revealed that the alkyl chains adopt a gauche conformation, indicating their disordered state based on their CH2symmetric and asymmetric vibrations. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) allows the determination of the moisture and organic content in clays. Here, TGA revealed that the surfactant in the clay was thermally stable, with Td ranging from 353° C to 417° C. The difference in the melting behavior of the pristine amino fatty acids and confined fatty acids in the interlayer galleries of the clay were evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimerty (DSC). The melting temperatures (Tm) of the amino fatty acid in the clay were initially found to be higher than those of the free

  15. Tuning thermal conductivity in molybdenum disulfide by electrochemical intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gaohua; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qiye; Zhang, Ruigang; Li, Dongyao; Banerjee, Debasish; Cahill, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of interest for energy storage, nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Here, we report that the thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide can be modified by electrochemical intercalation. We observe distinct behaviour for thin films with vertically aligned basal planes and natural bulk crystals with basal planes aligned parallel to the surface. The thermal conductivity is measured as a function of the degree of lithiation, using time-domain thermoreflectance. The change of thermal conductivity correlates with the lithiation-induced structural and compositional disorder. We further show that the ratio of the in-plane to through-plane thermal conductivity of bulk crystal is enhanced by the disorder. These results suggest that stacking disorder and mixture of phases is an effective mechanism to modify the anisotropic thermal conductivity of 2D materials. PMID:27767030

  16. Oxygen-intercalated CuScO_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draeseke, A. D.; Yanagi, H.; Tucker, D.; Easley, D.; McIntyre, D. H.; Tate, J.; Li, J.; Sleight, A. W.

    2002-03-01

    Oxygen intercalation is a means of introducing p-type carriers into wide bandgap delafossites, CuMO_2, provided the M cation is not too small. We present measurements on a series of thin films of CuScO2 whose oxygen content ranges from 2.0 to 2.5. The conductivity increases from less than 0.001 S/cm to about 20 S/cm as the oxygen introduces carriers into the material, while the average transparency in the visible region decreases from over 70present optical, transport, and structural data for this series of films. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under DMR0071727 and by the Research Corporation.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of rhodium nanoclusters on TiO2(110) surface using organometallic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravian, Homa

    2018-01-01

    The adsorption of hexarhodium hexadecylcarbonyl ([Rh6(CO)16]) and rhodium dicarbonyl acetylacetonate ([Rh(CO)2(acac)]) and the nucleation of Rh nanoclusters on TiO2(110) single crystal substrate were examined using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. When [Rh6(CO)16] was deposited on the TiO2(110) surface at 323 K, aggregated particles with wide size distribution were formed, which resulted in Rh6 frame destruction and rhodium aggregation after decarbonylation. In contrast, deposition of [Rh(CO)2(acac)] at 373 K in presence of CO at 10-7 mbar resulted in formation of site-isolated multinuclear organometallic species ([Rhx(CO)y]) with narrow size distribution, which showed minimal perturbation to [Rh6(CO)16] structure and led to formation of uniform nanoparticles after decarbonylation. Subsequent annealing showed that [Rhx(CO)y] species deposited on the surface from [Rh6(CO)16] precursor formed large agglomerated particles with wide size distribution upon annealing to 573 K while [Rhx(CO)y] prepared through surface synthesis of [Rh(CO)2(acac)] on TiO2(110) surface following CO exposure at 373 K resulted in clusters that were relatively stable up to 573 K and only underwent agglomeration beyond this temperature.

  18. Determination of Rhodium(III Ions by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry after Preconcentration with Modified Magnetic Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Fayazi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method for analysis of trace amount of Rh(III ions by magnetic activated carbon modified with 2,3,5,6-tetra(2-pyridylpyrazine (MAC/TPPZ as the magnetic sorbent has been proposed. The proposed adsorbent was found to be advantageous over conventional solid phase extraction (SPE in terms of operational simplicity and low time-consuming. The experimental parameters affecting the extraction/preconcentration and determination of the analyte were systematically examined. In order to investigate the selectivity of this magnetic sorbent, the effect of a variety of ions on preconcentration and recovery of Rh(III ions were also investigated. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear for the concentration range of 0.8-650 µg l-1. The limit of detection (LOD, 3Sb/m and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 8, c = 50 µg l-1 were 0.1 µg l-1 and 3.6%, respectively. The maximum sorption capacity of the adsorbent for rhodium was found to be 21.6 mg g-1. The presented procedure was applied to monitoring rhodium in water and synthetic samples.

  19. Study of activation cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions on rhodium up to 40 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditroi, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Excitation function measurement of deuteron induced reactions on rhodium up to 40 MeV. {yields} Model code calculations with EMPIRE, ALICE and TALYS. {yields} Integral production yield calculation. {yields} Thin layer activation (TLA) with the produced isotopes. - Abstract: In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the {sup 103}Rh(d,x) {sup 100,101,103}Pd, {sup 100g,101m,101g,102m,102g}Rh and {sup 103g}Ru reactions were determined up to 40 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. Excitation functions of the contributing reactions were calculated using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated and compared with experimental integral yield data reported in the literature. From the measured cross-sections and previous data, activation curves were deduced to support thin layer activation (TLA) on rhodium and Rh containing alloys.

  20. Transition Metal Titanophosphates with Intercalated Molecular Photoluminescence and Catalytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ling-I; Chen, Pei-Lin; Yang, Jia-Hao; Peng, Chi-How; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2017-10-04

    In this study, α-TiP layered structure incorporating a heterometal center for organic ligand binding to enhance structural complexity and functionality were prepared. The protons of the α-TiP layer were replaced with zinc ions coordinated by 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid (PCA) and water to form a layer structure, TiZn(PO4 )2 (H2 O)(PCA) (1). The tetrahedral zinc center with coordinated water in 1 is unprecedented in zincophosphate or zinc-MOF systems and is usually only found in metalloenzyme systems. The neutral zincotitanophosphate layers, tightly stacked through hydrogen bonds, showed velcro-like behavior on intercalating 4,4'-trimethylenedipyridine (TMDP) reversibly. It rendered a remarkable luminescence property to 1, emitting blue-to-white light under UV excitation. Surprisingly, the replacement of TMDP for PCA in the hydrothermal synthesis still resulted in 1, plus another structure, Ti4 Zn2 (H2 TPB)(PO4 )4 (HPO4 )4 (H2 PO4 )2 (2) (TPB=1,2,4,5-tetra(4-pyridyl)benzene). Clearly, in situ C-C cracking and C-C coupling of TMDP simultaneously occurred to generate PCA and TPB and thereafter the oxidant, Zn(NO3 )2 , was quantitatively determined to isolate crystal 1 from 2. The structure of 2 also featured α-TiP layers with pedant Zn tetrahedra but formed a three-dimensional neutral framework through TPB. For the first time, α-TiP-derived structures and their properties have been elucidated, which help in understanding intriguing in situ ligand formation and intercalation-induced luminescence, to exploit potential photocatalysis in polymerization. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. REGIOSELECTIVE OXIDATIONS OF EQUILENIN DERIVATIVES CATALYZED BY A RHODIUM (III) PORPHYRIN COMPLEX-CONTRAST WITH THE MANGANESE (III) PORPHYRIN. (R826653)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractEquilenin acetate and dihydroequilenin acetate were oxidized with iodosobenzene and a rhodium(III) porphyrin catalyst. The selectivity of the reactions differs from that with the corresponding Mn(III) catalyst, or from that of free radical chain oxidation.

  2. Rhodium-Catalyzed Oxidative Benzannulation of N-Adamantyl-1-naphthylamines with Internal Alkynes via Dual C-H Bond Activation: Synthesis of Substituted Anthracenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Ji, Dingwei; Yamamoto, Yoshinori; Almansour, Abdulrahman I; Arumugam, Natarajan; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Bao, Ming

    2016-09-02

    Rhodium-catalyzed oxidative benzannulation of N-adamantyl-1-naphthylamines with internal alkynes to produce highly substituted anthracenes in satisfactory to good yields was developed. The annulation reaction proceeded smoothly under mild conditions in the presence of [Cp*RhCl2]2 as the precatalyst and Cu(OAc)2 as the oxidant.

  3. Rhodium-Catalyzed Oxidative Benzannulation of N-Pivaloylanilines with Internal Alkynes through Dual C-H Bond Activation: Synthesis of Highly Substituted Naphthalenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Feng, Xiujuan; Yamamoto, Yoshinori; Almansour, Abdulrahman I; Arumugam, Natarajan; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Bao, Ming

    2016-11-22

    An efficient method was developed for the synthesis of highly substituted naphthalenes through rhodium-catalyzed oxidative benzannulation of N-pivaloylanilines with internal alkynes. The benzannulation reaction proceeded smoothly through dual C-H bond activation to produce the corresponding highly substituted naphthalene products in satisfactory to good yields. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  5. Development of accurate mass spectrometric routine and reference methods for the determination of trace amounts of iridium and rhodium in photographic emulsionsf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krystek, Petra; Heumann, Klaus G.

    1999-01-01

    For the determination of trace amounts of iridium and rhodium in photographic emulsions different sample treatment procedures were coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and, for iridium, also with negative thermal ionisation isotope dilution mass spectrometry (NTI-IDMS)

  6. Single-molecule kinetics and footprinting of DNA bis-intercalation: the paradigmatic case of Thiocoraline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Manosas, Maria; Frutos, Silvia; Tulla-Puche, Judit; Albericio, Fernando; Ritort, Felix

    2015-03-11

    DNA bis-intercalators are widely used in molecular biology with applications ranging from DNA imaging to anticancer pharmacology. Two fundamental aspects of these ligands are the lifetime of the bis-intercalated complexes and their sequence selectivity. Here, we perform single-molecule optical tweezers experiments with the peptide Thiocoraline showing, for the first time, that bis-intercalation is driven by a very slow off-rate that steeply decreases with applied force. This feature reveals the existence of a long-lived (minutes) mono-intercalated intermediate that contributes to the extremely long lifetime of the complex (hours). We further exploit this particularly slow kinetics to determine the thermodynamics of binding and persistence length of bis-intercalated DNA for a given fraction of bound ligand, a measurement inaccessible in previous studies of faster intercalating agents. We also develop a novel single-molecule footprinting technique based on DNA unzipping and determine the preferred binding sites of Thiocoraline with one base-pair resolution. This fast and radiolabelling-free footprinting technique provides direct access to the binding sites of small ligands to nucleic acids without the need of cleavage agents. Overall, our results provide new insights into the binding pathway of bis-intercalators and the reported selectivity might be of relevance for this and other anticancer drugs interfering with DNA replication and transcription in carcinogenic cell lines. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Fabrication and Resistivity of IBr Intercalated Vapor-Grown Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Smith, Jaclyn M.; Gahl, Gregory K.; Stevens, Eric C.; Gaier, Elizabeth M.

    1998-01-01

    Composites using vapor-crown carbon fibers (VGCF), the most conductive of the carbon fiber types, are attractive for applications where low density, high strength, and at least moderate conductivity are required, such as electromagnetic interference shielding covers for spacecraft. The conductivity can be enhanced another order of magnitude by intercalation of the VGCF. If a high Z intercalate is used, the protection of components from ionizing radiation can be enhanced also. Thus, the intercalation of VGCF with IBr is reported. Since composite testing is required to verify properties, the intercalation reaction optimization, stability of the intercalation compound, scale-up of the intercalation reaction, composite fabrication, and resistivity of the resulting composites is also reported. The optimum conditions for low resistivity and uniformity for the scaled up reaction (20-30 g of product) were 114 C for at least 72 hr, yielding a fiber with a resistivity of 8.7+/-2 micro-Omega-cm. The thermal stability of these fibers was poor, with degradation occurring at temperatures as low as 40 C in air, though they were insensitive to water vapor. Composite resistivity was 20-30 micro-Omega-cm, as measured by contactless conductivity measurements, about a factor of five higher than would be expected from a simple rule of mixtures. The addition of 1.0 percent Br2, intercalated microfibers increased the resistivity of the composites by more than 20 percent.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of montmorillonite clay intercalated with molecular magnetic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcel G.; Martins, Daniel O.T.A.; Carvalho, Beatriz L.C. de [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ 24.020–150 (Brazil); Mercante, Luiza A. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia para o Agronegócio (LNNA), Embrapa Instrumentação, São Carlos, SP 13560 970 (Brazil); Soriano, Stéphane [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ 24.210 346 (Brazil); Andruh, Marius [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Bucharest, Str. Dumbrava Rosie nr. 23, Bucharest (Romania); Vieira, Méri D., E-mail: gqimeri@vm.uff.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ 24.020–150 (Brazil); Vaz, Maria G.F., E-mail: mariavaz@vm.uff.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ 24.020–150 (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    In this work montmorillonite (MMT) clay, whose matrix was modified with an ammonium salt (hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide – CTAB), was employed as an inorganic host for the intercalation of three different molecular magnetic compounds through ion exchange: a nitronyl nitroxide derivative 2-[4-(N-ethyl)-pyridinium]-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (p-EtRad{sup +}) and two binuclear coordination compounds, [Ni(valpn)Ln]{sup 3+}, where H{sub 2}valpn stands for 1,3-propanediyl-bis(2-iminomethylene-6-methoxy-phenol), and Ln=Gd{sup III}; Dy{sup III}. The pristine MMT and the intercalated materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and magnetic measurements. The X-ray diffraction data analysis showed an increase of the interlamellar space of the intercalated MMT, indicating the intercalation of the magnetic compounds. Furthermore, the magnetic properties of the hybrid compounds were investigated, showing similar behavior as the pure magnetic guest species. - Graphical abstract: Montmorillonite clay was employed as inorganic host for the intercalation of three different molecular magnetic compounds through ion exchange - Highlights: • Montmorillonite was employed as a host material. • Three molecular magnetic compounds were intercalated through ion exchange. • The compounds were successful intercalated maintaining the layered structure. • The hybrid materials exhibited similar magnetic behavior as the pure magnetic guest.

  9. Cerium Oxide Nanoclusters on Graphene/Ru(0001): Intercalation of Oxygen via Spillover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, Zbynek; Netzer, Falko P.; Dohnálek, Zdenek

    2015-08-25

    Cerium oxide is an important catalytic material known for its ability to store and release oxygen, and as such, it has been used in a range of applications, both as an active catalyst and as a catalyst support. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy, we investigated oxygen interactions with CeOx nanoclusters on a complete graphene monolayer-covered Ru(0001) surface at elevated temperatures (600 – 725 K). Under oxidizing conditions (P_(O_2 ) = 1 × 10-7 Torr), oxygen intercalation under the graphene layer is observed. Time dependent studies demonstrate that the intercalation proceeds via spillover of oxygen from CeOx nanoclusters through the graphene (Gr) layer onto the Ru(0001) substrate and extends until the Gr layer is completely intercalated. Atomically resolved images further show that oxygen forms a p(2×1) structure underneath the Gr monolayer. Temperature dependent studies yield an apparent kinetic barrier for the intercalation of 1.26 eV. This value correlates well with the theoretically determined value for the reduction of small CeO2 clusters reported previously. At higher temperatures, the intercalation is followed by a slower etching of the intercalated graphene (apparent barrier of 1.64 eV). Vacuum annealing of the intercalated Gr leads to the formation of carbon monoxide, causing etching of the graphene film, demonstrating that the spillover of oxygen is not reversible. In agreement with previous studies, no intercalation is observed on a complete graphene monolayer without CeOx clusters, even in the presence of a large number of point defects. These studies demonstrate that the easily reducible CeOx clusters act as intercalation gateways capable of efficiently delivering oxygen underneath the graphene layer.

  10. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide intercalated ZnO quantum dots nanoballs for selective biosensing detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhao, Minggang; Li, Yingchun; Fan, Sisi; Ding, Longjiang; Liang, Jingjing; Chen, Shougang

    2016-07-01

    ZnO quantum dots (QDs), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are always used in sensors due to their excellent electrochemical characteristics. In this work, ZnO QDs were intercalated by rGO sheets with cross-linked MWCNTs to construct intercalation nanoballs. A MWCNTs/rGO/ZnO QDs 3D hierarchical architecture was fabricated on supporting Ni foam, which exhibited excellent mechanical, kinetic and electrochemical properties. The intercalation construction can introduce strong interfacial effects to improve the surface electronic state. The selectively determinate of uric acid, dopamine, and ascorbic acid by an electrode material using distinct applied potentials was realized.

  11. High voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, William C. (Inventor); Blanco, Mario (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides high capacity and high voltage Li-ion batteries that have a carbonaceous cathode and a nonaqueous electrolyte solution comprising LiF salt and an anion receptor that binds the fluoride ion. The batteries can comprise dual intercalating electrode Li ion batteries. Methods of the present invention use a cathode and electrode pair, wherein each of the electrodes reversibly intercalate ions provided by a LiF salt to make a high voltage and high specific capacity dual intercalating electrode Li-ion battery. The present methods and systems provide high-capacity batteries particularly useful in powering devices where minimizing battery mass is important.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of laurate-intercalated Mg–Al layered double hydroxide prepared by coprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Nathalie Christiane; Katiyar, Vimal; Koch, Christian Bender

    2012-01-01

    Effective utilization of layered double hydroxides (LDH) for industrial applications requires the synthesis of pure and well-defined LDH phases. In the present study, dodecanoate (laurate) anions were intercalated into Mg–Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH-C12) by coprecipitation in the presence...... intercalated structure, but we here demonstrate it to be magnesium laurate (Mg-C12). The LDH-C12 compound showed high structural order with a basal spacing of 2.41nm. Fourier-transform IR-spectra confirmed the intercalation of the laurate anions in the interlayer. Transmission electron microscopy showed plate...

  13. Intercalated vs Non-Intercalated Morphologies in Donor-Acceptor Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: PBTTT:Fullerene Charge Generation and Recombination Revisited

    KAUST Repository

    Collado Fregoso, Elisa

    2017-08-04

    In this contribution, we study the role of the donor:acceptor interface nanostructure upon charge separation and recombination in organic photovoltaic devices and blend films, using mixtures of PBTTT and two different fullerene derivatives (PC70BM and ICTA) as models for intercalated and non-intercalated morphologies, respectively. Thermodynamic simulations show that while the completely intercalated system exhibits a large free-energy barrier for charge separation, this barrier is significantly lower in the non-intercalated system, and almost vanishes when energetic disorder is included in the model. Despite these differences, both fs-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) and TDCF exhibit extensive first-order losses in that system, suggesting that geminate pairs are the primary product of photoexcitation. In contrast, the system that comprises a combination of fully intercalated polymer:fullerene areas and fullerene aggregated domains (1:4 PBTTT:PC70BM), is the only one that shows slow, second-order recombination of free charges, resulting in devices with an overall higher short circuit current and fill factor. This study therefore provides a novel consideration of the role of the interfacial nanostructure and the nature of bound charges, and their impact upon charge generation and recombination.

  14. Intercalation of alcohols into barium phenylphosphonate: Influence of the number and position of functional groups in the guests on their arrangement in the intercalates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík; Zima, Vítězslav; Svoboda, Jan; Růžička, Aleš

    2017-07-01

    Barium phenylphosphonate dihydrate and its intercalates with alkanols, 1,n-diols and 1,2-diols were prepared and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction. The structure of the ethanol intercalate was solved from single-crystal X-ray data. The intercalate with composition Ba4(C6H5PO3)4·3C2H5OH·4H2O is composed of four crystallographically independent BaO8 polyhedra, the coordination in three of them is complemented by an oxygen atom of the intercalated ethanol molecule. The polyhedra are connected through oxygen atoms of phosphonate groups forming an inorganic layer from which phenyl groups are jutting out below and above. The phenyl groups are arranged in such a way that they form cavities, in which the alcohol molecules reside. The dependence of the basal spacing on the length of the carbon chains is linear in the case of alcohols and 1,2-alkanediols. In the case of 1,n-alkanediol intercalates a strong even-odd effect is observed for diols with six and more carbon atoms in the chain.

  15. Kinetics and thermodynamics of small molecule binding to pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Doherty, Mark D.

    2013-04-15

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the binding of several small molecules, L (L = N2, H2, D2, and C2H 4), to the coordinatively unsaturated pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes Rh[tBu2PCH2(C6H3)CH 2PtBu2] (1) and Rh[tBu 2P(CH2)2(CH)(CH2)2P tBu2] (2) in organic solvents (n-heptane, toluene, THF, and cyclohexane-d12) have been investigated by a combination of kinetic flash photolysis methods, NMR equilibrium studies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Using various gas mixtures and monitoring by NMR until equilibrium was established, the relative free energies of binding of N2, H2, and C2H4 in cyclohexane-d12 were found to increase in the order C 2H4 < N2 < H2. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that 355 nm excitation of 1-L and 2-L results in the photoejection of ligand L. The subsequent mechanism of binding of L to 1 and 2 to regenerate 1-L and 2-L is determined by the structure of the PCP ligand framework and the nature of the solvent. In both cases, the primary transient is a long-lived, unsolvated species (τ = 50-800 ns, depending on L and its concentration in solution). For 2, this so-called less-reactive form (LRF) is in equilibrium with a more-reactive form (MRF), which reacts with L at diffusion-controlled rates to regenerate 2-L. These two intermediates are proposed to be different conformers of the three-coordinate (PCP)Rh fragment. For 1, a similar mechanism is proposed to occur, but the LRF to MRF step is irreversible. In addition, a parallel reaction pathway was observed that involves the direct reaction of the LRF of 1 with L, with second-order rate constants that vary by almost 3 orders of magnitude, depending on the nature of L (in n-heptane, k = 6.7 × 10 5 M-1 s-1 for L = C2H4; 4.0 × 106 M-1 s-1 for L = N2; 5.5 × 108 M-1 s-1 for L = H2). Experiments in the more coordinating solvent, THF, revealed the binding of THF to 1 to generate 1-THF, and its subsequent reaction with L, as a

  16. Anthrobiogeochemical platinum, palladium and rhodium cycles of earth: Emerging environmental contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Arijeet; Sen, Indra Sekhar

    2017-11-01

    Anthrobiogeochemical cycles have been a subject of scientific research for many decades as they are important for identifying possible sources, sinks, and pathways of an element in the environment. In this study, we quantified global cycles for the platinum group elements (PGE; platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh)). We quantified the stocks of Pt, Pd, and Rh in Earth's various reservoirs, such as the core, mantle, consolidated crust, biomass, seawater, unconsolidated sediments, and atmosphere, as well as coal and petroleum deposits. We further quantified their fluxes, both natural and anthropogenic, between each reservoir, by identifying the flows across the hydrosphere, geosphere, biosphere, atmosphere and anthroposphere, including from mining activities, fossil fuel and biomass burning, construction activities, soil erosion, human contributions to net primary productivity, riverine transport, aeolian dust movement, primary production, volcanic eruption, sea-salt spray, crustal subduction, crust formation at mid ocean ridges, PGE recovery from recycling processes, and cosmic dust inputs at the Earth's surface. Stocks of PGEs were quantified by multiplying the mass of the reservoir by the average Pt, Pd and Rh concentration in the reservoir, whereas Pt, Pd and Rh fluxes were calculated by multiplying the rate of mass movement across the reservoirs with the Pt, Pd and Rh concentrations of the material. Uncertainties were explicitly incorporated in stock and flow estimations through Monte Carlo simulations. Our calculations reveal that the total surficial anthropogenic Pt, Pd, and Rh mobilizations were greater than their corresponding natural surficial mobilizations. We show that crustal subduction and crustal formation is the most important natural flow and contributes 21-42% of total PGE mobilization. When Earth's surficial processes are considered, soil erosion is the dominant flow for Rh and Pt mobilization, comprising 33% and 13%, respectively, of the

  17. Effect of induction chemotherapy on estimated risk of radiation pneumonitis in bulky non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Neha P., E-mail: npamin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University and Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, MI (United States); Miften, Moyed; Thornton, Dale; Ryan, Nicole; Kavanagh, Brian; Gaspar, Laurie E [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Patients with bulky non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be at a high risk for radiation pneumonitis (RP) if treated with up-front concurrent chemoradiation. There is limited information about the effect of induction chemotherapy on the volume of normal lung subsequently irradiated. This study aims to estimate the reduction in risk of RP in patients with NSCLC after receiving induction chemotherapy. Between 2004 and 2009, 25 patients with Stage IV NSCLC were treated with chemotherapy alone (no surgery or radiation therapy [RT]) and had computed tomography (CT) scans before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Simulated RT plans were created for the prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans so as to deliver 60 Gy to the thoracic disease in patients who had either a >20% volumetric increase or decrease in gross tumor volume (GTV) from chemotherapy. The prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy scans were analyzed to compare the percentage of lung volume receiving≥20 Gy (V20), mean lung dose (MLD), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Eight patients (32%) had a GTV reduction >20%, 2 (8%) had GTV increase >20%, and 15 (60%) had stable GTV. In the 8 responders, there was an absolute median GTV decrease of 88.1 cc (7.3 to 351.6 cc) or a 48% (20% to 62%) relative reduction in tumor burden. One had >20% tumor progression during chemotherapy, yet had an improvement in dosimetric parameters postchemotherapy. Among these 9 patients, the median decrease in V20, MLD, and NTCP was 2.6% (p<0.01), 2.1 Gy (p<0.01), and 5.6% (p<0.01), respectively. Less than one-third of patients with NSCLC obtain >20% volumetric tumor reduction from chemotherapy alone. Even with that amount of volumetric reduction, the 5% reduced risk of RP was only modest and did not convert previously ineligible patients to safely receive definitive thoracic RT.

  18. Treatment of bulky stage IB and IIB cervical cancers with outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation and extrafascial hysterectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nagell, J.R.; Maruyama, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.S.; Hanson, M.B.; Gallion, H.H.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    From January, 1977, to December, 1982, twenty-nine patients with bulky (>4 cms diameter) Stage IB or IIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of out-patient neutron brachytherapy (Cf-252) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Residual tumor was present in the hysterectomy specimens of 25 per cent. Complications during and following radiation therapy and surgery were minimal and included vaginal stenosis, proctitis, and hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean duration of hospitalization for surgery in these patients was 6.6 days (range 5-15 days) and postoperative morbidity was low. No patient required blood transfusion. Four patients developed urinary tract infections and two had superficial wound separations. Following treatment, patients were seen at monthly intervals for one year, every three months for two years, and every six months thereafter. No patient has been lost to follow-up. Two patients (7 per cent) developed tumor recurrence and have died of disease (1 of distant metastases; 1 local). The remaining 27 patients (93 per cent) are alive and well with no evidence of disease 24-89 months (mean 48 months) after therapy. No radiogenic fistulae or bowel obstruction were observed. These preliminary results suggest that the combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy for patients with Stage IB and IIB cervical cancer is well tolerated. Complications associated with this treatment regimen have been minimal, and the recurrence rate is low. The duration of intracavitary neutron brachytherapy was short, and outpatient therapy was well received by patients.

  19. Bulky DNA Adducts in Cord Blood, Maternal Fruit-and-Vegetable Consumption, and Birth Weight in a European Mother-Child Study (NewGeneris)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Schoket, Bernadette; Godschalk, Roger W

    2013-01-01

    with those with high intake (-58 g; 95% CI: -206, 90 g)Conclusions: Maternal exposure to genotoxic agents that induce the formation of bulky DNA adducts may affect intrauterine growth. Maternal fruit and vegetable consumption may be protective.Citation: Pedersen M, Schoket B, Godschalk RW, Wright J, von...... to several genotoxic agents including PAHs.Objectives: We estimated the association between bulky DNA adduct levels and birth weight in a multicenter study and examined modification of this association by maternal intake of fruits and vegetables during pregnancy.Methods: Pregnant women from Denmark, England......, Greece, Norway, and Spain were recruited in 2006-2010. Adduct levels were measured by the 32P-postlabeling technique in white blood cells from 229 mothers and 612 newborns. Maternal diet was examined through questionnaires.Results: Adduct levels in maternal and cord blood samples were similar...

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of intercalating somatostatin receptor binding peptide conjugates for endoradiotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graham, Keith; Wang, Qin; Garcia Boy, Regine; Eisenhut, Michael; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2007-01-01

    .... In order to exploit the cytotoxic potential of intercalator-Auger-emitter conjugates, bis-benzimidazole dyes, Hoechst 33258 and 33342, were linked to a somatostatin receptor affine carrier peptide...

  1. CO intercalation of graphene on Ir(111) in the millibar regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arman, M.A.; Andersen, Mie; Granas, E.

    2013-01-01

    Here we show that it is possible to intercalate CO under graphene grown on Ir(111) already at room temperature when CO pressures in the millibar regime are used. From the interplay of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy we conclude that the intercalated CO adsorption...... structure is similar to the (3√3 × 3√3)R30°) adsorption structure that is formed on Ir(111) upon exposure to 1 mbar of CO. Further, density functional theory calculations reveal that the structural and electronic properties of CO-intercalated graphene are similar to p-doped freestanding graphene. Finally we...... characterize nonintercalated stripes and islands that we always observe in the CO-intercalated graphene. We observe these nonintercalated areas predominately in HCP and FCC areas near step edges and suggest that stress release in graphene is the driving force for their formation, while the weak chemical bonds...

  2. Removal of lead from aqueous solution on glutamate intercalated layered double hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Yanming

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate intercalated Mg–Al layered double hydroxide (LDH was prepared by co-precipitation and the removal of Pb2+ in the aqueous solution was investigated. The prepared samples were characterized by XRD, FT-IR and SEM. It was shown that glutamate can intercalate into the interlayer space of Mg–Al LDH. The glutamate intercalated Mg–Al LDH can effectively adsorb Pb2+ in the aqueous solution with an adsorption capacity of 68.49 mg g−1. The adsorption of Pb2+ on glutamate intercalated Mg–Al LDH fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetics model and the isotherm can be well defined by Langmuir model.

  3. Acrylate intercalation and in situ polymerization in iron-, cobalt-, or manganese-substituted nickel hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaysse, C; Guerlou-Demourgues, L; Duguet, E; Delmas, C

    2003-07-28

    A chimie douce route based on successive redox and exchange reactions has allowed us to prepare new hybrid organic-inorganic materials, composed of polyacrylate macromolecules intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), deriving from Ni(OH)(2). Monomer intercalation and in situ polymerization mechanisms have appeared to be strongly dependent upon the nature of the substituting cation in the slabs. In the case of iron-based LDHs, a phase containing acrylate monomeric intercalates has been isolated and identified by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Second, interslab free-radical polymerization of acrylate anions has been successfully initiated using potassium persulfate. In cobalt- or manganese-based LDHs, one-step polymerization has been observed, leading directly to a material containing polyacrylate intercalate.

  4. The Mechanism of the Interfacial Charge and Mass Transfer during Intercalation of Alkali Metal Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventosa, Edgar; Paulitsch, Bianca; Marzak, Philipp; Yun, Jeongsik; Schiegg, Florian; Quast, Thomas; Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S

    2016-12-01

    Intercalation of alkali metal cations, like Li+ or Na+, follows the same three-stage mechanism of the interfacial charge and mass transfer irrespective of the nature of the electrolyte, electrolyte composition or electrode material.

  5. Environmental, Dietary, Maternal, and Fetal Predictors of Bulky DNA Adducts in Cord Blood: A European Mother–Child Study (NewGeneris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Michelle A.; Schoket, Bernadette; Godschalk, Roger W.; Espinosa, Ana; Landström, Anette; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Merlo, Domenico F.; Fthenou, Eleni; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; van Schooten, Frederik-J.; Hoek, Gerard; Brunborg, Gunnar; Meltzer, Helle M.; Alexander, Jan; Nielsen, Jeanette K.; Sunyer, Jordi; Wright, John; Kovács, Katalin; de Hoogh, Kees; Gutzkow, Kristine B.; Hardie, Laura J.; Chatzi, Leda; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Anna, Lívia; Ketzel, Matthias; Haugen, Margaretha; Botsivali, Maria; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Cirach, Marta; Toledano, Mireille B.; Smith, Rachel B.; Fleming, Sarah; Agramunt, Silvia; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Lukács, Viktória; Kleinjans, Jos C.; Segerbäck, Dan; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bulky DNA adducts reflect genotoxic exposures, have been associated with lower birth weight, and may predict cancer risk. Objective: We selected factors known or hypothesized to affect in utero adduct formation and repair and examined their associations with adduct levels in neonates. Methods: Pregnant women from Greece, Spain, England, Denmark, and Norway were recruited in 2006–2010. Cord blood bulky DNA adduct levels were measured by the 32P-postlabeling technique (n = 511). Diet and maternal characteristics were assessed via questionnaires. Modeled exposures to air pollutants and drinking-water disinfection by-products, mainly trihalomethanes (THMs), were available for a large proportion of the study population. Results: Greek and Spanish neonates had higher adduct levels than the northern European neonates [median, 12.1 (n = 179) vs. 6.8 (n = 332) adducts per 108 nucleotides, p Alexander J, Nielsen JK, Sunyer J, Wright J, Kovács K, de Hoogh K, Gutzkow KB, Hardie LJ, Chatzi L, Knudsen LE, Anna L, Ketzel M, Haugen M, Botsivali M, Nieuwenhuijsen MJ, Cirach M, Toledano MB, Smith RB, Fleming S, Agramunt S, Kyrtopoulos SA, Lukács V, Kleinjans JC, Segerbäck D, Kogevinas M. 2015. Environmental, dietary, maternal, and fetal predictors of bulky DNA adducts in cord blood: a European mother–child study (NewGeneris). Environ Health Perspect 123:374–380; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408613 PMID:25626179

  6. Bulky DNA Adducts in Cord Blood, Maternal Fruit-and-Vegetable Consumption, and Birth Weight in a European Mother–Child Study (NewGeneris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoket, Bernadette; Godschalk, Roger W.; Wright, John; von Stedingk, Hans; Törnqvist, Margareta; Sunyer, Jordi; Nielsen, Jeanette K.; Merlo, Domenico F.; Mendez, Michelle A.; Meltzer, Helle M.; Lukács, Viktória; Landström, Anette; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Kovács, Katalin; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Haugen, Margaretha; Hardie, Laura J.; Gützkow, Kristine B.; Fleming, Sarah; Fthenou, Eleni; Farmer, Peter B.; Espinosa, Aina; Chatzi, Leda; Brunborg, Gunnar; Brady, Nigel J.; Botsivali, Maria; Arab, Khelifa; Anna, Lívia; Alexander, Jan; Agramunt, Silvia; Kleinjans, Jos C.; Segerbäck, Dan; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tobacco-smoke, airborne, and dietary exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with reduced prenatal growth. Evidence from biomarker-based studies of low-exposed populations is limited. Bulky DNA adducts in cord blood reflect the prenatal effective dose to several genotoxic agents including PAHs. Objectives: We estimated the association between bulky DNA adduct levels and birth weight in a multicenter study and examined modification of this association by maternal intake of fruits and vegetables during pregnancy. Methods: Pregnant women from Denmark, England, Greece, Norway, and Spain were recruited in 2006–2010. Adduct levels were measured by the 32P-postlabeling technique in white blood cells from 229 mothers and 612 newborns. Maternal diet was examined through questionnaires. Results: Adduct levels in maternal and cord blood samples were similar and positively correlated (median, 12.1 vs. 11.4 adducts in 108 nucleotides; Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.66, p Fleming S, Fthenou E, Farmer PB, Espinosa A, Chatzi L, Brunborg G, Brady NJ, Botsivali M, Arab K, Anna L, Alexander J, Agramunt S, Kleinjans JC, Segerbäck D, Kogevinas M. 2013. Bulky DNA adducts in cord blood, maternal fruit-and-vegetable consumption, and birth weight in a European mother–child study (NewGeneris). Environ Health Perspect 121:1200–1206; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206333 PMID:23906905

  7. Application of mean-field model of polymer melt intercalation in organo-silicates for nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghetti, Paulo; Qutubuddin, Syed

    2005-08-15

    The mean-field, lattice-based model of polymer melt intercalation in organically-modified layered silicates (OLS) originally developed by Vaia and Giannelis was applied for different polymers such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polypropylene (PP), and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). The nature of each polymer controls significantly the intercalation of the system. The internal energy change caused by the interaction of polymer, surfactant and clay is the strongest factor in determining the equilibrium structure of the nanocomposite system.

  8. Evolution of interfacial intercalation chemistry on epitaxial graphene/SiC by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferralis, Nicola, E-mail: ferralis@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Carraro, Carlo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • H-intercalated epitaxial graphene–SiC interface studied with surface enhanced Raman. • Evolution of graphene and H–Si interface with UV-ozone, annealing and O-exposure. • H–Si interface and quasi-freestanding graphene are retained after UV-ozone treatment. • Enhanced ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene. • Novel SERS method for characterizing near-surface graphene–substrate interfaces. - Abstract: A rapid and facile evaluation of the effects of physical and chemical processes on the interfacial layer between epitaxial graphene monolayers on SiC(0 0 0 1) surfaces is essential for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Here, the evolution of the atomic scale epitaxial graphene-buffer-layer–SiC interface through hydrogen intercalation, thermal annealings, UV-ozone etching and oxygen exposure is studied by means of single microparticle mediated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (smSERS). The evolution of the interfacial chemistry in the buffer layer is monitored through the Raman band at 2132 cm{sup −1} corresponding to the Si-H stretch mode. Graphene quality is monitored directly by the selectively enhanced Raman signal of graphene compared to the SiC substrate signal. Through smSERS, a simultaneous correlation between optimized hydrogen intercalation in epitaxial graphene/SiC and an increase in graphene quality is uncovered. Following UV-ozone treatment, a fully hydrogen passivated interface is retained, while a moderate degradation in the quality of the hydrogen intercalated quasi-freestanding graphene is observed. While hydrogen intercalated defect free quasi-freestanding graphene is expected to be robust upon UV-ozone, thermal annealing, and oxygen exposure, ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene results in enhanced amorphization of the quasi-freestanding (compared to non-intercalated) graphene, leading ultimately to its complete etching.

  9. Intercalation of urea into kaolinite for preparation of controlled release fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdavi Fariba; Abdul Rashid Suraya; Khanif Yusop Mohd

    2014-01-01

    In this study urea was intercalated between layers of kaolinite by dry grinding technique to be used for preparing controlled release fertilizer. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) patterns confirmed the intercalation of urea into kaolinite by the significant expansion of the basal spacing of kaolinite layers from 0.710 nm to 1.090 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) also confirmed the hydrogen bonding between urea and kaolinite. Based on CHNS ...

  10. Critical role of DNA intercalation in enzyme-catalyzed nucleotide flipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Jenna M; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2014-11-10

    Nucleotide flipping is a common feature of DNA-modifying enzymes that allows access to target sites within duplex DNA. Structural studies have identified many intercalating amino acid side chains in a wide variety of enzymes, but the functional contribution of these intercalating residues is poorly understood. We used site-directed mutagenesis and transient kinetic approaches to dissect the energetic contribution of intercalation for human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase, an enzyme that initiates repair of alkylation damage. When AAG flips out a damaged nucleotide, the void in the duplex is filled by a conserved tyrosine (Y162). We find that tyrosine intercalation confers 140-fold stabilization of the extrahelical specific recognition complex, and that Y162 functions as a plug to slow the rate of unflipping by 6000-fold relative to the Y162A mutant. Surprisingly, mutation to the smaller alanine side chain increases the rate of nucleotide flipping by 50-fold relative to the wild-type enzyme. This provides evidence against the popular model that DNA intercalation accelerates nucleotide flipping. In the case of AAG, DNA intercalation contributes to the specific binding of a damaged nucleotide, but this enhanced specificity comes at the cost of reduced speed of nucleotide flipping. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Mechanochemical synthesis and intercalation of Ca(II)Fe(III)-layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferencz, Zs.; Szabados, M.; Varga, G.; Csendes, Z. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 8, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Materials and Solution Structure Research Group, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Aradi Vértanúk tere 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Kukovecz, Á. [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); MTA-SZTE “Lendület” Porous Nanocomposites Research Group, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Kónya, Z. [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); MTA-SZTE Reaction Kinetics and Surface Chemistry Research Group, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Carlson, S. [MAX IV Laboratory, Ole Römers väg 1, Lund SE-223 63 (Sweden); Sipos, P. [Materials and Solution Structure Research Group, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Aradi Vértanúk tere 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 7, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); and others

    2016-01-15

    A mechanochemical method (grinding the components without added water – dry grinding, followed by further grinding in the presence of minute amount of water or NaOH solution – wet grinding) was used in this work for the preparation and intercalation of CaFe-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Both the pristine LDHs and the amino acid anion (cystinate and tyrosinate) intercalated varieties were prepared by the two-step grinding procedure in a mixer mill. By systematically changing the conditions of the preparation method, a set of parameters could be determined, which led to the formation of close to phase-pure LDH. The optimisation procedure was also applied for the intercalation processes of the amino acid anions. The resulting materials were structurally characterised by a range of methods (X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, thermogravimetry, X-ray absorption and infra-red spectroscopies). It was proven that this simple mechanochemical procedure was able to produce complex organic–inorganic nanocomposites: LDHs intercalated with amino acid anions. - Graphical abstract: Amino acid anion-Ca(II)Fe(III)-LDHs were successfully prepared by a two-step milling procedure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of pristine and amino acid intercalated CaFe-LDHs by two-step milling. • Identifying the optimum synthesis and intercalation parameters. • Characterisation of the samples with a range of instrumental methods.

  12. Evolution of interfacial intercalation chemistry on epitaxial graphene/SiC by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferralis, Nicola; Carraro, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    A rapid and facile evaluation of the effects of physical and chemical processes on the interfacial layer between epitaxial graphene monolayers on SiC(0 0 0 1) surfaces is essential for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Here, the evolution of the atomic scale epitaxial graphene-buffer-layer-SiC interface through hydrogen intercalation, thermal annealings, UV-ozone etching and oxygen exposure is studied by means of single microparticle mediated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (smSERS). The evolution of the interfacial chemistry in the buffer layer is monitored through the Raman band at 2132 cm-1 corresponding to the Sisbnd H stretch mode. Graphene quality is monitored directly by the selectively enhanced Raman signal of graphene compared to the SiC substrate signal. Through smSERS, a simultaneous correlation between optimized hydrogen intercalation in epitaxial graphene/SiC and an increase in graphene quality is uncovered. Following UV-ozone treatment, a fully hydrogen passivated interface is retained, while a moderate degradation in the quality of the hydrogen intercalated quasi-freestanding graphene is observed. While hydrogen intercalated defect free quasi-freestanding graphene is expected to be robust upon UV-ozone, thermal annealing, and oxygen exposure, ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene results in enhanced amorphization of the quasi-freestanding (compared to non-intercalated) graphene, leading ultimately to its complete etching.

  13. Dirac cone in two dimensional bilayer graphene by intercalation with V, Nb, and Ta transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhira, Srimanta; Lucht, Kevin P.; Mendoza-Cortes, Jose L.

    2018-02-01

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) is a semiconductor whose band gap and properties can be tuned by various methods such as doping or applying gate voltage. Here, we show how to tune electronic properties of BLG by intercalation of transition metal (TM) atoms between two monolayer graphene (MLG) using a novel dispersion-corrected first-principle density functional theory (DFT) approach. We intercalated V, Nb, and Ta atoms between two MLG. We found that the symmetry, the spin, and the concentration of TM atoms in BLG-intercalated materials are the important parameters to control and to obtain a Dirac cone in their band structures. Our study reveals that the BLG intercalated with one vanadium (V) atom, BLG-1V, has a Dirac cone at the K-point. In all the cases, the present DFT calculations show that the 2pz sub-shells of C atoms in graphene and the 3dyz sub-shells of the TM atoms provide the electron density near the Fermi energy level (EF) which controls the material properties. Thus, we show that out-of-plane atoms can influence in-plane electronic densities in BLG and enumerate the conditions necessary to control the Dirac point. This study offers insight into the physical properties of 2D BLG intercalated materials and presents a new strategy for controlling the electronic properties of BLG through TM intercalation by varying the concentration and spin arrangement of the metals resulting in various conducting properties, which include: metal, semi-metal and semiconducting states.

  14. Why medical students choose not to carry out an intercalated BSc: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Jamie A; Cleland, Jennifer; Lemon, John; Galley, Helen F

    2010-03-23

    At some medical schools, students can opt to undertake a 1 year intercalated degree, usually a BSc, in addition to their medical course. Over the last few years the numbers of students who have opted to undertake an intercalated degree have been steadily decreasing despite the advantages in securing foundation posts. The aim of this study was to find out why medical students opted not to take an intercalated degree. All 4th and 5th year medical students (n = 343) who had elected not to take an intercalated degree were personally handed a questionnaire. 293 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 85%). The most common reason students opted not to intercalate was because they did not want to have another year of study (69.6%) or incur more debt (51.9%). Only 45 (15.3%) students said they had enough information to inform their decision: reported take up of information provision was poor. Our findings indicate that the benefits of intercalating need to be better defined and presented to students in a way that they can make a more informed decision.

  15. An intercalated BSc degree is associated with higher marks in subsequent medical school examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer A; Milne, Andrew; Sinclair, Hazel; Lee, Amanda J

    2009-05-19

    To compare medical students on a modern MBChB programme who did an optional intercalated degree with their peers who did not intercalate; in particular, to monitor performance in subsequent undergraduate degree exams. This was a retrospective, observational study of anonymised databases of medical student assessment outcomes. Data were accessed for graduates, University of Aberdeen Medical School, Scotland, UK, from the years 2003 to 2007 (n = 861). The main outcome measure was marks for summative degree assessments taken after intercalating. Of 861 medical students, 154 (17.9%) students did an intercalated degree. After adjustment for cohort, maturity, gender and baseline (3rd year) performance in matching exam type, having done an IC degree was significantly associated with attaining high (18-20) common assessment scale (CAS) marks in three of the six degree assessments occurring after the IC students rejoined the course: the 4th year written exam (p < 0.001), 4th year OSCE (p = 0.001) and the 5th year Elective project (p = 0.010). Intercalating was associated with improved performance in Years 4 and 5 of the MBChB. This improved performance will further contribute to higher academic ranking for Foundation Year posts. Long-term follow-up is required to identify if doing an optional intercalated degree as part of a modern medical degree is associated with following a career in academic medicine.

  16. Why medical students choose not to carry out an intercalated BSc: a questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemon John

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At some medical schools, students can opt to undertake a 1 year intercalated degree, usually a BSc, in addition to their medical course. Over the last few years the numbers of students who have opted to undertake an intercalated degree have been steadily decreasing despite the advantages in securing foundation posts. The aim of this study was to find out why medical students opted not to take an intercalated degree. Methods All 4th and 5th year medical students (n = 343 who had elected not to take an intercalated degree were personally handed a questionnaire. Results 293 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 85%. The most common reason students opted not to intercalate was because they did not want to have another year of study (69.6% or incur more debt (51.9%. Only 45 (15.3% students said they had enough information to inform their decision: reported take up of information provision was poor. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the benefits of intercalating need to be better defined and presented to students in a way that they can make a more informed decision.

  17. Low cost iodine intercalated graphene for fuel cells electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoiu, Adriana; Raceanu, Mircea; Carcadea, Elena; Varlam, Mihai; Stefanescu, Ioan

    2017-12-01

    On the theoretical predictions, we report the synthesis of iodine intercalated graphene for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) applications. The structure and morphology of the samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, specific surface area by BET method, Raman investigations. The presence of elemental iodine in the form of triiodide and pentaiodide was validated, suggesting that iodine was trapped between graphene layers, leading to interactions with C atoms. The electrochemical performances of iodinated graphenes were tested and compared with a typical PEMFC configuration, containing different Pt/C loading (0.4 and 0.2 mg cm-2). If iodinated graphene is included as microporous layer, the electrochemical performances of the fuel cell are higher in terms of power density than the typical fuel cell. Iodine-doped graphenes have been successfully obtained by simple and cost effective synthetic strategy and demonstrated new insights for designing of a high performance metal-free ORR catalyst by a scalable technique.

  18. Nanoporous Ag-CNTs foamed electrode for lithium intercalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Khoshnevisan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Intercalation of lithium into Ag-CNTs sample is reported here. We have used a nano-porous silver foam as a frame for deposition of the CNTs   inside   the   pores   by   electrophoresis   deposition   (EPD technique. By using  chronopotentiometry method,  we  have noticed that the Li storage capacity of the prepared Ag-CNTs electrode was improved  noticeably  in  comparison  with  literature.  In  addition,  a very  good functional stability  for  the  prepared  electrode  has  been tested   during   subsequent   cycles   of   charge / discharge   (C&D procedures. By scanning the cycle's regulated current from 0.2 up to 1.0 mA , it was shown that in the range of 0.4–0.6 mA reversibility of the C&D capacity became optimum and the voltage profiles were converged, as well.

  19. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Songchen [Ames Laboratory; Manna, Kuntal [Ames Laboratory; Ellern, Arkady [Ames Laboratory; Sadow, Aaron D [Ames Laboratory

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(η4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(η4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(η4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(η4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(μ-Cl)(η2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}Rh(μ-H)(μ-Cl)Rh(η2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(η3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis

  20. Rhodium(I-Complexes Catalyzed 1,4-Conjugate Addition of Arylzinc Chlorides to N-Boc-4-pyridone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghai Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhodium(I-complexes catalyzed the 1,4-conjugate addition of arylzinc chlorides to N-Boc-4-pyridone in the presence of chlorotrimethylsilane (TMSCl. A combination of [RhCl(C2H42]2 and BINAP was determined to be the most effective catalyst to promote the 1,4-conjugate addition reactions of arylzinc chlorides to N-Boc-4-pyridone. A broad scope of arylzinc reagents with both electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents on the aromatic ring successfully underwent 1,4-conjugate addition to N-Boc-4-pyridone to afford versatile 1,4-adducts 2-substituted-2,3-dihydropyridones in good to excellent yields (up to 91% and excellent ee (up to 96% when (S-BINAP was used as chiral ligand.

  1. The role of fluctuations in bistability and oscillations during the H2 + O2 reaction on nanosized rhodium crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosfils, P.; Gaspard, P.; Visart de Bocarmé, T.

    2015-08-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is presented of fluctuations observed by field ion microscopy in the catalytic reaction of water production on a rhodium tip. A stochastic approach is developed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the different phenomena observed in the experiment, including burst noise manifesting itself in a bistability regime, noisy oscillations, and nanopatterns with a cross-like oxidized zone separating the surface into four quadrants centered on the {111} facets. The study is based on a stochastic model numerically simulating the processes of adsorption, desorption, reaction, and transport. The surface diffusion of hydrogen is described as a percolation process dominated by large clusters corresponding to the four quadrants. The model reproduces the observed phenomena in the ranges of temperature, pressures, and electric field of the experiment.

  2. Zeolite-supported metal complexes of rhodium and of ruthenium: a general synthesis method influenced by molecular sieving effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Isao; Chen, Cong-Yan; Gates, Bruce C

    2010-09-28

    A general method for synthesis of supported metal complexes having a high degree of uniformity is presented, whereby organometallic precursors incorporating acetylacetonate (C(5)H(7)O(2)(-), acac) ligands react with zeolites incorporating OH groups near Al sites. The method is illustrated by the reactions of Rh(acac)(CO)(2) and of cis-Ru(acac)(2)(eta(2)-C(2)H(4))(2) with zeolites slurried in n-pentane at room temperature. The zeolites were H-Beta, H-SSZ-42, H-Mordenite, and HZSM-5. Infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of the zeolites incorporating rhodium complexes indicate the formation of Rh(CO)(2)(+) bonded near Al sites; similar results have been reported for the formation of zeolite-supported Rh(eta(2)-C(2)H(4))(2)(+) from Rh(acac)(eta(2)-C(2)H(4))(2). IR spectra of the supported rhodium gem-dicarbonyls include sharp, well-resolved nu(CO) bands, demonstrating that the sites surrounding each metal complex are nearly equivalent. The frequencies of the nu(CO) bands show how the composition of the zeolite influences the bonding of the supported species, demonstrating subtle differences in the roles of the zeolite as ligands. When the zeolite has pore openings larger than the critical diameter of the precursor organometallic compound, the latter undergoes facile transport into the interior of the zeolite, so that a uniform distribution of the supported species results, but when the precursors barely fit through the zeolite apertures, the mass transport resistance is significant and the supported metal complexes are concentrated near the pore mouths.

  3. Synthesis and application of Amberlite xad-4 functionalized with alizarin red-s for preconcentration and adsorption of rhodium (III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A new chelating resin was prepared by coupling Amberlite XAD-4 with alizarin red-s through an azo spacer, characterized by infra-red spectroscopy and thermal analysis and studied for Rh(III) preconcentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for rhodium monitoring in the environment. The optimum pH for sorption of the metal ion was 6.5. The sorption capacity was found 2.1 mg/g of resin for Rh(III). A recovery of 88% was obtained for the metal ion with 1.5 M HCl as eluting agent. Kinetic adsorption data were analyzed by adsorption and desorption times of Rh(III) on modified resin. Scat chard analysis revealed that the homogeneous binding sites were formed in the polymers. The linear regression equation was Q/C = –1.3169Q + 27.222 (R2 = 0.9239), for Rh were formed in the SPE sorbent,Kd and Qmax for the affinity binding sites were calculated to be 0.76 μmol/mL and 20.67 μmol/g, respectively. The equilibrium data and parameters of Rh(III) adsorption on modified resin were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Redlich–Peterson models. The experimental adsorption isotherm was in good concordance with Langmuir and Freundlich models (R2 > 0.998) and based on the Langmuir isotherm the maximum amount of adsorption (qmax) was 4.842 mg/g. The method was applied for rhodium ions determination in environmental samples. with high recovery (>80%). PMID:23369526

  4. Synthesis and application of Amberlite xad-4 functionalized with alizarin red-s for preconcentration and adsorption of rhodium (III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sid Kalal Hossein

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new chelating resin was prepared by coupling Amberlite XAD-4 with alizarin red-s through an azo spacer, characterized by infra-red spectroscopy and thermal analysis and studied for Rh(III preconcentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES for rhodium monitoring in the environment. The optimum pH for sorption of the metal ion was 6.5. The sorption capacity was found 2.1 mg/g of resin for Rh(III. A recovery of 88% was obtained for the metal ion with 1.5 M HCl as eluting agent. Kinetic adsorption data were analyzed by adsorption and desorption times of Rh(III on modified resin. Scat chard analysis revealed that the homogeneous binding sites were formed in the polymers. The linear regression equation was Q/C = –1.3169Q + 27.222 (R2 = 0.9239, for Rh were formed in the SPE sorbent,Kd and Qmax for the affinity binding sites were calculated to be 0.76 μmol/mL and 20.67 μmol/g, respectively. The equilibrium data and parameters of Rh(III adsorption on modified resin were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Redlich–Peterson models. The experimental adsorption isotherm was in good concordance with Langmuir and Freundlich models (R2 > 0.998 and based on the Langmuir isotherm the maximum amount of adsorption (qmax was 4.842 mg/g. The method was applied for rhodium ions determination in environmental samples. with high recovery (>80%.

  5. SU-F-J-162: Is Bulky Electron Density Assignment Appropriatefor MRI-Only Based Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, P; Chen, X; Johnstone, C; Gore, E; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the appropriateness of bulky electron density assisment for MRI-only treatment planning for lung cancer via comparing dosimetric difference between MRI- and CT-based plans. Methods: Planning 4DCTs acquired for six representative lung cancer patients were used to generate CT-based IMRT plans. To avoid the effect of anatomic difference between CT and MRI, MRI-based plans were generated using CTs by forcing the relative electron density (rED) of organ specific values from ICRU report 46 and using the mean rED value of the internal target volume (ITV) of the patient for the ITV. Both CT and “MRI” plans were generated using a research planning system (Monaco, Elekta) employing Monte Carlo dose calculation the following dose-volume-parameters (DVPs): D99 – dose delivered to 99% of the ITV/PTV volume; D95; D5; D1; Vpd –volume receiving the prescription dose; V5 – volume of normal lung irradiated > 5 Gy; and V20. The percent point difference and dose difference was used for comparison for Vpd-V5-V20 and D99-D1, respectively. Four additional plans per patient were calculated with rEDITV = 0.6 and 1.0 and rEDlung = 0.1 and 0.5. Results: Noticeable differences in the ITV and PTV point doses and DVPs were observed. Variations in Vpd ranged from 0.0–6.4% and 0.32–18.3% for the ITV and PTV, respectively. The ITV and PTV variations in D99, D95, D5 and D1 were 0.15–3.2 Gy. The normal lung V5 & V20 variations were no larger than 1.9%. In some instances, varying the rEDITV between rEDmean, 0.6 and 1.0 resulted in D95 increases ranging from 3.9–6.3%. Uniform rED assignment on normal lung affected DVPs of ITV and PTV by 4.0–9.8% and 0.3–19.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The commonly-used uniform rED assignment in MRI-only based planning may not be appropriate for lung-cancer. A voxel based method, e.g. synthetic CT generated from MRI data, is required. This work was partially funded by Elekta, Inc.

  6. (η2,η2-Cycloocta-1,5-diene[2-(diphenylphosphanylmethylpyridine-κ2N,P]rhodium(I tetrafluoridoborate 1,2-dichloroethane monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siping Wei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Rh(C8H12(C18H16NP]BF4 has been prepared as a precatalyst for applications in rhodium-catalysed additions of carbocyclic acids to terminal alkynes leading to anti-Markovnikov Z-enol esters. Here the triclinic pseudopolymorph of the title compound is presented. In contrast to the earlier reported pseudopolymorph (orthorhombic space group [Wei et al. (2013. Chem. Eur. J. 19, 12067–12076], the triclinic polymorph contains half a molecule of dichloromethane as solvent in the asymmetric unit. The rhodium(I atom exhibits a square-planar coordination. The estimated diffraction contribution of the disordered solvent (a half molecule of dichloroethane per asymmetric unit was subtracted from the observed diffraction data using the SQUEEZE [Spek (2015. Acta Cryst. C71, 9–16] routine in PLATON. The given chemical formula and other crystal data do not take the solvent into account.

  7. Localization of Sodium Channels in Intercalated Disks Modulates Cardiac Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Jan P.; Rohr, Stephan; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the sodium current (INa) and the degree of gap-junctional electrical coupling are the key determinants of action potential (AP) conduction in cardiac tissue. Immunohistochemical studies have shown that sodium channels (NaChs) are preferentially located in intercalated disks (IDs). Using dual immunocytochemical staining, we confirmed the colocalization of NaChs with connexin43 in cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. In mathematical simulations of conduction using the Luo-Rudy dynamic model of the ventricular AP, we assessed the hypothesis that conduction could be modulated by the preferential localization of NaChs in IDs. Localization of INa at the ID caused a large negative potential in the intercellular cleft, which influenced conduction in two opposing ways, depending on the degree of electrical coupling: (1) for normal and moderately reduced coupling, the negative cleft potential led to a large overshoot of the transmembrane potential resulting in a decreased driving force for INa itself (self-attenuation), which slowed conduction; (2) for greatly reduced coupling (<10%), the negative cleft potential induced by INa in the prejunctional membrane led to suprathreshold depolarization of the postjunctional membrane, which facilitated and accelerated conduction. When cleft potential effects were not incorporated, conduction was not significantly affected by the ID localization of INa. By enhancing conduction through the establishment of cleft potentials, the localization of NaChs in IDs might protect the myocardium from conduction block, very slow conduction, and microreentry under conditions of greatly reduced coupling. Conversely, by supporting moderately slow conduction, this mechanism could also promote arrhythmias PMID:12480819

  8. Rhodium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of arylboronates and diazoesters and tandem alkylation reaction for the synthesis of quaternary α,α-heterodiaryl carboxylic esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Yuk-Tai; Zhou, Zhongyuan; Yu, Wing-Yiu

    2011-10-07

    A rhodium-catalyzed one-pot three-component coupling reaction was developed for the synthesis of quaternary α,α-heterodiaryl carboxylic esters. This reaction involves cross-coupling of the arylrhodium(I) complexes with α-aryldiazoacetates to form oxa-π-allylrhodium complexes. With KOtBu and alkyl halides, tandem alkylation of the allyl complex occurs to form a quaternary stereocenter at the carbenic carbon. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Cobalt intercalation at the graphene/iridium(111) interface: Influence of rotational domains, wrinkles, and atomic steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaic, S.; Kimouche, A.; Coraux, J.; Rougemaille, N. [CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Santos, B.; Locatelli, A. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S: 14 km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2014-03-10

    Using low-energy electron microscopy, we study Co intercalation under graphene grown on Ir(111). Depending on the rotational domain of graphene on which it is deposited, Co is found intercalated at different locations. While intercalated Co is observed preferentially at the substrate step edges below certain rotational domains, it is mostly found close to wrinkles below other domains. These results indicate that curved regions (near substrate atomic steps and wrinkles) of the graphene sheet facilitate Co intercalation and suggest that the strength of the graphene/Ir interaction determines which pathway is energetically more favorable.

  10. Rhodium, iridium and nickel complexes with a 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene tris-MIC ligand. Study of the electronic properties and catalytic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Mejuto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The coordination versatility of a 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene-tris-mesoionic carbene ligand is illustrated by the preparation of complexes with three different metals: rhodium, iridium and nickel. The rhodium and iridium complexes contained the [MCl(COD] fragments, while the nickel compound contained [NiCpCl]. The preparation of the tris-MIC (MIC = mesoionic carbene complex with three [IrCl(CO2] fragments, allowed the estimation of the Tolman electronic parameter (TEP for the ligand, which was compared with the TEP value for a related 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene-tris-NHC ligand. The electronic properties of the tris-MIC ligand were studied by cyclic voltammetry measurements. In all cases, the tris-MIC ligand showed a stronger electron-donating character than the corresponding NHC-based ligands. The catalytic activity of the tri-rhodium complex was tested in the addition reaction of arylboronic acids to α,β-unsaturated ketones.

  11. Bulky dna adducts in cord blood, maternal fruit-and-vegetable consumption, and birth weight in a European mother-child study (NewGeneris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Marie; Schoket, Bernadette; Godschalk, Roger W; Wright, John; von Stedingk, Hans; Törnqvist, Margareta; Sunyer, Jordi; Nielsen, Jeanette K; Merlo, Domenico F; Mendez, Michelle A; Meltzer, Helle M; Lukács, Viktória; Landström, Anette; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Kovács, Katalin; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Haugen, Margaretha; Hardie, Laura J; Gützkow, Kristine B; Fleming, Sarah; Fthenou, Eleni; Farmer, Peter B; Espinosa, Aina; Chatzi, Leda; Brunborg, Gunnar; Brady, Nigel J; Botsivali, Maria; Arab, Khelifa; Anna, Lívia; Alexander, Jan; Agramunt, Silvia; Kleinjans, Jos C; Segerbäck, Dan; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2013-10-01

    Tobacco-smoke, airborne, and dietary exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with reduced prenatal growth. Evidence from biomarker-based studies of low-exposed populations is limited. Bulky DNA adducts in cord blood reflect the prenatal effective dose to several genotoxic agents including PAHs. We estimated the association between bulky DNA adduct levels and birth weight in a multicenter study and examined modification of this association by maternal intake of fruits and vegetables during pregnancy. Pregnant women from Denmark, England, Greece, Norway, and Spain were recruited in 2006-2010. Adduct levels were measured by the 32P-postlabeling technique in white blood cells from 229 mothers and 612 newborns. Maternal diet was examined through questionnaires. Adduct levels in maternal and cord blood samples were similar and positively correlated (median, 12.1 vs. 11.4 adducts in 108 nucleotides; Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.66, p < 0.001). Cord blood adduct levels were negatively associated with birth weight, with an estimated difference in mean birth weight of -129 g (95% CI: -233, -25 g) for infants in the highest versus lowest tertile of adducts. The negative association with birth weight was limited to births in Norway, Denmark, and England, the countries with the lowest adduct levels, and was more pronounced in births to mothers with low intake of fruits and vegetables (-248 g; 95% CI: -405, -92 g) compared with those with high intake (-58 g; 95% CI: -206, 90 g). Maternal exposure to genotoxic agents that induce the formation of bulky DNA adducts may affect intrauterine growth. Maternal fruit and vegetable consumption may be protective.

  12. Environmental, dietary, maternal, and fetal predictors of bulky DNA adducts in cord blood: a European mother-child study (NewGeneris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Marie; Mendez, Michelle A; Schoket, Bernadette; Godschalk, Roger W; Espinosa, Ana; Landström, Anette; Villanueva, Cristina M; Merlo, Domenico F; Fthenou, Eleni; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; van Schooten, Frederik-J; Hoek, Gerard; Brunborg, Gunnar; Meltzer, Helle M; Alexander, Jan; Nielsen, Jeanette K; Sunyer, Jordi; Wright, John; Kovács, Katalin; de Hoogh, Kees; Gutzkow, Kristine B; Hardie, Laura J; Chatzi, Leda; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Anna, Lívia; Ketzel, Matthias; Haugen, Margaretha; Botsivali, Maria; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Cirach, Marta; Toledano, Mireille B; Smith, Rachel B; Fleming, Sarah; Agramunt, Silvia; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Lukács, Viktória; Kleinjans, Jos C; Segerbäck, Dan; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-04-01

    Bulky DNA adducts reflect genotoxic exposures, have been associated with lower birth weight, and may predict cancer risk. We selected factors known or hypothesized to affect in utero adduct formation and repair and examined their associations with adduct levels in neonates. Pregnant women from Greece, Spain, England, Denmark, and Norway were recruited in 2006-2010. Cord blood bulky DNA adduct levels were measured by the 32P-postlabeling technique (n = 511). Diet and maternal characteristics were assessed via questionnaires. Modeled exposures to air pollutants and drinking-water disinfection by-products, mainly trihalomethanes (THMs), were available for a large proportion of the study population. Greek and Spanish neonates had higher adduct levels than the northern European neonates [median, 12.1 (n = 179) vs. 6.8 (n = 332) adducts per 108 nucleotides, p < 0.001]. Residence in southern European countries, higher maternal body mass index, delivery by cesarean section, male infant sex, low maternal intake of fruits rich in vitamin C, high intake of dairy products, and low adherence to healthy diet score were statistically significantly associated with higher adduct levels in adjusted models. Exposure to fine particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide was associated with significantly higher adducts in the Danish subsample only. Overall, the pooled results for THMs in water show no evidence of association with adduct levels; however, there are country-specific differences in results with a suggestion of an association in England. These findings suggest that a combination of factors, including unknown country-specific factors, influence the bulky DNA adduct levels in neonates.

  13. Intercalation of urea into kaolinite for preparation of controlled release fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdavi Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study urea was intercalated between layers of kaolinite by dry grinding technique to be used for preparing controlled release fertilizer. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD patterns confirmed the intercalation of urea into kaolinite by the significant expansion of the basal spacing of kaolinite layers from 0.710 nm to 1.090 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR also confirmed the hydrogen bonding between urea and kaolinite. Based on CHNS elemental analysis, 20% (wt. urea was intercalated between kaolinite layers. The urea-intercalated kaolinite was mixed with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC binder and was granulated to prepare the nitrogen-based controlled release fertilizer. To study the nitrogen release behavior of granules, ultraviolet/visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy was used through the diacetyl monoxime (DAM colorimetric method. The result of UV-Vis spectroscopy showed that intercalation of urea into kaolinite decreased the nitrogen release from 25.50 to 13.66 % after 24 hours and from 98.15 to 70.01% after 30 days incubation in water. According to the results, the prepared controlled release fertilizer (CRF behaved according to the standard for CRFs.

  14. Synthesis of reduced graphene oxide intercalated ZnO quantum dots nanoballs for selective biosensing detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; Zhao, Minggang, E-mail: zhaomg@ouc.edu.cn; Li, Yingchun; Fan, Sisi; Ding, Longjiang; Liang, Jingjing; Chen, Shougang, E-mail: sgchen@ouc.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • A MWCNTs/rGO/ZnO quantum dots intercalation nanoballs decorated 3D hierarchical architecture is fabricated on Ni foam. • Large numbers of ZnO quantum dots are intercalated by rGO sheets to construct hierarchical nanoballs. • Improved mechanical, kinetic and electrochemical properties are found. • The strong interfacial effect makes the material can be used for selective detection of dopamine, ascorbic acid and uric acid. - Abstract: ZnO quantum dots (QDs), reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are always used in sensors due to their excellent electrochemical characteristics. In this work, ZnO QDs were intercalated by rGO sheets with cross-linked MWCNTs to construct intercalation nanoballs. A MWCNTs/rGO/ZnO QDs 3D hierarchical architecture was fabricated on supporting Ni foam, which exhibited excellent mechanical, kinetic and electrochemical properties. The intercalation construction can introduce strong interfacial effects to improve the surface electronic state. The selectively determinate of uric acid, dopamine, and ascorbic acid by an electrode material using distinct applied potentials was realized.

  15. Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside: Intermolecular interactions and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Rodríguez, A. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC-CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    This contribution discusses the intercalation of imidazole and its 2-ethyl derivative, and pyridine in 2D copper nitroprusside. In the interlayer region, neighboring molecules remain interacting throu gh their dipole and quadrupole moments, which supports the solid 3D crystal structure. The crystal structure of this series of intercalation compounds was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction patterns complemented with spectroscopic information. The intermolecular interactions were studied from the refined crystal structures and low temperature magnetic measurements. Due to strong attractive forces between neighboring molecules, the resulting π–π cloud overlapping enables the ferromagnetic coupling between metal centers on neighboring layers, which was actually observed for the solids containing imidazole and pyridine as intercalated molecules. For these two solids, the magnetic data were properly described with a model of six neighbors. For the solid containing 2-ethylimidazole and for 2D copper nitroprusside, a model of four neighbors in a plane is sufficient to obtain a reliable data fitting. - Highlights: • Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Molecular properties of intercalation compounds of 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Magnetic properties of hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Hybrid inorganic–organic 3D framework.

  16. Intercalation of two-dimensional graphite films on metals by atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Gall, N R; Tontegode, A Ya; Usufov, M M

    1999-01-01

    An analysis is made of some general laws governing a new physical effect, i.e., the spontaneous penetration of particles (atoms, C/sub 60/ molecules) adsorbed on a two-dimensional graphite film on a metal (Ir, Re, Pt, Mo, ...) to beneath the graphite film (intercalation). It is shown that atoms having low ionization potentials (Cs, K, Na) intercalate a two-dimensional graphite film on iridium at T=300-400 K with an efficiency Aleph approximately=0.5, accumulating beneath the film to a concentration of up to a monolayer. Atoms having high ionization potentials (Si, Pt, Ni, C, Mo, etc.) intercalate a two- dimensional graphite film on iridium at T approximately=1000 K with an efficiency Aleph approximately=1, forming beneath the film a thick intercalate layer which is strongly bonded chemically to the metal substrate but is probably weakly bonded to the graphite monolayer by van der Waals forces. The presence of a graphite "lid" impeding the escape of atoms from the intercalated state up to record high temperatu...

  17. Quaternary ammonium salts intercalated α-ZrP compounds for adsorption of phenolic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongning; Liu, Wenjin; Yao, Wei; Zhang, Ke; Zhong, Jing; Chen, Ruoyu

    2013-03-01

    By using methylamine as the colloidization agent to weaken the interactions of α-ZrP laminate, the quaternary ammonium salts of DTAB, TTAB, CTAB and STAB were successfully intercalated into the methylamine pre-pillared α-ZrP, denoted as DTAB-ZrP, TTAB-ZrP, CTAB-ZrP and STAB-ZrP, respectively. XRD, FTIR, TEM and N2 sorption were used to characterize the intercalated compounds, and the arrangements of intercalated quaternary ammonium salts within ZrP were supposed according to the results. It was shown that the interlayer distances were increased from 0.76 nm to 2.10-3.50 nm and the intercalated quaternary amine salt cationic bonded with Psbnd O- anion through electrostatic interaction. The phenolic compounds adsorption results have demonstrated that all the four intercalated compounds have good adsorption performance, and CTAB-ZrP show the highest maximum adsorption amounts of 0.90, 1.25 and 1.34 mmol g-1, for phenol, 2-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenolare, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of phenolic compounds are linear with the C0 of 2.0-6.0 mmol L-1 and fit well to both the Linear and the Freundlich models, which indicated that the adsorption mechanism is mainly partition effects of organic phase within ZrP interlayer.

  18. Influence of metal ions intercalation on the vibrational dynamics of water confined between MXene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, Naresh C.; Naguib, Michael; Ganeshan, Karthik; Shin, Yun K.; Ostadhossein, Alireza; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Daemen, Luke L.; Gogotsi, Yury; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.

    2017-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) carbides and nitrides of early transition metals (MXenes) combine high conductivity with hydrophilic surfaces, which make them promising for energy storage, electrocatalysis, and water desalination. The effects of intercalated metal ions on the vibrational states of water confined in Ti3C2Tx MXenes have been explored using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and molecular-dynamics simulations to better understand the mechanisms that control MXenes' behavior in aqueous electrolytes, water purification, and other important applications. We observe an INS signal from water in all samples, pristine and with lithium, sodium, or potassium ions intercalated between the 2D Ti3C2Tx layers. However, only a small amount of water is found to reside in Ti3C2Tx intercalated with metal ions. Water in pristine Ti3C2Tx is more disordered, with bulklike characteristics, in contrast to intercalated Ti3C2Tx , where water is more ordered, irrespective of the metal ions used for intercalation. The ordering of the confined water increases with the ion size. This finding is further confirmed from molecular-dynamics simulation, which showed an increase in interference of water molecules with increasing ion size resulting in a concomitant decrease in water mobility, therefore providing guidance to tailor MXene properties for energy and environmental applications.

  19. In Situ Study of Li Intercalation into Highly Crystalline Graphitic Flakes of Varying Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianli; Sole, Christopher; Drewett, Nicholas E; Velický, Matěj; Hardwick, Laurence J

    2016-11-03

    An in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study of Li intercalation into graphite flakes with different thicknesses ranging from 1.7 nm (3 graphene layers) to 61 nm (ca. 178 layers) is presented. The lithiation behavior of these flakes was compared to commercial microcrystalline graphite with a typical flake thickness of ∼100 nm. Li intercalation into the graphitic flakes was observed under potential control via in situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. As graphite flakes decreased in thickness, a Raman response indicative of increased tensile strain along the graphene sheet was observed during the early stages of intercalation. A progressively negative wavenumber shift of the interior and bounding modes of the split G band (E2g2(i) and E2g2(b)) is interpreted as a weakening of the C-C bonding. Raman spectra of Li intercalation into thin graphitic flakes are presented and discussed in the context of implications for Li ion battery applications, given that intercalation induced strain may accelerate carbon negative electrode aging and reduce long-term cycle life.

  20. INTERPRETATION OF POTENTIAL INTERMITTENCE TITRATION TECHNIQUE EXPERIMENTS FOR VARIOUS Li-INTERCALATION ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D.Levi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we compare two different approaches for the calculation of the enhancement factor Wi, based on its definition as the ratio of the chemical and the component diffusion coefficients for species in mixed-conduction electrodes, originated from the "dilute solution" or "lattice gas" models for the ion system. The former approach is only applicable for small changes of the ion concentration while the latter allows one to consider a broad range of intercalation levels. The component diffusion coefficient of lithium ions has been determined for a series of lithium intercalation anodes and cathodes. A new "enhancement factor" for the ion transport has been defined and its relations to the intercalation capacitance and the intercalation isotherm have been established. A correlation between the dependences of the differential capacitance and the partial ion conductivity on the potential has been observed. It is considered as a prove that the intercalation process is controlled by the availability of sites for Li-ion insertion rather than by the concurrent insertion of the counter-balancing electronic species.

  1. A retrospective study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radical hysterectomy versus radical hysterectomy alone in patients with stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma presenting as a bulky mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatori E

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Eriko Takatori, Tadahiro Shoji, Anna Takada, Takayuki Nagasawa, Hideo Omi, Masahiro Kagabu, Tatsuya Honda, Fumiharu Miura, Satoshi Takeuchi, Toru Sugiyama Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Iwate, Japan Objective: In order to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC for stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma with a bulky mass, we retrospectively compared patients receiving NAC followed by radical hysterectomy (RH; NAC group with patients who underwent RH without NAC (Ope group. Patients and methods: The study period was from June 2002 to March 2014. The subjects were 28 patients with a stage II bulky mass in the NAC group and 17 such patients in the Ope group. The chi-square test was used to compare operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, use of blood transfusion, and time from surgery to discharge between the two groups. Moreover, the log-rank test using the Kaplan–Meier method was performed to compare disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS between the groups. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, or use of blood transfusion. However, the time from surgery to discharge was 18 days (14–25 days in the NAC group and 25 days (21–34 days in the Ope group; the patients in the NAC group were discharged earlier (P=0.032. The hazard ratio for DFS in the NAC group as compared with that in the Ope group was 0.36 (95% CI 0.08–0.91, and the 3-year DFS rates were 81.2% and 41.0%, respectively (P=0.028. Moreover, the hazard ratio for OS was 0.39 (95% CI 0.11–1.24, and the 3-year OS rates were 82.3% and 66.4%, respectively (P=0.101. Conclusion: NAC with cisplatin and irinotecan was confirmed to prolong DFS as compared with RH alone. The results of this study suggest that NAC might be a useful adjunct to surgery in the treatment of stage II squamous

  2. Intercalating fluorescence dye YOYO-1 prevents the folding transition in giant duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, N; Akitaya, T; Yoshikawa, K

    2001-08-17

    Recently, it has become clear that with the addition of polyamines, giant DNA molecules of size greater than 10 kbp exhibit all-or-none switching between elongated coil and folded compact states. Here the effects of the intercalating fluorescent labeling dye, YOYO-1, and the minor-groove binding fluorescent labeling dye, DAPI, on the folding transition of single giant T4 DNA (166 kbp) induced by spermidine(3+) were examined, by use of the experimental technique of single molecular chain observation with fluorescence microscopy. It is found that the intercalating dye, YOYO-1, markedly prevents the folding transition, whereas the minor-groove binding dye, DAPI, exhibits negligible effect on the folding transition. This action of YOYO-1 is discussed in relation to the biological effect of intercalators. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Mössbauer study of pH dependence of iron-intercalation in montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmann, E., E-mail: kuzmann@caesar.elte.hu [Eötvös Loránd University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Garg, V. K.; Singh, H.; Oliveira, A. C. de; Pati, S. S. [University of Brasília, Institute of Physics (Brazil); Homonnay, Z.; Rudolf, M. [Eötvös Loránd University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Molnár, Á. M.; Kovács, E. M. [University of Debrecen, Imre Lajos Isotope Laboratory, Department of Colloid and Environmental Chemistry (Hungary); Baranyai, E. [University of Debrecen, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Hungary); Kubuki, S. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Nagy, N. M.; Kónya, J. [University of Debrecen, Imre Lajos Isotope Laboratory, Department of Colloid and Environmental Chemistry (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and XRD have successfully been applied to show the incorporation of Fe ion into the interlayer space of montmorillonite via treatment with FeCl {sub 3} in acetone. The 78K {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra of montmorillonite samples reflected magnetically split spectrum part indicating the intercalation of iron into the interlayer of montmorillonite via the treatment with FeCl {sub 3}+acetone and washed with water until the initial pH=2.3 increased to pH=4.14. It was found that the occurrence of intercalated iron in the form of oxide-oxihydroxide in montmorillonite increases with the pH. Intercalation was confirmed by the gradual increase in the basal spacing d{sub 001} with pH.

  4. Specific features of the charge and mass transfer in a silver-intercalated hafnium diselenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleshchev, V. G.; Selezneva, N. V.; Baranov, N. V.

    2013-07-01

    The specific features of the charge transfer in intercalated samples of Ag x HfSe2 have been studied for the first time by alternating current (ac) impedance spectroscopy. It has been found that relaxation processes in an ac field are accelerated with increasing silver content in the samples. The complex conductivity ( Y) shows a frequency dispersion described by power law Y ˜ ω s , which is characteristic of the hopping conductivity mechanism. The Ag x HfSe2 compounds demonstrate shorter relaxation times as compared to those observed in hafnium diselenide intercalated with copper atoms, and this fact indicates that the charge carrier mobility in the silver-intercalated compounds is higher. The possibility of silver ion transfer in Ag x HfSe2 is confirmed by the measurements performed by the method of electrochemical cell emf.

  5. NMR studies of the conformation and motion of tetrahydrofuran in graphite intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, Daniel Franz [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    The behavior of tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules intercalated in graphite layers in compounds Cs(THF){sub 1.3}C{sub 24} and K(THF){sub 2.5}C{sub 24} was studied by proton NMR. The graphite layers in these compounds impose a uniform ordering on the THF molecules, giving rise to sharp NMR spectra. Experimental and simulated proton NMR spectra were used to investigate geometry, orientation and conformation of intercalated THF, and to determine whether pseudorotation, a large amplitude low-frequency vibration observed in gaseous THF, can also occur in the constrained environment provided by the graphite intercalation compounds. Deuterium and multiple quantum proton NMR spectra were also simulated in order to determine if these techniques could further refine the proton NMR results.

  6. X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging as Multiscale Probes of Intercalation Phenomena in Cathode Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrocks, Gregory A.; De Jesus, Luis R.; Andrews, Justin L.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2017-09-01

    Intercalation phenomena are at the heart of modern electrochemical energy storage. Nevertheless, as out-of-equilibrium processes involving concomitant mass and charge transport, such phenomena can be difficult to engineer in a predictive manner. The rational design of electrode architectures requires mechanistic understanding of physical phenomena spanning multiple length scales, from atomistic distortions and electron localization at individual transition metal centers to phase inhomogeneities and intercalation gradients in individual particles and concentration variances across ensembles of particles. In this review article, we discuss the importance of the electronic structure in mediating electrochemical storage and mesoscale heterogeneity. In particular, we discuss x-ray spectroscopy and imaging probes of electronic and atomistic structure as well as statistical regression methods that allow for monitoring of the evolution of the electronic structure as a function of intercalation. The layered α-phase of V2O5 is used as a model system to develop fundamental ideas on the origins of mesoscale heterogeneity.

  7. Thermoelectric Properties of Li-Intercalated ZrSe2 Single Crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgate, Tim; Liu, Yufei; Hitchcock, Dale

    2013-01-01

    can profoundly affect the structural, thermal, and electronic properties of such materials. While the thermoelectric potential of layer-structured transitionmetal dichalcogenides has been formerly studied by several groups, to our best knowledge, neither the thermoelectric properties of ZrSe2 nor...... the impact of intercalation on its thermoelectric properties have been reported (specifically, the full evaluation of the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, which includes the thermal conductivity). In this proof-of-principle study, ZrSe2 single crystals have been synthesized using an iodine-assisted vapor...... transport method, followed by a wet-chemistry lithium intercalation process. The results of resistivity, thermopower, and thermal conductivity measurements between 10 K and 300 K show that Li intercalation induced additional charge carriers and structural disorder that favorably affected the thermoelectric...

  8. Electrode Surface Composition of Dual-Intercalation, All-Graphite Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Dyatkin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dual-intercalation batteries implement graphite electrodes as both cathodes and anodes and offer high specific energy, inexpensive and environmentally sustainable materials, and high operating voltages. Our research investigated the influence of surface composition on capacities and cycling efficiencies of chemically functionalized all-graphite battery electrodes. We subjected coreshell spherical particles and synthetic graphite flakes to high-temperature air oxidation, and hydrogenation to introduce, respectively, –OH, and –H surface functional groups. We identified noticeable influences of electrode surface chemistry on first-cycle efficiencies and charge storage densities of anion and cation intercalation into graphite electrodes. We matched oxidized cathodes and hydrogenated anodes in dual-ion batteries and improved their overall performance. Our approach provides novel fundamental insight into the anion intercalation process and suggests inexpensive and environmentally sustainable methods to improve performance of these grid-scale energy storage systems

  9. Hybrid Doping of Few-Layer Graphene via a Combination of Intercalation and Surface Doping

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Ahmed

    2017-05-23

    Surface molecular doping of graphene has been shown to modify its work function and increase its conductivity. However, the associated shifts in work function and increases in carrier concentration are highly coupled and limited by the surface coverage of dopant molecules on graphene. Here we show that few-layer graphene (FLG) can be doped using a hybrid approach, effectively combining surface doping by larger (metal-)organic molecules, while smaller molecules, such as Br2 and FeCl3, intercalate into the bulk. Intercalation tunes the carrier concentration more effectively, whereas surface doping of intercalated FLG can be used to tune its work function without reducing the carrier mobility. This multi-modal doping approach yields a very high carrier density and tunable work function for FLG, demonstrating a new versatile platform for fabricating graphene-based contacts for electronic, optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications.

  10. The organometallic fluorine chemistry of palladium and rhodium: studies toward aromatic fluorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushin, Vladimir V

    2010-01-19

    analogue of Wilkinson's catalyst [(Ph(3)P)(3)RhF] and P-F bond-forming reactions at Pd(II) are insensitive to phosphine concentration and, because of the small size of fluorine, occur even with bulky phosphine ligands. These observations may guide further efforts toward metal-catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination of haloarenes. We have also developed aryne-mediated and CuF(2)/TMEDA-promoted aromatic fluorination reactions. The formation of fluoroarenes from the corresponding iodo- and bromoarenes in the presence of the CuF(2)/TMEDA system is the first example of a transition metal-mediated fluorination of nonactivated aryl halides in the liquid phase. Progress has also been made toward the development of aromatic trifluoromethylation. We have found unexpectedly facile and clean benzotrifluoride formation as a result of Ph-CF(3) reductive elimination from [(Xantphos)Pd(Ph)CF(3)]. This observation demonstrates for the first time that the notoriously strong and inert metal-CF(3) bond can be easily cleaved (at 50-80 degrees C) as a result of reductive elimination to produce the desired aryl-trifluoromethyl bond, the only previously missing link of the catalytic loop. Our study of the novel complex [(Ph(3)P)(3)RhCF(3)] has led to a rationale for the long-puzzling strong trans influence (electron donation) of the CF(3) group which, in complete contrast, is known to be an electron acceptor in organic chemistry.

  11. Separation of rhodium(III and iridium(IV chlorido species by quaternary diammonium centres hosted on silica microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Majavu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Silica gel was functionalized with six different quaternary diammonium centres derived from ethylenediamine (EDA, tetramethylenediamine (TMDA, hexamethylenediamine (HMDA, 1,8-diaminooctane (OMDA, 1,10-diaminodecane (DMDA and 1,12-diaminododecane (DDMDA to produce Si-QUAT EDA, Si-QUAT TMDA, Si-QUAT HMDA, Si-QUAT OMDA, Si-QUAT DMDA and Si-QUAT DDMDA, respectively. The synthesized silica-based resins were characterized by means of FTIR, XPS, SEM, BET surface area, thermogravimetric analysis and elemental analysis. The materials were used to investigate the adsorption and separation of [RhCl5(H2O]2− and [IrCl6]2−. Batch studies (equilibrium and kinetic studies were conducted to study the adsorption of [RhCl5(H2O]2− and [IrCl6]2− onto Si-QUAT EDA, Si-QUAT TMDA, Si-QUAT HMDA, Si-QUAT OMDA, Si-QUAT DMDA and Si-QUAT DDMDA using single metal aqueous solutions. The Freundlich isotherm confirmed multilayer adsorption and the Freundlich constant (kf displayed the following ascending order; Si-QUAT EDA, Si-QUAT TMDA, Si-QUAT HMDA, Si-QUAT OMDA and Si-QUAT DMDA, and a decrease in kf for Si-QUAT DDMDA. Kinetic studies suggest a pseudo-first order kinetic model. Column studies were also conducted for a binary mixture of these metal ion chlorido species ([RhCl5(H2O]2− and [IrCl6]2−. The iridium loading capacities increased as the carbon spacer between the diammonium centres increased in the following order; Si-QUAT EDA, Si-QUAT TMDA, Si-QUAT HMDA, Si-QUAT OMDA and Si-QUAT DMDA (4.56 mg/g, 6.88 mg/g, 14.63 mg/g, 19.01 mg/g and 29.35 mg/g, respectively. It was observed that the iridium loading capacity of Si-QUAT DDMDA decreased to 8.90 mg/g. This paper presents iridium-specific materials that could be applied in solutions of secondary PGMs sources containing rhodium and iridium as well as in feed solutions from ore processing. Keywords: Silica gel, Quaternary diammonium centres, Rhodium, Iridium, Separation

  12. Effet de la concentration du cuivre ou de l'argent sur les propriétés des agrégats de rhodium déposés sur silice amorphe dans l'hydrogénation du 1,3 butadiène

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksibi, Z.; Ghorbel1, A.; Bellamy, B.

    1999-02-01

    Some samples with rhodium, rhodium-copper and rhodium-silver deposited on amorphous silica by vapor deposition of the metallic phase under high-vacuum (P argent déposés sur une silice amorphe par vapodéposition d'une phase métallique dans des conditions ultra-vide (P argent sur les propriétés catalytiques du rhodium dans l'hydrogénation du 1,3 butadiène ont été étudiés. Les résultats montrent que la réaction étudiée est sensible à la taille des agrégats de rhodium et nous notons une différence importante entre l'effet du cuivre et de l'argent sur les propriétés du rhodium. En effet le cuivre forme un alliage avec le rhodium et provoque un effet poison d?où une modification de l'activité du métal noble, alors que l'argent exerce un effet de masque sur les particules de rhodium sans toutefois former d'alliage avec ce dernier.

  13. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Stage IE- IIE, Non-Bulky Primary Gastric Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma with Post-Chemotherapy Complete Remission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwen Li

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of consolidation radiation in patients with stage IE-IIE, non-bulky primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL.A cohort consisted of 71 consecutive patients with stage IE-IIE, non-bulky primary gastric DLBCL was retrospectively analyzed. All of them had been in complete remission after receiving at least four cycles of chemotherapy, containing rituximab or not. Consolidation radiation was delivered thereafter in 28 patients while other 43 received clinical observation only. Locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS, disease-free survival (DFS, overall survival (OS and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS were compared between patients with or without radiotherapy.The 10-year LRFS, DFS, OS and DMFS were 100% and 81.4% (p = 0.028, 91.7% and 77.1% (p = 0.14, 91.7% and 77.8% (p = 0.67, 91.7% and 78.0% (p = 0.42 for patients with or without radiotherapy.Radiotherapy is associated with improved locoregional control of patients with early stage primary gastric DLBCL, who have achieved complete remission following at least four cycles of chemotherapy.

  14. Metallic conductivity and air stability in copper chloride intercalated carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, H.; Woollam, J. A.; Yavrouian, A.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon-copper chloride intercalation compounds have been obtained by using variously graphitized carbon fibers as host materials. The resultant conductors are air stable, thermally stable to 450 K, have electrical resistivities as low as 12.9 microohm cm at room temperature, and have metallic conductivity temperature dependencies. These intercalated fibers have tensile strengths of 160000 psi, and Young's moduli of 25 x 10 to the 6th psi. For aerospace use, 1/(resistivity x density) is a figure of merit. On this basis, a reduction in resistivity by a factor of two will make this conductor competitive with copper.

  15. Plasma synthesis of lithium based intercalation powders for solid polymer electrolyte batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C [Idaho Falls, ID; Pink, Robert J [Pocatello, ID; Nelson, Lee O [Idaho Falls, ID

    2005-01-04

    The invention relates to a process for preparing lithium intercalation compounds by plasma reaction comprising the steps of: forming a feed solution by mixing lithium nitrate or lithium hydroxide or lithium oxide and the required metal nitrate or metal hydroxide or metal oxide and between 10-50% alcohol by weight; mixing the feed solution with O.sub.2 gas wherein the O.sub.2 gas atomizes the feed solution into fine reactant droplets, inserting the atomized feed solution into a plasma reactor to form an intercalation powder; and if desired, heating the resulting powder to from a very pure single phase product.

  16. Hydroxy double salts loaded with bioactive ions: Synthesis, intercalation mechanisms, and functional performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaassis, Abdessamad Y.A. [UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AX (United Kingdom); Xu, Si-Min; Guan, Shanyue; Evans, David G. [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wei, Min, E-mail: weimin@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Williams, Gareth R., E-mail: g.williams@ucl.ac.uk [UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AX (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    The intercalation of the anions of diclofenac (Dic), naproxen (Nap), and valproic acid (Val) into three hydroxy double salts (HDSs) has been explored in this work. Experiments were performed with [Co{sub 1.2}Zn{sub 3.8}(OH){sub 8}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O (CoZn-NO{sub 3}), [Ni{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}(OH){sub 8}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O (NiZn-NO{sub 3}) and [Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O (Zn-NO{sub 3}). It proved possible to intercalate diclofenac and naproxen into all three HDSs. In contrast, Val could be intercalated into CoZn-NO{sub 3} but when it was reacted with Zn-NO{sub 3} the HDS structure was destroyed, and the product comprised ZnO. Successful intercalation was verified by X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, and elemental microanalysis. Molecular dynamics simulations showed the Dic and Nap ions to arrange themselves in an “X” shape in the interlayer space, forming a bilayer. Val was found to adopt a position with its aliphatic groups parallel to the HDS layer, again in a bilayer. In situ time resolved X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that intercalation of Dic and Nap into CoZn-NO{sub 3} and Zn-NO{sub 3} is mechanistically complex, with a number of intermediate phases observed. In contrast, the intercalation of all three guests into NiZn-NO{sub 3} and of Val into CoZn-NO{sub 3} are simple one step reactions proceeding directly from the starting material to the product. The HDS-drug composites were found to have sustained release profiles. - Graphical abstract: Seven new drug intercalates of hydroxy double salts (HDSs) have been prepared and characterised. The intercalation mechanisms have been explored, and the drug release properties of the HDS/drug composites quantified. Display Omitted.

  17. Ferric chloride-graphite intercalation compounds as anode materials for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Zhu, Yongchun; Guo, Cong; Zhu, Xiaobo; Liang, Jianwen; Qian, Yitai

    2014-01-01

    Ferric chloride-graphite intercalation compounds (FeCl3 -GICs) with stage 1 and stage 2 structures were synthesized by reacting FeCl3 and expanded graphite (EG) in air in a stainless-steel autoclave. As rechargeable Li-ion batteries, these FeCl3 -GICs exhibit high capacity, excellent cycling stability, and superior rate capability, which could be attributed to their unique intercalation features. This work may enable new possibilities for the fabrication of Li-ion batteries. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Li-intercalation into the Bi-based oxychlorides with the layered structures; Bi wo fukumu sojo enka sankabutsu eno Li intercalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, M.; Abe, Y.; Koike, Y. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2000-10-15

    We have succeeded in preparing Li-intercalated Bi-based oxychlorides with the layered structures Li{sub x}BiOCl and Li{sub x}BiPbO{sub 2}Cl (0 {<=} x {<=} 1) by means of the chemical technique using a solution of n-buthyllithium in hexane and the electrochemical one. In the case of the chemical technique for both BiOCl and BiPbO{sub 2}Cl, the host samples have turned black gradually and the electrical resistivity has decreased with increasing treatment-time. However, the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity has still remained semiconductive. From the powder x-ray diffraction and ICP analyses, the products have been found to be of the single phase within the Li-content of 0 {<=} x {<=} 1. The time required for the Li-intercalation by the electrochemical technique has been a fraction of that by the chemical technique. (author)

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the reduction of a macrocyclic Rh(III) complex by chromium(II) ions: pH-controlled selectivity to rhodium(II) vs. rhodium(III) hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajna-Fuller, Ewa; Bakac, Andreja

    2011-10-28

    Aqueous chromium(II) ions reduce a macrocyclic Rh(III) complex L(1)(H(2)O)(2)Rh(3+) (L(1) = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane) to the hydride L(1)(H(2)O)RhH(2+) in two discrete, one-electron steps. The first step generates L(1)(H(2)O)Rh(2+) with kinetics that are first order in each rhodium(III) complex and Cr(H(2)O)(6)(2+), and inverse in [H(+)], k/M(-1) s(-1) = 0.065/(0.0031 + [H(+)]). Further reduction of L(1)(H(2)O)Rh(2+) to L(1)(H(2)O)RhH(2+) is kinetically independent of [H(+)], k/M(-1) s(-1) = 0.30. The difference in [H(+)] dependence allows relative rates of the two steps to be manipulated to generate either L(1)(H(2)O)Rh(2+) or L(1)(H(2)O)RhH(2+) as the final product.

  20. Intercalation synthesis of graphene-capped iron silicide atop Ni(111): Evolution of electronic structure and ferromagnetic ordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebenyuk, G.S. [Ioffe Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vilkov, O.Yu.; Rybkin, A.G. [St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gomoyunova, M.V. [Ioffe Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Senkovskiy, B.V. [St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); II. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Usachov, D.Yu. [St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vyalikh, D.V. [St. Petersburg State University, 199034 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Molodtsov, S.L. [European XFEL GmbH, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Experimental Physics, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); ITMO University, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Pronin, I.I., E-mail: Igor.Pronin@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); ITMO University, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Evolution of Graphene/Ni system due to intercalation with Fe and Si is studied. • Graphene strongly interacts with the topmost atoms of the intercalated fcc Fe film. • The in-plane ferromagnetic ordering of the film arises after intercalation of 5 ML Fe. • Fe-Si solid solution and Fe{sub 3}Si surface silicide are formed after intercalation of Si. • The capping graphene layer is weakly electronically coupled to the silicide phase. - Abstract: A new method for synthesis of graphene-protected iron silicides has been tested, which consists in formation of graphene on Ni(111) followed by two-step intercalation of the system with Fe and Si. Characterization of the samples was performed in situ by low-energy electron diffraction, angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation and magnetic linear dichroism in photoemission of Fe 3p electrons. It is shown, that at 400 °C the intercalation of graphene/Ni(111) with iron occurs in a range up to 14 ML. The graphene layer strongly interacts with the topmost Fe atoms and stabilizes the fcc structure of the film. The in-plane ferromagnetic ordering of the film has a threshold nature and arises after the intercalation of 5 ML Fe due to the thickness-driven spin reorientation transition. Subsequent intercalation of graphene/Fe/Ni(111) with Si leads to the formation of the inhomogeneous system consisted of intercalated and nonintercalated areas. The intercalated islands coalesce at 2 ML Si when a Fe-Si solid solution covered with the Fe{sub 3}Si surface silicide is formed. The Fe{sub 3}Si silicide is ferromagnetic and has an ordered (√3 × √3)R30° structure. The graphene layer is weakly electronically coupled to the silicide phase keeping its remarkable properties ready for use.

  1. Adsorption of Ruthenium, Rhodium and Palladium from Simulated High-Level Liquid Waste by Highly Functional Xerogel - 13286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Takashi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Koyama, Shin-ichi [Fukushima Fuels and Materials Department O-arai Research and Development Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Narita-cho 4002, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University Aramaki-Aza-Aoba 6-6-01-2,Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, 980-8579 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Fission products are generated by fission reactions in nuclear fuel. Platinum group (Pt-G) elements, such as palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh) and ruthenium (Ru), are also produced. Generally, Pt-G elements play important roles in chemical and electrical industries. Highly functional xerogels have been developed for recovery of these useful Pt-G elements from high - level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW). An adsorption experiment from simulated HLLW was done by the column method to study the selective adsorption of Pt-G elements, and it was found that not only Pd, Rh and Ru, but also nickel, zirconium and tellurium were adsorbed. All other elements were not adsorbed. Adsorbed Pd was recovered by washing the xerogel-packed column with thiourea solution and thiourea - nitric acid mixed solution in an elution experiment. Thiourea can be a poison for automotive exhaust emission system catalysts, so it is necessary to consider its removal. Thermal decomposition and an acid digestion treatment were conducted to remove sulfur in the recovered Pd fraction. The relative content of sulfur to Pd was decreased from 858 to 0.02 after the treatment. These results will contribute to design of the Pt-G element separation system. (authors)

  2. Preparation, Characterization and NO-CO Redox Reaction Studies over Palladium and Rhodium Oxides Supported on Manganese Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Fal Desai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of PdO/MnO2 and Rh2O3/MnO2 is investigated for NO-CO redox reaction. Supported catalysts are prepared by wet impregnation method. Among the tested catalysts, PdO/MnO2 shows higher activity for this reaction. Active metal dispersion on MnO2 enhances the selectivity for N2 over N2O in this reaction. The XRD substantiate the formation of MnO2 monophasic phase. SEM images show the formation of elongated particles. TEM images indicate nano-size rod-like morphologies. An increase in the catalytic activity is observed on supported Pd and Rh oxides on MnO2. Temperature programed desorption studies with NO and CO are undertaken to investigate the catalytic surface studies. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 22nd November 2014; Revised: 31st December 2014; Accepted: 2nd January 2015How to Cite: Fal Desai, M.S., Kunkalekar, R.K., Salker, A.V. (2015. Preparation, Characterization and NO-CO Redox Reaction Studies over Palladium and Rhodium Oxides Supported on Manganese Dioxide. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (1: 98-103. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7802.98-103Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7802.98-103 

  3. In vitro study of radiosensitizer effect of rhodium complexes; Estudo in vitro do efeito radiossensibilizador de complexos de rodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogero, Sizue O. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Negron, Ana Cecilia V.; Najjar, Renato [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Depto. de Quimica Fundamental]. E-mail: anita@iq.usp.br

    2000-07-01

    Radiosensitizers are chemical agents which enhance the radiation sensitivity of hypoxic tumor cells aiming to better radiotherapy efficacy in the treatment of cancer. The rhodium complexes tested in this work were the carboxylates Rh{sub 2}Ac{sub 4}, Rh{sub 2}Tfa{sub 4}, Rh{sub 2}Cit{sub 4}, the amidate Rh{sub 2}Tfc{sub 4} and the metronidazole adducts Rh{sub 2}Ac{sub 4}Metro{sub 2}, Rh{sub 2}Tfc{sub 4}Metro{sub 2} and Rh{sub 2}Cit{sub 4}Metro{sub 2}. The radiosensitizing effects of these Rh(II) complexes were tested in vitro by irradiation of Chinese Hamster CHOk1 cells under hypoxic atmosphere in the presence of the complexes, using gamma rays from a {sup 60}Co source and doses of 2,7 and 4,3 Gy. A cytotoxicity test has been performed to determinate the non-toxic concentrations of these compounds, in order to rule out the possibility of cell death induced by the complex toxicity. A dose of 2,7 Gy showed no interesting effects but under a 4,7 Gy dose the complex Rh{sub 2}Ac{sub 4} showed a higher radiosensitizing effect than the other compounds and close to previously reported effects which required high radiation doses. (author)

  4. Engineering Functions into Platinum and Platinum-Rhodium Nanoparticles in a One-Step Microwave Irradiation Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyva, Maria; Wragg, David S; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Sjåstad, Anja O

    2017-04-01

    Platinum (Pt) and platinum-rhodium (PtRh) nanoparticles (NPs) are active catalysts for a range of important industrial reactions, and their response has been shown to be affected by size, morphology, composition, and architectural configuration. We report herein the engineering of these functionalities into NPs by suitably modifying our single-step fabrication process by using microwave irradiation dielectric heating. NPs with different morphologies are acquired by manipulating the reaction kinetics with the concentration of the capping agent while keeping the reaction time constant. Pt@Rh core@shell octopod-cube, Pt-truncated-cube, and cube and small-sphere NPs having "near-monodisperse" distributions and average sizes in the range of 4 to 18 nm are obtained. By increasing the microwave time the composition of Pt@Rh can be tuned, and NPs with a Rh-rich shell and a tunable Pt100-x Rh x (x≤41 at %) core are fabricated. Finally, alloy bimetallic PtRh NPs with controlled composition are designed by simultaneous tuning of the relative molar ratio of the metal precursors and the microwave irradiation time.

  5. [A bimetal anode with tungsten or rhodium? Comparative studies on image quality and dosage requirement in mammography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, M; Hermann, K P; Breiter, N; Moritz, J; Müller, D; Grabbe, E

    1995-11-01

    The impact of different anode materials (tungsten and rhodium) on spatial resolution, image contrast and radiation exposure was studied. Two mammographic systems providing bimetal x-ray tubes (Mo/W and Mo/Rh) were compared by imaging a breast radiography phantom with additional acrylic plates from 3 to 8 cm thickness. Spatial resolution was evaluated using a line bar pattern. Image contrast was assessed by measuring the ratio of optical densities in a acrylic step-wedge. The entrance dose was measured with a low energy ionisation chamber. The spatial resolution was about 13 lp/mm regardless of the beam quality. The image contrast depended substantially on the thickness. A similar image contrast was found with Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and Rh/Rh for simulated breast thicknesses of 4 to 6 cm and with Rh/Rh and W/Rh for 7 cm. In comparison to Mo/Mo the dose reduction was significant for Mo/Rh (35%), Rh/Rh (50%) and W/Rh (60%). Bimetal x-ray tubes provide optimal conditions for screen film mammography of both normal and dense breasts, allowing good contrast and dose reduction by using the adequate anode/filter-combination.

  6. Hydroformylation of propene and 1-hexene catalysed by a alpha-zirconium phosphate supported rhodium-phosphine complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Magnus; Andersson, C; Hjortkjær, Jes

    2001-01-01

    The reaction of the amphiphilic ligand {4-[bis(diethylaminoethyl)aminomethyl]diphenyl}phosphine with alpha -zirconium phosphate, of intermediate surface area (24m(2) g(-1)), provided a phosphine functionalised support in which electrostatic interaction between ammonium groups on the ligand and de......-protonated surface hydroxyl groups on the support provided the binding force. The X-ray powder diffractogram of the material showed that the binding lowers the crystallinity of the carrier and that the ligand is not intercalated but bound at the outer surface and at the entrances to the interlamellar space. Reaction...

  7. Characterization of Intercalating State of YOYO-1 in λDNA Using SNOM/AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, H.; Homma, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Wang, Jia; Sakata-Sogawa, K.; Shimamoto, N.

    λDNA Molecules, in which YOYO-1 was intercalated, were imaged and characterized using a scanning near-field optical / atomic-force microscope. In the microscope system, a scanning unit is mounted on an inverse microscope where the bent optical fiber probe is used to operate in the dynamic mode AFM. Solution of λDNA, 5 μM (base concentration) with 5 μM and 500 nM YOYO-1, were prepared and cast on a γ-APTES treated-cover slips. λDNA immobilized on the cover slips aggregated in line. For λDNA with 5 μM YOYO-1, there is variation in the fluorescence intensity of the DNA and ratios of the fluorescence intensity showed almost integers in each region. As the fluorescence intensity correlated with the area of cross section in the DNA topography, it was suggested that YOYO-1 intercalated in the DNA homogeneously. Contrary, the fluorescence intensity of λDNA with 500 nM YOYO-1 was heterogeneous and did not correlate with the area of topographic cross section. This suggested that YOYO-1 was not intercalated to 71 λDNA uniformly in the concentration and intercalated partially and cooperatively.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of organic intercalated layered double hydroxides and their application in bitumen modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Song [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yu, Jianying, E-mail: jyyu@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Sun, Yubin [Center for Materials Research and Analysis, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wu, Shaopeng [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Organic layered double hydroxides (LDHs) intercalated by sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) were prepared by anion-exchange method and applied to modify bitumen aiming at improving ageing resistance of bitumen. The organic LDHs (SDBS–LDHs) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Ultraviolet and visible (UV–vis) spectrophotometry. The effect of SDBS–LDHs and LDHs on physical and anti-ageing properties of bitumen was evaluated by means of conventional and rheological test. The results of XRD, FTIR and SEM show that SDBS is successfully intercalated into interlayer of LDHs, and the UV–vis reflectance and absorbance curves illustrate that intercalation of SDBS enhances the UV shielding effect of LDHs. The addition of SDBS–LDHs or LDHs has little influence on physical properties of bitumen because SDBS–LDHs and LDHs are physically mixed in bitumen. Compared with pristine bitumen after TFOT and UV irradiation ageing, the introduction of SDBS–LDHs and LDHs significantly improves thermal- and photo-oxidative ageing resistance of bitumen. Notably, bitumen with SDBS–LDHs exhibits better anti-ageing performance than that with LDHs, implying more effective modification of SDBS-LDHs which is due to the enhanced UV protective ability and compatibility with bitumen of SDBS–LDHs. - Highlights: • XRD, FTIR and SEM were used to confirm the successful intercalation. • SDBS–LDHs show superior UV protective ability. • SDBS–LDHs improved the anti-ageing properties of bitumen.

  9. Influence of water contamination and conductive additives on the intercalation of lithium into graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joho, F.; Rykart, B.; Novak, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Spahr, M.E.; Monnier, A. [Timcal AG, Sins (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The irreversible charge loss in the first cycle of lithium intercalation into graphite electrodes for lithium-ion batteries is discussed as a function of water contamination of the electrolyte solution. Furthermore, the improvement of the electrode cycle life due to conductive additives to graphite is demonstrated. (author) 5 figs., 3 refs.

  10. Concerted intercalation and minor groove recognition of DNA by a homodimeric thiazole orange dye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Gadjev, N I; Deligeorgiev, T

    2000-01-01

    The thiazole orange dye TOTO binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by a sequence selective bis-intercalation. Each chromophore is sandwiched between two base pairs in a (5'-CpT-3'):(5'-ApG-3') site, and the linker spans two base pairs in the minor groove. We have used one- and two-dimensional NMR...

  11. A mandatory intercalated degree programme: revitalising and enhancing academic and evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John P; Farish, Stephen; McCalman, Janet S; McColl, Geoffrey J

    2010-01-01

    Recruitment of medical graduates to research careers is declining. Expansion of medical knowledge necessitates all graduates be equipped to critically evaluate new information. To address these challenges, a mandatory intercalated degree programme was introduced as part of curriculum reform. To review the place on intercalated degrees, the methods available for learning about research and to analyse experience with a new university programme focusing on research. A literature review followed by the analysis of experience with eight cohorts of students who had completed the new programme. A total of 1599 students completed the programme. Laboratory-based research was the most common choice followed by clinical research, population health, epidemiology, medical humanities and mental health. Also, 93% of students spent over 75% of their time undertaking research. Sixty-three students published their research, half as first authors. Students and coordinators support the programme. Learning about research during the postgraduate phase is variable and frequently left to individual choice. Intercalating an additional degree focusing on research can achieve a number of learning objectives but demands a level of maturity, autonomy and preparedness, not uniformly present in students undertaking a mandatory intercalated programme. A more realistic goal is the development of 'research-mindedness' amongst all students.

  12. Structure, molecular simulation, and release of aspirin from intercalated Zn-Al-layered double hydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zilin; Li, Xiaowei; Lv, Fengzhu; Zhang, Qian; Chu, Paul K; Zhang, Yihe

    2015-11-01

    Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid (AA), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is intercalated into Zn-Al-layered double hydroxides (ZnAl-LDHs) by co-precipitation and reconstruction methods. The composition, structure, and morphology of the intercalated products as well as their release behavior are determined experimentally and theoretically by Material Studio 5.5. Experimental results disclose the strong interaction between the LDHs sheets and AA in the intercalated ZnAl-LDHs produced by co-precipitation and slow release of AA from the intercalated ZnAl-LDHs in both phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and borate buffered saline (BBS) solutions. The percentage of AA released from the ZnAl-LDHs prepared by both methods in PBS (96.87% and 98.12%) are much more than those in BBS (68.59% and 81.22%) implying that both H4BO4(-) and H2PO4(-) can exchange with AA in the ZnAl-LDHs. After AA is released to PBS, ZnAl-LDHs break into small pieces. The experimental results are explained theoretically based on the calculation of the bonding energy between the anions and LDHs sheets as well as the AlO bond length change in the LDHs sheets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Highly Efficient Iodine Capture by Layered Double Hydroxides Intercalated with Polysulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Shulan; Islam, Saiful M.; Shim, Yurina; Gu, Qingyang; Wang, Pengli; Li, Hao; Sun, Genban; Yang, Xiaojing; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2014-12-23

    We demonstrate strong iodine (I-2) vapor adsorption using Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (MgAl-LDH) nanocomposites intercalated with polysulfide (S-x(2-)) groups (S-x-LDH, x = 2, 4, 6). The as-prepared LDH/polysulfide hybrid materials display highly efficient iodine capture resulting from the reducing property of the intercalated polysulfides. During adsorption, the I-2 molecules are reduced to I-3(-) anions by the intercalated [S-x](2-) groups that simultaneously are oxidized to form S8. In addition to the chemical adsorption, additional molecular I-2 is physically captured by the LDH composites. As a result of these parallel processes, and despite their very low BET surface areas, the iodine capture capacities of S-2-LDH, S-4-LDH, and S-6-LDH are similar to 1.32, 1.52, and 1.43 g/g, respectively, with a maximum adsorption of 152% (wt %). Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and temperature-variable powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements show the resulting I-3(-) ions that intercalated into the LDH gallery have high thermal stability (>= 350 degrees C). The excellent iodine adsorption performance combined with the facile preparation points to the S-x-LDH systems as potential superior materials for adsorption of radioactive iodine, a waste product of the nuclear power industry.

  14. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicot, M.; Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775 K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77 K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  15. Towards Novel Multifunctional Pillared Nanostructures : Effective Intercalation of Adamantylamine in Graphene Oxide and Smectite Clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spyrou, Konstantinos; Potsi, Georgia; Diamanti, Evmorfia K.; Ke, Xiaoxing; Serestatidou, Eleni; Verginadis, Ioannis I.; Velalopoulou, Anastasia P.; Evangelou, Angelos M.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Multifunctional pillared materials are synthesized by the intercalation of cage-shaped adamantylamine (ADMA) molecules into the interlayer space of graphite oxide (GO) and aluminosilicate clays. The physicochemical and structural properties of these hybrids, determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD),

  16. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Hamad, E; Goze-Bac, C; Aznar, R [nanoNMRI group, UMR5587, Universite Montpellier II, Place E Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Nitze, F; Waagberg, T [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, 90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Schmid, M; Mehring, M, E-mail: Thomas.wagberg@physics.umu.se [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the {sup 13}C and {sup 133}Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The 'metallization' of Cs{sub x}C materials where x=0-0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(E{sub F}) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin-lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called {alpha} and {beta} and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 ({alpha}-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05{<=}x{<=}0.143 at high intercalation levels ({beta}-phase). The new {beta}-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp{sup 2}) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(E{sub F}), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  17. Li intercalation in graphite: a van der Waals density functional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazrati, E.; de Wijs, G.A.; Brocks, G.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling layered intercalation compounds from first principles poses a problem, as many of their properties are determined by a subtle balance between van der Waals interactions and chemical or Madelung terms, and a good description of van der Waals interactions is often lacking. Using van der Waals

  18. Intercalation and structural aspects of macroRAFT agents into MgAl layered double hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinova, Dessislava; Cenacchi Pereira, Ana; Lansalot, Muriel; D’Agosto, Franck; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie; Leroux, Fabrice; Taviot-Guého, Christine; Cadars, Sylvian

    2016-01-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the design of layered double hydroxide (LDH)-based hybrid materials. In this work, we demonstrate the intercalation by anion exchange process of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and three different hydrophilic random copolymers of acrylic acid (AA) and n-butyl acrylate (BA) with molar masses ranging from 2000 to 4200 g mol−1 synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, into LDH containing magnesium(II) and aluminium(III) intralayer cations and nitrates as counterions (MgAl-NO3 LDH). At basic pH, the copolymer chains (macroRAFT agents) carry negative charges which allowed the establishment of electrostatic interactions with the LDH interlayer and their intercalation. The resulting hybrid macroRAFT/LDH materials displayed an expanded interlamellar domain compared to pristine MgAl-NO3 LDH from 1.36 nm to 2.33 nm. Depending on the nature of the units involved into the macroRAFT copolymer (only AA or AA and BA), the intercalation led to monolayer or bilayer arrangements within the interlayer space. The macroRAFT intercalation and the molecular structure of the hybrid phases were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and solid-state 13C, 1H and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies to get a better description of the local structure. PMID:28144548

  19. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  20. Enhancement of electron-phonon coupling in Cs-overlayered intercalated bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeman, J; Sugawara, K; Sato, T; Takahashi, T

    2016-05-25

    We have performed high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on cesium (Cs) intercalated bilayer graphene with a Cs overlayer (Cs-C8CsC8). Low-energy electron diffraction shows a (2  ×  2) pattern consistent with intercalation of a Cs layer similar to bulk C8Cs, in addition to the signature of a nearly commensurate superstructure created by the Cs overlayer. ARPES results reveal folding of the π bands due to the periodic (2  ×  2) potential of the intercalated Cs atoms, together with a free-electron-like state at the [Formula: see text] point. Significant mass renormalization is observed in the band dispersion near the Fermi level, indicative of strong electron-phonon coupling. Based on analysis of the self-energy, we find anisotropic electron-phonon coupling with an estimated strength of [Formula: see text]  ±  0.02 in the K-[Formula: see text] direction, and [Formula: see text] in the K-M direction. This coupling is much larger than that of other doped graphenes, and comparable to superconducting bulk GICs. We attribute this large electron-phonon coupling constant to the presence of the Cs overlayer, which highly dopes [Formula: see text] bands, and creates a structure similar to stage-I graphite intercalation compounds.

  1. Europium underneath graphene on Ir(111): Intercalation mechanism, magnetism, and band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Stefan; Huttmann, Felix; Petrović, Marin; Witt, Christian; Förster, Daniel F.; Vo-Van, Chi; Coraux, Johann; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Sessi, Violetta; Vergara, Ignacio; Rückamp, Reinhard; Grüninger, Markus; Schleheck, Nicolas; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Frank; Ohresser, Philippe; Kralj, Marko; Wehling, Tim O.; Michely, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The intercalation of Eu underneath Gr on Ir(111) is comprehensively investigated by microscopic, magnetic, and spectroscopic measurements, as well as by density functional theory. Depending on the coverage, the intercalated Eu atoms form either a (2 ×2 ) or a (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ superstructure with respect to Gr. We investigate the mechanisms of Eu penetration through a nominally closed Gr sheet and measure the electronic structures and magnetic properties of the two intercalation systems. Their electronic structures are rather similar. Compared to Gr on Ir(111), the Gr bands in both systems are essentially rigidly shifted to larger binding energies resulting in n doping. The hybridization of the Ir surface state S1 with Gr states is lifted, and the moiré superperiodic potential is strongly reduced. In contrast, the magnetic behavior of the two intercalation systems differs substantially, as found by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The (2 ×2 ) Eu structure displays plain paramagnetic behavior, whereas for the (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ structure the large zero-field susceptibility indicates ferromagnetic coupling, despite the absence of hysteresis at 10 K. For the latter structure, a considerable easy-plane magnetic anisotropy is observed and interpreted as shape anisotropy.

  2. Combination probes with intercalating anchors and proximal fluorophores for DNA and RNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jieqiong; Wilson, Adam; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-09-30

    A new class of modified oligonucleotides (combination probes) has been designed and synthesised for use in genetic analysis and RNA detection. Their chemical structure combines an intercalating anchor with a reporter fluorophore on the same thymine nucleobase. The intercalator (thiazole orange or benzothiazole orange) provides an anchor, which upon hybridisation of the probe to its target becomes fluorescent and simultaneously stabilizes the duplex. The anchor is able to communicate via FRET to a proximal reporter dye (e.g. ROX, HEX, ATTO647N, FAM) whose fluorescence signal can be monitored on a range of analytical devices. Direct excitation of the reporter dye provides an alternative signalling mechanism. In both signalling modes, fluorescence in the unhybridised probe is switched off by collisional quenching between adjacent intercalator and reporter dyes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and RNA targets are identified by differences in the duplex melting temperature, and the use of short hybridization probes, made possible by the stabilisation provided by the intercalator, enhances mismatch discrimination. Unlike other fluorogenic probe systems, placing the fluorophore and quencher on the same nucleobase facilitates the design of short probes containing multiple modifications. The ability to detect both DNA and RNA sequences suggests applications in cellular imaging and diagnostics. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Analysis and prediction of stacking sequences in intercalated lamellar vanadium phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, Romain [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226 CNRS - Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Rennes (France); Centre Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes (France); Fourre, Yoann; Furet, Eric; Gautier, Regis; Le Fur, Eric [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226 CNRS - Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Rennes (France)

    2015-04-15

    An approach is presented that enables the analysis and prediction of stacking sequences in intercalated lamellar vanadium phosphates. A comparison of previously reported vanadium phosphates reveals two modes of intercalation: (i) 3d transition metal ions intercalated between VOPO{sub 4} layers and (ii) alkali/alkaline earth metal ions between VOPO{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O layers. Both intercalations were investigated using DFT calculations in order to understand the relative shifts of the vanadium phosphate layers. These calculations in addition to an analysis of the stacking sequences in previously reported materials enable the prediction of the crystal structures of M{sub x}(VOPO{sub 4}).yH{sub 2}O (M = Cs{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+} and Sn{sup 2+}). Experimental realization and structural determination of Cd(VOPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O by single-crystal X-ray diffraction confirmed the predicted stacking sequences. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Preparation of Fe-intercalated Graphite Based on Coal Tailings, Dimensional Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Gustian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intercalated graphite from coal tailings have been modified through the intercalation of iron. Coal tailings which is a byproduct of the destruction process and flakes washing results from mining coal. Intercalation of iron goal is to improve the physical properties of graphite and modifying sizes of crystal lattice structure with thermal method. Modification process begins with the carbonization of coal tailings at 500ºC and activated with phosphoric acid. Activation process has done by pyrolysis at 700ºC. The results of pyrolysis was soaked in mineral oil for 24 hours, then pyrolysis again with variations in temperature 800°C and 900ºC for 1 hour and subsequent intercalation iron at 1% and 2%. Material before activated, after activated, and the results of pyrolysis still indicates order nano: 29, 25 and 36 nm respectively. X-ray diffraction characterization results indicate that change in the structure, the sizes crystal lattice structure of the material The greater the concentration of iron was added, the resulting peak at 2θ = 33 and 35 also will be more sharply. The results of SEM showed different morphologies from each treatment.

  5. Intercalation and structural aspects of macroRAFT agents into MgAl layered double hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessislava Kostadinova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention has been devoted to the design of layered double hydroxide (LDH-based hybrid materials. In this work, we demonstrate the intercalation by anion exchange process of poly(acrylic acid (PAA and three different hydrophilic random copolymers of acrylic acid (AA and n-butyl acrylate (BA with molar masses ranging from 2000 to 4200 g mol−1 synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization, into LDH containing magnesium(II and aluminium(III intralayer cations and nitrates as counterions (MgAl-NO3 LDH. At basic pH, the copolymer chains (macroRAFT agents carry negative charges which allowed the establishment of electrostatic interactions with the LDH interlayer and their intercalation. The resulting hybrid macroRAFT/LDH materials displayed an expanded interlamellar domain compared to pristine MgAl-NO3 LDH from 1.36 nm to 2.33 nm. Depending on the nature of the units involved into the macroRAFT copolymer (only AA or AA and BA, the intercalation led to monolayer or bilayer arrangements within the interlayer space. The macroRAFT intercalation and the molecular structure of the hybrid phases were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and solid-state 13C, 1H and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopies to get a better description of the local structure.

  6. ORGANIC-INORGANIC HYBRIDS PREPARED FROM ALKYL PHOSPHONIUM SALTS INTERCALATED MONTMORILLONITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAHELI GANGULY

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Present investigation is focused on systematic and detailed characterization of alkyl phosphonium intercalated montmorillonite (MMT. The objective of the work is to provide a better understanding of the specific changes in properties of the hybrid material with changes in structure of incoming organic cations. In the present work, Na-MMT was intercalated with phosphonium salts of two different cationic head compositions namely alkyl triphenyl and alkyl tributyl groups. Length of alkyl chain was also varied. Resultant organic-inorganic hybrids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Thermogravimetry (TG and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Effective volume occupied by the cationic heads influenced interlayer arrangements. Intercalated MMT with two different cationic heads behaved differently in relation to thermal decomposition patterns. Possible explanation was given based on hybridization of bonds. Van der Waals attachment of alkyl chains influenced the interlayer stacking and organic loading. Attempts were made to correlate the changes in properties of intercalated MMT with the structural aspects of incoming organic cations.

  7. Electronic properties and orbital-filling mechanism in Rb-intercalated copper phthalocyanine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evangelista, F.; Gotter, R.; Mahne, N.; Nannarone, S.; Ruocco, A.; Rudolf, P.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of the electronic properties of a thin film of copper phthalocyanine deposited on Al(100) and progressively intercalated with rubidium atoms was followed by photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. Electron donation from the Rb atoms to the C32H16N8Cu molecules results in the

  8. Effect of friction on oxidative graphite intercalation and high-quality graphene formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Steffen; Halbig, Christian E; Grote, Fabian; Rietsch, Philipp; Börrnert, Felix; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Bernd; Eigler, Siegfried

    2018-02-26

    Oxidative wet-chemical delamination of graphene from graphite is expected to become a scalable production method. However, the formation process of the intermediate stage-1 graphite sulfate by sulfuric acid intercalation and its subsequent oxidation are poorly understood and lattice defect formation must be avoided. Here, we demonstrate film formation of micrometer-sized graphene flakes with lattice defects down to 0.02% and visualize the carbon lattice by transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution. Interestingly, we find that only well-ordered, highly crystalline graphite delaminates into oxo-functionalized graphene, whereas other graphite grades do not form a proper stage-1 intercalate and revert back to graphite upon hydrolysis. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that ideal stacking and electronic oxidation of the graphite layers significantly reduce the friction of the moving sulfuric acid molecules, thereby facilitating intercalation. Furthermore, the evaluation of the stability of oxo-species in graphite sulfate supports an oxidation mechanism that obviates intercalation of the oxidant.

  9. Electron beam induced electronic transport in alkyl amine-intercalated VOx nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dwyer, C.; Lavayen, V.; Clavijo Cedeno, C.E.; Sotomayor Torres, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The electron beam induced electronic transport in primary alkyl amine-intercalated V2O5 nanotubes is investigated where the organic amine molecules are employed as molecular conductive wires to an aminosilanized substrate surface and contacted to Au interdigitated electrode contacts. The results

  10. Renal intercalated cells are rather energized by a proton than a sodium pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambrey, Régine; Kurth, Ingo; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Houillier, Pascal; Purkerson, Jeffrey M; Leviel, Françoise; Hentschke, Moritz; Zdebik, Anselm A; Schwartz, George J; Hübner, Christian A; Eladari, Dominique

    2013-05-07

    The Na(+) concentration of the intracellular milieu is very low compared with the extracellular medium. Transport of Na(+) along this gradient is used to fuel secondary transport of many solutes, and thus plays a major role for most cell functions including the control of cell volume and resting membrane potential. Because of a continuous leak, Na(+) has to be permanently removed from the intracellular milieu, a process that is thought to be exclusively mediated by the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in animal cells. Here, we show that intercalated cells of the mouse kidney are an exception to this general rule. By an approach combining two-photon imaging of isolated renal tubules, physiological studies, and genetically engineered animals, we demonstrate that inhibition of the H(+) vacuolar-type ATPase (V-ATPase) caused drastic cell swelling and depolarization, and also inhibited the NaCl absorption pathway that we recently discovered in intercalated cells. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase had no effects. Basolateral NaCl exit from β-intercalated cells was independent of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase but critically relied on the presence of the basolateral ion transporter anion exchanger 4. We conclude that not all animal cells critically rely on the sodium pump as the unique bioenergizer, but can be replaced by the H(+) V-ATPase in renal intercalated cells. This concept is likely to apply to other animal cell types characterized by plasma membrane expression of the H(+) V-ATPase.

  11. Clinical Analysis of stereotactic body radiation therapy using extracranial gamma knife for patients with mainly bulky inoperable early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hanjun

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the clinical efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT using extracranial gamma knife in patients with mainly bulky inoperable early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Materials and methods A total of 43 medically inoperable patients with mainly bulky Stage I/II NSCLC received SBRT using gamma knife were reviewed. The fraction dose and the total dose were determined by the radiation oncologist according to patients' general status, tumor location, tumor size and the relationship between tumor and nearby organ at risk (OAR. The total dose of 34~47.5 Gy was prescribed in 4~12 fractions, 3.5~10 Gy per fraction, one fraction per day or every other day. The therapeutic efficacy and toxicity were evaluated. Results The median follow-up was 22 months (range, 3-102 months. The local tumor response rate was 95.35%, with CR 18.60% (8/43 and PR 76.74% (33/43, respectively. The local control rates at 1, 2, 3, 5 years were 77.54%, 53.02%, 39.77%, and 15.46%, respectively, while the 1- and 2-year local control rates were 75% and 60% for tumor ≤3 cm; 84% and 71% for tumor sized 3~5 cm; 55% and 14.6% for tumor sized 5~7 cm; and 45%, 21% in those with tumor size of >7 cm. The overall survival rate at 1, 2, 3, 5 years were 92.04%, 78.04%, 62.76%, 42.61%, respectively. The toxicity of stereotactic radiation therapy was grade 1-2. Clinical stages were significantly important factor in local control of lung tumors (P = 0.000. Both clinical stages (P = 0.015 and chemotherapy (P = 0.042 were significantly important factors in overall survival of lung tumors. Conclusion SBRT is an effective and safe therapy for medically inoperable patients with early stage NSCLC. Clinical stage was the significant prognostic factors for both local tumor control and overall survival. The toxicity is mild. The overall local control for bulky tumors is poor. Tumor size is a poor prognostic factor, and the patients for

  12. Distribution of cardiac sodium channels in clusters potentiates ephaptic interactions in the intercalated disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hichri, Echrak; Abriel, Hugues; Kucera, Jan P

    2017-12-06

    It has been proposed that ephaptic conduction, relying on interactions between the sodium (Na+ ) current and the extracellular potential in intercalated discs, might contribute to cardiac conduction when gap junctional coupling is reduced, but this mechanism is still controversial. In intercalated discs, Na+ channels form clusters near gap junction plaques, but the functional significance of these clusters has never been evaluated. In HEK cells expressing cardiac Na+ channels, we show that restricting the extracellular space modulates the Na+ current, as predicted by corresponding simulations accounting for ephaptic effects. In a high-resolution model of the intercalated disc, clusters of Na+ channels that face each other across the intercellular cleft facilitate ephaptic impulse transmission when gap junctional coupling is reduced. Thus, our simulations reveal a functional role for the clustering of Na+ channels in intercalated discs, and suggest that rearrangement of these clusters in disease may influence cardiac conduction. It has been proposed that ephaptic interactions in intercalated discs, mediated by extracellular potentials, contribute to cardiac impulse propagation when gap junctional coupling is reduced. However, experiments demonstrating ephaptic effects on the cardiac Na+ current (INa ) are scarce. Furthermore, Na+ channels form clusters around gap junction plaques, but the electrophysiological significance of these clusters has never been investigated. In patch clamp experiments with HEK cells stably expressing human Nav 1.5 channels, we examined how restricting the extracellular space modulates INa elicited by an activation protocol. In parallel, we developed a high-resolution computer model of the intercalated disc to investigate how the distribution of Na+ channels influences ephaptic interactions. Approaching the HEK cells to a non-conducting obstacle always increased peak INa at step potentials near the threshold of INa activation and decreased

  13. Direct intercalation of cisplatin into zirconium phosphate nanoplatelets for potential cancer nanotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Agustín; González, Millie L.; Pérez, Riviam J.; David, Amanda; Mukherjee, Atashi; Báez, Adriana; Clearfield, Abraham; Colón, Jorge L.

    2013-11-01

    We report the use of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets for the encapsulation of the anticancer drug cisplatin and its delivery to tumor cells. Cisplatin was intercalated into ZrP by direct ion exchange and was tested in vitro for cytotoxicity in the human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line. The structural characterization of the intercalated cisplatin in ZrP suggests that during the intercalation process, the chloride ligands of the cisplatin complex were substituted by phosphate groups within the layers. Consequently, a new phosphate phase with the platinum complex directly bound to ZrP (cisPt@ZrP) is produced with an interlayer distance of 9.3 Å. The in vitro release profile of the intercalated drug upon a pH stimulus shows that at low pH under lysosomal conditions the platinum complex is released with simultaneous hydrolysis of the zirconium phosphate material, while at higher pH the complex is not released. Experiments with the MCF-7 cell line show that cisPt@ZrP reduced the cell viability up to 40%. The cisPt@ZrP intercalation product is envisioned as a future nanotherapy agent against cancer. Taking advantage of the shape and sizes of the ZrP particles and controlled release of the drug at low pH, it is intended to exploit the enhanced permeability and retention effect of tumors, as well as their intrinsic acidity, for the destruction of malignant cells.We report the use of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets for the encapsulation of the anticancer drug cisplatin and its delivery to tumor cells. Cisplatin was intercalated into ZrP by direct ion exchange and was tested in vitro for cytotoxicity in the human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line. The structural characterization of the intercalated cisplatin in ZrP suggests that during the intercalation process, the chloride ligands of the cisplatin complex were substituted by phosphate groups within the layers. Consequently, a new phosphate phase with the platinum complex directly bound to ZrP (cisPt@ZrP) is

  14. Mg-doped and oxygen-intercalated CuScO2 delafossites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kykyneshi, R.; Nielsen, B. C.; Tate, J.; Li, J.; Sleight, A. W.

    2004-05-01

    The effect of Mg doping and O-intercalation on the structural and transport properties of CuSc_1-xMg_xO_2+y, a p-type transparent conducting oxide (TCO), were studied in the sintered powder and thin film forms. Mg^2+ substitution on the Sc^3+ site resulted in a maximum conductivity of 0.015 S/cm at x ª 0.06 in CuSc_1-xMg_xO2 sintered pellets, with similar values for polycrystalline thin films of the same composition. Oxygen intercalation allowed substantially more carriers to be introduced, and therefore had a larger impact on the properties of CuSc_1-xMg_xO_2+y. The highest conductivity measured was 0.5 S/cm in a CuSc_0.95Mg_0.05O_2.33 pellet and 25 S/cm in a heavily intercalated thin film. The amount of oxygen entering the lattice varied with Mg doping in powders. Substitutional doping of films at the level of a few percent of Mg introduced no significant change in optical absorption, while the O-intercalation darkened both films and powders. We observed, via x-ray diffraction of powders and films, the formation of two phases during oxygen intercalation with compositions close to CuSc_1-xMg_xO2 and CuSc_1-xMg_xO_2.5, and a systematic increase of the average a-axis lattice parameter. This work is partially funded by the National Science Foundation.

  15. New insights into the intercalation chemistry of Al(OH)3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gareth R; Moorhouse, Saul J; Prior, Timothy J; Fogg, Andrew M; Rees, Nicholas H; O'Hare, Dermot

    2011-06-14

    This paper reports a number of recent developments in the intercalation chemistry of Al(OH)(3). From Rietveld refinement and solid-state NMR, it has been possible to develop a structural model for the recently reported [M(II)Al(4)(OH)(12)](NO(3))(2)·yH(2)O family of layered double hydroxides (LDHs). The M(2+) cations occupy half of the octahedral holes in the Al(OH)(3) layers, and it is thought that there is complete ordering of the metal ions while the interlayer nitrate anions are highly disordered. Filling the remainder of the octahedral holes in the layers proved impossible. While the intercalation of Li salts into Al(OH)(3) is facile, it was found that the intercalation of M(II) salts is much more capricious. Only with Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn nitrates and Zn sulfate were phase-pure LDHs produced. In other cases, there is either no reaction or a phase believed to be an LDH forms concomitantly with impurity phases. Reacting Al(OH)(3) with mixtures of M(II) salts can lead to the production of three-metal M(II)-M(II)'-Al LDHs, but it is necessary to control precisely the starting ratios of the two M(II) salts in the reaction gel because Al(OH)(3) displays selective intercalation of M nitrate (Li > Ni > Co ≈ Zn). The three-metal M(II)-M(II)'-Al LDHs exhibit facile ion exchange intercalation, which has been investigated in the first energy dispersive X-ray diffraction study of a chemical reaction system performed on Beamline I12 of the Diamond Light Source.

  16. Effect of bulky substituents on thiopyrylium polymethine aggregation in the solid state: A theoretical evaluation of the implications for all-optical switching applications

    KAUST Repository

    Gieseking, Rebecca L.

    2014-11-25

    Polymethine dyes in dilute solutions display many of the optical properties required for all-optical switching applications. However, in thin films, aggregation and polymethine-counterion interactions can substantially modify their properties and limit their utility. Here, we examine the impact of a series of bulky substituents on the solid-state molecular packing of thiopyrylium polymethines by using a theoretical approach combining molecular-dynamics simulations and quantum-chemical calculations. Importantly, it is found that the positions of the substituents near the center and/or ends of the dye determine the extent to which aggregation is reduced; in particular, substituents near the polymethine center primarily modify the type of aggregation that is observed, while substituents near the polymethine ends reduce aggregation and aid in maintaining solution-like properties in the solid state. Our theoretical study elucidates relationships between molecular structure and bulk optical properties and provides design guidelines for all-optical switching materials.

  17. H{sub 2} production from CH{sub 4} decomposition: Regeneration capability and performance of nickel and rhodium oxide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, M.E.; Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Marie Curie n 2, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Hori, C.E. [Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Av. Joao Naves de Avila 2121, Campus Santa Monica, Bloco 1K, 38400-902 Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Goldwasser, M.R. [Centro de Catalisis Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado 47102, Los Chaguaramos, Caracas (Venezuela); Griboval-Constant, A. [Unite de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, UMR CNRS 8181, U.S.T.L., Batiment C3, 59655, Villeneuve D' Ascq, Cedex (France)

    2008-09-15

    Nickel-lanthanum (LaNiO{sub 3}) and nickel-rhodium-lanthanum (LaNi{sub 0.95}Rh{sub 0.05}O{sub 3}) perovskite-type oxide precursors were synthesized by different methodologies (co-precipitation, sol-gel and impregnation). They were reduced in an H{sub 2} atmosphere to produce nickel and rhodium nanoparticles on the La{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. All samples were tested in the catalytic decomposition of CH{sub 4}. Methane decomposed into carbon and H{sub 2} at reaction temperatures as low as 450 C - no other reaction products were observed. Conversions were in the range of 14-28%, and LaNi{sub 0.95}Rh{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} synthesized by co-precipitation was the most active catalyst. All catalysts maintained sustained activity even after massive carbon deposition indicating that these deposits are of the nanotube-type, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The reaction seems to occur in a way that a nickel or rhodium crystal face is always clean enough to expose sufficient active sites to make the catalytic process continue. The samples were subjected to a reduction-oxidation-reduction cycle and in situ analyses confirmed the stability of the perovskite structure. All diffraction patterns showed a phase change around 400 C, due to reduction of LaNiO{sub 3} to an intermediate La{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}O{sub 5} structure. When the reduction temperatures reach 600 C, this structure collapses through the formation of Ni{sup 0} crystallites deposited on the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Under oxidative conditions, the perovskite system is recomposed with nickel re-entering the LaNiO{sub 3} framework structure accounting for the regenerative capability of these solids. (author)

  18. Ionic liquid ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for preconcentration of trace amounts of rhodium prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaakbari, Elaheh [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Research Society, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali, E-mail: mostafavi.ali@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afzali, Daryoush [Environment and Nanochemistry Department, Research Institute of Environmental Science, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Science, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mineral Industries Research Center, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-30

    In this article, we consider ionic liquid based ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace amounts of rhodium from aqueous samples and show that this is a fast and reliable sample pre-treatment for the determination of rhodium ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The Rh(III) was transferred into its complex with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylamino phenol as a chelating agent, and an ultrasonic bath with the ionic liquid, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide at room temperature was used to extract the analyte. The centrifuged rhodium complex was then enriched in the form of ionic liquid droplets and prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, 300 {mu}L ethanol was added to the ionic liquid-rich phase. Finally, the influence of various parameters on the recovery of Rh(III) was optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 4.0-500.0 ng mL{sup -1}, the detection limit was 0.37 ng mL{sup -1} (3S{sub b}/m, n = 7) and the relative standard deviation was {+-}1.63% (n = 7, C = 200 ng mL{sup -1}). The results show that ionic liquid based ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry, is a rapid, simple, sensitive and efficient analytical method for the separation and determination of trace amounts of Rh(III) ions with minimum organic solvent consumption.

  19. Heteroarene-Directed Oxidative sp(2) C-H Bond Allylation with Aliphatic Alkenes Catalyzed by an (Electron-Deficient η(5)-Cyclopentadienyl)rhodium(III) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Yuji; Shibata, Yu; Tanaka, Ken

    2016-06-17

    It has been established that the oxidative sp(2) C-H bond allylation with aliphatic alkenes proceeds under mild conditions by using heteroarenes as directing groups and an (electron-deficient η(5)-cyclopentadienyl)rhodium(III) complex, [Cp(E)RhCl2]2, as a precatalyst. In sharp contrast, the use of [Cp*RhCl2]2 instead of [Cp(E)RhCl2]2 led to a complex mixture of products under the same reaction conditions.

  20. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  1. Rhodium as permanent modifier for atomization of lead from biological fluids using tungsten filament electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Parsons, Patrick J.; Aldous, Kenneth M.; Brockman, Paul; Slavin, Walter

    2002-04-01

    Rhodium (Rh) was investigated as a permanent modifier for the atomization of Pb from biological fluids in W-filament atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Heating the W-filament with a Rh solution provided a protective coating for subsequent determinations of Pb in blood and urine matrices. The W-filament AAS instrumentation used was based on a prototype design that utilized self-reversal background correction scheme and peak area measurements. We found that Rh not only stabilized Pb during the pyrolysis step, but also facilitated the removal of carbonaceous residues during the cleaning step, requiring much less power than with phosphate modifier. Thus, the filament lifetime was greatly extended to over 300 firings. Periodic reconditioning with Rh was necessary every 30 firings or so. Conditioning the filament with Rh also permitted direct calibration using simple aqueous Pb standards. The method detection limit for blood Pb was approximately 1.5 μg dl -1, similar to that reported previously. Potential interferences from concomitants such as Na, K, Ca and Mg were evaluated. Accuracy was verified using lead reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the New York State Department of Health. Blood lead results below 40 μg dl -1 were within ±1 μg dl -1 of certified values, and within ±10% above 40 μg dl -1; within-run precision was ±10% or better. Additional validation was reported using proficiency test materials and human blood specimens. All blood lead results were within the acceptable limits established by regulatory authorities in the US. When measuring Pb in urine, sensitivity was reduced and matrix-matched calibration became necessary. The method of detection limit was 27 μg l -1 for urine Pb. Urine lead results were also validated using an acceptable range comparable to that established for blood lead by US regulatory agencies.

  2. Intercalation effect on hyperfine parameters of Fe in FeSe superconductor with Tc = 42 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shylin, Sergii I.; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Sedlmaier, Stefan J.; Clarke, Simon J.; Cassidy, Simon J.; Wortmann, Gerhard; Medvedev, Sergey A.; Felser, Claudia

    2015-03-01

    57Fe-Mössbauer spectra of superconducting β-FeSe, the Li/NH3 intercalate product and a subsequent sample of this intercalate treated with moist He gas have been measured in the temperature range 4.7-290 K. A correlation is established between hyperfine parameters and critical temperature T{c} in these phases. A strong increase of the isomer shift upon intercalation is explained by a charge transfer from the Li/NH3 intercalate to the FeSe layers resulting in an increase of T{c} up to 42 K. A significant decrease of the quadrupole splitting above 240 K has been attributed to diffusive motion of Li+ ions within the interlamellar space.

  3. Improved antiparasitic activity by incorporation of organosilane entities into half-sandwich ruthenium(II) and rhodium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Muneebah; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Land, Kirkwood M; Liu, Nicole; Hopper, Melissa; Hsiao, Allyson; Burgoyne, Andrew R; Stringer, Tameryn; Meyer, Mervin; Wiesner, Lubbe; Chibale, Kelly; Smith, Gregory S

    2015-02-07

    A series of ferrocenyl- and aryl-functionalised organosilane thiosemicarbazone compounds was obtained via a nucleophilic substitution reaction with an amine-terminated organosilane. The thiosemicarbazone (TSC) ligands were further reacted with either a ruthenium dimer [(η(6-i)PrC6H4Me)Ru(μ-Cl)Cl]2 or a rhodium dimer [(Cp*)Rh(μ-Cl)Cl]2 to yield a series of cationic mono- and binuclear complexes. The thiosemicarbazone ligands, as well as their metal complexes, were characterised using NMR and IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The molecular structure of the binuclear ruthenium(ii) complex was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The thiosemicarbazones and their complexes were evaluated for their in vitro antiplasmodial activities against the chloroquine-sensitive (NF54) and chloroquine-resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum strains, displaying activities in the low micromolar range. Selected compounds were screened for potential β-haematin inhibition activity, and it was found that two Rh(iii) complexes exhibited moderate to good inhibition. Furthermore, the compounds were screened for their antitrichomonal activities against the G3 Trichomonas vaginalis strain, revealing a higher percentage of growth inhibition for the ruthenium and rhodium complexes over their corresponding ligand.

  4. Enantioselective Rhodium-Catalyzed [2+2+2] Cycloadditions of Terminal Alkynes and Alkenyl Isocyanates: Mechanistic Insights Lead to a Unified Model that Rationalizes Product Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Derek M.; Oberg, Kevin M.; Yu, Robert T.; Lee, Ernest E.; Perreault, Stéphane; Oinen, Mark Emil; Pease, Melissa L.; Malik, Guillaume; Rovis, Tomislav

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript describes the development and scope of the asymmetric rhodium-catalyzed [2+2+2] cycloaddition of terminal alkynes and alkenyl isocyanates leading to the formation of indolizidine and quinolizidine scaffolds. The use of phosphoramidite ligands proved crucial for avoiding competitive terminal alkyne dimerization. Both aliphatic and aromatic terminal alkynes participate well, with product selectivity a function of both the steric and electronic character of the alkyne. Manipulation of the phosphoramidite ligand leads to tuning of enantio- and product selectivity, with a complete turnover in product selectivity seen with aliphatic alkynes when moving from Taddol-based to biphenol-based phosphoramidites. Terminal and 1,1-disubstituted olefins are tolerated with nearly equal efficacy. Examination of a series of competition experiments in combination with analysis of reaction outcome shed considerable light on the operative catalytic cycle. Through a detailed study of a series of X-ray structures of rhodium(cod)chloride/phosphoramidite complexes, we have formulated a mechanistic hypothesis that rationalizes the observed product selectivity. PMID:19817441

  5. Rhodium based clusters for oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation in 0.5 M H2SO4, tolerant to methanol and carbon monoxide, respectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe-Godinez, J.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O.; Borja-Arco, E.; Altamirano-Gutierrez, A. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Queritaro (Mexico); Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Rhodium (Rh6(CO)16) and novel Rh-based clusters were prepared using thermolysis techniques under different conditions in N2 and H2 reaction media, as well as in n-nonane, o-xylene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene and dimethylsulfoxide. The clusters were used as novel electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the absence and presence of 1.0 and 2.0 M methanol solutions. The catalysts were also used for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with pure hydrogen (H2) and in the presence of carbon monoxide (CO). Rotating disk electrode measurements were used to analyze the materials. The study showed that the electrocatalyst support ratio plays a significant role in the electrochemical behaviour of the materials. Rh6(CO)16 and Rh2(1,2-DCB) presented the best electrocatalytic behaviour for ORR and HOR in the absence and presence of methanol and CO. The study demonstrated that the rhodium-based materials are capable of performing ORR and HOR while being tolerant of both methanol and CO. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Polymeric optical sensors for selective and sensitive nitrite detection using cobalt(III) corrole and rhodium(III) porphyrin as ionophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Si; Wo, Yaqi; Meyerhoff, Mark E., E-mail: mmeyerho@umich.edu

    2014-09-16

    Highlights: • We examine cobalt(III) corroles and rhodium(III) porphyrins as ionophores in polymeric films for optical sensors to detect nitrite. • Different types of proton chromoionophores are evaluated to optimize nitrite response. • Selectivity over lipophilic anions such as perchlorate and thiocyanate is observed. • Both ionophores yield optical sensors that are fully reversible. • The cobalt(III) corrole based sensor is employed to determine nitric oxide emission rates from NO donor doped polymers with good accuracy. - Abstract: Cobalt(III) 5,10,15-tris(4-tert-butylphenyl) corrole with a triphenylphosphine axial ligand and rhodium(III) 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-tert-butylphenyl) porphyrin are incorporated into plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) films to fabricate nitrite-selective bulk optodes via absorbance measurements. The resulting films yield sensitive, fast and fully reversible response toward nitrite with significantly enhanced nitrite selectivity over other anions including lipophilic anions such as thiocyanate and perchlorate. The selectivity patterns differ greatly from the Hofmeister series based on anion lipophilicity and are consistent with selectivity obtained with potentiometric sensors based on the same ionophores. The optical nitrite sensors are shown to be useful for detecting rates of emission of nitric oxide (NO) from NO releasing polymers containing S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine.

  7. Pseudo Dirac dispersion in Mn-intercalated graphene on SiC

    KAUST Repository

    Kahaly, M. Upadhyay

    2013-07-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of bulk C6Mn, bulk C 8Mn, and Mn-intercalated graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) and SiC(0001̄) are investigated by density functional theory. We find for both configurations of Mn-intercalated graphene a nonmagnetic state, in agreement with the experimental situation for SiC(0 0 0 1), and explain this property. The electronic structures around the Fermi energy are dominated by Dirac-like cones at energies consistent with data from angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy [Gao et al., ACS Nano. 6 (2012) 6562]. However, our results demonstrate that the corresponding states trace back to hybridized Mn d orbitals, and not to the graphene. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Silicene on Monolayer PtSe2: From Strong to Weak Binding via NH3 Intercalation

    KAUST Repository

    Sattar, Shahid

    2018-01-16

    We study the properties of silicene on monolayer PtSe2 by first-principles calculations and demonstrate a much stronger interlayer interaction than previously reported for silicene on other semiconducting substrates. This fact opens the possibility of a direct growth. A band gap of 165 meV results from inversion symmetry breaking and large spin-splittings in the valence and conduction bands from proximity to monolayer PtSe2 and its strong spin–orbit coupling. It is also shown that the interlayer interaction can be effectively reduced by intercalating NH3 molecules between silicene and monolayer PtSe2 without inducing charge transfer or defect states near the Fermi energy. A small NH3 diffusion barrier makes intercalation a viable experimental approach to control the interlayer interaction.

  9. Synchrotron-Radiation X-Ray Investigation of Li+/Na+ Intercalation into Prussian Blue Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Moritomo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prussian blue analogies (PBAs are promising cathode materials for lithium ion (LIB and sodium ion (SIB secondary batteries, reflecting their covalent and nanoporous host structure. With use of synchrotron-radiation (SR X-ray source, we investigated the structural and electronic responses of the host framework of PBAs against Li+ and Na+ intercalation by means of the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS. The structural investigation reveals a robust nature of the host framework against Li+ and Na+ intercalation, which is advantageous for the stability and lifetime of the batteries. The spectroscopic investigation identifies the redox processes in respective plateaus in the discharge curves. We further compare these characteristics with those of the conventional cathode materials, such as, LiCoO2, LiFePO4, and LiMn2O4.

  10. Flexibility of short ds-DNA intercalated by a dipyridophenazine ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchao eJia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We use Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET in order to measure the increase of flexibility of short ds-DNA induced by the intercalation of dipyridophenazine (dppz ligand in between DNA base pairs. By using a DNA double strand fluorescently labeled at its extremeties, it is shown that the end-to-end length increase of DNA due to the intercalation of one dppz ligand is smaller than the DNA base pair interdistance. This may be explained either by a local bending of the DNA or by an increase of its flexibility. The persistence length of the formed DNA/ligand is evaluated. The described structure may have implications in the photophysical damages induced by the complexation of DNA by organometallic molecules.

  11. Origin of the high p-doping in F intercalated graphene on SiC

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2011-08-04

    The atomic and electronic structures of F intercalated epitaxialgraphene on a SiC(0001) substrate are studied by first-principles calculations. A three-step fluorination process is proposed. First, F atoms are intercalated between the graphene and the SiC, which restores the Dirac point in the band structure. Second, saturation of the topmost Si dangling bonds introduces p-doping up to 0.37 eV. Third, F atoms bond covalently to the graphene to enhance the p-doping. Our model explains the highly p-doped state of graphene on SiC after fluorination [A. L. Walter et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 184102 (2011)].

  12. Silicene on Monolayer PtSe2: From Strong to Weak Binding via NH3 Intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Shahid; Singh, Nirpendra; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2018-01-31

    We study the properties of silicene on monolayer PtSe2 by first-principles calculations and demonstrate a much stronger interlayer interaction than previously reported for silicene on other semiconducting substrates. This fact opens the possibility of a direct growth. A band gap of 165 meV results from inversion symmetry breaking and large spin-splittings in the valence and conduction bands from proximity to monolayer PtSe2 and its strong spin-orbit coupling. It is also shown that the interlayer interaction can be effectively reduced by intercalating NH3 molecules between silicene and monolayer PtSe2 without inducing charge transfer or defect states near the Fermi energy. A small NH3 diffusion barrier makes intercalation a viable experimental approach to control the interlayer interaction.

  13. Three-dimensional metal-intercalated covalent organic frameworks for near-ambient energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Ding, Zijing; Meng, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    A new form of nanoporous material, metal intercalated covalent organic framework (MCOF) is proposed and its energy storage property revealed. Employing density functional and thermodynamical analysis, we find that stable, chemically active, porous materials could form by stacking covalent organic framework (COF) layers with metals as a gluing agent. Metal acts as active sites, while its aggregation is suppressed by a binding energy significantly larger than the corresponding cohesive energy of bulk metals. Two important parameters, metal binding and metal-metal separation, are tuned by selecting suitable building blocks and linkers when constructing COF layers. Systematic searches among a variety of elements and organic molecules identify Ca-intercalated COF with diphenylethyne units as optimal material for H2 storage, reaching a striking gravimetric density ~ 5 wt% at near-ambient conditions (300 K, 20 bar), in comparison to < 0.1 wt% for bare COF-1 under the same condition. PMID:23698018

  14. 10th International School of Materials Science and Technology : Intercalation in Layered Materials "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    1986-01-01

    This volume is prepared from lecture notes for the course "Intercalation in Layered Materials" which was held at the Ettore Majorana Centre for Scientific Culture at Erice, Sicily in July, 1986, as part of the International School of Materials Science and Tech­ nology. The course itself consisted of formal tutorial lectures, workshops, and informal discussions. Lecture notes were prepared for the formal lectures, and short summaries of many of the workshop presentations were prepared. This volume is based on these lecture notes and research summaries. The material is addressed to advanced graduate students and postdoctoral researchers and assumes a background in basic solid state physics. The goals of this volume on Intercalation in Layered Materials include an introduc­ tion to the field for potential new participants, an in-depth and broad exposure for stu­ dents and young investigators already working in the field, a basis for cross-fertilization between workers on various layered host materials...

  15. Formation and rejoining of deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand breaks induced in isolated cell nuclei by antineoplastic intercalating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Y; Schwartz, R E; Kohn, K W; Zwelling, L A

    1984-07-03

    The biochemical characteristics of the formation and disappearance of intercalator-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) were studied in nuclei from mouse leukemia L1210 cells by using filter elution methodology [Bradley, M. O., & Kohn, K.W. (1979) Nucleic Acids Res. 7, 793-804]. The three intercalators used were 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA), 5-iminodaunorubicin (5-ID), and ellipticine. These compounds differ in that they produced predominantly DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) (m-AMSA) or predominantly DNA double-strand breaks (ellipticine) or a mixture of both SSB and DSB (5-ID) in whole cells. In isolated nuclei, each intercalator produced DSB at a frequency comparable to that which is produced in whole cells. Moreover, these DNA breaks reversed within 30 min after drug removal. It thus appeared that neither ATP nor other nucleotides were necessary for intercalator-dependent DNA nicking-closing reactions. The formation of the intercalator-induced DSB was reduced at ice temperature. Break formation was also reduced in the absence of magnesium, at a pH above 6.4 and at NaCl concentrations above 200 mM. In the presence of ATP and ATP analogues, the intercalator-induced cleavage was enhanced. These results suggest that the intercalator-induced DSB are enzymatically mediated and that the enzymes involved in these reactions can catalyze DNA double-strand cleavage and rejoining in the absence of ATP, although the occupancy of an ATP binding site might convert the enzyme to a form more reactive to intercalators. Three inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II--novobiocin, nalidixic acid, and norfloxacin--reduced the formation of DNA strand breaks.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Hole-doping of fullerenes and nanotubes by way of intercalation chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claves, D

    2007-01-01

    Succeeding to the electron-doping processes of carbon nanostructures, chemical methods devoted to the hole-doping of the latter have significantly developed over the past ten years. Intercalation chemistry remains a top-rated technique in this purpose, among the variety of available chemical doping schemes. A review of the p-type doping of fullerenes and nanotubes by this method is exposed, which also includes a wide range of derived potential applications and prospects regarding the materials thus obtained.

  17. Activation of cGAS-dependent antiviral responses by DNA intercalating agents

    OpenAIRE

    P?pin, Genevi?ve; Nejad, Charlotte; Thomas, Belinda J.; Ferrand, Jonathan; McArthur, Kate; Bardin, Philip G.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Gantier, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Acridine dyes, including proflavine and acriflavine, were commonly used as antiseptics before the advent of penicillins in the mid-1940s. While their mode of action on pathogens was originally attributed to their DNA intercalating activity, work in the early 1970s suggested involvement of the host immune responses, characterized by induction of interferon (IFN)-like activities through an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate here that sub-toxic concentrations of a mixture of acriflavine and profl...

  18. Intercalation and structural aspects of macroRAFT agents into MgAl layered double hydroxides

    OpenAIRE

    Dessislava Kostadinova; Ana Cenacchi Pereira; Muriel Lansalot; Franck D’Agosto; Elodie Bourgeat-Lami; Fabrice Leroux; Christine Taviot-Guého; Sylvian Cadars; Vanessa Prevot

    2016-01-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the design of layered double hydroxide (LDH)-based hybrid materials. In this work, we demonstrate the intercalation by anion exchange process of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and three different hydrophilic random copolymers of acrylic acid (AA) and n-butyl acrylate (BA) with molar masses ranging from 2000 to 4200 g mol−1 synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, into LDH containing magnesium(II) and aluminium(II...

  19. Retention of contaminants Cd and Hg adsorbed and intercalated in aluminosilicate clays: A first principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasto de Lima, F D; Miwa, R H; Miranda, Caetano R

    2017-11-07

    Layered clay materials have been used to incorporate transition metal (TM) contaminants. Based on first-principles calculations, we have examined the energetic stability and the electronic properties due to the incorporation of Cd and Hg in layered clay materials, kaolinite (KAO) and pyrophyllite (PYR). The TM can be (i) adsorbed on the clay surface as well as (ii) intercalated between the clay layers. For the intercalated case, the contaminant incorporation rate can be optimized by controlling the interlayer spacing of the clay, namely, pillared clays. Our total energy results reveal that the incorporation of the TMs can be maximized through a suitable tuning of vertical distance between the clay layers. Based on the calculated TM/clay binding energies and the Langmuir absorption model, we estimate the concentrations of the TMs. Further kinetic properties have been examined by calculating the activation energies, where we found energy barriers of ∼20 and ∼130 meV for adsorbed and intercalated cases, respectively. The adsorption and intercalation of ionized TM adatoms were also considered within the deprotonated KAO surface. This also leads to an optimal interlayer distance which maximizes the TM incorporation rate. By mapping the total charge transfers at the TM/clay interface, we identify a net electronic charge transfer from the TM adatoms to the topmost clay surface layer. The effect of such a charge transfer on the electronic structure of the clay (host) has been examined through a set of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) simulations, characterizing the changes of the XANES spectra upon the presence of the contaminants. Finally, for the pillared clays, we quantify the Cd and Hg K-edge energy shifts of the TMs as a function of the interlayer distance between the clay layers and the Al K-edge spectra for the pristine and pillared clays.

  20. Work Function Characterization of Potassium-Intercalated, Boron Nitride Doped Graphitic Petals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. McCarthy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on characterization techniques for electron emission from potassium-intercalated boron nitride-modified graphitic petals (GPs. Carbon-based materials offer potentially good performance in electron emission applications owing to high thermal stability and a wide range of nanostructures that increase emission current via field enhancement. Furthermore, potassium adsorption and intercalation of carbon-based nanoscale emitters decreases work functions from approximately 4.6 eV to as low as 2.0 eV. In this study, boron nitride modifications of GPs were performed. Hexagonal boron nitride is a planar structure akin to graphene and has demonstrated useful chemical and electrical properties when embedded in graphitic layers. Photoemission induced by simulated solar excitation was employed to characterize the emitter electron energy distributions, and changes in the electron emission characteristics with respect to temperature identified annealing temperature limits. After several heating cycles, a single stable emission peak with work function of 2.8 eV was present for the intercalated GP sample up to 1,000 K. Up to 600 K, the potassium-intercalated boron nitride modified sample exhibited improved retention of potassium in the form of multiple emission peaks (1.8, 2.5, and 3.3 eV resulting in a large net electron emission relative to the unmodified graphitic sample. However, upon further heating to 1,000 K, the unmodified GP sample demonstrated better stability and higher emission current than the boron nitride modified sample. Both samples deintercalated above 1,000 K.

  1. Retention of contaminants Cd and Hg adsorbed and intercalated in aluminosilicate clays: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasto de Lima, F. D.; Miwa, R. H.; Miranda, Caetano R.

    2017-11-01

    Layered clay materials have been used to incorporate transition metal (TM) contaminants. Based on first-principles calculations, we have examined the energetic stability and the electronic properties due to the incorporation of Cd and Hg in layered clay materials, kaolinite (KAO) and pyrophyllite (PYR). The TM can be (i) adsorbed on the clay surface as well as (ii) intercalated between the clay layers. For the intercalated case, the contaminant incorporation rate can be optimized by controlling the interlayer spacing of the clay, namely, pillared clays. Our total energy results reveal that the incorporation of the TMs can be maximized through a suitable tuning of vertical distance between the clay layers. Based on the calculated TM/clay binding energies and the Langmuir absorption model, we estimate the concentrations of the TMs. Further kinetic properties have been examined by calculating the activation energies, where we found energy barriers of ˜20 and ˜130 meV for adsorbed and intercalated cases, respectively. The adsorption and intercalation of ionized TM adatoms were also considered within the deprotonated KAO surface. This also leads to an optimal interlayer distance which maximizes the TM incorporation rate. By mapping the total charge transfers at the TM/clay interface, we identify a net electronic charge transfer from the TM adatoms to the topmost clay surface layer. The effect of such a charge transfer on the electronic structure of the clay (host) has been examined through a set of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) simulations, characterizing the changes of the XANES spectra upon the presence of the contaminants. Finally, for the pillared clays, we quantify the Cd and Hg K-edge energy shifts of the TMs as a function of the interlayer distance between the clay layers and the Al K-edge spectra for the pristine and pillared clays.

  2. Nanoparticle intercalation-induced interlayer-gap-opened graphene–polyaniline nanocomposite for enhanced supercapacitive performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Sungjin; Park, Young Ran [Graphene Research Institute & Department of Chemistry, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sanghyuk [Graphene Research Institute & Department of Chemistry, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy and Mineral Resources Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeong Jin [Department of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of); Doh, Ji Hoon [Graphene Research Institute & Department of Chemistry, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Electron Microscopy Research, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kyungjung [Department of Energy and Mineral Resources Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Won G. [Division of Electron Microscopy Research, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byungnam [Radiation Equipment Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Woo Seok [Electronic Material and Device Research Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do 13509 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, TaeYoung [Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do 13120 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Young Joon, E-mail: yjhong@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • High energy–power supercapacitor electrode is demonstrated using EDLC–PC hybridized rGO–PANi nanocomposite. • A method for perpetuated intercalation of nanoparticles into interlayer gap of rGO is developed. • The intercalaction (i) exfoliates rGO layers, (ii) prevents self-agglomeration, and (iii) enlarges specific surface area of rGO for high power performance. • Electric resistance is substantially reduced by forming more rGO–PANi links via grafting of PANi to well-opened rGO edges. - Abstract: This study demonstrates a method for improving supercapacitive performance of two-dimensional nanosheet-based composite electrode. As a hybridized electrostatic double layer capacitor–electrochemical pseudocapacitor (EDLC–PC) electrode, we synthesized reduced graphene oxide–polyaniline nanofibers (rGO–PANi NFs) composite electrode. For the enhanced supercapacitive performances, insulator silver chloride nanoparticles (AgCl NPs) were intercalated into the interlayer gap of rGO. The AgCl NP intercalation (i) exfoliated rGO layers and (ii) prevented rGO-self-agglomeration that makes it difficult to utilize the high surface-to-volume ratio of ideal mono- (or few-) atomic-thick rGO layers. As a result, (iii) the specific capacitance was improved in accordance with the enlarged specific surface area of rGO. Furthermore, (iv) the well-developed rGO edges, which were opened by the AgCl intercalation, enabled formation of more bonds between PANi and rGO by selective grafting of PANi to the rGO edges. Hence, the bonds of PANi–rGO, as conducting paths, substantially reduced the total electrical resistance. Enhanced specific capacitance, ion diffusion efficiency, and reduced electrical resistance indicated the bi-functional roles of AgCl NP insertion for high performance hybridized EDLC–PC electrodes.

  3. Photoresponsive multilayer spiral nanotubes: intercalation of polyfluorinated cationic azobenzene surfactant into potassium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhiwei; Takagi, Shinsuke; Shimada, Tetsuya; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Inoue, Haruo

    2006-01-25

    The first successful synthesis of photoresponsive multilayer spiral nanotubes by the introduction of polyfluorinate cationic azobenzene derivative, trans-[2-(2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutylamino)ethyl]-{2-[4-(4-hexyphenylazo)-phenoxy]ethyl}dimethylammonium (abbreviated as C3F7-Azo+), into layered niobate interlayer I by a two-step guest-guest exchange method using the intercalation compound, methyl viologen (MV2+)-K4Nb6O17, as precursor is reported.

  4. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael E Hawtin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II is critical for DNA replication, transcription and chromosome segregation and is a well validated target of anti-neoplastic drugs including the anthracyclines and epipodophyllotoxins. However, these drugs are limited by common tumor resistance mechanisms and side-effect profiles. Novel topoisomerase II-targeting agents may benefit patients who prove resistant to currently available topoisomerase II-targeting drugs or encounter unacceptable toxicities. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative, a chemical scaffold not used previously for cancer treatment. Voreloxin is completing Phase 2 clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. This study defined voreloxin's anticancer mechanism of action as a critical component of rational clinical development informed by translational research.Biochemical and cell-based studies established that voreloxin intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II, causing DNA double-strand breaks, G2 arrest, and apoptosis. Voreloxin is differentiated both structurally and mechanistically from other topoisomerase II poisons currently in use as chemotherapeutics. In cell-based studies, voreloxin poisoned topoisomerase II and caused dose-dependent, site-selective DNA fragmentation analogous to that of quinolone antibacterials in prokaryotes; in contrast etoposide, the nonintercalating epipodophyllotoxin topoisomerase II poison, caused extensive DNA fragmentation. Etoposide's activity was highly dependent on topoisomerase II while voreloxin and the intercalating anthracycline topoisomerase II poison, doxorubicin, had comparable dependence on this enzyme for inducing G2 arrest. Mechanistic interrogation with voreloxin analogs revealed that intercalation is required for voreloxin's activity; a nonintercalating analog did not inhibit proliferation or induce G2 arrest, while an analog with enhanced intercalation was 9.5-fold more potent.As a first-in-class anticancer

  5. Synthesis and Characteristics of Valeric Acid-Zinc Layered Hydroxide Intercalation Material for Insect Pheromone Controlled Release Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new intercalation compound of insect pheromone, valeric acid (VA, based on zinc layered hydroxide (ZLH as host release material, was successfully prepared through coprecipitation method. The as-produced organic-inorganic nanolayered material, valerate nanohybrid, VAN, shows the formation of a new peak at lower 2θ angle with basal spacing of 19.8 Å with no ZnO reflections, which indicate that the intercalation of anion between the inorganic ZLH interlamellae was accomplished. The elemental, FTIR, and ATR analyses of the nanohybrid supported the fact that the intercalation with the percentage anion loading was calculated to be 23.0% (w/w. The thermal stability property of the resulting nanohybrid was enhanced compared to the unbound anion. Field emission scanning electron micrograph of the ZnO has a nonuniform granular structure but transforms into flake-like structure with various sizes after the intercalation process. Release kinetics of anion from the interlayer of intercalated compound exhibited a slow release behavior governed by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model at different pHs of aqueous media. The valerate anion was released from VAN with the highest release rate at pH 4. These findings provide the basis to further development of controlled release formulation for insect pheromone based on ZLH intercalation.

  6. Intramolecular recombination R-triplex in solution: stabilization by bis-intercalator YOYO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Timoshin, Vladimir V; Borisova, Olga F; Zhurkin, Victor B; Florentiev, Vladimir L; Shchyolkina, Anna K

    2008-12-01

    Recognition of double-stranded DNA with a mixed nucleotide sequence by oligonucleotide is a long-term challenge. This aim can be achieved via formation of the recombination R-triplex, accommodating two identical DNA strands in parallel orientation, and antiparallel complementary strand. In the absence of proteins the R-triplex stability is low, however, so that intermolecular R-triplex is not formed by three DNA strands in a ligand-free system. Recently, recognition of DNA with mixed base sequence by single-stranded oligonucleotide in the presence of bis-intercalator YOYO was reported. Here, we describe thermodynamic characteristics of YOYO complexes with the model oligonucleotides 5'-GT-2AP-GACTGAG TTTT CTCAGTCTACGC GAA GCGTAGACTGAG-3' (R(2AP)CW) bearing a single reporting 2-aminopurine (2AP) in place of adenine and 5'-CTCAGTCTACGC GAA GCGTAGACTGAG-3' (CW). We found that each oligonucleotide is able to bind two YOYO molecules via intercalation mode in 0.5 M LiCl. Fluorescence intensity of YOYO intercalated in triplex R(2AP)CW and in CW hairpin increased 40-fold compared to the free YOYO. Remarkably, the melting temperature of the triplex (determined using temperature dependence of the 2AP fluorescence) increased from 19 degrees C to 33 degrees C upon binding two YOYO molecules. Further increase in the YOYO concentration resulted in binding of up to five YOYO molecules to R(2AP)CW triplex and up to six YOYO molecules to CW hairpin.

  7. DNA in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix and interactions with three intercalating cyanine dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Norden, Bengt; Åkerman, Björn

    2011-10-27

    We investigate how DNA interacts with drugs in humid polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films by using a homologous set of cyanine dyes (YO(+), YO-PRO(2+), and YOYO(4+)) known to intercalate into DNA with increasing affinity with increasing charge. UV-vis spectroscopy shows that the PVA matrix destabilizes all three DNA-dye complexes compared to aqueous solution but to a lesser degree as the dye charge increases. The monovalent YO is fully dissociated from DNA within minutes, whereas the dissociation of the divalent YO-PRO takes about one hour and occurs by a two-step mechanism. The tetravalent homodimer YOYO is even less affected by the PVA environment and remains intercalated in the B-form DNA also in the PVA films. The reduced stability of the DNA-dye complexes is discussed in terms of steric and dielectric properties of the PVA matrix. After being kept in dry PVA films for 48 h the DNA-YOYO complexes can be reformed reversibly by rehumidifying the films for 30 min. The ability to store aligned and confined DNA intercalated with ligand complexes may be useful in studies on structural properties of nucleic acids.

  8. A redox active and electrochemiluminescent threading bis-intercalator and its applications in DNA assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Tansil, Natalia C; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2006-01-01

    A redox active and electrochemiluminescent (ECL) threading bis-intercalator, consisting of two N,N'-bis(3-propyl-imidazole)-1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimides (PIND) linked by a Ru(dmbpy)2(2+) (dmbpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) complex (PIND-Ru-PIND), was synthesized for the first time. Its optical, electrochemical, and ECL properties were studied. UV-vis spectrophotometric measurements indicated that the two PIND groups bind to the double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) in a threading intercalation mode, while the Ru(dmbpy)2(2+) reinforces the intercalation via electrostatic interaction with ds-DNA. An ECL DNA biosensor was fabricated using PIND-Ru-PIND. A 2000-fold sensitivity enhancement over direct voltammetry was obtained, making this an ultrasensitive system for ECL detection of DNA. Under optimized conditions, the biosensor allowed the detection of a target DNA in the range of 0.70-400 pM with a detection limit of 400 fM.

  9. Mechanochemical synthesis of Cu-Al and methyl orange intercalated Cu-Al layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jun, E-mail: forsjun@whut.edu.cn [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Luoshi Road 122, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); He, Xiaoman; Chen, Min; Hu, Huimin [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Luoshi Road 122, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Zhang, Qiwu, E-mail: zhangqw@whut.edu.cn [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Luoshi Road 122, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Liu, Xinzhong [College of Ecological Environment and Urban Construction, Fujian University of Technology, Fuzhou 350118 China (China)

    2017-04-15

    In this study, a mechanochemical route to synthesize a Cu-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) and a methyl orange (MO) intercalated one (MO-LDH) was introduced, in which basic cupric carbonate (Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}) and aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) with Cu/Al molar ratio at 2/1 was first dry ground for 2 h and then agitated in water or methyl orange solution for another 4 h to obtain the LDH and MO-LDH products without any heating operation. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Thermogravimetry (TG), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The products showed high crystallinity phase of Cu-Al and MO intercalated Cu-Al LDH with no evident impurities, proving that the craft introduced here was facile and effective. The new idea can be applied in other fields to produce organic-inorganic composites. - Highlights: • A facile mechanochemical route to synthesize Cu-Al and MO intercalated Cu-Al LDH. • The products possesses high crystalline of LDH phase with no impure phases. • The dry milling process induces the element substitution between the raw materials. • The agitation operation helps the grain growth of LDH.

  10. Effects of Intercalation on the Hole Mobility of Amorphous Semiconducting Polymer Blends

    KAUST Repository

    Cates, Nichole C.

    2010-06-08

    Fullerenes have been shown to intercalate between the side chains of many crystalline and semicrystalline polymers and to affect the properties of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells. Here we present the first in-depth study of intercalation in an amorphous polymer. We study blends of the widely studied amorphous polymer poly(2-methoxy-5-(3studied amorphous polymer poly(,7·studied amorphous polymer poly(-dimethyloctyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MDMO-PPV) with a variety of molecules using photoluminescence measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and space-charge limited current mobility measurements. The blends with elevated hole mobilities exhibit complete photoluminescence quenching and show no phase separation in a scanning electron microscope. We conclude that intercalation occurs in MDMO-PPV:fullerene blends and is responsible for the increase in the MDMO-PPV hole mobility by several orders of magnitude when it is blended with fullerenes, despite the dilution of the hole-conducting polymer with an electron acceptor. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Na-Ion Intercalation and Charge Storage Mechanism in 2D Vanadium Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, Seong-Min [Chemistry Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Qiao, Ruimin [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Yang, Wanli [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Lee, Sungsik [X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Yu, Xiqian [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 China; Anasori, Babak [Department of Material Science and Engineering, A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia PA 19104 USA; Lee, Hungsui [Chemistry Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Gogotsi, Yury [Department of Material Science and Engineering, A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia PA 19104 USA; Yang, Xiao-Qing [Chemistry Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA

    2017-07-14

    Two-dimensional vanadium carbide MXene containing surface functional groups (denoted as V2CTx, where Tx are surface functional groups) was synthesized and studied as anode material for Na-ion batteries. V2CTx anode exhibits reversible charge storage with good cycling stability and high rate capability through electrochemical test. The charge storage mechanism of V2CTx material during Na+ intercalation/deintercalation and the redox reaction of vanadium were studied using a combination of synchrotron based X-ray diffraction (XRD), hard X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS). Experimental evidence of a major contribution of redox reaction of vanadium to the charge storage and the reversible capacity of V2CTx during sodiation/desodiation process have been provided through V K-edge XANES and V L2,3-edge sXAS results. A correlation between the CO32- content and Na+ intercalation/deintercalation states in the V2CTx electrode observed from C and O K-edge in sXAS results imply that some additional charge storage reactions may take place between the Na+-intercalated V2CTx and the carbonate based non-aqueous electrolyte. The results of this study will provide valuable information for the further studies on V2CTx as anode material for Na-ion batteries and capacitors.

  12. Oscillatory behaviors and hierarchical assembly of contractile structures in intercalating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Zallen, Jennifer A.

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuations in the size of the apical cell surface have been associated with apical constriction and tissue invagination. However, it is currently not known if apical oscillatory behaviors are a unique property of constricting cells or if they constitute a universal feature of the force balance between cells in multicellular tissues. Here, we set out to determine whether oscillatory cell behaviors occur in parallel with cell intercalation during the morphogenetic process of axis elongation in the Drosophila embryo. We applied multi-color, time-lapse imaging of living embryos and SIESTA, an integrated tool for automated and semi-automated cell segmentation, tracking, and analysis of image sequences. Using SIESTA, we identified cycles of contraction and expansion of the apical surface in intercalating cells and characterized them at the molecular, cellular, and tissue scales. We demonstrate that apical oscillations are anisotropic, and this anisotropy depends on the presence of intact cell-cell junctions and spatial cues provided by the anterior-posterior patterning system. Oscillatory cell behaviors during axis elongation are associated with the hierarchical assembly and disassembly of contractile actomyosin structures at the medial cortex of the cell, with actin localization preceding myosin II and with the localization of both proteins preceding changes in cell shape. We discuss models to explain how the architecture of cytoskeletal networks regulates their contractile behavior and the mechanisms that give rise to oscillatory cell behaviors in intercalating cells.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and cation adsorption of p-aminobenzoic acid intercalated on calcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Camila F.N. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo, 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, PR (Brazil); Lazarin, Angélica M., E-mail: amlazarin2@uem.br [Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo, 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, PR (Brazil); Sernaglia, Rosana L.; Andreotti, Elza I.S. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo, 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, PR (Brazil)

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy photographs of calcium phosphate (a) and intercalated with p-aminobenzoic acid (b). Highlights: ► Calcium phosphate was intercalated with p-aminobenzoic acid. ► Guest molecule contains nitrogen and oxygen atoms from amine and carboxylic groups. ► These basic centers are potentially useful for cation coordination in ethanol solution. ► Crystal morphology of compounds is lamellar, it agrees with expected structural characteristics. -- Abstract: Crystalline lamellar calcium phosphate retained 4-aminobenzoic acid inside its cavity without leaching. The intense infrared bands in the 1033 and 1010 cm{sup −1} interval confirmed the presence of the phosphonate groups attached to the inorganic layer, with sharp and intense peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns, which gave basal distances of 712 and 1578 pm for the original and the intercalated compounds, respectively. Solid-state {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra presented only one peak for the phosphate groups attached to the main inorganic polymeric structure near −2.4 ppm. The adsorption isotherms from ethanol gave the maximum adsorption capacities of 6.44 and 3.34 mmol g{sup −1} for nickel and cobalt, respectively, which stability constant and distribution coefficient followed Co > Ni.

  14. Multimodality of Structural, Electrical, and Gravimetric Responses of Intercalated MXenes to Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muckley, Eric S; Naguib, Michael; Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Vlcek, Lukas; Osti, Naresh C; Sacci, Robert L; Sang, Xiahan; Unocic, Raymond R; Xie, Yu; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mamontov, Eugene; Page, Katharine L; Kent, Paul R C; Nanda, Jagjit; Ivanov, Ilia N

    2017-11-28

    Understanding of structural, electrical, and gravimetric peculiarities of water vapor interaction with ion-intercalated MXenes led to design of a multimodal humidity sensor. Neutron scattering coupled to molecular dynamics and ab initio calculations showed that a small amount of hydration results in a significant increase in the spacing between MXene layers in the presence of K and Mg intercalants between the layers. Films of K- and Mg-intercalated MXenes exhibited relative humidity (RH) detection thresholds of ∼0.8% RH and showed monotonic RH response in the 0-85% RH range. We found that MXene gravimetric response to water is 10 times faster than their electrical response, suggesting that H 2 O-induced swelling/contraction of channels between MXene sheets results in trapping of H 2 O molecules that act as charge-depleting dopants. The results demonstrate the use of MXenes as humidity sensors and infer potential impact of water on structural and electrical performance of MXene-based devices.

  15. Interlayer Structures and Dynamics of Arsenate and Arsenite Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxides: A First Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchun Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by using first principles simulation techniques, we explored the basal spacings, interlayer structures, and dynamics of arsenite and arsenate intercalated Layered double hydroxides (LDHs. Our results confirm that the basal spacings of NO3−-LDHs increase with layer charge densities. It is found that Arsenic (As species can enter the gallery spaces of LDHs with a Mg/Al ratio of 2:1 but they cannot enter those with lower charge densities. Interlayer species show layering distributions. All anions form a single layer distribution while water molecules form a single layer distribution at low layer charge density and a double layer distribution at high layer charge densities. H2AsO4− has two orientations in the interlayer regions (i.e., one with its three folds axis normal to the layer sheets and another with its two folds axis normal to the layer sheets, and only the latter is observed for HAsO42−. H2AsO3− orientates in a tilt-lying way. The mobility of water and NO3− increases with the layer charge densities while As species have very low mobility. Our simulations provide microscopic information of As intercalated LDHs, which can be used for further understanding of the structures of oxy-anion intercalated LDHs.

  16. Intercalation of a Zn(II) complex containing ciprofloxacin drug between DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Asadian, Ali Ashraf; Mahdavi, Mryam

    2017-11-02

    In this study, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of a Zn(II) complex containing an antibiotic drug, ciprofloxacin, with calf thymus DNA using spectroscopic methods. It was found that Zn(II) complex could bind with DNA via intercalation mode as evidenced by: hyperchromism in UV-Vis spectrum; these spectral characteristics suggest that the Zn(II) complex interacts with DNA most likely through a mode that involves a stacking interaction between the aromatic chromophore and the base pairs of DNA. DNA binding constant (K b = 1.4 × 10 4 M -1 ) from spectrophotometric studies of the interaction of Zn(II) complex with DNA is comparable to those of some DNA intercalative polypyridyl Ru(II) complexes 1.0 -4.8 × 10 4 M -1 . CD study showed stabilization of the right-handed B form of DNA in the presence of Zn(II) complex as observed for the classical intercalator methylene blue. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH DNA-MB, indicating that it binds to DNA in strong competition with MB for the intercalation.

  17. 1,8-Naphthalimide: A Potent DNA Intercalator and Target for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Runjhun; Luxami, Vijay; Kaur, Harsovin; Tandon, Nitin; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2017-10-01

    The poor pharmacokinetics, side effects and particularly the rapid emergence of drug resistance compromise the efficiency of clinically used anticancer drugs. Therefore, the discovery of novel and effective drugs is still an extremely primary mission. Naphthalimide family is one of the highly active anticancer drug based upon effective intercalator with DNA. In this article, we review the discovery and development of 1,8-naphthalimide moiety, and, especially, pay much attention to the structural modifications and structure activity relationships. The review demonstrates how modulation of the moiety affecting naphthalimide compound for DNA binding that is achieved to afford a profile of antitumor activity. The DNA binding of imide and ring substitution at naphthalimide, bisnaphthalimide, naphthalimide-metal complexes is achieved by molecular recognition through intercalation mode. Thus, this synthetic/natural small molecule can act as a drug when activation or inhibition of DNA function, is required to cure or control the cancer disease. The present study is a review of the advances in 1,8-naphthalimide-related research, with a focus on how such derivatives are intercalated into DNA for their anticancer activities. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Regenerable Cu-intercalated MnO2 layered cathode for highly cyclable energy dense batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Gautam G.; Gallaway, Joshua W.; Turney, Damon E.; Nyce, Michael; Huang, Jinchao; Wei, Xia; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2017-03-01

    Manganese dioxide cathodes are inexpensive and have high theoretical capacity (based on two electrons) of 617 mAh g-1, making them attractive for low-cost, energy-dense batteries. They are used in non-rechargeable batteries with anodes like zinc. Only ~10% of the theoretical capacity is currently accessible in rechargeable alkaline systems. Attempts to access the full capacity using additives have been unsuccessful. We report a class of Bi-birnessite (a layered manganese oxide polymorph mixed with bismuth oxide (Bi2O3)) cathodes intercalated with Cu2+ that deliver near-full two-electron capacity reversibly for >6,000 cycles. The key to rechargeability lies in exploiting the redox potentials of Cu to reversibly intercalate into the Bi-birnessite-layered structure during its dissolution and precipitation process for stabilizing and enhancing its charge transfer characteristics. This process holds promise for other applications like catalysis and intercalation of metal ions into layered structures. A large prismatic rechargeable Zn-birnessite cell delivering ~140 Wh l-1 is shown.

  19. One-step exfoliation and surface modification of lamellar hydroxyapatite by intercalation of glucosamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Honglin [Research Institute for Biomaterials and Transportation, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, 330013 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Li, Wei; Ji, Dehui [Research Institute for Biomaterials and Transportation, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, 330013 (China); Zuo, Guifu [Hebei Provincial Key Laboratory of Inorganic Nonmetallic Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei United University, Tangshan, 063009 (China); Xiong, Guangyao, E-mail: xiongguangyao@163.com [Research Institute for Biomaterials and Transportation, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, 330013 (China); Zhu, Yong [School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Li, Lili; Han, Ming [Research Institute for Biomaterials and Transportation, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, 330013 (China); Wu, Caoqun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Wan, Yizao, E-mail: yzwantju@126.com [Research Institute for Biomaterials and Transportation, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, 330013 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Effective exfoliation is crucial to the application of layered materials in many fields. Herein, we report a novel effective, scalable, and ecofriendly method for the exfoliation of lamellar HAp by glucosamine intercalation such that individual HAp nanoplates can be obtained. The as-exfoliated HAp nanoplates were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. It is found that the glucosamine intercalation not only results in complete exfoliation of lamellar HAp but also introduces the glucosamine molecules onto the surface of individual HAp nanoplates, thus obtaining separated glucosamine-grafted HAp nanoplates (Glu-HAps). Results from MTT assay demonstrate that glucosamine grafting on HAp nanoplates greatly improves the cell growth and proliferation as compared to nongrafted HAp counterparts. - Highlights: • Glucosamine was used as intercalation agent to exfoliate lamellar hydroxyapatite. • Glucosamine was grafted onto the as-exfoliated nanoplate-like hydroxyapatite. • Exfoliation and surface grafting were accomplished in one step. • Glucosamine-grafted HAp showed improved biocompatibility over nongrafted one.

  20. Nanoparticle intercalation-induced interlayer-gap-opened graphene-polyaniline nanocomposite for enhanced supercapacitive performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Sungjin; Park, Young Ran; Park, Sanghyuk; Kim, Hyeong Jin; Doh, Ji Hoon; Kwon, Kyungjung; Hong, Won G.; Kim, Byungnam; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, TaeYoung; Hong, Young Joon

    2017-08-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving supercapacitive performance of two-dimensional nanosheet-based composite electrode. As a hybridized electrostatic double layer capacitor-electrochemical pseudocapacitor (EDLC-PC) electrode, we synthesized reduced graphene oxide-polyaniline nanofibers (rGO-PANi NFs) composite electrode. For the enhanced supercapacitive performances, insulator silver chloride nanoparticles (AgCl NPs) were intercalated into the interlayer gap of rGO. The AgCl NP intercalation (i) exfoliated rGO layers and (ii) prevented rGO-self-agglomeration that makes it difficult to utilize the high surface-to-volume ratio of ideal mono- (or few-) atomic-thick rGO layers. As a result, (iii) the specific capacitance was improved in accordance with the enlarged specific surface area of rGO. Furthermore, (iv) the well-developed rGO edges, which were opened by the AgCl intercalation, enabled formation of more bonds between PANi and rGO by selective grafting of PANi to the rGO edges. Hence, the bonds of PANi-rGO, as conducting paths, substantially reduced the total electrical resistance. Enhanced specific capacitance, ion diffusion efficiency, and reduced electrical resistance indicated the bi-functional roles of AgCl NP insertion for high performance hybridized EDLC-PC electrodes.

  1. A naproxen complex of dysprosium intercalates into calf thymus DNA base pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mengsi; Jin, Jianhua; Xu, Guiqing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Cui, Fengling, E-mail: fenglingcui@hotmail.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Luo, Hongxia [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Binding mode to ctDNA was studied by various methods. • Intercalation is the most possible binding mode. • Dynamic and static quenching occurred simultaneously. • Hydrophobic force played a major role. • Binding characteristic of rare earth complexes to DNA are dependent on the element. - Abstract: The binding mode and mechanism of dysprosium–naproxen complex (Dy–NAP) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) were studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectra in physiological buffer (pH 7.4). The results showed that more than one type of quenching process occurred and the binding mode between Dy–NAP with ctDNA might be intercalation. In addition, ionic strength, iodide quenching and fluorescence polarization experiments corroborated the intercalation binding mode between Dy–NAP and ctDNA. The calculated thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH and ΔS at different temperature demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction force played a major role in the binding process.

  2. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomibuchi, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Uyeda, Taro Q.P. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki, E-mail: tw007@nasu.bio.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Department of Judo Therapy, Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143 flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas (ASA

  3. P(CH)P pincer rhodium(I) complexes: the key role of electron-poor imidazoliophosphine extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Cécile; Lepetit, Christine; Canac, Yves; Duhayon, Carine; Zargarian, Davit; Chauvin, Remi

    2013-01-07

    The coordination chemistry of a potentially pincer-type dicationic meta-phenylene-bis(imidazoliophosphine) ligand 3 to neutral and cationic carbonylrhodium(I) centers has been investigated. Similarly to what was observed previously for its ortho-phenylene counterpart, 3 was found to bind to the RhCl(CO) fragment in a trans-chelating manner that makes possible a weak Rh-C(H) interaction, inferred from the nonbonding but relatively short Rh-C and Rh-H contacts observed in the solid state structure of the dicationic adduct (3)RhCl(CO) (5). Formation of the target PCP-type pincer complex could not be triggered despite multiple attempts to deprotonate the central C-H moiety in the initial dicationic adduct 5, or in the tricationic species [(3)Rh(CO)](+) (8) generated by abstraction of the chloride ion from 5. Complex 8 was identified on the basis of NMR and IR analyses as a Rh(I)-stabilized P(CH)P-intermediate en route to the anticipated classical PCP-type pincer complex. Analysis of the electronic structure of this intermediate computed at the density functional level of theory (DFT level) revealed a bonding overlap between a Rh d-orbital and π-orbitals of the m-phenylene ring. NBO analyses and calculated Wiberg indices confirm that this interaction comprises an η(1)-C-Rh bonding mode, with only secondary contributions from the geminal C and H atoms. Although the target PCP-type pincer complex could not be generated, treatment of the tricationic intermediate with methanol induced a P-CN(2) bond cleavage at both imidazoliophosphine moieties, resulting in the formation of a dicationic "open pincer" species, that is, a nonchelated bis((MeO)PPh(2))-stabilized aryl-Rhodium complex that is the κC-only analogue of the putative κP,κC,κP-PCP complex sought initially. Theoretical studies at the DFT level of experimental or putative species relevant to the final C-H activation process ruled out the oxidative addition pathway. Two alternative pathways are proposed to explain

  4. Preoperative radiation therapy and surgery in the treatment of 'bulky' squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix (stage Ib, IIa, and IIb operable tumors)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touboul, Emmanuel; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Roche, Betarice; Mauban, Serge; Batel-Copel, Laure; Schwartz, L.H.; Schlienger, Michel; Laugier, Alain (Hopital Tenon, 75 - Paris (France)); Lefranc, J.P.; Blondon, Jean; Guerin, R.A. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France))

    1992-05-01

    Between 1982-1988, 42 women with 'bulky' squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix, larger than 5 cm, were treated. Median follow-up was 5 years (from 37-106 months). Age range was 25-77 years (mean: 49). There were 14 stage Ib, 5 stage IIa and 34 stage IIb operable patients. Forty grays were delivered at mid-plane of the pelvis (23 fractions in 31 days) using four-fold technique (6-18 MV). External beam radiation therapy was followed by 20 Gy of intracavitary radiation therapy. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH-BSO) and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy were performed 48 days later. The 3- and 5-year disease-free survival was 83 and 81% respectively. The 5-year locoregional control rate was 83%. Thirteen patients suffered from mild to severe complications (31%) but there were only 2 long-term complications (5%). (author). 39 refs.; 2 figs.; 4 tabs.

  5. Effect of the Configuration of a Bulky Aluminum Initiator on the Structure of Copolymers of l,l-Lactide with Symmetric Comonomer Trimethylene Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Socka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of configuration of an asymmetric bulky initiator 2,2′-[1,1′-binaphtyl-2,2′-diyl- bis-(nitrylomethilidyne]diphenoxy aluminum isopropoxide (Ini on structure of copolymer of asymmetric monomer l,l-lactide (Lac with symmetric comonomer trimethylene carbonate (Tmc was studied using polarimetry, dilatometry, Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC, and Carbon Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (13C NMR. When the S-enantiomer of Ini was used the distribution in copolymer chains at the beginning of polymerization is statistical, with alternacy tendency, changing next through a gradient region to homoblocks of Tmc. However, when R-Ini was used, the product formed was a gradient oligoblock one, with Tmc blocks prevailing at the beginning, changing to Lac blocks dominating at the end part of chains. Initiation of copolymerization with the mixture of both initiator enantiomers (S:R = 6:94 gave a multiblock copolymer of similar features but shorter blocks. Analysis of copolymerization progress required complex analysis of dilatometric data, assuming different molar volume contraction coefficients for units located in different triads. Comonomer reactivity ratios of studied copolymerizations were determined.

  6. Relationship between electrochemical potentials and substitution reaction rates of ferrocene-containing β-diketonato rhodium(I) complexes; cytotoxicity of [Rh(FcCOCHCOPh)(cod)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, Jeanet; Swarts, Jannie C

    2011-06-14

    A series of ferrocene-containing rhodium complexes of the type [Rh(FcCOCHCOR)(cod)] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) with R = CF(3), 1, (E(pa)(Rh) = 269; E(o)'(Fc) = 329 mV vs. Fc/Fc(+)), CCl(3), 2, (E(pa) = 256; E(o)' = 312 mV), CH(3), 3, (E(pa) = 177; E(o)' = 232 mV), Ph = C(6)H(5), 4, (E(pa) = 184; E(o)' = 237 mV), and Fc = ferrocenyl = (C(5)H(5))Fe(C(5)H(4)), 5, (E(pa) = 135; E(o)'(Fc1) = 203; E(o)'(Fc2) = 312 mV), have been studied electrochemically in CH(3)CN. Results indicated that the rhodium(I) centre is irreversibly oxidised to Rh(III) in a two-electron transfer process before the ferrocenyl fragment is reversibly oxidized in a one-electron transfer process. The peak anodic (oxidation) potential, E(pa), (in V vs. Fc/Fc(+)) of the rhodium core in 1-5 relates to k(2), the second-order rate constant for the substitution of (FcCOCHCOR)(-) with 1,10-phenanthroline in [Rh(FcCOCHCOR)(cod)] to form [Rh(phen)(cod)](+) in methanol at 25 °C with the equation lnk(2) = 39.5 E(pa)(Rh) - 3.69, while the formal oxidation potential of the ferrocenyl groups in 1-5 relates to k(2) by lnk(2) = 40.8 E(o)'(Fc)-6.34. Complex 4 (IC(50) = 28.2 μmol dm(-3)) was twice as cytotoxic as the free FcCOCH(2)COPh ligand having IC(50) = 54.2 μmol dm(-3), but approximately one order of magnitude less toxic to human HeLa neoplastic cells than cisplatin (IC(50) = 2.3 μmol dm(-3)).

  7. Mechanism of dehydroxylation temperature decrease and high temperature phase transition of coal-bearing strata kaolinite intercalated by potassium acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongfei; Liu, Qinfu; Cui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Zhiliang; Frost, Ray L

    2012-06-15

    The thermal decomposition and dehydroxylation process of coal-bearing strata kaolinite-potassium acetate intercalation complex (CSKK) has been studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermal analysis, mass spectrometric analysis and infrared emission spectroscopy. The XRD results showed that the potassium acetate (KAc) have been successfully intercalated into coal-bearing strata kaolinite with an obvious basal distance increase of the first basal peak, and the positive correlation was found between the concentration of intercalation regent KAc and the degree of intercalation. As the temperature of the system is raised, the formation of KHCO(3), KCO(3) and KAlSiO(4), which is derived from the thermal decomposition or phase transition of CSKK, is observed in sequence. The IR results showed that new bands appeared, the position and intensities shift can also be found when the concentration of intercalation agent is raised. The thermal analysis and mass spectrometric analysis results revealed that CSKK is stable below 300°C, and the thermal decomposition products (H(2)O and CO(2)) were further proved by the mass spectrometric analysis. A comparison of thermal analysis results of original coal-bearing strata kaolinite and its intercalation complex gives new discovery that not only a new mass loss peak is observed at 285 °C, but also the temperature of dehydroxylation and dehydration of coal bearing strata kaolinite is decreased about 100 °C. This is explained on the basis of the interlayer space of the kaolinite increased obviously after being intercalated by KAc, which led to the interlayer hydrogen bonds weakened, enables the dehydroxylation from kaolinite surface more easily. Furthermore, the possible structural model for CSKK has been proposed, with further analysis required in order to prove the most possible structures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thin-walled nanoscrolls by multi-step intercalation from tubular halloysite-10 Å and its rearrangement upon peroxide treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zsirka, Balázs, E-mail: zsirkab@almos.vein.hu [University of Pannonia, Institute of Environmental Engineering, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Horváth, Erzsébet, E-mail: erzsebet.horvath@gmail.com [University of Pannonia, Institute of Environmental Engineering, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Szabó, Péter, E-mail: xysma@msn.com [University of Pannonia, Department of Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Juzsakova, Tatjána, E-mail: yuzhakova@almos.uni-pannon.hu [University of Pannonia, Institute of Environmental Engineering, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Szilágyi, Róbert K., E-mail: szilagyi@montana.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Fertig, Dávid, E-mail: fertig.david92@gmail.com [University of Pannonia, Department of Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Makó, Éva, E-mail: makoe@almos.vein.hu [University of Pannonia, Institute of Materials Engineering, P.O. Box 158, Veszprém 8201 Hungary (Hungary); Varga, Tamás, E-mail: vtamas@chem.u-szeged.hu [University of Szeged, Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, Rerrich B. tér 1., Szeged H-6720 Hungary (Hungary); and others

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Halloysite intercalation/delamination. • Thin-walled nanoscroll preparation. • Oxidative surface cleaning with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and heating. • X-ray diffraction, TEM, N{sub 2} adsorption, TG/DTG and FT-IR/ATR measurements. • Nanoscroll rearrangement, periodicity along the crystallographic ‘c’-axis. - Abstract: Surface modification of the halloysite-10 Å mineral with tubular morphology can be achieved by slightly modified procedures developed for the delamination of kaolinite minerals. The resulting delaminated halloysite nanoparticles have unexpected surface/morphological properties that display, new potentials in catalyst development. In this work, a four-step intercalation/delamination procedure is described for the preparation of thin-walled nanoscrolls from the multi-layered hydrated halloysite mineral that consists of (1) intercalation of halloysite with potassium acetate, (2) replacement intercalation with ethylene glycol, (3) replacement intercalation with hexylamine, and (4) delamination with toluene. The intercalation steps were followed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, thermogravimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. Delamination eliminated the crystalline order and the crystallite size along the ‘c’-axis, increased the specific surface area, greatly decreased the thickness of the mineral tubes to a monolayer, and shifted the pore diameter toward the micropore region. Unexpectedly, the removal of residual organics from intercalation steps adsorbed at the nanoscroll surface with a peroxide treatment resulted in partial recovery of crystallinity and increase of crystallite size along the ‘c’-crystal direction. The d(001) value showed a diffuse pattern at 7.4–7.7 Å due to the rearrangement of the thin-walled nanoscrolls toward the initial tubular morphology of the dehydrated halloysite-7 Å mineral.

  9. High-resolution 13C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Bouhrara, M.

    2011-09-06

    We present 13 C high-resolution magic-angle-turning (MAT) and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data of Cs and Rb intercalated single walled carbon nanotubes. We find two distinct phases at different intercalation levels. A simple charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites is the most probable alkali site.

  10. Rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation for the synthesis of quinonoid compounds: Significant Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activities and electrochemical studies of functionalized quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Guilherme A M; Silva, Thaissa L; Goulart, Marilia O F; de Simone, Carlos A; Barbosa, Juliana M C; Salomão, Kelly; de Castro, Solange L; Bower, John F; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N

    2017-08-18

    Thirty four halogen and selenium-containing quinones, synthesized by rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation and palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, were evaluated against bloodstream trypomastigotes of T. cruzi. We have identified fifteen compounds with IC 50 /24 h values of less than 2 μM. Electrochemical studies on A-ring functionalized naphthoquinones were also performed aiming to correlate redox properties with trypanocidal activity. For instance, (E)-5-styryl-1,4-naphthoquinone 59 and 5,8-diiodo-1,4-naphthoquinone 3, which are around fifty fold more active than the standard drug benznidazole, are potential derivatives for further investigation. These compounds represent powerful new agents useful in Chagas disease therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Theoretical study of the adsorption of rhodium on a TiO{sub 2}(1 1 0)-1 Multiplication-Sign 1 surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutombo, P., E-mail: mutombo@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Balazs, N. [Reaction Kinetics Laboratory, Institute of Nanochemistry and Catalysis, CRC of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 168, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Majzik, Z. [Institute of Physics of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Reaction Kinetics Laboratory, Institute of Nanochemistry and Catalysis, CRC of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 168, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Berko, A. [Reaction Kinetics Laboratory, Institute of Nanochemistry and Catalysis, CRC of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 168, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Chab, V. [Institute of Physics of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2012-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study the adsorption of rhodium on a TiO{sub 2}(1 1 0)-1 Multiplication-Sign 1 surface as a function of coverage. It was found that Rh atom prefers the hollow site between a bridging oxygen atom, a threefold oxygen atom and a fivefold coordinated Ti atom, regardless of the coverage used. DFT calculations also suggest that Rh-Rh interaction is attractive along the [0 0 1] direction, implying that the Rh 1D nanostructure should grow preferentially along this direction. Simulated Rh dimer clusters resemble strongly Pd dimers resolved in STM experiments suggesting that both metals occupy the same adsorption site at the TiO{sub 2}(1 1 0) surface.

  12. Polymeric optical sensors for selective and sensitive nitrite detection using cobalt(III) corrole and rhodium(III) porphyrin as ionophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si; Wo, Yaqi; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2014-09-16

    Cobalt(III) 5,10,15-tris(4-tert-butylphenyl) corrole with a triphenylphosphine axial ligand and rhodium(III) 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-tert-butylphenyl) porphyrin are incorporated into plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) films to fabricate nitrite-selective bulk optodes via absorbance measurements. The resulting films yield sensitive, fast and fully reversible response toward nitrite with significantly enhanced nitrite selectivity over other anions including lipophilic anions such as thiocyanate and perchlorate. The selectivity patterns differ greatly from the Hofmeister series based on anion lipophilicity and are consistent with selectivity obtained with potentiometric sensors based on the same ionophores. The optical nitrite sensors are shown to be useful for detecting rates of emission of nitric oxide (NO) from NO releasing polymers containing S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of rhodium-doped calcium niobate nanosheets for hydrogen production from a water/methanol system without cocatalyst loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yohei; Ida, Shintaro; Hyodo, Junji; Hagiwara, Hidehisa; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2011-11-16

    Rhodium-doped calcium niobate nanosheets were synthesized by exfoliating layered KCa(2)Nb(3-x)Rh(x)O(10-δ) and exhibited high photocatalytic activity for H(2) production from a water/methanol system without cocatalyst loading. The maximum H(2) production rate of the nanosheets was 165 times larger than that of the parent Rh-doped layered oxide. The quantum efficiency at 300 nm was 65%. In this system, the methanol was oxidized to formaldehyde (main product), formic acid, and carbon dioxide by holes, whereas electrons cause the reduction of water to H(2). The conductivity of the parent layered oxide was decreased by doping, which indicates the octahedral RhO(6) unit in the lattice of the nanosheet functions as an electron trap site. The RhO(6) units in the nanosheet probably also act as reaction sites for H(2) evolution.

  14. Investigating continuous co-intercalation of solvated lithium ions and graphite exfoliation in propylene carbonate-based electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hee-Youb; Jeong, Soon-Ki

    2018-01-01

    Forming an effective solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is a significant issue in lithium ion batteries that utilize graphite as a negative electrode material, because the SEI determines the reversibility of the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions into graphite for secondary batteries. In propylene carbonate (PC)-based electrolyte solutions, ceaseless co-intercalation of solvated lithium ions takes place because no effective SEI is formed. It is indisputable that this continuous co-intercalation leads to graphite exfoliation; however, the reason for this is currently not well understood. In this study, we investigate interfacial reactions that contribute to SEI formation on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in ethylene carbonate (EC) and PC-based electrolyte solutions by in situ atomic force microscopy. The blisters formed on HOPG after the decomposition of solvated lithium ions within the graphite layers do not change over the course of ten electrochemical cycles in an EC-based electrolyte solution. In contrast, when cycling in PC-based electrolytes, the blisters continually change, and the height at the vicinity of the graphite edge plane increases. These morphological changes are attributed to the continuous co-intercalation of solvated lithium ions in PC-based electrolyte solutions.

  15. Classical Keggin Intercalated into Layered Double Hydroxides: Facile Preparation and Catalytic Efficiency in Knoevenagel Condensation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yueqing; Fang, Yanjun; Zhang, Yingkui; Miras, Haralampos N; Song, Yu-Fei

    2015-10-12

    The family of polyoxometalate (POM) intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH) composite materials has shown great promise for the design of functional materials with numerous applications. It is known that intercalation of the classical Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) of [PW12 O40 ](3-) (PW12 ) into layered double hydroxides (LDHs) is very unlikely to take place by conventional ion exchange methods due to spatial and geometrical restrictions. In this paper, such an intercalated compound of Mg0.73 Al0.22 (OH)2 [PW12 O40 ]0.04 ⋅0.98 H2 O (Mg3 Al-PW12 ) has been successfully obtained by applying a spontaneous flocculation method. The Mg3 Al-PW12 has been fully characterized by using a wide range of methods (XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, EDX, XPS, FT-IR, NMR, BET). XRD patterns of Mg3 Al-PW12 exhibit no impurity phase usually observed next to the (003) diffraction peak. Subsequent application of the Mg3 Al-PW12 as catalyst in Knoevenagel condensation reactions of various aldehydes and ketones with Z-CH2 -Z' type substrates (ethyl cyanoacetate and malononitrile) at 60 °C in mixed solvents (V2-propanol :Vwater =2:1) demonstrated highly efficient catalytic activity. The synergistic effect between the acidic and basic sites of the Mg3 Al-PW12 composite proved to be crucial for the efficiency of the condensation reactions. Additionally, the Mg3 Al-PW12 -catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde with ethyl cyanoacetate demonstrated the highest turnover number (TON) of 47 980 reported so far for this reaction. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Renal type a intercalated cells contain albumin in organelles with aldosterone-regulated abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Buus Jensen

    Full Text Available Albumin has been identified in preparations of renal distal tubules and collecting ducts by mass spectrometry. This study aimed to establish whether albumin was a contaminant in those studies or actually present in the tubular cells, and if so, identify the albumin containing cells and commence exploration of the origin of the intracellular albumin. In addition to the expected proximal tubular albumin immunoreactivity, albumin was localized to mouse renal type-A intercalated cells and cells in the interstitium by three anti-albumin antibodies. Albumin did not colocalize with markers for early endosomes (EEA1, late endosomes/lysosomes (cathepsin D or recycling endosomes (Rab11. Immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed the presence of albumin-containing large spherical membrane associated bodies in the basal parts of intercalated cells. Message for albumin was detected in mouse renal cortex as well as in a wide variety of other tissues by RT-PCR, but was absent from isolated connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Wild type I MDCK cells showed robust uptake of fluorescein-albumin from the basolateral side but not from the apical side when grown on permeable support. Only a subset of cells with low peanut agglutinin binding took up albumin. Albumin-aldosterone conjugates were also internalized from the basolateral side by MDCK cells. Aldosterone administration for 24 and 48 hours decreased albumin abundance in connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts from mouse kidneys. We suggest that albumin is produced within the renal interstitium and taken up from the basolateral side by type-A intercalated cells by clathrin and dynamin independent pathways and speculate that the protein might act as a carrier of less water-soluble substances across the renal interstitium from the capillaries to the tubular cells.

  17. Screening of Threading Bis-Intercalators Binding to Duplex DNA by Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzitelli, Carolyn L.; Chu, Yongjun; Reczek, Joseph J.; Iverson, Brent L.

    2007-01-01

    The DNA binding of novel threading bis-intercalators V1, trans-D1, and cis-C1, which contain two naphthalene diimide (NDI) intercalation units connected by a scaffold, was evaluated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and DNAse footprinting techniques. ESI-MS experiments confirmed that V1, the ligand containing the –Gly3-Lys-peptide scaffold, binds to a DNA duplex containing the 5'-GGTACC-3' specific binding site identified in previous NMR-based studies. The ligand formed complexes with a ligand/DNA binding stoichiometry of 1:1, even when there was excess ligand in solution. Trans-D1 and cis-C1 are new ligands containing a rigid spiro-tricyclic scaffold in the trans- and cis- orientations, respectively. Preliminary DNAse footprinting experiments identified possible specific binding sites of 5'-CAGTGA-5' for trans-D1 and 5'-GGTACC-3' for cis-C1. ESI-MS experiments revealed that both ligands bound to DNA duplexes containing the respective specific binding sequences, with cis-C1 exhibiting the most extensive binding based on a higher fraction of bound DNA value. Cis-C1 formed complexes with a dominant 1:1 binding stoichiometry, whereas trans-D1 was able to form 2:1 complexes at ligand/DNA molar ratios ≥ 1 which is suggestive of non-specific binding. Collisional activated dissociation (CAD) experiments indicate that DNA complexes containing V1, trans-D1, and cis-C1 have a unique fragmentation pathway, which was also observed for complexes containing the commercially available bisintercalator echinomycin, as a result of similar binding interactions, marked by intercalation in addition to hydrogen bonding by the scaffold with the DNA major or minor groove. PMID:17098442

  18. Search for DNA damage by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase involves early intercalation by an aromatic residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Jenna M; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2017-09-29

    DNA repair enzymes recognize and remove damaged bases that are embedded in the duplex. To gain access, most enzymes use nucleotide flipping, whereby the target nucleotide is rotated 180° into the active site. In human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG), the enzyme that initiates base excision repair of alkylated bases, the flipped-out nucleotide is stabilized by intercalation of the side chain of tyrosine 162 that replaces the lesion nucleobase. Previous kinetic studies provided evidence for the formation of a transient complex that precedes the stable flipped-out complex, but it is not clear how this complex differs from nonspecific complexes. We used site-directed mutagenesis and transient-kinetic approaches to investigate the timing of Tyr 162 intercalation for AAG. The tryptophan substitution (Y162W) appeared to be conservative, because the mutant protein retained a highly favorable equilibrium constant for flipping the 1, N 6 -ethenoadenine (ϵA) lesion, and the rate of N -glycosidic bond cleavage was identical to that of the wild-type enzyme. We assigned the tryptophan fluorescence signal from Y162W by removing two native tryptophan residues (W270A/W284A). Stopped-flow experiments then demonstrated that the change in tryptophan fluorescence of the Y162W mutant is extremely rapid upon binding to either damaged or undamaged DNA, much faster than the lesion-recognition and nucleotide flipping steps that were independently determined by monitoring the ϵA fluorescence. These observations suggest that intercalation by this aromatic residue is one of the earliest steps in the search for DNA damage and that this interaction is important for the progression of AAG from nonspecific searching to specific-recognition complexes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Rapid exchange between atmospheric CO2 and carbonate anion intercalated within magnesium rich layered double hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Pathik; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ohki, Shinobu; Tansho, Masataka; Shimizu, Tadashi; Eisaku, Nii; Sasai, Ryo; Labuta, Jan; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Iyi, Nobuo

    2014-10-22

    The carbon cycle, by which carbon atoms circulate between atmosphere, oceans, lithosphere, and the biosphere of Earth, is a current hot research topic. The carbon cycle occurring in the lithosphere (e.g., sedimentary carbonates) is based on weathering and metamorphic events so that its processes are considered to occur on the geological time scale (i.e., over millions of years). In contrast, we have recently reported that carbonate anions intercalated within a hydrotalcite (Mg0.75Al0.25(OH)2(CO3)0.125·yH2O), a class of a layered double hydroxide (LDH), are dynamically exchanging on time scale of hours with atmospheric CO2 under ambient conditions. (Ishihara et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 18040-18043). The use of (13)C-labeling enabled monitoring by infrared spectroscopy of the dynamic exchange between the initially intercalated (13)C-labeled carbonate anions and carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2. In this article, we report the significant influence of Mg/Al ratio of LDH on the carbonate anion exchange dynamics. Of three LDHs of various Mg/Al ratios of 2, 3, or 4, magnesium-rich LDH (i.e., Mg/Al ratio = 4) underwent extremely rapid exchange of carbonate anions, and most of the initially intercalated carbonate anions were replaced with carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2 within 30 min. Detailed investigations by using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, adsorption, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR revealed that magnesium rich LDH has chemical and structural features that promote the exchange of carbonate anions. Our results indicate that the unique interactions between LDH and CO2 can be optimized simply by varying the chemical composition of LDH, implying that LDH is a promising material for CO2 storage and/or separation.

  20. Molecular Simulation Models of Carbon Dioxide Intercalation in Hydrated Sodium Montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Saidi, Wissam [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Romanov, Vyacheslav [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Cygan, Randall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jordan, Kenneth [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Guthrie, George [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-22

    In this study, classical molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory (DFT)-based molecular dynamics are used to elucidate the process of CO2 intercalation into hydrated Na-montmorillonite at P-T conditions relevant to geological formations suitable for CO2 storage. Of particular interest are the structural and transport properties of interlayer species after CO2 intercalation. The conducted simulations allowed the research team to quantify expansion/contraction of smectite as a function of CO2 and H2O compositions. The resulting swelling curves can be used to gauge the amount of stored CO2, compare it to the experiment, and estimate changes in geomechanical properties of the storage formation. The obtained results showed that the infrared signal of the asymmetric stretch vibration of CO2 molecule is extremely sensitive to the solvent environment. The extent of the frequency shift relative to the gas-phase value can be used to probe hydration level in the interlayer with intercalated CO2. Interaction of supercritical CO2 with brine in deep geological formations promotes an increase of hydrophobicity of clay surfaces. As a result of wettability alteration, estimated diffusion constants of CO2 and H2O increase with the increased CO2 load; this can contribute to faster migration of CO2 throughout the formation.

  1. Methotrexatum intercalated layered double hydroxides: Statistical design, mechanism explore and bioassay study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao-Feng [Department of Gastroenterology, Weihai municipal hospital, Weihai 264200 (China); Liu, Su-Qing [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Material, College of Chemistry and Material Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Li, Shu-Ping, E-mail: lishuping@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Material, College of Chemistry and Material Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2015-04-01

    A series of methotrexatum intercalated layered double hydroxide (MTX/LDH for short) hybrids have been synthesized by a mechanochemical–hydrothermal method, the statistical experiments are planned and conducted to find out the critical factor influencing the physicochemical properties. Four variables, i.e., addition of NaOH solution, grinding duration, hydrothermal temperature and time, are chosen to play as the examined factors in the orthogonal design. Furthermore, three respective levels, i.e., high, medium and low levels, are conducted in the design. The resulting hybrids are then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, transmission electron microscope (TEM) graphs and Zeta potentials. XRD diffractions indicate that MTX anions have been successfully intercalated into LDH interlayers and the amount of NaOH solution can change the gallery height greatly. The information from TEM graphs and Zeta potentials state that the increase of alkali solution gives rise to regular morphology and the increase of Zeta potentials. As a result of the statistical analysis, addition of alkali solution is the major factor affecting the morphology and drug-loading capacity. At last, the mechanism of particle growth is explored emphatically, and the anticancer efficacy of some MTX/LDH hybrids is estimated by MTT assay on A549 cells as well. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of synthesis and properties of MTX intercalated LDH hybrids. - Highlights: • Increasing NaOH solution gives rise to high drug-loading capacity. • Increasing the alkali solution leads to high layer charge and regular morphology. • The monodispersity has critical effect on the tumor suppression efficiency.

  2. Colloidal stability, surface characterisation and intracellular accumulation of Rhodium(II) citrate coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in breast tumour: a promising platform for cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Nunes, Eloiza da [Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus Samambaia, Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Lemos Brettas Carneiro, Marcella; Guirelli Simoes de Oliveira, Ricardo; Nair Bao, Sonia [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas (Brazil); Ribeiro de Souza, Aparecido, E-mail: ardsouza@quimica.ufg.br [Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus Samambaia, Instituto de Quimica (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    The colloidal stability of a rhodium(II) citrate, Rh{sub 2}(H{sub 2}cit){sub 4}, coating on the surface of maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles was studied and compared in different dispersion media. The adsorption of Rh{sub 2}(H{sub 2}cit){sub 4} at the water-maghemite interface was evaluated as a function of pH and complex concentration. A slight pH-dependent adsorption of the complex was observed with a maximum at pH 3. The colloidal stability of the functionalised nanoparticles with different amounts of Rh{sub 2}(H{sub 2}cit){sub 4} as a function of pH was evaluated using dynamic light scattering measurements. The particles have a mean magnetic core size of 5.6 nm and the hydrodynamic diameters are approximately 60 nm, which remained unchanged in the pH range in which the samples were a stable sol. The tolerance to different dispersion media, which were deionised water, saline, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), foetal bovine serum (FBS) and NaCl solutions with different concentrations, was investigated. At moderate ionic strength, the colloidal stability of the dispersions was similar in saline and in PBS compared to the stability of dispersions diluted in water. Moreover, the intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles in 4T1 breast tumour was examined by ultrastructural analysis performed by transmission electron microscopy. The rhodium(II) citrate-coated nanoparticles were found mostly in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Thus, we suggest that these SPIO nanoparticles functionalized with Rh{sub 2}(H{sub 2}Cit){sub 4} can be potential tools for anticancer therapy.

  3. Surgical principles for managing stage IB2, IIA2, and IIB uterine cervical cancer (Bulky Tumors) in Japan: a survey of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Mikio; Aoki, Yoichi; Sakamoto, Masaru; Shimada, Muneaki; Takeshima, Nobuhiro; Fujiwara, Hisaya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kita, Tunekazu; Takizawa, Ken

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the current operative management of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2, IIA2, and IIB uterine cervical cancer (bulky tumors) in Japan by surveying the member institutions of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group. We conducted a survey to assess current operative management, including indications and treatment, at all 199 active member institutions of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group. A total of 166 institutions (83.4%) responded to the survey. For patients with stage IIB squamous cell carcinoma, 35.5% (59/166) of the institutions performed surgery. For stage IIB nonsquamous cell carcinoma, surgery was performed at 88 (53.7%) of 164 institutions. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was provided by 75 (45.5%) of 165 institutions (actively in 44 and reluctantly in 31). At 101 (61.2%) of 165 institutions, para-aortic node dissection was performed as part of radical surgery in patients with any indications. At 96 (57.9%) of 166 institutions, high-risk patients underwent chemoradiotherapy after surgery. On the other hand, adjuvant chemotherapy was given to high-risk and intermediate-risk patients at 19.9% and 33.1% institutions, respectively. More than half of the 166 institutions considered the number of metastatic nodes (91/166, 54.8%) and tumor histology (116/166, 69.9%) when selecting adjuvant therapy. This survey provided information regarding the current surgical management of uterine cervical cancer (stages IB2, IIA2, and IIA) in Japan.

  4. Luminescent copper(ı) (pseudo)halide complexes with neocuproine and a novel bulky tris (aminomethyl) phosphine derived from 2-piperazinopyridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starosta, Radosław, E-mail: radoslaw.starosta@chem.uni.wroc.pl; Komarnicka, Urszula K.; Puchalska, Małgorzata

    2013-11-15

    A novel bulky phosphine derived from 2-piperazinopyridine P(CH{sub 2}N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}N-2-py){sub 3} (1) and its chalcogenide derivatives (oxide, sulfide and selenide) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Next, two new copper(I) iodide or isothiocyanate complexes with 1 and 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmp): [CuI(dmp)(1)] (1I) and [CuNCS(dmp)(1)] (1T), have been also synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and studied by NMR, UV–vis, IR and luminescence spectroscopies. The X-ray structure of the complex 1T·1.81(CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}) was determined. The coordination geometry around the Cu(I) center is pseudo-tetrahedral with distortions resulting mostly from the molecular packing in the crystal cell. Both complexes exhibit orange photoluminescence in the solid state, which is much stronger for 1I than for 1T. The luminescence spectra of both complexes at room and 77 K temperatures show relatively large bands with a typical batochromic shift accompanying the lowering of the temperature. On the basis of TDDFT calculations we interpreted these bands as of (MX,MPR{sub 3})LCT type resulting mainly from the transitions from the copper–iodine (or isothiocyanate) bonds and a small admixture of copper–phosphine bonds to antibonding orbitals of dmp diimine. Highlights: • A novel tris(aminomethyl)phosphine is obtained from 2-piperazinopyridine • Two new CuI and CuNCS complexes with dmp and a novel phosphine are presented. • An X-ray structure of one of the complexes is characterized. • Solid-state UV–vis and luminescence spectra of the complexes are discussed. • Main absorbance and luminescence bands are of (MX,MPR{sub 3})LCT type.

  5. Preparation of bulky amorphous Zr-Al-Co-Ni-Cu alloys by copper mold casting and their thermal and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Akihisa; Zhang, Tao; Masumoto, Tsuyoshi

    1995-03-01

    Bulky amorphous alloys were found to form in Zr-Al-M (M = Co, Ni, Cu) systems by arc melting on a copper hearth. The largest thickness for glass formation is 6.1 mm for Zr60Al10Co3Ni9Cu18, 6.8 mm for Zr60Al15Co5Ni15Cu5 and 6.2 mm for Zr55Al20Co(17.5)Ni(2.5)Cu5. The optimum composition for glass-forming ability shifts from the Cu-rich side to the Co-rich side through the Ni-rich side with increasing Al content from 10 to 20%. The use of a metallic mold casting process enabled the formation of amorphous cylinders with the largest diameter of 7 mm for the three alloys. The compositional effect for the large glass-forming ability has also been discussed by taking the present data into consideration. The cast amorphous Zr60Al10Co3Ni9Cu18 alloy subjected to tensile testing exhibits distinct serrated flow before final fracture. The generation of the serrated flow is noticed because the alloy has a ductile nature which enables the momentary stop of the shear sliding. The Young's modulus, tensile fracture strength and fracture elongation are 97 GPa, 1510 MPa and 2.0%, respectively. The fracture occurs along the maximum shear plane and the fracture surface consists of a well-developed vein pattern. The size of their veins is about 10 times as large as that for the melt-spun ribbon and hence the shear deformation region occurs in a much wider region for the cast alloy, indicating the necessity of a larger amount of energy up to final fracture. The finding of the amorphous alloys with the large glass-forming ability and the extremely ductile nature is important for the subsequent development of metallic glassy materials.

  6. Comparative analysis of the influence of bulky β-alkyl substituents on fluorescent properties of some series of spatially distorted meso-phenyl substituted porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagun, E. I.; Zenkevich, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    We present results of our systematic investigation and comparative analysis of the spectral-kinetic properties of absorption and fluorescence of two series of related planar porphyrins in liquid media at 293 K, in which deviations from the planarity are caused by contact steric interactions of eight peripheral β-pyrrole methyl (-CH3) or ethyl (-C2H5) groups with a successively increasing number (from one to four) and varying position of meso-phenyl (Ph) substituents in the porphyrin macrocycle. It is substantiated that considerable differences between the spectral-kinetic properties of absorption and fluorescence of the octaethyl- and octamethylporphyrin molecules, which have the same number of meso-phenyl substituents, are caused by fundamentally different roles played by β-ethyl and β-methyl groups, which differ in volume and which determine differences in the character of steric interactions and the efficiency of the dynamic relaxation of the tetrapyrrole macrocycle. It is revealed that there is a difference between calculated f theor and experimentally determined f exp values of the fluorescence probability, which is caused by conformational rearrangements of spatially distorted porphyrin macrocycles in the S 1 excited state, which reduce the oscillator strength and lower the energy of the long-wavelength transition S 0 → S 1. It is found that the chemical nature, the size, and the number of bulky -CH3 or -C2H5 β-pyrrole groups affect weakly rate constants of fluorescence quenching by molecular oxygen and do not create noticeable steric hindrances for contact interactions of the oxygen molecule with the π-conjugated system of the tetrapyrrole macrocycle.

  7. Lowering Band Gap of an Electroactive Metal-Organic Framework via Complementary Guest Intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiyong; Panda, Dillip K; Gordillo, Monica A; Khatun, Amina; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Saha, Sourav

    2017-09-27

    A new honeycomb-shaped electroactive metal-organic framework (MOF) has been constructed from an electron deficient naphthalenediimide (NDI) ligand equipped with two terminal salicylic acid groups. π-Intercalation of electron-rich planar tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) guests between the NDI ligands stacked along the walls lowers the electronic band gap of the material by ca. 1 eV. An improved electron delocalization through the guest-mediated π-donor/acceptor stacks is attributed to the diminished band gap of the doped material, which forecasts an improved electrical conductivity.

  8. Formation of hydrotalcite in aqueous solutions and intercalation of ATP by anion exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Hiroki; Chiba, Jun; Ito, Masahiro; Takeda, Takashi; Kikkawa, Shinichi; MAWATARI, Yasuteru; TABATA, Masayoshi

    2006-01-01

    The formation reaction and the intercalation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were studied for hydrotalcite (HT), a layered double hydroxide (LDH) of magnesium and aluminum. Hydrotalcite with nitrate ions in the interlayer (HT-NO3) was formed (A) by dropwise addition of a solution of magnesium and aluminum nitrates (pH ca. 3) to a sodium hydroxide solution (pH ca. 14) until the pH decreased from 14 to 10 and (B) by dropwise addition of the NaOH solution to the solution of magnesium and aluminu...

  9. Unforeseen high temperature and humidity stability of FeCl3 intercalated few layer graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wehenkel, Dominique Joseph; Bointon, Thomas Hardisty; Booth, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of the stability of the structure and electrical properties of FeCl3 intercalated few-layer graphene to high levels of humidity and high temperature. Complementary experimental techniques such as electrical transport, high resolution transmission electron...... microscopy and Raman spectroscopy conclusively demonstrate the unforseen stability of this transparent conductor to a relative humidity up to 100% at room temperature for 25 days, to a temperature up to 150 degrees C in atmosphere and to a temperature as high as 620 degrees C in vacuum, that is more than...

  10. Crystal structure of a four-stranded intercalated DNA: d(C4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Cai, L.; Zhang, X.; Rich, A.

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of d(C4) solved at 2.3-A resolution reveals a four-stranded molecule composed of two interdigitated or intercalated duplexes. The duplexes are held together by hemiprotonated cytosine-cytosine base pairs and are parallel stranded, but the two duplexes point in opposite directions. The molecule has a slow right-handed twist of 12.4 degrees between covalently linked cytosine base pairs, and the base stacking distance is 3.1 A. This is in general agreement with the NMR studies. A biological role for DNA in this conformation is suggested.

  11. Electron-phonon interaction and pairing mechanism in superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margine, E R; Lambert, Henry; Giustino, Feliciano

    2016-02-19

    Using the ab initio anisotropic Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions, we investigate the electron-phonon interaction and the pairing mechanism in the recently-reported superconducting Ca-intercalated bilayer graphene. We find that C6CaC6 can support phonon-mediated superconductivity with a critical temperature Tc = 6.8-8.1 K, in good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations indicate that the low-energy Caxy vibrations are critical to the pairing, and that it should be possible to resolve two distinct superconducting gaps on the electron and hole Fermi surface pockets.

  12. Efficient dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by hydrophobic green rust intercalated with dodecanoate anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayala Luis, Karina Barbara; Ginette Anneliese Cooper, Nicola; Bender Koch, Christian

    2012-01-01

    similar to those found in heavily contaminated groundwater close to polluted industrial sites (14 988 mu M) was reduced mainly to the fully dechlorinated products carbon monoxide (CO, yields >54 and formic acid (HCOOH, yields >6. Minor formation of chloroform (CF), the only chlorinated degradation product......The reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by Fe-II-Fe-III hydroxide (green rust) intercalated with dodecanoate, (Fe4Fe2III)-Fe-II (OH)(12)(C12H23O2)(2)center dot gamma H2O (designated GR(C12)), at pH similar to 8 and at room temperature was investigated. CT at concentration levels...

  13. A lipid membrane intercalating conjugated oligoelectrolyte enables electrode driven succinate production in Shewanella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, AW; Garner, LE; Nevin, KP; Woodard, TL; Franks, AE; Lovley, DR; Sumner, JJ; Sund, CJ; Bazan, GC

    2013-06-01

    An amphiphilic conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE) that spontaneously intercalates into lipid membranes enables Shewanella oneidensis to use a graphite electrode as the sole electron donor for succinate production. Current consumed in a poised electrochemical system by Shewanella with micromolar concentrations of COE correlates well with the succinate produced via fumarate reduction as determined by HPLC analysis. Confocal microscopy confirms incorporation of the COE into the microbes on the electrode surface. This work presents a unique strategy to induce favorable bio-electronic interactions for the production of reduced microbial metabolites.

  14. Lithium intercalation and interfacial kinetics of composite anodes formed by oxidized graphite and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, M.; Nobili, F.; Dsoke, S.; Tossici, R.; Marassi, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Camerino, Via S. Agostino, 1, 62032 Camerino (MC) (Italy); D' Amico, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri, 9, 62032 Camerino (MC) (Italy); Croce, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita degli Studi ' ' G. D' Annunzio' ' , Via dei Vestini, 31, 66013 Chieti (Italy)

    2009-05-01

    The electrochemical behavior of composite anodes prepared either by mixing partially oxidized graphite and Cu powders or by coating the pristine partially oxidized graphite electrodes with few-nanometer-thick Cu layers has been studied by slow-scan-rate cyclic voltammetry (SSCV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles over the temperature range of -30 C to 20 C. The interfacial intercalation/deintercalation kinetics has also been investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The role of the Cu in improving low-temperature performances and kinetics of graphite electrodes is discussed. (author)

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Graphene Thin Films by Chemical Reduction of Exfoliated and Intercalated Graphite Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Thema

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial flakes of graphite were prepared into functionalized graphene oxide (GO by chemical treatment. After the exfoliation and intercalation of graphene into functionalized graphene oxide that formed stable colloidal dispersion in polar aprotic solvent, the reduction process was undertaken by continuous stirring with hydrazine hydrate. The reduced material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, attenuated total reflectance (ATR FT-IR, ultraviolet visible (UV-vis, atomic force microscopy (AFM and Raman spectroscopy which confirm the oxidation of graphite and reduction of graphene oxide into graphene sheet.

  16. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach

  17. Protein intercalation in DNA as one of main modes of fixation of the most stable chromatin loop domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. I. Chopei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The main mechanism of DNA track formation during comet assay of nucleoids, obtained after removal of cell membranes and most of proteins, is the extension to anode of negatively supercoiled DNA loops attached to proteins, remaining in nucleoid after lysis treatment. The composition of these residual protein structures and the nature of their strong interaction with the loop ends remain poorly studied. In this work we investigated the influence of chloroquine intercalation and denaturation of nucleoid proteins on the efficiency of electrophoretic track formation during comet assay. The results obtained suggest that even gentle protein denaturation is sufficient to reduce considerably the effectiveness of the DNA loop migration due to an increase in the loops size. The same effect was observed under local DNA unwinding upon chloroquine intercalation around the sites of the attachment of DNA to proteins. The topological interaction (protein intercalation into the double helix between DNA loop ends and nucleoid proteins is discussed.

  18. Simultaneous Intercalation of 1-Naphthylacetic Acid and Indole-3-butyric Acid into Layered Double Hydroxides and Controlled Release Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release formulations have been shown to have potential in overcoming the drawbacks of conventional plant growth regulators formulations. A controlled-release formulation of 1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA simultaneous intercalated MgAl-layered double hydroxides (LDHs was prepared. The synthetic nanohybrid material was characterized by various techniques, and release kinetics was studied. NAA and IBA anions located in the gallery of MgAl-LDHs with bilayer arrangement, and the nanohybrids particles were of typical plate-like shape with the lateral size of 50–100 nm. The results revealed that NAA and IBA have been intercalated into the interlayer spaces of MgAl-LDHs. The release of NAA and IBA fits pseudo-second-order model and is dependent on temperature, pH value, and release medium. The nanohybrids of NAA and IBA simultaneously intercalated in LDHs possessed good controlled release properties.

  19. Hexagonal boron nitride intercalated multi-layer graphene: a possible ultimate solution to ultra-scaled interconnect technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Jun Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We proposed intercalation of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN in multilayer graphene to improve its performance in ultra-scaled interconnects for integrated circuit. The effect of intercalated hBN layer in bilayer graphene is investigated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. We find the hBN intercalated bilayer graphene exhibit enhanced transport properties compared with pristine bilayer ones, and the improvement is attributed to suppression of interlayer scattering and good planar bonding condition of inbetween hBN layer. Based on these results, we proposed a via structure that not only benefits from suppressed interlayer scattering between multilayer graphene, but also sustains the unique electrical properties of graphene when many graphene layers are stacking together. The ideal current density across the structure can be as high as 4.6×109 A/cm2 at 1V, which is very promising for the future high-performance interconnect.

  20. Optical contrast spectra studies for determining thickness of stage-1 graphene-FeCl{sub 3} intercalation compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Wen-Peng, E-mail: han-wenpeng@163.com, E-mail: yunze.long@163.com; Yan, Xu; Zhao, Hui [College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Li, Qiao-Qiao; Lu, Yan [State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Long, Yun-Ze, E-mail: han-wenpeng@163.com, E-mail: yunze.long@163.com [College of Physics, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials and Optoelectronic Devices, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Because of novel features in their structural, electronic, magnetic and optical properties, especially potential applications in nanoelectronics, the few-layer graphene intercalation compounds (FLGICs) have been intensively studied recently. In this work, the dielectric constant of the doped graphene of stage-1 FeCl{sub 3}-GIC is obtained by fitting the optical contrast spectra. And fully intercalated stage-1 FeCl{sub 3}-FLGICs were prepared by micromechanical cleavage method from graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) for the first time. Finally, we demonstrated that the thickness of stage-1 FeCl{sub 3}-GICs by micromechanical cleavage can be determined by optical contrast spectra. This method also can be used to other FLGICs, such as SbCl{sub 5}-FLGICs and AuCl{sub 5}-FLGICs, etc.

  1. Synthesis of Various Polyaniline / Clay Nanocomposites Derived from Aniline and Substituted Aniline Derivatives by Mechanochemical Intercalation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kalaivasan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyaniline clay nanocomposite can be prepared by mechano-chemical method in which intercalation of anilinium ion into the clay lattices accomplished by mechanical grinding of sodium montmorillonite (Na+MMT in presence of anilinium hydrochloride at room temperature using mortar & pestle for about 30 min and subsequent grinding with oxidizing agent, ammonium peroxysulfate. The appearance of green colour indicates the formation of polyaniline/clay nanocomposite (PANI/Clay. Similarly aniline derivatives like o-toludine and o-anisidine in the form of HCl salt can form intercalation into the clay lattices. The intercalated aniline derivatives were ground mechanically in presence of oxidizing agent ammonium peroxysulfate lead to formation of substituted polyaniline/ clay nanocomposites. The characteristics of various polyaniline-clay nanocomposites were investigated using UV-Visible, FT-IR, cyclic voltammetry studies.

  2. Hexagonal boron nitride intercalated multi-layer graphene: a possible ultimate solution to ultra-scaled interconnect technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Jun; Sun, Qing-Qing; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Peng-Fei; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2012-03-01

    We proposed intercalation of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in multilayer graphene to improve its performance in ultra-scaled interconnects for integrated circuit. The effect of intercalated hBN layer in bilayer graphene is investigated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. We find the hBN intercalated bilayer graphene exhibit enhanced transport properties compared with pristine bilayer ones, and the improvement is attributed to suppression of interlayer scattering and good planar bonding condition of inbetween hBN layer. Based on these results, we proposed a via structure that not only benefits from suppressed interlayer scattering between multilayer graphene, but also sustains the unique electrical properties of graphene when many graphene layers are stacking together. The ideal current density across the structure can be as high as 4.6×109 A/cm2 at 1V, which is very promising for the future high-performance interconnect.

  3. Adsorptive and photocatalytic removal of phenol by layered niobates organically modified through intercalation and silylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiba, Shosuke; Haga, Jun-ichi; Hashimoto, Sachika; Nakato, Teruyuki

    2010-12-01

    Layered hexaniobate K4Nb6O17 was modified with dodecylammonium ions and octadecyltrimethoxysilane molecules, which were held in the interlayer spaces by electrostatic interactions and covalent attachment to the layers, respectively. Interlayer spacing of the niobate was expanded by incorporation of the bulky organic species. Vapor adsorption isotherms of benzene and water indicated hydrophobic interlayer microenvironments of the organically modified niobates. Both of the modified niobates fairly adsorbed phenol dissolved in water. The photocatalytic activity of hexaniobate allowed the organically modified materials to photocatalytically decompose phenol upon UV irradiation. Decomposition time courses and quantitative analysis of phenol present in the system indicated that the phenol molecules adsorbed on the niobates were preferentially degraded. XRD and IR analyses of the modified niobates indicated that the silylated niobate was more durable than the ion-exchanged sample; the former kept the structure during the photocatalytic process while the latter was partly collapsed.

  4. Effect of intercalator substituent and nucleotide sequence on the stability of DNA- and RNA-naphthalimide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Charles A; Hudson, Graham A; Hardebeck, Laura K E; Jolley, Elizabeth A; Ren, Yi; Lewis, Michael; Znosko, Brent M

    2015-07-01

    DNA intercalators are commonly used as anti-cancer and anti-tumor agents. As a result, it is imperative to understand how changes in intercalator structure affect binding affinity to DNA. Amonafide and mitonafide, two naphthalimide derivatives that are active against HeLa and KB cells in vitro, were previously shown to intercalate into DNA. Here, a systematic study was undertaken to change the 3-substituent on the aromatic intercalator 1,8-naphthalimide to determine how 11 different functional groups with a variety of physical and electronic properties affect binding of the naphthalimide to DNA and RNA duplexes of different sequence compositions and lengths. Wavelength scans, NMR titrations, and circular dichroism were used to investigate the binding mode of 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives to short synthetic DNA. Optical melting experiments were used to measure the change in melting temperature of the DNA and RNA duplexes due to intercalation, which ranged from 0 to 19.4°C. Thermal stabilities were affected by changing the substituent, and several patterns and idiosyncrasies were identified. By systematically varying the 3-substituent, the binding strength of the same derivative to various DNA and RNA duplexes was compared. The binding strength of different derivatives to the same DNA and RNA sequences was also compared. The results of these comparisons shed light on the complexities of site specificity and binding strength in DNA-intercalator complexes. For example, the consequences of adding a 5'-TpG-3' or 5'-GpT-3' step to a duplex is dependent on the sequence composition of the duplex. When added to a poly-AT duplex, naphthalimide binding was enhanced by 5.6-11.5°C, but when added to a poly-GC duplex, naphthalimide binding was diminished by 3.2-6.9°C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Redox-neutral rhodium-catalyzed C-H functionalization of arylamine N-oxides with diazo compounds: primary C(sp(3))-H/C(sp(2))-H activation and oxygen-atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing; Chen, Zhaoqiang; Yang, Yaxi; Ai, Wen; Tang, Huanyu; Wu, Yunxiang; Zhu, Weiliang; Li, Yuanchao

    2015-10-05

    An unprecedented rhodium(III)-catalyzed regioselective redox-neutral annulation reaction of 1-naphthylamine N-oxides with diazo compounds was developed to afford various biologically important 1H-benzo[g]indolines. This coupling reaction proceeds under mild reaction conditions and does not require external oxidants. The only by-products are dinitrogen and water. More significantly, this reaction represents the first example of dual functiaonalization of unactivated a primary C(sp(3) )H bond and C(sp(2) )H bond with diazocarbonyl compounds. DFT calculations revealed that an intermediate iminium is most likely involved in the catalytic cycle. Moreover, a rhodium(III)-catalyzed coupling of readily available tertiary aniline N-oxides with α-diazomalonates was also developed under external oxidant-free conditions to access various aminomandelic acid derivatives by an O-atom-transfer reaction. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Intercalation of a nonionic surfactant (C10E3) bilayer into a Na-montmorillonite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guégan, Régis

    2010-12-21

    A nonionic surfactant, triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether (C(10)E(3)), characterized by its lamellar phase state, was introduced in the interlayer of a Na-montmorillonite clay at several concentrations. The synthesized organoclays were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering in conjunction with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and adsorption isotherms. Experiments showed that a bilayer of C(10)E(3) was intercalated into the interlayer space of the naturally exchanged Na-montmorillonite, resulting in the aggregation of the lyotropic liquid crystal state in the lamellar phase. This behavior strongly differs from previous observations of confinement of nonionic surfactants in clays where the expansion of the interlayer space was limited to two monolayers parallel to the silicate surface and cationic surfactants in clays where the intercalation of organic compounds is introduced into the clay galleries through ion exchange. The confinement of a bilayer of C(10)E(3) nonionic surfactant in clays offers new perspectives for the realization of hybrid nanomaterials, since the synthesized organoclays preserve the electrostatic characteristics of the clays, thus allowing further ion exchange while presenting at the same time a hydrophobic surface and a maximum opening of the interlayer space for the adsorption of neutral organic molecules of important size with functional properties.

  7. Concerted intercalation and minor groove recognition of DNA by a homodimeric thiazole orange dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkenborg, J; Gadjev, N I; Deligeorgiev, T; Jacobsen, J P

    2000-01-01

    The thiazole orange dye TOTO binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by a sequence selective bis-intercalation. Each chromophore is sandwiched between two base pairs in a (5'-CpT-3'):(5'-ApG-3') site, and the linker spans two base pairs in the minor groove. We have used one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy to examine the dsDNA binding of an analogue of TOTO in which the linker has been modified to contain a bipyridyl group (viologen) that has minor groove binding properties. We have investigated the binding of this analogue, called TOTOBIPY, to three different dsDNA sequences containing a 5'-CTAG-3', a 5'-CTTAG-3', and a 5'-CTATAG-3' sites, respectively, demonstrating that TOTOBIPY prefers to span three base pairs. The many intermolecular NOE connectivities between TOTOBIPY and the d(CGCTTAGCG):d(CGCTAAGCG) oligonucleotide in the complex shows that the bipyridyl-containing linker is positioned in the minor groove and spans three base pairs. Consequently, we have succeeded in designing and synthesizing a ligand that recognizes an extended recognition sequence of dsDNA as the result of a concerted intercalation and minor groove binding mode.

  8. The kinetics of YOYO-1 intercalation into single molecules of double-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Marcel; Dryden, David T F

    2010-12-10

    The cyanine dye, YOYO-1, has frequently been used in single DNA molecule imaging work to stain double-stranded DNA as it fluoresces strongly when bound. The binding of YOYO-1 lengthens the DNA due to bis-intercalation. We have investigated the kinetics of binding, via this increase in DNA length, for single, hydrodynamically-stretched molecules of lambda DNA observed via Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. The rate and degree of lengthening in 40mM NaHCO(3) (pH 8.0) buffer depend upon the free dye concentration with the reaction taking several minutes to reach completion even in relatively high, 40nM, concentrations of YOYO-1. In the absence of overstretching of the DNA molecule, we determine the second order rate constant to be 3.8±0.7×10(5)s(-1)M(-1), the dissociation constant to be 12.1±3.4nM and the maximum DNA molecule extension to be 36±4%. The intercalation time constant (inverse of the pseudo-first order rate constant), τ, decreased from 309 to 62s as YOYO-1 levels increased from 10 to 40nM. The kinetics of binding help with interpretation of the behavior of DNA-YOYO-1 complexes when overstretched and establish defined conditions for the preparation of DNA-YOYO-1 complexes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Photoswitching of monomeric and dimeric DNA-intercalating cyanine dyes for super-resolution microscopy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flors, Cristina

    2010-05-01

    A growing trend in far-field super resolution fluorescence microscopy based on single molecule photoswitching involves the replacement of photoactivatable fluorophores by common organic dyes in which photoswitching reactions or blinking can be induced. This alternative strategy can greatly simplify the sample preparation and imaging scheme in some cases, and enables its application to a wider range of biological systems. This methodology has been applied successfully to unveil the nanoscale organisation of proteins, but little progress has been seen to date in DNA super-resolution imaging. Previous results have shown that blinking can be induced in the DNA-intercalating dimeric dye YOYO-1 in combination with a reducing buffer, and in turn super-resolution images of DNA can be reconstructed. However, monomeric intercalating dyes like YO-PRO-1 are more advantageous for biological applications. This paper shows that both YO-PRO-1 and YOYO-1 can be used in super-resolution imaging, and different sample preparation strategies are compared in terms of spatial resolution and homogeneity of the reconstructed super-resolution images. Moreover, ensemble and single-molecule experiments provide insight into the switching mechanism. The dyes YOYO-1 and YO-PRO-1 hold great potential for their use in nanoscale imaging of DNA topology in biology and nanoscience.

  10. Analysis of Charge Transfer for in Situ Li Intercalated Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Rana, Kuldeep

    2012-05-24

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays have been synthesized with lithium (Li) intercalation through an alcohol-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition technique by using a Li-containing catalyst. Scanning electron microscopy images display that synthesized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dense and vertically aligned. The effect of the Li-containing catalyst on VA-CNTs has been studied by using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). XPS results show the change in binding energy of Li 1s and C 1s peaks, which indicates that Li is inserted in VA-CNTs during growth. Analysis of Raman spectra reveals that the G-band profile of CNTs synthesized with the Li-containing catalyst is shifted, suggesting an electronic interaction between Li and neighboring C atoms of the CNTs. The EELS spectra of the C K edge and Li K edge from CNTs also confirmed that Li is inserted into CNTs during synthesis. We have performed ab inito calculations based on density functional theory for a further understanding of the structural and electronic properties of Li intercalated CNTs, especially addressing the controversial charge-transfer state between Li and C. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Methotrexate intercalated layered double hydroxides with the mediation of surfactants: Mechanism exploration and bioassay study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Tian, De-Ying; Li, Shu-Ping, E-mail: lishuping@njnu.edu.cn; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-12-01

    Methotrexatum intercalated layered double hydroxides (MTX/LDHs) hybrids were synthesized by the co-precipitation method and three kinds of nonionic surfactants with different hydrocarbon chain lengths were used. The resulting hybrids were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD and FTIR investigations manifest the successful intercalation of MTX anions into the interlayer of LDHs. TEM graphs indicate that the morphology of the hybrids changes with the variation of the chain length of the surfactants, i.e., the particles synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG-7) present regular disc morphology with good monodispersity, while samples with the mediation of alkyl polyglycoside (APG-14) are heavily aggregated and samples with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-10) exhibit irregular branches. Furthermore, the release and bioassay experiments show that monodisperse MTX/LDHs present good controlled-release and are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells. - Highlights: • Surfactants could be used to modify the dispersing state of MTX/LDHs hybrids. • Surfactants have great effect on the morphology of MTX/LDHs hybrids. • MTX/LDHs with good monodisperse degree are more efficient in the suppression of the tumor cells.

  12. Electron Transfer Governed Crystal Transformation of Tungsten Trioxide upon Li Ions Intercalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhiguo; He, Yang; Gu, Meng; Du, Yingge; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chongmin

    2016-09-21

    Reversible insertion/extraction of ions into a host lattice constitutes the fundamental operating principle of rechargeable battery and electrochromic materials. It is far more commonly observed that insertion of ions into a host lattice can lead to structural evolution of the host lattice, and for the most cases such a lattice evolution is subtle. However, it has never been clear as what kind of factors to control such a lattice structural evolution. Based on tungsten trioxide (WO3) model crystal, we use in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and first principles calculation to explore the nature of Li ions intercalation induced crystal symmetry evolution of WO3. We discovered that Li insertion into the octahedral cavity of WO3 lattice will lead to a low to high symmetry transition, featuring a sequential monoclinic→tetragonal→cubic phase transition. The first principle calculation reveals that the phase transition is essentially governed by the electron transfer from Li to the WO6 octahedrons, which effectively leads to the weakening the W-O bond and modifying system band structure, resulting in an insulator to metal transition. The observation of the electronic effect on crystal symmetry and conductivity is significant, providing deep insights on the intercalation reactions in secondary rechargeable ion batteries and the approach for tailoring the functionalities of material based on insertion of ions in the lattice.

  13. Two-step electrochemical intercalation and oxidation of graphite for the mass production of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianyun; He, Pei; Mohammed, Mahdi A; Zhao, Xin; Young, Robert J; Derby, Brian; Kinloch, Ian A; Dryfe, Robert A W

    2017-11-01

    Conventional chemical oxidation routes for the production of graphene oxide (GO), such as the Hummers method, suffer from environmental and safety issues due to their use of hazardous and explosive chemicals. These issues are addressed by electrochemical oxidation methods but such approaches typically have a low yield due to inhomogeneous oxidation. Herein we report a two-step electrochemical intercalation and oxidation approach to produce GO on a large laboratory scale (ten's of grams) comprising: (1) forming a stage 1 graphite intercalation compound (GIC) in concentrated sulfuric acid; (2) oxidizing and exfoliating the stage 1 GIC in an aqueous solution of 0.1 M ammonium sulfate. This two-step approach leads to GO with a high yield (>70 wt.%), good quality (>90%, monolayer), and reasonable oxygen content (17.7 at.%). Moreover, the as-produced GO can be subsequently deeply reduced (3.2 at.% oxygen; C/O ratio 30.2) to yield highly conductive (54,600 S m-1) reduced GO. Electrochemical capacitors based on the reduced GO showed an ultra-high rate capability of up to 10 V s-1 due to this high conductivity.

  14. Pitx2, an atrial fibrillation predisposition gene, directly regulates ion transport and intercalated disc genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Zhang, Min; Li, Lele; Bai, Yan; Zhou, Yuefang; Moon, Anne M; Kaminski, Henry J; Martin, James F

    2014-02-01

    Pitx2 is the homeobox gene located in proximity to the human 4q25 familial atrial fibrillation (AF) locus. When deleted in the mouse germline, Pitx2 haploinsufficiency predisposes to pacing-induced AF, indicating that reduced Pitx2 promotes an arrhythmogenic substrate. Previous work focused on Pitx2 developmental functions that predispose to AF. Although Pitx2 is expressed in postnatal left atrium, it is unknown whether Pitx2 has distinct postnatal and developmental functions. To investigate Pitx2 postnatal function, we conditionally inactivated Pitx2 in the postnatal atrium while leaving its developmental function intact. Unstressed adult Pitx2 homozygous mutant mice display variable R-R interval with diminished P-wave amplitude characteristic of sinus node dysfunction, an AF risk factor in human patients. An integrated genomics approach in the adult heart revealed Pitx2 target genes encoding cell junction proteins, ion channels, and critical transcriptional regulators. Importantly, many Pitx2 target genes have been implicated in human AF by genome-wide association studies. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy studies in adult Pitx2 mutant mice revealed structural remodeling of the intercalated disc characteristic of human patients with AF. Our findings, revealing that Pitx2 has genetically separable postnatal and developmental functions, unveil direct Pitx2 target genes that include channel and calcium handling genes, as well as genes that stabilize the intercalated disc in postnatal atrium.

  15. Metal porphyrin intercalated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite utilized for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyan Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a simple and facile self-assembly method to successfully fabricate cationic metal porphyrin –MtTMPyP (Mt= Cobalt (II, Manganese (III, or Iron (III; TMPyP = 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (N-methylpyridinium-4-yl porphyrin intercalated into the layer of graphene oxide (GO by the cooperative effects of electrostatic and π–π stacking interaction between positively charged metal porphyrin and negatively charged GO sheets. Followed by reduction with hydrazine vapor, a series of novel 2D MtTMPyP/rGOn were fabricated. The as-prepared 2D hybrids were fully characterized and tested as non-noble metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in an alkaline medium. The MtTMPyP/rGOn hybrids, especially CoTMPyP/rGO5, demonstrated an improved electrocatalytic activity for ORR and a number of exchanged electrons close to 4-electron reaction, increased stability and excellent tolerance to methanol, showing a potential alternative catalyst for ORR in fuel cells and air batteries. Keywords: Metal porphyrin, Reduced graphene oxide, Intercalation, Oxygen reduction reaction, Catalyst

  16. Adsorption and kinetic studies of the intercalation of some organic compounds onto Na+-montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemeay, A H; El-Sherbiny, A S; Zaki, A B

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption and the kinetics of the intercalation of metanil yellow dye, p-aminodiphenylamine (p-NH(2)-DPA), and benzidine by colloidally dispersed Na(+)-montmorillonte (Na(+)-MMT) have been studied. The adsorption isotherm parameters confirmed the occurrence of chemical adsorption that is based on the cation-exchange process. The selectivity of these compounds toward Na(+)-MMT follows the order metanil yellowp-NH(2)-DPA>benzidine. The rate of oxidation has been quantitatively measured using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. The rate constant follows the order benzidineintercalation process.

  17. Final Scientific/Technical Report for Low Cost, High Capacity Non- Intercalation Chemistry Automotive Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdichevsky, Gene

    2017-09-08

    Commercial Li-ion batteries typically use Ni- and Co-based intercalation cathodes. As the demand for improved performance from batteries increases, these cathode materials will no longer be able to provide the desired energy storage characteristics since they are currently approaching their theoretical limits. Conversion cathode materials are prime candidates for improvement of Li-ion batteries. On both a volumetric and gravimetric basis they have higher theoretical capacity than intercalation cathode materials. Metal fluoride (MFx) cathodes offer higher specific energy density and dramatically higher volumetric energy density. Challenges associated with metal fluoride cathodes were addressed through nanostructured material design and synthesis. A major goal of this project was to develop and demonstrate Li-ion cells based on Si-comprising anodes and metal fluoride (MFx) comprising cathodes. Pairing the high-capacity MFx cathode with a high-capacity anode, such as an alloying Si anode, allows for the highest possible energy density on a cell level. After facing and overcoming multiple material synthesis and electrochemical instability challenges, we succeeded in fabrication of MFx half cells with cycle stability in excess of 500 cycles (to 20% or smaller degradation) and full cells with MFx-based cathodes and Si-based anodes with cycle stability in excess of 200 cycles (to 20% or smaller degradation).

  18. Intercalation of Coordinatively Unsaturated Fe(III) Ion within Interpenetrated Metal-Organic Framework MOF-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Rebecca J; Burns, Thomas; Greer, Samuel M; Kobera, Libor; Stoian, Sebastian A; Korobkov, Ilia; Hill, Stephen; Bryce, David L; Woo, Tom K; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-06-01

    Coordinatively unsaturated Fe(III) metal sites were successfully incorporated into the iconic MOF-5 framework. This new structure, Fe(III) -iMOF-5, is the first example of an interpenetrated MOF linked through intercalated metal ions. Structural characterization was performed with single-crystal and powder XRD, followed by extensive analysis by spectroscopic methods and solid-state NMR, which reveals the paramagnetic ion through its interaction with the framework. EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy confirmed that the intercalated ions were indeed Fe(III) , whereas DFT calculations were employed to ascertain the unique pentacoordinate architecture around the Fe(III) ion. Interestingly, this is also the first crystallographic evidence of pentacoordinate Zn(II) within the MOF-5 SBU. This new MOF structure displays the potential for metal-site addition as a framework connector, thus creating further opportunity for the innovative development of new MOF materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Engineering of (10-hydroxycamptothecin intercalated layered double hydroxide)@liposome nanocomposites with excellent water dispersity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongfang; Wu, Xiaowen; Mi, Yuwei; Li, Haiping; Hou, Wanguo

    2017-09-01

    A hierarchical nanocomposite of 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), a nonionic and lipophilic anticancer drug, intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH) encapsulated in liposomes was constructed. HCPT molecules were first incorporated into sodium cholate (Ch) micelles, and the resultant negatively charged HCPT-loaded Ch micelles were then co-assembled with positively charged LDH single-layer nanosheets, forming a HCPT/Ch intercalated LDH (HCPT-Ch-LDH) host-gest nanohybrid. The nanohybrid particles were further coated with liposomes (LSs), gaining a core-shell nanocomposite, denoted as (HCPT-Ch-LDH)@LS. The so-obtained samples were characterized using TEM, SAXS, FT-IR, DLS, and elemental analyses. Special emphasis was placed on the effect of liposome-coating for the HCPT-Ch-LDH on its water dispersity and drug-release. The results showed that the nanocomposite has excellent water dispersity and enhanced drug sustained-release performance in comparison with the HCPT-Ch-LDH, demonstrating that the liposome-coating for drug-LDH nanohybrids is an effective strategy to enhance their water dispersity and sustained-release performances. This work provides an effective strategy for engineering of LDH-based delivery systems for nonionic and lipophilic drugs.

  20. Pauli limiting and metastability regions of superconducting graphene and intercalated graphite superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, F. D. R.; Marques, A. M.; Dias, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of metastability regions in the in-plane magnetic field versus temperature phase diagram of graphene and intercalated graphite superconductors. Due to the vanishing density of states, undoped graphene requires a finite BCS interaction Vc to become superconducting (any finite doping drives this critical value to zero). Above Vc, superconducting graphene under in-plane magnetic field displays the conventional low temperature first-order transition (FOT) to the normal phase, but the width of the associated metastability region (normalized to the zero-temperature critical field) vanishes when doping goes to zero and the interaction approaches Vc. In the case of intercalated graphite superconductors, modeled as two-dimensional two-band superconductors (a graphene-like band and a metallic interlayer band), a critical graphene intraband interaction is required for the appearance of a second metastability region in the superconducting region of the phase diagram. The width of this metastability region also goes to zero as the graphene intraband interaction approaches, from above, its critical value and the metastability region vanishes at the zero-temperature supercooling field associated with the metallic interlayer band. Slightly above this critical value, the low-temperature FOT line bifurcates at an intermediate temperature into a FOT line and a second-order transition line.

  1. Size-dependent spinodal and miscibility gaps for intercalation in nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Damian; Bazant, Martin Z

    2009-11-01

    Using a recently proposed mathematical model for intercalation dynamics in phase-separating materials ( Singh , G. K. , Ceder , G. and Bazant , M. Z. Electrochimica Acta 2008 , 53 , 7599. ), we show that the spinodal and miscibility gaps generally shrink as the host particle size decreases to the nanoscale. Our work is motivated by recent experiments on the high-rate Li-ion battery material LiFePO(4); this serves as the basis for our examples, but our analysis and conclusions apply to any intercalation material. We describe two general mechanisms for the suppression of phase separation in nanoparticles, (i) a classical bulk effect, predicted by the Cahn-Hilliard equation in which the diffuse phase boundary becomes confined by the particle geometry; and (ii) a novel surface effect, predicted by chemical-potential-dependent reaction kinetics, in which insertion/extraction reactions stabilize composition gradients near surfaces in equilibrium with the local environment. Composition-dependent surface energy and (especially) elastic strain can contribute to these effects but are not required to predict decreased spinodal and miscibility gaps at the nanoscale.

  2. Mechanism of kaolinite sheets curling via the intercalation and delamination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Liu, Qinfu; Cheng, Hongfei; Zhang, Shuai; Frost, Ray L

    2015-04-15

    Kaolinite naturally occurs in the plate form for the interlayer hydrogen bond and the distortion and adaption of tetrahedron and octahedron. But kaolinite sheets can be exfoliated to nanoscrolls artificially in laboratory through multiple-step displacement intercalation. The driving force for kaolinite sheet to be curled nanoscroll originates from the size discrepancy of Si-O tetrahedron and Al-O octahedron. The displacement intercalation promoted the platy kaolinite sheets spontaneously to be scrolled by eliminating the interlayer hydrogen bond and atomic interaction. Kaolinite nanoscrolls are hollow tubes with outer face of tetrahedral sheet and inner face of octahedral sheet. Based on the theoretical calculation it is firstly reported that the minimum interior diameter for a single kaolinite sheet to be scrolled is about 9.08 nm, and the optimal 24.30 nm, the maximum 100 nm, which is verified by the observation of scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The different adaption types and discrepancy degree between tetrahedron and octahedron generate various curling forces in different directions. The nanoscroll axes prefer the directions as [100], [11¯0], [110], [31¯0], and the relative curling force are as follows, [31¯0]>[100]=[11¯0]>[110]. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Study on the Effect of Pt Intercalation into Layered Niobate Perovskite for Photocatalytic Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Takei, Takahiro; Miura, Akira; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Katsumata, Ken-ichi; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2015-07-14

    A novel photocatalyst consisting of an intercalated perovskite H(1-2x)Pt(x)LaNb2O7 was fabricated by ion exchange. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results confirmed that Pt(2+) exists within the interlayer space of the layered perovskite. H(1-2x)Pt(x)LaNb2O7 composed of layered niobate perovskite and intercalated Pt(2+) completely degraded a 20 ppm phenol solution in 3 h under irradiation by Xe light, which exhibits photocatalytic activity superior to those of RbLaNb2O7, Pt-deposited RbLaNb2O7, and HLaNb2O7. From first-principles density functional theory simulation, high photocatalytic activity of H(1-2x)Pt(x)LaNb2O7 is attributed to the emergence of a new O 2p-Pt 5d hybridized band on top of the valence band.

  4. Uniform second Li ion intercalation in solid state ϵ-LiVOPO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangoh, Linda W.; Quackenbush, Nicholas F. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Sallis, Shawn [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Wiaderek, Kamila M.; Ma, Lu; Wu, Tianpin; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Lin, Yuh-Chieh; Ong, Shyue Ping [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive 0448, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Wen, Bohua; Chernova, Natasha A.; Whittingham, M. Stanley [NECCES, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Guo, Jinghua [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lee, Tien-Lin; Schlueter, Christoph [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Piper, Louis F. J., E-mail: lpiper@binghamton.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Full, reversible intercalation of two Li{sup +} has not yet been achieved in promising VOPO{sub 4} electrodes. A pronounced Li{sup +} gradient has been reported in the low voltage window (i.e., second lithium reaction) that is thought to originate from disrupted kinetics in the high voltage regime (i.e., first lithium reaction). Here, we employ a combination of hard and soft x–ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy techniques to depth profile solid state synthesized LiVOPO{sub 4} cycled within the low voltage window only. Analysis of the vanadium environment revealed no evidence of a Li{sup +} gradient, which combined with almost full theoretical capacity confirms that disrupted kinetics in the high voltage window are responsible for hindering full two lithium insertion. Furthermore, we argue that the uniform Li{sup +} intercalation is a prerequisite for the formation of intermediate phases Li{sub 1.50}VOPO{sub 4} and Li{sub 1.75}VOPO{sub 4}. The evolution from LiVOPO{sub 4} to Li{sub 2}VOPO{sub 4} via the intermediate phases is confirmed by direct comparison between O K–edge absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory.

  5. Photoelectron Holographic Atomic Arrangement Imaging of Cleaved Bimetal-intercalated Graphite Superconductor Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Nishiyama, Saki; Izumi, Masanari; Uesugi, Eri; Goto, Hidenori; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Sugita, Kenji; Daimon, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Yuji; Hamada, Ikutaro; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-04

    From the C 1s and K 2p photoelectron holograms, we directly reconstructed atomic images of the cleaved surface of a bimetal-intercalated graphite superconductor, (Ca, K)C 8 , which differed substantially from the expected bulk crystal structure based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Graphene atomic images were collected in the in-plane cross sections of the layers 3.3 Å and 5.7 Å above the photoelectron emitter C atom and the stacking structures were determined as AB- and AA-type, respectively. The intercalant metal atom layer was found between two AA-stacked graphenes. The K atomic image revealing 2 × 2 periodicity, occupying every second centre site of C hexagonal columns, was reconstructed, and the Ca 2p peak intensity in the photoelectron spectra of (Ca, K)C 8 from the cleaved surface was less than a few hundredths of the K 2p peak intensity. These observations indicated that cleavage preferentially occurs at the KC 8 layers containing no Ca atoms.

  6. A New Perspective on Intercalated Disc Organization: Implications for Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jifen Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adherens junctions and desmosomes are intercellular adhesive junctions and essential for the morphogenesis, differentiation, and maintenance of tissues that are subjected to high mechanical stress, including heart and skin. The different junction complexes are organized at the termini of the cardiomyocyte called the intercalated disc. Disruption of adhesive integrity via mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins causes an inherited heart disease, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC. Besides plakoglobin, which is shared by adherens junctions and desmosomes, other desmosomal components, desmoglein-2, desmocollin-2, plakophilin-2, and desmoplakin are also present in ultrastructurally defined fascia adherens junctions of heart muscle, but not other tissues. This mixed-type of junctional structure is termed hybrid adhering junction or area composita. Desmosomal plakophilin-2 directly interacts with adherens junction protein alphaT-catenin, providing a new molecular link between the cadherin-catenin complex and desmosome. The area composita only exists in the cardiac intercalated disc of mammalian species suggesting that it evolved to strengthen mechanical coupling in the heart of higher vertebrates. The cross-talk among different junctions and their implication in the pathogenesis of ARVC are discussed in this review.

  7. Synthesis and DNA interaction of ethylenediamine platinum(II) complexes linked to DNA intercalants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duskova, Katerina; Sierra, Sara; Fernández, María-José; Gude, Lourdes; Lorente, Antonio

    2012-12-15

    A series of ethylenediamine platinum(II) complexes connected through semi-rigid chains of 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane to DNA intercalating subunits (naphthalene, anthracene or phenazine) has been synthesized, and their interactions with calf thymus (CT) DNA have been evaluated by viscometric titrations and equilibrium dialysis experiments. The parent ligands that contain anthracene or phenazine chromophores showed a monointercalative mode of DNA interaction (especially the anthracene derivative), with apparent association constants in the order of 10(4) M(-1). The corresponding platinum(II) complexes bind CT DNA through bisintercalation, as established by the significant increase of DNA contour length inferred from viscosity measurements, and the association constants are in the order of 10(5) M(-1). The naphthalene derivatives, however, exhibit a mixed mode of interaction, which suggests a partial contribution of both intercalation and groove binding for the ligand, and monointercalation in the case of the platinum(II) complex. Competition dialysis experiments carried out on the intercalative compounds have revealed a moderate selectivity towards GC DNA sequences for the derivatives containing the anthracene chromophore. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural features of intercalated CaFe-layered double hydroxides studied by X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy and computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, Zs.; Ádok-Sipiczki, M.; Hannus, I.; Sipos, P.; Pálinkó, I.

    2015-06-01

    The intercalation of various N-containing carboxylic acid anions into CaFe-layered double hydroxides was performed by the dehydration-rehydration method. Particular attention was paid to the effect of solvent mixture used during preparation. It was found that various solvent mixtures resulted in different interlayer distances and, thus, different arrangements of the anions between the layers. The dimensions of the intercalated anions and detailed analysis of the infrared spectra gave clues for the reasonable prediction of the spatial arrangements of the anions in the interlamellar space.

  9. Enhanced anti-HIV-1 activity of G-quadruplexes comprising locked nucleic acids and intercalating nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Nielsen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Two G-quadruplex forming sequences, 50-TGGGAG and the 17-mer sequence T30177, which exhibit anti-HIV-1 activity on cell lines, were modified using either locked nucleic acids (LNA) or via insertions of (R)-1-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyl)glycerol (intercalating nucleic acid, INA) or (R)-1-O-[4......-(1-pyrenylethynyl)phenylmethyl]glycerol (twisted intercalating nucleic acid, TINA). Incorporation of LNA or INA/TINA monomers provide as much as 8-fold improvement of anti-HIV-1 activity. We demonstrate for the first time a detailed analysis of the effect the incorporation of INA/TINA monomers in quadruplex forming...

  10. Tailor-made graphite oxide-DAB poly(propylene imine) dendrimer intercalated hybrids and their potential for efficient CO2 adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, T.; Katsaros, F.; Sideratou, Z.; Romanos, G.; Ivashenko, O.; Rudolf, P.; Kooi, B. J.; Papageorgiou, S.; Karakassides, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the rational design and synthesis of DAB poly(propylene imine) dendrimer (DAB) intercalated graphite oxide (GO) hybrids with tailorable interlayer distances. The amine groups originating from the intercalated dendrimer molecules cross-link adjacent GO sheets and strongly favour CO2

  11. An N-Linked Bidentate Phosphoramidite Ligand (N-Me-BIPAM for Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric 1,4-Addition of Arylboronic Acids to α,β-Unsaturated Ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Miyaura

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new bidentate phosphoramidite (N-Me-BIPAM based on Shibasaki’s N-linked BINOL was synthesized. This ligand appears to be highly effective for rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric conjugated addition of arylboronic acids to α,β-unsaturated enones. The reaction of ortho-substituted arylboronic acid with acyclic and cyclic enones provides the corresponding products in good yields and enantioselectivities.

  12. Rhodium (II) cycle alkanecarboxylate: synthesis, spectroscopic and thermo analytic studies and evaluation of the antitumor potential; Cicloalcanocarboxilatos de rodio(II). Sintese, estudos espectroscopicos, termoanaliticos e avaliacao do potencial antitumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Aparecido Ribeiro de

    1995-07-01

    Four new rhodium(II) carboxylates (cyclopropane, cyclobutane, cyclopentane, and cyclohexanecarboxylate), and other already known rhodium (II) carboxylates (acetate, propionate, butyrate, metoxyacetate, dichloroacetate, and trifluoroacetate), have been prepared for study in this work. The compounds were characterized by elementary and thermogravimetric analysis, magnetic susceptibility, and electronic, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy. The reaction of Rh CL{sub 3}.aq with the sodium carboxylates was studied aiming to improve the understanding of the redox process involved. Spectroscopy studies (Raman and electronic) were made to examine the transition involved in the Rh-Rh and Rh-O bonds. The results have shown a direct relation between the force of the carboxylic acid and the Rh-O force, but show a inverse relation with the Rh-Rh bond force. Thermal analysis studies were undertaken and the obtained date show a resemblance of the TG/DTG curves with that found in literature. In the other hand, the DSC curves show a different results: in open crucible, the peaks associated with the cage breakdown are exothermic and, in closed crucible this peaks are endothermic. The thermodecomposition products were analyzed. The evolved gases were identified by GC?MS and {sup 1}H and {sup 13} C NMR spectra. The residues were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Antitumor activity of rhodium cyclopropanecarboxylate was evaluated in vitro (cell cultures K562 and Ehrlich) and in vivo (Balb-c mice with ascite Ehrlich tumor), indicating an increased life span (87.5%) of the treated animals. (author)

  13. Determination of Ultra-trace Rhodium in Water Samples by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry after Cloud Point Extraction Using 2-(5-Iodo-2-Pyridylazo)-5-Dimethylaminoaniline as a Chelating Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Quan; Huo, Yanyan; Wu, Jiangyan; He, Yaping; Yang, Xiaohui; Yang, Longhu

    2017-03-24

    A highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) separation/preconcentration and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection has been developed for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of rhodium in water samples. A new reagent, 2-(5-iodo-2-pyridylazo)-5-dimethylaminoaniline (5-I-PADMA), was used as the chelating agent and the nonionic surfactant TritonX-114 was chosen as extractant. In a HAc-NaAc buffer solution at pH 5.5, Rh(III) reacts with 5-I-PADMA to form a stable chelate by heating in a boiling water bath for 10 min. Subsequently, the chelate is extracted into the surfactant phase and separated from bulk water. The factors affecting CPE were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.1-6.0 ng/mL, the detection limit was 0.023 ng/mL for rhodium and relative standard deviation was 3.67% (c = 1.0 ng/mL, n = 11).The method has been applied to the determination of trace rhodium in water samples with satisfactory results.

  14. Duplication of Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial EF-Tu: pre-adaptation to T-arm truncation and exclusion of bulky aminoacyl residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Aya; Suematsu, Takuma; Aihara, Koh-Ki; Kita, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoh-Ichi

    2017-03-07

    Translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) delivers aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) to ribosomes in protein synthesis. EF-Tu generally recognizes aminoacyl moieties and acceptor- and T-stems of aa-tRNAs. However, nematode mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs frequently lack all or part of the T-arm that is recognized by canonical EF-Tu. We previously reported that two distinct EF-Tu species, EF-Tu1 and EF-Tu2, respectively, recognize mt tRNAs lacking T-arms and D-arms in the mitochondria of the chromadorean nematode Caenorhabditis elegansC. elegans EF-Tu2 specifically recognizes the seryl moiety of serylated D-armless tRNAs. Mitochondria of the enoplean nematode Trichinella possess three structural types of tRNAs: T-armless tRNAs, D-armless tRNAs, and cloverleaf tRNAs with a short T-arm. Trichinella mt EF-Tu1 binds to all three types and EF-Tu2 binds only to D-armless Ser-tRNAs, showing an evolutionary intermediate state from canonical EF-Tu to chromadorean nematode (e.g. C. elegans) EF-Tu species. We report here that two EF-Tu species also participate in Drosophila melanogaster mitochondria. Both D. melanogaster EF-Tu1 and EF-Tu2 bound to cloverleaf and D-armless tRNAs. D. melanogaster EF-Tu1 has the ability to recognize T-armless tRNAs that do not evidently exist in D. melanogaster mitochondria, but do exist in related arthropod species. In addition, D. melanogaster EF-Tu2 preferentially bound to aa-tRNAs carrying small amino acids, but not to aa-tRNAs carrying bulky amino acids. These results suggest that the Drosophila mt translation system could be another intermediate state between the canonical and nematode mitochondria-type translation systems. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Lithium intercalation in the LiLaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7} perovskite structure; Intercalation du lithium dans la structure perovskite LiLaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnke, C.; Bohnke, O.; Fourquet, J.L. [Universite du Maine, 72 - Le Mans (France). Laboratoire des Fluorures

    1996-12-31

    ABO{sub 3} perovskite-type oxides having vacancies in the A-sites of their structure are interesting candidates for solid electrolytes when their A-sites are occupied by Li{sup +} ions having a high mobility. This is the case with the [Li{sub 3x}La{sub 2/3-x}]TiO{sub 3} solid solution compound which has a 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} ionic conductivity at ambient temperature. Electrochemical intercalation in this material is possible thanks to the presence of Ti{sup 4+} but the small amount of vacancies (0.33 maximum) leads to a low intercalation rate. In order to solve this problem, the LiLaNb{sub 2}O{sub 7} material which has a greater amount of vacancies has been studied and the results relative to the electrochemical intercalation of lithium in this perovskite are presented. The thermodynamical and kinetics properties of the lithium intercalation reaction have been studied by intermittent galvano-static discharges and impedance spectroscopy in LiClO{sub 4}-propylene carbonate medium. (J.S.) 7 refs.

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of ionic intercalation/de-intercalation during the formation of α-cobalt hydroxide and its polymorphic transition to β-cobalt hydroxide: Reaction-diffusion framework

    KAUST Repository

    Rahbani, Janane

    2012-01-01

    We study the kinetics and mechanism of intercalation and de-intercalation of small anions during the formation of crystalline α-Co(OH) 2 and its transformation to β-Co(OH) 2 within a reaction-diffusion framework. We therein use fluorescence spectroscopy with Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) as a probe as well as other spectroscopic and imaging techniques. The method is based on the reaction and diffusion of hydroxide ions into a gel matrix containing the Co(ii) ions, the conjugate anions to be intercalated and Rh6G. The advantage of this simple method is that it allows us to separate throughout space the various stages during the formation of α-Co(OH) 2 and its transformation to β-Co(OH) 2, thus enabling fluorescence measurements of the those stages by simply focusing on different areas of the tube. It also permits us to extract with ease the solids for characterization and image analysis. The macroscopic evolution of the system, which consists of a leading blue front designating the formation of α-Co(OH) 2 followed by a sharp blue/pink interface designating the transformation to the pink β-Co(OH) 2, exhibits different dynamics depending on the anion present in the gel. At a certain stage, the blue/pink interface stops its propagation and only the blue front continues. This represents clear evidence of the dependence of the kinetics of intercalation and de-intercalation on the nature of the anion. The coexisting polymorphs were collected and characterized using XRD, FTIR, Raman and UV-Vis. The fluorescence images of the α-Co(OH) 2 reveal clearly the presence of Rh6G between its layers, whereas images from the β polymorph indicate the opposite. Moreover, the fluorescence of Rh6G is monitored during the formation of α-Co(OH) 2 and its conversion to β-Co(OH) 2. During the formation, the fluorescence intensity and lifetime are significantly increased whereas the opposite happens during the transformation to the β phase. We are able to calculate the activation energies

  17. Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Pristine, Intercalated, and Functionalized Epitaxial Graphene on Silicon Carbide(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Jonathan D.

    Since its isolation in 2004, graphene has received virtually unparalleled attention from researchers in various fields. The great interest in graphene is driven in no small part by its superlative and unique electronic properties, intrinsic low dimensionality, and its potential for application in nanoelectronics. However, in order to exploit the extraordinary electronic properties of graphene, it is first necessary to develop a suitable growth method that is amenable to production at the wafer-scale. One of the most promising routes to large-scale production of graphene is via thermal extrusion of from silicon carbide. This dissertation is focused on understanding the structure of epitaxial graphene grown on the Si-terminated face of silicon carbide (EG/SiC(0001)), as well as its modified (intercalated, functionalized) forms. To do this, I employ synchrotron-based X-ray characterization techniques to investigate these structures with A-scale resolution and chemical sensitivity. The primary objective of this dissertation is to use a novel approach to clarify long-standing uncertainties concerning the nature of the interface between EG and the SiC substrate. This interface is highly technologically relevant, and its precise structure and chemical composition have direct influence on the properties of the graphene itself. To this end, I construct a high-resolution (sub-A), chemically-sensitive atomic density map of the interfacial structure using X-ray surface scattering combined with the X-ray standing wave-enhanced photoelectron spectroscopy. Next, I switch focus to engineered EG/SiC(0001) interfacial structures, which have been observed to influence the electronic properties of the overlaying graphene. Here, I present a structural investigation of the effects of hydrogen intercalation on the interfacial structure of SiC(0001), a process that has been suggested to decouple the interfacial layer from the SiC substrate. Finally, characterization efforts are extended

  18. Preparation and inhibition properties of molybdate intercalated ZnAlCe layered double hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Huajie; Wang, Jihui, E-mail: jhwang@tju.edu.cn; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Wenbin

    2016-09-05

    ZnAlCe layered double hydroxide intercalated by molybdate (ZnAlCe−MoO{sub 4} LDH) was successfully synthesized by using co-precipitation method, and the morphology, structure of ZnAlCe−MoO{sub 4} LDH were observed and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. The inhibition behavior of ZnAlCe−MoO{sub 4} LDH for Q235 steel in 3.5%NaCl solution was determined by polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) methods. The results shows that the synthesized ZnAlCe−MoO{sub 4} LDH has a lamellar structure with a particle size of 0.1–2.0 μm, an average thickness of 30 nm, and a basal plane spacing of 0.898 nm. Compared with the addition of ZnAl layered double hydroxide intercalated by nitrate (ZnAl−NO{sub 3} LDH) and ZnAl layered double hydroxide intercalated by molybdate (ZnAl−MoO{sub 4} LDH) in 3.5% NaCl solution, Q235 steel in 3.5%NaCl + ZnAlCe−MoO{sub 4} LDH solution has a lower corrosion current density, larger polarization resistance and a higher inhibition efficiency. The addition of ZnAlCe−MoO{sub 4} LDH will reduce the chloride concentration in 3.5% NaCl solution by the anion exchanged with molybdate, and improve the corrosion resistance of Q235 steel owing to the formation of passive film with the composition of ferrous or iron molybdate and deposition film with zinc and cerium hydroxides. - Highlights: • ZnAlCe−MoO{sub 4} LDH compound was successfully synthesized by co-precipitation method. • ZnAlCe−MoO{sub 4} LDH has a better inhibition effect to Q235 steel in 3.5%NaCl solution. • The Cl{sup −} ions in solution was partially exchanged with MoO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions in host layers. • The passive film and deposition film were formed by the release of LDH compound.

  19. Base-Displaced Intercalated Structure of the N-(2'-Deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone DNA Adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politica, Dustin A; Malik, Chanchal K; Basu, Ashis K; Stone, Michael P

    2015-12-21

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), an environmental mutagen found in diesel exhaust and a suspected carcinogen, undergoes metabolic reduction followed by reaction with DNA to form aminobenzanthrone (ABA) adducts, with the major alkylation product being N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone (C8-dG-ABA). Site-specific synthesis of the C8-dG-ABA adduct in the oligodeoxynucleotide 5'-d(GTGCXTGTTTGT)-3':5'-d(ACAAACACGCAC)-3'; X = C8-dG-ABA adduct, including codons 272-275 of the p53 gene, has allowed for investigation into the structural and thermodynamic properties of this adduct. The conformation of the C8-dG-ABA adduct was determined using NMR spectroscopy and was refined using molecular dynamics (MD) calculations restrained by experimentally determined interproton distance restraints obtained from NOE experiments. The refined structure revealed that the C8-dG-ABA adduct formed a base-displaced intercalated conformation. The adducted guanine was shifted into the syn conformation about the glycosidic bond. The 5'- and 3'-neighboring base pairs remained intact. While this facilitated π-stacking interactions between the ABA moiety and neighboring bases, the thermal melting temperature (Tm) of the adduct-containing duplex showed a decrease of 11 °C as compared to the corresponding unmodified oligodeoxynucleotide duplex. Overall, in this sequence, the base-displaced intercalated conformation of the C8-dG-ABA lesion bears similarity to structures of other arylamine C8-dG adducts. However, in this sequence, the base-displaced intercalated conformation for the C8-dG-ABA adduct differs from the conformation of the N(2)-dG-ABA adduct reported by de los Santos and co-workers, in which it is oriented in the minor groove toward the 5' end of the duplex, with the modified guanine remaining in the anti conformation about the glyosidic torsion angle, and the complementary base remaining within the duplex. The results are discussed in relationship to differences between the C8-d

  20. Intercalated duct cell is starting point in development of pancreatic ductal carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Toshikazu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it is well known that the pancreatic ductal carcinoma may develop having a relationship to the mucous gland hyperplasia (MGH with atypia (PanIN-1B by PanIN system, the starting point of this atypical MGH is unclear. To know it, we examined the pancreas tissue using many methods described below. Methods 1. Twenty-seven surgically resected pancreas tissue specimens, including pancreatic ductal carcinomas (PDC, chronic pancreatitis and normal pancreas, were investigated using immunohistochemical stainings for MUC1, MUC6, 45M1, Ki67 and p53. 2. DNA extraction and analysis of K-ras mutation at codon 12 using microdissection method: The paraffin blocks with 16 regions including the intercalated duct cell (IC adjacant to the atypical MGH were prepared for DNA extraction. Mutation of K-ras codon 12 was analized and compared in enriched polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked minisequence assay (PCR-ELMA. Results 1. In the normal pancreas, although no positive cell was seen in 45M1, p53, Ki67, the cytoplasm of IC were always positive for MUC1 and sometimes positive for MUC6. In the pancreas with fibrosis or inflammation, MGH was positive for MUC6 and 45M1. And atypical MGH was positive for MUC1, MUC6 and 45M1. Some IC adjacent to the atypical MGH was positive for Ki67 as well as atypical MGH. The carcinoma cells in all cases of PDC were diffusely positive for MUC1, 45M1, p53 and Ki67, and focally positive for MUC6. 2. In K-ras mutation, we examined the regions including IC adjacent to the atypical MGH, because the immunohistochemical apomucin stainings of these regions resembled those of PDC as decribed above. And K-ras mutation was confirmed in 12 of 16 regions (75%. All mutations were a single mutation, in 6 regions GTT was detected, in 4 regions GAT was detected and in 2 region AGT was detected. Conclusion Some intercalated duct cell may be the starting point of the pancreatic ductal carcinoma, because the exhibitions of

  1. Alloying in an Intercalation Host: Metal Titanium Niobates as Anodes for Rechargeable Alkali-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Aninda Jiban; Das, Suman; Swain, Diptikanta; Guru Row, Tayur N; Ahuja, Rajeev; Araujo, Rafael B; Shi, Songxin

    2017-12-27

    We discuss here a unique flexible non-carbonaceous layered host viz. metal titanium niobates, M-Ti-niobate (Ti: Titanium; M: Al3+, Pb2+, Sb3+, Ba2+, Mg2+) which can synergistically store both lithium-ions and sodium-ions via simultaneous intercalation and alloying mechanisms. M-Ti-niobate is formed by ion-exchange of the K+-ions, which are specifically located inside galleries between the layers formed by edge and corner sharing TiO6 and NbO6 octahedral units in the sol-gel synthesized potassium titanium niobate (KTiNbO5). Drastic volume changes (approximately 300-400%) typically associated with alloying mechanism of storage are completely tackled chemically by the unique chemical composition and structure of the M-Ti-niobates. The free space between the adjustable Ti/Nb octahedral layers easily accommodates the volume changes. Due to the presence of an optimum amount of multivalent alloying metal ions (50-75% of total K+) in the M-Ti-niobate, efficient alloying reaction takes place directly with ions and completely eliminates any form of mechanical degradation of the electroactive particles. The M-Ti-niobate can be cycled over a wide voltage range (as low as 0.01 V) and displays remarkably stable Li+ and Na+ ion cyclability (> 2 Li+/Na+ per formula unit) for widely varying current densities over few hundreds to thousands of successive cycles. The simultaneous intercalation and alloying storage mechanisms is also studied within the density functional theory (DFT) framework. DFT expectedly shows a very small variation in the volume of Al-titanium niobate following lithium alloying. Moreover, the theoretical investigations also conclusively endorse the occurrence of the alloying process of Li-ions with the Al-ions along with the intercalation process during discharge. The M-Ti-niobates studied here demonstrates a paradigm shift in chemical design of electrodes and will pave the way for development of multitude of improved electrodes for different battery chemistries

  2. An infrared study of adsorption of para-nitrophenol on mono-, di- and tri-alkyl surfactant intercalated organoclays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; Zhou, Qin; He, Hongping; Xi, Yunfei

    2008-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the adsorption of para-nitrophenol on mono-, di- and tri-alkyl surfactant intercalated montmorillonite. Organoclays were obtained by the cationic exchange of mono-, di- and tri-alkyl chain surfactants for sodium ions [hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMAB), dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDOAB), methyltrioctadecylammonium bromide (MTOAB)] in an aqueous solution with Na-montmorillonite. Upon formation of the organoclay, the properties change from strongly hydrophilic to strongly hydrophobic. This change in surface properties is observed by a decrease in intensity of the OH stretching vibrations assigned to water in the cation hydration sphere of the montmorillonite. As the cation is replaced by the surfactant molecules, the para-nitrophenol replaces the surfactant molecules in the clay interlayer. Bands attributed to CH stretching and bending vibrations change for the surfactant intercalated montmorillonite. Strong changes occur in the HCH deformation modes of the methyl groups of the surfactant. These changes are attributed to the methyl groups locking into the siloxane surface of the montmorillonite. Such a concept is supported by changes in the SiO stretching bands of the montmorillonite siloxane surface. This study demonstrates that para-nitrophenol will penetrate into the untreated clay interlayer and replace the intercalated surfactant in surfactant modified clay, resulting in the change of the arrangement of the intercalated surfactant.

  3. Imaging of DNA molecule and characterization of the intercalating state of YOYO-1 in λ-DNA using SNOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Homma, Katsunori; Yamamoto, Noritaka; Sakata-Sogawa, K.; Shimamoto, Nobuo

    2000-10-01

    The operation principle and configuration of the Scanning Near-field Optical/Atomic Force Microscope (SNOAM) is introduced in the paper. DNA molecules were imaged in AFM mode and in SNOM mode. The topography images and the fluorescence images of single DNA molecule were obtained. The topography image in SNOM mode is of high resolution. The near-field fluorescence image shows the fluorescence distribution of DNA molecules. (lambda) DNA Molecules, in which YOYO-1 was intercalated, were imaged and characterized. For (lambda) DNA with 5 (mu) M YOYO-1, there is variation in the fluorescence intensity of the DNA and ratios of the fluorescence intensity showed almost integers in each region. As the fluorescence intensity correlated with the area of cross section in the DNA topography, it was suggested that YOYO-1 intercalated in the DNA homogeneously. Contrary, the fluorescence intensity of (lambda) DNA with 500 (mu) M YOYO-1 was heterogeneous and did not correlate with the area of topographic cross section. This suggested that YOYO-1 was not intercalated to (lambda) DNA uniformly in the concentration and intercalated partially and cooperatively.

  4. Increasing the Analytical Sensitivity by Oligonucleotides Modified with Para- and Ortho-Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acids - TINA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Uffe V; Géci, Imrich; Jøhnk, Nina

    2011-01-01

    -TINA molecules and 7-fold by addition of para-TINA molecules (versus the unmodified DNA oligonucleotide), with a 4-fold increase retained at 1 M ionic strength. Both intercalators sustained the discrimination of mismatches in the dsDNA (indicated by ΔTm), unless placed directly adjacent to the mismatch...

  5. Effective intercalation of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) into hydrocalumite: Mechanism discussion via near-infrared and mid-infrared investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Tianqi; Qian, Guangren; Wu, Daishe; Frost, Ray L

    2015-10-05

    The intercalation of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), into hydrocalumite (CaAl-LDH-Cl) was investigated in this study. To understand the intercalation behavior, X-ray diffraction (XRD), mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were undertaken. The near-infrared spectra indicated a special spectral range from 6000 to 5600 cm(-1)and prominent bands of CaAl-LDH-Cl intercalated with SDS around 8388 cm(-1). This band was assigned to the second overtone of the first fundamental of CH stretching vibrations of SDS, and it could be used to determinate the result of CaAl-LDH-Cl modified by SDS. Moreover, the results revealed that different adsorption behaviors were observed at different (high and low) concentrations of SDS. When the SDS concentration was around 0.2 mol L(-1), anion exchange intercalation occurred and the interlayer distance expanded to about 3.25 nm. When SDS concentration was 0.005 mol L(-1), the surface adsorption of DS(-) was the major anion exchange event. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Radial intercalation is regulated by the Par complex and the microtubule-stabilizing protein CLAMP/Spef1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Michael E.; Putzbach, William; Bacon, Elizabeth; Kim, Sun K.

    2014-01-01

    The directed movement of cells is critical for numerous developmental and disease processes. A developmentally reiterated form of migration is radial intercalation; the process by which cells move in a direction orthogonal to the plane of the tissue from an inner layer to an outer layer. We use the radial intercalation of cells into the skin of Xenopus laevis embryos as a model to study directed cell migration within an epithelial tissue. We identify a novel function for both the microtubule-binding protein CLAMP and members of the microtubule-regulating Par complex during intercalation. Specifically, we show that Par3 and aPKC promote the apical positioning of centrioles, whereas CLAMP stabilizes microtubules along the axis of migration. We propose a model in which the Par complex defines the orientation of apical migration during intercalation and in which subcellular localization of CLAMP promotes the establishment of an axis of microtubule stability required for the active migration of cells into the outer epithelium. PMID:25070955

  7. A two-dimensional magnetic hybrid material based on intercalation of a cationic Prussian blue analog in montmorillonite nanoclay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gournis, Dimitrios; Papachristodoulou, Christina; Maccallini, Enrico; Rudolf, Petra; Karakassides, Michael A.; Karamanis, Dimitrios T.; Sage, Marie-Helene; Palstra, Thomas T. M.; Colomer, Jean-Francois; Papavasileiou, Konstantinos D.; Melissas, Vasilios S.; Gangas, Nicolaos H.

    2010-01-01

    A highly ordered two-dimensional hybrid magnetic nanocomposite has been prepared by synthesizing and intercalating a new cationic aluminum-hydroxy ferric ferrocyanide compound into a cation-adsorbing nanoclay (montmorillonite). Chemical and structural properties were investigated by X-ray

  8. First-principles study on interlayer state in alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms intercalated bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-11-01

    Energetics and electronic structures of alkali metal (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) and alkaline earth metal (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) atoms intercalated bilayer graphene are systematically investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Formation of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms intercalated bilayer graphene is exothermic except for Be and Mg. The interlayer state between two graphene layers is occupied for K, Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, and Ba. We find that the energetic position of the interlayer states between bilayer graphene monotonically shifts downward with increasing of interlayer distance. The interlayer distances of more than 4.5 Å and 4.0 Å, respectively, are necessary for the occupation of the interlayer state in bilayer graphene for alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms, which is almost independent of the intercalant metal species. We discuss the relevance to occurrence of superconductivity for the metal intercalated bilayer graphene in terms of the occupation of the interlayer state and the phonon frequency of metal ions.

  9. Effect of low-temperature conditions on passive layer growth in Li intercalation materials: In situ impedance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsoukov, E.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, J.H.; Yoon, C.O.; Lee, H. [Korea Kumho Petrochemical Co., Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Kumho Chemical Labs.

    1998-08-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the formation of insulating layers at the surfaces of microscopic particles of mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB), graphite, and hard carbon during the first Li-intercalation into these materials at ambient temperature as well as at {minus}20 C. Investigations were carried out in a three-electrode sandwich cell, designed for impedance measurements in the frequency range 64 kHz to 5 mHz. The impedance spectra, obtained in the potential range 1.5 and 0.02 V during the first charge, were analyzed by complex nonlinear least square fits. A new model, taking into account the porous structure of the intercalation material, electrochemical processes at the interface, as well as spherical diffusion of Li ions toward the centers of the particles, has been used for this analysis. The first intercalation at {minus}20 C results in formation of an insulating layer, which is about 90 times thinner than in the room-temperature case, as concluded from an analysis of experimental results. The irreversible capacity loss, which is 1.3 times larger at {minus}20 C that at room temperature, is ascribed to the formation of a porous precipitate of electrolyte decomposition products on the particle surface. Additional Li intercalation at room temperature results in an irreversible capacity loss of 26% from the initial value, and formation of a composite layer, including low-temperature and room-temperature deposited components.

  10. Thermoelectric transport properties of polycrystalline titanium diselenide co-intercalated with nickel and titanium using spark plasma sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgate, Tim; Zhu, S.; Zhou, M.

    2013-01-01

    Polycrystalline samples of nickel intercalated (0–5%) TiSe2 were attempted via solid-state reaction in evacuated quartz tubes followed by densification using a spark plasma sintering process. X-ray diffraction data indicated that mixed NiSe2 and TiSe2 phases were present after initial synthesis b...

  11. Drug intercalation in layered double hydroxide clay: Application in the development of a nanocomposite film for guided tissue regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborti, M.; Jackson, J.K.; Plackett, David

    2011-01-01

    of release by intercalation of alendronate anions in magnesium/aluminum layered double hydroxide (LDH) clay nanoparticles and dispersed in the PLGA film matrix. Tetracycline, loaded as free drug into the film together with alendronate–LDH clay complex released more rapidly than alendronate, but showed...

  12. Tribological performance of Mg/Al/Ce layered double hydroxides nanoparticles and intercalated products as lubricant additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuo; Qin, Haojing; Zuo, Ranfang; Bai, Zhimin, E-mail: zhimibai@cugb.edu.cn

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Mg/Al/Ce layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were synthesized by coprecipitation. • Mg/Al/Ce LDHs were intercalated with succinic acid and lauric acid respectively. • LDHs intercalated with lauric acid had the best friction properties among products. • Sliding of layers, good dispersity and a protective film decided the performance. - Abstract: Mg/Al/Ce ternary layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were synthesized via coprecipitation and intercalated by succinic acid and lauric acid through ion exchange method respectively. The LDHs products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). Tribological properties of LDHs as lubricant additives were evaluated by four-ball friction and air compressor test. The results indicated that Mg/Al/Ce LDHs were prepared successfully with Ce/Al molar ratio of 0.05 and crystallization temperature of 140 °C. The interlayer spacing of LDHs precursor was expanded by succinic acid and lauric acid to 8.838 and 17.519 Å respectively. All the three LDHs products can reduce friction and wear of engine lubricating oil in the tests. LDHs intercalated with lauric acid showed best tribological performance among them which was attributed to sliding each other between laminates, good dispersibility in oil medium and a protective tribofilm formed on the worn surface.

  13. Intercalation of Mg-ions in layered V2O5 cathode materials for rechargeable Mg-ion batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Daniel Risskov; Johannesen, Pætur; Christensen, Christian Kolle

    The development of functioning rechargeable Mg-ion batteries is still in its early stage, and a coarse screening of suitable cathode materials is still on-going. Within the intercalation-type cathodes, layered crystalline materials are of high interest as they are known to perform well in Li...

  14. A hybrid material assembled by anthocyanins from açaí fruit intercalated between niobium lamellar oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Neto, Angela Albuquerque; Shiguihara, Ana Lucia; Izumi, Celly M S; Bizeto, Marcos Augusto; Leroux, Fabrice; Temperini, Marcia L Arruda; Constantino, Vera R Leopoldo

    2009-06-07

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials can be prepared dispersing organic species into well-defined inorganic nanoblocks. This paper describes the immobilization of natural dyes from the extract of the Brazilian açaí-fruit into two types of layered hexaniobate precursors derived from H(2)K(2)Nb(6)O(17): (i) colloidal dispersion of niobate exfoliated nanoparticles and (ii) niobate pre-intercalated with tetraethylammonium cations (TEA(+)). The restacking of exfoliated particles in the presence of açaí anthocyanins promotes their intercalation and produces stacked layers showing large basal spacing (ca. 50 A). The TEA(+) pre-intercalated niobate provides particles with lower content of dye species than the exfoliated precursor but with higher degree of organization and regularity according to X-ray diffraction data and images obtained by electron microscopies. Vibrational (FTIR and Raman) and (13)C NMR spectroscopies indicate the presence of flavylium cations in the hybrid materials and spectral profiles characteristic of glycosylated anthocyanidins. According to thermal analysis results, the purplish hybrids materials are more stable than the free açaí-dyes. One hybrid sample was heated under air up to 170 degrees C and maintained at this temperature for 240 min. No weight loss events were observed and the sample retained its original color, indicating that the intercalation of anthocyanin into hexaniobate increases its thermal stability. Considering the structural, chemical, optical and thermal properties of the synthesized hybrid materials, they might be good candidates to be investigated for future specialized applications.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy study investigating Li intercalation in tunnel structured ζ-V2O5 nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arijita; Yoo, Hyun Deog; Nolis, Gene; Andrews, Justin; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Cabana, Jordi; Klie, Robert; Joint Center for Energy Storage Research Collaboration

    Energy storage research has become quite relevant in recent years with the advent of smarter electronic devices and electric vehicles that demand more efficient options. Orthorhombic α-V2O5 has been known as a versatile intercalation cathode host for lithium and beyond Li cations, such as Na and Mg. Recent reports have established that a novel tunnel structured polymorph, ζ-V2O5 can perform better as a cathode material, and can intercalate Li and Mg chemically. This contribution will focus on an in depth study of phase formation upon electrochemical Li intercalation of this new polymorph, ζ-V2O5 using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy(STEM) electron energy loss spectroscopy(EELS) and energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy(EDX). Results will also be presented investigating Mg and Na intercalation into this ζ-V2O5 polymorph and compare the electrochemical performance in the various scenarios directly with structural changes at an atomic scale. This work is supported by Joint Center for Energy Storage Research(JCESR).

  16. Selective synthesis and characterization of single-site HY zeolite-supported rhodium complexes and their use as catalysts for ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khivantsev, Konstantin

    Single-site Rh(CO)2, Rh(C2H4)2 and Rh(NO)2 complexes anchored on various dealuminated HY zeolites can be used as precursors for the selective surface mediated synthesis of well-defined site-isolated Rh(CO)(H)x complexes. DFT calculations and D 2 isotope exchange experiments provide strong evidence for the formation of a family of site isolated mononuclear rhodium carbonyl hydride complexes (including the first examples of RhH complexes with undissociated H2 ligands): Rh(CO)(H2), Rh(CO)(H)2, and Rh(CO)(H). The fraction of each individual complex formed varies significantly with the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite and the nature of the precursor used. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(CO)2 complexes are very active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. There is strong evidence for the cooperation mechanism between mononuclear rhodium complexes and Bronsted acid sites of the zeolite support in C-C bond formation process, as well as ethane formation. Finally, it is shown that the dimerization pathway selectivity can be progressively tuned (and completely switched off) by modifying the number of Bronsted acid sites on the zeolite surface. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(NO)2 complexes can be selectively formed upon exposure of Rh(CO)2/HY to the gas phase NO/He. They are structurally similar to Rh(CO)2/HY with Rh(I) retaining square planar geometry and nitrosyl ligands adopting a linear configuration. Rh(NO)2/HY30 is active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. This is the first unprecedented example of a supported transition-metal nitrosyl complex capable of performing a catalytic reaction. Moreover, this is the first example of a site-isolated Rh complex with ligands other than ethylene or carbonyl, which can catalyze both ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization. Unlike its dicarbonyl counterpart, dinitrosyl rhodium complex has a uniquely different reactivity towards ethylene and hydrogen

  17. Room temperature ammonia sensor based on copper nanoparticle intercalated polyaniline nanocomposite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, U. V.; Ramgir, Niranjan S.; Karmakar, N.; Bhogale, A.; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.; Kothari, D. C.

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of copper nanoparticles intercalated-polyaniline nanocomposites (NC) have been deposited at room temperatures by in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of different concentrations of Cu nanoparticles. The response characteristics of the NC thin films toward different gases namely NH3, CO, CO2, NO and CH4 were examined at room temperature. Both pure polyaniline (PANI) and NC films exhibited a selective response toward NH3. Incorporation of Cu nanoparticles resulted in an improvement of the sensors response and response kinetics. The response and the recovery times of composite film toward 50 ppm of NH3 were 7 and 160 s, respectively. Additionally, the NC sensor film could reversibly detect as low as 1 ppm of NH3 concentrations. The enhanced response of NC films toward NH3 is attributed to the deprotonation and reprotonation processes as also supported by Raman investigations.

  18. Materialographic preparation of lithium-carbon intercalation compounds; Materialographische Praeparation von Lithium-Kohlenstoff-Einlagerungsverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druee, Martin; Seyring, Martin; Grasemann, Aaron [Jena Univ. (Germany). Otto Schott Institute of Materials Research; Rettenmayr, Markus [Center for Energy and Environmental Chemistry, Jena (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The materialographic investigation of anode materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries is a significant step in the understanding and development of electrode materials, but made dramatically more difficult due to the high reactivity of the materials involved. In this work a method is presented which permits the metallographic preparation of the lithium-carbon intercalation compounds used as anode materials in today's rechargeable lithium ion batteries, and which allows the details of their microstructures to be contrasted. After classic, but absolutely water free, preparation in a protective gas atmosphere, the final stage of preparation is carried out using both ion beam polishing and manual polishing on a stationary polishing disc, whereby no significant differences of the quality of the microstructural images obtained is apparent.

  19. Graphene quantum dots produced by exfoliation of intercalated graphite nanoparticles and their application for temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy Khiem; Kim, TaeYoung

    2018-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have received much attention as a new class of fluorescent materials due to their unique transport phenomena and broadband absorption. Here, we present a method to produce pristine blue-luminescent GQDs from graphite nanoparticles by the intercalation of graphite nanoparticles and subsequent exfoliation in liquids. The as-synthesized GQDs are composed of highly crystalline carbon rings and show uniform size distribution ranging from 3 to 4 nm with an average thickness of ∼1 nm. The GQDs exhibit an excitation-dependent blue photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 22.3%. Furthermore, the GQDs were explored as an active sensing material for temperature measurement. The GQD-based temperature sensors show high responsivity to temperature changes over the range 30-80 °C.

  20. Removal of Pb{sup 2+} from the aqueous solution by tartrate intercalated layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yanming; Zhao, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xi; Li, Shifeng; Liu, Dongbin; Fan, Lihui [Shenyang University of Chemical Technology, Shenyang (China)

    2016-01-15

    Adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} ion by a tartrate intercalated MgAl layered double hydroxides (MgAl-TA LDHs) was studied. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated as a function of various experimental parameters using batch adsorption experiments. The results indicated that the adsorption isotherm was well described by Sips model. The kinetic adsorption data were fitted well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation. The adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} was controlled mainly by the chemical process combined with intraparticle diffusion. Parameters of adsorption thermodynamic suggested that the interaction of Pb{sup 2+} adsorbed by MgAl-TA LDHs adsorbents was thermodynamically spontaneous and endothermic.