WorldWideScience

Sample records for building restoration

  1. The steps of the restoration of a building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAZAKAMADYANDOFrancescaHarimanitra,; PAOLOVINCENZOGENOVESE; BANGOURAFacinet

    2011-01-01

    Today, when we talk about restoring an old building, many people think it's a total destruction of the building in order to place a new one. Restoring a building requires a lot of information and skills: be aware that restoring an old house is that with time and patience, take the maximum time to properly analyze the building and the environment in which it is located, seeking to understand the history of the evolution of the building and its architectural language, study the environment where the building and observe the unique architectural elements, we must ensure that all transactions will be made in accordance with the logic of the building design and original materials and avoid pastiche, seek the advice of professional expertise in the subject, we must put in mind that restoration is not the alteration or change.

  2. Effects of the restoration mortar on chalk stone buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, R. M.; Teodorescu, S.; Ştirbescu, R. M.; Dulamă, I. D.; Şuică-Bunghez, I. R.; Bucurică, I. A.; Fierăscu, R. C.; Fierscu, I.; Ion, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    The monument buildings as components of cultural heritage are exposed to degradation of surfaces and chemical and mechanical degradation, often associated to soiling and irreversible deterioration of the building. In many conservative and restorative works, a cement-based mortar was used without knowing all the adverse effects of this material on the building. This paper deals with the study of the effects of natural cement used in restorative works in the particular case of the Basarabi-Murfatlar Churches Ensemble. Cement-based materials exposed to sulfate present in the chalk stone - gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), can induce signs of deterioration, due to ettringite ([Ca3Al (OH)612H2O]2(SO4)32H2O) or thaumasite (Ca3[Si(OH)612H2O](CO3)SO4) formation. These phases contribute to strain within the material, inducing expansion, strength loss, spalling and severe degradation. Several combined techniques (XRD, EDXRF, ICP-AES, SEM, EDS, sulphates content, FT-IR and Raman analysis were carried out to put into evidence the effects of them on the building walls.

  3. Clinical comparison of various esthetic restorative options for coronal build-up of primary anterior teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhan, Himanshu; Pandit, Inder Kumar; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj; Gupta, Monika; Kochhar, Gulsheen Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to compare the clinical performance of composite, strip crowns, biological restoration, and composite with stainless steel band when used for the coronal build-up of anterior teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients aged 3-6 years presenting with mutilated primary anterior teeth due to caries or trauma were selected for the study using randomized simple sampling. A total of 52 primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into four equal groups having 13 teeth in each group. Teeth in Group I were restored with composite, in Group II with strip crowns, in Group III with biologic restoration and with stainless steel band reinforced composite in group IV. The restorations were evaluated for color match, retention, surface texture, and anatomic form according to Ryge's Direct (US Public Health Service) evaluation criteria at baseline (immediate postoperative), after 48 h, 3, 6, and 9 months. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test, and level of significance, that is, P value was determined. Results: At baseline, none of the groups showed any color changes. Other than Group III all other groups showed highly significant changes (P 0.05). Deterioration in surface texture was exhibited maximum by restorations in Group IV followed by Group I at 3 months. Whereas, no surface changes were seen in Group II and III. Only Group I and IV showed discontinuity in anatomic form after 3 months. After 6 months, except in Group II, discontinuity in anatomic form was observed in all the groups. Discontinuity in anatomic form was seen in all the 4 groups after 9 months although the difference was not significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Biological restoration was found to be most satisfying esthetically owing to color compatibility with the patient's tooth. Thus, it has a great potential to be used as esthetic restorative option in primary anteriors. PMID:26759595

  4. Clinical comparison of various esthetic restorative options for coronal build-up of primary anterior teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Duhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to compare the clinical performance of composite, strip crowns, biological restoration, and composite with stainless steel band when used for the coronal build-up of anterior teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients aged 3-6 years presenting with mutilated primary anterior teeth due to caries or trauma were selected for the study using randomized simple sampling. A total of 52 primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into four equal groups having 13 teeth in each group. Teeth in Group I were restored with composite, in Group II with strip crowns, in Group III with biologic restoration and with stainless steel band reinforced composite in group IV. The restorations were evaluated for color match, retention, surface texture, and anatomic form according to Ryge′s Direct (US Public Health Service evaluation criteria at baseline (immediate postoperative, after 48 h, 3, 6, and 9 months. The data obtained were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test, and level of significance, that is, P value was determined. Results: At baseline, none of the groups showed any color changes. Other than Group III all other groups showed highly significant changes (P 0.05. Deterioration in surface texture was exhibited maximum by restorations in Group IV followed by Group I at 3 months. Whereas, no surface changes were seen in Group II and III. Only Group I and IV showed discontinuity in anatomic form after 3 months. After 6 months, except in Group II, discontinuity in anatomic form was observed in all the groups. Discontinuity in anatomic form was seen in all the 4 groups after 9 months although the difference was not significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Biological restoration was found to be most satisfying esthetically owing to color compatibility with the patient′s tooth. Thus, it has a great potential to be used as esthetic restorative option in primary anteriors.

  5. Energy-conscious restoration of post-war residential buildings. A guide. Energiegerechte Instandsetzung von Nachkriegswohngebaeuden. Ein Leitfaden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerschberger, A.; Weidlich, B.

    1989-12-01

    In principle thermal insulation systems are suited to take over steps of conventional repairs of damages on buildings. Energy-conscious restoration of damaged facades result in energy savings of 20 to 40%. An overview given about these possibilities describes in detail damages of post-war buildings and suitable repair measures as well as the energy status of residential buildings and advantages of energy-conscious restoration. In connection with comparative evaluations of cost and economy information is given about insulation systems for the energy-conscious restoration of external walls. Correspondingly it is reflected on systems for this kind of restoration of flat roofs containing remarks about tenants' apportionment of costs and acceptance. The benefit of these measure is to be seen in regained functionality, increased service life, amelioration of aesthetic qualities and the associated living area as well as energy conservation. (HWJ).

  6. a Historical Timber Frame Model for Diagnosis and Documentation Before Building Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, M.; Viale, A.; Reeb, S.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the project that is described in this paper was to define a four-level timber frame survey mode of a historical building: the so-called "Andlau's Seigniory", Alsace, France. This historical building (domain) was built in the late XVIth century and is now in a stage of renovation in order to become a heritage interpretation centre. The used measurement methods combine Total Station measurements, Photogrammetry and 3D Terrestrial Laser scanner. Different modelling workflows were tested and compared according to the data acquisition method, but also according to the characteristics of the reconstructed model in terms of accuracy and level of detail. 3D geometric modelling of the entire structure was performed including modelling the degree of detail adapted to the needs. The described 3D timber framework exists now in different versions, from a theoretical and geometrical one up to a very detailed one, in which measurements and evaluation of deformation by time are potentially allowed. The virtually generated models involving archaeologists, architects, historians and specialists in historical crafts, are intended to be used during the four stages of the project: (i) knowledge of the current state of needs for diagnosis and understanding of former construction techniques; (ii) preparation and evaluation of restoration steps; (iii) knowledge and documentation concerning the archaeological object; (iv) transmission and dissemination of knowledge through the implementation of museum animations. Among the generated models we can also find a documentation of the site in the form of virtual tours created from panoramic photographs before and during the restoration works. Finally, the timber framework model was structured and integrated into a 3D GIS, where the association of descriptive and complementary digital documents was possible. Both offer tools leading to the diagnosis, the understanding of the structure, knowledge dissemination, documentation and the

  7. Measurement of color in different construction materials. The restoration in sandstone buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Pascua, N.

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of construction materials and their subsequent repair purposes include a search of knowledge and preservation of their original appearance. For this reason, the main aim of this study is to determine a color range which does not change with the possible actions on a building, both when restoration works which imply the use and repair of "ancient" materials are carried out, and when construction is carried out with new materials. It is necessary to obtain the quantification of this property in order to check its variation over the passage of time. Each construction material must be taken into account as an isolated problem, since the color is different in each case.

    El empleo de materiales de construcción y la aplicación sobre ellos de productos de reparación requiere un detallado estudio sobre su forma de actuación y la importancia de la conservación del aspecto original de los mismos. Por este motivo, el objetivo principal de este estudio es el determinar un intervalo de color que se conserve a pesar de todas las posibles intervenciones que se acometan en el edificio, tanto cuando se realizan trabajos de restauración, que implican el uso y reparación de materiales "viejos", o bien cuando se llevan a cabo trabajos de construcción con materiales nuevos. Es necesario cuantificar dicha propiedad para poder controlar el paso del tiempo. Cada material de construcción debe ser considerado como un problema aislado, ya que el color es distinto en cada caso.

  8. Restoration and conversion to re-use of historic buildings incorporating increased energy efficiency: A case study - the Haybarn complex, Hilandar Monastery, Mount Athos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Šekularac Jelena A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A proper approach to restoration of historic buildings is crucial for monumental heritage protection. The objective of the paper is to define a methodology for historic buildings restoration in order to increase energy efficiency and re-usability in accordance with modern standards. The main method used in the paper is the observation of historic buildings during their restoration and exploitation, analysis and evaluation of achieved results regarding energy efficiency and energy saving, through the examples of the buildings belonging to Hilandar Monastery, Mount Athos, in Greece. Mount Athos was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List for its cultural and natural values. This case study discusses the abandoned and dilapidated historic buildings of the Haybarn Complex (Stable, Mulekeepers’ House and Haybarn, the achieved results regarding the restoration of these buildings, their energy efficiency and turning into the premises for occasional stays. The research results are recommendations for increasing energy efficiency while performing the restoration of historic buildings, so that these buildings could be re-used in a new way. The most significant contribution of the paper is the practical test of energy refurbishment of these historic buildings conducted using the principles and methods of energy efficiency, in compliance with conservation requirements and authenticity of historic buildings.

  9. Empathy, Equity, Empowerment: Using Restorative Practices to Build Character and Community While Reducing Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses how Christopher Martin, a middle school science teacher in Denver, Colorado, finds success using restorative approaches that focus on empathy rather than punitive zero-tolerance school discipline policies. Upon reflection of his first school's discipline policy, he realized that the school operated out of fear and compliance…

  10. Measurement of Moisture in Wood for Application in the Restoration of Old Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Moron

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There are many historic buildings whose construction is based on timber frame walls. Most buildings built during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were based on timber frame walls with vertical support elements. These timber frame elements are affected by their moisture content and by the passage of time. If the interaction of the timber frame walls with hygrothermal fluctuations were known, the maintenance of these buildings could be improved significantly. To determine the moisture content of wood there are two types of meters on the market: on the one hand, capacitance meters which consist of two side ends and where the moisture content is measured locally between two peaks. On the other hand, there are meters based on the variation of electromagnetic transmittance of timber, which depends on the moisture of timber. The second ones are very expensive and difficult to handle. This work presents a new non-intrusive capacitive sensor that measures the global moisture content in a section of the timber frame walls and therefore its accuracy is similar to the accuracy that can be obtained with electromagnetic transmittance meters. Additionally, as it is a capacitive sensor, it is low cost and easy to operate.

  11. Measurement of Moisture in Wood for Application in the Restoration of Old Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moron, Carlos; Garcia-Fuentevilla, Luisa; Garcia, Alfonso; Moron, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    There are many historic buildings whose construction is based on timber frame walls. Most buildings built during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were based on timber frame walls with vertical support elements. These timber frame elements are affected by their moisture content and by the passage of time. If the interaction of the timber frame walls with hygrothermal fluctuations were known, the maintenance of these buildings could be improved significantly. To determine the moisture content of wood there are two types of meters on the market: on the one hand, capacitance meters which consist of two side ends and where the moisture content is measured locally between two peaks. On the other hand, there are meters based on the variation of electromagnetic transmittance of timber, which depends on the moisture of timber. The second ones are very expensive and difficult to handle. This work presents a new non-intrusive capacitive sensor that measures the global moisture content in a section of the timber frame walls and therefore its accuracy is similar to the accuracy that can be obtained with electromagnetic transmittance meters. Additionally, as it is a capacitive sensor, it is low cost and easy to operate. PMID:27187410

  12. Energy and microclimatic performance of restored hypogeous buildings in south Italy: The ''Sassi'' district of Matera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinale, Nicola [Department of Engineering and Environmental Physics, University of Basilicata, Via Lazazzera, 75100 Matera (Italy); Rospi, Gianluca; Stazi, Alessandro [Department of Architecture, Constructions and Structures, Polytechnic University of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The site of the ''Sassi of Matera'' classified by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as World Heritage in 1993, is an exceptional example of traditional bioclimatic Mediterranean architecture. Within this immense artistic heritage, we find hypogea habitations, stone buildings, and mixed habitation - half-hypogeum and half-built. In this study, we analyze the energy and microclimatic performance of hypogeous structures in three states: not-restored, immediately after restoration, and a few years after restoration (in normal use). We monitored a surface hypogeum and a deep hypogeum. We performed a dynamic parametric simulation using the software EnergyPlus to quantify the energetic balance of the hypogeous structures during one calendar year. The energetic valuation of the surface hypogea shows that these environments, once restored and in a condition of normal use, give indoor comfort within the limits of comfort thermo-hygrometrics established by the comfort indices of predicted mean vote (PMV) and predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD). The huge thermal mass of the walls ensures that the microclimate indoor conditions are regular throughout the seasons, without differences in the daily thermal oscillation. Deep hypogea without an air change system cannot reach thermal-hygrometric comfort values. We determined that these structures have a null thermal balance during mid-season, while in the summer the floor loses heat, thereby cooling the environment. The opposite occurs in winter. We can conclude that these buildings were designed as bioclimatic. In fact they can be used, after restoration, with limited use of technology systems. (author)

  13. Building up knowledge on resilience of fragile lands in subarctic climate - a metadatabase for land degradation and restoration in southern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, David C.; de Lavenne, Alban; Þórsson, Jóhann

    2016-04-01

    Resilience is the capacity of an ecosystem to respond to a perturbation or disturbance by resisting perturbations and recovering quickly. Natural catastrophes, such as floods, droughts, landslides, storms and volcanic eruptions can have devastating impacts on natural and build environment. Nevertheless, researchers worldwide have identified anthropogenic impacts to be the cause for enhanced consequences of natural catastrophes. Iceland, the small island on the mid Atlantic ridge is an ideal location to investigate anthropogenic impacts on the resilience of natural ecosystems. The dramatic deforestation after the arrival of the first settlers ~1100 years ago, the subsequent year round livestock grazing along with devastating ash emissions during volcanic eruptions and a harsh sub-polar oceanic climate have led to severe degradation of large areas of Icelandic soils. Since the beginning of the 20th century diverse restoration measures have been implemented at a large-scale on lowland areas of Iceland making them an ideal case study to investigate the effects of restoration on the resilience of water resources. Since over 100 years the Soil Conservation Service of Iceland (SCSI) has been restoring and investigating degraded landscapes, collecting valuable information and data on restoration research in Iceland. In a joint effort to provide an overview of terminated and ongoing research project, the SCSI and Reykjavik University have established a metadatabase summarizing all relevant restoration projects in the Rangárvellir area, a representative study site in southern Iceland. The SCSI and other governmental agencies have conducted numerous research and restoration projects in the area, including land restoration, land management, reforestation, hydrometeorological monitoring, vegetation mapping, to name just a few. The combination of these projects provides a valuable set of observational data and knowledge regarding the history of land restoration in Rang

  14. Eco-environment Restoration and Regional Differentiation Characteristics Based on “Building Terrace and Returning Slope Farmland to Forests and Grass”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhua; LIU; Yong; XU

    2013-01-01

    Based on the scientific and technological achievements in the past decade in the Loess Hilly-gully Region and the successful demonstration experience in Yan’an Yangou watershed, we summarize the characteristics of eco-environment restoration pattern based on "building terrace and returning slope farmland to forests and grass". According to the data on land use, slope farmland and the agricultural population in 1999, we calculate the area of new terrace that needs to be built, the area of garden plot that needs to be extended, vegetation restoration area and investment demand in counties (cities, districts). Establishing and using some indicators, such as basic farmland extension indicator, garden plot extension indicator, vegetation restoration index and investment demand density, we conduct type classification and analysis of regional differentiation characteristics in 55 counties (cities, districts). The results show that in the Loess Hilly-gully Region, 691 600 hm2 of new terrace needs to be built, 792 000 hm2 of economic forests and orchards need to be extended, 5 410 200 hm2 of vegetation needs to be restored, and the total investment demand is 15.82 billion yuan; in terms of geographical distribution, obviously there are two key areas for eco-environment restoration (one is located in the border area between northern Shaanxi and northwestern Shanxi, and the other is located in the eastern Gansu and southern Ningxia area); the classified regional guidance policies should be formulated as soon as possible, and the limited funds should be concentrated in the key areas.

  15. Post-occupancy evaluation of a restored industrial building: A contemporary art and design gallery in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mundo-Hernández

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained from a post-occupancy evaluation (POE study conducted in an old fabric building called “La Violeta”. This structure has been recently converted into a contemporary art gallery. La Violeta is located in Puebla City, Mexico. The building dates from the beginning of the 19th century; it was built and used as a textile factory until the first decades of the 20th century. This POE study aims to assess the new use of the building from the users׳ point of view. Methodology involves historical research of the building, analysis of the conversion strategy, walkthrough investigation, and a user survey. Questions regarding the re-utilization strategy used in the building and its current use are included in the survey, such as “How do people perceive the space regarding its functionality, accessibility, and comfort?” Although the re-utilization process destroyed several historic elements, the re-use of old industrial spaces that otherwise would be obsolete and disused seems pertinent. Developing small renovation projects as part of an integral and wider project seems feasible. Users perceive the building as comfortable but not properly advertised as an art gallery, and its location is difficult to find.

  16. The façades along the Cassaro in Palermo: historical-building characterization, degradation, restoration norms for interventions

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    Giovanni Fatta

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The good-will to operate in the old town privileging the history and the maintenance of historic buildings, is manifest in this study on the Vittorio Emanuele monumental street, the foundation axis of Palermo, and it’s architectural degraded and disfigured fronts. The search concerning sixty civil buildings is based initially on a cognitive process that includes historical analysis, geometric and dimensional survey, investigation on constituent materials and decay systems, in relation to environmental or anthropic causes. The study includes a design proposal that, according to the individuality of cases, it would represent an intervention code about some recurrent critical aspects on which it’s possible to intervene only applying codified procedures. The proposed designs show so an application to concrete cases, not abdicating to involve physical and economic urban environment: the re-qualification of building materials and architectural language would respect the historical image without depressing the market demands.

  17. Site characterization report for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), also known as the Fission Product Pilot Plant, is a surplus facility in the main plant area to the east of the South Tank Farm slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). The building consists of two concrete cells (north and south) on a concrete pad and was used to extract radioisotopes of ruthenium, strontium, cesium, cerium, rhenium and other elements from aqueous fission product waste. Site characterization activities of the building were initiated. The objective of the site characterization was to provide information necessary for engineering evaluation and planning of D ampersand D approaches, planning for personal protection of D ampersand D workers, and estimating waste volumes from D ampersand D activities. This site characterization report documents the investigation with a site description, a summary of characterization methods, chemical and radiological sample analysis results, field measurement results, and waste volume estimates

  18. Creation of Polyurethane Injection Materials, Their Pilot-industrial Production, Development and Industrial Introduction of the Technology of Strengthening and Restoring the Operability of Damaged Constructions and Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marukha, V.І.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane and foam polyurethane fluid injection materials not conceding foreign analogues and technology technology of restoration and strengthening the operability of concrete and reinforced concrete structures and buildings damaged by cracks were developed. Normative and technical documentation on the injection materials and technological processes was created. The diagnosticrestoring complex for implementing the above technologies was designed, installed and utilized at the construction sites. The equipment is designed and manufactured; the technology of the research and industrial production of «A» and «B» components of injecting polyurethane materials is designed and developed. The pilot-scale batch is manufactured. Technological processes of preparation and application of the «A» and «B» componentsof the injecting materials in industrial conditions are worked out and implemented.

  19. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS)

  20. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 113: Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Building Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Smith

    2001-01-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure in place of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 113 Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility (R-MAD). CAU 113 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (NDEP, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-04-01, R-MAD Facility (Figures 1-2). This plan provides the methodology for closure in place of CAU 113. The site contains radiologically impacted and hazardous material. Based on preassessment field work, there is sufficient process knowledge to close in place CAU 113 using the SAFER process. At a future date when funding becomes available, the R-MAD Building (25-3110) will be demolished and inaccessible radiologic waste will be properly disposed in the Area 3 Radiological Waste Management Site (RWMS).

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization plan: Area 23, Building 650 Leachfield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of Corrective Action Unit 94, Area 23, Building 650 Leachfield. It is a land disposal unit, located southeast of Building 650, that was in operation from 1965 to October 1992, with an estimated annual discharge rate of less than 984 liters from designated sinks, floor drains, and emergency decontamination showers in Building 650. The objectives of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site: and obtain sufficient sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste (IDW). All references to regulations in this plan are to the versions of the regulations that are current at the time of publication of this plan. The scope of the characterization will include subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings, and sample analysis for both site characterization and waste management purposes

  2. Bayesian methods to restore and re build images: application to gamma-graphy and to photofission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayesian algorithms are developed to solve inverse problems in gamma imaging and photofission tomography. The first part of this work is devoted to the modeling of our measurement systems. Two models have been found for both applications: the first one is a simple conventional model and the second one is a cascaded point process model. EM and MCMC Bayesian algorithms for image restoration and image reconstruction have been developed for these models and compared. The cascaded point process model does not improve significantly the results previously obtained by the classical model. To original approaches have been proposed, which increase the results previously obtained. The first approach uses an inhomogeneous Markov Random Field as a prior law, and makes the regularization parameter spatially vary. However, the problem of the estimation of hyper-parameters has not been solved. In the case of the deconvolution of point sources, a second approach has been proposed, which introduces a high level prior model. The picture is modeled as a list of objects, whose parameters and number are unknown. The results obtained with this method are more accurate than those obtained with the conventional Markov Random Field prior model and require less computational costs. (author)

  3. Site characterization report for Building 3506 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building 3506, also known as the Waste Evaporator Facility, is a surplus facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) slated for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). The building is located in the ORNL main plant area, to the west of the South Tank Farm and near the intersection of Central Avenue and Third Street. Characterization tasks consisted of three main activities: inspections, radiological measurements, and radiological and chemical sampling and analysis. Inspection reports document general facility conditions, as-built information, and specialized information such as structural evaluations. Radiological measurements define the quantity and distribution of radioactive contaminants; this information is used to calibrate a dose model of the facility and estimate the total activity, in curies, of each major radioactive isotope. The radiological information from sample analyses is used to refine the radiological model of the facility, and the radionuclide and hazardous chemical analyses are used for waste management planning. This report presents data from the field investigation and laboratory analyses in the form of a site description, as-built drawings, summary tables of radiological and chemical contaminant concentrations, and a waste volume estimate

  4. Restoration of ailing wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswald J Schmitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide.

  5. Restoring forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Douglass F.; Oliet, Juan A.; Aronson, James;

    2015-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation is occurring at high rates but humankind is experiencing historical momentum that favors forest restoration. Approaches to restoration may follow various paradigms depending on stakeholder objectives, regional climate, or the degree of site degradation. The vast amount...... of land requiring restoration implies the need for spatial prioritization of restoration efforts according to cost-benefit analyses that include ecological risks. To design resistant and resilient ecosystems that can adapt to emerging circumstances, an adaptive management approach is needed. Global change...

  6. Alternatives evaluation for the decontamination and decommissioning of buildings 3506 and 3515 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    this is an alternative evaluation document that records the evaluation process and justification for choosing the alternative recommended for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the 3506 and 3515 buildings at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The alternatives for the D&D of the two buildings were: (1) no action (continued surveillance and maintenance), (2) decontamination for free release, (3) entombment in place, (4) partial dismantlement, and (5) complete dismantlement. Soil remediation is not included in any of the alternatives. The recommended alternative for the D&D of Building 3506 is partial dismantlement at an estimated cost of $936, 000 in escalated dollars. The cost estimate for complete dismantlement is $1,384,000. The recommended alternative for the D&D of Building 3515 is complete dismantlement at an estimated cost of $3,733,000 in escalated dollars. This alternative is recommended, because the soils below the foundation of the 3515 building are highly contaminated, and removing the foundation in the D&D project results in lower overall worker risk, costs, and improved post-D&D site conditions. A further recommendation is to revise these cost estimates after the conclusion of the ongoing characterization study. The results of the characterization of the two buildings is expected to change some of the assumptions and resolve some of the uncertainties in the development of these estimates.

  7. ramic restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish R Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration.

  8. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2001-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations.

  9. Restorative neuroscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, Robert H; Meyer, Morten; Ducray, Angélique D;

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the search for therapeutic options for diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS), for which currently no effective treatment strategies are available. Replacement of damaged cells and restoration of function can be accomplished by transplantation of...

  10. Restoring Ancestral Language, Restoring Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Kay T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Cherokee Language Renewal Program that was designed to help Cherokee elementary school children learn to function in the dominant culture without sacrificing their own cultural heritage. Explains how the program got started, and reports on how it helps restore a cultural identify to a people who are at risk of losing their identity.…

  11. Restoration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    In the accompanying photos, a laboratory technician is restoring the once-obliterated serial number of a revolver. The four-photo sequence shows the gradual progression from total invisibility to clear readability. The technician is using a new process developed in an applications engineering project conducted by NASA's Lewis Research Center in conjunction with Chicago State University. Serial numbers and other markings are frequently eliminated from metal objects to prevent tracing ownership of guns, motor vehicles, bicycles, cameras, appliances and jewelry. To restore obliterated numbers, crime laboratory investigators most often employ a chemical etching technique. It is effective, but it may cause metal corrosion and it requires extensive preparatory grinding and polishing. The NASA-Chicago State process is advantageous because it can be applied without variation to any kind of metal, it needs no preparatory work and number recovery can be accomplished without corrosive chemicals; the liquid used is water.

  12. Nanoparticle-based concretes for the restoration of historical and contemporary buildings: a new way for CO2 reduction in architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Enrico; Ciliberto, Enrico; Verdura, Pietro Damiano; Lo Giudice, Elio; Navarra, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    The production of the cement is a highly energy-intensive process and contributes to the release of pollutants into the atmosphere due to both the chemical reactions occurring in the kiln and, in most cases, the burning of fossil fuels for power production. So, the reduction of the cement content in a concrete would be indirectly useful to decrease the pollutant emissions in the atmosphere. The results of our investigation indicate that the replacement levels of cement by the 4 % of nanoparticles show a positive increasing of many physical and chemical properties allowing a relevant saving of cement content inside a concrete mixture. The compressive strengths, tensile splitting, propagations of ultrasonic pulses and water permeability tests were investigated on different models and realistic structures by the ISO EN rules. The influence of the nanoparticles on physical and mechanical properties was measured at different ripening times. Both silica and iron oxides make cement pastes harder and accelerated hydration processes of the cements. A remarkable decreasing in water permeability was also observed showing that nanoconcretes can be used as innovative restoration systems for cement-based historical and contemporary artefacts in order to avoid carbonation processes. Moreover, a smaller quantity of cement binder inside the mortar causes relevant positive effects on the reduction of carbon dioxide emission in the atmosphere.

  13. Prosperity Restored

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An ancient-style architectural complex enables people to time travel to a commercial center more than 1,000 years ago Just before noon, more and more people poured into the temple fair held at the Tang West Market, agroup of ancient-style buildings in Xi’an,

  14. Site Restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of SCK-CEN's Site Restoration Department for 2001 are described. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and the management of spent fuel and the flow of dismantled materials and the recycling of materials from decommissioning activities based on the smelting of metallic materials in specialised foundries. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations and performs R and D on new techniques including processes for the treatment of various waste components including the reprocessing of spent fuel, the treatment of tritium, the treatment of liquid alkali metals into cabonates through oxidation, the treatment of radioactive organic waste and the reconditioning of bituminised waste products

  15. HVAC design in preservative restoration of historical building-Peace Hotel%历史保护建筑和平饭店修缮与整治工程暖通空调系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘蕾; 饶松涛; 包文毅

    2012-01-01

    针对和平饭店修缮与整治工程中暖通空调系统设计作概要性总结,着重介绍了几个重点保护区域的空调系统设计.探讨了防排烟系统设计与文物保护相矛盾时的解决办法,总结了历史保护建筑修缮设计的特点和设计体会,希望能为国内其他保护建筑修缮空调设计提供借鉴.%Summarizes the HVAC design during the preservative restoration of the hotel and focuses on the air conditioning system design of several key protected areas. Investigates the solution of conflicts between smoke control and extraction design and cultural relic protection, concludes the design characteristics and experience of the historical conservation buildings, which can be used as a reference for other similar design in China.

  16. Fernald restoration: ecologists and engineers integrate restoration and cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Eric; Homer, John

    2002-07-15

    As cleanup workers excavate pits and tear down buildings at the Fernald site in southwest Ohio, site ecologists are working side-by-side to create thriving wetlands and develop the early stages of forest, prairie, and savanna ecosystems to restore natural resources that were impacted by years of site operations. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy-Fernald Office (DOE-FN) and its cleanup contractor, Fluor Fernald, Inc., initiated several ecological restoration projects in perimeter areas of the site (e.g., areas not used for or impacted by uranium processing or waste management). The projects are part of Fernald's final land use plan to restore natural resources over 904 acres of the 1,050-acre site. Pete Yerace, the DOE-FN Natural Resource Trustee representative is working with the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees in an oversight role to resolve the state of Ohio's 1986 claim against DOE for injuries to natural resources. Fluor Fernald, Inc., and DOE-FN developed the ''Natural Resource Restoration Plan'', which outlines 15 major restoration projects for the site and will restore injured natural resources at the site. In general, Fernald's plan includes grading to maximize the formation of wetlands or expanded floodplain, amending soil where topsoil has been removed during excavation, and establishing native vegetation throughout the site. Today, with cleanup over 35 percent complete and site closure targeted for 2006, Fernald is entering a new phase of restoration that involves heavily remediated areas. By working closely with engineers and cleanup crews, site ecologists can take advantage of remediation fieldwork (e.g., convert an excavated depression into a wetland) and avoid unnecessary costs and duplication. This collaboration has also created opportunities for relatively simple and inexpensive restoration of areas that were discovered during ongoing remediation. To ensure the survival of the plant material in heavily

  17. Building perservation practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Marie Kirstine

    of architects and planners is primarily to reconcile the conservation prospects with the future use of buildings and sites. They intermediary the site through selections of the narratives, and in practice the restoration or transformation projects becomes a communication of the selected story, utilized...... planning? In this paper I will focus on the communication of the architects working with building preservation and planning, how they communicate the building, the interventions and the storytelling in practice. The methods used by the architects are based on a practice, where some skills are learned...... through education, such as documentation of buildings and the restoration as a way of communicating the architect's intervention on the building, meanwhile the communication of the buildings history is seen as a "natural" skill and the methods are not questioned in the practice. The storytelling has today...

  18. Eesti Ajaloomuuseumi Suurgildi hoone. Püsinäitus "Visa hing. 11 000 aastat Eesti ajalugu" = Restoration of the Estonian History Museum Great Guild Hall building, permanent exhibition "Spirit of survival. 11,000 years of Estonian history" / Margit A

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Argus, Margit, 1981-

    2012-01-01

    Suurgildi hoone renoveerimisest, sisekujundusest, ekspositsioonist. Sisearhitektid Margit Aule, Liis Lindvere, Margit Argus (Koko Arhitektid). Restaureerimisarhitekt: Mart Keskküla (Restor). Graafilise disaini autorid Jan Tomson, Indrek Sirkel, Mikk Heinsoo, Kaarel Nõmmik, Andrus Kõresaar (Produktsioonigrupp). Ekspositsiooni multimeedia ja interaktsioon: Produktsioonigrupp

  19. Global Ecosystem Restoration Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Miguel; Garcia, Monica; Fernandez, Nestor

    2015-01-01

    The Global ecosystem restoration index (GERI) is a composite index that integrates structural and functional aspects of the ecosystem restoration process. These elements are evaluated through a window that looks into a baseline for degraded ecosystems with the objective to assess restoration...

  20. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  1. After the Disaster: Restoring Library Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses precautions which can be taken to minimize loss or damage to library buildings and collections resulting from natural disasters (fires, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, storms). Preventive measures (alarm systems, interior protection), salvage efforts, restoration of collection and library facility, rebuilding collection and…

  2. Evaluation of efficacy of restorative dental treatment provided under general anesthesia at hospitalized pediatric dental patients of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs other posterior restorations. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up in comparison of other restorations.

  3. Restoring the worn dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, R L; Ouellet, D F

    1992-01-01

    Strong dental materials and dental porcelains are providing dentists with restorative opportunities that are more conservative because they require less destruction of healthy tooth structure and yield a more esthetic result. In cases of severe wear due to attrition, abrasion, and erosion, this process can be stopped, restoring the esthetics and function by using proper techniques and materials. The case report described in this article demonstrates the conservative restoration of severe wear due to attrition and erosion. Teeth were lengthened, wear was restored, and further wear was ceased by using a combination of bonded porcelain, a heat, light, and self-cure resin system, and a new glass-ionomer restorative material. The result was a strong, durable restoration (that required no anesthesia) with high esthetics.

  4. Watershed Restoration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  5. Fracture resistance of posterior teeth restored with modern restorative materials

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim M. Hamouda; Shehata, Salah H.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars restored with recent restorative materials. Fifty maxillary premolars were divided into five groups: Group 1 were unprepared teeth; Group 2 were teeth prepared without restoration; Group 3 were teeth restored with tetric ceram HB; Group 4 were teeth restored with InTen S; and Group 5 were teeth restored with Admira. The samples were tested using a universal testing machine. Peak loads at fracture were recorded. The teeth restored with ...

  6. Restoring Damaged Aquatic Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, John

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems must play a major role to ensure that water, which is both essential and scarce, is always available for both present and future generations. This has become even more urgent in light of the ongoing increase in total world population and predicted changes in the world climate. Since aquatic ecosystems have been damaged at a rate far in excess of both natural restoration and anthropogenic restoration, it is essential that both restorative processes be accelerated. However, e...

  7. Challenges of ecological restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halme, Panu; Allen, Katherine A.; Aunins, Ainars;

    2013-01-01

    on Biological Diversity. Several northern countries are now taking up this challenge by restoring forest biodiversity with increasing intensity. The ecology and biodiversity of boreal forests are relatively well understood making them a good model for restoration activities in many other forest ecosystems. Here...... of the target ecosystem should be established with the need for restoration carefully assessed and the outcome properly monitored. Finally, we identify the most important challenges that need to be solved in order to carry out efficient restoration with powerful and long-term positive impacts on biodiversity...

  8. The Application of Computer Virtual Reality Technology in the Digital Restoration of Ancient Buildings%计算机虚拟现实技术在古建筑数字化复原中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐会娟; 李德雄; 刘丽娜

    2016-01-01

    计算机虚拟现实技术的快速发展为我国古建筑复原工作提供了技术支撑,文章以计算机虚拟现实技术的概述作为论述突破口,分析计算机虚拟现实技术在古建筑数字化复原中的具体应用过程,以此提高古建筑文化遗产保护工作。%The rapid development of the computer virtual reality technology provides the technical support for China's ancient architecture restoration work,based on the overview of the computer virtual reality technology as a breakthrough point,analysis of the computer virtual reality technology in digital restoration of ancient concrete application process,to improve the work of protection of ancient cultural heritage.

  9. Restorative culture in school. Continuation of discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Pentin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the lack of effective ways of building relationships, parenting responsibility and conflict solving in the school community. It is addressed to the whole school community – to the administration, psychologists and social workers, to the faculty, parents and students. We discuss the key concepts and principles of “restorative culture” and the reasons for its introduction in educational institutions. The restorative culture refers to activities on formation and spread of interpersonal relations value in the aspect of its understanding, trust, acceptance of active responsibility, separation of problems and subjects, and focus on the successful experience. We briefly discuss the theory of restorative justice and narrative practice. Particular attention is paid to the typical methods of school response to conflicts, and to zero-tolerance policy. We propose that the school community needs a number of specific technologies that would optimally suit for different types of situations and would constitute a part of the system

  10. A new proposal to optimize the occlusal margin in direct resin composite restorations of posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Luís Henrique; Monteiro, Sylvio; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2008-01-01

    Modern operative dentistry provides practitioners of esthetic dentistry the means for performing direct restorations in a virtually imperceptible way. However, this attribute of resin composite can cause difficulties because the absence of contrast between the tooth structure and the restoration can impede visualization of the cavity limits. The purpose of this article is to highlight some operative steps that, when appropriately performed, will facilitate the building of direct resin composite restorations in posterior teeth, significantly reducing the possibility of restorative overextension.

  11. Bearing restoration by grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  12. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  13. Technologies for lake restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Helmut KLAPPER

    2003-01-01

    Lakes are suffering from different stress factors and need to be restored using different approaches. The eutrophication remains as the main water quality management problem for inland waters: both lakes and reservoirs. The way to curb the degradation is to stop the nutrient sources and to accelerate the restoration with help of in-lake technologies. Especially lakes with a long retention time need (eco-) technological help to decrease the nutrient content in the free water. The microbial and...

  14. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen. PMID:12412967

  15. Restoration of Shoulder Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boe, Chelsea C; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-08-01

    Restoration of shoulder function in patients with brachial plexus injury can be challenging. Initial reported efforts were focused on stabilizing the shoulder, improving inferior subluxation and restoring abduction and flexion of the joint. Recent advancements and improved understanding of coordinated shoulder motion and the biomechanical properties of the muscles around the shoulder applicable to tendon transfer have expanded available surgical options to improve shoulder function, specifically external rotation. Despite the advances in reconstructive options, brachial plexus injury remains a serious problem that requires complex surgical solutions, prolonged recovery, and acceptance of functional loss. PMID:27387074

  16. Challenges of ecological restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halme, Panu; Allen, Katherine A.; Aunins, Ainars;

    2013-01-01

    The alarming rate of ecosystem degradation has raised the need for ecological restoration throughout different biomes and continents. North European forests may appear as one of the least vulnerable ecosystems from a global perspective, since forest cover is not rapidly decreasing and many ecosys...

  17. [Influence of implant restoration on traditional restoration idea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H C

    2016-01-01

    Implant restoration affected the traditional restoration idea. Artificial implant restoration has a profound influence on the design of dental restoration. Implant supported prostheses have not only changed the method of oral rehabilitation, but also integrated revolutionary concept with the traditional treatment protocol. By using implants, posterior missing molars can be effectively restored and thus eliminating the disadvantages of traditional removable partial denture for Kennedy classification Ⅰ, Ⅱ partically edentulous dentition. Full edentulous arch can also be restored with implant fixed denture which provide much better oral health related quality of life compared with the traditional complete denture. It is useful to master the theory and skills of artificial implant restoration, and to provide a reference for the restoration of oral physiological function.

  18. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, CH; Mei, L.; Cheung, C.; Nalliah, RP

    2013-01-01

    The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slot preparation includes being more conservative and increasing tooth integrity and strength by preserving the marginal ridge. However, tunnel restoration is technique-sensitive and can be particularly challenging for inexperienced restorative dentists. Recent advances in technology, suc...

  19. Papahanaumokuakea - Laysan Island Restoration 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Goal of the Laysan Island Restoration is to restore Laysan to a "Pristine" state which would require minimal monitoring and habitat for Endemic Endangered...

  20. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  1. River Restoration and Meanders

    OpenAIRE

    G. Mathias Kondolf

    2006-01-01

    Among the most visually striking river restoration projects are those that involve the creation of a new channel, often in a new alignment and generally with a form and dimensions that are different from those of the preproject channel. These channel reconstruction projects often have the objective of creating a stable, single-thread, meandering channel, even on rivers that were not historically meandering, on rivers whose sediment load and flow regime would not be consistent with such stable...

  2. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  3. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu CH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Hung Chu1, May L Mei,1 Chloe Cheung,1 Romesh P Nalliah2 1Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Restorative Dentistry and Biomaterials Sciences, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slot preparation includes being more conservative and increasing tooth integrity and strength by preserving the marginal ridge. However, tunnel restoration is technique-sensitive and can be particularly challenging for inexperienced restorative dentists. Recent advances in technology, such as the contemporary design of dental handpieces with advanced light-emitting diode (LED and handheld comfort, offer operative dentists better vision, illumination, and maneuverability. The use of magnifying loupes also enhances the visibility of the preparation. The advent of digital radiographic imaging has improved dental imaging and reduced radiation. The new generation of restorative materials has improved mechanical properties. Tunnel restoration can be an option to restore proximal caries if the dentist performs proper case selection and pays attention to the details of the restorative procedures. This paper describes the clinical technique of tunnel restoration and reviews the studies of tunnel restorations. Keywords: operative, practice, tunnel preparation, composite, amalgam, glass ionomer

  4. SELECTION OF METHOD FOR RESTORATION OF PARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ivanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains definitions for a process and a methodology for restoration of parts on the basis of the analysis of the known methods and their selection. Geometric parameters and operational properties that should be provided for restoration of parts have been determined in the paper. A process for selection of the required method for restoration parts has been improved and it makes it possible to synthesize an optimal process of the restoration according to a criterion of industrial resource consumption with due account of quality, productivity and security limits. A justification on measures that meet the required limits has been presented in the paper. The paper shows a direction of technical solutions that ensure complete use of residual life of repair fund parts. These solutions can be achieved through close application of all repair sizes of work-pieces with revision of their values, uniform removal of the allowance while cutting the work-pieces at optimum locating, application of coating processes only in technically justified cases, application of straightening with thermal fixing of its results or all-around compression of deformable elements. The paper proposes to limit a number of overhauls for the units together with restoration of basic and fundamental parts by two repairs for the whole period of their lifetime. Number of shaft journal building-up should be limited by one building-up operation throughout the whole life cycle of the part with the purpose to preserve its length within the prescribed limits. It has been recommended to expand an application area of volumetric plastic deformation of material in the form of thermoplastic distribution or reduction of repair work-pieces representing class of rotation bodies with holes that ensures an allowance to machine external and internal surfaces for nominal dimensions without coating. A structure of the coating material with fine inclusions of carbides or nitrides of metals and

  5. River Restoration and Meanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mathias Kondolf

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the most visually striking river restoration projects are those that involve the creation of a new channel, often in a new alignment and generally with a form and dimensions that are different from those of the preproject channel. These channel reconstruction projects often have the objective of creating a stable, single-thread, meandering channel, even on rivers that were not historically meandering, on rivers whose sediment load and flow regime would not be consistent with such stable channels, or on already sinuous channels whose bends are not symmetrical. Such meandering channels are often specified by the Rosgen classification system, a popular restoration design approach. Although most projects of this type have not been subject to objective evaluation, completed postproject appraisals show that many of these projects failed within months or years of construction. Despite its, at best, mixed results, this classification and form-based approach continues to be popular because it is easy to apply, because it is accessible to those without formal training in fluvial geomorphology, and probably because it satisfies a deep-seated, although unrecognized, cultural preference for single-thread meandering channels. This preference is consistent with 18th-century English landscape theories, which held the serpentine form to be ideal and led to widespread construction of meandering channels on the country estates of the era. The preference for stability in restored channels seems to be widely accepted by practitioners and funders despite the fact that it is antithetical to research showing that dynamically migrating channels have the greatest ecological richness.

  6. Skjern River Restoration Counterfactual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    heritage. While the meanders of the Skjern River were reconstructed according to its assumed course in 1870s, the embanked canal, which was the main feature and symbol of a comprehensive cultivation project from the 1960s, was deconstructed and reduced to incomprehensible traces of the past. Not only did...... history and more openness towards constant change. In this approach the idea of palimpsest as metaphor for the cultural landscape plays an important role. Rather than being an obstacle for the restoration of nature, the historical layer following the comprehensive cultivation project from the 1960s...

  7. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Chu CH; Mei ML; Cheung C; Nalliah RP

    2013-01-01

    Chun-Hung Chu1, May L Mei,1 Chloe Cheung,1 Romesh P Nalliah2 1Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Restorative Dentistry and Biomaterials Sciences, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slot pre...

  8. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chun-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Chun-Hung Chu1, May L Mei,1 Chloe Cheung,1 Romesh P Nalliah2 1Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Restorative Dentistry and Biomaterials Sciences, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slo...

  9. Reparative dentistry or restorative dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Bruce W

    2008-01-01

    The real definition of restorative dentistry is found in the heart and hands of each individual restorative dentist. His or her training, continuing dental education, mentors, needs (financial and emotional), and style of practice all help to develop a philosophy of dental practice that affects daily restorative decisions. Depending on the factors described above, the decision to repair a tooth or change the environment and restore the tooth to a different shape, size, or color also may change. In recent years, patients' esthetic desires have become more of a factor than they were in previous decades. There are no exact written-tn-stone definitions of restorative dentistry, since the answers are operator-dependent and can vary. This column is meant to be food for thought and perhaps inspire discussion when dentists assemble for meetings or study clubs with the goal of delivering longer-lasting dentistry through a restorative dental practice. PMID:18348367

  10. Archived film analysis and restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Rares, A.

    2004-01-01

    The progressive degradation of current film archives poses a serious threat to the preservation of our cultural and technical heritage. Digitization and digital restoration are currently the most viable solutions for the long term preservation and high quality restoration of filmed material. They also open the path for more effective search, reuse and distribution of the archived content. This thesis covers various aspects of digital restoration applied to archived film. The main focus here l...

  11. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  12. Technologies for lake restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut KLAPPER

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Lakes are suffering from different stress factors and need to be restored using different approaches. The eutrophication remains as the main water quality management problem for inland waters: both lakes and reservoirs. The way to curb the degradation is to stop the nutrient sources and to accelerate the restoration with help of in-lake technologies. Especially lakes with a long retention time need (eco- technological help to decrease the nutrient content in the free water. The microbial and other organic matter from sewage and other autochthonous biomasses, causes oxygen depletion, which has many adverse effects. In less developed countries big reservoirs function as sewage treatment plants. Natural aeration solves problems only partly and many pollutants tend to accumulate in the sediments. The acidification by acid rain and by pyrite oxidation has to be controlled by acid neutralizing technologies. Addition of alkaline chemicals is useful only for soft waters, and technologies for (microbial alkalinization of very acidic hardwater mining lakes are in development. The corrective measures differ from those in use for eutrophication control. The salinization and water shortage mostly occurs if more water is used than available. L. Aral, L. Tschad, the Dead Sea or L. Nasser belong to waters with most severe environmental problems on a global scale. Their hydrologic regime needs to be evaluated. The inflow of salt water at the bottom of some mining lakes adds to stability of stratification, and thus accumulation of hydrogen sulphide in the monimolimnion of the meromictic lakes. Destratification, which is the most used technology, is only restricted applicable because of the dangerous concentrations of the byproducts of biological degradation. The contamination of lakes with hazardous substances from industry and agriculture require different restoration technologies, including subhydric isolation and storage, addition of nutrients for better self

  13. Natural processes in delta restoration: application to the Mississippi Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paola, Chris; Twilley, Robert R; Edmonds, Douglas A; Kim, Wonsuck; Mohrig, David; Parker, Gary; Viparelli, Enrica; Voller, Vaughan R

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of river deltas involves diverting sediment and water from major channels into adjoining drowned areas, where the sediment can build new land and provide a platform for regenerating wetland ecosystems. Except for local engineered structures at the points of diversion, restoration mainly relies on natural delta-building processes. Present understanding of such processes is sufficient to provide a basis for determining the feasibility of restoration projects through quantitative estimates of land-building rates and sustainable wetland area under different scenarios of sediment supply, subsidence, and sea-level rise. We are not yet to the point of being able to predict the evolution of a restored delta in detail. Predictions of delta evolution are based on field studies of active deltas, deltas in mine-tailings ponds, experimental deltas, and countless natural experiments contained in the stratigraphic record. These studies provide input for a variety of mechanistic delta models, ranging from radially averaged formulations to more detailed models that can resolve channels, topography, and ecosystem processes. Especially exciting areas for future research include understanding the mechanisms by which deltaic channel networks self-organize, grow, and distribute sediment and nutrients over the delta surface and coupling these to ecosystem processes, especially the interplay of topography, network geometry, and ecosystem dynamics. PMID:21329199

  14. Restoring medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity. PMID:22915177

  15. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole reactor building is accommodated in a shaft and is sealed level with the earth's surface by a building ceiling, which provides protection against penetration due to external effects. The building ceiling is supported on walls of the reactor building, which line the shaft and transfer the vertical components of forces to the foundations. The thickness of the walls is designed to withstand horizontal pressure waves in the floor. The building ceiling has an opening above the reactor, which must be closed by cover plates. Operating equipment for the reactor can be situated above the building ceiling. (orig./HP)

  16. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  17. Restorative Justice in School Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, David R.; Breslin, Beau

    2001-01-01

    Explores the recent implementation of restorative justice practices in Minnesota, Colorado, and Pennsylvania school communities, examining how their approaches can address substance abuse problems and offer alternatives to zero-tolerance policies. The three programs are committed to the idea that restoration is a more appropriate educational tool…

  18. SOCIAL WELFARE AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Fox

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the links and connections between social work and restorative justice. After a brief description of social work, restorative justice and family group conferencing, I will explore some the complementary theoretical links and practice applications, critically examining the potential implications and opportunities for social work practitioners and academics in relation to practice.

  19. Archived film analysis and restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rares, A.

    2004-01-01

    The progressive degradation of current film archives poses a serious threat to the preservation of our cultural and technical heritage. Digitization and digital restoration are currently the most viable solutions for the long term preservation and high quality restoration of filmed material. They al

  20. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  1. River Restoration Data in Lamoille County, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Documented river and riparian buffer restoration projects in Lamoille County, Vermont. Restoration includes buffer plantings (trees and shrubs), bank stabilization...

  2. Marcus Agrippa’s Building Activity in Ancient Rome

    OpenAIRE

    Таривердиева, Сабина Эльмар кызы

    2014-01-01

    The author examines the ideological significance of public buildings and constructions of Marcus Agrippa in Rome, who restored all the Roman aqueducts and built new ones as well as erected a huge complex of buildings in the Campus Martius thereby completely changing its face. The main ideological purpose of the building was to glorify the princeps, his family, and at a later stage the principate regime, which is most clearly reflected in the Pantheon. But if compared with the buildings of Aug...

  3. Laboratory Building.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  4. Kondolf Diagram for River Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehabilitation, protection, and management of riverine backwaters (floodplain aquatic habitats that are seasonally or periodically connected to the main channel) are becoming increasingly common. General criteria for selecting restoration goals and evaluating alternative designs are lacking. An app...

  5. Papahanaumokuakea - Laysan Island Restoration 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project will support restoration activities at Laysan Island. Staff and volunteers continue efforts to eradicate alien invasive species such as Indian dropseed...

  6. Papahanaumokuakea - Laysan Island Restoration 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project supports restoration activities at Laysan Island. Staff and volunteers continue efforts to eradicate alien invasive species such as Indian dropseed...

  7. Basic research for environmental restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Basic research for environmental restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Esthetic restoration of primary incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, F; García-Godoy, F

    1999-04-01

    A simple and esthetic technique for restoring cariously involved primary maxillary incisors is described. The technique includes mini-pins, a preformed celluloid crown and resin-based composite. PMID:10477982

  10. Restoration of sea eagle population: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josef RAJCHARD; Jan PROCH(A)ZKA

    2009-01-01

    The population density of the white-tailed sea eagle Haliaeetus albicilla is very low in many countries. In last twenty years, the sea eagle population in South Bohemia was restored by strict protection subsidized by reintroduction. The active help consisted of feeding during winter and building of artificial nests. A new sea eagle breeding population arose in the T(r)ebo(n) basin area in the early 1980' s. Until this time sea eagles had used former breeding places only for wintering, probably coming from the Baltic. The South Bohemian sea eagle population is very unique: it exists in a densely man-occupied landscape, mainly in areas with very intensive carp breeding in artificial fishponds and was partly artficially (help to wintering birds and reintroduction of some individuals) restored. The experience from South Bohemia may have importance for populations of the sea eagle in other areas of its occurence, primarily in the continental conditions [Current Zoology 55 (5):315-318,2009].

  11. Casting and Mechanized Titanium Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Madrigal, A.; Lopez, I; Suarez, MJ; Salido, MP.

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: New materials and methods for clinical dentistry are continuously being introduced. There is a growing interest in the use of titanium as a restorative material for several reasons: its relatively low cost, favorable physical properties and biocompatibility. However, titanium is technically more difficult to handle than conventional metal alloys. There are two fabrication methods for titanium restorations: casting and mechanized (a combination of machine duplication and spark er...

  12. Constructing power system restoration strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Y.; Liu, CC; Zhang, P.; K. Sun

    2009-01-01

    System restoration is an integral part of the overall defense system against catastrophic outages. The nature of system restoration problem involves status assessment, optimization of generation capability and load pickup. The optimization problem needs to take into numerous practical considerations and, therefore, it cannot be formulated as one single optimization problem. The other critical consideration for the development of decision support tools is its generality, i.e., the tools should...

  13. Forest Landscape Restoration in the Drylands of Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Smith-Ramírez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR involves the ecological restoration of degraded forest landscapes, with the aim of benefiting both biodiversity and human well-being. We first identify four fundamental principles of FLR, based on previous definitions. We then critically evaluate the application of these principles in practice, based on the experience gained during an international, collaborative research project conducted in six dry forest landscapes of Latin America. Research highlighted the potential for FLR; tree species of high socioeconomic value were identified in all study areas, and strong dependence of local communities on forest resources was widely encountered, particularly for fuelwood. We demonstrated that FLR can be achieved through both passive and active restoration approaches, and can be cost-effective if the increased provision of ecosystem services is taken into account. These results therefore highlight the potential for FLR, and the positive contribution that it could make to sustainable development. However, we also encountered a number of challenges to FLR implementation, including the difficulty of achieving strong engagement in FLR activities among local stakeholders, lack of capacity for community-led initiatives, and the lack of an appropriate institutional and regulatory environment to support restoration activities. Successful implementation of FLR will require new collaborative alliances among stakeholders, empowerment and capacity building of local communities to enable them to fully engage with restoration activities, and an enabling public policy context to enable local people to be active participants in the decision making process.

  14. How to scientifically assess a restoration project: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.; Freire, D. M.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Vazquez-Calvo, C.

    2012-04-01

    Commonly, it is said that there is lack of communication among scientists, conservators, restorers, project managers and architects. But sometimes this communication flows, and we can find enormous benefits from and for all the participating agents. This is the case we present in this work, in which technical agents in charge of the restoration of a building, asked for some scientific advice to perform the restoration of a heritage building. The results were successful and fantastic for both of them, in terms of one part asking for consultation and the other answering to the demands and resolving real problems. This is the case of a marvellous Renaissance building (Medinaceli Dukes palace, 15th-16th centuries) in the central area of Spain (Cogolludo, Guadalajara). Focused on the restoration project, we were asked for consultancy on how to solve matters like the assessment of the already fixed in project cleaning method for the stone façades, the efficacy and durability methods for some conservation products to be applied, the presence or not of a patina on the stone; the viability of using some restoration mortars, and the origin of some efflorescences that came out just after placed in the building a restoration rendering mortar. Responses to these matters were answered by performing tests both in the lab and on site in the building. The efficiency and effects on stone of the blasting cleaning method was assessed by first analysing the nature and thickness of the surface deposits to be removed (SEM-EDS analyses); secondly, roughness and colour measurements were performed, and thirdly, SEM-EDS analyses were carried out again to determine whether the cleaning method was able to remove part of the surface deposits, completely, or even part of the stone substrate. Some conservation products were tested on stone specimens, both their efficacy and their durability, concluding that it was better not to apply any of them. A patina was found on the stone façade under SEM

  15. Energy Efficiency Approach to Intelligent Building

    OpenAIRE

    Gitanjali Birangal; Dr. S.V. Admane; Shinde, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Energy efficiency has nowadays become one of the most challenging tasks and this has boosted research on fresh fields, such as Ambient Intelligence. Energy consumption in the housing and tertiary sectors is especially high in developed countries. There is a great potential for energy savings in these sectors. Energy conservation measures are developed for newly constructed buildings and for buildings under restoration. However, to achieve a significant diminution in en...

  16. Restoring force method and response estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The restoring force method is briefly outlined. Signal modifications that are necessary to successfully determine restoring force functions are discussed and illustrated. Restoring force functions for a base and a force excited system were determined and their effectiveness demonstrated by comparing measured and predicted signals. Additional developments that would make the restoring force method more general are suggested. 5 refs., 12 figs

  17. Respiratory Health Effects Associated with Restoration Work in Post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans

    OpenAIRE

    Rando, Roy J.; Lefante, John J.; Freyder, Laurie M.; Robert N. Jones

    2012-01-01

    Background. This study examines prevalence of respiratory conditions in New Orleans-area restoration workers after Hurricane Katrina. Methods. Between 2007 and 2010, spirometry and respiratory health and occupational questionnaire were administered to 791 New Orleans-area adults who mostly worked in the building construction and maintenance trades or custodial services. The associations between restoration work hours and lung function and prevalence of respiratory symptoms were examined by mu...

  18. Technical approach to groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Approach to Groundwater Restoration (TAGR) provides general technical guidance to implement the groundwater restoration phase of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The TAGR includes a brief overview of the surface remediation and groundwater restoration phases of the UMTRA Project and describes the regulatory requirements, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, and regulatory compliance. A section on program strategy discusses program optimization, the role of risk assessment, the observational approach, strategies for meeting groundwater cleanup standards, and remedial action decision-making. A section on data requirements for groundwater restoration evaluates the data quality objectives (DQO) and minimum data required to implement the options and comply with the standards. A section on sits implementation explores the development of a conceptual site model, approaches to site characterization, development of remedial action alternatives, selection of the groundwater restoration method, and remedial design and implementation in the context of site-specific documentation in the site observational work plan (SOWP) and the remedial action plan (RAP). Finally, the TAGR elaborates on groundwater monitoring necessary to evaluate compliance with the groundwater cleanup standards and protection of human health and the environment, and outlines licensing procedures

  19. Coupling systematic planning and expert judgement enhances the efficiency of river restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Simone D; Gessner, Jörn; Hermoso, Virgilio; Wolter, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Ineffectiveness of current river restoration practices hinders the achievement of ecological quality targets set by country-specific regulations. Recent advances in river restoration help planning efforts more systematically to reach ecological targets at the least costs. However, such approaches are often desktop-based and overlook real-world constraints. We argue that combining two techniques commonly used in the conservation arena - expert judgement and systematic planning - will deliver cost-effective restoration plans with a high potential for implementation. We tested this idea targeting the restoration of spawning habitat, i.e. gravel bars, for 11 rheophilic fish species along a river system in Germany (Havel-Spree rivers). With a group of local fish experts, we identified the location and extent of potential gravel bars along the rivers and necessary improvements to migration barriers to ensure fish passage. Restoration cost of each gravel bar included the cost of the action itself plus a fraction of the cost necessary to ensure longitudinal connectivity by upgrading or building fish passages located downstream. We set restoration targets according to the EU Water Framework Directive, i.e. relative abundance of 11 fish species in the reference community and optimised a restoration plan by prioritising a subset of restoration sites from the full set of identified sites, using the conservation planning software Marxan. Out of the 66 potential gravel bars, 36 sites which were mainly located in the downstream section of the system were selected, reflecting their cost-effectiveness given that fewer barriers needed intervention. Due to the limited overall number of sites that experts identified as being suitable for restoring spawning habitat, reaching abundance-targets was challenged. We conclude that coupling systematic river restoration planning with expert judgement produces optimised restoration plans that account for on-the-ground implementation constraints

  20. Building Inclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeanet Kullberg; Isik Kulu-Glasgow

    2009-01-01

    The social inclusion of immigrants and ethnic minorities is a central issue in many European countries. Governments face challenges in ensuring housing for immigrants, delivering public services, promoting neighbourhood coexistence and addressing residential segregation. The Building Inclusion proje

  1. Building Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... family's native language) is taught as the child's second language through reading, writing, speech, and use of residual ... that parents can use to help their child learn language. There are many types of building blocks, and ...

  2. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Tufo, Stephanie N; Myers, Emily B

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of fluent speech in one's native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is "restored" via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read at the level of one's peers without any clear failure due to environmental influences. In the current study we utilized the phonemic restoration illusion paradigm to examine individual differences in phonemic restoration across a range of reading ability, from very good to dyslexic readers. Results demonstrate that restoration occurs less in those who have high scores on measures of phonological processing. Based on these results, we suggest that the processing or representation of acoustic detail may not be as reliable in poor and dyslexic readers, with the result that lexical information is more likely to override acoustic properties of the stimuli. This pattern of increased restoration could result from a failure of perceptual tuning, in which unstable representations of speech sounds result in the acceptance of non-speech sounds as speech. An additional or alternative theory is that degraded or impaired phonological processing at the speech sound level may reflect architecture that is overly plastic and consequently fails to stabilize appropriately for speech sound representations. Therefore, the inability to separate speech and noise may result as a deficit in separating noise from the acoustic signal. PMID:24926230

  3. Conservative preparations for cast restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingburg, H T

    1976-04-01

    Partial veneer crowns still play a role in modern restorative dentistry. They must be used in the right situation with thoughtful treatment planning, and they must be done well in accordance with certain principles. Three-quarter crowns are less retentive than full crowns, but they can be used successfully as single unit restorations and retainers for short span bridges. Retention can be enhanced by the use of proximal boxes. The M.O.D. onlay, a modified inlay with occlusal coverage, minimizes the damaging effects of stress generated by occlusal forces. There is little indication for the use of M.O.D. inlays or large two surface inlays.

  4. Image restoration fundamentals and advances

    CERN Document Server

    Gunturk, Bahadir Kursat

    2012-01-01

    Image Restoration: Fundamentals and Advances responds to the need to update most existing references on the subject, many of which were published decades ago. Providing a broad overview of image restoration, this book explores breakthroughs in related algorithm development and their role in supporting real-world applications associated with various scientific and engineering fields. These include astronomical imaging, photo editing, and medical imaging, to name just a few. The book examines how such advances can also lead to novel insights into the fundamental properties of image sources. Addr

  5. Treatment planning for restorative implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Ricardo A; Klemons, Gary

    2015-04-01

    In this article, current literature on fixed and removable prosthodontics is reviewed along with evidence-based systematic reviews, including advice from those in the dental profession with years of experience, which help restorative dentists manage and treat their cases successfully. Treatment planning for restorative implantology should be looked at in 4 sections: (1) review of past medical history, (2) oral examination and occlusion, (3) dental imaging (ie, cone-beam computed tomography), and (4) fixed versus removable prosthodontics. These 4 concepts of treatment planning, along with proper surgical placements of the implant(s), result in successful cases. PMID:25835794

  6. Image Restoration with New Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow-Møller, Anne Marie

    The article examines the role played by the corporate website while a company - Arla - attempted to restore an image tarnished by unethical behaviour. The company's strategy focussed on dialogue: it introduced a large number of authentic employees in their natural role as cook, dairy farmer, etc...... their image as a faceless monopoly with a humanized, personalised version. However, it should also be questioned if, in the long run, it was the image campaign rather than the visible efforts of the company to behave with consideration that brought about the desired change. Keywords: Image restoration......, corporate communication, consumer dialogue...

  7. Mathematics behind a Class of Image Restoration Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita STATE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The restoration techniques are usually oriented toward modeling the type of degradation in order to infer the inverse process for recovering the given image. This approach usually involves the option for a criterion to numerically evaluate the quality of the resulted image and consequently the restoration process can be expressed in terms of an optimization problem. Most of the approaches are essentially based on additional hypothesis concerning the statistical properties of images. However, in real life applications, there is no enough information to support a certain particular image model, and consequently model-free developments have to be used instead. In our approaches the problem of image denoising/restoration is viewed as an information transmission/processing system, where the signal representing a certain clean image is transmitted through a noisy channel and only a noise-corrupted version is available. The aim is to recover the available signal as much as possible by using different noise removal techniques that is to build an accurate approximation of the initial image. Unfortunately, a series of image qualities, as for instance clarity, brightness, contrast, are affected by the noise removal techniques and consequently there is a need to partially restore them on the basis of information extracted exclusively from data. Following a brief description of the image restoration framework provided in the introductory part, a PCA-based methodology is presented in the second section of the paper. The basics of a new informational-based development for image restoration purposes and scatter matrix-based methods are given in the next two sections. The final section contains concluding remarks and suggestions for further work.

  8. The effect of a fiber reinforced cavity configuration on load bearing capacity and failure mode of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM resin composite overlay restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Rocca; C.M. Saratti; M. Cattani-Lorente; A.J. Feilzer; S. Scherrer; I. Krecji

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the fracture strength and the mode of failure of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM overlays with fiber reinforced composite build-up of the pulp chamber. Methods 40 Devitalized molars were cut over the CEJ and divided into five groups (n = 8). The pulp chambe

  9. Zirconia-reinforced dental restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Chen

    2013-01-01

    The series of studies conducted in this thesis showed that there are several ways to enhance the performance of fixed restorations regarding the application of zirconia. One possible way is to change the sintering procedure of zirconia, so that the physical properties of zirconia such BFS, density o

  10. Terrorism, forgiveness and restorative justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pemberton, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is intended to enhance understanding of the complexities of restorative justice in cases of terrorism from a victimological perspective. It does so first by analysing what separates terrorism from other forms of crime. The author argues that the main distinction concerns the peculiarly pu

  11. Bayesian image restoration, using configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, Thordis

    configurations are expressed in terms of the mean normal measure of the random set. These probabilities are used as prior probabilities in a Bayesian image restoration approach. Estimation of the remaining parameters in the model is outlined for salt and pepper noise. The inference in the model is discussed...

  12. Bayesian image restoration, using configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, Thordis Linda

    2006-01-01

    configurations are expressed in terms of the mean normal measure of the random set. These probabilities are used as prior probabilities in a Bayesian image restoration approach. Estimation of the remaining parameters in the model is outlined for the salt and pepper noise. The inference in the model is discussed...

  13. Strategic plan for Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Information Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, P.J.; Beck, J.E.; Gephart, R.E. [and others

    1994-06-01

    This strategic plan addresses information management for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Hanford Site. This Program leads the cleanup of the Hanford Site`s soil, groundwater, buried waste, and the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities. The vision that drives this strategic plan is to ensure that quality information is available to the people who need it, when they need it, at a convenient location, in a usable form, and at an acceptable cost. Although investments are being made in managing the vast amounts of information, which include data, records and documents associated with the Hanford Site`s production history and new cleanup mission, it is widely recognized that efforts to date have not accomplished the vision. Effective information management involves more than the compilation of massive amounts of electronic and non-electronic information. It also involves integrating information management into business processes that support user`s needs and decisionmaking. Only then can information management complement and enable environmental restoration priorities and practices, help identify environmental restoration requirements, and enable communication within the Environmental Restoration Program and between the Program and its stakeholders. Successfully accomplishing the Hanford Site mission requires an integrated approach to information management that crosses organizational boundaries, streamlines existing systems, and builds new systems that support the needs of the future. This plan outlines that approach.

  14. Strategic plan for Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Information Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This strategic plan addresses information management for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Hanford Site. This Program leads the cleanup of the Hanford Site's soil, groundwater, buried waste, and the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities. The vision that drives this strategic plan is to ensure that quality information is available to the people who need it, when they need it, at a convenient location, in a usable form, and at an acceptable cost. Although investments are being made in managing the vast amounts of information, which include data, records and documents associated with the Hanford Site's production history and new cleanup mission, it is widely recognized that efforts to date have not accomplished the vision. Effective information management involves more than the compilation of massive amounts of electronic and non-electronic information. It also involves integrating information management into business processes that support user's needs and decisionmaking. Only then can information management complement and enable environmental restoration priorities and practices, help identify environmental restoration requirements, and enable communication within the Environmental Restoration Program and between the Program and its stakeholders. Successfully accomplishing the Hanford Site mission requires an integrated approach to information management that crosses organizational boundaries, streamlines existing systems, and builds new systems that support the needs of the future. This plan outlines that approach

  15. Uncertainty at the Source: Science for River Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, W. L.

    2002-12-01

    Sustainable river restoration depends on effective predictive science leading to sound planning, design, and decision-making. Recent American experience has shown that fluvial geomorphology must address the following sources of uncertainty to reach its full potential as a partner in river restoration. (1) Science must take a more active role in establishing realistic goals for restoration; (2) established theory should be more fully exploited applications in restoration; (3) established theory must be improved by including role of humans and their societies; (4) site-based approaches need to be supplemented by improved watershed perspectives; (5) geomorphic science must build better connections with the biological sciences and engineering; (6) uncertainty needs to be more fully explored and quantified in geomorphic predictions; (7) uncertainty should be more effectively communicated to decision-makers and the public in quantitative and qualitative terms; (8) researchers and decision-makers need to deal more effectively with their biases and avoid advocacy science. From a philosophical perspective, researchers in fluvial geomorphology must come to recognize that their work must not only be good science, it must also be useful science.

  16. Illinois reclaimed soil productivity: Restoration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consolidation Coal Co. (Consol) has nearly 8,000 acres of high capability and prime farmland reclamation responsibility in Illinois. It has been involved in research in the area of restored soil productivity since 1976 with the University of Illinois and Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. Consol maintains an intensive program to demonstrate and test deep tillage equipment. The research and in-house demonstrations identified soil physical strength (compaction) as the main limiting factor to restoring a soil's productive capacity. There are two primary ways to address this issue, prevention and amelioration. The former was not an option for Consol because many acres were already reclaimed and the company had a major scraper fleet. Along with other operators in Illinois, Consol started an aggressive search for equipment and techniques that could loosen compacted soils. In 1987 Consol was the first to use the D.M.I.-Super Tiger deep soil plow, originally developed and manufactured by D.M.I., Inc. of Goodfield, Illinois. This plow is composed of a single parabolic, static shank with a 44-inch wide sweep weighing 1,200 pounds. It is capable of plowing 48 inches deep while leaving the top soil in place. A Caterpillar D9L tractor with 460 horsepower is used to pull the plow. In 1990 the decision was made to commit to this equipment as the best technology currently available. In 1994 Consol received a patent waiver from D.M.I. to build its own plow. The Consol built plow has been in use since the summer of 1995. To date, Consol has plowed over 3,900 acres with a D.M.I. plow

  17. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N. Del Tufo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of fluent speech in one’s native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is ‘restored’ via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read at the level of one’s peers without any clear failure due to environmental influences. In the current study we utilized the phonemic restoration illusion paradigm, to examine individual differences in phonemic restoration across a range of reading ability, from very good to dyslexic readers. Results demonstrate that restoration occurs less in those who have high scores on measures of phonological processing. Based on these results, we suggest that the processing or representation of acoustic detail may not be as reliable in poor and dyslexic readers, with the result that lexical information is more likely to override acoustic properties of the stimuli. This pattern of increased restoration could result from a failure of perceptual tuning, in which unstable representations of speech sounds result in the acceptance of non-speech sounds as speech. An additional or alternative theory is that degraded or impaired phonological processing at the speech sound level may reflect architecture that is overly plastic and consequently fails to stabilize appropriately for speech sound representations. Therefore the inability to separate speech and noise may result as a deficit in separating noise from the acoustic signal.

  18. Competence Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    The main question that guides this paper is how governments are focusing (and must focus) on competence building (education and training) when designing and implementing innovation policies. With this approach, the paper aims at filling the gap between the existing literature on competences...... on the one hand, and the real world of innovation policy-making on the other, typically not speaking to each other. With this purpose in mind, this paper discusses the role of competences and competence-building in the innovation process from a perspective of innovation systems; it examines how governments...... and public agencies in different countries and different times have actually approached the issue of building, maintaining and using competences in their innovation systems; it examines what are the critical and most important issues at stake from the point of view of innovation policy, looking particularly...

  19. Building Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas

    2007-01-01

    ‘The procurement of construction work is complex, and a successful outcome frequently elusive’. With this opening phrase of the book, the authors take on the challenging job of explaining the complexity of building procurement. Even though building procurement systems are, and will remain, complex...... despite this excellent book, the knowledge, expertise, well-articulated argument and collection of recent research efforts that are provided by the three authors will help to make project success less elusive. The book constitutes a thorough and comprehensive investigation of building procurement, which...... evolves from a simple establishment of a contractual relationship to a central and strategic part of construction. The authors relate to cultural, ethical and social and behavioural sciences as the fundamental basis for analysis and understanding of the complexity and dynamics of the procurement system...

  20. Environmental conservation and restoration ecology: two facets of the same problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Urbanska

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Restoration ecology has often been regarded as a subordinate component of conservation biology and yet the two disciplines differ from each other. Conservation aims at staving off extinction, i.e. preserving ecological structures and services which still exist, however endangered they may be. On the other hand, the principal objective of restoration is re-building ecological structures and services that have been destroyed. The most distinct focus of conservation is on population response to exploitation, whereas restoration is principally concerned with over-exploited sites and landscapes in which communities/ecosystems are to be re-built. Conservation aims at preserving as many species as possible; on the other hand, the biodiversity approach in restoration may be addressed on three levels viz. 1 initial species diversity, 2 post-restoration increase of diversity via spontaneous species immigration, and 3 age-state diversity of developing plant cover.

    The conceptual framework in conservation biology differs from that in restoration ecology. The two basic paradigms used in conservation biology are 1 small-population paradigm and 2 declining-population paradigm, and one of its useful concepts is population viability assessment (PVA. The two principal paradigms used in restoration ecology are 1 nature-in-balance paradigm and 2 nature-in-flux paradigm. Interfaces between conservation and restoration may be recognized when e.g., recovery strategies for threatened species include habitat/ecosystem restoration, or when population processes in non-threatened species are studied to verify their usefulness as restoration material.

    Integration of species and ecosystem approaches is already recognizable in ecology. It is to be hoped that in future conservation and restoration become integrated components of ecosystem management, but for the time being they remain two different facets of the same problem which is the negative human impact

  1. Why Buildings Fail: Are We Learning From Our Mistakes?

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kevin Parfitt

    2012-01-01

    Most building professionals have investigated or performed remedial designs for at least one architectural or engineering system failure during their careers. Other practitioners, especially those who work for forensic consultants or firms specializing in disaster response and repair, are more familiar with the variety and extent of building failures as they assist their clients in restoring damaged or deficient buildings. The advent of social medial and twenty-four-hour news channels along w...

  2. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  3. Building Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The report Building Bridges adresses the questions why, how and for whom academic audience research has public value, from the different points of view of the four working groups in the COST Action IS0906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies – “New Media Genres, Media Literacy and Trust...... in the Media”, “Audience Interactivity and Participation”, “The Role of Media and ICT Use for Evolving Social Relationships” and “Audience Transformations and Social Integration”. Building Bridges is the result of an ongoing dialogue between the Action and non-academic stakeholders in the field of audience...

  4. Restoration of the Detroit Observatory at the University of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesell, P. S.; Seitzer, P.

    1996-12-01

    The Detroit Observatory, located on the University of Michigan's campus, was erected in 1854 and named in honor of its many benefactors from the City of Detroit. It is the most significant unaltered mid-nineteenth century observatory in America with its original astronomical instruments still intact and operational, and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The Observatory is an important physical legacy of the University's early scientific preeminence, since it served as the training ground for many of the most prominent astronomers of the 19th century. A full restoration of the building is currently underway. When completed, the Observatory will serve as a museum of astronomical and meteorological science. As part of the project, the 12 5/8 inch Henry Fitz refracting telescope (1857) and the 6 inch Pistor & Martins meridian circle (1854) will undergo historical restoration.

  5. Economic barriers and incentives for biodiversity restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costs related with restoration efforts, as well as the economic incentives, are fundamental issues that have not been fully considered from a formal standpoint. Through the analysis of restoration trials in collaboration with an indigenous community in western Mexico, we analyzed economic issues related with the restoration trials themselves, and with the economic context that gives incentives for ecological restoration. We reach to the conclusion that the cost-benefit relationship of the restoration process by itself can be straightforward calculated in some cases, calculating economic benefits accrued from the diversity restored to ecosystem is more difficult. In terms of the incentives for biodiversity restoration, we concluded that in many cases, economic variables out of the control of those involved in restoration are determinant.

  6. Building Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The report Building Bridges adresses the questions why, how and for whom academic audience research has public value, from the different points of view of the four working groups in the COST Action IS0906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies – “New Media Genres, Media Literacy and Trust...

  7. Sustainable Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Elle, Morten

    The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems...

  8. 5 CFR 353.301 - Restoration rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration rights. 353.301 Section 353... DUTY FROM UNIFORMED SERVICE OR COMPENSABLE INJURY Compensable Injury § 353.301 Restoration rights. (a.... Although these restoration rights are agencywide, the employee's basic entitlement is to the...

  9. Resilience and Restoration of Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. Cottingham

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Lake water quality and ecosystem services are normally maintained by several feedbacks. Among these are nutrient retention and humic production by wetlands, nutrient retention and woody habitat production by riparian forests, food web structures that cha nnel phosphorus to consumers rather than phytoplankton, and biogeochemical mechanisms that inhibit phosphorus recycling from sediments. In degraded lakes, these resilience mechanisms are replaced by new ones that connect lakes to larger, regional economi c and social systems. New controls that maintain degraded lakes include runoff from agricultural and urban areas, absence of wetlands and riparian forests, and changes in lake food webs and biogeochemistry that channel phosphorus to blooms of nuisance al gae. Economic analyses show that degraded lakes are significantly less valuable than normal lakes. Because of this difference in value, the economic benefits of restoring lakes could be used to create incentives for lake restoration.

  10. RESTORING VISION USING HUMAN OPSINS

    OpenAIRE

    Cehajic-Kapetanovic, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    Restoring vision using human opsinsJasmina Cehajic-Kapetanovic; The University of Manchester, Doctor of Philosophy, 2015Inherited retinal degenerations (IRDs) are progressive degenerative conditions that affect around 1 in 2500 people worldwide and lead to severe visual impairment due to irreversible loss of photoreceptors. These conditions are currently untreatable. However, inner retinal neurons, including bipolar and ganglion cells, can survive representing promising targets for emerging o...

  11. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Del Tufo, Stephanie N.; Myers, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of fluent speech in one's native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is “restored” via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read...

  12. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Del Tufo, Stephanie N.; Myers, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of fluent speech in one’s native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is ‘restored’ via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read...

  13. Digital restoration research and three-dimensional model construction on Xieqiqu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, M.; Piao, W.; Guo, J.

    2015-08-01

    As the Baroque style complex in Yuanmingyuan (Old Summer Palace), Xiyanglou (Western Buildings) carries a unique history of the imperial resort. The significance of its restoration has drawn much attention from home and aboard in the field of cultural heritage conservation. Yuanmingyuan Digital Restoration Research Project was officially launched in 2013. Five out of the thirteen scenes in Xiyanglou, namely Xieqiqu (Harmonious Wonder), Haiyantang (Hall of National Peace), Fangwaiguan (Belvedere), Xushuilou(Water Supply Building) and Guanshuifa (Throne to observe water displays), have been studied and restored digitally within the first two years of the project. Among all the scenes in Xiyanglou, Xieqiqu is the first European-style palace and the first scene to be studied in the Digital Restoration Research Project. The 3D reconstruction of the site is based on the current-day survey of the ruins in combination with the historic archival research. Taking Xieqiqu as a case, this paper introduces the digital restoration methodologies, progress and achievements of Yuanmingyuan Digital Restoration Research Project.

  14. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedemann Jensen, Per

    1999-04-01

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developing generic methodologies for ranking restoration techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps: characterisation of relevant contaminated sites; identification and characterisation of relevant restoration techniques; assessment of the radiological impact; development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options; formulation of generic conclusions and development of a manual. The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated with radioactive materials as a result of the operation of these installations. The areas considered for remedial measures include contaminated land areas, rivers and sediments in rivers, lakes, and sea areas. Five contaminated European sites have been studied. Various remedial measures have been envisaged with respect to the optimisation of the protection of the populations being exposed to the radionuclides at the sites. Cost-benefit analysis and multi-attribute utility analysis have been applied for optimisation. Health, economic and social attributes have been included and weighting factors for the different attributes have been determined by the use of scaling constants. (au)

  15. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developing generic methodologies for ranking restoration techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps: characterisation of relevant contaminated sites; identification and characterisation of relevant restoration techniques; assessment of the radiological impact; development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options; formulation of generic conclusions and development of a manual. The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated with radioactive materials as a result of the operation of these installations. The areas considered for remedial measures include contaminated land areas, rivers and sediments in rivers, lakes, and sea areas. Five contaminated European sites have been studied. Various remedial measures have been envisaged with respect to the optimisation of the protection of the populations being exposed to the radionuclides at the sites. Cost-benefit analysis and multi-attribute utility analysis have been applied for optimisation. Health, economic and social attributes have been included and weighting factors for the different attributes have been determined by the use of scaling constants. (au)

  16. Environmental Restoration 1997 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1997, the Environmental Restoration Program at the Savannah River Site achieved all of the ''Breakthrough Goals'' that were established with the regulatory agencies in 1995 to advance their cleanup efforts. Effective focus on field remediation was demonstrated by the allocation of 75% of program funding to remediation activities. The Remediation Phase is complete or has begun on sixty-nine waste sites that represent approximately 80% of the known environmental and health risk. The average time required for the assessment phase of active projects was reduced by 50%, from 49 to less than 24 months, which allows cleanup actions to start twice as fast as before. Breakthrough performance has tangible results. During 1997, all of the funding allocation was used effectively to accomplish environmental restoration scope worth over $123 million. That represents a validated cost efficiency of over 20% for the third straight year. Over half of the 500 contaminated acres at SRS have been cleaned up or are currently in the remediation phase. Almost 3 billion gallons of groundwater have been restored by removing over half a million pounds of organic solvents

  17. Role of XRF in the restoration of a prominent architectural monument at the site of Mleiha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Eisa; Attaelmanan, Atta

    2012-07-01

    The fort at Mleiha is one of the most well known archaeological sites of its period (3rd c. BC to 3rd c. AD) in the United Arab Emirates and has provided much valuable information. The period of its construction and use coincided with the Parthian period, during which there were extensive commercial contacts between the UAE and Mediterranean cities, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Southwest Iran, Pakistan, East Africa, and the southern Arabian Peninsula. It was restored using local materials, and traditional construction methods. The objective of this study was to utilize XRF techniques for the identification of the elemental composition of building material used to construct an archaeological fort, and to compare it to composition of the restoration material. Results of the study show strong correlation between the original fort building material and those used for restoration.

  18. Building Letters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Cabinet是种十分吸引人却很简单的衬线字体,是由一名匿名字体设计师专门为Building Letters最新的资金筹集活动所设计的。这个Building Letters包中包含一个CDROM,有32种字体,以及一本专门设计的杂志和两张由Eboy和Emigre所设计的海报。字体光盘样例是由世界顶级的字体设计师们设计的.

  19. Treatment of "non-restorable" teeth. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donly, K J

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a case report of the dental care for permanent teeth that were originally considered "non-restorable". The temporary placement of stainless steel crowns was completed, followed by traditional endodontic therapy. The crowns were used as build-up matrices, access being prepared in the occlusal of the crown. Glass ionomer silver was then placed, followed by marginal finishing. Although this report is an isolated case, and is considered as temporary treatment, there may be indications to consider this technique for clinical care, on an individual basis.

  20. 200 Areas soil remediation strategy -- Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The remediation and waste management activities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site (located in Richland, Washington) currently range from remediating groundwater, remediating source units (contaminated soils), decontaminating and decommissioning of buildings and structures, maintaining facilities, managing transuranic, low-level and mixed waste, and operating tank farms that store high-level waste. This strategy focuses on the assessment and remediation of soil that resulted from the discharge of liquids and solids from processing facilities to the ground (e.g., ponds, ditches, cribs, burial grounds) in the 200 Areas and addresses only those waste sites assigned to the Environmental Restoration Program

  1. Model Building

    OpenAIRE

    Frampton, Paul H.

    1997-01-01

    In this talk I begin with some general discussion of model building in particle theory, emphasizing the need for motivation and testability. Three illustrative examples are then described. The first is the Left-Right model which provides an explanation for the chirality of quarks and leptons. The second is the 331-model which offers a first step to understanding the three generations of quarks and leptons. Third and last is the SU(15) model which can accommodate the light leptoquarks possibly...

  2. Building economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, D.O.(red.)

    Publikationen er på engelsk. Den omfatter alle indlæg på det fjerde internationale symposium om byggeøkonomi, der blev arrangeret af SBI for det internationale byggeforskningsråd CIB. De fem bind omhandler: Methods of Economic Evaluation, Design Optimization, Ressource Utilization, The Building...... Market og Economics and Technological Forecasting in Construction. Et indledende bind bringer statusrapporter for de fem forskningsområder, og det sidste bind sammenfatter debatten på symposiet....

  3. Expanding Opportunity through Critical Restorative Justice Portraits of Resilience at the Individual and School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David; Wadhwa, Anita

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we tackle the disadvantaging conditions of zero tolerance policies in school settings and advocate using an alternative approach--critical restorative justice through peacemaking circles--to nurture resilience and open opportunity at the school level. In the process, this article builds on theory and qualitative research and…

  4. Identity Border Crossings within School Communities, Precursors to Restorative Conferencing: A Symbolic Interactionist Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Kimberly Giaudrone; Thomas, Joy; Vaughn, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    Our study uses an interdisciplinary theoretical lens to understand the complexity of community building as a precursor to restorative practices. Key to these measures is that offenders take responsibility for their actions and undergo reintegration into the school community. Yet, until these students feel they belong to the school community in the…

  5. The science and practice of river restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen; Lane, Stuart N.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2015-08-01

    River restoration is one of the most prominent areas of applied water-resources science. From an initial focus on enhancing fish habitat or river appearance, primarily through structural modification of channel form, restoration has expanded to incorporate a wide variety of management activities designed to enhance river process and form. Restoration is conducted on headwater streams, large lowland rivers, and entire river networks in urban, agricultural, and less intensively human-altered environments. We critically examine how contemporary practitioners approach river restoration and challenges for implementing restoration, which include clearly identified objectives, holistic understanding of rivers as ecosystems, and the role of restoration as a social process. We also examine challenges for scientific understanding in river restoration. These include: how physical complexity supports biogeochemical function, stream metabolism, and stream ecosystem productivity; characterizing response curves of different river components; understanding sediment dynamics; and increasing appreciation of the importance of incorporating climate change considerations and resiliency into restoration planning. Finally, we examine changes in river restoration within the past decade, such as increasing use of stream mitigation banking; development of new tools and technologies; different types of process-based restoration; growing recognition of the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in rivers; increasing expectations of water quality improvements from restoration; and more effective communication between practitioners and river scientists.

  6. Demographic Effects of Habitat Restoration for the Grey-Crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis, in Victoria, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Vesk

    Full Text Available Considerable resources are spent on habitat restoration across the globe to counter the impacts of habitat loss and degradation on wildlife populations. But, because of time and resourcing constraints on many conservation programs, the effectiveness of these habitat restoration programs in achieving their long-term goals of improving the population viability of particular wildlife species is rarely assessed and many restoration programs cannot demonstrate their effectiveness. Without such demonstration, and in particular demonstrating the causal relationships between habitat restoration actions and demographic responses of the target species, investments in restoration to achieve population outcomes are of uncertain value.Here, we describe an approach that builds on population data collected for a threatened Australian bird - the Grey-crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis - to evaluate how effectively targeted habitat restoration work improves its viability. We built upon an extensive historical survey by conducting surveys 13 years later at 117 sites stratified by presence/absence of restoration works and by detection or not of birds in the first survey. Our performance metric was the number of individuals in a social group, which is both a measure of local abundance and directly related to breeding success. We employed an occupancy model to estimate the response of Grey-crowned Babbler social group size to the effects of time, restoration works, local habitat as measured by the density of large trees, and distance to the nearest other known group of babblers.Babbler group size decreased over the survey period at sites without restoration works, but restoration works were effective in stemming declines where they were done. Restoration was responsible for a difference of about one bird per group of 3-5 individuals; this is an important effect on the reproductive success of the social group. Effectiveness of restoration works targeted at the

  7. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with indirect composite inlay and onlay restorations – An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraheem F. Alshiddi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, endodontically treated teeth were successfully restored with indirect composite inlay and onlay restorations. However, the fractures that accompanied the inlay restorations were more severe and were unable to be restored.

  8. Long-term evaluation of extensive restorations in permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwenhuysen, J.-P. van; D'hoore, W.D.; Carvalho, J.;

    2003-01-01

    Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry......Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry...

  9. Factors influencing bonding fixed restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Crown displacement often occurs because the features of tooth preparations do not counteract the forces directed against restorations. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of preparation designs on retention and resistance of fixed restorations. METHOD The study was performed on 64 differently sized stainless steel dies. Also, caps which were used for evaluated retention were made of stainless steel for each die. After cementing the caps on experimental dies, measuring of necessary tensile forces to separate cemented caps from dies was done. Caps, which were made of a silver-palladium alloy with a slope of 60° to the longitudinal axis formed on the occlusal surface, were used for evaluating resistance. A sudden drop in load pressure recorded by the test machine indicated failure for that cap. RESULTS A significant difference was found between the tensile force required to remove the caps from the dies with different length (p<0.05 and different taper (p<0.01. The greatest retentive strengths (2579.2 N and 2989.8 N were noticed in experimental dies with the greatest length and smallest taper. No statistically significant (p>0.05 differences were found between tensile loads for caps cemented on dies with different diameter. Although there was an apparent slight increase in resistance values for caps on dies with smaller tapers, the increase in resistance for those preparation designs was not statistically significant. There was a significant difference among the resistance values for caps on dies with different length (p<0.01 and diameter (p<0.05. CONCLUSION In the light of the results obtained, it could be reasonably concluded that retention and resistance of the restoration is in inverse proportion to convergence angle of the prepared teeth. But, at a constant convergence angle, retention and resistance increase with rising length and diameter.

  10. Environmental restoration using horizontal wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that under sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy, technical personnel from the Savannah River Laboratory and other DOE laboratories, universities and private industry have completed a full scale demonstration of environmental remediation using horizontal wells. The test successfully removed approximately 7250 kg of contaminants. A large amount of characterization and monitoring data was collected to aid in interpretation of the test and to provide the information needed for future environmental restorations that employ directionally drilled wells as extraction or delivery systems

  11. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Hedemann

    1999-01-01

    with radioactive materials as a result of the operation of these installations. The areasconsidered for remedial measures include contaminated land areas, rivers and sediments in rivers, lakes, and sea areas. Five contaminated European sites have been studied. Various remedial measures have been envisaged...... techniques -assessment of the radiological impact -development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options -formulation ofgeneric conclusions and development of a manual The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated...

  12. Complications in hair restoration surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Meza, David; Niedbalski, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Hair loss affects more than 1.2 billion people worldwide. As the technology and artistry of hair restoration surgery has improved including natural results, so too has the popularity of this procedure. As with any other surgical procedure, complications may occur and this presents a major challenge for the surgeon and the patient. This article provides an overview of the complications most likely to occur during the pre, intra, and postoperative periods with modern hair transplant surgery (single follicular unit or multifollicular unit) including scalp surgery, and discusses their treatment and most importantly their prevention. PMID:19185800

  13. Current status of zirconia restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsumura, Hideo; Ban, Seiji; Kobayashi, Taira

    2013-10-01

    During the past decade, zirconia-based ceramics have been successfully introduced into the clinic to fabricate fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), along with a dental computer-aided/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. In this article (1) development of dental ceramics, (2) the current status of dental CAD/CAM systems, (3) CAD/CAM and zirconia restoration, (4) bond between zirconia and veneering ceramics, (5) bond of zirconia with resin-based luting agents, (6) surface finish of zirconia restoration and antagonist enamel wear, and (7) clinical evaluation of zirconia restoration are reviewed. Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) showed better mechanical properties and superior resistance to fracture than other conventional dental ceramics. Furthermore, ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline and alumina nanocomposites (Ce-TZP/A) had the highest fracture toughness and had resistance to low-temperature aging degradation. Both zirconia-based ceramics have been clinically available as an alternative to the metal framework for fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Marginal adaptation of zirconia-based FDPs is acceptable for clinical application. The most frequent clinical complication with zirconia-based FDPs was chipping of the veneering porcelain that was affected by many factors. The mechanism for the bonding between zirconia and veneering ceramics remains unknown. There was no clear evidence of chemical bonding and the bond strength between zirconia and porcelain was lower than that between metal and porcelain. There were two alternatives proposed that might avoid chipping of veneering porcelains. One was hybrid-structured FDPs comprising CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain parts adhering to a CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia framework. Another option was full-contour zirconia FDPs using high translucent zirconia. Combined application of silica coating and/or silane coupler, and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate is

  14. Call to restore Mesopotamian marshlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    When the current military conflict in Iraq has concluded, a rehabilitation of that country should include a full assessment and action plan for restoring the marshlands of Mesopotamia, the United Nations Environment Programme said on 22 March.The marshlands, also known as the Fertile Crescent, could disappear within three to five years, according to UNEP.UNEP Executive Director Klaus Toepfer said the loss of the marshlands “is an environmental catastrophe for this region and underscores the huge pressures facing wetlands and freshwater ecosystems across the world.”

  15. 309 Building fire protection analysis and justification for deactivation of sprinkler system. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, R.P.

    1997-06-25

    Provide a `graded approach` fire evaluation in preparation for turnover to Environmental Restoration Contractor for D&D. Scope includes revising 309 Building book value and evaluating fire hazards, radiological and toxicological releases, and life safety issues.

  16. Restoration and Rehabilitation of world heritage Site of Chupan Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish Rohani, S.

    2015-08-01

    Church of Chupan is located in Jolfa cityin north of Iran and is laid at south side of Arax River. Built of the church traced back to 14th to 15th century and the time when Armenians were inhabited in the region. Chupan church had been inscribed at World Heritage List of UNESCO under no 1262 in 2008, as one of the five churches of "Armenian Monasteries of Azerbaijan province of Iran" dossier. As it is located at a religious and tourism road of Darresham and each year most of Armenian from all over the world visited the church as a part of a religious ceremony, also as the same church on opposite side of the Arax in Republic of Nakhchivan is completely destroyed between 1998-2002 and the church is the only existing evidence of these two couple church, the restoration and rehabilitation of chupan church is very important. Because of very bad statues of structure stability and long-term neglect of the conservation and preservation of the building, restoration and rehabilitation of the church in the earliest was necessary. Restoration of this church was my MA degree thesis and now as a Ph.D student in field of urban design and planning student, I am working on the next step which is to revitalization and rehabilitation of the church.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA, restoring Beethovens music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merheb, Maxime; Vaiedelich, Stéphane; Maniguet, Thiérry; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Great ancient composers have endured many obstacles and constraints which are very difficult to understand unless we perform the restoration process of ancient music. Species identification in leather used during manufacturing is the key step to start such a restoration process in order to produce a facsimile of a museum piano. Our study reveals the species identification in the leather covering the hammer head in a piano created by Erard in 1802. This is the last existing piano similar to the piano that Beethoven used with its leather preserved in its original state. The leather sample was not present in a homogeneous piece, yet combined with glue. Using a DNA extraction method that avoids PCR inhibitors; we discovered that sheep and cattle are the origin of the combination. To identify the species in the leather, we focused on the amounts of mitochondrial DNA in both leather and glue and results have led us to the conclusion that the leather used to cover the hammer head in this piano was made of cattle hide.

  18. Geodetic evaluation of the building's facade

    OpenAIRE

    Kopač, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This graduation thesis discusses the geodetic evaluation of the facade on the Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering. In the thesis, the terms facade and restoration are defined. Options to visually represent 3D model are briefly described. Generally the photogrammetric and terrestrial laser surveying methods were used. The polar method at measuring the building's facade by using tachymeter is presented in more detailed way. The basic geodetic network was established and it serves as coord...

  19. Building Philippine SMEs Resilience to Natural Disasters

    OpenAIRE

    Ballesteros, Marife M.; Sonny N. Domingo

    2015-01-01

    Disasters are bad for business specifically for small and medium enterprises (SMEs). These catastrophic events can compromise capital, logistics, product market, and labor, which compromise business continuity and recovery. Physical damage and disruptions in supply and labor can cause temporary business closure while structural repairs to buildings and recovery or replacement of damaged equipment needed to restore operations require large amount of resources. The adverse impact may not only b...

  20. Streambed Composition and its Contribution to Spawning Viability Following the Completion of the Stoney Creek Weir Restoration Project

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Kurt (Ed.); Byrne, Shane; Drover, Alicia; Van Pelt, Ginny; Liu, Kitty

    2013-01-01

    Salmon populations are highly endangered, and in an attempt to restore these populations, habitat restoration projects have become abundant. The Stoney Creek Environment Committee established one such project to enhance salmon spawning conditions at Stoney Creek in Burnaby, BC, by building three weirs. In this report, the streambed composition of the three weirs is analyzed in relation to salmon spawning conditions for the five species of Salmonidea present in Stoney Creek. The result is a nu...

  1. Community Resilience: Workshops on Private Sector and Property Owner Requirements for Recovery and Restoration from a Diasaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-12-22

    This report summarizes the results of a proejct sponsored by DTRA to 1) Assess the readiness of private-sector businesses, building owners, and service providers to restore property and recover operations in the aftermath of a wide-area dispersal of anthrax; and 2) Understand what private property owners and businesses "want and need" from federal, state, and local government to support recovery and restoration from such an incident.

  2. Portable hyperspectral device as a valuable tool for detection of protective agents on hystorical buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Vettori S.; Pecchioni E.; Camaiti M.; Garfagnoli F.; Benvenuti M.; Costagliola P.; Moretti S.

    2012-01-01

    In the recent past, a wide range of protective products (in most cases, synthetic polymers) have been applied to the surfaces of ancient buildings/artefacts to preserve them from alteration [1]. The lack of a detailed mapping of the permanence and efficacy of these treatments, in particular when applied on large surfaces such as building facades, may be particularly noxious when new restoration treatments are needed and the best choice of restoration protocols has to be taken. The presence of...

  3. Evaluation of resins for provisional restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, J O; Haveman, C W; Butzin, C

    1992-06-01

    An in vivo study of two resin materials (Barricaid and Caulk Temporary Crown and Bridge Resin) was done to determine the retention, post-operative sensitivity, and fabrication time of provisional restorations made from these materials. Following the placement of these resins in 67 intracoronal cavity preparations of 19 adult patients, a baseline evaluation was made which included a clinical examination and color slides. Twenty-four hours after the temporary restorations were placed, the patients completed evaluations of the post-operative sensitivity experienced. There was no difference in post-operative sensitivity between the teeth restored with Barricaid or Caulk Temporary Crown and Bridge Resin. At the insertion appointment of the final restoration, the interim restoration's success rate was determined. There was no difference between the retention of the two provisional materials. Fabrication time was significantly different with Barricaid restorations requiring less than one-half the fabrication time of the Caulk Temporary Crown and Bridge Resin material. PMID:1388950

  4. [Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by dental restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kiminori

    2014-06-01

    We report herein on 5 patients with odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration (caries cutting, cavity preparation, inlay restoration). Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis was noted following dental restoration. Even though the pulp cavity and dental pulp were intact, the odontogenic maxillary sinusitis occurred caused by an apical lesion. Infection by way of the dentinal tubules was suggested to be a cause of the pathophysiology. Endoscopic sinus surgery was indicated in patients with intractable odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by the dental restoration. Cone-beam x-ray CT was useful for the accurate diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental restoration. Physicians should thus be aware of the possibility that a tooth, which has undergone dental restoration, may cause odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

  5. Guidelines for Direct Adhesive Composite Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Society Of Cariology And Endodontology, Chinese Stomatological Association Csa

    2015-01-01

    Direct adhesive composite restoration, a technique to restore tooth defects by bonding composite resin materials, has been widely used in the restoration of dental caries or other tooth defects. Retention of composite resin restoration mainly relies on bonding strength between the materials and dental tissue. The clinical outcomes rely greatly on the regulated clinical practice of dentists. In 2011, the Society of Cariology and Endodontology of Chinese Stomatological Association (CSA) published the 'Practices and evaluation criteria of composite resin bonded restoration (Discussion Version)'. Since then, opinions and comments regarding the 'Discussion Version' have been widely circulated within the Society. The final version of the guideline was based on systematic reviews of scientific literature and requirements for the edit of technical guidelines, and through several rounds of discussions, revisions and supplements. The society recommends this guideline for clinicians to use in their practices, when conducting direct composite restorations.

  6. Evaluating the process of ecological restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Nilsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed a conceptual framework for evaluating the process of ecological restoration and applied it to 10 examples of restoration projects in the northern hemisphere. We identified three major phases, planning, implementation, and monitoring, in the restoration process. We found that evaluation occurred both within and between the three phases, that it included both formal and informal components, and that it often had an impact on the performance of the projects. Most evaluations were short-term and only some parts of them were properly documented. Poor or short-term evaluation of the restoration process creates a risk that inefficient methods will continue to be used, which reduces the efficiency and effectiveness of restoration. To improve the restoration process and to transfer the knowledge to future projects, we argue for more formal, sustained evaluation procedures, involving all relevant stakeholders, and increased and improved documentation and dissemination of the results.

  7. Building lease: a new financial opportunity for public infrastructures

    OpenAIRE

    Aldo Norsa; Dario Trabucco

    2012-01-01

    The building lease is a new tool available to the government to finance public ‘cold’ infrastructures which allows to spread the investment over several years. Some major projects have recently been funded with this solution which can be used for both new works and for interventions on the existing buildings. The use of the building lease on existing assets (such as renovations or restorations), however, is still very rare, because of the need to «sale and lease back» the building concerned....

  8. Assessing the future of green building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Raymond J.

    2005-04-01

    As the realities of resource depletion and global environmental degradation become more evident, we can anticipate a maturing and strengthening of the public's concern and knowledge on environmental issues. This will translate into an expectation for greater environmental responsibility and, as with other sectors, the building industry will be increasingly scrutinized for its environmental actions. The adoption of environmental strategies has been accelerated by the emergence of building environmental assessment methods that have provided both a definition and common language for green buildings as well as a means of communicating performance improvements. Whereas the current focus is on ``green'' design-reducing or mitigating the environmental consequences of buildings-the future concerns will embrace mitigation, adaptation to the new conditions and restoring previous adversely impacted regions and human settlements. This presentation will provide an overview of the evolution of green building practices to set a context for understanding emerging issues in building acoustics. Since the adoption of green building practices is a function of the context that shapes political and public priorities, the presentation compares and contrasts several short and long-term scenarios some certain, others more speculative and their direct and indirect consequences for environmental progress building design.

  9. Energy Efficiency Approach to Intelligent Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitanjali Birangal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Energy efficiency has nowadays become one of the most challenging tasks and this has boosted research on fresh fields, such as Ambient Intelligence. Energy consumption in the housing and tertiary sectors is especially high in developed countries. There is a great potential for energy savings in these sectors. Energy conservation measures are developed for newly constructed buildings and for buildings under restoration. However, to achieve a significant diminution in energy consumption apart from the standard energy-efficiency methods, pioneering technologies should be implemented, including renewable energy. Now, buildings are increasingly anticipated to meet higher and more complex performance requirements. Among these requirements, energy efficiency is renowned as an international goal to promote energy sustainability. Different approaches have been adapted to concentrate on this goal, the most up to date relating consumption patterns with human occupancy. Energy efficiency is keywords that can be originate these days in all domains in which energy demand exists. A significant aspect that can improve the energy efficiency in buildings is the use of building automation systems. Alternatively, building automation systems are usually not considered for energy conservation, as they are mostly used for comfort and safety. This consistently causes immense problems due to an fruitless use of these systems and unawareness of energy consumption. It is therefore essential that the existing system solutions are adapted to focus on energy conservation. Our research approach in developing an intelligent system to improve energy efficiency in intelligent buildings, which takes into account the different technical infrastructures of building

  10. River restoration success: a question of perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähnig, S C; Lorenz, A W; Hering, D; Antons, C; Sundermann, A; Jedicke, E; Haase, P

    2011-09-01

    What defines success and failure of river restoration measures is a strongly debated topic in restoration science, but standardized approaches to evaluate either are still not available. The debate is usually centered on measurable parameters, which adhere to scientific objectivity. More subjective aspects, such as landscape aesthetics or recreational value, are usually left out, although they play an important role in the perception and communication of restoration success. In this paper, we show that different perceptions of restoration success exist by analyzing data from 26 river restoration measures in Germany. We addressed both objective parameters, such as hydromorphological changes and changes in fish and benthic invertebrate assemblages, from field investigations, and subjective parameters, such as opinions and perceptions, from water managers via an online survey. With regard to the objective hydromorphological and biotic parameters, our results agree with many studies that have reported improvements in the hydromorphology following restoration; however, there is no similar agreement between results concerning changes in the benthic invertebrate and fish assemblages. The objective results do not correspond to the subjective parameters because self-evaluation of the restoration projects by water managers was overly positive. Indeed, 40% of the respondents admitted that their evaluation was based on gut feeling, and only 45% of the restoration measures were monitored or occasionally checked. This lack of objectively recorded data meant that the water managers were not able to reasonably evaluate restoration success. In contrast, some self-evaluation responses reflected a different perception of the restoration success that was based on landscape aesthetic values or on benefit for the public; others adopted a general "condemned to success" attitude. Based on our data, we argue (1) that goals should be thoughtfully formulated prior to restoration

  11. Restorative justice within the criminal justice system

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiljević-Prodanović Danica

    2010-01-01

    Positioning of restorative justice within the criminal justice system is one of the current questions preoccupying theorists and practitioners in the field. During decades restorative justice processes have been predominantly used within juvenile justice systems for dealing with minor offences committed by juveniles. Number of jurisdictions in Europe, USA, Canada, Australia have criminal codifications containing provisions that enable use of restorative justice processes in aim of diver...

  12. The Management of Dissonance in Nature Restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    by the Skjern River Restoration Project (1999-2003), one interpretation of the landscape sometimes suppresses other valid interpretations, neglecting its diverse history. Landscape architecture might, however, provide an alternative approach to nature restoration that is more site-specific, allowing...... for multiple interpretations to coexist. Indications can be found in the Re-naturalization of River Aire (2002-2015)—a restoration project, which reveals approaches that could be labelled landscape architecture specific....

  13. Can Viral Videos Help Beaver Restore Streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J. M.; Pollock, M. M.; Lewallen, G.; Jordan, C.; Woodruff, K.

    2015-12-01

    Have you watched YouTube lately? Did you notice the plethora of cute animal videos? Researchers, including members of our Beaver Restoration Research team, have been studying the restoration potential of beaver for decades, yet in the past few years, beaver have gained broad acclaim and some much deserved credit for restoration of aquatic systems in North America. Is it because people can now see these charismatic critters in action from the comfort of their laptops? While the newly released Beaver Restoration Guidebook attempts to answer many questions, sadly, this is not one of them. We do, however, address the use of beaver (Castor canadensis) in stream, wetland, and floodplain restoration and discuss the many positive effects of beaver on fluvial ecosystems. Our team, composed of researchers from NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, and Portland State University, has developed a scientifically rigorous, yet accessible, practitioner's guide that provides a synthesis of the best available science for using beaver to improve ecosystem functions. Divided into two broad sections -- Beaver Ecology and Beaver Restoration and Management -- the guidebook focuses on the many ways in which beaver improve habitat, primarily through the construction of dams that impound water and retain sediment. In Beaver Ecology, we open with a discussion of the general effects that beaver dams have on physical and biological processes, and we close with "Frequently Asked Questions" and "Myth Busters". In Restoration and Management, we discuss common emerging restoration techniques and methods for mitigating unwanted beaver effects, followed by case studies from pioneering practitioners who have used many of these beaver restoration techniques in the field. The lessons they have learned will help guide future restoration efforts. We have also included a comprehensive beaver ecology library of over 1400 references from scientific journals

  14. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjna Nayar; Aruna, U.; Wasim Manzoor Bhat

    2015-01-01

    The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically "safe" materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and ...

  15. River Restoration for a Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beechie, T. J.; Pollock, M. M.; Pess, G. R.; Roni, P.

    2012-12-01

    Future climate scenarios suggest that riverine habitats will be significantly altered in the next few decades, forcing managers to ask whether and how river restoration activities should be altered to accommodate climate change. Obvious questions include: Will climate change alter river flow and temperature enough to reduce action effectiveness? What types of restoration actions are more likely to remain effective in a climate altered future? To help address these questions, we reviewed literature on habitat restoration actions and river processes to determine the degree to which different restoration actions are likely to either ameliorate a climate effect or increase habitat diversity and resilience. Key findings are that restoring floodplain connectivity and re-aggrading incised channels ameliorate both stream flow and temperature changes and increase lateral connectivity, whereas restoring in-stream flows can ameliorate decreases in low flows as well as stream temperature increases. Other restoration actions (e.g., reducing sediment supply, in-stream rehabilitation) are much less likely to ameliorate climate change effects. In general, actions that restore watershed and ecosystem processes are most likely to be robust to climate change effects because they allow river channels and riverine ecosystems to evolve in response to shifting stream flow and temperature regimes. We offer a decision support process to illustrate how to evaluate whether a project design should be altered to accommodate climate change effects, and show examples of restoration actions that are likely to be resilient to a changing climate.

  16. Governing Forest Landscape Restoration: Cases from Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora van Oosten

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Forest landscape restoration includes both the planning and implementation of measures to restore degraded forests within the perspective of the wider landscape. Governing forest landscape restoration requires fundamental considerations about the conceptualisation of forested landscapes and the types of restoration measures to be taken, and about who should be engaged in the governance process. A variety of governance approaches to forest landscape restoration exist, differing in both the nature of the object to be governed and the mode of governance. This paper analyses the nature and governance of restoration in three cases of forest landscape restoration in Indonesia. In each of these cases, both the original aim for restoration and the initiators of the process differ. The cases also differ in how deeply embedded they are in formal spatial planning mechanisms at the various political scales. Nonetheless, the cases show similar trends. All cases show a dynamic process of mobilising the landscape’s stakeholders, plus a flexible process of crafting institutional space for conflict management, negotiation and decision making at the landscape level. As a result, the landscape focus changed over time from reserved forests to forested mosaic lands. The cases illustrate that the governance of forest landscape restoration should not be based on strict design criteria, but rather on a flexible governance approach that stimulates the creation of novel public-private institutional arrangements at the landscape level.

  17. Clinical guidelines for indirect resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, A

    1997-06-01

    Ongoing advances in adhesive dentistry have made it possible to successfully and predictably bond tooth-supporting restorations using conservative preparation techniques. Improvements in the durability and esthetic properties of tooth-colored restorative materials have also increased the range of available treatment options. However, dentists have been slow to accept both direct and indirect posterior esthetics. This article provides a step-by-step technique for practitioners who choose to treat their patients with indirect resin esthetic restorations. It will not discuss other posterior restorative treatment techniques or materials (i.e. gold, porcelain, amalgam, bonded amalgam, or direct resin).

  18. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  19. ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION:OUR HOPE FOR THE FUTURE?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu-gao; LI Xiu-zhen; HE Hong S; HU Yuan-man

    2004-01-01

    Ecological restoration is widely employed from tens to millions of hectares in space, and from tens of days to thousands of years in time, which forces consideration of it thoroughly. We argue that three questions are the most important among the contents relevant of ecological restoration, including why, what and how to restore degraded systems. Why to restore determines whether or not the degraded ecological systems should be restored. What to restore is the goal of ecological restoration. The explicit goal of ecological restoration is necessary to guide ecological restoration workers in pursuit of excellence and prevent restoration from being swamped by purely technological activities. And how to restore means the methods and steps we should apply. To ensure the final success of ecological restoration, restored sites should be monitored and managed for long time to determine whether the selected methods are appropriate, and can be remedy better. Only to deal with these effectively, ecological restoration would be the hope for the future.

  20. Imperial Gun Foundaries of İstanbul and Their Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oğuz Ceylan

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Guns had proved to be very effective in the conquest of Constantinople by the Ottoman Turks in 1453 AD. This is the reason why Sultan Mehmed the Second, also named briefly “Fatih” (The Conqueror had built these gun foundries directly after the conquest of the city, out of the Genoese city walls in front of the Galata Gate. The first foundry had to be extended at the end of the XV. Century during the reign of Sultan Bayezıd the Second. Only 20 years after this extension, in the time of Sultan Süleyman the First, known as “Süleyman the Magnificient”, the foundries could not meet the requirements of the Empire any longer. Only two foundry buildings remained from the whole complex to our days. The large building with a row of five domes and two aisles covered with barrel-vaults is dated back to the XVIII. Century. The domesrest on arches and pendentives supported by eight columns. The smaller building having a square plan had been built by the “Conqueror”, in the middle of the XV. Century. It has a single dome as a roof, again with a lantern at its apex. The restoration of the existing buildings took place in 1958-1959 and in the years from 1973 to 1984. The buildings were used as “Gun Museum” until they were left to Mimar Sinan University in 1992.The rearrangement of the interior was carried out by the specialists of the University. Since1998 the buildings are in use as “Cultural And Exhibition Center of Mimar Sinan University”.

  1. Dileptons and Chiral Symmetry Restoration

    CERN Document Server

    Hohler, P M

    2015-01-01

    We report on recent work relating the medium effects observed in dilepton spectra in heavy-ion collisions to potential signals of chiral symmetry restoration. The key connection remains the approach to spectral function degeneracy between the vector-isovector channel with its chiral partner, the axialvector-isovector channel. Several approaches are discussed to elaborate this connection, namely QCD and Weinberg sum rules with input for chiral order parameters from lattice QCD, and chiral hadronic theory to directly evaluate the medium effects of the axialvector channel and the pertinent pion decay constant as function of temperature. A pattern emerges where the chiral mass splitting between rho and a_1 burns off and is accompanied by a strong broadening of the spectral distributions.

  2. Restorative Mediation: The Application of Restorative Justice Practice and Philosophy to Clergy Sexual Abuse Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Douglas E.; Harvey, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This article will present the restorative justice model and examine how the restorative justice philosophy and process can be applied to clergy-perpetrated sexual abuse and religious sexual misconduct to resolve legal claims and allow the process of healing to begin. Restorative justice is a holistic approach to criminal, civil, and church law…

  3. Survival of ART restorations assessed using selected FDI and modified ART restoration criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farag, A.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Abdelwahab, H.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    A new set of criteria for assessing the quality of restorations using modern restorative materials, named FDI criteria, was recently introduced. This study tested the null hypothesis that there is no significant difference in survival estimate percentages of ART restorations assessed using selected

  4. Review and proposals on vegetation restoration in the Loess Plateau, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhui ZHANG; Guobin LIU

    2008-01-01

    A group of scientists conducted a comprehen-sive investigation on ecological safety and water and soil erosion in the Northwest Loess Plateau, Northwest China. The data gathered was analyzed in terms of achievement, existing problems, and strategy and mea-sures on vegetation restoration in the area. Since the policies of conversion from cropland to forest (CCF) and forbid grazing and cutting (FGC) were carried out, vegetation quality and coverage rate increased quickly in the Loess Plateau area, strengthening the concept of eco-environment protection. Environment harness measure-ments were optimized. The multiform investments on eco-environment and urbanization development in China will benefit vegetation restoration. However, there have been some persisting problems, such as the shortage of investment, instability of government policy, expectation of extravagant economic benefit, larger rate of planta-tion, and scarce technologies supporting vegetation restoration. Many key theories and practice problems require an urgent resolution. In the future, short-, mid-,and long-term goals for vegetation restoration should be clear, achievement should be expanded, and the natural restoration area should be increased. The benefit for the contractor on vegetation restoration should be ensured. Investment on vegetation building research work should be increased.

  5. Inside the “Black Box” of River Restoration: Using Catchment History to Identify Disturbance and Response Mechanisms to Set Targets for Process-Based Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Creese

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Many river restoration projects fail. Inadequate project planning underpins many of the reasons given for failure (such as setting overly ambitious goals; selecting inappropriate sites and techniques; losing stakeholder motivation; and neglecting to monitor, assess, and document projects. Another major problem is the lack of an agreed guiding image to direct the activities aimed at restoring the necessary biophysical and ecological processes within the logistic constraints of on-ground works. Despite a rich literature defining the components of restoration project planning, restoration ecology currently lacks an explicit and logical means of moving from the initial project vision through to on-ground strategies. Yet this process is fundamental because it directly links the ecological goals of the project to the on-ground strategies used to achieve them. We present a planning process that explicitly uses an interdisciplinary mechanistic model of disturbance drivers and system responses to build from the initial project vision to the implementation of on-ground works. A worked example on the Upper Hunter River in southeastern Australia shows how understanding catchment history can reveal disturbance and response mechanisms, thus facilitating process-based restoration.

  6. Building energy analysis tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Larry; Parker, Andrew; Long, Nicholas; Metzger, Ian; Dean, Jesse; Lisell, Lars

    2016-04-12

    A building energy analysis system includes a building component library configured to store a plurality of building components, a modeling tool configured to access the building component library and create a building model of a building under analysis using building spatial data and using selected building components of the plurality of building components stored in the building component library, a building analysis engine configured to operate the building model and generate a baseline energy model of the building under analysis and further configured to apply one or more energy conservation measures to the baseline energy model in order to generate one or more corresponding optimized energy models, and a recommendation tool configured to assess the one or more optimized energy models against the baseline energy model and generate recommendations for substitute building components or modifications.

  7. Restoration of the endodontically treated posterior tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Polesel

    2014-06-01

    Results and conclusions: Direct adhesive restorations, indirect bonded restorations and traditional full crown are three therapeutic options for the single posterior endodontically treated teeth. The amount of remaining sound tooth structure is the most significant factor influencing the therapeutic approach. The clinician's operative skill is a determining aspect for long-term success of adhesive inlays.

  8. Soil inoculation steers restoration of terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubs, E R Jasper; van der Putten, Wim H; Bosch, Machiel; Bezemer, T Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Many natural ecosystems have been degraded because of human activities(1,2) and need to be restored so that biodiversity is protected. However, restoration can take decades and restoration activities are often unsuccessful(3) because of abiotic constraints (for example, eutrophication, acidification) and unfavourable biotic conditions (for example, competition or adverse soil community composition). A key question is what manageable factors prevent transition from degraded to restored ecosystems and what interventions are required for successful restoration(2,4). Experiments have shown that the soil community is an important driver of plant community development(5-8), suggesting that manipulation of the soil community is key to successful restoration of terrestrial ecosystems(3,9). Here we examine a large-scale, six-year-old field experiment on ex-arable land and show that application of soil inocula not only promotes ecosystem restoration, but that different origins of soil inocula can steer the plant community development towards different target communities, varying from grassland to heathland vegetation. The impact of soil inoculation on plant and soil community composition was most pronounced when the topsoil layer was removed, whereas effects were less strong, but still significant, when the soil inocula were introduced into intact topsoil. Therefore, soil inoculation is a powerful tool to both restore disturbed terrestrial ecosystems and steer plant community development. PMID:27398907

  9. Restoring primary anterior teeth: updated for 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, William F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the current literature associated with the techniques and materials for the restoration of primary anterior teeth and make clinical recommendations based upon the available literature. A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available to utilize for restoring primary incisors. Awareness of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material can enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are either some type of stainless steel or zirconia crown. There is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, the amount of tooth structure remaining, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables that affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative solution is chosen. PMID:25905657

  10. The Teacher's Guide to Restorative Classroom Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Luanna H.; Evans, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    With restorative discipline, schools move beyond punitive approaches to shared expectations for learning and behavior. Used together with "The School Leader's Guide to Restorative Discipline," this teacher's guide shows how to create a welcoming and responsible community within your classroom, contributing to a consistent, schoolwide approach to…

  11. Shame and Guilt in Restorative Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodogno, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I examine the relevance and desirability of shame and guilt to restorative justice conferences. I argue that a careful study of the psychology of shame and guilt reveals that both emotions possess traits that can be desirable and traits that can be undesirable for restoration. Mo...

  12. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

  13. Techniques of forest restoration in restingas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Garcia da Silva Morais Rodrigues

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Restinga is an ecosystem of the Atlantic Forest Biome vegetation which has ecological functions and is undergoing anthropogenic occupations that result in the disturbance and its suppression of these environments. But to be the restoration of degraded restinga is necessary to know the different formations of the ecosystem and their respective characteristics. From this diagnosis, one can choose the most appropriate techniques to apply for its restoration. Thus, this study aims to conduct a literature on restoration techniques in restinga environments. It was found that forest restoration on restinga, in most cases there is use of natural regeneration techniques nucleation, and these studies highlight the successional advances and establishments of life forms preserved features of the area, thus making the restoration in these environments.

  14. Crown lengthening surgery: a restorative-driven periodontal procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, D F; Handelsman, M; Ravon, N A

    1999-02-01

    Improper management of the periodontal tissues during restorative procedures is a common, but often overlooked, cause of failure. When a restoration is placed, the preservation of an intact, healthy periodontium is necessary to maintain the tooth or teeth being restored. Predictable long-term restorative success requires a combination of restorative principles with the correct management of the periodontal tissues.

  15. Respiratory Health Effects Associated with Restoration Work in Post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy J. Rando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study examines prevalence of respiratory conditions in New Orleans-area restoration workers after Hurricane Katrina. Methods. Between 2007 and 2010, spirometry and respiratory health and occupational questionnaire were administered to 791 New Orleans-area adults who mostly worked in the building construction and maintenance trades or custodial services. The associations between restoration work hours and lung function and prevalence of respiratory symptoms were examined by multiple linear regression, , or multiple logistic regression. Results. 74% of participants performed post-Katrina restoration work (median time: 620 hours. Symptoms reported include episodes of transient fever/cough (29%, sinus symptoms (48%, pneumonia (3.7%, and new onset asthma (4.5%. Prevalence rate ratios for post-Katrina sinus symptoms (PRR = 1.3; CI: 1.1, 1.7 and fever and cough (PRR = 1.7; CI: 1.3, 2.4 were significantly elevated overall for those who did restoration work and prevalence increased with restoration work hours. Prevalence rate ratios with restoration work were also elevated for new onset asthma (PRR = 2.2; CI: 0.8, 6.2 and pneumonia (PRR = 1.3; CI: 0.5, 3.2 but were not statistically significant. Overall, lung function was slightly depressed but was not significantly different between those with and without restoration work exposure. Conclusions. Post-Katrina restoration work is associated with moderate adverse effects on respiratory health, including sinusitis and toxic pneumonitis.

  16. Building trust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Activate' is the energy magazine for secondary schools and is part of the Education Programme which is managed on behalf of the British Nuclear Industry Forum by AEA Technology. activate is the flagship communication device between the British Nuclear Industry Forum's Education Programme and secondary schools in the UK. It was developed from a previous publication, Nuclear Bulletin. There is a need for the nuclear industry to build trust with teachers and students in the UK, where for a long time, everything that the industry has said, written or printed has been disregarded by school teachers as propaganda. Over the last few years the industry has put in a great deal of effort to position itself as a provider of educationally sound and socially acceptable information. 'Activate' was an evolution of this idea and there was a hole in the market for a lively, activity and article based magazine that could be used in the classroom. The target audience is principally teachers of science, mathematics and geography, but also includes teachers of art,, English and history with students of between 11 and 18. The results were very positive in that teachers appreciated the colourful and lively nature of activate and they felt that it provided information and opinions in an un biased and non-propagandist way. Their comments about layout, number of activities style of presentation were taken into account and during the summer of 1994 activate was remodelled ready for re launch in September. The feedback so far is good with more teachers signing up every week to receive their own free copy

  17. Fracture Resistance and Failure Mode of Endodontically Treated Premolars Restored with Different Adhesive Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Sarabi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The restoration of endodontically treated teeth is a topic that has been studied extensively but it is still a challenge for dental practitioners. The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance, fracture patterns and fracture location of endodontically treated human maxillary premolars restored with direct and indirect composite resin and ceramic restoration. Methods: Eighty non-carious maxillary premolars were selected and divided into four groups (n=20. Endodontic treatment and mesio-occluso-distal preparations were carried out in all the groups except for the control group (group I. Subsequently, the prepared teeth were restored as follows: group II: indirect composite restoration; group III: ceramic restoration; group IV: direct composite restoration. The specimens were subjected to compressive axial loading until fracture occurred. The mode of failure was also recorded. Results: Group I had higher fracture resistance (1196.82±241.74 than the other groups (P

  18. Environnmental Restoration and Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first Five-Year Plan, written in 1989, the Department of Energy (DOE) committed to rapidly bringing all operating facilities into compliance with applicable laws and regulations and to cleaning up the 1989 inventory of contaminated inactive sites and facilities by the year 2019. This FY 1993--1997 Five-Year Plan moves the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) one step closer to this 30-year goal. The overall EM strategy has three thrusts. First, where risk assessment shows an actual or potential threat to human health and safety -- do immediately whatever is possible to reduce, mitigate, stabilize, and confine the threat. Second, where nobody knows how to solve a problem (as distinct from merely preventing it from getting worse) -- act decisively to develop methods to do it right the first time. Third, where compliance and cleanup must proceed with or without next-generation technologies -- plan, with affected parties and within the provisions of Interagency Agreements, the work to be accomplished and its schedule. This third Five-Year Plan discusses current EM program accomplishments, what the program intends to achieve over the next 5 years, and where it needs to be heading in order to meet its 30-year and other environmental goals

  19. Error image aware content restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Lee, Moonsik; Jung, Byunghee

    2015-12-01

    As the resolution of TV significantly increased, content consumers have become increasingly sensitive to the subtlest defect in TV contents. This rising standard in quality demanded by consumers has posed a new challenge in today's context where the tape-based process has transitioned to the file-based process: the transition necessitated digitalizing old archives, a process which inevitably produces errors such as disordered pixel blocks, scattered white noise, or totally missing pixels. Unsurprisingly, detecting and fixing such errors require a substantial amount of time and human labor to meet the standard demanded by today's consumers. In this paper, we introduce a novel, automated error restoration algorithm which can be applied to different types of classic errors by utilizing adjacent images while preserving the undamaged parts of an error image as much as possible. We tested our method to error images detected from our quality check system in KBS(Korean Broadcasting System) video archive. We are also implementing the algorithm as a plugin of well-known NLE(Non-linear editing system), which is a familiar tool for quality control agent.

  20. Model for Refurbishment of Heritage Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2014-01-01

    A model intended for the selection of feasible refurbishment measures for heritage buildings was developed. The model showed how to choose, evaluate and implement measures that create synergy between the interests in preserving heritage values and creating cost efficient refurbishment that complies...... with the requirements for the use of the building. The model focuses on the cooperation and dialogue between authorities and owners, who refurbish heritage buildings. The developed model was used for the refurbishment of the listed complex, Fæstningens Materialgård. Fæstningens Materialgård is a case study where...... the Heritage Agency, the Danish Working Environment Authority and the owner as a team cooperated in identifying feasible refurbishments. In this case, the focus centered on restoring and identifying potential energy savings and deciding on energy upgrading measures for the listed complex. The refurbished...

  1. Atraumatic restorative treatment in atypical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Simino Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The atraumatic restorative treatment has been widely divulged among professionals in the area of Pediatric Dentistry. This restorative technique is included in the philosophy of Minimal Intervention and is considered one of the most conservative treatments, because only the layer of infected dentin caries is removed. Moreover, the atraumatic restorative treatment has been shown to be less painful than conventional approaches, and local anesthesia is rarely required. After the removal of the infected dentin, the cavities are filled with glass ionomer cement, a material that has antimicrobial capacity, good marginal sealing and constant fluorine release and recharge. In spite of the increasing number of studies about atraumatic restorative treatment, only studies related to restorations in occlusal cavities have shown scientific evidences about the technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of atraumatic restorative treatment in cavities with 3 or more surfaces involved, by means of a clinical case report of a patient with extensive dstruction in primary teeth, who was submitted to atraumatic restorative treatment, and observe the result of the treatment after one year of clinical and radiographic control.

  2. Integrating ecological restoration into CDM forestry projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Concerns and issues in sustainability of CDM forestry projects are reviewed. • Ecological restoration is suggested to be integrated in the CDM framework. • As an ecosystem supporting service, soil restoration on degraded land is of primary importance. • Regenerating forests naturally rather than through monoculture plantations is suggested. • Potential social impacts of ecological restoration are discussed. - Abstract: The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is proposed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote sustainable development. CDM forestry projects should contribute to mitigation of climate change through afforestation and reforestation (A/R) activities on degraded land in developing countries. However, like other types of CDM projects, the forestry projects have encountered a number of concerns and critiques. Appropriate approaches and concrete aims to achieve long-term sustainability have been lacking, and reforms have therefore been called for. The aims of this paper are to examine the published information relevant to these concerns, and frame appropriate approaches for a more sustainable CDM. In this review, as a first step to tackle some of these issues, ecological restoration is suggested for integration into the CDM framework. Essentially, this involves the restoration of ecosystem supporting service (soil restoration), upon which forests regenerate naturally rather than establishing monoculture plantations. In this way, forestry projects would bring cost-effective opportunities for multiple ecosystem services. Potential approaches, necessary additions to the monitoring plans, and social impacts of ecological restoration in CDM projects are discussed

  3. Hyporheic Restoration in Streams and Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, E. T.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2008-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is the area of mixing of surface and groundwater beneath and adjacent to streams and rivers. The unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of the hyporheic zone, often different from both surface water and groundwater, create unique habitat for organisms. Exchange of water between surface water and the hyporheic zone additionally creates hyporheic functions such as nutrient processing, toxic mineralization, and thermal buffering, which benefit surface water ecosystems and humans downstream. Human activities have reduced hyporheic exchange through impacts like channel simplification and introduction of fines which clog the bed. Efforts to improve ecological conditions in impaired streams and rivers have increased dramatically in recent decades. Nevertheless, the value of hyporheic restoration as a component of stream and river restoration is only beginning to be acknowledged. Further, guidance for accomplishing hyporheic restoration is scarce. Nevertheless, due to considerable recent interest in the hyporheic zone and its functions, data that could inform hyporheic restoration efforts are already fairly common. Here we lay out possible goals for hyporheic restoration and summarize design data that already exist in the scientific literature. We also lay out the hyporheic restoration process, and set that within the largest context of stream and river restoration and watershed planning. Finally, we present our future vision for future research, creating design guidance, and government leadership.

  4. RESTORATION INDUCED BY CATALASE IN IRRADIATED MICROORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, Raymond; Caldas, Luis Renato

    1952-01-01

    1. E. coli, strain K-12, and B. megatherium 899, irradiated in strict but still undefined physiological conditions with certain heavy doses of ultraviolet light, are efficiently restored by catalase, which acts on or fixes itself upon the bacteria in a few minutes. This restoration (C. R.), different from photorestoration, is aided by a little visible light. 2. At 37° the restorability lasts for about 2 hours after UV irradiation; the restored cells begin to divide at the same time as the normal survivors. 3. C. R. is not produced after x-irradiation. 4. B. megatherium Mox and E. coli, strain B/r show little C. R.; E. coli strain B shows none. None of these three strains is lysogenic, whereas the two preceding catalase-restorable strains are. 5. Phage production in the system "K-12 infected with T2 phage" is restored by catalase after UV irradiation, whereas phage production in the system "infected B" is not. 6. With K-12, catalase does not prevent the growth of phage and the lysis induced by UV irradiation (Lwoff's phenomenon). 7. Hypotheses are discussed concerning: (a) the chemical nature of this action of catalase; (b) a possible relation between C. R. and lysogenicity of the sensitive bacteria; (c) the consequences of such chemical restorations on the general problem of cell radiosensitivity. PMID:14898028

  5. The diachronic path: the virtual restoration of the Spanish walls of Ortigia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Valenti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are architectural works whose mark on the area is no longer impressed by matter and for which interventions cannot be defined in a material restoration. There are important buildings which having being in fact destroyed by the will of community decision-making, with complex processes and often controversies, have literally cancelled out pieces ofhistory. In the absence of matter, the representation conducted using the latest digital technology, which has made a significant contribution to the documentation of these works for which a virtual restoration helps tokeep the record alive. The study focuses on the impressive work of the Spanish walls that for more than three centuries have marked the city of Syracuse and which the political events of the late nineteenth century have largely destroyed. The goal is to render this cultural heritage available, in the same way as a material restoration would, through virtual reality.

  6. Hydrological classification, a practical tool for mangrove restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van Anne F.; Brake, te Bram; Huijgevoort, Van Marjolein H.J.; Dijksma, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Mangrove restoration projects, aimed at restoring important values of mangrove forests after degradation, often fail because hydrological conditions are disregarded. We present a simple, but robust methodology to determine hydrological suitability for mangrove species, which can guide restoration

  7. BUILDING 341 Seismic Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halle, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3.

  8. Current Concepts in Restorative Implant Dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prof.Marchack

    2009-01-01

    Patients today are incteasingly aware of dental implants.and their expectations are for esthetically and functionally pleasingimplant restorations that mimic natural teeth.This presentation will give both the experienced and novice practitioner a better understand-ing of how restorative implant dentistry has evolved.Treatment planning and restorative options for single implants.multiple implants andfully edentulons arches will be discussed,and the use of modern materials and CADCAM technology in fabricating the most contemporaryfixed implant supported prostheses will be demonstrated.

  9. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Sanjna; Aruna, U; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-04-01

    The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically "safe" materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and functional application of this exciting computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-digital zirconia-based system for a natural smile. PMID:26015733

  10. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically "safe" materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and functional application of this exciting computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-digital zirconia-based system for a natural smile.

  11. Forestry and restoration of water bodies. Economic assessment on the basis of lake restoration costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollution load to water bodies deriving from forestry activities can regionally be a significant factor deteriorating the state of water bodies. Eutrophication, silting and acidification of water bodies eventually require restoration activities. Restoration of water bodies is expensive and often there is not enough financing available to implement the needed measures. The purpose of this study is to examine the relation between loading and costs of restoration. Restoration costs for different restoration alternatives are estimated using a cost per unit method based on the area and volume of the water body. The share of restoration costs depends on the used restoration method and ranges from 0,1 to 60 % of the total stumpage price that could be gathered from the target forestry area when assessing removal of phosphorus and sediment. The costs were below 1,0 % of the stumpage value when using the most inexpensive restoration methods, precipitation of phosphorus and removal of surface sediment. On the whole, it can be stated that even though restoration costs remain percentually low in comparison with the profit gained from wood production when using the most inexpensive methods, the costs do have significance when considering the water effects of forestry on a larger scale. It has to be observed that the calculated restoration costs are not total costs when estimating the economic significance of water pollution deriving from forestry, because the estimation was based on a cost per unit method, which means that only those components were taken into consideration for which a correlation between forestry-derived pollution and restoration costs could clearly be demonstrated. For example, the costs of brook restoration have not been assessed in this study, even though the pollution to water is heaviest in the brooks and lakes of the headwater region situated in the direct vicinity of the forestry area. In addition, the costs of restoration for fishery purposes are

  12. The digital restoration of film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catanese, Rossella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquest article tracta sobre la conservació i la restauració de pel·lícules amb tecnologies digitals. Les pel·lícules, com a expressió de la memòria col·lectiva, formen part del patrimoni comú de la humanitat, i mereixen ser preservades i difoses. Per això, la qüestió de la preservació dels materials cinematogràfics està guanyant pes, sobretot si tenim en compte la fragilitat estructural i la curta durada de l'estoc de pel·lícules. L'estat actual del mitjà audiovisual és de transició: a poc a poc l'element analògic i fotoquímic és substituït pel sistema digital. I això influeix molt en les pràctiques de producció i distribució del cinema, i també en els debats teòrics sobre el mitjà: els criteris d'arxivament i els processos de restauració no són una excepció a aquesta lògica.Este artículo trata sobre la conservación y la restauración de películas con tecnologías digitales. Las películas, como expresión de la memoria colectiva, forman parte del patrimonio común de la humanidad, y merecen ser preservadas y difundidas. Por eso, la cuestión de la preservación de los materiales cinematográficos está ganando peso, sobre todo si tenemos en cuenta la fragilidad estructural y la corta duración del stock de películas. El estado actual del medio audiovisual es de transición: poco a poco el elemento analógico y fotoquímico es sustituido por el sistema digital. Lo cual influye mucho en las prácticas de producción y distribución del cine, y también en los debates teóricos sobre el medio: los criterios de archivo y los procesos de restauración no son una excepción a esta lógica.This article focuses on the issues of conservation and restoration of films through digital technologies. Films, as an expression of collective memory, become part of the common heritage of humankind, which deserves to be safeguarded and disseminated. As a consequence of this awareness, the issue of preserving cinematic

  13. Water Awareness Through Environmental Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Caldwell, K.

    2012-04-01

    and negative effects of human presence on the local and global water supply. Student research scientifically tested ways to slow down the effects of run-off contaminants. Students also revisit water analysis and plant trees as buffers as part of their stream preservation efforts in a culminating activity. Oyster Reef Restoration Project: As a result of changes in climate, pollution and human consumption, the oyster population in the Chesapeake Bay had previously been on a rapid decline. The Oyster Reef Restoration Project allows students to understand the creatures of the bay and the cause of this decline. They explore the domino effect this has had on the quality of the water in the bay and future implications on the environment when the oyster population fluctuates significantly. Students construct concrete reefs and study the components of its contents and the reef's impact on the bay. Students are responsible for mixing, pouring and preparing the reef for its eventual drop in the bay. Wetlands Recovery: Following the elimination of a substantial amount of the natural wetlands behind the elementary and middle schools, a wetlands area was erected on the school grounds. This pond has been used to learn about habitats and the role humans, plants and organisms play in the preservation of the earth soil and water supply. This wetland is used by both the elementary and middle schools as a place for hands-on inquiry based learning. Students maintain the upkeep of the pond and teach other students at lower grades.

  14. Terrorism, Forgiveness and Restorative Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Pemberton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to enhance understanding of the complexities of restorative justice in cases of terrorism from a victimological perspective. It does so first by analysing what separates terrorism from other forms of crime. The author argues that the main distinction concerns the peculiarly public nature of terrorism, in which the attack on the direct victims is intended to influence a (far larger group of so-called vicarious victims. This means that the public is likely to experience terrorist attacks as attacks on themselves. As a consequence the public can feel entitled to processes of forgiveness which in turn can conflict with the direct victims’ own experience. To illuminate this issue the paper proposes a novel distinction in third party forgiveness processes: between public forgiveness, i.e. forgiveness relating to the public wrongfulness inherent in crime, and vicarious forgiveness, i.e. the public’s experience of forgiveness itself. The complexities for restorative justice after terrorism can be then be viewed in terms of the tensions between the direct victims’ private and the publics’ vicarious forgiveness processes. Este artículo pretende facilitar la comprensión de las complejidades de la justicia restaurativa en casos de terrorismo desde una perspectiva victimológica. Lo hace primero mediante el análisis de lo que separa el terrorismo de otras formas de delincuencia. El autor sostiene que la distinción principal se refiere a la naturaleza pública específica del terrorismo, ya que mediante el ataque a las víctimas directas se pretende influir en el grupo (mucho más grande de las llamadas víctimas vicarias. Esto significa que es probable que el público sienta los ataques terroristas como ataques contra ellos mismos. De esta forma, el público puede sentirse con derecho sobre los procesos de perdón, lo que, a su vez, puede entrar en conflicto con la propia experiencia de las víctimas directas. Para iluminar

  15. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 and 2. Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease. Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely.In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine. In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve. In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers. In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of the

  16. Danish building typologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Kragh, Jesper

    The objective of TABULA is to develop a harmonised building typology for European countries. Each national building typology will consist of a set of residential model buildings with characteristic energy-related properties (element areas of the thermal building envelope, U-values, supply system...... efficiencies). The model buildings will each represent a specific construction period of the country in question and a specific building size. Furthermore the number of buildings, flats and the overall floor areas will be given, which are represented by the different building types of the national typologies....

  17. Integrating Responsive Building Elements in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Matthias; Amato, Alex; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    energy strategies to develop guidelines and procedures for estimation of environmental performance of responsive building elements and integrated building concepts This paper introduces the ideas of this collaborative work and discusses its usefulness for Hong Kong and China. Special focus was put......There is a global need for a more sustainable building development. About 50% of energy is used in buildings indicating that buildings provide a considerable potential for operational energy savings. Studies were conducted with the following objectives: to perform a state-of-the-art review...

  18. Fisheries Restoration Grant Program Projects [ds168

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile (FRGP_All_020209.shp) represents the locations of all ongoing and completed salmonid restoration projects in California with existing records in the...

  19. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  20. Models for Patch-Based Image Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrovic Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a supervised learning approach for object-category specific restoration, recognition, and segmentation of images which are blurred using an unknown kernel. The novelty of this work is a multilayer graphical model which unifies the low-level vision task of restoration and the high-level vision task of recognition in a cooperative framework. The graphical model is an interconnected two-layer Markov random field. The restoration layer accounts for the compatibility between sharp and blurred images and models the association between adjacent patches in the sharp image. The recognition layer encodes the entity class and its location in the underlying scene. The potentials are represented using nonparametric kernel densities and are learnt from training data. Inference is performed using nonparametric belief propagation. Experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our model for the restoration and recognition of blurred license plates as well as face images.

  1. Models for Patch-Based Image Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithun Das Gupta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a supervised learning approach for object-category specific restoration, recognition, and segmentation of images which are blurred using an unknown kernel. The novelty of this work is a multilayer graphical model which unifies the low-level vision task of restoration and the high-level vision task of recognition in a cooperative framework. The graphical model is an interconnected two-layer Markov random field. The restoration layer accounts for the compatibility between sharp and blurred images and models the association between adjacent patches in the sharp image. The recognition layer encodes the entity class and its location in the underlying scene. The potentials are represented using nonparametric kernel densities and are learnt from training data. Inference is performed using nonparametric belief propagation. Experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our model for the restoration and recognition of blurred license plates as well as face images.

  2. Geomorphic Analysis - Trinity River Restoration Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the Trinity River project is to identify the potential positive effects of large-scale restoration actions in a 63 kilometer reach of the Trinity River...

  3. US Forest Service Integrated Resource Restoration (IRR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting activities funded through the Integrated Resource Restoration (IRR) NFRR Budget Line Item and reported through the U.S. Forest...

  4. ROV Based Underwater Blurred Image Restoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhishen; DING Tianfu; WANG Gang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method of ROV based image processing to restore underwater blurry images from the theory of light and image transmission in the sea. Computer is used to simulate the maximum detection range of the ROV under different water body conditions. The receiving irradiance of the video camera at different detection ranges is also calculated. The ROV's detection performance under different water body conditions is given by simulation. We restore the underwater blurry images using the Wiener filter based on the simulation. The Wiener filter is shown to be a simple useful method for underwater image restoration in the ROV underwater experiments. We also present examples of restored images of an underwater standard target taken by the video camera in these experiments.

  5. Forest restoration, biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aerts Raf

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Globally, forests cover nearly one third of the land area and they contain over 80% of terrestrial biodiversity. Both the extent and quality of forest habitat continue to decrease and the associated loss of biodiversity jeopardizes forest ecosystem functioning and the ability of forests to provide ecosystem services. In the light of the increasing population pressure, it is of major importance not only to conserve, but also to restore forest ecosystems. Ecological restoration has recently started to adopt insights from the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF perspective. Central is the focus on restoring the relation between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Here we provide an overview of important considerations related to forest restoration that can be inferred from this BEF-perspective. Restoring multiple forest functions requires multiple species. It is highly unlikely that species-poor plantations, which may be optimal for above-ground biomass production, will outperform species diverse assemblages for a combination of functions, including overall carbon storage and control over water and nutrient flows. Restoring stable forest functions also requires multiple species. In particular in the light of global climatic change scenarios, which predict more frequent extreme disturbances and climatic events, it is important to incorporate insights from the relation between biodiversity and stability of ecosystem functioning into forest restoration projects. Rather than focussing on species per se, focussing on functional diversity of tree species assemblages seems appropriate when selecting tree species for restoration. Finally, also plant genetic diversity and above - below-ground linkages should be considered during the restoration process, as these likely have prominent but until now poorly understood effects at the level of the ecosystem. The BEF-approach provides a useful framework to evaluate forest restoration in an

  6. RADIOPACITY OF RESTORATIVE MATERIALS USING DIGITAL IMAGES

    OpenAIRE

    Leda Maria Pescinini Salzedas; Mário Jefferson Quirino Louzada; Antonio Braz de Oliveira Filho

    2006-01-01

    The radiopacity of esthetic restorative materials has been established as an important requirement, improving the radiographic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of six restorative materials using a direct digital image system, comparing them to the dental tissues (enamel-dentin), expressed as equivalent thickness of aluminum (millimeters of aluminum). Five specimens of each material were made. Three 2-mm thick longitudinal sections were cut from an intact extrac...

  7. Laser application in otology for hearing restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Igino

    1994-09-01

    Prior to the development of the stapes replacement prosthesis in the early 1950s, loss of hearing due to otosclerosis remained an untreatable disease. Today, loss of hearing due to otosclerosis can be restored in the majority of cases to near normal levels. Since 1980 the laser has played a major and important role in otosclerosis surgery. This paper explores the use of lasers for hearing restoration and compares the results of laser surgery to non-laser surgery.

  8. Leadership success within disaster restoration projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Randy R; Baroudi, Bassam

    2014-01-01

    Successful project managers draw their performance from essential leadership traits, as guided by their core values.Within disaster recovery, contractors who mitigate, repair, and reconstruct the built environment are often faced with challenges exceeding the norm. The effective leader is commonly expected to consider stakeholder motivations within distressing situations as well as other external and environmental factors when seeking to lead the project team to successful outcomes. This research is most concerned with leadership within the context of disaster restoration of the built environment. Its stimulus comes from the Restoration Industry Association (RIA)'s efforts to highlight leadership traits and core values for its Certified Restorer Body of Knowledge but would be of value to others associated with disaster recovery operations. Among organizations whose membership includes thousands of practitioners who restore and reconstruct the built environment after disasters, the RIA is the only one yet to formally and substantially research which core values and leader traits are deemed critical for the success of efforts to manage the means and methods applied on recovery job sites. Forty-six seasoned disaster restoration industry project professionals voluntarily responded to a survey questionnaire that sought their opinions about the traits and core values that they consider most important for successful disaster restoration project leadership. The most important leader traits were effective communication, professional competence, and leadership by example. The most important restoration industry values were integrity, compassion, and trustworthiness. The recognized imperative of compassion was unexpected in light of stereotypes often associated with construction-related contractors. This and other findings permit disaster response and recovery stakeholders to better understand qualities they should wish to see in leaders of contractor organizations, which

  9. Methane emissions from a peatland following restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, J. M.; Day, S. M.

    2007-09-01

    Peatland drainage and peat extraction changes natural peatlands from a net carbon sink to that of a large net source due to increased respiration and the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) fixing vegetation. Restoration of these altered peatland ecosystems is being applied to reduce these carbon emissions. As peatland restoration is a new and emerging land-use management practice, the purpose of this research was to examine the impact of restoration on the methane (CH4) component of the carbon cycle at the Bois-des-Bel peatland located near Rivière-du-Loup, Québec from early May to mid October for several years. The seasonal CH4 fluxes prior to restoration at an extracted (cutover) and a restored peatland were not significantly different from each other or zero. However, three years postrestoration the seasonal CH4 emissions at the restored site were 4.2 g m-2 CH4 season-1, 4.6 times greater than the cutover site. Ponds and ditches at the restored site were seasonal CH4 emission hot spots (0.3 and 2.9 g m-2 CH4 season-1, respectively); however, emissions from herbaceous vegetation (1.0 g m-2 CH4 season-1) were the dominant source of CH4 from the restored peatland due to its large areal extent. CH4 fluxes from the Bois-des-Bel peatland represented 14% of the total CO2-equivalent losses from the site. This study demonstrates the importance of vegetation succession on peatland-atmosphere flux of CH4.

  10. [Dental restoration materials in pediatric dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C L

    1997-02-01

    Restorative materials in pediatric dentistry have to fulfill special requirements. They should be easy to handle and applicable in a not always dry mouth. They should potentially be adhesive in order to avoid too much mechanical preparation. They do not have to be extremely wear resistant as the dwell time of the restorations is relatively short. Glass-ionomer cements and in particular the resin modified types possess properties which make them almost ideal for the required purpose.

  11. The need for complementary hydraulic analysis in post-restoration monitoring of river restoration projects

    OpenAIRE

    T. A. Endreny; M. M. Soulman

    2011-01-01

    River restoration design methods are incrementally improved by studying and learning from monitoring data in previous projects. In this paper, we report post-restoration monitoring data for a Natural Channel Design (NCD) restoration project along 1600 m (10 channel wavelengths) of the Batavia Kill in the Catskill Mountains, NY, implemented in 2001 and 2002. The NCD project used a reference-reach to determine channel form, empirical relations between the project site and reference site bankful...

  12. Large river floodplain restoration: predicting species richness and trait responses to the restoration of hydrological connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Paillex, Amael; Dolédec, Sylvain; Castella, Emmanuel; Mérigoux, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    1. Floodplains are species-rich environments often strongly impacted by human activities. In particular, the negative effects of progressive and rapid disconnection of secondary channels have led to restoration programmes and a growing interest in restoration ecology. 2. Current restoration strategies in large river floodplains focus on the macroinvertebrate response related to the increases in lateral connectivity of the secondary channels. We constructed a framework to assess a gradient of ...

  13. Avian communities in Spartina maritima restored and non-restored salt marshes

    OpenAIRE

    G. Curado; E. Figueroa; Sánchez, Marta I; J. M. Castillo

    2013-01-01

    Capsule Salt marsh restoration with the native halophytes Spartina maritima and Zostera noltii can lead to significant improvement in habitat, increasing bird diversity over a 2-year period. Aims To assess the evolution of the avian communities in S. maritima restored salt marshes 2 years after planting, in comparison with adjacent non-restored marshes in the Odiel Marshes (southwest Iberian Peninsula). Methods Bird censuses were conducted from October 2008 to September 2009 in rectangular pl...

  14. Effect of restoration size on fracture resistance of bonded amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemuth, J S; Hagge, M S; Broome, J S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of restoration size on the fracture strength of amalgam restorations bonded with Amalgambond Plus (with HPA). Research has shown that this adhesive is dispersed throughout the unset amalgam during condensation and that a decrease in diametral tensile strength, proportional to the amount of adhesive incorporated into the unset amalgam, has resulted. Smaller cavity preparations have a higher ratio of surface area to volume than do larger preparations, and it was anticipated that a proportionately greater amount of adhesive would be incorporated into smaller amalgam restorations. Sixty extracted human molars were divided into four groups of 15 teeth and mounted in tray acrylic-filled PVC cylinders. Shallow approximo-occlusal channels were prepared in two groups. One group was restored with Amalgambond Plus and Tytin amalgam, the other with just Tytin amalgam. Larger proximo-occlusal preparations were made in the remaining two groups, then restored in the same fashion. Samples were stored in 37 degrees C for at least 24 hours, then thermocycled from 5-55 degrees C 1000 times with a one-minute dwell time. Specimens were mounted in a Universal Testing Machine, and a chisel was applied to the restorations in compression mode at a crosshead speed of 5.0 mm/minute until bulk fracture of the amalgam occurred. The results indicated no difference in bulk fracture strengths between large amalgam restorations restored with and without Amalgambond Plus. However, small amalgam restorations restored with Amalgambond Plus exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.025) bulk fracture strengths than small amalgam restorations restored without use of the adhesive. PMID:11203813

  15. Hanford groundwater cleanup and restoration conceptual study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the sitewide groundwater restoration study is to (1)develop groundwater use scenarios, (2) identify potential groundwater restoration technologies that may be appropriate at the Hanford Site, (3) recommend sitewide engineering systems.that satisfy the restoration objectives for each groundwater-use scenario, and (4) identify emerging technologies or research and development (R ampersand D) needs that have potential at the Hanford Site. Three groundwater restoration-use scenarios have been developed to meet specific objectives and land uses at the Hanford Site. These scenarios are described in detail within the next section. This report presents three recommended sitewide systems, one for each scenario, that are engineered to a preconceptual level of detail. Within each scenario, the engineered system is intended to restore groundwater on a sitewide basis, rather than to collect individual systems for each operable unit. Although aggregate areas (100, 200, 300, and 600) may have distinct restoration systems, these systems must be compatible and integrated for successful implementation and operation within each scenario. This report also identifies technologies that were considered during the formulation of the sitewide engineered systems. New and emerging technologies or R ampersand D needs are discussed along with their application and potential to each groundwater-use scenario

  16. Ecological restoration of litter in mined areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresinha Gonçalves Bizuti, Denise; Nino Diniz, Najara; Schweizer, Daniella; de Marchi Soares, Thaís; Casagrande, José Carlos; Henrique Santin Brancalion, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The success of ecological restoration projects depends on going monitoring of key ecological variables to determine if a desired trajectory has been established and, in the case of mining sites, nutrient cycling recovery plays an utmost importance. This study aimed to quantify and compare the annual litter production in native forests, and in restoration sites established in bauxite mines. We collected samples in 6 native forest remnants and 6 year-old restoration sites every month for a period of one year, in the city of Poços de Caldas/MG, SE Brazil. 120 wire collectors were used (0,6x0,6) and suspended 30cm above the soil surface. The material was dried until constant weight, weighed and fractionated in leaves, branches and reproductive material. The average annual litter production was 2,6 Mg ha-1 in native forests and 2,1 in forest in restoration sites, differing statistically. Litter production was higher in the rainy season, especially in September. Among the litter components, the largest contributor to total production was the fraction leaves, with 55,4% of the total dry weight of material collected, followed by reproductive material which contributed 24,5% and branches, with 20%. We conclude that the young areas in restoration process already restored important part, but still below the production observed in native areas.

  17. DIRECT PERMANENT RESTORATIVES - AMALGAM VS COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyashree

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Dental restoration is the most commonly administered dental treatment. These restorations are subjected to dynamic conditions in oral cavity, are likely to fail and need replacement. Ideal restorative material should pass two tests - Longitivity and Esthetics. Longitivity of the restorative material depends on three major factors - first is Patient’s factors, second is Operator`s skills and last is the Restorative material itself. Dentists today have a plethora of materials to choose from. Materials like Silver Amalgam being tested over a century, other nubile but promising materials, developed recently and yet to be tested in long run. This puts a dentist in dilemma so as which material to select to ensure durable clinical p erformance after placement. Amalgam has been tested over 165 years and has fulfilled almost all desired qualities of a restorative material except esthetics. On the other hand composites have advantage in cases where esthetics is of prime importance; howev er Recent studies conclude them at par with amalgam 1 . Performance of these two materials is assessed on following criterions - Longevity, wear resistance, cost effectiveness, marginal leakage and predisposal to secondary decay, biocompatibility, pulp irri tation, tooth preparation, technique sensitivity and esthetics

  18. Exxon Valdez -- Framework for natural resource restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once the task of evaluating the nature and extent of natural resource injuries caused by the Exxon Valdez oil spill neared completion, the equally daunting task of formulating proper restorative measures began. The essence of the natural resource restoration effort is to determine how to utilize the monies received from the criminal and civil settlements to fulfill the natural resource trustees' responsibilities to restore Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska to their condition prior to the spill. Given the magnitude and variety of environmental impact, i.e., natural resource injuries ranging from the death of thousands of sea birds and marine mammals to the persistent sublethal affects of hydrocarbon contamination in intertidal sediments, the field of restorative endeavor is as broad and perplexing as was responding to the spill itself. This paper discusses the policy and legal parameters which give structure to the scientific and technical decisions the natural resource trustees must make in the years to come as they engage in their restoration responsibilities. The discussed policy and legal parameters translate generally to natural resource restoration under such statutes as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, the Clean Water Act and the Oil Pollution Act of 1990

  19. Elwha River Restoration: Sediment Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrel, S.; Bountry, J.; Randle, T. J.; Ritchie, A.; Huginin, H.; Torrance, A.

    2013-12-01

    been a consistent component of the released material. Future monitoring will include documenting the effect of encountering the lakebed muds on erosion rates of delta sediments in the former Lake Mills. Uncertainty in the amount of sediments released from Lake Mills will be addressed through continued monitoring as part of the adaptive management plan set forth during the restoration project. Monitoring will also continue to document the progression of sediments in the downstream Elwha River system.. NPS web camera photograph of Lake Mills delta upstream from Glines Canyon Dam.

  20. Water-table-dependent hydrological changes following peatland forestry drainage and restoration: Analysis of restoration success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menberu, Meseret Walle; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Marttila, Hannu; Irannezhad, Masoud; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Penttinen, Jouni; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    A before-after-control approach was used to analyze the impact of peatland restoration on hydrology, based on high temporal resolution water-table (WT) data from 43 boreal peatlands representative of a south-boreal to north-boreal climate gradient. During the study, 24 forestry drained sites were restored and 19 pristine peatlands used as control sites. Different approaches were developed and used to analyze WT changes (mean WT position, WT fluctuation, WT hydrograph, recession, and storage characteristics). Restoration increased WT in most cases but particularly in spruce mires, followed by pine mires and fens. Before restoration, the WT fluctuation (WTF) was large, indicating peat temporary storage gain (SG). After restoration, the WT hydrograph recession limb slopes and SG coefficients (Rc) declined significantly. Drainage or restoration did not significantly affect mean diurnal WT fluctuations, used here as a proxy for evapotranspiration. Overall, the changes in WT characteristics following restoration indicated creation of favorable hydrological conditions for recovery of functional peatland ecosystems in previously degraded peatland sites. This was supported by calculation of bryophyte species abundance thresholds for WT. These results can be used to optimize restoration efforts in different peatland systems and as a qualitative conceptual basis for future restoration operations.

  1. Survival of ART restorations assessed using selected FDI and modified ART restoration criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Abeer; van der Sanden, Wil J M; Abdelwahab, Hisran; Frencken, Jo E

    2011-06-01

    A new set of criteria for assessing the quality of restorations using modern restorative materials, named FDI criteria, was recently introduced. This study tested the null hypothesis that there is no significant difference in survival estimate percentages of ART restorations assessed using selected FDI and modified ART criteria after 1 and 5 years. One operator placed a total of 60 class I and 30 Class II high-viscosity glass-ionomer ART restorations in ninety 14- to 15-year-olds. Two calibrated and independent evaluators using both criteria evaluated restorations on diestone replicas at baseline and after 1 and 5 years. Statistical analyses were done using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. The survival results of ART restorations assessed using both sets of criteria after 1 and 5 years (p = 0.27) did not differ significantly. Three ART restorations were assessed as failures according to the ART criteria, while they were assessed as survived using the FDI criteria. We conclude that the modified ART criteria enable reliable assessment of ART restorations in permanent teeth from diestone replicas and that there was no significant difference in survival estimates of ART restorations assessed using both sets of criteria. The null hypothesis was accepted.

  2. The Building Commissioning Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, John A.; Casault, Rick

    This book discusses building commissioning, which is the process of certifying that a new facility meets the required specifications. As buildings have become more complex, the traditional methods for building start-up and final acceptance have been proven inadequate, and building commissioning has been developed, which often necessitates the use…

  3. Global building physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    High ambitions are set for the building physics performance of buildings today. No single technology can achieve fulfilment of these ambitions alone. Integrated, multi-facetted solutions and optimization are necessary. A holistic, or ‘global’, technological perspective is needed, which includes all...... aspects of the building as defined in building engineering. We live in an international society and building solutions are developed across country borders. Building physics is a global theme. The International Association of Building Physics has global appeal. This brief article reports the keynote...

  4. Global Building Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    High ambitions are set for the building physics performance of buildings today. No single technology can achieve fulfilment of these ambitions alone. Integrated, multi-facetted solutions and optimization are necessary. A holistic, or “global”, technological perspective is needed, which includes all...... aspects of the building as defined in building engineering. We live in an international society and building solutions are developed across country borders. Building physics is a global theme. The International Association of Building Physics has global appeal. The keynote lecture and this brief paper...

  5. Implications of Rising Sea Level on Everglades Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, H. R.

    2008-05-01

    The strong likelihood of a significant rise in sea level during this century must be incorporated into the design of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) and its execution. With a warming Arctic and increased wind shear in the waters adjacent to Antarctica, accelerated ice melt of both Greenland and Antarctica has begun. With positive feedbacks, this melt appears irreversible on the century scale. Scientists of the Miami-Dade County Climate Change Task Force project that a global rise of sea level of at least 0.9-1.5 meters (3-5 feet) will occur by the end of the century. This anticipated rise will diminish the value of CERP unless (a) the design thoroughly incorporates a realistic sea level rise scenario and (b) there is a refocus of CERP's design to optimize water flow for wetland-community peat growth with the purpose of retarding saline encroachment. The goals of Everglades restoration must become (1) to provide an increase in water flowing at a gradually increasing elevation to permit rapid accumulation of robust organic peat beneath the freshwater wetland and (2) to actively manage the coastal mangrove wetland (e.g., aid hurricane recovery) to help it maintain a robust upwards-building peat margin. If this is done, the central and northern Everglades may survive as a healthy wetland habitat and provide fresh groundwater resources well into the next century. Actively building freshwater and mangrove peat and a dependable supply of freshwater are both critical to retarding saline encroachment up the Everglades depression. Without these, a 1.5 meter rise in sea level could move saline water nearly to Lake Okeechobee. Critical research questions and changes in management need to be addressed for this to succeed. The communities and conditions for optimal freshwater peat buildup must be documented and demonstrated. New management strategies must be designed and maintained to encourage rapid recovery of mangrove forests destroyed by hurricanes

  6. Retrofitting Listed Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a case study where the energy demand for a listed building constructed in 1900 is reduced. Many older buildings are listed and have restrictions that include the entire building or that include only its exterior. For the building presented, only its exterior facade is listed...... of the local urban environment and therefore listed. The reduced energy demand, related to individual measures, is estimated and building physics requirements are addressed together with the economic options for evaluating the profitability....

  7. River and riparian restoration in the southwest: Results of the National River Restoration Science Synthesis project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follstad, Shah J.J.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gloss, S.P.; Bernhardt, E.S.

    2007-01-01

    Restoration activity has exponentially increased across the Southwest since 1990. Over 37,000 records were compiled into the National River Restoration Science Synthesis (NRRSS) database to summarize restoration trends and assess project effectiveness. We analyzed data from 576 restoration projects in the Southwest (NRRSS-SW). More than 50% of projects were less than or equal to 3 km in length. The most common restoration project intent categories were riparian management, water quality management, in-stream habitat improvement, and flow modification. Common project activities were well matched to goals. Conservative estimates of total restoration costs exceeded $500 million. Most restoration dollars have been allocated to flow modification and water quality management. Monitoring was linked to 28% of projects across the Southwest, as opposed to just 10% nationwide. Mean costs were statistically similar whether or not projects were monitored. Results from 48 telephone interviews provided validation of NRRSS-SW database analyses but showed that project costs are often underreported within existing datasets. The majority of interviewees considered their projects to be successful, most often based upon observed improvements to biota or positive public reaction rather than evaluation of field data. The efficacy of restoration is difficult to ascertain given the dearth of information contained within most datasets. There is a great need for regional entities that not only track information on project implementation but also maintain and analyze monitoring data associated with restoration. Agencies that fund or regulate restoration should reward projects that emphasize monitoring and evaluation as much as project implementation. ?? 2007 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  8. Overcoming restoration paradigms: value of the historical record and metapopulation dynamics in native oyster restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romuald N. Lipcius

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Restoration strategies for native oyster populations rely on multiple sources of information, which often conflict due to time- and space-varying patterns in abundance and distribution. For instance, strategies based on population connectivity and disease resistance can differ, and extant and historical records of abundance and distribution are often at odds, such that the optimal strategy is unclear and valuable restoration sites may be excluded from consideration. This was the case for the Lynnhaven River subestuary of lower Chesapeake Bay, which was deemed unsuitable for Eastern Oyster restoration based on physical conditions, disease challenge, and extant oyster abundance. Consequently, we (i evaluated previously unknown historical data from the 1800s, (ii quantified extant oyster recruitment and abundance, physical conditions, and disease presence on constructed restoration reefs and alternative substrates, and (iii assessed simulations from biophysical models to identify potential restoration sites in the metapopulation. The collective data distinguished numerous restoration sites (i in the polyhaline zone (salinity 18.4-22.2 where disease resistance is evolving, (ii where oysters were abundant in the late 1800s-early 1900s, (iii of recent high recruitment, abundance and survival, despite consistent and elevated disease challenge, and (iv interconnected as a metapopulation via larval dispersal. Moreover, a network of constructed restoration reefs met size structure, abundance and biomass standards of restoration success. These findings demonstrate that assumptions about the suitability of sites for oyster restoration based on individual processes can be severely flawed, and that in-depth examination of multiple processes and sources of information are required for oyster reef restoration plans to maximize success. We use these findings and previous information to recommend a strategy for successful restoration of subtidal oyster reefs

  9. River restoration: separating myths from reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, N.; Woodward, G.

    2015-12-01

    River restorations are a social construct where degraded systems are physically modified to obtain a pre-disturbance set of attributes. These can be purely esthetic but are often linked to some kind of biotic recovery or the provision of important ecosystem services such as flood control or self-purification. The social setting of restoration projects, with a range of potential conflicts, significantly reduces scale of most interventions to a size with little room, or wish, for natural processes. We show that projects sizes are still very small and that the restoration target is not to recover natural geomorphic processes but rather to fulfil human perception of what a nice stream looks like. One case from Danish lowland streams, using a space-for-time substitution approach, shows excess use of pebble and gravel when restoring channelized sandy bottom streams, de-coupling the link between energy and substrate characteristics that are found in natural lowland systems. This has implication for both the biological structure and functioning of these systems as a direct link between substrate heterogeneity and macroinvertebrate diversity was not found in restored streams, while the density of grazer increased indicating an increased use of periphyton as a basal resource. Another case of adding woody debris to UK lowland streams, using a BACI study design, showed very little effect on the macroinvertebrate community even after a 100-year flood, which indicate that added tree trunks did not provide additional flow refugia. We suggest that restoration schemes should aim at restoring the natural physical structural complexity in the streams and at the same time enhance the possibility of re-generating the natural geomorphological processes sustaining the habitats in streams and rivers.

  10. [Key points in anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoping; Qian, Dongdong; Yuan, Yu; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper introduced the key points in fabricating anterior esthetic restorations with all ceramic materials, including pre-operative smile design, standard tooth preparation, provisional restoration fabrication, all ceramic materials selection, all ceramic restoration bonding, ceramic crack and fracture prevention. And then, the authors summarized and reviewed the clinical common problems in anterior esthetic restorations.

  11. 7 CFR 1410.10 - Restoration of wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration of wetlands. 1410.10 Section 1410.10... Restoration of wetlands. (a) An owner or operator who entered into a CRP contract on land that is suitable for restoration to wetlands or that was restored to wetlands while under such contract, may, if approved by...

  12. Transforming ecosystems: When, where, and how to restore contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Jason R; Farag, Aïda M; Cadotte, Marc W; Clements, William H; Smith, James R; Ulrich, Cheryl P; Woods, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Chemical contamination has impaired ecosystems, reducing biodiversity and the provisioning of functions and services. This has spurred a movement to restore contaminated ecosystems and develop and implement national and international regulations that require it. Nevertheless, ecological restoration remains a young and rapidly growing discipline and its intersection with toxicology is even more nascent and underdeveloped. Consequently, we provide guidance to scientists and practitioners on when, where, and how to restore contaminated ecosystems. Although restoration has many benefits, it also can be expensive, and in many cases systems can recover without human intervention. Hence, the first question we address is: "When should we restore contaminated ecosystems?" Second, we provide suggestions on what to restore-biodiversity, functions, services, all 3, or something else--and where to restore given expected changes to habitats driven by global climate change. Finally, we provide guidance on how to restore contaminated ecosystems. To do this, we analyze critical aspects of the literature dealing with the ecology of restoring contaminated ecosystems. Additionally, we review approaches for translating the science of restoration to on-the-ground actions, which includes discussions of market incentives and the finances of restoration, stakeholder outreach and governance models for ecosystem restoration, and working with contractors to implement restoration plans. By explicitly considering the mechanisms and strategies that maximize the success of the restoration of contaminated sites, we hope that our synthesis serves to increase and improve collaborations between restoration ecologists and ecotoxicologists and set a roadmap for the restoration of contaminated ecosystems. PMID:26033665

  13. 30 CFR 874.14 - Water supply restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water supply restoration. 874.14 Section 874.14... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION GENERAL RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.14 Water supply restoration. (a) Any... supply restoration projects. For purposes of this section, “water supply restoration projects” are...

  14. Transforming ecosystems: When, where, and how to restore contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Jason R; Farag, Aïda M; Cadotte, Marc W; Clements, William H; Smith, James R; Ulrich, Cheryl P; Woods, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Chemical contamination has impaired ecosystems, reducing biodiversity and the provisioning of functions and services. This has spurred a movement to restore contaminated ecosystems and develop and implement national and international regulations that require it. Nevertheless, ecological restoration remains a young and rapidly growing discipline and its intersection with toxicology is even more nascent and underdeveloped. Consequently, we provide guidance to scientists and practitioners on when, where, and how to restore contaminated ecosystems. Although restoration has many benefits, it also can be expensive, and in many cases systems can recover without human intervention. Hence, the first question we address is: "When should we restore contaminated ecosystems?" Second, we provide suggestions on what to restore-biodiversity, functions, services, all 3, or something else--and where to restore given expected changes to habitats driven by global climate change. Finally, we provide guidance on how to restore contaminated ecosystems. To do this, we analyze critical aspects of the literature dealing with the ecology of restoring contaminated ecosystems. Additionally, we review approaches for translating the science of restoration to on-the-ground actions, which includes discussions of market incentives and the finances of restoration, stakeholder outreach and governance models for ecosystem restoration, and working with contractors to implement restoration plans. By explicitly considering the mechanisms and strategies that maximize the success of the restoration of contaminated sites, we hope that our synthesis serves to increase and improve collaborations between restoration ecologists and ecotoxicologists and set a roadmap for the restoration of contaminated ecosystems.

  15. 32 CFR 644.452 - Minor restoration cases-determining extent of restoration required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... restoration cases, ENG Form 1440A-R, Joint Terminal Condition Survey, will be used. The Government... repairs, and other factors sufficient to properly complete and sign ENG Form 1440B-R, Cost of Restoration.... (b) Preparation of ENG Form 1440-R. Use of ENG Form 1440B-R is premised upon the ability of the...

  16. 75 FR 6354 - NOAA Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program Project Grants under the Great Lakes Restoration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-ZC10 NOAA Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program Project Grants under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative; Correction AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... notice published in the Federal Register on January 19, 2010. That notice announced the NOAA Great...

  17. Prioritization of Forest Restoration Projects: Tradeoffs between Wildfire Protection, Ecological Restoration and Economic Objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. Vogler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of US federal forest restoration programs on national forests is a complex process that requires balancing diverse socioecological goals with project economics. Despite both the large geographic scope and substantial investments in restoration projects, a quantitative decision support framework to locate optimal project areas and examine tradeoffs among alternative restoration strategies is lacking. We developed and demonstrated a new prioritization approach for restoration projects using optimization and the framework of production possibility frontiers. The study area was a 914,657 ha national forest in eastern Oregon, US that was identified as a national priority for restoration with the goal of increasing fire resiliency and sustaining ecosystem services. The results illustrated sharp tradeoffs among the various restoration goals due to weak spatial correlation of forest stressors and provisional ecosystem services. The sharpest tradeoffs were found in simulated projects that addressed either wildfire risk to the urban interface or wildfire hazard, highlighting the challenges associated with meeting both economic and fire protection goals. Understanding the nature of tradeoffs between restoration objectives and communicating them to forest stakeholders will allow forest managers to more effectively design and implement economically feasible restoration projects.

  18. ICT Enhanced Buildings Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansson, Per

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes and gives example on how Information and Communication, ICT, can and will enhance and support the building functional systems defined from client and end-user needs and requirements. The building systems may be derived from functional requirements on buildings such as usability...... and security on highest level with sub-systems definitions on lever levels. Building functional sub-systems may be defined for user comfort, indoor-climate, evacuation, space configuration, aesthetics, O&M etc. These building systems are supported by Information and Communication Technology, ICT, and building...... with focus on virtual building models support, new services and user environment definitions and development, virtual spaces and augmented reality, intelligent building components, application ontologies, and ICT systems integration to illustrate ICT enhanced buildings potentials and R&D needs.  ...

  19. Sustainable Buildings in Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The first attempts to build sustainable buildings in Denmark were typically located on the countryside. The basic idea was to create buildings that were independent of the technical infrastructure. District heating has, however, been the dominating solution to heating in buildings in Denmark......, and the focus on sustainable building have gradually turned from special houses on the countryside to normally looking houses in the urban fabric, integrated in the technical infrastructure. Some new built urban areas in Denmark will, however, not have to be supplied with district heating – these developments...... are going to consist of passive houses. The first sustainable buildings were built by their users, and the user – building interaction still play a decisive role for the performance of the present sustainable buildings. The users have to understand how the building functions. Urban design is essential...

  20. Cumulative effects of restoration efforts on ecological characteristics of an open water area within the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B.R.; Shi, W.; Houser, J.N.; Rogala, J.T.; Guan, Z.; Cochran-Biederman, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ecological restoration efforts in large rivers generally aim to ameliorate ecological effects associated with large-scale modification of those rivers. This study examined whether the effects of restoration efforts-specifically those of island construction-within a largely open water restoration area of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) might be seen at the spatial scale of that 3476ha area. The cumulative effects of island construction, when observed over multiple years, were postulated to have made the restoration area increasingly similar to a positive reference area (a proximate area comprising contiguous backwater areas) and increasingly different from two negative reference areas. The negative reference areas represented the Mississippi River main channel in an area proximate to the restoration area and an open water area in a related Mississippi River reach that has seen relatively little restoration effort. Inferences on the effects of restoration were made by comparing constrained and unconstrained models of summer chlorophyll a (CHL), summer inorganic suspended solids (ISS) and counts of benthic mayfly larvae. Constrained models forced trends in means or in both means and sampling variances to become, over time, increasingly similar to those in the positive reference area and increasingly dissimilar to those in the negative reference areas. Trends were estimated over 12- (mayflies) or 14-year sampling periods, and were evaluated using model information criteria. Based on these methods, restoration effects were observed for CHL and mayflies while evidence in favour of restoration effects on ISS was equivocal. These findings suggest that the cumulative effects of island building at relatively large spatial scales within large rivers may be estimated using data from large-scale surveillance monitoring programs. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Transforming ecosystems: When, where, and how to restore contaminated sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Jason R.; Farag, Aida M.; Cadotte, Marc W.; Clements, William H.; Smith, James R.; Ulrich, Cheryl P.; Woods, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Chemical contamination has impaired ecosystems, reducing biodiversity and the provisioning of functions and services. This has spurred a movement to restore contaminated ecosystems and develop and implement national and international regulations that require it. Nevertheless, ecological restoration remains a young and rapidly growing discipline and its intersection with toxicology is even more nascent and underdeveloped. Consequently, we provide guidance to scientists and practitioners on when, where, and how to restore contaminated ecosystems. Although restoration has many benefits, it also can be expensive, and in many cases systems can recover without human intervention. Hence, the first question we address is: “When should we restore contaminated ecosystems?” Second, we provide suggestions on what to restore—biodiversity, functions, services, all 3, or something else—and where to restore given expected changes to habitats driven by global climate change. Finally, we provide guidance on how to restore contaminated ecosystems. To do this, we analyze critical aspects of the literature dealing with the ecology of restoring contaminated ecosystems. Additionally, we review approaches for translating the science of restoration to on-the-ground actions, which includes discussions of market incentives and the finances of restoration, stakeholder outreach and governance models for ecosystem restoration, and working with contractors to implement restoration plans. By explicitly considering the mechanisms and strategies that maximize the success of the restoration of contaminated sites, we hope that our synthesis serves to increase and improve collaborations between restoration ecologists and ecotoxicologists and set a roadmap for the restoration of contaminated ecosystems.

  2. Applied building physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hens, Hugo S L C

    2012-01-01

    The energy crises of the 1970s, persisting moisture problems, complaints about sick buildings, thermal, visual and olfactory discomfort, and the move towards more sustainability in building construction have pushed Building Physics to the forefront of building innovation. The societal pressure to diminish energy consumption in buildings without impairing usability acted as a trigger to activate the whole notion of performance based design and construction. As with all engineering sciences, Building Physics is oriented towards application, which is why, after a first book on fundamentals this s

  3. Pardon in the light of restorative justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinović Dušica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to consider pardon in the restorative justice context. Beginning from the basic standpoint that restorative justice imposes request for interests-balancing of different subjects connected by criminal act, the author tries to examine the articulation of the aforementioned standpoint through the pardon concept, accepted in domestic positive law. There is no doubt that the institute is designed in favour of the crime perpetrator, which is confirmed by the analysis of different legal effects produced by its content, while the victim- and society interests remained, at least, insufficiently protected. Therefore, the author points to some positive examples from comparative law and poses certain suggestions, that can be of use for eventual reforming of the institute, in order to achieve values of restorative justice. .

  4. River restoration, discharge uncertainties and floods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendiondo, E.M. [Kassel Univ. (Germany). Hydraulic Structures and Water-Resources Engineering]|[Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Pesquisas Hidraulicas; Clarke, R.T. [Univ. Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Pesquisas Hidraulicas; Toensmann, F. [Kassel Univ. (Germany). Hydraulic Structures and Water-Resources Engineering

    2000-07-01

    Although ecological river restoration is updated continuously, discharge uncertainties are not being addressed to practical purposes, i.e. flood mitigation. So, uncertainty-based strategies need to be addressed with resilient river habitats. Not only the flood-defence and river-restoration framework of Toensmann (1996), but also the uncertainties in rating curves pointed by Clarke et al (2000), are used as starting points to propose an alternative flood mitigation scheme, managing hydraulics, ecology and statistics for restoring watercourses. Our working hypothesis considers the likelihood and the resiliency of riparian habitats in order to encompass the routing effects caused by this alternative flood mitigation scheme. Herein we depict the strategy and assessment for the appraisal of flood mitigation due to discharge reduction in rating curves, with application examples. (orig.)

  5. Design for Restoration: beyond the survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Carbonara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available  This new issue, that we can define special, marks an important change for DISEGNARECON (its transfer from the University of Bologna to the University of L’Aquila facing the topic of the Design for the Restoration in a way that is special too. Treated in fact - beside the outgoing editor in chief, Roberto Mingucci - by Mario Centofanti, who now assumes the responsibility for the magazine, and Giovanni Carbonara, which is definitely authoritative reference in the field. Sharing a strong interest for communicating the Restoration Project, they intended to indicate the substantial union of methods and objectives between the disciplines of architectural survey and of restoration, which makes the meaning of an aggregation now also institutionally formalized and particularly significant for the project on the existing architecture. 

  6. Common Prosthetic Implant Complications in Fixed Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link-Bindo, Elyce E; Soltys, James; Donatelli, David; Cavanaugh, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Many clinicians consider implants to be one of the most important innovations in dental care. Even so, over the past 40 years of implant dentistry, complications have been a constant struggle for restorative dentists, surgeons, and patients alike. Implant-related problems can be particularly challenging and frustrating, especially given that an implant is thought to be a "lifetime" solution expected to yield minimal difficulties. This, however, is not necessarily the case with prosthetic restorations. With innovations in implant technology continuing to rapidly advance, maintaining knowledge of all the latest developments can be challenging for clinicians. The purpose of this article is to provide a basic understanding of the treatment, management, and prevention of common prosthetic and technical implant complications seen in the office of a restorative dentist. PMID:27548395

  7. Lower Red River Meadow Stream Restoration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a continuing effort to restore anadromous fish populations in the South Fork Clearwater River basin of Idaho, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Lower Red River Meadow Restoration Project (Project). The Project is a cooperative effort with the Idaho Soil and Water Conservation District, Nez Perce National Forest, Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), and the Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho. The proposed action would allow the sponsors to perform stream bank stabilization, aquatic and riparian habitat improvement activities on IDFG's Red River Management Area and to secure long-term conservation contracts or agreements for conducting streambank and habitat improvement activities with participating private landowners located in the Idaho County, Idaho, study area. This preliminary Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of stabilizing the stream channel, restoring juvenile fish rearing habitat and reestablishing a riparian shrub community along the stream

  8. Restorative and Invisalign: a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Robert A; Brandt, Douglas J; Crawford, Craig H; Fallah, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    This case report describes an interdisciplinary treatment approach using the Invisalign System (Align Technology, Inc., Santa Clara, California) for orthodontics in combination with restorative dentistry. This combined approach was selected for an optimum esthetic and functional result. This case report demonstrates how a restorative case can be improved with prerestorative orthodontic alignment. The Invisalign System was used for opening the bite anteriorly, space distribution, and midline correction. The restorative dentistry procedures involved veneering to enhance the maxillary incisor length-to-width ratio and provide anterior guidance. The cosmetic alternative treatment modality to conventional fixed orthodontics allowed the clinician to accomplish the prerestorative orthodontic goals to help meet the desires of an esthetically conscientious patient.

  9. Voids in Sonic Fill(TM) restorations compared to traditional incrementally-filled composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abourezq, Ibraheem A.

    SonicFill(TM) is a new composite resin and delivery system designed to provide rapid filling of cavity preparations by decreasing viscosity through application of sonic energy. However, it may produce unwanted air voids in the final restoration due to the short filling time. Air voids compromise long-term performance by providing weak foci, discontinuity at cavosurface margins and at internal cavity walls, and potential crack propagation. This study assessed the locations, sizes, and numbers of voids in SonicFill restorations compared with traditional composite resin restorations in a set of extracted molars with mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity preparations. Fifty noncarious intact extracted third molars were collected randomly from a large collection of discarded anonymous tooth specimens. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were cut, and teeth were assigned randomly to one of two groups ( n = 25). The first group was restored with SonicFill composite in two steps. The second group was restored with Herculite Ultra(TM) using an multiple increment layering technique (1-2 mm per layer). Cross-sectional images of the filling were taken by digital microscope. A total of 196 voids were found in the 50 specimens: 97 in SonicFill restorations and 99 in conventional restorations. Mean number of voids in SonicFill restorations was 3.88 versus 3.96 for conventional restorations. Mean percentage of void area in SonicFill restorations was 0.588% versus 0.508% for conventional restorations. Unpaired t tests for these differences indicated no statistically significant differences (p =.931 and p =.629, respectively). One-way ANOVA tests for mean void count and mean void area percentage differences by three location zones for conventional and SonicFill restorations also indicated no significant differences among the groups. The bulk-fill SonicFill system does not result in increased or decreased numbers or ii area of voids within Class II MOD restorations compared with a

  10. Matrix Krylov subspace methods for image restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khalide jbilou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we consider some matrix Krylov subspace methods for solving ill-posed linear matrix equations and in those problems coming from the restoration of blurred and noisy images. Applying the well known Tikhonov regularization procedure leads to a Sylvester matrix equation depending the Tikhonov regularized parameter. We apply the matrix versions of the well known Krylov subspace methods, namely the Least Squared (LSQR and the conjugate gradient (CG methods to get approximate solutions representing the restored images. Some numerical tests are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  11. Complications in hair-restoration surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konior, Raymond J

    2013-08-01

    Most complications associated with hair restoration are completely preventable and arise from variables that are directly controlled by the surgeon and the patient. Physicians who thoroughly grasp the nuances of modern surgical techniques and fully understand the physiologic dynamics of the balding process are least likely to generate a physician-controlled error. Highly motivated, well-educated patients who carefully follow instructions and take an active role in the postoperative recovery process minimize the chance of patient-controlled errors. This article discusses potential complications associated with surgical hair restoration, and the roles of the patient and physician in minimizing the risk of complications. PMID:24017992

  12. Environmental Restoration Program Control Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, R.T.

    1992-08-13

    Environmental Restoration managers need to demonstrate that their programs are under control. Unlike most industrial programs, the public is heavily involved in Environmental Restoration activities. The public is demanding that the country prove that real progress is being made towards cleaning up the environment. A Program Control Management System can fill this need. It provides a structure for planning, work authorization, data accumulation, data analysis and change control. But it takes time to implement a control system and the public is losing its patience. This paper describes critical items essential to the quick development and implementation of a successful control system.

  13. Nerve Transfers to Restore Shoulder Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leechavengvongs, Somsak; Malungpaishorpe, Kanchai; Uerpairojkit, Chairoj; Ng, Chye Yew; Witoonchart, Kiat

    2016-05-01

    The restoration of shoulder function after brachial plexus injury represents a significant challenge facing the peripheral nerve surgeons. This is owing to a combination of the complex biomechanics of the shoulder girdle, the multitude of muscles and nerves that could be potentially injured, and a limited number of donor options. In general, nerve transfer is favored over tendon transfer, because the biomechanics of the musculotendinous units are not altered. This article summarizes the surgical techniques and clinical results of nerve transfers for restoration of shoulder function. PMID:27094888

  14. Restorative dentistry for the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackmyer, Steven P; Donly, Kevin J

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry sponsored the Pediatric Restorative Dentistry Consensus Conference in 2002. This paper will review the consensus statements that were issued as a result of the conference. Since the conference there have been advances in procedures, materials, and techniques that need to be considered in terms of some of the consensus statements. The introduction of the First Dental Home, interim therapeutic restoration and nanotechnology are examples of some of the materials and techniques that are now part of everyday pediatric dentistry. This paper will discuss the updates as it relates to each of the 2002 consensus statements. PMID:21309276

  15. The Management of Dissonance in Nature Restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2016-01-01

    Nature restoration is far from a neural undertaking. Just like any other type of heritage production, it can be the source of dissonance—‘our’ nature is not necessary ‘their’ nature. Often this dissonance is managed in ways, which are not particularly sensitive to site-specificity. As exemplified...... for multiple interpretations to coexist. Indications can be found in the Re-naturalization of River Aire (2002-2015)—a restoration project, which reveals approaches that could be labelled landscape architecture specific....

  16. The Management of Dissonance in Nature Restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    Nature restoration is far from a neural undertaking. Just like any other type of heritage production, it can be the source of dissonance—‘our’ nature is not necessary ‘their’ nature. Often this dissonance is managed in ways, which are not particularly sensitive to site-specificity. As exemplified...... for multiple interpretations to coexist. Indications can be found in the Re-naturalization of River Aire (2002-2015)—a restoration project, which reveals approaches that could be labelled landscape architecture specific....

  17. Combination restoration in full mouth rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful restoration of the dentition requires plenty of contemporary and conventional treatment techniques and planning and attachment retained partial dentures are one such kind of treatment modality in prosthodontics. Satisfactory restoration in a patient with a partially edentulous situation can be challenging especially when unilateral or bilateral posterior segment of teeth is missing. One such treatment modality is attachment-retained cast partial dentures. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of a case with maxillary complete denture and opposing cast partial denture with precision attachment.

  18. [How does sleeping restore our brain?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Stenberg, Tarja

    2015-01-01

    The central function of sleep is to keep our brain functional, but what is the restoration that sleep provides? Sleep after learning improves learning outcomes. According to the theory of synaptic homeostasis the total strength of synapses, having increased during the day, is restored during sleep, making room for the next day's experiences. According to the theory of active synaptic consolidation, repetition during sleep strengthens the synapses, and these strengthened synapses form a permanent engram. According to a recent study, removal of waste products from the brain may also be one of the functions of sleep. PMID:26237917

  19. Hanford B Reactor Building Hazard Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 105-B Reactor (hereinafter referred to as B Reactor) is located in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The B Reactor is one of nine plutonium production reactors that were constructed in the 1940s during the Cold War Era. Construction of the B Reactor began June 7, 1943, and operation began on September 26, 1944. The Environmental Restoration Contractor was requested by RL to provide an assessment/characterization of the B Reactor building to determine and document the hazards that are present and could pose a threat to the environment and/or to individuals touring the building. This report documents the potential hazards, determines the feasibility of mitigating the hazards, and makes recommendations regarding areas where public tour access should not be permitted

  20. Legislation and informed consent brochures for dental patients receiving amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Cochran, Amy A; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, Norway banned the use of mercury for amalgam restorations. Four states in the United States have developed Informed Consent Brochures for amalgam restorations that must be given to their dental patients. The authors describe a patient who had a large cavity in his left lower molar tooth no.18 that had to be removed by an oral surgeon. When the patient went to the oral surgeon, the surgeon told the patient that he would replace the carious tooth with a gold implant. He was not given an Informed Consent Brochure regarding dental restorative materials. The oral surgeon extracted the carious tooth, replacing the tooth with a supposed gold crown implant. On his yearly dental examination, his dentist took an x-ray of his dental implant and explained that the x-ray could not distinguish whether the implant contained either gold or mercury. Consequently, the dentist referred him to a dental clinic in which the dental implant could be removed without mercury contamination of the patient's neurologic system during the extraction of the implant from the root canal. During the removal of the dental restoration, the dentist found build up expanding into the root canal that had a black color. The crown and underlying tooth were sent to ALT BioScience for analysis. Elemental analysis of the crown and underlying tooth confirmed the presence of mercury in the restoration. The patient should have been given an Informed Consent Brochure by the dentist that described the dental restoration that was used in the dental implant.

  1. Comfort control in buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Castilla, Maria del Mar; Rodriguez, Francisco de Asis

    2014-01-01

    This book describes both concepts and development of advanced comfort control systems in buildings, with significant energy saving, and attention to thermal, visual and indoor air quality. The concepts are proven through real tests in a bioclimatic building.

  2. Building the Korogwe Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Richard, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania.......An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania....

  3. Building Design & Construction - Sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-11-01

    Offers a brief history of green building; presents the results of a specially commissioned survey; and analyzes the chief trends, issues, and published research, based on interviews with dozens of experts and participants in green building.

  4. Robotic buildings(s)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Technological and conceptual advances in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and material science have enabled robotic building to be in the last decade prototypically implemented. In this context, robotic building implies both physically built robotic environments and robotically supp

  5. Better Buildings Challenge Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-06-01

    The Better Buildings Challenge is a national leadership initiative calling on corporate chief executive officers, university presidents, and state and local leaders to make a significant commitment to building energy efficiency.

  6. Requirements for existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012.......This report collects energy performance requirements for existing buildings in European member states by June 2012....

  7. Integrated Building Health Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: Building health management is an important part in running an efficient and cost-effective building. Many problems in a building’s system can go...

  8. Allegheny County Building Footprints

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains photogrammetrically compiled roof outlines of buildings. All near orthogonal corners are square. Buildings that are less than 400 square feet...

  9. Buildings interoperability landscape - Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Dave B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephan, Eric G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Weimin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Corbin, Charles D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Widergren, Steven E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Buildings are an integral part of our nation’s energy economy. The advancement in information and communications technology (ICT) has revolutionized energy management in industrial facilities and large commercial buildings. As ICT costs decrease and capabilities increase, buildings automation and energy management features are transforming the small-medium commercial and residential buildings sectors. A vision of a connected world in which equipment and systems within buildings coordinate with each other to efficiently meet their owners’ and occupants’ needs, and where buildings regularly transact business with other buildings and service providers (such as gas and electric service providers) is emerging. However, while the technology to support this collaboration has been demonstrated at various degrees of maturity, the integration frameworks and ecosystems of products that support the ability to easily install, maintain, and evolve building systems and their equipment components are struggling to nurture the fledging business propositions of their proponents.

  10. Building Materials Property Table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-04-16

    This information sheet describes a table of some of the key technical properties of many of the most common building materials taken from ASHRAE Fundamentals - 2001, Moisture Control in Buildings, CMHC, NRC/IRC, IEA Annex 24, and manufacturer data.

  11. Building the ISS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石继忠; 李秀霞

    2007-01-01

    Have you seen people building houses?To build a house,you need workers.They use their hands,tools and machines to put everything together. Building the ISS is almost the same.The difference is that the workers are astronauts.They

  12. Future Green Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Drysdale, David; Lund, Henrik;

    Efficient buildings are essential for an affordable Danish energy supply in 2050. The purpose of this report is to describe the contribution and role of the building sector in a 100% renewable energy future, as well as the transitions that are necessary in the building sector to support this chan...

  13. Marine Building Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Westby, Ola

    2006-01-01

    This textbook is all about building of ships, platforms and other offshore installations. The geometry and functions of systems and structures are explained as an introduction to management and technology at shipyards and building sites. Both loadbearing structures, outfitting and installation of accommodation are included. Project management, production planning, cost calculations, building methods, discipline knowledge (welding, painting, insulation, mechanical, piping etc.), fabrication te...

  14. Building with History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas-Jones, Rachel; Adams, Charlotte; Green, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    on the thermal and energetic properties of historic buildings, as distinct from their social meaning and use. A similar separation between the physi- cal building and its social use is inherent in methodologies such as energy audits that constitute key devices through which buildings are institution- ally...

  15. Ghost suppression in image restoration filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    An optimum image restoration filter is described in which provision is made to constrain the spatial extent of the restoration function, the noise level of the filter output and the rate of falloff of the composite system point-spread away from the origin. Experimental results show that sidelobes on the composite system point-spread function produce ghosts in the restored image near discontinuities in intensity level. By redetermining the filter using a penalty function that is zero over the main lobe of the composite point-spread function of the optimum filter and nonzero where the point-spread function departs from a smoothly decaying function in the sidelobe region, a great reduction in sidelobe level is obtained. Almost no loss in resolving power of the composite system results from this procedure. By iteratively carrying out the same procedure even further reductions in sidelobe level are obtained. Examples of original and iterated restoration functions are shown along with their effects on a test image.

  16. Oral environment control before restorative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Matos Vieira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to describe caries disease treatment, by means of a clinical case report, with a view to promoting the patient’s health before definitive restorative treatments, considering that treatment should include changes in the patient’s dietary and hygiene habits, and not be restricted only to restoring lesions, as well as the establishment of an individualized treatment plan for each patient. Iodine-based antimicrobial solution was applied, instructions about oral hygiene and dietary habit changes were provided. The stepwise excavation technique was performed in tooth 15, mass excavation followed by the application of glass ionomer cement in the other teeth that presented carious lesions. White stain lesions were remineralized, and cicatrizes and fissures in the posterior teeth were sealed. After health was reestablished, the temporary restorations were replaced by definitive restorations. Changes in the treatment philosophy of caries disease, based on changes in the patient’s habits and removal of foci of infection have been presented with the object of producing an effective change in this paradigm, in order to increase the longevity of teeth with less operative intervention.

  17. Restorative Justice for Discipline with Respect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelynski, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Expulsion is commonly schools' last resort to maintain discipline and keep schools safe. But increasingly, educators are turning to "restorative justice"--an alternative method from the field of criminology--with promising results. According to Randall Comfort, assistant upper-school director, Mounds Park Academy, St. Paul, Minnesota, using this…

  18. SOFT COMPUTING APPROACH FOR NOISY IMAGE RESTORATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A genetic learning algorithm based fuzzy neural network was proposed for noisy image restoration, which can adaptively find and extract the fuzzy rules contained in noise. It can efficiently remove image noise and preserve the detail image information as much as possible. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is able to performa far better than conventional noise removing techniques.

  19. Restoring faith in politics from deliberation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quim Brugué

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Politics is in difficulties. It is constantly blamed by people, who also require it to respond. The world is increasingly complex and diverse, and politics is needed to facilitate the continuity of a civilized community. The article defines the conceptual and operative bases of deliberative democracy, which is interpreted as the way to restore faith in politics.

  20. ENDODONTIC TREATMENT AND POST-CORE RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Hafifah

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic root canal treatment is to maintain the tooth as long as possible in the arch’s width in a good functional status. In order to reach that goal, all irritation to the pulp should be eliminated so that the tooth has a healthy periodontal tissue support. A female patient, aged 37 years, came for her upper front tooth which had been restored with a pin crown a year ago. One month ago she had a swelling accompanied with throbbing pain. There was no history of general diseases and her oral hygiene was good. Clinically 11 was restored with a pin crown and the radiographic picture showed a narrow pulp chamber, normal roots with normal canals, thickened periodontium, broken laminar dura, and diffuse periapical rarefaction. The tooth was diagnosed with pulpal necrosis. A conventional root canal treatment was performed followed by the insertion of a post core crown. The result showed a satisfactory treatment plan, a good restoration, successful treatment in this case was due to the role of the dentist to create healthy soft and hard tissues in the oral cavity before restoration, and also due to patient cooperation.

  1. A review of coral reef restoration techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, H.W.G.; Smith, S.R.; Becking, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    In this review the following three reef restoration techniques are discussed: 1. Coral gardening, 2. Larval seeding, and 3. Reef balls. In this report we provide a description of each method and review the pro/cons using the following criteria: 1. Survival of fragments and larvae before transplantat

  2. Restoration of the eyebrows by hair transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gho, Coen; Neumann, Martino

    2014-04-01

    Partial loss of the eyebrows can be the result of epilation, scars, and inflammatory diseases. Facial hair and eyebrows play a major role in our mimetic expression and interaction. Therefore, facial hair restoration of the eyebrows can improve the appearance and psychological well-being of patients. We report the use of partial longitudinal follicular unit transplantation (PLFUT) to restore eyebrows. A total of 10 patients (age between 18 and 59 years; mean, 39 years) have been treated with PLFUT to restore the eyebrows. The grafts were harvested from the occipital area of the scalp. Suitable grafts were impregnated with a preservative solution and implanted into the eyebrows areas. Hair growth in the donor area as well as the eyebrows was observed before treatment and at intervals of 1 week, 3 months, and 1 year after treatment. Evaluation of the donor area reveals no visible scars with almost all hair follicles in the donor site reproducing hairs after 1 year. All treated patients were satisfied or very satisfied with their cosmetic results. PLFUT is a reliable, patient friendly method suitable for hair restoration of eyebrows in healthy persons as well as in burn scar tissue. PMID:24810133

  3. The importance of demonstratively restoring order.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Keizer

    Full Text Available Contrary to what is often assumed, order is not the strongest context for encouraging normative behavior. The strongest context effect on normative behavior comes from cues that clearly convey other people's respect for norms. Ironically, this show of respect necessitates some contrasting disrespect that is being restored. Using civic virtues (such as helping behavior as a prototype of normative behavior, the three field experiments described in this paper reveal the impact of normative cues on civic virtues. Results show that the strongest effect on making people follow prosocial norms in public places emanates from seeing order being restored, rather than just order being present. The robust and surprisingly large effects show that observing other people's respect for one particular norm (as evidenced in their restoring physical order makes it more likely that the onlooker follows other norms as well. This implies that prosocial behavior has the highest chance of spreading when people observe order being restored. There are clear policy implications: create low cost "normative respect cues" wherever it is desirable to increase conformity to norms.

  4. Restorative Justice: Pedagogy, Praxis, and Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Brenda E.; Vaandering, Dorothy

    2012-01-01

    In the ongoing effort of designing school contexts in support of proactive discipline, a range of practices and theoretical frameworks have been advanced, from behaviorist approaches to social and emotional learning. This article describes the theory and practice of restorative justice with the aim of defining this distinctive paradigm, in…

  5. 76 FR 47055 - Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... 26, 2010, at 75 FR 4006 proposing to amend the ERP regulatory requirements to add that the ERP.... Background The Agency published a final rule on October 12, 2004, at 69 FR 60541 requiring all borrowers to... 7 CFR Part 1730 RIN 0572-AC16 Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP) AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service,...

  6. Stimulating nitrate removal processes of restored wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Kate A; Groffman, Peter M; Lehmann, Johannes; Schneider, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The environmental and health effects caused by nitrate contamination of aquatic systems are a serious problem throughout the world. A strategy proposed to address nitrate pollution is the restoration of wetlands. However, although natural wetlands often remove nitrate via high rates of denitrification, wetlands restored for water quality functions often fall below expectations. This may be in part because key drivers for denitrification, in particular soil carbon, are slow to develop in restored wetlands. We added organic soil amendments that range along a gradient of carbon lability to four newly restored wetlands in western New York to investigate the effect of carbon additions on denitrification and other processes of the nitrogen cycle. Soil carbon increased by 12.67-63.30% with the use of soil amendments (p ≤ 0.0001). Soil nitrate, the carbon to nitrogen ratio, and microbial biomass nitrogen were the most significant predictors of denitrification potential. Denitrification potential, potential net nitrogen nitrification and mineralization, and soil nitrate and ammonium, were highest in topsoil-amended plots, with increases in denitrification potential of 161.27% over control plots. While amendment with topsoil more than doubled several key nitrogen cycling processes, more research is required to determine what type and level of amendment application are most effective for stimulating removal of exogenous nitrate and meeting functional goals within an acceptable time frame. PMID:24915604

  7. 75 FR 71625 - System Restoration Reliability Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... Reliability Standards for the Bulk-Power System, Order No. 693, 72 FR 16416 at P 297 (Apr. 4, 2007), FERC... No. 486, 52 FR 47897 (Dec. 17, 1987), FERC Stats. & Regs. ] 30,783 (1987). \\34\\ 18 CFR 380.4(a)(5... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 40 System Restoration Reliability Standards November 18,...

  8. 76 FR 16277 - System Restoration Reliability Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ...\\ System Restoration Reliability Standards, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, 75 FR 71625 (Nov. 24, 2010... System, Order No. 693, 72 FR 16416 (Apr. 4, 2007), FERC Stats. & Regs. ] 31,242, at P 297, order on reh'g... required. \\29\\ Regulations Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, Order No. 486, 52 FR...

  9. Setting targets in strategies for river restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedroli, G.B.M.; Blust, de G.; Looy, van K.; Rooij, van S.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Since about 90% of the natural floodplain area of rivers in Europe has been reclaimed and now lacks river dynamics, nature rehabilitation along rivers is of crucial importance for the restoration of their natural function. Flood protection, self-purification of surface water, groundwater recharge, s

  10. Restoration of images with rotated shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzer, S.; Steidl, G.; Teuber, T.

    2008-07-01

    Methods for image restoration which respect edges and other important features are of fundamental importance in digital image processing. In this paper, we present a novel technique for the restoration of images containing rotated (linearly transformed) rectangular shapes which avoids the round-off effects at vertices produced by known edge-preserving denoising techniques. Following an idea of Berkels et al. our approach is also based on two steps: the determination of the angles related to the rotated shapes and a subsequent restoration step which incorporates the knowledge of the angles. However, in contrast to Berkels et al., we find the smoothed rotation angles of the shapes by minimizing a simple quadratic functional without constraints which involves only first order derivatives so that we finally have to solve only a linear system of equations. Moreover, we propose to perform the restoration step either by quadratic programming or by solving an anisotropic diffusion equation. We focus on a discrete approach which approximates derivatives by finite differences. Particular attention is paid to the choice of the difference filters. We prove some relations concerning the preservation of rectangular shapes for our discrete settingE Finally, we present numerical examples for the denoising of artificial images with rotated rectangles and parallelograms and for the denoising of a real-world image.

  11. Restor pakub kileseina asemele moodulaeda / Askur Alas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alas, Askur, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    Tüli ehitusfirma Restor ja Tallinna linna vahel linnamüüriäärse maa täisehitamise pärast. Restori nõue ehitusloa taastamiseks jäi rahuldamata muinsuskaitsealal omavoliliselt lammutatud 18. sajandi hoonete pärast. Restoril on valminud ridaelamuboksid Plate ja Eppingi tornide vahel

  12. Reference condition approach to restoration planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, J.M.; Theiling, C.H.; Lubinski, S.J.; Smith, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Ecosystem restoration planning requires quantitative rigor to evaluate alternatives, define end states, report progress and perform environmental benefits analysis (EBA). Unfortunately, existing planning frameworks are, at best, semi-quantitative. In this paper, we: (1) describe a quantitative restoration planning approach based on a comprehensive, but simple mathematical framework that can be used to effectively apply knowledge and evaluate alternatives, (2) use the approach to derive a simple but precisely defined lexicon based on the reference condition concept and allied terms and (3) illustrate the approach with an example from the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) using hydrologic indicators. The approach supports the development of a scaleable restoration strategy that, in theory, can be expanded to ecosystem characteristics such as hydraulics, geomorphology, habitat and biodiversity. We identify three reference condition types, best achievable condition (A BAC), measured magnitude (MMi which can be determined at one or many times and places) and desired future condition (ADFC) that, when used with the mathematical framework, provide a complete system of accounts useful for goal-oriented system-level management and restoration. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. My Non-Restorative Sleep Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthy Ambar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Personal experience of systemic effects of late night sleep deprivation and non-restorative sleep-a common experience amongst doctors, has been described. Results of some simple self-experimentations have been mentioned to highlight the possible pathogenetic mechanisms.

  14. Valuation of nature in conservation and restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, JAA; van der Windt, HJ; Keulartz, J

    2001-01-01

    Valuation of nature is an important aspect of nature conservation and restoration. Understanding valuation in a broad sense may contribute to conservation strategies since it may lead to better support from society. In this article we propose a model of valuation with respect to conservation and res

  15. Discussion about the effect of digital plants library on the plants landscape restoration in Yuanmingyuan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, L.; Guxin, S.; Gongli, L.

    2015-08-01

    Chinese classical garden emphasizes not only the construction of building, mountains and rivers, spring and stone landscape but also the selection and configuration mode of the plant species. Yuanmingyuan, a classical work of Chinese garden art, is of both the magnificence of northern royal garden and the delicacy of southern private garden. The plants landscape in Yuanmingyuan also has its own unique style. But it is regretful that after several disasters, it nearly disappears just as other building clusters. The Re- Yuanmingyuan group re-presents the plants landscape of Yuanmingyuan through investigation, restoration and three-dimensional space generation, and makes proposal about the concept of digital plants library for the first time with the expectation to provide basic support for the digital restoration of cultural heritage by establishing the plants library. The paper also introduces the process of digital plants library system construction as well as the significance of the library construction for the landscape restoration in Yuanmingyuan and even the northern royal garden.

  16. Crime Victims Support System and Restorative Justice: Possible Implementation in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlinda Azman, PhD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Victims’ position is increasingly acknowledged in the criminal justice system across the world. Because of that, criminal justice systems in various countries slowly transform from focusing too much on the relationship between offenders and the legal system and to between the offenders and their victims. Several programs are highlighted such as victim-offender mediation, family group conferences, reparative orders and referral orders in this article. Findings from several studies support the effectiveness of the programs on both the victims and the offenders in terms of several measurements such as satisfaction and recidivism. Looking at this revolution, Malaysian academicians and professionals are beginning to recognize restorative justice as a possible revolution to its criminal justice system, but Malaysian criminal justice system first needs to strengthen or build components that support victims of crime, as this is one of the main principles of restorative justice. Currently, Malaysia still focuses on offenders and their relationship with legal system, but not much with their own victims (physical, emotional, and psychological consequences of the crime. Several possible issues before formal implementation of restorative justice are discussed. The issues (culture, training, and attitude of Malaysian people, including the victims, offenders, and those who work with them can influence the efficiency of restorative justice programs if not identified systematically. These issues can also be the possible research areas to be ventured in the future as these researches can help in implementation.

  17. Wetland Microbial Community Response to Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; Tringe, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland restoration has been proposed as a potential long-term carbon storage solution, with a goal of engineering geochemical dynamics to accelerate peat accretion and encourage greenhouse gas (GHG) sequestration. However, wetland microbial community composition and metabolic rates are poorly understood and their predicted response to wetland restoration is a veritable unknown. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors that shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater tidal marshes to hypersaline ponds in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun metagenomics, coupled with greenhouse gas measurements, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range in salinity and restoration status. Seawater delivers sulfate to wetland ecosystems, encouraging sulfate reduction and discouraging methane production. As expected, we observed the highest rates of methane production in the freshwater wetlands. Recently restored wetlands had significantly higher rates of methane production compared to their historic counterparts that could be attributed to variations in trace metal and organic carbon content in younger wetlands. In contrast, our sequencing results revealed an almost immediate return of the indigenous microbial communities following seasonal flooding and full tidal restoration in saline and hypersaline wetlands and managed ponds. Notably, we found elevated methane production rates in hypersaline ponds, the result of methylotrophic methane production confirmed by sequence data and lab incubations. Our study links belowground microbial communities and their aboveground greenhouse gas production and highlights the inherent complexity in predicting wetland microbial response in the face of both natural and unnatural disturbances.

  18. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals

  19. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education

  20. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-09-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

  1. Assessing the carbon benefit of saltmarsh restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Benjamin; Paterson, David; Hanley, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of carbon sequestration rates in coastal ecosystems is required to better realise their potential role in climate change mitigation. Through accurate valuation this service can be fully appreciated and perhaps help facilitate efforts to restore vulnerable ecosystems such as saltmarshes. Vegetated coastal ecosystems are suggested to account for approximately 50% of oceanic sedimentary carbon despite their 2% areal extent. Saltmarshes, conservatively estimated to store 430 ± 30 Tg C in surface sediment deposits, have experienced extensive decline in the recent past; through processes such as land use change and coastal squeeze. Saltmarsh habitats offer a range of services that benefit society and the natural world, making their conservation meaningful and beneficial. The associated costs of restoration projects could, in part, be subsidised through payment for ecosystem services, specifically Blue carbon. Additional storage is generated through the (re)vegetation of mudflat areas leading to an altered ecosystem state and function; providing similar benefits to natural saltmarsh areas. The Eden Estuary, Fife, Scotland has been a site of saltmarsh restoration since 2000; providing a temporal and spatial scale to evaluate these additional benefits. The study is being conducted to quantify the carbon benefit of restoration efforts and provide an insight into the evolution of this benefit through sites of different ages. Seasonal sediment deposition and settlement rates are measured across the estuary in: mudflat, young planted saltmarsh, old planted saltmarsh and extant high marsh areas. Carbon values being derived from loss on ignition organic content values. Samples are taken across a tidal cycle on a seasonal basis; providing data on tidal influence, vegetation condition effects and climatic factors on sedimentation and carbon sequestration rates. These data will inform on the annual characteristics of sedimentary processes in the estuary and be

  2. Building Order in the Building Company Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Krivdová, Magdaléna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to describe an organization of a building order, and to show its key phases. The individual phases of how a order is completed in a company are shown on practical examples. The first two chapters deal with the current situation of today's construction industry; consequently, the reasons for introducing the principles of project management into the construction business practice are mentioned. The third chapter is devoted to the description of a building order. It...

  3. Controlling the intelligent building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBlanc, R.J.

    1985-08-01

    Companies will be able to locate in intelligent buildings that offer access to a variety of sophisticated communications equipment, at the heart of which are building controls that ensure a comfortable and safe working environment for the occupants. Future buildings will include advanced telephones or workstations with built-in building control sensors for temperature, light level, and security. Advanced telecommunication systems may have telephone cabinets with built-in control functions which eliminate the need for discrete control systems. The owners and tenants will both enjoy benefits if the controls are carefully selected and designed so that they integrate into a single building package.

  4. Net zero energy buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieminen, J., Email: jyri.nieminen@vtt.fi

    2012-06-15

    Two net zero apartment buildings with basically similar architecture have been built in Finland, in Kuopio (latitude 62.90) and in Jaervenpaeae (latitude 60.50). The aim was to test the possibilities to build zero energy buildings at high latitudes. The Kuopio case is a student hostel and the Jaervenpaeae case a home for elderly people. The total energy demand in the buildings are 102 MWh for Kuopio and 94.3 for Jaervenpaeae corresponding to 48 and 45 and kWh/gross-m2. The buildings utilise district heat and are connected to the local grid. The renewable energy production bases in the Kuopio case on solar heat and photovoltaics. The Kuopio building has been finished in 2010 and the Jaervenpaeae building in 2011. (orig.)

  5. Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-29

    Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

  6. Integrated Assessment of Prevention and Restoration Actions to Combat Desertification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, S.; Orr, B. J.; Vallejo, R.

    2009-12-01

    Recent advances in desertification and land degradation research have provided valuable conceptual and analytical frameworks, degradation indicators, assessment tools and surveillance systems with respect to desertification drivers, processes, and impacts. These findings, together with stakeholders’ perceptions and local/regional knowledge, have helped to define and propose measures and strategies to combat land degradation. However, integrated and comprehensive assessment and evaluation of prevention and restoration strategies and techniques to combat desertification is still lacking, and knowledge on the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of the proposed strategies over a wide range of environmental and socio-economic conditions is very scarce. To address this challenge, we have launched a multinational project (PRACTICE - Prevention and Restoration Actions to Combat Desertification. An Integrated Assessment), funded by the European Commission, in order to link S & T advances and traditional knowledge on prevention and restoration practices to combat desertification with sound implementation, learning and adaptive management, knowledge sharing, and dissemination of best practices. The key activities for pursuing this goal are (1) to establish a platform and information system of long-term monitoring sites for assessing sustainable management and actions to combat desertification, (2) to define an integrated protocol for the assessment of these actions, and (3) to link project assessment and evaluation with training and education, adaptive management, and knowledge sharing and dissemination through a participatory approach involving scientists, managers, technicians, financial officers, and members of the public who are/were impacted by the desertification control projects. Monitoring sites are distributed in the Mediterranean Europe (Greece, Italy, Spain, and Portugal), Africa (Morocco, Namibia, South Africa), Middle East (Israel), China, and South and North

  7. Final Restoration and Mitigation Monitoring Plan for the Island Ponds Restoration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Restoration and Mitigation Monitoring Plan (RMMP) presents the approaches necessary to satisfy mitigation and monitoring requirements described in the various...

  8. Defects Investigation in Old Timber Building: Case Study of Masjid Lama Defects Investigation in Old Timber Building: Case Study of Masjid Lama

    OpenAIRE

    Suhana Johar; Hafsah Yahiya; Adi Irfan Che-Ani; Norngainy Mohd Tawil; Abdul Gaffer Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and highlights the importance parts of a conservation programs, particularly for timber building. Masjid Lama Mulong is one of a remaining cultural heritage experiencing conservation works as to restore the uniqueness of the building and its history that once existed. Made from cengal, one of the famous local hardwoods, however, it is not spared to the threat of decay and deterioration from its agent. In conservation, one of the important stages is to insp...

  9. The cost and feasibility of marine coastal restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Saunders, Megan I; Abdullah, Sabah; Mills, Morena; Beher, Jutta; Possingham, Hugh P; Mumby, Peter J; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2016-06-01

    Land-use change in the coastal zone has led to worldwide degradation of marine coastal ecosystems and a loss of the goods and services they provide. Restoration is the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged, or destroyed and is critical for habitats where natural recovery is hindered. Uncertainties about restoration cost and feasibility can impede decisions on whether, what, how, where, and how much to restore. Here, we perform a synthesis of 235 studies with 954 observations from restoration or rehabilitation projects of coral reefs, seagrass, mangroves, salt-marshes, and oyster reefs worldwide, and evaluate cost, survival of restored organisms, project duration, area, and techniques applied. Findings showed that while the median and average reported costs for restoration of one hectare of marine coastal habitat were around US$80000 (2010) and US$1600000 (2010), respectively, the real total costs (median) are likely to be two to four times higher. Coral reefs and seagrass were among the most expensive ecosystems to restore. Mangrove restoration projects were typically the largest and the least expensive per hectare. Most marine coastal restoration projects were conducted in Australia, Europe, and USA, while total restoration costs were significantly (up to 30 times) cheaper in countries with developing economies. Community- or volunteer-based marine restoration projects usually have lower costs. Median survival of restored marine and coastal organisms, often assessed only within the first one to two years after restoration, was highest for saltmarshes (64.8%) and coral reefs (64.5%) and lowest for seagrass (38.0%). However, success rates reported in the scientific literature could be biased towards publishing successes rather than failures. The majority of restoration projects were short-lived and seldom reported monitoring costs. Restoration success depended primarily on the ecosystem, site selection, and techniques

  10. How is success or failure in river restoration projects evaluated? Feedback from French restoration projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Bertrand; Piégay, Hervé; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Vaudor, Lise

    2014-05-01

    Since the 1990s, French operational managers and scientists have been involved in the environmental restoration of rivers. The European Water Framework Directive (2000) highlights the need for feedback from restoration projects and for evidence-based evaluation of success. Based on 44 French pilot projects that included such an evaluation, the present study includes: 1) an introduction to restoration projects based on their general characteristics 2) a description of evaluation strategies and authorities in charge of their implementation, and 3) a focus on the evaluation of results and the links between these results and evaluation strategies. The results show that: 1) the quality of an evaluation strategy often remains too poor to understand well the link between a restoration project and ecological changes; 2) in many cases, the conclusions drawn are contradictory, making it difficult to determine the success or failure of a restoration project; and 3) the projects with the poorest evaluation strategies generally have the most positive conclusions about the effects of restoration. Recommendations are that evaluation strategies should be designed early in the project planning process and be based on clearly-defined objectives. PMID:24675435

  11. Restoration in Its Natural Context: How Ecological Momentary Assessment Can Advance Restoration Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Beute

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available More and more people use self-tracking technologies to track their psychological states, physiology, and behaviors to gain a better understanding of themselves or to achieve a certain goal. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA also offers an excellent opportunity for restorative environments research, which examines how our physical environment (especially nature can positively influence health and wellbeing. It enables investigating restorative health effects in everyday life, providing not only high ecological validity but also opportunities to study in more detail the dynamic processes playing out over time on recovery, thereby bridging the gap between laboratory (i.e., short-term effects and epidemiological (long-term effects research. We have identified four main areas in which self-tracking could help advance restoration research: (1 capturing a rich set of environment types and restorative characteristics; (2 distinguishing intra-individual from inter-individual effects; (3 bridging the gap between laboratory and epidemiological research; and (4 advancing theoretical insights by measuring a more broad range of effects in everyday life. This paper briefly introduces restorative environments research, then reviews the state of the art of self-tracking technologies and methodologies, discusses how these can be implemented to advance restoration research, and presents some examples of pioneering work in this area.

  12. [Restoring esthetics and function of posterior teeth using direct composite restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samet, N

    2001-10-01

    The growing demand for esthetic restorations in the posterior segments and the reports from all over the world concerning the possibility of a toxic effect of amalgam brought to the development of the composite resin materials. These allow excellent esthetic results without compromising the quality and long-term stability of the restorations. Out of the various types of posterior esthetic restorations, the most available are the direct ones. There are several substantial differences between fabricating amalgam or posterior composite restorations. The most significant difference concerns bonding to the tooth structures. The key to success in these restorations is the understanding of the reasons for failure, and the ways to prevent them. The failures are divided into two groups: biological failures--namely secondary caries, and mechanical failures--namely fracture and abrasion. The other key is understanding the materials used and their proper handling. This article illustrates in detail a step-by-step procedure the sequence of fabricating a posterior composite restoration in a posterior mandibular tooth, describing both techniques and materials used.

  13. Restoration of motion-blurred image based on border deformation detection: a traffic sign restoration model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiliang Zeng

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid development of motor vehicle Driver Assistance Systems (DAS, the safety problems associated with automatic driving have become a hot issue in Intelligent Transportation. The traffic sign is one of the most important tools used to reinforce traffic rules. However, traffic sign image degradation based on computer vision is unavoidable during the vehicle movement process. In order to quickly and accurately recognize traffic signs in motion-blurred images in DAS, a new image restoration algorithm based on border deformation detection in the spatial domain is proposed in this paper. The border of a traffic sign is extracted using color information, and then the width of the border is measured in all directions. According to the width measured and the corresponding direction, both the motion direction and scale of the image can be confirmed, and this information can be used to restore the motion-blurred image. Finally, a gray mean grads (GMG ratio is presented to evaluate the image restoration quality. Compared to the traditional restoration approach which is based on the blind deconvolution method and Lucy-Richardson method, our method can greatly restore motion blurred images and improve the correct recognition rate. Our experiments show that the proposed method is able to restore traffic sign information accurately and efficiently.

  14. Challenges of ecosystem restoration in Louisiana - availability of sediment and its management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, S. M.; Freeman, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Human intervention has impaired the Mississippi River's ability to deliver sediment to its delta wetlands, and as a consequence acute land loss in coastal Louisiana has resulted in an unprecedented ecocatastrophe. To mitigate this degradation, an unparalleled restoration effort is underway. For this effort to be successful and sustainable, various sediment input mechanisms must be integrated, including: building appropriate sediment-diversions; beneficially using the millions of cubic metres of sediment dredged annually from navigational channels; harvesting deposits of sand and suitable sediment from the river and offshore; and related sediment management activities that are compatible with other uses of the river. A comprehensive sediment management plan has been developed to identify and delineate potential sediment sources for restoration, and to provide a framework for managing sediment resources wisely, cost effectively, and in a systematic manner. The Louisiana Sediment Management Plan provides regional strategies for improved comprehensive management of Louisiana's limited sediment resources.

  15. Interspecific competition in tributaries: Prospectus for restoring Atlantic salmon in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James H.; Wedge, Leslie R.

    1999-01-01

    Historically, Lake Ontario may have supported the world's largest freshwater population of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). However, by the late 1800's, salmon were virtually extinct in the lake due to the damming of tributaries, overharvest, deforestation, and pollution. Of these factors, the building of dams on tributaries, which precluded access by the salmon to natal spawning streams, was probably the most detrimental. Since the extirpation of Atlantic salmon in the Lake Ontario watershed over a century ago, considerable change has occurred throughout the lake and tributary ecosystem. The changes within the ecosystem that may have the most profound effect on Atlantic salmon restoration include the presence of exotic species, including other salmonines, and reduced habitat quality, especially in tributaries. These changes must be taken into account when considering Atlantic salmon restoration.

  16. Use of Amphibian Communities as Indicators of Restoration Success

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) requires the use of ecological indicators to measure the success of restoration efforts. The Everglades...

  17. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge : Restoration Site Histories

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project contains a collection of restoration site histories for the cleanup restoration at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. This project...

  18. Selecting cost-effective areas for restoration of ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, M F; Hermoso, V; Perhans, K; Lovelock, C E; Herrera-Silveira, J A

    2015-04-01

    Selection of areas for restoration should be based on cost-effectiveness analysis to attain the maximum benefit with a limited budget and overcome the traditional ad hoc allocation of funds for restoration projects. Restoration projects need to be planned on the basis of ecological knowledge and economic and social constraints. We devised a novel approach for selecting cost-effective areas for restoration on the basis of biodiversity and potential provision of 3 ecosystem services: carbon storage, water depuration, and coastal protection. We used Marxan, a spatial prioritization tool, to balance the provision of ecosystem services against the cost of restoration. We tested this approach in a mangrove ecosystem in the Caribbean. Our approach efficiently selected restoration areas that at low cost were compatible with biodiversity targets and that maximized the provision of one or more ecosystem services. Choosing areas for restoration of mangroves on the basis carbon storage potential, largely guaranteed the restoration of biodiversity and other ecosystem services.

  19. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project : Phase 1 monitoring plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This SBSP Restoration Project Monitoring Plan provides methods to document the effect of restoration on important elements such as mercury uptake, and water and...

  20. A modeling framework for system restoration from cascading failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoran; Li, Daqing; Zio, Enrico; Kang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    System restoration from cascading failures is an integral part of the overall defense against catastrophic breakdown in networked critical infrastructures. From the outbreak of cascading failures to the system complete breakdown, actions can be taken to prevent failure propagation through the entire network. While most analysis efforts have been carried out before or after cascading failures, restoration during cascading failures has been rarely studied. In this paper, we present a modeling framework to investigate the effects of in-process restoration, which depends strongly on the timing and strength of the restoration actions. Furthermore, in the model we also consider additional disturbances to the system due to restoration actions themselves. We demonstrate that the effect of restoration is also influenced by the combination of system loading level and restoration disturbance. Our modeling framework will help to provide insights on practical restoration from cascading failures and guide improvements of reliability and resilience of actual network systems.

  1. Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the project of Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology, the followings were studied. 1. Development of decontamination and repair technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities 2. Development of dismantling technology 3. Development of environmental restoration technology. (author)

  2. Non-monetary benefit indicators for prioritizing wetlands restoration projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological restoration of wetlands can reestablish ecosystem services that provide valuable social and environmental benefits. Explicitly characterizing these benefits can help managers better allocate scarce resources among potential restoration projects. Economic valuation stud...

  3. [Progress and prospects on evaluation of ecological restoration: a review of the 5th World Conference on Ecological Restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing-Yi; Zhao, Wen-Wu

    2014-09-01

    The 5th World Conference on Ecological Restoration was held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA on October 6-11, 2013. About 1200 delegates from more than 50 countries attended the conference, and discussed the latest developments in different thematic areas of ecological restoration. Discussions on evaluation of ecological restoration were mainly from three aspects: The construction for evaluation indicator system of ecological restoration; the evaluation methods of ecological restoration; monitoring and dynamic evaluation of ecological restoration. The meeting stressed the importance of evaluation in the process of ecological restoration and concerned the challenges in evaluation of ecological restoration. The conference had the following enlightenments for China' s research on evaluation of ecological restoration: 1) Strengthening the construction of comprehensive evaluation indicators system and focusing on the multi-participation in the evaluation process. 2) Paying more attentions on scale effect and scale transformation in the evaluation process of ecological restoration. 3) Expanding the application of 3S technology in assessing the success of ecological restoration and promoting the dynamic monitoring of ecological restoration. 4) Carrying out international exchanges and cooperation actively, and promoting China's international influence in ecological restoration research.

  4. Building for animal production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to limit the radiation dose to persons working with animal husbandry in severe fallout situations, it was considered necessary to make an inventory of the Swedish livestock buildings as to number, location, use and size. These data as well as data on geometry of buildings, building material and thickness of the material in walls and roofs are given in the present work. On the basis of the mentioned data, calculations were made of the shielding factors of different types of livestock buildings. The collected data can also be used in preparedness planning in relation to housing facilities for livestock and location and size of animal production in situations of crises or war. The calculations show shielding factors for different types of livestock buildings of normal ground area within the range of 0.18-0.71. The higher value indicates a fairly poor shielding effect. The inventory and the calculations show that in those regions in Sweden where the main part of the livestock is managed, the types of buildings are, however, characterized by radiation shielding factors of 0.3-0.4. Calculation were also made of the radiation level inside the buildings following decontamination of roofs or of surrounding ground. Ground decontamination only, i.e., removal of the upper contaminated surface layer, will reduce the radiation level inside the building. For most buildings the radius of the surrounding area to be decontaminated has to be 15-30 times larger than the width of the building in order to achieve a 50 percentage reduction of the radiation level inside the building. For buildings of medium or large size and with thick walls the radiation contribution from the roof is greater than the radiation from the ground, and regardless of the size of the ground areas decontaminated the radiation level inside these buildings will only be reduced by 20-30%. 15 refs, 11 figs, 14 tabs

  5. Study on the Ecological Restoration Project of Dalian Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Choosing Dalian Lake as study area to implement ecological restoration project,the existing environmental problems in Dalian Lake were analyzed firstly,and then the project area in Dalian Lake was divided into wetland restoration and reconstruction area,forest wetland cultivation area and shallow wetland restoration and diversity conservation area,finally corresponding restoration measures were put forward according to various function areas,so as to improve the economic output of wetland and operability an...

  6. Image Restoration Technology Based on Discrete Neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Duoying

    2015-01-01

    With the development of computer science and technology, the development of artificial intelligence advances rapidly in the field of image restoration. Based on the MATLAB platform, this paper constructs a kind of image restoration technology of artificial intelligence based on the discrete neural network and feedforward network, and carries out simulation and contrast of the restoration process by the use of the bionic algorithm. Through the application of simulation restoration technology, ...

  7. Collarless metal ceramic restorations to obscure the umbrella effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afroz Shaista

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetics with porcelain fused to metal restoration in the anterior region can be adversely affected due to the inadequate teeth preparations and design of the prosthesis. We presented here a case report where esthetics was compromised due to darkening of the interdental papilla and marginal gingival and overcontoured restorations in relation to porcelain fused to metal restorations. Good esthetic results were obtained by using basic principles of tooth preparation and using collarless metal ceramic restorations.

  8. Research advance in forest restoration on the burned blanks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIXiu-zhen; ZHAOShan-lun; YINHai-wei; KONGFan-hua

    2003-01-01

    How to restore the destroyed forest after forest fire is a key question that man must face. This paper reviewed the research situation and history on the forest restoration burned blanks and summed up the research methods used into four scales: seed-bank scale, community scale, ecosystem scale and landscape scale. The new technologies such as GIS & Remote Sensing used to vegetation restoration were also summarized. The strategies and developing trend of vegetation restoration research on burned blanks were discussed.

  9. Restoring Charlemagne’s chapel: historical consciousness, material culture, and transforming images of Aachen in the 1840s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny H. Shaffer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The 1840s offer crystallizing images of Charlemagne’s chapel at Aachen that continue to resonate. In this decade, the Carolingian building, restored in words and images by scholars, made an auspicious debut within the coalescing discipline of art history. Simultaneously, the well-known restoration of the extant medieval chapel, which began in the 1850s, found sure footing as the chapel’s columnar screen, which Napoleon had removed, was reinserted. While these co-existing, interrelated restoration movements – focused on the chapel’s dilapidated state and notions of its importance as an imperial, Christian, and German work – diverged in methods and results after mid-century, they remain central to understanding both the chapel in scholarship and the extraordinary monument in the town centre of Aachen today.

  10. 12 CFR 325.104 - Capital restoration plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under section 38(e)(2) of the FDI Act. A bank that is required to submit a capital restoration plan as a... FDI Act by each company that controls the bank. (c) Review of capital restoration plans. Within 60... restoration plan that does not contain the guarantee required under section 38(e)(2) of the FDI Act, the...

  11. Power Grid Islands Service Restoration Based on Cloud Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao; HE Jinghan; YIN Hang; BO Zhiqian; B Kirby

    2011-01-01

    To reduce customer minutes loss (CML), service restoration is an increasingly important task for the power grid. The main objective in islands service restoration procedures is to restore as many loads as possible for healthy networks through the reconfiguration without violating the network operation constraints. The proposed method can be described by the following equation.

  12. 5 CFR 353.303 - Restoration rights of TAPER employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration rights of TAPER employees... Restoration rights of TAPER employees. An employee serving in the competitive service under a temporary... employee serving in a position classified above GS-15), is entitled to be restored to the position he...

  13. Reinventing the Wheel: Teaching Restoration Ecology without the Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speldewinde, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Restoration ecology is "the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged or destroyed." Restoration can range from returning the system to its "natural" state through to restoring some ecological functionality to a system. The University of Western Australia offers an undergraduate degree in Restoration…

  14. 21 CFR 878.3800 - External aesthetic restoration prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. 878... External aesthetic restoration prosthesis. (a) Identification. An external aesthetic restoration prosthesis... external prosthesis adhesive. The device is not intended to be implanted. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs

  16. Critic appraisal. Postoperative sensitivity with indirect restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, David; Walter, Ricardo; Swift, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative sensitivity is characterized by short and sharp pain, and often experienced after cementation of indirect restorations. Factors associated with the occurrence of post-cementation sensitivity include type of cement, removal of smear layer by acid-etching, aggressive tooth preparation, inadequate provisional restorations, and patient's age. Its prevention is based on either interfering with mechanoreceptor activity or occluding the dentinal tubules. Regarding the latter, application of dentin desensitizers may be effective for blocking the tubules and significantly reducing dentin permeability and consequently postoperative sensitivity. This Critical Appraisal will present available clinical data where traditional materials such as zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements (GIC) as well as self-adhesive resin-based cements were used. PMID:24761824

  17. Integrating TQM into environmental restoration projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, J.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Lenexa, KS (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Responsible and cost-effective waste management and environmental restoration are best achieved when the principles and procedures of Total Quality Management are made an integral part of the process. By describing three case histories, we explore and explain techniques for using TQM in environmental projects. Key aspects considered include: quality measurement systems; establishing and maintaining standard operating procedures; management and technical peer review; the use of Quality Improvement Teams; Roadmapping (a new procedure that the US Department of Energy is incorporating into environmental restoration programs); and the role of audit teams in document production. The three case histories covered include: The Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project on which Roadmapping and Quality Improvement Teams have led to significant changes in procedures; the EPA ARCS program on which adoption of project management Standard Operating Procedures enhanced cost and schedule control; the Jacobs Engineering TQM program that emphasizes performance measurement and management and project technical peer review.

  18. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  19. Image Denoising with Modified Wavelets Feature Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin D Ruikar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Image Denoising is the principle problem of image restoration and many scholars have been devoted to this area and proposed lots of methods. In this paper we propose modified feature restoration algorithm based on threshold and neighbor technique which gives better result for all types of noise. Because of some limits of conventional methods in image denoising, several drawbacks are seen in the conventional methods such as introduction of blur and edges degradation. Those can be removed by using the new technique which is based on the wavelet transforms. The shrinkage algorithms like Universal shrink, Visue shrink, bays shrink; have strengths in Gaussian noise removal. Our proposed method gives noise removal for all types of noise, in wavelet domain. It gives a better peak signal to noise ratio as compared to traditional methods.

  20. Electronic approaches to restoration of sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, G. A.; Palanker, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    Retinal prostheses are a promising means for restoring sight to patients blinded by the gradual atrophy of photoreceptors due to retinal degeneration. They are designed to reintroduce information into the visual system by electrically stimulating surviving neurons in the retina. This review outlines the concepts and technologies behind two major approaches to retinal prosthetics: epiretinal and subretinal. We describe how the visual system responds to electrical stimulation. We highlight major differences between direct encoding of the retinal output with epiretinal stimulation, and network-mediated response with subretinal stimulation. We summarize results of pre-clinical evaluation of prosthetic visual functions in- and ex vivo, as well as the outcomes of current clinical trials of various retinal implants. We also briefly review alternative, non-electronic, approaches to restoration of sight to the blind, and conclude by suggesting some perspectives for future advancement in the field.

  1. Enamel hypoplasia: challenges of esthetic restorative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Araújo, Élito; Bernardon, Jussara Karina; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2016-01-01

    Enamel defects, such as white or yellow-brown spots, usually cause problems that are more esthetic than functional. Enamel hypoplasia may be the result of hereditary, systemic, or local factors. Dental trauma is a local etiologic factor. It is relatively common in the primary dentition and can cause defects on the surface of permanent successors. Treatment for such defects can differ, depending on the depth of the spots. For deeper white-spot lesions, a composite resin restoration may be necessary. This is an excellent mode of treatment, due to both its low cost and its conservation of healthy tooth structure. The objective of this case report is to describe composite resin restoration of a maxillary central incisor affected by enamel hypoplasia.

  2. Enamel hypoplasia: challenges of esthetic restorative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Araújo, Élito; Bernardon, Jussara Karina; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2016-01-01

    Enamel defects, such as white or yellow-brown spots, usually cause problems that are more esthetic than functional. Enamel hypoplasia may be the result of hereditary, systemic, or local factors. Dental trauma is a local etiologic factor. It is relatively common in the primary dentition and can cause defects on the surface of permanent successors. Treatment for such defects can differ, depending on the depth of the spots. For deeper white-spot lesions, a composite resin restoration may be necessary. This is an excellent mode of treatment, due to both its low cost and its conservation of healthy tooth structure. The objective of this case report is to describe composite resin restoration of a maxillary central incisor affected by enamel hypoplasia. PMID:27599287

  3. Invisalign and porecelain: the contemporary restorative powerhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Trent W

    2009-12-01

    For years, restorative practices and traditional orthodontics stood largely separate from one another save for the most extreme instances. Orthodontics has evolved over the years, and a new breed of orthodontic technology appeared in the late 1990s. A clear alternative to traditional orthodontics emerged, and Invisalign (Align Technology, Inc., Santa Clara, CA) was born. Historically, orthodontics and restorative work, within a practice, rarely coincided on the same patient, but the advances within both disciplines have afforded a new and innovative way of considering conservative dentistry. No longer does there have to be aggressive preparation to attain a desired result. With patient understanding, a negligible amount of patience, and the desire to achieve the very best dentistry has to offer, the potential is limitless.

  4. Sustainable Building Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2009-01-01

    Energy-savings in the existing building stock have becomes a main goal in national and international policies. Often focus is on building-renovations, whereas the potential of sustainable building operation to a large extent has been neglected. Nevertheless, international research as well...... as practical experiences from Danish housing estates indicates that there are large potentials for energy savings by focusing on the operation of the buildings. We suggest that in order to achieve sustainability in the existing housing, renovation and operations should be seen as integrated parts...... building operation as an 'umbrella' for various ways of reducing flows of energy, water and waste in the daily operation of the buildings, for instance by regular monitoring the consumption, by using 'green accounting', by applying policies for sustainability etc. The paper is based on case studies...

  5. Creating a catchment perspective for river restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Benda

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tributary-confluence dynamics can be obscured, and information to develop appropriate and cost effective river restoration strategies can be unavailable. This is the case in the Pas River catchment in northern Spain (650 km2, in which land use and development have obscured the natural fluvial landscape in many parts of the basin. To address this issue we coupled general principles of hydro-geomorphic processes with computer tools to characterize the fluvial landscape. Using a 5-m digital elevation model, valley-floor surfaces were mapped according to elevation above the channel and proximity to key geomorphic processes. The predicted fluvial landscape is patchily distributed according to topography, valley morphology, river network structure, and fan and terrace landforms. The vast majority of the fluvial landscape in the main segments of the Pas River catchment is presently masked by human infrastructure, with only 15% not impacted by river control structures and development. The reconstructed fluvial landscape provides a catchment scale context to support restoration planning, in which areas of potential ecological productivity and diversity could be targeted for in-channel, floodplain and riparian restoration projects.

  6. Setting targets in strategies for river restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroli, B.; De Blust, Geert; Van Looy, Kris; Rooij, S. van

    2006-01-01

    Since about 90% of the natural floodplain area of rivers in Europe has been reclaimed and now lacks river dynamics, nature rehabilitation along rivers is of crucial importance for the restoration of their natural function. Flood protection, self-purification of surface water, groundwater recharge, species protection and migration are all involved in this process. It is now generally recognised that rivers form natural arteries in Europe but are also of economic importance and are recognisable...

  7. Creating a catchment perspective for river restoration

    OpenAIRE

    L. Benda; MILLER, D; J. Barquín

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges in river restoration is to identify the natural fluvial landscape in catchments with a long history of river control. Intensive land use on valley floors often predates the earliest remote sensing: levees, dikes, dams, and other structures alter valley-floor morphology, river channels and flow regimes. Consequently, morphological patterns indicative of the fluvial landscape including multiple channels, extensive floodplains, wetlands, and fluvial-riparian and tribu...

  8. ATRAUMATIC RESTORATIVE TREATMENT – A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangameshwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABASTRACT: Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART was origina lly developed in field settings in African subcontinent (Tanzania by Univ ersity of Dar el Salaam in 1980s; subsequently World Health Organization (WHO promote s the use of ART especially with children. As the name indicates Atraumatic Restorat ive Treatment (ART is basically a minimally invasive procedure that involves removing of softened carious dentine using hand instruments and then restoring the cavity with an a dhesive material usually the Glass Ionomer Cement [1]. ART is based on the maximum preservation of sound tooth tissue and the minimum feeling of discomfort and pain, since there is use o f hand instruments it perhaps also reduces pain due to reduced vibrations as occurs while use o f rotary dental instruments. This technique is gaining popularity and acceptability especially in c hildren, elderly and with those individuals who have fear and anxiety about dental treatment [2 , 3]. ART requires use of very minimal portable dental equipment and was designed to use in field/community settings. It was developed for use in less developed countries of the world, where art was seen as an affordable option for patents who can’t afford to pay for more s ophisticated treatments, but with improved technique and use of improved restorative materials its use has considerable expanded to developed countries as well [4-6]. This article give s a brief overview of ART and its uses in the present scenario. KEY WORDS: ART = Atraumatic Restorative Technique, GIC = Glas s Ionomer Cement

  9. Compatibility of repair mortars in restoration projects

    OpenAIRE

    Schueremans, Luc; Van Balen, Koenraad; Cizer, Özlem; Janssens, Elke; Serré, Gerty; Elsen, Jan; Brosens, Kris; Ignoul, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Mortars used for restoration must be highly compatible with historic materials in terms of physical, chemical and mechanical properties in order to assure the durability of masonry on the long term. Compatibility criteria are defined based on the original mortar characteristics but the efficiency and the performance of the repair mortar after application on masonry are not generally evaluated. From this perspective, historic mortars and repair mortars from 3 historic masonry structures were a...

  10. Discoloration of Provisional Restorations after Oral Rinses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Bora; Ayaz, Elif Aydogan; Ulusoy, Kıvanç Utku; Altintas, Subutay Han; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Bagis, Nilsun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Oral rinses are widely used to promote periodontal health with provisional restorations during the interim period. The aim of this study was to compare the discoloration of provisional restoration materials with different oral rinses. Material and Methods: A total of 140 disc-shaped specimens (shade A2) (10 mm x 2 mm) were prepared from one PMMA-based (TemDent Classic®) and three different bis-acrylic-based (Protemp II®, Luxatemp® and Fill-In®) provisional restoration materials (n=7). The color values (L*, a*, and b*) of each specimen were measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter, and the color changes (∆E) were calculated according to the CIE L*a*b* system. The specimens were immersed in each of the 4 oral rinses (alcohol-containing mouthwash, chlorhexidine, benzydamine HCl, benzydamine HCl and chlorhexidine) twice a day for 2 minutes. After 2 minutes of immersion in the oral rinses, the specimens were immersed in artificial saliva. The specimens were exposed to the oral rinses and the artificial saliva for 3 weeks. Two-way ANOVA, the Bonferroni test and the paired sample t-test were used for statistical analyses (p0.05). The lowest color change was observed in PMMA-based Temdent in all oral rinses (pbis-acryl composites after immersion in saliva or the mixture of benzydamine HCl and chlorhexidine and the alcohol-containing mouthwash for 3 weeks (p>0.05). After immersion in chlorhexidine, the color change values of Protemp II and Fill-in showed significant differences (p=0.018). Protemp II also showed less discoloration than the other bis-acryl composites, and this color change was statistically significant (p materials for provisional restorations appears to be more effective. PMID:24046524

  11. Sustainable Behaviors and Perceived Psychological Restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Corral-Verdugo, Victor; García,Fernanda I.; Tapia-Fonllem,Cesar; Fraijo-Sing, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at exploring one potential psychological benefit of sustainable behaviors: the perceived psychological restoration (PR) associated to engaging in pro-environmental activities at both the physical and social levels. PR involves the recovery of lost psychological resources (attention, positive mood states, psychological wellbeing) mostly caused by attentional fatigue and stress, while sustainable behavior constitutes a set of actions aimed at the protection of natural and s...

  12. The adhesive revolution of restorative dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, IE; Newsome, PRH

    1996-01-01

    In many countries, the incidence of dental decay in the young is decreasing, and Hong Kong is no exception. However, there remains in the region, a number of restorative dental problems of some significance. These are tooth discolouration, fracture, and root surface decay. This article discusses these problems and the way in which their treatment is increasingly being undertaken by means of minimalԸ?intervention adhesive techniques. The formulation of dental adhesive systems that are effectiv...

  13. Graded Structures for All-ceramic Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y.; Chai, H.; Lawn, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    One failure mode of all-ceramic restorations is radial cracking at the cementation surface, from occlusally induced flexure of the stiffer ceramic layer(s) on the softer dentin underlayer. We hypothesize that such failure may be substantially mitigated by an appropriate grading of elastic modulus through the ceramic thickness. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into zirconia plates, with resulting diminished modulus in the outer surfaces. The plates were then...

  14. Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

  15. Techniques and devices to restore cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Serruya, Mijail Demian; Kahana, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Executive planning, the ability to direct and sustain attention, language and several types of memory may be compromised by conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, cancer, autism, cerebral palsy and Alzheimer’s disease. No medical devices are currently available to help restore these cognitive functions. Recent findings about the neurophysiology of these conditions in humans coupled with progress in engineering devices to treat refractory neurological conditions imply that the time...

  16. Restorative Justice in Indonesia: Traditional Value

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Achjani Zulfa

    2011-01-01

    Restorative Justice” is a model approach which emerged in the 1960s in an effort to solve criminal cases. Unlike the approach used in conventional criminal justice system, this approach focuses on the direct participation of perpetrators, victims and society in the settlement process. This theory of the approach is still debated, but the view is in fact growing and it exercises a lot of influence on legal policies and practices in several countries. The UN through its basic principles consid...

  17. CERAMIC RESTORATION REPAIR: REPORT OF TWO CASES

    OpenAIRE

    Luís Henrique Araújo Raposo; Natália Antunes Neiva; Gisele Rodrigues da Silva; Hugo Lemes Carlo; Adérito Soares da Mota; Célio Jesus do Prado; Carlos José Soares

    2009-01-01

    The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of patients with multiple missing teeth can be performed with several techniques and materials. Ceramic restorations provide reliable masticatory function and good esthetics. However, fracture can occur in some cases due to their brittle behavior. In some cases, the replacement of an extensive prosthesis is a problem due to the high treatment cost. In this paper, two cases are presented, in which fractures occurred in extensive metal-ceramic fixed pa...

  18. Breast restoration decision making: enhancing the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaby, L L

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the breast restoration decision-making patterns used by women who opted to have their breast cancer treated by mastectomy. Sixty-four women wearing external breast prostheses and 31 women with breast reconstructions were interviewed. Modified versions of Simon's notion of "bounded rationality" and Janis and Mann's conflict model provided the conceptual scaffolding for the study. Five breast restoration decision-making patterns emerged from the analysis of the interview data: (a) Enlightened (actively seeks information, considers positive and negative aspects, and demonstrates deliberation on the alternatives), (b) Contented (passively accepts minimum information on alternatives because of a preference toward a particular type), (c) Sideliner (uncritically adopts any alternative that is easy and simple to implement), (d) Shifter (gives over the decision to others), and (e) Panic-stricken (can make no rational decision on alternatives). In the prosthesis group, the major pattern used was the Sideliner, and in the reconstruction group it was the Contented. None of the participants used the Enlightened pattern. The data indicated that there was no evidence of active information-seeking behavior or deliberation on the alternatives as part of the women's decision-making process. The findings suggest a need for a registered nurse oncology specialist to be accessible to women during the period when decisions regarding breast restoration are made. This professional has the knowledge to interact effectively with these women and serve as their advocate during the decision-making process. Implications for professional practice and a model for competent breast restoration decision making are presented.

  19. Renovation of the facades of buildings 11, 12, 13 and 14

    CERN Multimedia

    TS/FM group

    2005-01-01

    Restoration work on the facades of Buildings 11, 12, 13 and 14 will begin on 6 June 2005 and is scheduled to be completed by the end of September. This work consists in replacing the windows of Building 14 and of the eastern facade of Building 13, and in repairing the windows of Buildings 11 and 12 and of the northern facade of Building 13. The concrete parts which have suffered carbonation damage will also be repaired. During this period, parking around these buildings will be restricted for safety reasons and for the requirements of the work site. All people working in these buildings or in their direct vicinity are kindly requested to comply with the signs in place. Thank you in advance for your understanding. Group TS/FM

  20. Renovation of the facades of buildings 11, 12, 13 and 14

    CERN Document Server

    TS/FM Group

    2005-01-01

    Restoration work on the facades of Buildings 11, 12, 13 and 14 will begin on 6 June 2005 and is scheduled to be completed by the end of September. This work consists in replacing the windows of Building 14 and of the eastern facade of Building 13, and in repairing the windows of Buildings 11 and 12 and of the northern facade of Building 13. The concrete parts which have suffered carbonation damage will also be repaired. During this period, parking around these buildings will be restricted for safety reasons and for the requirements of the work site. All people working in these buildings or in their direct vicinity are kindly requested to comply with the signs in place. Thank you in advance for your understanding. TS/FM Group

  1. Never say Never. About the Restoration of Henry van de Velde’s Booktower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia van Peteghem

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the central library within the university of Ghent (27.000 students is fourfold: it is the centre of the library’s network and its reorganisation, trying to get the current number (> 300 of libraries down. It is the digital library in all its aspects, it is the repository library for cultural heritage and “passive” collections and it offers a working place in its wonderful book tower of Henry van de Velde. The story of the book tower starts in the 1930s when Henry van de Velde was asked to build a University Library and offices for the department of Art history. His tower-idea was not exactly what the chief librarian had in mind, so he had to (network hard to get the building he wanted. It was finished on the verge of the second world war. The concrete building has a height of 64 meter, has 24 floors and a “belvedere” and houses almost 3 million books in closed racks. The university did not neglect the tower during all these years, but was not always aware of the historical value and often choose the cheapest way for building matters. A couple of years ago a private person bought the Van de Velde archive of the book tower (which was in private hands, got fascinated with the building, got angry because of lack of care and networked (maybe as hard as Van de Velde once did to get it built to get it restored. The board of directors of the university said yes to the restoration (estimated on 41 million Euro in September 2005.

  2. Capacity Building in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Adam McCarty

    2001-01-01

    This report is the outcome of a study commissioned to examine the capacity building needs in Vietnam, and is a supplementary document to the Asian Development Bank's Country Operational Strategy for Vietnam. Vietnam's needs in terms of capacity building are particularly important given that is it a transitional economy and also one with little institutional experience in dealing with the international donor community. This paper examines the international awareness of capacity building and ca...

  3. Development of Ecological Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Keizikas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents research on ecological buildings and their influence on the constructional sphere. The aim of the paper is to reveal the essence of ecological architecture showing substantial progress and its potential to stimulate architectural and technological growth. The article also describes relations between the ideas of ecological buildings and the ‘passive house’ concepts and aspects of development as well as describes the possibilities of improving building sustainability and energy efficiency. Article in Lithuanian

  4. The need for complementary hydraulic analysis in post-restoration monitoring of river restoration projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Endreny

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available River restoration design methods are incrementally improved by studying and learning from monitoring data in previous projects. In this paper, we report post-restoration monitoring data for a Natural Channel Design (NCD restoration project along 1600 m (10 channel wavelengths of the Batavia Kill in the Catskill Mountains, NY, implemented in 2001 and 2002. The NCD project used a reference-reach to determine channel form, empirical relations between the project site and reference site bankfull dimensions to size channel geometry, and hydraulic and sediment computations to test channel capacity and sediment stability. In addition 12 cross-vanes and 48 j-hook vanes used in NCD for river training were installed to protect against bank erosion and maintain scour pools for fish habitat. Changes in pool depths were monitored with surveys from 2002–2004, and then after the channel-altering April 2005 flood. Aggradation in pools was attributed to cross-vane arms not concentrating flow in the center of the channel, which subsequently caused flow splitting and 4 partial point bar avulsions during the 2005 flood. Hydrodynamic simulation at the 18 m3s−1 bankfull flow suggested avulsions occurred where vanes allowed erosive bank scour to initiate the avulsion cut, and once the flow was split, the diminished in-channel flow caused more aggradation in the pools. In this project post-restoration monitoring had detected aggradation and considered it a problem. The lesson for the larger river restoration community is monitoring protocol should include complementary hydraulic and sediment analysis to comprehend potential consequences and develop preventative maintenance. River restoration and monitoring teams should be trained in robust hydraulic and sediment analytical methods that help them extend project restoration goals.

  5. Fracture Resistance of Pulpotomized Primary Molar Restored with Extensive Class II Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mazhari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate fracture resistance of pulpoto-mized primary molar teeth restored with extensive multisurface amalgam restorations.Materials and Methods: Eighty extracted carious human primary molar teeth were se-lected forpresent study. Teeth were divided in to eight groups of ten. Mesio- or disto-occlusal and Mesio-occluso-distal cavities with different cavity wall thickness (1.5 or 2.5mm were prepared in both first and second primary molar teeth. After restoring teeth with amalgam, all specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Then samples were thermocycled for 1000 cycles from 5°C to 55°C. The specimens then were subjected to a compressive load in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min-1. ANOVA and t-test were used for statistical analysis.Results: Mean fracture resistance of first and second molar teeth were 975.5 N (SD=368.8 and 1049.2 N (SD=540.1 respectively. In the first molar group, fracture resis-tance of two-surface cavities was significantly more than three-surface cavities (P<0.001, however this difference was not statistically significant in the second molar group. In both first and second molar group, fracture resistance incavities with 2.5 mm wall thickness, was significantly more than the group with 1.5 mm wall thickness.Conclusion: The mean fracture resistance in pulpotomized primary molar restored with amalgam restorations was higher than reported maximum bite force in primary teeth even in extensive multi-surface restorations. Therefore, the teeth with large proximal carious lesions in schoolchildren could be restored with amalgam.

  6. Russian: United States Environmental Restoration Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Russian - United States Environmental Restoration Workshop, held in Washington, D.C., and Richland, Washington, from April 5 through 18, 1993, was the first extended collaborative information exchange between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Russian scientists at the site level. In addition to the Russian scientists, workshop participants included scientists and staff from DOE, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the US Environmental Training Institute (USETI), universities, and the private sector. The first week (April 5 through 10) of the workshop took place in Washington, D.C., where the Russian and US participants were presented with a US perspective on environmental restoration and remediation issues from representatives in DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The second week (April 11 through 18) occurred in Richland, Washington, where the participants were presented with site-specific environmental restoration and remediation issues related to Hanford Site cleanup. This report is a compilation of the presentations, discussions, and experiences shared during the second week of the workshop in Richland, Washington.

  7. Restorative effects of virtual nature settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtchanov, Deltcho; Barton, Kevin R; Ellard, Colin

    2010-10-01

    Previous research regarding the potential benefits of exposing individuals to surrogate nature (photographs and videos) has found that such immersion results in restorative effects such as increased positive affect, decreased negative affect, and decreased stress. In the current experiment, we examined whether immersion in a virtual computer-generated nature setting could produce restorative effects. Twenty-two participants were equally divided between two conditions, while controlling for gender. In each condition, participants performed a stress-induction task, and were then immersed in virtual reality (VR) for 10 minutes. The control condition featured a slide show in VR, and the nature experimental condition featured an active exploration of a virtual forest. Participants in the nature condition were found to exhibit increased positive affect and decreased stress after immersion in VR when compared to those in the control condition. The results suggest that immersion in virtual nature settings has similar beneficial effects as exposure to surrogate nature. These results also suggest that VR can be used as a tool to study and understand restorative effects.

  8. Factors for formulating strategies for environmental restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication focusses on factors which are important for formulating a strategy for environmental restoration. In parallel to this effort, the IAEA has conducted activities in related areas which have been reported in companion reports dealing with (1) the characterization of radioactively contaminated sites for remediation purposes and (2) available technology for cleanup and remediation of radioactively contaminated sites. Additionally, follow-up activities will focus on two other areas, viz. planning and management options for cleanup of contaminated groundwater, and post-restoration monitoring of decommissioned sites. In a separate initiative the IAEA has developed preliminary guidance on radiological criteria for determining when cleanup action is needed and for deciding on when areas have been cleaned up to a sufficient extent. It is also concerned with radioactive contamination of soils, groundwaters, structures and biota which may have the potential for harm to people. It is intended that it will serve as an important source of information and data on the key factors to be considered in the formulation of an environmental restoration strategy

  9. Advanced Protection & Service Restoration for FREEDM Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Urvir

    A smart electric power distribution system (FREEDM system) that incorporates DERs (Distributed Energy Resources), SSTs (Solid State Transformers - that can limit the fault current to two times of the rated current) & RSC (Reliable & Secure Communication) capabilities has been studied in this work in order to develop its appropriate protection & service restoration techniques. First, a solution is proposed that can make conventional protective devices be able to provide effective protection for FREEDM systems. Results show that although this scheme can provide required protection but it can be quite slow. Using the FREEDM system's communication capabilities, a communication assisted Overcurrent (O/C) protection scheme is proposed & results show that by using communication (blocking signals) very fast operating times are achieved thereby, mitigating the problem of conventional O/C scheme. Using the FREEDM System's DGI (Distributed Grid Intelligence) capability, an automated FLISR (Fault Location, Isolation & Service Restoration) scheme is proposed that is based on the concept of 'software agents' & uses lesser data (than conventional centralized approaches). Test results illustrated that this scheme is able to provide a global optimal system reconfiguration for service restoration.

  10. Strategic planning for power system restorations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van Hententyck, Pascal [BROWN UNIV.; Coffrin, Carleton [BROWN UNIV.

    2010-10-12

    This paper considers the power system restoration planning problem (PSRPP) for disaster recovery, a fundamental problem faced by all populated areas. PSRPPs are complex stochastic optimization problems that combine resource allocation, warehouse location, and vehicle routing considerations. Furthermore, electrical power systems are complex systems whose behavior can only be determined by physics simulations. Moreover, these problems must be solved under tight runtime constraints to be practical in real-world disaster situations. This work is three fold: (1) it formalizes the specification of PSRPPs; (2) introduces a simple optimization-simulation hybridization necessary for solving PSRPPs; and (3) presents a complete restoration algorithm that utilizes the strengths of mixed integer programming, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search. This paper studied a novel problem in the field of humanitarian logistics, the Power System Restoration Problem (PSRPP). The PSRPP models the strategic planning process for post disaster power system recovery. The paper proposed a multi-stage stochastic hybrid optimization algorithm that yields high quality solutions to real-world benchmarks provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The algorithm uses a variety of technologies, including MIP, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search, to exploit the structure of each individual optimization subproblem. The experimental results on hurricane disaster benchmarks indicate that the algorithm is practical from a computational standpoint and produce significant improvements over existing relief delivery procedures.

  11. PDS Lunar Data Node - Apollo Data Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Alfred B.; Williams, D. R.; Guinness, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Data Node (LDN) was formed under the auspices of the Planetary Data System (PDS) Geosciences (GEO) Node to restore selected Apollo data sets to a modern format. The Apollo lunar missions returned a wealth of information, including long-term (1969-1977) surface data collected by autonomous ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package) stations emplaced by the crews of the Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 missions, surface point measurements, and orbital data. Much of the ALSEP and other surface and orbital data housed at NSSDC are in forms which are not readily usable, such as microfilm, hardcopy, and magnetic tapes with older, seldom-used formats. The LDN is prioritizing these data based on their scientific and engineering value for hazard and resource assessment and the level of effort required for archiving. Data from three experiments, X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Cold Cathode Ion Gage (CCIG), and Solar Wind Spectrometer (SWS), comprising eight unique data sets, have been restored and are in peer review process. The CCIG data have completed peer review and have been delivered to PDS GEO Node. We will report on progress made and plans for future data restorations.

  12. Kissimmee River restoration: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, P J; Toth, L A; Koebel, J W; Strayer, P K

    2002-01-01

    Channelization of the Kissimmee River transformed a 167 km meandering river into a 9 metre deep, 75 metre wide, 90 km drainage canal (C-38) that is compartmentalized with levees and water control structures into a series of five stagnant pools. Channelization dramatically changed water level and flow characteristics, drained 21,000 hectares of floodplain wetlands and severely impacted fish and wildlife populations. A $500 million dollar restoration project will restore the ecological integrity of the river-floodplain system by reconstructing the natural river channel and reestablishing hydrologic processes. Sixty expectations have been established to quantify the ecosystem's recovery. The first phase of reconstruction was completed in February 2001 and included movement of 9.2 million cubic metres of earth to backfill 12 km of C-38, the explosive demolition of one water control structure, construction of two sections (2.4 km) of new river channel, and reestablishment of 24 contiguous km of river. Numerous social, political, and technical challenges have been encountered during the project's evolution. Recommendations are provided for future restoration projects. PMID:12171366

  13. Novel Approach for Image Restoration and Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabab Abdul Rasool

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a new technique in image restoration and transmission process, where the image size is halved after transforming it to the frequency domain by applying discrete Fourier transform. The conjugate symmetry and mirror property of transformed image spectrums could be utilized by deleting the redundant spectrums from second half image after tracking and keeping the conjugated locations. Those redundant locations are kept using one- to- one relationship. Depending on the halving procedure, the new image size will be divided by two. A reconstructed procedure is created to redistribute the deleted spectrum with their associated locations. The reconstructed image is ready now for restoring again by applying the inverse discrete Fourier transform back to the spatial domain. The restored image is qualified using Peak Signal to Noise Ratio measurement and the result was very satisfied. The advantages of this technique appear in the storage cost, where the memory locations will be reduced to the half. Also, from communication side, this work approved that the image transmission time needs to transmit the halved image is half of the original one.

  14. Evaluating the Reasons of Amalgam Restoration Replacement in Esthetic and Restorative Department of Babol Dental School in 2013-14

    OpenAIRE

    F Abolghasemzade; H. Alaghehmand; H Khadem; R Judi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dental amalgam is regarded as a popular restorative material. The purpose of this study is to investigate the reasons of replacing amalgam restorations in patients referring to Babol dental school within 2013-2014. Methods: In this analytic-descriptive study, age, sex, type of occlusion DMF, existence of parafunction, as well as type of tooth, restoration class and reason of amalgam restoration replacement were recorded in patients referred to the Babol dental school during 2...

  15. Restoring Alternate Bar Sequences in Large Rivers: Flow, Sediment, and Elbow Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trush, W. J.; McBain, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Large river management must rely on crucial premises that the river channel is a product of its watershed's hydrology and the space within which it moves, and that native plant and animal species have evolved with, and still depend on, the natural annual hydrograph. While interesting academically, these premises may appear to offer very limited utility as management tools, given few large rivers in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere have escaped major hydrologic and geomorphic change. The opposite, however, is likely true. Without reconstructing and incorporating an historical perspective, large river restoration will fail. Healthy river ecosystems can be achieved without completely restoring the natural unregulated hydrology, sediment supply regime, and original migration corridor. Usually there is little choice. An historical perspective identifies crucial threshold streamflow, sediment, and corridor processes driving a healthy river ecosystem. Alternating point bar sequences are the building blocks of alluvial rivers that also function as the physical template for creating abundant, high quality habitat for fish, amphibians, and riparian plant. While alternating bars can be created with bulldozers, their evolution, longevity, and quality will endure only if key geomorphic and biological threshold processes are provided by naturally variable annual hydrographs. An historical perspective therefore must identify how unregulated annual hydrographs once created and fostered dynamic alternating bar sequences. Restoration practitioners must then devise ways to restore these processes while purposefully cheating Mother Nature of some of her flow, sediment, and corridor width (elbow room). Two commonly prescribed high flow releases, flushing flows and the bankfull discharge, address several geomorphic requirements yet neither, or the two combined, can restore and maintain alternating bar sequences. Higher flood peak magnitudes from winter floods and spring snowmelt

  16. Building valve amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Building Valve Amplifiers is a unique hands-on guide for anyone working with tube audio equipment--as an electronics hobbyist, audiophile or audio engineer. This 2nd Edition builds on the success of the first with technology and technique revisions throughout and, significantly, a major new self-build project, worked through step-by-step, which puts into practice the principles and techniques introduced throughout the book. Particular attention has been paid to answering questions commonly asked by newcomers to the world of the valve, whether audio enthusiasts tackling their first build or

  17. Healthy Buildings '88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Healthy Buildings '88 Conference focuses on the technical solutions and functional requirements contributing to Healthy Buildings for people to live and work in. The main object of the Conference is to give architects, consultants, real-estate owners and manufacturers of building materials recommendations on choice of materials and choice of systems and on how to combine materials and systems. The program includes overview lectures, plenary symposia with invited speakers, workshops, poster presentations and an exhibition of scientific, educational and technical material. One part of the conference is devoted to the problem of radon in residential buildings

  18. Sick building syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Sick building syndrome describes a number of mostly unspesific complaints of some occupants of the building. The exact pathophysiological mechanism remains elusive. It is a multi factorial event which may include physical, chemical, biological as well as psycological factors. In many cases it is due to insufficient maintenance of the HVAC (heating, ventilation, air conditioning system in the building. Sign and symptoms can be uncomfortable and even disabling, which may include mucus membrane irritation, neurotoxic symptoms, asthma like symptoms, skin complaints, gastrointestinal symptoms and other related symptoms. There are various investigation methods to diagnose sick building syndrome, and on site assessment of the building is extremely useful. Prevention through a proactive air quality monitoring program is far more desirable than dealing with an actual sick building. Indoor air and the sick building symdrome serves as a paradigm of modern occupational and environmental medicine. (Med J Indones 2002; 11:124-31Keywords: indoor air pollution, sick building syndrome, building related illness

  19. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was Pcomposite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not affect fracture resistance of the teeth. Key words:Amalgam, composite, fracture resistance, restoration. PMID:27398176

  20. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was Pamalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not affect fracture resistance of the teeth. Key words:Amalgam, composite, fracture resistance, restoration. PMID:27398176

  1. Know to restore: an integrated model

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiana Bartolomei

    2012-01-01

    Renovation and conservation interventions on historical buildings are generally accomplished based on wide and heterogeneous documents. The possibility of using this information is important for the design of appropriate strategies of intervention. The use of a Multimedia Information Archive (A.I.M) allows in-depth knowledge of the buildings preservation status and can generate new data for further processing through dedicated procedures leading the user to highlight significant conceptual li...

  2. A restorative approach for class II resin composite restorations: a two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M J M C

    2015-01-01

    This clinical report describes a restorative technique used to replace two Class II resin composite restorations on the upper premolars. A sectional matrix band was used in conjunction with an elastic ring (Composi-Tight) to obtain tight proximal contact. A nanofilled resin composite (Filtek Supreme Ultra) was incrementally applied using oblique layers to reduce the C-factor, each layer being no more than 2 mm thick, and then light cured for 20 seconds with a light-emitting diode lamp (EliparFreeLight 2 LED Curing Light) with a power density of 660 mW/cm(2). A centripetal technique was used to restore the lost tooth structure from the periphery toward the center of the cavity in order to achieve a better contour and anatomy with less excess, thereby minimizing the use of rotary instruments during the finishing procedures. Finally, the resin composite restorations were finished and polished, and a surface sealer (Perma Seal) was applied to fill small gaps and defects that may have been present on the surfaces and margins of the restorations after the finishing and polishing procedures.

  3. Thatcher Bay, Washington, Nearshore Restoration Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breems, Joel; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Grossman, Eric E.; Elliott, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The San Juan Archipelago, located at the confluence of the Puget Sound, the Straits of Juan de Fuca in Washington State, and the Straits of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada, provides essential nearshore habitat for diverse salmonid, forage fish, and bird populations. With 408 miles of coastline, the San Juan Islands provide a significant portion of the available nearshore habitat for the greater Puget Sound and are an essential part of the regional efforts to restore Puget Sound (Puget Sound Shared Strategy 2005). The nearshore areas of the San Juan Islands provide a critical link between the terrestrial and marine environments. For this reason the focus on restoration and conservation of nearshore habitat in the San Juan Islands is of paramount importance. Wood-waste was a common by-product of historical lumber-milling operations. To date, relatively little attention has been given to the impact of historical lumber-milling operations in the San Juan Archipelago. Thatcher Bay, on Blakely Island, located near the east edge of the archipelago, is presented here as a case study on the restoration potential for a wood-waste contaminated nearshore area. Case study components include (1) a brief discussion of the history of milling operations. (2) an estimate of the location and amount of the current distribution of wood-waste at the site, (3) a preliminary examination of the impacts of wood-waste on benthic flora and fauna at the site, and (4) the presentation of several restoration alternatives for the site. The history of milling activity in Thatcher Bay began in 1879 with the construction of a mill in the southeastern part of the bay. Milling activity continued for more than 60 years, until the mill closed in 1942. Currently, the primary evidence of the historical milling operations is the presence of approximately 5,000 yd3 of wood-waste contaminated sediments. The distribution and thickness of residual wood-waste at the site was determined by using sediment

  4. Clean Water Action Plan: Restoring and protecting America`s waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    On October 18, 1997, the 25th anniversary of the enactment of the Clean Water Act, the Vice President called for a renewed effort to restore and protect water quality. The Vice President asked that the Secretary of Agriculture and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working with other affected agencies, develop a Clean Water Action Plan that builds on clean water successes and addresses three major goals: (1) enhanced protection from public health threats posed by water pollution; (2) more effective control of polluted runoff; and (3) promotion of water quality protection on a watershed basis.

  5. River restoration and habitat improvements in the sub-arctic river Bognelva – effects on anadromous fish

    OpenAIRE

    Bråthen Schedel, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Alterations of watercourses in the form of channelization, dam building and digging of dikes has been ongoing for centuries. This has eliminated much of the vital natural variation found in rivers that is necessary for optimal fish habitat, and thus, a major cause of declines of the fish population in many watercourses. In recent times, these effects have been recognized and efforts to restore these altered rivers have been initiated. I examined the river Bognelva located in northern Norway t...

  6. Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Results of Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Salinity and Hydrologic Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, Mark W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Willis Jonathan M.; DesRoches, Dennis J.

    2001-02-21

    This study builds upon earlier research conducted by Southeastern Louisiana University concerning the efficacy of utilizing processed drill cuttings as an alternative substrate source for wetland rehabilitation (wetland creation and restoration). Previous research has indicated that processed drill cuttings exhibit a low degree of contaminant migration from the process drill cuttings to interstitial water and low toxicity, as tested by seven-day mysid shrimp chronic toxicity trials.

  7. The restoring of bulb turbine-groups of the Rance tidal power plant; La renovation des groupes bulbes de l`usine maremotrice de la Rance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naudy, A. [Hydraulique Services, 68 - Mulhouse (France)

    1997-12-31

    After 30 years of functioning, it has been necessary to carry out a general and preventive overhauling of bulb turbine-groups of the Rance power plant. The restoring concerns the turbines, the alternators, the automatisms, the auxiliary systems, the transformers and the dam sluices. A dismantling and storage building will be built near the plant to do these works. (J.S.)

  8. Healing the Earth: Through Programs in Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, the Tribal Colleges Are Working Together to Solve the Nation's Most Pressing Environmental Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Carlos

    1992-01-01

    Describes "Promoting Environmental Restoration/Management for American Indians" (PERMA), a joint effort of all Indian controlled colleges to create certificate programs in environmental and waste management. PERMA includes a summer bridge program to build science/math skills; a core academic transfer curriculum; a vocationally oriented two-year…

  9. Shifting paradigms in coastal restoration: Six decades' lessons from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zezheng; Cui, Baoshan; He, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    With accelerating degradation of coastal environment worldwide, restoration has been elevated as a global strategy to enhance the functioning and social services of coastal ecosystems. While many developing countries suffer from intense coastal degradation, current understanding of the science and practice of their coastal restorations is extremely limited. Based on analysis of >1000 restoration projects, we provide the first synthesis of China's coastal restorations. We show that China's coastal restoration has recently entered a rapidly developing stage, with an increasing number of restoration projects carried out in multiple types of coastal ecosystems. While long-term, national-level restorations enforced by the government appear promising for some coastal ecosystems, especially mangroves, restorations of many other coastal ecosystems, such as salt marshes, seagrasses and coral reefs, have been much less implemented, likely due to under-appreciation of their ecosystem services values. Furthermore, the planning, techniques, research/assessment, and participation models underlying current restorations remain largely inadequate for restoration to effectively halt rapid coastal degradation. To promote success, we propose a framework where paradigms in current restorations from planning to implementation and assessment are transformed in multiple ways. Our study has broad implications for coastal environmental management policies and practices, and should inform sustainable development of coupled human-ocean systems in many countries. PMID:27220097

  10. Investigation of Combined Indirect Evaporative Ducted Cooling Equipment Efficiency in Historical Building in Temperate Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Brahmanis Artūrs; Pelīte Uldis

    2014-01-01

    The present study is devoted to the evaluation of efficiency of the combined indirect evaporative – compressor water cooling system under various outdoor air humidity conditions of temperate climate. This is a building- based study, which represents the results of the analytical research, conducted in the recently restored 19th century historical building, The Art Museum Riga Bourse. Indirect adiabatic water chiller is equipped with a compressor, and supplies cooled fl...

  11. Designing regional pattern for ecosystem restoration: A case study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Guoqiang

    2006-01-01

    Designing regional pattern is challenging for ecosystem restoration both in theory and in practice. The present study proposed a new approach to design regional pattern for ecosystem restoration with a case in the arid valley of Upper Minjiang River, SW China. The procedures are: (1) Determine the regional pattern of main environmental factors based on the relationships between the important environmental factors and the main geographical factors generated from DEM data. (2) Overlay the maps of the main environmental factors. (3) Generate a lookup table according to the species selection rule we proposed to link the candidate restoration species to the main environmental factors.(4) Determine the regional pattern of ecosystem restoration by positioning the restoration species in the map of environmental factors according to the lookup table. The regional restoration pattern designed in this way would be applicable not only to restoring a region, but also to predicting the future landscape change.

  12. Restoration of the former site of the institute for nuclear physics research in Amsterdam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1946 the Institute for Nuclear Physics Research (IKO) started operations on the site of an old gas factory made available by the City of Amsterdam. In 1997 IKO became part of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics and High-Energy Physics (NIKHEF). In 1996 NIKHEF left the laboratory site after 50 years of occupation. The City of Amsterdam, being the owner of the area, decided that in view of the plants for development of the area, the buildings should be demolished and the area made suitable for public use. The site was used as a nuclear research laboratory since 1946, housing a synchrocyclotron from 1947 to 1977 and a linear electron accelerator from 1968 to 1977. Several nuclear chemistry laboratories were in operation from 1946 to 1984. During the 50-year period the original buildings were modified and enlarged, and new buildings were added. Before the responsibility for the area could be transferred to the City and the operating licence could be adjusted to the new situation the Dutch authorities required that a site restoration project be executed. The site restoration project was planned in stages, each of which was supervised and evaluated by the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment, and the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment. Special interest groups such as Greenpeace, LAKA Foundation (a non-profit organisation acting as a consultant for the neighbouring population), the City of Amsterdam and the local City-Boards were following the process closely. The project encompassed the following stages: Set-up of a plan for the clearance of the building structures, including the criteria for release, in consultation with the ministries involved. Radiation protection was an integral part of the plan. Investigation of possible radioactive contamination of the evacuated buildings. Six undocumented contaminations and one documented contamination were identified. Supervised removal of contaminated building structures by a

  13. Buildings for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian Regional Inst. for School Building Research, Colombo (Sri Lanka).

    The quarterly review for October and December 1967 of the Asian Regional Institute for School Building Research at Colombo, Ceylon--(1) reviews two main activities of a cost and space utilization study and a report of the workshop of the directors and UNESCO experts on regional educational buildings, (2) describes a method for determining teacher…

  14. Building a Better Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navah, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Kids love to build robots, letting their imaginations run wild with thoughts of what they might look like and what they could be programmed to do. Yet when students use cereal boxes and found objects to make robots, often the projects look too similar and tend to fall apart. This alternative allows students to "build" robots in a different way,…

  15. Building: Food for thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraïm Rodríguez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The sculpture presented by Efraïm Rodríguez for the conference is titled “pequeño arquitecto” (The Little Architect, a figure which represents a child building a tower with pieces of classical children’s block building toys; the child itself is built out of the same sculpted materials.

  16. Building Numbers from Primes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  17. Electromagnetically shielded building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs

  18. School Building Defect Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahli M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In providing a conducive learning environment for the student, the school building must be in good condition. This paper is evaluating the existing condition of primary school building in Sarawak, Malaysia. It focuses on building defects pattern for school building. The primary data collection is from the school building condition survey with involvement of 24 primary schools. The schools have been selected using simple random sampling and stratified sampling (of school age as the variable of selection. The reporting method is based on Condition Survey Protocol (CSP 1 Matrix. Data analysis covers descriptive and inferential statistics. The analysis carried out found that the overall 4,725 defects have been identified. The building defect pattern is mainly on Ground Level of 3,176 defects, the highest number of defects components found on walls (798. 16.2% defects are cracks from 11 common defects and most of all the highest score of defects based on age of the building were the building in the range of 11 to 20 years.

  19. Integrated Building Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    In the first half of the 20th century, HVAC systems and artificial lighting were developed to meet indoor comfort needs. Before the introduction of mechanical systems, climate - not building style or appearance - was the major determinant of building form. Comfort was achieved through passive means...

  20. Heat loss from Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Kenneth; Næraa, Rikke

    1997-01-01

    Determination of heat loss coefficients for buildings in Denmark. The coefficient are determined for 15 building groups and 3 year intervals. They are based on the BBR-registre and assumptions of U-values(W/K*m2)and computed in a simple spreed sheet model.The results are used in the REVEILLE...... project for calculations in the SESAM model....

  1. Body-building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    正In recent years, more and more people spare no pains to join in the body-building group. People begin to take part in various fitness clubs or fitness centers in their spare time. This shows body-building has become an indispensable part of many people’s life.

  2. Building a Data Warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Elliott

    2002-01-01

    Describes how to build a data warehouse, using the Schools Interoperability Framework (www.sifinfo.org), that supports data-driven decision making and complies with the Freedom of Information Act. Provides several suggestions for building and maintaining a data warehouse. (PKP)

  3. LARGE BUILDING RADON MANUAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes information on how bilding systems -- especially the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system -- inclurence radon entry into large buildings and can be used to mitigate radon problems. It addresses the fundamentals of large building HVAC syst...

  4. Dancing building prevents collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, R.

    2007-01-01

    In future, anybody caught inside a building during an earthquake need no longer fear the roof collapsing on them. Thanks to the use of composite materials, all the building will do is dance along, riding the waves of the earthquake. At least, according to Professor Ir. Adriaan Beukers of the Aerospa

  5. Site restoration: Restoring Lost Lake, a Carolina bay at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC, is part of the U.S. Department of Energy complex for production of materials for U.S. Government defense activities. From 1958 to 1985 mixed wastes (wastes which are both hazardous and radioactive) generated by aluminum forming/metal finishing processes at SRS were discharged to a settling basin with overflow directed to an adjacent Carolina bay known as Lost Lake. Use of the basin system was discontinued in 1985, and physical closure in situ began in 1988. The project's Closure Plan required that Lost Lake be restored to a 'natural wetland system'. An on-site interdisciplinary team designed the restoration project to demonstrate the effectiveness of various levels of active remediation of Carolina bays as well as restoring Lost Lake. Closure was completed in August 1991, and the site will be maintained for at least 30 years. (author)

  6. [Multi-source data acquisition technology in the restoration of the complete denture restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Weiwei; Wang, Yong; Pan, Shaoxia; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-02-01

    In complete-denture restoration of edentulous jaws, the following information is needed: functional impression of edentulous jaws, jaw relationship and facial fullness, parameters of individual mandibular movement, etc. Traditional clinical methods in obtaining these data, which depend greatly on practitioners' clinical experience and skills, are subjective, complicated and low efficient. With the development of the digital restoration of edentulous jaws, a variety of equipment for three-dimensional scan have been applied in acquiring three-dimensional source data concerning the needed information, which greatly simplifies the process of data obtaining, reduces the dependence on operational skills and subjective experience, improves efficiency and efficacy of diagnosis and treatment, and standardizes the restoration process. PMID:26926199

  7. Energy Performance of Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    emissions in the coming years. By approving the Energy Performance in Buildings Directive the European Union has taken a strong leadership role in promoting energy efficiency in buildings in Europe, and the Directive will be the most powerful instrument developed to date for the building sector in Europe...... programme (ECCP) was established in June 2000 to help identify the most environmentally cost-effective measures enabling the EU to meet its target under the Kyoto Protocol, namely an 8% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels by 2012. Energy use in buildings accounts for almost half of all CO......-effective energy saving potential of between 22% and 40% of the energy consumption in the sector by the year 2020. The paper presents the European approach to improve sustainability in the building sector, which has a very high potential for considerable reduction of energy consumption and green house gas...

  8. CERN's newest building

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Vernède

    2011-01-01

    With a growing number of users looking for offices, the shortage of space has become acute, particularly for physicists. Building 42, inaugurated on Friday 11 February, offers almost 300 new work-spaces and a particularly pleasant working environment.   Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, the Swiss State Secretary for Education and Research (left), Rolf Heuer , CERN Director-General (centre), and Mark Muller, President of the Government of the Republic and Canton of Geneva and Head of the Department of Construction and Information Technology (right) at the opening of Building 42 on 11 February, 2011.   Construction work for the new Building 42 began in January 2009, thanks to support from the Swiss foundation FIPOI (Fondation des immeubles pour les organisations internationales). After two years of work, the building, an extension of Building 40, is ready to accommodate physicists from around the world who have come to work on the LHC. "We had more than 25 external contractors working...

  9. Hypophysectomyinduced regression of female rat lacrimal glands. Partial restoration/maintenance by dihydrotestosterone and prolactin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Kirsten Birgitte; Azzarolo, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Ophthalmology, hypophysectomi, rats regression, lacrimal galnds, restoration, dihydrotestosterone, prolactin......Ophthalmology, hypophysectomi, rats regression, lacrimal galnds, restoration, dihydrotestosterone, prolactin...

  10. Evaluation of periodontal status adjacent to interproximal surfaces restored with composite resin, in comparison with non-restored interproximal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvia Christina Barros de Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the periodontal status of interproximal surfaces restored with composite resin, in comparison with non-restored interproximal surfaces. Methods: In 65 patients, we analyzed 145 restored surfaces and 145 non-restored surfaces. Results: Most of the restored surfaces (54.3% showed radiographic alterations, which was shown to be higher among restorations with clinically detected proximal excess (56.8% x 52.8%; with lack of restorative material (64.5% x 51.4%; in restorations with proximal overhang (67.7% x 44.4%; in teeth with gingival inflammation?/bleeding (55.1% x 40.0% and in teeth with probing depth exceeding 3 mm (64.3% x 52.9%. However, there were no significant associations for these variables. Of the non-restored surfaces, 24.4% showed radiographic alterations, however there were no significant associations. Conclusion: The results showed a statistical significance for radiographic alterations in restored and non-restored surfaces.

  11. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H3PO4) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  12. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Jie [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang Jiecheng; Liu Xiaochen [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ma Jian [Hospital of Stomatology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Liu Changsheng [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Fang Jing, E-mail: biomater2006@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei Shicheng, E-mail: nic7505@263.net [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  13. Clinical Investigation of a New Bulk Fill Composite Resin in the Restoration of Posterior Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Dental Restoration Failure of Marginal Integrity; Dental Caries; Unrepairable Overhanging of Dental Restorative Materials; Poor Aesthetics of Existing Restoration; Secondary Dental Caries Associated With Failed or Defective Dental Restorations; Fractured Dental Restorative Materials Without Loss of Materials; Fracture of Dental Restorative Materials With Loss of Material

  14. Restoring Soil Quality to Mitigate Soil Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattan Lal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Feeding the world population, 7.3 billion in 2015 and projected to increase to 9.5 billion by 2050, necessitates an increase in agricultural production of ~70% between 2005 and 2050. Soil degradation, characterized by decline in quality and decrease in ecosystem goods and services, is a major constraint to achieving the required increase in agricultural production. Soil is a non-renewable resource on human time scales with its vulnerability to degradation depending on complex interactions between processes, factors and causes occurring at a range of spatial and temporal scales. Among the major soil degradation processes are accelerated erosion, depletion of the soil organic carbon (SOC pool and loss in biodiversity, loss of soil fertility and elemental imbalance, acidification and salinization. Soil degradation trends can be reversed by conversion to a restorative land use and adoption of recommended management practices. The strategy is to minimize soil erosion, create positive SOC and N budgets, enhance activity and species diversity of soil biota (micro, meso, and macro, and improve structural stability and pore geometry. Improving soil quality (i.e., increasing SOC pool, improving soil structure, enhancing soil fertility can reduce risks of soil degradation (physical, chemical, biological and ecological while improving the environment. Increasing the SOC pool to above the critical level (10 to 15 g/kg is essential to set-in-motion the restorative trends. Site-specific techniques of restoring soil quality include conservation agriculture, integrated nutrient management, continuous vegetative cover such as residue mulch and cover cropping, and controlled grazing at appropriate stocking rates. The strategy is to produce “more from less” by reducing losses and increasing soil, water, and nutrient use efficiency.

  15. Shape Restoration by Active Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Arbuckle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Shape restoration is defined as the problem of constructing a desired, or goal, solid shape Sg by growing an initial solid Si, which is a subset of the goal but is otherwise unknown. This definition attempts to capture abstractly a situation that often arises in the physical world when a solid object loses its desired shape due to wear and tear, corrosion or other phenomena. For example, if the top of the femur becomes distorted, the hip joint no longer functions properly and may have to be replaced surgically. Growing it in place back to its original shape would be an attractive alternative to replacement. This paper presents a solution to the shape restoration problem by using autonomous assembly agents (robots that self-assemble to fill the volume between Sg and Si. If the robots have very small dimension (micro or nano, the desired shape is approximated with high accuracy. The assembly agents initially execute a random walk. When two robots meet, they may exchange a small number of messages. The robot behavior is controlled by a finite state machine with a small number of states. Communication contact models chemical communication, which is likely to be the medium of choice for robots at the nanoscale, while small state and small messages are limitations that also are expected of nanorobots. Simulations presented here show that swarms of such robots organize themselves to achieve shape restoration by using distributed algorithms. This is one more example of an interesting geometric problem that can be solved by the Active Self-Assembly paradigm introduced in previous papers by the authors.

  16. Identifying sites for elk restoration in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesco, R.L.; Van Manen, F.T.; Clark, J.D.; Cartwright, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    We used spatial data to identify potential areas for elk (Cervus elaphus) restoration in Arkansas. To assess habitat, we used locations of 239 elk groups collected from helicopter surveys in the Buffalo National River area of northwestern Arkansas, USA, from 1992 to 2002. We calculated the Mahalanobis distance (D2) statistic based on the relationship between those elk-group locations and a suite of 9 landscape variables to evaluate winter habitat in Arkansas. We tested model performance in the Buffalo National River area by comparing the D2 values of pixels representing areas with and without elk pellets along 19 fixed-width transects surveyed in March 2002. Pixels with elk scat had lower D2 values than pixels in which we found no pellets (logistic regression: Wald χ2 = 24.37, P cover, gently sloping ridge tops and valleys, low human population density, and low road densities. To assess the potential for elk–human conflicts in Arkansas, we used the analytical hierarchy process to rank the importance of 8 criteria based on expert opinion from biologists involved in elk management. The biologists ranked availability of forage on public lands as having the strongest influence on the potential for elk–human conflict (33%), followed by human population growth rate (22%) and the amount of private land in row crops (18%). We then applied those rankings in a weighted linear summation to map the relative potential for elk–human conflict. Finally, we used white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) densities to identify areas where success of elk restoration may be hampered due to meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) transmission. By combining results of the 3 spatial data layers (i.e., habitat model, elk–human conflict model, deer density), our model indicated that restoration sites located in west-central and north-central Arkansas were most favorable for reintroduction.

  17. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH IN DISASTER RESTORATION ACTIVITY AFTER SOME MAJOR EARTHQUAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyosawa, Yasuo; Itoh, Kazuya; Kikkawa, Naotaka

    Occupational safety and health in disaster restoration activity following the Great Hanshin Earthquake (1995), Niigata Chuetsu Earthquake (2004), Niigata Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (2007) Great East Japan Earthquake (2011) were analyzed and characterized in order to raise awareness on the risks and hazards in such work. In this scenario, the predominant type of accident is a "fall" which increases mainly due to the fact that labourers are working to repair houses and buildings. On the other hand, landslides were prevalent in the Niigata Chuetsu Earthquake, resulting in more accidents occurring during geotechnical works rather than in buildings construction works. In the abnormal conditions that characterize recovery activities, when safety and health measures have a tendency to be neglected, it is important to reinstate adequate measures as soon as possible by carrying out the usial risk assessments.

  18. Knowledge formalization of intelligent building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žáček, Martin

    2016-06-01

    This article aim is understanding the basic knowledge about an intelligent building. The notion of the intelligent building can be called any building equipped with computer and communication technology, which can automatically respond to internal or external stimuli. The result of the intelligent building is an automated and foreseeing of activities that enable to reduce operating costs and increase comfort. The best way to use the intelligent building is for a low-energy building, a passive building, or for building with high savings. The output of this article is the formalization of basic knowledge of the intelligent building by RDF graph.

  19. Energy management systems in buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lush, D.M.

    1979-07-01

    An investigation is made of the range of possibilities available from three types of systems (automatic control devices, building envelope, and the occupants) in buildings. The following subjects are discussed: general (buildings, design and personnel); new buildings (envelope, designers, energy and load calculations, plant design, general design parameters); existing buildings (conservation measures, general energy management, air conditioned buildings, industrial buildings); man and motivation (general, energy management and documentation, maintenance, motivation); automatic energy management systems (thermostatic controls, optimized plant start up, air conditioned and industrial buildings, building automatic systems). (MCW)

  20. Not Competent, Not Restorable, and Not Committable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Kirk W

    2016-06-01

    I comment on the problem discussed by Simpson of criminal defendants who are found not competent, not restorable, and subject to involuntary civil commitment. He presents the 2010 case of Donn Thomas Spinosa in Oregon as an exemplar of serial nonrestorability. The facts of the Spinosa case are illustrative of a prosecutor who is frustrated by not being able to bring a criminal prosecution against a person who is not competent to stand trial and a state hospital that is proposing discharge of the person because he can no longer be civilly committed. I review and apply the longstanding constitutional principles of Jackson v. Indiana to the Spinosa case. PMID:27236172

  1. Microeconomic analysis of military aircraft bearing restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding program was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed. The annual cost savings to U.S. Army aviation is approximately $950,000.00 for three engines and three transmissions. The capital value over an indefinite life is approximately ten million dollars. The annual cost savings for U.S. Air Force engines is approximately $313,000.00 with a capital value of approximately 3.1 million dollars. The program will result in the government obtaining bearings at lower costs at equivalent reliability. The bearing industry can recover lost profits during a period of reduced demand and higher costs.

  2. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe

  3. Flouride release from various restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, O; Uçtaşli, M; Can, H; Türköz, E; Can, M

    1997-09-01

    Fluoride release from six light-activated restorative materials, including two resinmodified glass-ionomers, two composites, and two compomers, was evaluated and compared with one conventional acid-based glass-ionomer cement. The amount and rate of release varied among the tested materials. Both resin-modified glass-ionomers and the conventional acid-base glass-ionomer cements released more fluoride then the composites and compomers (p < 0.05). Additionally, composite materials released less fluoride than compomer materials (p < 0.05). Release of fluoride by the tested materials showed a significant decrease after all the tested time intervals.

  4. Minimally invasive restorative dentistry: a biomimetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malterud, Mark I

    2006-08-01

    When providing dental treatment for a given patient, the practitioner should use a minimally invasive technique that conserves sound tooth structure as a clinical imperative. Biomimetics is a tenet that guides the author's practice and is generally described as the mimicking of natural life. This can be accomplished in many cases using contemporary composite resins and adhesive dental procedures. Both provide clinical benefits and support the biomimetic philosophy for treatment. This article illustrates a minimally invasive approach for the restoration of carious cervical defects created by poor hygiene exacerbated by the presence of orthodontic brackets.

  5. Environmental restoration value engineering guidance document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides guidance on Value Engineering (VE). VE is an organized team effort led by a person trained in the methodology to analyze the functions of projects, systems, equipment, facilities, services, and processes for achieving the essential functions at the lowest life cycle cost while maintaining required performance, reliability, availability, quality, and safety. VE has proven to be a superior tool to improve up-front project planning, cut costs, and create a better value for each dollar spent. This document forms the basis for the Environmental Restoration VE Program, describes the VE process, and provides recommendations on when it can be most useful on ER projects

  6. Planning aquatic ecosystem restoration monitoring programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thom, R.M.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted as part of the Evaluation of Environmental Investments Research Program (EEIRP). The EEIRP is sponsored by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify relevant approaches and features for environmental investment measures to be applied throughout the project life; (2) develop methods to access the effectiveness of the approach or feature for providing the intended environmental output; (3) develop and provide guidance for formulating environmental projects; and (4) provide guidance for formulating and identifying relevant cost components of alternate restoration plans.

  7. Cleaning up Hanford: The environmental restoration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the environmental restoration program on the Hanford Reservation responsible for dealing with contaminated soil and groundwater and with inactive nuclear facilities. Many signs of significant progress can be seen, including waste area identification along the Columbia River, volume estimates refined and excavation started. Numerous facilities in the 100 area are being decommissioned, and a demonstration of long-term interim safe storage for one of the surplus reactors is in progress. A comprehensive groundwater treatment strategy is in place. 8 figs

  8. Time is no healer: increasing restoration age does not lead to improved benthic invertebrate communities in restored river reaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leps, Moritz; Sundermann, Andrea; Tonkin, Jonathan D; Lorenz, Armin W; Haase, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Evidence for successful restoration of riverine communities is scarce, particularly for benthic invertebrates. Among the multitude of reasons discussed so far for the lack of observed effects is too short of a time span between implementation and monitoring. Yet, studies that explicitly focus on the importance of restoration age are rare. We present a comprehensive study based on 44 river restoration projects in Germany, focusing on standardized benthic invertebrate sampling. A broad gradient ranging from 1 to 25years in restoration age was available. In contrast to clear improvements in habitat heterogeneity, benthic community responses to restoration were inconsistent when compared to control sections. Taxon richness increased in response to restoration, but abundance, diversity and various assessment metrics did not respond clearly. Restoration age was a poor predictor of community composition and community change, as no significant linear responses could be detected using 34 metrics. Moreover, only 5 out of 34 tested metrics showed non-linear shifts at restoration ages of 2 to 3years. This might be interpreted as an indication of a post-restoration disturbance followed by a re-establishment of pre-restoration conditions. BIO-ENV analysis and fourth-corner modeling underlined the low importance of restoration age, but revealed high importance of catchment-scale characteristics (e.g., ecoregion, catchment size and land use) in controlling community composition and community change. Overall, a lack of time for community development did not appear to be the ultimate reason for impaired benthic invertebrate communities. Instead, catchment-scale characteristics override the effectiveness of restoration. To enhance the ecological success of future river restoration projects, we recommend improving water quality conditions and catchment-scale processes (e.g., connectivity and hydrodynamics) in addition to restoring local habitat structure. PMID:27046138

  9. ECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS OF RESTORATED TRADITIONAL SETTLEMENTS: A CASE STUDY IN KALEİÇİ (ANTALYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer MUTLU DANACI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Historical fabrics of the cities reflect the cultural backgrounds of the societies. For centuries in historical urban settlements formed via experiences the most appropriate structure type to the climatic conditions and the region, has been produced. With the industrial revolution, to be able to have more comfortable places in the settlement, fossil fuel based energy consumption began to be generally preferred. As a result, the ecological balance in the nature has begun to deteriorate in an irrevocable way. To find a solution for the situation, in ecological architecture and planning issues various ecological structure criteria is defined. Accordingly, buildings appropriate to the local and climatic characteristics are meant to be constructed besides the use of renewable energy sources and minimizing energy consumption. When historical city fabrics are analyzed in the ecological context, one can observe that these include sustainable structure characteristics. In order for the buildings to be renewed and restored in accordance with their original structures, great care should be given in terms of financial resource, manpower, material and control.Antalya Kaleiçi which was chosen as the working area was analyzed in terms of settlement structure, building form and structure cover, place organization, material choice, renewable, clean energy usage and water saving and usage and it was determined to have ecological, sustainable settlement characteristics. Traditional architecture samples which have been built by the people after trial and error for centuries and with the solutions appropriate to the climatic and environmental conditions are highly appropriate to the ecological design criteria as structures and settlements peculiar to the district. However the mistakes in the restoration of the buildings used for touristic aims after 1970s, adding of new necessary functions to the buildings, not taking care of the original structure and materials

  10. Building on Tradition: The Art of Adobe and the Revival of Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Amanda; Swan, Susan

    2001-01-01

    A New Mexico foundation helps primarily Hispanic and American Indian communities restore adobe churches by supplying technical assistance and matching grants. Community leadership of the projects enhances volunteer commitment. The projects build community cohesiveness and pride, maintain local culture, foster intergenerational relations, teach…

  11. Restoring complex folded geometries in 3D using paleomagnetic vectors; a new tool to validate underground reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Ramón, Mª; Pueyo, Emilio L.; Briz, José Luis; Caumon, Guillaume; Fernández, Óscar; Ciria, José Carlos; Pocovi, Andrés; Ros, Luis H.

    2013-04-01

    Three-dimensional reconstructions of the underground involve the integration of discrete and heterogeneous datasets and have significant socio- economic implications. The problem arises when there are limited data to build 3D models or when deformation processes are complex; these reasons inspired the development of restoration methods to validate subsurface reconstructions. The restoration is based on the application of simple geometric (or mechanic) laws that help reduce the uncertainty and increase geomodel accuracy. Apart from mechanical approaches, geometric methods are based on the initial assumption of global conservation of volume during deformation in addition to the paleo-horizontality of the stratigraphic horizons in the undeformed stage. The problem is that the bedding plane cannot be used as a three-dimensional reference system, because a single vector defines it and additional constraints are required. This is particularly important when dealing with complex structures, such as non-cylindrical structures and the superposition of non-coaxial geometries. In this context, paleomagnetism (known in both the deformed and undeformed stages) can contribute to building a more complete reference system and to reducing the uncertainty in restoration processes. The use of paleomagnetism in restoration tools was suggested in the early 1990's and only a few quantitative map-view applications have been developed since then. In this contribution, we introduce the two first surface restoration methods that use paleomagnetic vectors as a primary reference. The first one is a simple geometric approach based on the piecewise restoration of a triangulated surface into which paleomagnetic variables can be easily incorporated. It is valid for complexly folded structures. The surface is modelled by a mesh and the method starts from a pin-element. Triangles are laid flat and then fitted together to minimize distances between common vertices and paleomagnetic error. However

  12. Building Software with Gradle

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Studer, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will give an overview of the key concepts and main features of Gradle, the innovative build system that has become the de-facto standard in the enterprise. We will cover task declaration and task graph execution, incremental builds, multi-project builds, dependency management, applying plugins, extracting reusable build logic, bootstrapping a build, and using the Gradle daemon. By the end of this talk, you will have a good understanding of what makes Gradle so powerful yet easy to use. You will also understand why companies like Pivotal, LinkedIn, Google, and other giants with complex builds count on Gradle. About the speakers Etienne is leading the Tooling Team at Gradleware. He has been working as a developer, architect, project manager, and CTO over the past 15 years. He has spent most of his time building software products from the ground up and successfully shipping them to happy customers. He had ...

  13. Building Sustainability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Koukkari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Although social, economic, and cultural indicators are of substantial importance to the concept of sustainable building, this concept is usually related to environmental characteristics. Any building level assessment method is complex and involves contradictory aspects. Moreover, emphasizing qualitative criteria only increases confusion. R&D and standardization are thus concentrated to transparency and usability of the environmental methods. Other directions of research aim at performance-based design and methods to take regional and cultural aspects into account. In this paper, the perspectives of the sustainability assessment of a whole building are presented, based on a state of the art, feasibility study on performance analysis and the development of an extended life-cycle assessment for buildings. Using various tools, and based on the case studies of building sustainability assessment, environmental indicators were often shown to be of lesser importance than the other, soft ones. The first steps in the development of a building sustainability assessment method for Portuguese residential buildings will be presented and discussed in the end.

  14. Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenDor, Todd; Lester, T William; Livengood, Avery; Davis, Adam; Yonavjak, Logan

    2015-01-01

    Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1) in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales) annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business) linkages and increased household spending.

  15. Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd BenDor

    Full Text Available Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1 in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business linkages and increased household spending.

  16. Macroinvertebrate community assembly in pools created during peatland restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee E; Ramchunder, Sorain J; Beadle, Jeannie M; Holden, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Many degraded ecosystems are subject to restoration attempts, providing new opportunities to unravel the processes of ecological community assembly. Restoration of previously drained northern peatlands, primarily to promote peat and carbon accumulation, has created hundreds of thousands of new open water pools. We assessed the potential benefits of this wetland restoration for aquatic biodiversity, and how communities reassemble, by comparing pool ecosystems in regions of the UK Pennines on intact (never drained) versus restored (blocked drainage-ditches) peatland. We also evaluated the conceptual idea that comparing reference ecosystems in terms of their compositional similarity to null assemblages (and thus the relative importance of stochastic versus deterministic assembly) can guide evaluations of restoration success better than analyses of community composition or diversity. Community composition data highlighted some differences in the macroinvertebrate composition of restored pools compared to undisturbed peatland pools, which could be used to suggest that alternative end-points to restoration were influenced by stochastic processes. However, widely used diversity metrics indicated no differences between undisturbed and restored pools. Novel evaluations of restoration using null models confirmed the similarity of deterministic assembly processes from the national species pool across all pools. Stochastic elements were important drivers of between-pool differences at the regional-scale but the scale of these effects was also similar across most of the pools studied. The amalgamation of assembly theory into ecosystem restoration monitoring allows us to conclude with more certainty that restoration has been successful from an ecological perspective in these systems. Evaluation of these UK findings compared to those from peatlands across Europe and North America further suggests that restoring peatland pools delivers significant benefits for aquatic fauna by

  17. Macroinvertebrate community assembly in pools created during peatland restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee E; Ramchunder, Sorain J; Beadle, Jeannie M; Holden, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Many degraded ecosystems are subject to restoration attempts, providing new opportunities to unravel the processes of ecological community assembly. Restoration of previously drained northern peatlands, primarily to promote peat and carbon accumulation, has created hundreds of thousands of new open water pools. We assessed the potential benefits of this wetland restoration for aquatic biodiversity, and how communities reassemble, by comparing pool ecosystems in regions of the UK Pennines on intact (never drained) versus restored (blocked drainage-ditches) peatland. We also evaluated the conceptual idea that comparing reference ecosystems in terms of their compositional similarity to null assemblages (and thus the relative importance of stochastic versus deterministic assembly) can guide evaluations of restoration success better than analyses of community composition or diversity. Community composition data highlighted some differences in the macroinvertebrate composition of restored pools compared to undisturbed peatland pools, which could be used to suggest that alternative end-points to restoration were influenced by stochastic processes. However, widely used diversity metrics indicated no differences between undisturbed and restored pools. Novel evaluations of restoration using null models confirmed the similarity of deterministic assembly processes from the national species pool across all pools. Stochastic elements were important drivers of between-pool differences at the regional-scale but the scale of these effects was also similar across most of the pools studied. The amalgamation of assembly theory into ecosystem restoration monitoring allows us to conclude with more certainty that restoration has been successful from an ecological perspective in these systems. Evaluation of these UK findings compared to those from peatlands across Europe and North America further suggests that restoring peatland pools delivers significant benefits for aquatic fauna by

  18. Chemical Characterization of Lime-Based Binders in Historic Buildings of Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilovica, I.; Gulbe, L.; Vitina, I.; Igaune-Blumberga, S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the chemical composition of stone materials of several local historic buildings with a purpose of elaboration of restoration strategy, including the choice of restoration materials. Most of the examined mortars are lime- based hydraulic mortars, characteristic of the architecture of 19th/20th century. Pure aerial lime binders show reduced compatibility with historic materials, that is why lime binders with pozzolan additive (cement) are an appropriate choice for restoration. In order to examine the changes of hydraulicity (i.e. the property of binders to harden when exposed to water) of perspective restoration binders, a series of blended lime-cement mixtures were synthesized with growing content of cement (up to 10% by weight). A significant relationship between cement content and hydraulic properties has been shown.

  19. Buildings Interoperability Landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephan, Eric G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Weimin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Corbin, Charles D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Widergren, Steven E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Through its Building Technologies Office (BTO), the United States Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE-EERE) is sponsoring an effort to advance interoperability for the integration of intelligent buildings equipment and automation systems, understanding the importance of integration frameworks and product ecosystems to this cause. This is important to BTO’s mission to enhance energy efficiency and save energy for economic and environmental purposes. For connected buildings ecosystems of products and services from various manufacturers to flourish, the ICT aspects of the equipment need to integrate and operate simply and reliably. Within the concepts of interoperability lie the specification, development, and certification of equipment with standards-based interfaces that connect and work. Beyond this, a healthy community of stakeholders that contribute to and use interoperability work products must be developed. On May 1, 2014, the DOE convened a technical meeting to take stock of the current state of interoperability of connected equipment and systems in buildings. Several insights from that meeting helped facilitate a draft description of the landscape of interoperability for connected buildings, which focuses mainly on small and medium commercial buildings. This document revises the February 2015 landscape document to address reviewer comments, incorporate important insights from the Buildings Interoperability Vision technical meeting, and capture thoughts from that meeting about the topics to be addressed in a buildings interoperability vision. In particular, greater attention is paid to the state of information modeling in buildings and the great potential for near-term benefits in this area from progress and community alignment.

  20. The Mattole River Estuary: Restoration Efforts in a Dynamic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D.; Liquori, M.

    2010-12-01

    Despite extensive scientific advancement integrating our understanding of hydrology, geomorphology, and ecology in recent decades, the application of restoration in the field has been slow to evolve. This presentation will highlight 20 years of restoration practices in the Mattole River Estuary and how these practices have informed our understanding of this complex system. The Mattole River Watershed is a 304 square-mile basin located near the Mendocino Triple Junction in a remote region of California known as the “The Lost Coast” for its rugged mountains and undeveloped coastline. In addition to numerous species of fish, mammals, and over 250 bird species, the Mattole Watershed is home to three Federally-listed Threatened salmonids: California Coastal Chinook salmon, Southern Oregon/Northern California Coasts coho salmon, and Northern California steelhead trout. The 64 mile-long river meets the Pacific Ocean at the northern end of the 64,000 acre King Range National Conservation Area (KRNCA), managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The watershed is dynamic, with some of the nation’s highest annual rainfall (mean = 158 cm/yr), naturally occurring steep slopes, erosive sedimentary geology, and frequent earthquakes. All of these factors have amplified the negative effects of extensive logging and associated road building between 1945 and 1970, which left a legacy of increased sediment loads and high water temperatures that have yet to recover to pre-disturbance levels, severely impairing riparian and aquatic habitats. Prior to major land disturbances, the Mattole estuary/lagoon was notable for its deep, thermally-stratified pools and numerous functioning north and south bank slough channels that flushed sediments from the river and received marine water. As flows decline in late spring, a sandbar closes off surface flow from the river to the Pacific Ocean, forming a lagoon, which persists until flows increase in the fall. Today, the estuary is poor

  1. INL Green Building Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer Dalton

    2005-05-01

    Green buildings, also known as sustainable buildings, resource efficient buildings, and high performance buildings, are structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reducing solid waste and pollutants, and limiting the depletion of natural resources. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish the mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate green design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. With this in mind, the recommendations described in this strategy are intended to form the INL foundation for green building standards. The recommendations in this strategy are broken down into three levels: Baseline Minimum, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)Certification, and Innovative. Baseline Minimum features should be included in all new occupied buildings no matter what the purpose or size. These features do not require significant research, design, or capital costs and yet they can reduce Operation and Maintenance (O&M) costs and produce more environmentally friendly buildings. LEED Certification features are more aggressive than the Baseline Minimums in that they require documentation, studies, and/or additional funding. Combined with the Baseline Minimums, many of the features in this level will need to be implemented to achieve the goal of LEED certification. LEED Silver certification should be the minimum goal for all new buildings (including office buildings, laboratories, cafeterias, and visitor centers) greater than 25,000 square feet or a total cost of $10 million. Innovative features can also contribute to LEED certification, but are less mainstream than those listed in the previous two levels. These features are identified as areas where

  2. Environmental indicators for buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, Sven

    Environmental Indicators for Buildings are studied using two different perspectives: with a technological, environmental scientific departing point and with a social scientific departing point. Different relevant groups in the building sector are identified and analysed, using the Social...... Construction Of Technology theory as a frame for the studies. It is concluded that it is not possible to develop a common set of indicators that all the central actors in the building sector find acceptable - at least not in a near future. Different sets of solutions are, however, outlined in the thesis...

  3. Mycotoxins in building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    as in future energy efficient buildings. It brings together different disciplinary points of view on indoor mold, ranging from physics and material science to microbiology and health sciences. The contents have been outlined according to three main issues: Fundamentals, particularly addressing the crucial...... for avoiding adverse health effects is the prevention (or minimization) of persistent dampness and microbial growth on interior surfaces and in building structures. This book aims to describe the fundamentals of indoor mold growth as a prerequisite to tackle mold growth in the existing building stock as well...

  4. The corporate brand building

    OpenAIRE

    Wisterová, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    The target of this master's thesis is to follow the process of corporate brand building of the company Starkl zahradník, to analyse it and to suggest possible improvements. The thesis is divided into four main sections. The first section deals with the theoretical aspects of the corporate brand building. The second section observes the process of brand building of the brand Starkl zahradník. The third section deals with the survey that was carried out and analyse its results. This survey was ...

  5. Building Social Web Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    Building a web application that attracts and retains regular visitors is tricky enough, but creating a social application that encourages visitors to interact with one another requires careful planning. This book provides practical solutions to the tough questions you'll face when building an effective community site -- one that makes visitors feel like they've found a new home on the Web. If your company is ready to take part in the social web, this book will help you get started. Whether you're creating a new site from scratch or reworking an existing site, Building Social Web Applications

  6. From Hyporheic Science to River Restoration: The Contribution of Physically-Based Hydrological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, D. H.; Binley, A. M.; Heathwaite, L.

    2014-12-01

    River managers need practical tools to promote appropriately hyporheic functions in restoration schemes. Hyporheic ecosystems are largely controlled by hydrological processes, which may be simulated through physically-based models. Despite their apparent limitations (sophisticated, data-hungry, and computationally demanding), these models offer substantial advantages that may pertain to the operational level of river management: representation of specific landscapes, process-based sensitivity analyses, and alternative restoration scenario testing. This presentation builds on idealized and field-based studies, as well as literature examples, to discuss how physically-based models of hyporheic exchange can be fully exploited for restoration purposes. Results suggest that these models are best suited to map spatial patterns of exchange at the sediment-water interface, rather than to estimate HEF fluxes and residence times. Because subsurface data are typically unavailable or sparse, an approach combining high-resolution topographic data combined with a sensitivity analysis appears as a promising approach for: (a) delineating potential areas of upwelling and downwelling along longitudinal and lateral channel sections; and (b) highlighting potential differences in HEF characteristics between reaches. To achieve satisfactory simulations, however, the challenge lies in the topographic representation of the channel and the discretization of the mesh. Here, common pitfalls are identified, and guidance to overcome these is provided.

  7. 32 CFR 644.453 - Major restoration cases-determining extent of restoration required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the work is to be performed by the Government. ENG Form 1440-R, Cost of Restoration, will be used for... a measure of flexibility, ENG Form 1440-R is divided into five parts, each relating to specific factors, to be used as conditions may require. (b) Preparation of ENG Form 1440-R. Comments...

  8. Fracture resistance of teeth restored with different resin-based restorative systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Yoshio Kikuti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of teeth restored with resin composite. Forty-eight maxillary premolar teeth were chosen and randomly divided to six groups: G1 (control: sound teeth; G2: MOD preparation, unrestored; G3: MOD + Adper Single Bond 2/P60; G4: MOD + Adper Easy One/P60; G5: MOD + P90 restorative system; G6: MOD + Adper Easy One/P90 Bond/P90. Specimens were subjected to compressive axial loading (0.5 mm/min. Flexural strength and the modulus of elasticity were also tested (n = 7. The only statistical equivalence with sound teeth was noted for G3 (p < 0.05. Flexural strength and the modulus of elasticity varied among the composites tested (n = 10. The reestablishment of the resistance to fracture in premolars subjected to Class II MOD preparations is restorative-system-dependent. The silorane restorative system is not able to recover the resistance to fracture.

  9. The Department of Energy's environmental restoration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy operates a large industrial complex located at various production, processing, testing, and research and development installations across the country. This complex has generated, and continues to generate, significant quantities of radioactive, hazardous, and mixtures of radioactive and hazardous (mixed) wastes that must be managed. Over the past 40 + years of operation, the waste generated by this complex has been managed to then-current standards. However, some of these waste management practices have subsequently been proven to be inadequate for long-term environmental protection. Therefore, the Department is faced with the task of characterizing and remediating waste sites and facilities contaminated through operation of the complex over the past 40 + years. The Office of Environmental Restoration is responsible for environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning activities associated with 112 sites in 33 states, a site in the south pacific, and one site in Puerto Rico. This presentation describes the scope of the DOE problems, ranging from managing newly generated wastes to remediating previous disposal or operating facilities which do not meet current environmental standards. It will briefly describe some of the activities at the sites located near Livermore, CA; Hanford, WA; Los Alamos, NM; Rocky Flats, CO; Savannah River, SC; and Oak Ridge, TN. In addition, this presentation will serve as an introduction to specific papers on activities at Hanford, Oak Ridge, Savannah River, and Rocky Flats. (author)

  10. THE FINANCIAL RESTORATION OF INSURANCE COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUMINITA TULEASCA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The entire legal regulation of the insurance market is focused on the protection of the insurance policies holders, on keeping their trust in the insurance system and on the maintenance of the financial market steadiness. Noticing and solving the problems prior to the occurrence of insurers’ insolvency situation represents a fundamental aspect for the means of achieving such objective.By this survey we will analyse the financial restoration procedure of the insurance companies, Romanian legal entities, through the perspective of the whole aggregate of legal issues involved by this extremely complex and sensitive process required by the special nature of the insurance companies and by the impact of the activities carried out by these companies for the economic and social life of a state.Thus, there have been pointed out the particularities and the special nature of the insurance companies’ financial restoration as compared to the reorganization of the regular trade companies, the insurers’ means of avoiding the business failure, of avoiding the bankruptcy.

  11. The newly applied mortars in mosaic restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Moro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available L’intervention de restauration sur la mosaïque de Dionysos à Cologne a permis, dans le cadre du travail de fin d’étude, une recherche sur les problématiques liées au choix du lit de pose des mosaïques detachées et replacées sur de nouveaux supports. Elle a contribué à l’étude des facteurs qui influencent la conservation des mosaïques qui ont précédemment fait l’objet d’interventions de détachement du site originel.The restoration of the Dionysos mosaic in Cologne gave us the opportunity for analysing the process involved in the choice of interstitial mortars in mosaics that were detached from their original site and re-layed on new supports, thus losing their original setting bed. This intervention lead us to investigate the relationships between restoration and a philological perspective and the damages following the stripping of mosaics.

  12. Graded structures for all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Chai, H; Lawn, B R

    2010-04-01

    One failure mode of all-ceramic restorations is radial cracking at the cementation surface, from occlusally induced flexure of the stiffer ceramic layer(s) on the softer dentin underlayer. We hypothesize that such failure may be substantially mitigated by an appropriate grading of elastic modulus through the ceramic thickness. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into zirconia plates, with resulting diminished modulus in the outer surfaces. The plates were then bonded to a polymeric base and subjected to flexure by contact loading until fracture. Comparison of infiltrated specimens with non-infiltrated controls showed a significant increase in the fracture loads, by a factor of nearly 2. Finite element analysis revealed the cause of increase in the load-bearing capacity to be diminished tensile stresses within the lower-modulus graded zone, corresponding to an increase in material strength. The results confirmed that suitably graded structures can be highly beneficial in the design of next-generation all-ceramic restorations. PMID:20200413

  13. SIMULATION OF INTERLINE DYNAMIC VOLTAGE RESTORER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Singaravelan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach for the dynamic control of a current source inverter (CSI using Super Conductive Magnetic energy storage (SMES based Interline DVR. The dynamic voltage restorer (DVR provides a technically advanced and economical solution to voltage-sag problem. As the voltage-restoration process involves the real-power injection into the distribution system, the capability ofa DVR, especially for compensating long-duration voltage sags, it depends on the energy storage capacity of the DVR. The interline DVR proposed in this paper provides a way to replenish Dc-link energy storage dynamically. The IDVR consists of several DVRs connected to different distribution feeders in the power system. The DVRs in the IDVR system shares the common energy storage. When one of the DVRcompensates for voltage sag appearing in that feeder, the other DVRs replenish the energy in the common dc-link dynamically. Thus, one DVR in the IDVR system works in voltage-sag compensation mode whilethe other DVRs in the IDVR system operate in power-flow control mode. The proposed topology is simulated using Matlab/Simulink and total IDVR system is simulated using Matlab/Simulink.

  14. Bacterial microleakage of aged adhesive restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevin Cobanoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the marginal bacterial leakage of two self-etch adhesive systems after long-term water storage. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of extracted premolar teeth. After the sterilization of the teeth, four cavities were not restored for control purposes, whereas the other teeth were divided into two groups (n = 16 cavities each: Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE. After the application of the bonding agent, cavities were restored with a composite resin. Then, the teeth were thermo cycled, stored in saline solution for 6 months and put into a broth culture of Streptococcus mutans. The teeth were fixed, sectioned and stained using the Gram-Colour modified method. The stained sections were then evaluated under a light microscope. The bacterial leakage was scored as: 0 - absence of stained bacteria, 1 - bacterial staining along the cavity walls, 2 - bacterial staining within the cut dentinal tubules. The data were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-test (P = 0.05. Results: The bacterial staining was detected within the cut dentinal tubules in all control cavities, in three cavities in the CSE group and one cavity in the CPB group. There were no observed statistically significant differences between the bacterial penetrations of the two bonding systems (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Both bonding systems provided acceptable prevention of marginal bacterial leakage after long-term water storage.

  15. Interactions of liposomes with dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sanko; Adamczak, Malgorzata; Hiorth, Marianne; Smistad, Gro; Kopperud, Hilde Molvig

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro adsorption and retention of liposomes onto four common types of dental restorative materials (conventional and silorane-based resin composites as well as conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC)) have been investigated due to their potential use in the oral cavity. Uncoated liposomes (positively and negatively charged) and pectin (low- and high-methoxylated) coated liposomes were prepared and characterized in terms of particle size and zeta potential. The adsorption of liposomes was performed by immersion, quantified by fluorescence detection, and visualized by fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy. Positive liposomes demonstrated the highest adsorption on all four types of materials likely due to their attractive surface charge. They also retained well (minimum 40% after 60 min) on both conventional resin composite and GIC even when exposed to simulated salivary flow. Although an intermediate initial level of adsorption was found for the pectin coated liposomes, at least 70% high methoxylated-pectin coated liposomes still remained on the conventional resin composite after 60 min flow exposure. This indicates significant contribution of hydrophobic interactions in the prolonged binding of liposomes to resin composites. Based on these results, the present paper suggests two new possible applications of liposomes in the preservation of dental restorations.

  16. TREE SPECIES DIRECT SOWING FOR FOREST RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robério Anastácio Ferreira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The direct sowing to tropical forest restoration can be viable when the ecological and silvicultural aspects of species areknown. This work evaluated the effect of breaking seed dormancy and a physical protector on the initial growth of riparian treespecies. The experiment was carried out in a randomized blocks design, in a factorial (2x2, with four blocks and four plots for eachtreatment. The treatment to break seed dormancy used were: immersion in sulphuric acid for 20 minutes and washing in water for 1hour plus soaking for 24 hours for Trema micrantha; immersion in boiling water (100oC with following soaking until refreshing for24 hours to Senna multijuga and Senna macranthera and pre-soaking in water for 2 hours for Solanum granuloso-leprosum. Thephysical protector used was a transparent plastic cup (500mL. The breaking seed dormancy used was efficient in laboratory, exceptfor S. macranthera. In field conditions, it was efficient only for S. multijuga and S. macranthera. The physical protector did notpresented any benefit for the studied tree species regarding seedlings emergence and survival, but it provided significant differencesin height and base diameter for S. multijuga and in height for S. macranthera after three months. After 24 months, T. micranthapresented the highest values for height and basal diameter. S. macranthera presented the height relative growth and T. micrantha thehighest basal diameter. The studied species can be recommended for ecological forest restoration, using direct sowing.

  17. Ceramics in Restorative and Prosthetic DENTISTRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. Robert

    1997-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the ceramic engineer with information about the history and current use of ceramics in dentistry, contemporary research topics, and potential research agenda. Background material includes intra-oral design considerations, descriptions of ceramic dental components, and the origin, composition, and microstructure of current dental ceramics. Attention is paid to efforts involving net-shape processing, machining as a forming method, and the analysis of clinical failure. A rationale is presented for the further development of all-ceramic restorative systems. Current research topics receiving attention include microstructure/processing/property relationships, clinical failure mechanisms and in vitro testing, wear damage and wear testing, surface treatments, and microstructural modifications. The status of the field is critically reviewed with an eye toward future work. Significant improvements seem possible in the clinical use of ceramics based on engineering solutions derived from the study of clinically failed restorations, on the incorporation of higher levels of "biomimicry" in new systems, and on the synergistic developments in dental cements and adhesive dentin bonding.

  18. Building Technologies Program Key Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-15

    The Building Technologies Program (BTP) employs a balanced approach to making buildings more energy efficient. The three pillars of our program, research and development (R&D), market stimulation, and building and equipment standards, help meet our strategic vision.

  19. Green buildings pay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naboni, Emanuele; Edwards, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The new edition of ‘Green Buildings Pay’ authored by Brian Edwards and Emanuele Naboni explores the business and professional benefits which derive from architectural design driven by sustainability. With a new sub-title ‘Green Buildings Pay: design, productivity and ecology’ the book argues...... or environmental thinking and this finds expression in new approaches to the design of building facades, roofs, atria. Another is that new software simulation tools have changed energy assumptions and hence building forms. In a fast evolving arena, the book shows how architects are reshaping their practices....... Branding via LEED and BREEAM has taken green ideas to China and other emerging economies. The globalization of sustainability and of architectural practice is an important strand of the new edition....

  20. Helping clients build credit

    OpenAIRE

    Vikki Frank

    2007-01-01

    Until now people who repaid loans from community groups had not been on credit bureaus’ radar. Now Credit Builders Alliance is partnering with Experian to help clients of community lenders build strong credit histories.

  1. Municipal Building Energy Usage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data set contains energy use data from 2009-2014 for 139 municipally operated buildings. Metrics include: Site & Source EUI, annual electricity, natural...

  2. Buildings Sector Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostick, Donna J.; Nicholls, Andrew K.; McDonald, Sean C.; Hollomon, Jonathan B.

    2005-08-01

    A joint NREL, ORNL, and PNNL team conducted market analysis to help inform DOE/EERE's Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program planning and management decisions. This chapter presents the results of the market analysis for the Buildings sector.

  3. The perio-esthetic-restorative approach for anterior rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Tomar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring clinical success begins with a careful discussion of treatment planning, comprehensively covering all variables in simple to complex cases. Procedures including the crown lengthening surgery, furcation treatment and mucogingival therapy and tooth restoration are essential treatment regimens requiring multifaceted expertise. The interplay of periodontics and restorative dentistry is present at many fronts including the response of the gingival tissue to the restorative preparations. Dental restorations and periodontal health are inseparably interrelated. The adaptation of the margins, the contours of the restoration, the proximal relationships and the surface smoothness have a critical biological impact on the gingiva and the supporting periodontal tissues. The different surgical procedures used for crown lengthening are gingivectomy/gingivoplasty, apically positioned flap with or without osseous resection and orthodontic extrusion. The paper presents crown lengthening of severely mutilated teeth to increase the clinical crown height for adequate restoration.

  4. The perio-esthetic-restorative approach for anterior rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Nitin; Bansal, Tushika; Bhandari, Marisha; Sharma, Anamika

    2013-07-01

    Ensuring clinical success begins with a careful discussion of treatment planning, comprehensively covering all variables in simple to complex cases. Procedures including the crown lengthening surgery, furcation treatment and mucogingival therapy and tooth restoration are essential treatment regimens requiring multifaceted expertise. The interplay of periodontics and restorative dentistry is present at many fronts including the response of the gingival tissue to the restorative preparations. Dental restorations and periodontal health are inseparably interrelated. The adaptation of the margins, the contours of the restoration, the proximal relationships and the surface smoothness have a critical biological impact on the gingiva and the supporting periodontal tissues. The different surgical procedures used for crown lengthening are gingivectomy/gingivoplasty, apically positioned flap with or without osseous resection and orthodontic extrusion. The paper presents crown lengthening of severely mutilated teeth to increase the clinical crown height for adequate restoration.

  5. Tooth-colored CAD/CAM monolithic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, S

    2015-01-01

    A monolithic restoration (also known as a full contour restoration) is one that is manufactured from a single material for the fully anatomic replacement of lost tooth structure. Additional staining (followed by glaze firing if ceramic materials are used) may be performed to enhance the appearance of the restoration. For decades, monolithic restoration has been the standard for inlay and partial crown restorations manufactured by both pressing and computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques. A limited selection of monolithic materials is now available for dental crown and bridge restorations. The IDS (2015) provided an opportunity to learn about and evaluate current trends in this field. In addition to new developments, established materials are also mentioned in this article to complete the picture. In line with the strategic focus of the IJCD, the focus here is naturally on CAD/CAM materials. PMID:26110926

  6. Image Restoration Technology Based on Discrete Neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Duoying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of computer science and technology, the development of artificial intelligence advances rapidly in the field of image restoration. Based on the MATLAB platform, this paper constructs a kind of image restoration technology of artificial intelligence based on the discrete neural network and feedforward network, and carries out simulation and contrast of the restoration process by the use of the bionic algorithm. Through the application of simulation restoration technology, this paper verifies that the discrete neural network has a good convergence and identification capability in the image restoration technology with a better effect than that of the feedforward network. The restoration technology based on the discrete neural network can provide a reliable mathematical model for this field.

  7. A scientific basis for restoring fish spawning habitat in the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manny, Bruce A.; Roseman, Edward F.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Boase, James C.; Craig, Jaquelyn; Bennion, David H.; Read, Jennifer; Vaccaro, Lynn; Chiotti, Justin A.; Drouin, Richard; Ellison, Roseanne

    2015-01-01

    Loss of functional habitat in riverine systems is a global fisheries issue. Few studies, however, describe the decision-making approach taken to abate loss of fish spawning habitat. Numerous habitat restoration efforts are underway and documentation of successful restoration techniques for spawning habitat of desirable fish species in large rivers connecting the Laurentian Great Lakes are reported here. In 2003, to compensate for the loss of fish spawning habitat in the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers that connect the Great Lakes Huron and Erie, an international partnership of state, federal, and academic scientists began restoring fish spawning habitat in both of these rivers. Using an adaptive management approach, we created 1,100 m2 of productive fish spawning habitat near Belle Isle in the Detroit River in 2004; 3,300 m2 of fish spawning habitat near Fighting Island in the Detroit River in 2008; and 4,000 m2 of fish spawning habitat in the Middle Channel of the St. Clair River in 2012. Here, we describe the adaptive-feedback management approach that we used to guide our decision making during all phases of spawning habitat restoration, including problem identification, team building, hypothesis development, strategy development, prioritization of physical and biological imperatives, project implementation, habitat construction, monitoring of fish use of the constructed spawning habitats, and communication of research results. Numerous scientific and economic lessons learned from 10 years of planning, building, and assessing fish use of these three fish spawning habitat restoration projects are summarized in this article.

  8. Restoration of dragonfly habitat; Tonbo no seisoku kankyo to sono saisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yobu, S. [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1994-08-10

    Activities to build environments where familiar living creatures live have become active among citizen`s communities and local governments. This paper describes the ways to restore waterside ecological environment using dragonfly as a parameter, and examples of the restoration in urban areas, suburban areas and mountain valleys. The importance that comes first is to establish the future image, for which ecological design must be worked on based on surveys of diverse vegetation blocks. Vegetation transition rate is very high in Japan, where grasslands of low height change to high grasslands in two or three years causing change in living creatures that live therein. This condition requires such controls as mowing, felling, and mud dredging. Building an environment where dragonflies can live needs the water quality to have BOD at 10 mg per liter or lower. The egg-laying methods of dragonflies are divided into the water surface striking and egg-laying in plant tissues. It is necessary to prepare environments that suit species, such as stalks of Zizania protruding at watersides that facilitate dragonflies to emerge, grasslands where they find the places easy to live, and adequate degrees of sunlight irradiation. Very small modification of an environment often results in a great effect. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Building Services Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinzi, Michele; Romeo, Carlo; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund;

    2015-01-01

    of the description of 5 main technologies: condensing boilers, heat pumps, ventilation systems, lighting and photovoltaic systems. For each technology chapter there is the same content list: an introduction, a brief technology description, some advantages and disadvantages, market penetration and utilisation, energy......This guideline on Building Services Systems is one of four guidelines produced by the School of the Future project. The other three guidelines cover: Building Construction Elements, Improved Indoor Environmental Quality and Concepts for Zero Emission Schools. This guideline consists...

  10. Building Peaceful Borders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    China's efforts to build a harmonious world begin with establishing peaceful borders with its neighbors China's recent contribution to the world of international relations is the promotion of "building a harmonious world together," put forward by President Hu Jintao at the 60th anniversary of the UN in September 2005. As the core of the country's peaceful foreign policy in the new era, this approach has been well received and widely discussed in the international community. Meanwhile, Chinese foreign pol...

  11. Building Materials in Arctic Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    Building in the artic requires special attention on the appropriateness of building materials. The harsh climate makes execution difficult and sets unusual requirements for the pure material properties. In addition, there is a lack of choice of good, natural building materials in the arctic....... This results in high transport costs. The building materials situation in Greenland may potentially be improved by intensifying the reuse of building materials or by promoting the local production of building materials....

  12. Restoring CERN’s basic fabric

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Many of you will have noticed work going on around the CERN site: old trees are being removed, plumbing is being installed and scaffolding is going up around buildings. This is all part of a coordinated approach to consolidating CERN’s basic infrastructure: work that has been put on hold for many years while the Lab’s top priority was completing the LHC. Now that the LHC is built, it’s time to turn our attention to CERN’s buildings and open spaces. CERN covers a vast area and has many buildings, some dating back to the 1950s. For several years, building maintenance has been carried out on an as-necessary basis, with little attention being paid to preventative measures. As a result, there is much to be done, and it will take time to achieve. For our open spaces, it’s the same story. At CERN, we enjoy a very green working environment, but our trees are ageing and in some cases in danger of falling. The priority for 2009 is ...

  13. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, R.

    2012-07-12

    The purpose of lessons learned is to identify insight gained during a project – successes or failures – that can be applied on future projects. Lessons learned can contribute to the overall success of a project by building on approaches that have worked well and avoiding previous mistakes. Below are examples of lessons learned during ERDF’s ARRA-funded expansion project.

  14. Fluvial system restoration – case study: river Tua

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Gina-Lee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to provide river basin managers with a framework for river restoration. To that end, it presents and discusses the relevant information on the current condition of the river Tua, in northern Portugal, and establishes what can be done to restore the river basin in order to protect the most important drainage basin's functions and ecosystems. It is intended that this thesis will serve as an example of the application of current knowledge on freshwater restoration w...

  15. River restoration: morphological, hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological changes and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Schirmer, M.; Luster, J; N. Linde; Perona, P; Mitchell, E. A. D.; Barry, D. A.; O. A. Cirpka; P. Schneider; Vogt, T; Durisch-Kaiser, E

    2013-01-01

    River restoration is essential as a means to enhance river dynamics, environmental heterogeneity and biodiversity. The underlying processes governing the dynamic changes need to be understood thoroughly to ensure that restoration projects meet their goals. In particular, we need to understand quantitatively how hydromorphological variability relates to ecosystem functioning and services, biodiversity and (ground)water quality in restored river corridors. Here, we provide a short overview ...

  16. Polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin-based restorative materials

    OpenAIRE

    Stavridakis, Minos M; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    This study measured the linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces induced by polymerization shrinkage of a series of flowable resin-based restorative materials. The materials tested were 22 flowable resin-based restorative materials (Admira Flow, Aelite Flow, Aeliteflow LV, Aria, Crystal Essence, Definite Flow, Dyract Flow, Filtek Flow, FloRestore, Flow-it, Flow-Line, Freedom, Glacier, OmegaFlo, PermaFlo, Photo SC, Revolution 2, Star Flow, Synergy Flow, Tetric Flow, Ultrase...

  17. POLYTETRAFLUOROETYLENE TAPE AS TEMPORARY RESTORATIVE MATERIAL: A FLUID FILTRATION STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Keziban Olcay; Liviu SteIer; Hilal Erdoğan; Sema Belli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of temporary restorative materials at 24 hrs and 1 week. Materials and Methods: Endodontic access cavities were prepared in 56 extracted lower incisor-teeth and divided into 5 groups (n=10). Standard 5 mm deep access preparations were completed and root canals were prepared to size ISO #30 file. The access cavities were restored as follows: Group 1: temporary restorative material (Ceivitron); Grou...

  18. Ecological restoration alters microbial communities in mine tailings profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Li; Zhongjun Jia; Qingye Sun; Jing Zhan; Yang Yang; Dan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Ecological restoration of mine tailings have impact on soil physiochemical properties and microbial communities. The surface soil has been a primary concern in the past decades, however it remains poorly understood about the adaptive response of microbial communities along the profile during ecological restoration of the tailings. In this study, microbial communities along a 60-cm profile were investigated in a mine tailing pond during ecological restoration of the bare waste tailings (BW) wi...

  19. Surgical crown lengthening: a periodontal and restorative interdisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwani, Simran R; Parwani, Rajkumar N

    2014-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening helps to provide an adequate retention form for proper tooth preparation, thus enabling dentists to create esthetically pleasing and healthy restorations. Long-term stability requires accurate diagnosis and development of a comprehensive treatment plan in each case. This sequence of events stresses the importance of communication between the restorative dentist and the periodontist. This article presents 2 cases that involve surgical crown lengthening (including mucoperiosteal flap and ostectomy) for the restoration of teeth.

  20. Ecological restoration across the Mediterranean Basin as viewed by practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Alice; Oliveira, Graça; Mexia, Teresa; Valdecantos, Alejandro; Zucca, Claudio; Costantini, Edoardo A C; Abraham, Eleni M; Kyriazopoulos, Apostolos P; Salah, Ayman; Prasse, Ruediger; Correia, Otília; Milliken, Sarah; Kotzen, Benz; Branquinho, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Restoration efforts in the Mediterranean Basin have been changing from a silvicultural to an ecological restoration approach. Yet, to what extent the projects are guided by ecological restoration principles remains largely unknown. To analyse this issue, we built an on-line survey addressed to restoration practitioners. We analysed 36 restoration projects, mostly from drylands (86%). The projects used mainly soil from local sources. The need to comply with legislation was more important as a restoration motive for European Union (EU) than for non-EU countries, while public opinion and health had a greater importance in the latter. Non-EU countries relied more on non-native plant species than EU countries, thus deviating from ecological restoration guidelines. Nursery-grown plants used were mostly of local or regional provenance, whilst seeds were mostly of national provenance. Unexpected restoration results (e.g. inadequate biodiversity) were reported for 50% of the projects and restoration success was never evaluated in 22%. Long term evaluation (>6years) was only performed in 31% of cases, and based primarily on plant diversity and cover. The use of non-native species and species of exogenous provenances may: i) entail the loss of local genetic and functional trait diversity, critical to cope with drought, particularly under the predicted climate change scenarios, and ii) lead to unexpected competition with native species and/or negatively impact local biotic interactions. Absent or inappropriate monitoring may prevent the understanding of restoration trajectories, precluding adaptive management strategies, often crucial to create functional ecosystems able to provide ecosystem services. The overview of ecological restoration projects in the Mediterranean Basin revealed high variability among practices and highlighted the need for improved scientific assistance and information exchange, greater use of native species of local provenance, and more long