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Sample records for building indigenous capability

  1. Indigenous Technological Innovation : Capability and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Indigenous Technological Innovation : Capability and Competitiveness in China's Western Region. China has experienced extraordinary economic growth over the past 20 years. Nevertheless, the vast western region of the country tends to lag behind the dynamic eastern coastline. The gap between the two is an ongoing ...

  2. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...

  3. Building Server Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi

    2013-01-01

    Many western companies have moved part of their operations to China in order to take advantage of cheap resources and/or to gain access to a high potential market. Depending on motive, offshore facilities usually start either as “sales-only” of products exported by headquarters or “production......-only”, exporting parts and components back to headquarter for sales in the home country. In the course of time, the role of offshore subsidiaries in a company’s operations network tends to change and, with that, the capabilities, of the subsidiaries. Focusing on Danish subsidiaries in China, the objective...... of this project is to identify and explain trajectories of offshore subsidiary capability development. Given the nature of this objective the chief methodology is longitudinal, partly retrospective, partly real-time, case studies....

  4. Building server capabilities in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi; Slepniov, Dmitrij; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to further our understanding of multinational companies building server capabilities in China. The paper is based on the cases of two western companies with operations in China. The findings highlight a number of common patterns in the 1) managerial challenges related...

  5. Identity Building in Organisations: Proactive Capability Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2002-01-01

    Identity building in organisations is often viewed as legitimacy of value systems of the organisation. Based on empirical studies the task of this article is to argue that such a legitimacy approach risks failing in the longer perspective, if the proactive capability development is neglected....... The participatory scenario method presented in this article is one of the possible methods to enhance identity building based on proactive capability development....

  6. Culturally capable and culturally safe: Caseload care for Indigenous women by Indigenous midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R; Gamble, J; Kelly, J; Milne, T; Duffy, E; Sidebotham, M

    2016-12-01

    Evidence is emerging of the benefits to students of providing continuity of midwifery care as a learning strategy in midwifery education, however little is known about the value of this strategy for midwifery students. To explore Indigenous students' perceptions of providing continuity of midwifery care to Indigenous women whilst undertaking a Bachelor of Midwifery. Indigenous Bachelor of Midwifery students' experiences of providing continuity of midwifery care to Indigenous childbearing women were explored within an Indigenous research approach using a narrative inquiry framework. Participants were three Indigenous midwifery students who provided continuity of care to Indigenous women. Three interconnected themes; facilitating connection, being connected, and journeying with the woman. These themes contribute to the overarching finding that the experience of providing continuity of care for Indigenous women creates a sense of personal affirmation, purpose and a validation of cultural identity in Indigenous students. Midwifery philosophy aligns strongly with the Indigenous health philosophy and this provides a learning platform for Indigenous student midwives. Privileging Indigenous culture within midwifery education programs assists students develop a sense of purpose and affirms them in their emerging professional role and within their community. The findings from this study illustrate the demand for, and pertinence of, continuity of care midwifery experiences with Indigenous women as fundamental to increasing the Indigenous midwifery workforce in Australia. Australian universities should provide this experience for Indigenous student midwives. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PRODUCTION CAPABILITIES EFFICIENCY PREFABRICATION ERECTION OF BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOKOLOV I. A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Formulation of the problem. the largest reserves of increase of efficiency of building production concluded in the decision of problems of ensuring compliance with the technological properties of space-planning and constructive decisions of buildings organizational and technological conditions of manufacturing processes. Tendencies of development of the society determined the growth in construction, complexity of design rhenium building and makes it necessary to reduce the time of construction of buildings and reduce the cost of construction and installation works. In recent years, the architectural and compositional solutions constructed buildings are increasingly conflict with organizational, technological and technical capacity building organizations. This problem is solved by the improvement and development of new technologies of building production, the use of more modern construction machines and mechanisms. The implementation of the tasks can be solved by creating a space-planning and constructive decisions of buildings corresponding possibilities of building organizations and the creation of fundamentally new technologies. Currently, there is no single comprehensive approach allows to establish the extent to which space-constructive decisions of buildings technological possibilities of building production. Imbalance intentions and capabilities results in a significant increase in financial expenses for the construction of the building. The purpose of the article. It is necessary to propose a method of assessing the level of technological prefabrication construction of buildings, the application of which will provide an opportunity to improve the full process of erection of the building and, as a consequence, increase its efficiency by increasing the extent to which the technological properties of space-planning and constructive decisions of buildings organizational and technological conditions of manufacturing processes, pogruzki

  8. Building Airport Surface HITL Simulation Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Fay Cherie

    2016-01-01

    FutureFlight Central is a high fidelity, real-time simulator designed to study surface operations and automation. As an air traffic control tower simulator, FFC allows stakeholders such as the FAA, controllers, pilots, airports, and airlines to develop and test advanced surface and terminal area concepts and automation including NextGen and beyond automation concepts and tools. These technologies will improve the safety, capacity and environmental issues facing the National Airspace system. FFC also has extensive video streaming capabilities, which combined with the 3-D database capability makes the facility ideal for any research needing an immersive virtual and or video environment. FutureFlight Central allows human in the loop testing which accommodates human interactions and errors giving a more complete picture than fast time simulations. This presentation describes FFCs capabilities and the components necessary to build an airport surface human in the loop simulation capability.

  9. Building Strategic Capabilities for Sustained Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, M.; Hufenbach, B.; Houdou, B.

    2016-11-01

    We discuss a lunar exploration architecture that addresses the strategic objective of providing access to the lunar surface. This access enables the most exciting part of the lunar exploration: building a sustained infrastructure on the lunar surface.

  10. Blue Force Tracking: Building a Joint Capability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sweeney, Michael M

    2008-01-01

    .... The realities of current operations have created such a need for this capability, and there are at least a dozen different devices being used in our current operations supporting all functional areas...

  11. Dadirri: Using a Philosophical Approach to Research to Build Trust between a Non-Indigenous Researcher and Indigenous Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Marie Stronach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article focuses on a philosophical approach employed in a PhD research project that set out to investigate sport career transition (SCT experiences of elite Indigenous Australian sportsmen. The research was necessary as little is known about the transition of this cohort to a life after sport, or their experiences of retirement. A key problem within the SCT paradigm is a presumption that an end to elite sport requires a process of adjustment that is common to all sportspeople—a rather narrow perspective that fails to acknowledge the situational complexity and socio-cultural diversity of elite athletes. With such a range of personal circumstances, it is reasonable to suppose that athletes from different cultural groups will have different individual SCT needs. The researcher is non-Indigenous and mature aged: she encountered a number of challenges in her efforts to understand Indigenous culture and its important sensitivities, and to build trust with the Indigenous male participants she interviewed. An Indigenous philosophy known as Dadirri, which emphasises deep and respectful listening, guided the development of the research design and methodology. Consistent with previous studies conducted by non-Indigenous researchers, an open-ended and conversational approach to interviewing Indigenous respondents was developed. The objective was for the voices of the athletes to be heard, allowing the collection of rich data based on the participants’ perspectives about SCT. An overview of the findings is presented, illustrating that Indigenous athletes experience SCT in complex and distinctive ways. The article provides a model for non-Indigenous researchers to conduct qualitative research with Indigenous people.

  12. Building EOS capability for Malaysia - the options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subari, M. D.; Hassan, A.

    2014-06-01

    Earth observation satellite (EOS) is currently a major tool to monitor earth dynamics and increase human understanding of earth surface process. Since the early 80s, Malaysia has been using EOS images for various applications, such as weather forecasting, land use mapping, agriculture, environment monitoring and others. Until now, all EOS images were obtained from foreign satellite systems. Realising on the strategic need of having its own capability, Malaysia embarked into EOS development programs in the early 90s. Starting with TiungSAT-1, a micro-satellite carrying small camera, then followed by RazakSAT, a small satellite carrying 2.5 m panchromatic (PAN) medium-aperture-camera, the current satellite program development, the RazakSAT-2, designed to carry a 1.0 m high resolution PAN and 4.0m multi-spectral camera, would become a strategic initiative of the government in developing and accelerating the nation's capability in the area of satellite technology and its application. Would this effort continue until all needs of the remote sensing community being fulfilled by its own EOS? This paper will analyze the intention of the Malaysian government through its National Space Policy and other related policy documents, and proposes some policy options on this. Key factors to be considered are specific data need of the EOS community, data availability and the more subjective political motivations such as national pride.

  13. Market strategies and core capabilities in the building industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Job; Voordijk, Johannes T.; Joosten, Geert-Jan

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to show that the core competence approach has validity when applied to construction. The focus is on the analysis ofthe fit between market strategies of firms in the building industry and their core capabilities. Certain strategies require specific core capabilities

  14. Building Indigenous Social Capital in an Online World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Bandias

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the nexus between social relations of mutual benefit, information communication technology (ICT access and social inclusion. More specifically, a case study methodology is used to examine the role of ICT in facilitating the social capital of Indigenous communities. A remote Indigenous community in the Northern Territory (NT is the focus of the paper. Whilst the potential of social capital to affect positive outcomes across a diverse range of areas is well researched, Indigenous disadvantage is well documented and the role of ICT in facilitating social and economic development is well established, although little is known about the ICT social capital nexus in an Indigenous context. The paper commences with a review of the social capital literature. A description of the methodology employed in the data collection phase of the project is followed by the case study. The paper concludes with a summary of the findings and recommendations for further research.

  15. Building Technological Capability within Satellite Programs in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Danielle Renee

    Global participation in space activity is growing as satellite technology matures and spreads. Countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America are creating or reinvigorating national satellite programs. These countries are building local capability in space through technological learning. They sometimes pursue this via collaborative satellite development projects with foreign firms that provide training. This phenomenon of collaborative satellite development projects is poorly understood by researchers of technological learning and technology transfer. The approach has potential to facilitate learning, but there are also challenges due to misaligned incentives and the tacit nature of the technology. Perspectives from literature on Technological Learning, Technology Transfer, Complex Product Systems and Product Delivery provide useful but incomplete insight for decision makers in such projects. This work seeks a deeper understanding of capability building through collaborative technology projects by conceiving of the projects as complex, socio-technical systems with architectures. The architecture of a system is the assignment of form to execute a function along a series of dimensions. The research questions explore the architecture of collaborative satellite projects, the nature of capability building during such projects, and the relationship between architecture and capability building. The research design uses inductive, exploratory case studies to investigate six collaborative satellite development projects. Data collection harnesses international field work driven by interviews, observation, and documents. The data analysis develops structured narratives, architectural comparison and capability building assessment. The architectural comparison reveals substantial variation in project implementation, especially in the areas of project initiation, technical specifications of the satellite, training approaches and the supplier selection process. The individual

  16. Aligning and reconciling: building project capabilities for digital delivery \\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Sunila; Whyte, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Digital delivery of complex projects, using integrated software and processes, is an important emerging phenomenon as it transforms relationships across the associated ecology of project-based firms. Our study analyses how a project-based firm, ‘Global Engineering’, builds new project capabilities for digital delivery through work on three major road and railway infrastructure projects. We find that it seeks to: (1) align the project set-up with the firm’s existing capabilities; and (2) recon...

  17. Nanotechnology in South Asia : Building Capabilities and Governing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Nanotechnology in South Asia : Building Capabilities and Governing the Technology in South Asia. Nanotechnology is the study and manipulation of matter on an ultra-small scale, generally in the range of 1-100 nanometres (1 metre = 1 billion nanometres). Like biotechnology, nanotechnology has the potential to bring ...

  18. 168 Indigenous Language Implementation and Nation Building: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implementation and use of Nigerian indigenous languages in pre- primary schools via in-depth and ..... will die if such a nation fails to transfer its cultural heritage down to the younger generation. Duruaku (2001) ..... The policy here advocates that as a means of promoting social interaction and national cohesion, every child ...

  19. The national building code, indigenous contractors enforcement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before the introduction of the building code, in Nigeria, there was no realistic Legislature, control or moderation in the building industry. The introduction of the building code is a well come development. The problem that is facing the building code and the nation is the issue of implementation, enforcement and compliance ...

  20. Building capability through networking with investors and researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Schøtt, Thomas

    A startup requires financing, typically, and the startup is based on innovation, often. Capabilities for innovation and financing may be built simultaneously and created jointly at inception. Co-creation of capabilities for financing and innovation is accounted for in this study. Co...... of startups at inception, by 9,161 entrepreneurs, surveyed in Global Entrepreneurship Monitor in 49 countries. Co-creation is found to be reduced by the entrepreneur’s networking in the private sphere of family and friends, but to be benefiting from networking in the public sphere, especially by networking...... with investors and researchers simultaneously. The findings contribute to understanding capability building as embedded in networks around the startup....

  1. The Mediterranean non-indigenous ascidian Polyandrocarpa zorritensis: Microbiological accumulation capability and environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabili, Loredana; Licciano, Margherita; Longo, Caterina; Lezzi, Marco; Giangrande, Adriana

    2015-12-15

    We investigated the bacterial accumulation and digestion capability of Polyandrocarpa zorritensis, a non-indigenous colonial ascidian originally described in Peru and later found in the Mediterranean. Microbiological analyses were carried out on homogenates from "unstarved" and "starved" ascidians and seawater from the same sampling site (Adriatic Sea, Italy). Culturable heterotrophic bacteria (22 °C), total culturable bacteria (37 °C) and vibrios abundances were determined on Marine Agar 2216, Plate Count Agar and TCBS Agar, respectively. Microbial pollution indicators were measured by the most probable number method. All the examined microbiological groups were accumulated by ascidians but differently digested. An interesting outcome is the capability of P. zorritensis to digest allochthonous microorganisms such as coliforms as well as culturable bacteria at 37 °C, counteracting the effects of microbial pollution. Thus, the potential exploitation of these filter feeders to restore polluted seawater should be taken into consideration in the management of this alien species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Building Indigenous Community Resilience in the Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, B.

    2014-12-01

    Indigenous community resilience is rooted in the seasoned lifeways, developed over generations, incorporated into systems of knowledge, and realized in artifacts of infrastructure through keen observations of the truth and consequences of their interactions with the environment found in place over time. Their value lies, not in their nature as artifacts, but in the underlying patterns and processes of culture: how previous adaptations were derived and evolved, and how the principles and processes of detailed observation may inform future adaptations. This presentation examines how such holistic community approaches, reflected in design and practice, can be applied to contemporary issues of energy and housing in a rapidly changing climate. The Indigenous Peoples of the Great Plains seek to utilize the latest scientific climate modeling to support the development of large, utility scale distributed renewable energy projects and to re-invigorate an indigenous housing concept of straw bale construction, originating in this region. In the energy context, we explore the potential for the development of an intertribal wind energy dynamo on the Great Plains, utilizing elements of existing federal policies for Indian energy development and existing federal infrastructure initially created to serve hydropower resources, which may be significantly altered under current and prospective drought scenarios. For housing, we consider the opportunity to address the built environment in Indian Country, where Tribes have greater control as it consists largely of residences needed for their growing populations. Straw bale construction allows for greater use of local natural and renewable materials in a strategy for preparedness for the weather extremes and insurance perils already common to the region, provides solutions to chronic unemployment and increasing energy costs, while offering greater affordable comfort in both low and high temperature extremes. The development of large

  3. Building institutional capability in e-learning design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly Salmon

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We detail the research, development and initial outcomes of an intervention process to promote capability building in designing for e-learning at a dual mode university in the UK. The process, called CARPE DIEM, was built on a pilot study and became a Higher Education Academy ‘Pathfinder' project named ADELIE. We report on the model workshop, its deployment, research and development over a 12-month period with a variety of subject groups working in small teams with learning technologists, pedagogical facilitators and librarians. Outcomes include improved scores on an institutional e-learning benchmarking exercise and increased capability for designing for online activities for students in the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE. The model is stable enough to be tried in other institutions and continues to develop in scope.

  4. Building the Foundations and Enterprise Capabilities for Digital Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Sawy, Omar; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Amsinck, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    digital leadership as they undergo large organizational transformations and position themselves for the future. We define digital leadership for the enterprise as doing the right things for the strategic success of digitalization for the enterprise and its business ecosystem. How does an enterprise...... develop the internal capabilities for digital leadership in organizational transformation? What are the requisite digitalization moves around products, in marketing, with partners, within the enterprise business areas, and within the IT organization? How do these digitalization moves help enterprises...... insights can we provide to CIOs and CXOs in all industries about how to build the foundations for augmenting the enterprise capabilities for digital leadership? This paper seeks to provide such insights for next practices for digital leadership in organizational transformation while drawing on the decade...

  5. Building capability through networking with investors and researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Schøtt, Thomas

    -creation is embedded in the network around the starting entrepreneur, we expect. Co-creation benefits from networking with potential investors and with researchers and inventors, we hypothesize, and especially by networking with both investors and researchers concurrently. Co-creation is analyzed in a sample...... of startups at inception, by 9,161 entrepreneurs, surveyed in Global Entrepreneurship Monitor in 49 countries. Co-creation is found to be reduced by the entrepreneur’s networking in the private sphere of family and friends, but to be benefiting from networking in the public sphere, especially by networking...... with investors and researchers simultaneously. The findings contribute to understanding capability building as embedded in networks around the startup....

  6. Principals as Literacy Leaders with Indigenous Communities (PALLIC) Building Relationships: One School's Quest to Raise Indigenous Learners' Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Tasha; Webster, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    In 2011 to 2012, 48 schools in the Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland participated in the Principals as Literacy Leaders with Indigenous Communities (PALLIC) project. Central to this project was the establishment of positive working relationships between school principals and Indigenous community leaders in order to improve…

  7. International vs. domestic technology in-licensing: How do Chinese firms build their technological capabilities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Yuandi

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the different impacts of international and domestic technology in-licensing for Chinese firms as licensees on their technological capability building. The evolution of firms in developing countries and development of their technological capabilities has received increasing...

  8. Reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene in marine sediments: Biodiversity and dehalorespiring capabilities of the indigenous microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, B; Presta, E; Rossetti, S

    2016-03-01

    Chlorinated compounds pose environmental concerns due to their toxicity and wide distribution in several matrices. Microorganisms specialized in leading anaerobic reductive dechlorination (RD) processes, including Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc), are able to reduce chlorinated compounds to harmless products or to less toxic forms. Here we report the first detailed study dealing with the RD potential of heavy polluted marine sediment by evaluating the biodegradation kinetics together with the composition, dynamics and activity of indigenous microbial population. A microcosm study was conducted under strictly anaerobic conditions on marine sediment collected near the marine coast of Sarno river mouth, one of the most polluted river in Europe. Tetrachloroethene (PCE), used as model pollutant, was completely converted to ethene within 150 days at reductive dechlorination rate equal to 0.016 meq L(-1) d(-1). Consecutive spikes of PCE allowed increasing the degradation kinetics up to 0.1 meq L(-1)d(-1) within 20 days. Strictly anaerobiosis and repeated spikes of PCE stimulated the growth of indigenous Dhc cells (growth yield of ~7.0 E + 07 Dhc cells per μM Cl(-1) released). Dhc strains carrying the reductive dehalogenase genes tceA and vcrA were detected in the original marine sediment and their number increased during the treatment as demonstrated by the high level of tceA expression at the end of the microcosm study (2.41 E + 05 tceA gene transcripts g(-1)). Notably, the structure of the microbial communities was fully described by Catalysed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) as wells as the dynamics of the dechlorinating bacteria during the microcosms operation. Interestingly, a direct role of Dhc cells was ascertained suggesting the existence of strains adapted at salinity conditions. Additionally, non-Dhc Chloroflexi were retrieved in the original sediment and were kept stable over time suggesting their likely flanking role of the RD

  9. Capability Building and Learning: An Emergent Behavior Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreu Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Economics-based models of firms typically overlook management acts and capability development. We propose a model that analyzes the aggregate behavior of a population of firms resulting from both specific management decisions and learning processes, that induce changes in companies’ capabilities. Decisions are made under imperfect information and bounded rationality, and managers may sacrifice short-term performance in exchange for qualitative outcomes that affect their firm’s future potential. The proposed model provides a structured setting in which these issues -often discussed only informally- can be systematically analyzed through simulation, producing a variety of hard-to-anticipate emergent behaviors. Economic performance is quite sensitive to managers’ estimates of their firms’ capabilities, and companies willing to sacrifice short-run results for future potential appear to be more stable than the rest. Also, bounded rationality can produce chaotic dynamics reminiscent of real life situations.

  10. Capability Building in Educational Technology for Teachers in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Han; Zhuzhu, Wang

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to the project called Education Technology Capacity Building Plan for All Primary and Secondary Teachers now being implemented in China. Because information and communication technology skills training cannot match the demand of teachers' professional development, the Chinese Ministry of Education established…

  11. A Review of Maximizing Muscle Building Capabilities with Anabolic Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Agbons

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Building muscle at a rate faster than the human body would under normal circumstances is of great importance in skills and activities that require intense muscular effort. Although physical training stands as the backbone of muscle building, physiological variations make it an unfair yardstick in measuring individual efforts. Other methods of muscle building such as specialised nutrition and the use of digestive enzymes in breaking down proteins for quick absorption are also commonly used together with physical training. The use of anabolic substances, however, has proved more successful than any of the aforementioned methods. Nevertheless, with it comes ethical, legal, and clinical issues especially in sports. In spite of this, athletes still find ways of circumventing test protocols which have been a major issue for the World Anti-Doping Agency. However, advancements in science have opened the doorway for anabolic enzymes which are the ultimate muscle growers to be more or less, directly manipulated. One method is gene doping which involves altering gene expressions. The future of muscle building lies in man’s ability to decisively alter the functioning of these enzymes directly.

  12. A Multi-University Economic Capability-Building Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Shelley; Briar-Lawson, Katharine

    2017-01-01

    To prepare students to work competently with financially at-risk individuals, families, and communities, social work schools need to bring economic literacy skills into the curriculum. This article describes an ambitious financial capability education initiative in New York City. It reports on a unique collaborative effort to develop, use, and…

  13. Maintaining operational excellence: building capability beyond knowledge transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramjist, S. [Ontario Power Generation, Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, Bowmanville, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the issues relating to human resources and maintaining capabilities in an organization. The sustaining elements are: vision and plan for excellence; invest in the plant; invest in human capital; find and fix problems. There is much discussion about knowledge transfer and retention that is mainly focused on technical attributes and proficiency. We are losing more people with the requisite managerial and leadership capability than we can develop and backfill at a Time when our industry is facing increased competition and decreased margins. We are vulnerable because this Increases our dependence on augmented staff for certain key leadership roles. Previous methods for developing people will take too long and does not appeal to current generation. A solution, not the only solution, but the one we have chosen is initial hiring of operators, maintainers and engineers, internal promotion for key roles (FLM, FSOS, Shift Supervisor, Section Manager, ANO) and focus on all three aspects of capability and looking for leadership traits. Look for ambition, drive, initiative and motivation. Identify, separate and stream. Take specific measures to accelerate growth.

  14. Building a Practical Natural Laminar Flow Design Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Lynde, Michelle N.

    2017-01-01

    A preliminary natural laminar flow (NLF) design method that has been developed and applied to supersonic and transonic wings with moderate-to-high leading-edge sweeps at flight Reynolds numbers is further extended and evaluated in this paper. The modular design approach uses a knowledge-based design module linked with different flow solvers and boundary layer stability analysis methods to provide a multifidelity capability for NLF analysis and design. An assessment of the effects of different options for stability analysis is included using pressures and geometry from an NLF wing designed for the Common Research Model (CRM). Several extensions to the design module are described, including multiple new approaches to design for controlling attachment line contamination and transition. Finally, a modification to the NLF design algorithm that allows independent control of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) and cross flow (CF) modes is proposed. A preliminary evaluation of the TS-only option applied to the design of an NLF nacelle for the CRM is performed that includes the use of a low-fidelity stability analysis directly in the design module.

  15. Project-Oriented University – Building the Capability for Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul DOBRESCU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Global economy is increasingly a knowledge economy, making people’s skills and qualifications more important than traditional power indicators such as territory, geography, natural resources. Globalization imposes new rhythms of performance to every economic or social field. Higher education is no exception to this, since it lies at the interface with the external environment, where skills and qualifications will be used and exploited for economic benefits. Universities are under a two-fold pressure. First, they provide services, knowledge, skills for fast-moving sectors. The knowledge and skills may quickly become obsolete and irrelevant for the economy. Second, universities need to innovate and to adapt to situations of constant change. Both types of pressure force universities to develop their capability for innovation, which becomes a prerequisite for survival. The purpose of this paper is to explain the concept of projectoriented university as a type of university that explicitly uses projects to perform processes of medium to high complexity, thus allowing it to deal with the increasing turbulence and dynamics of its environments. This concept is premised on the idea that there is a connection between a university’s maturity in project management and its managerial competitiveness and innovativeness. The concept inherits the conceptual core of the model of the projectoriented company and it comprises two components. The former is concerned with the structural dimensions of project management, “the hard” component – processes, procedures, organizational structures, terminology. The latter is concerned with the social dimension of project management, the “soft” component – skills, attitudes, competences, project management culture. Empirical results are considered representative for the Romanian higher education system as a whole, with due nuances and exceptions.

  16. Building partnerships with Indigenous communities around climate change: A new UCAR initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    The atmospheric and related sciences have one of the lowest rates of participation by American Indians of any physical science. This not only disadvantages the atmospheric sciences by isolating them from a rich and relevant intellectual heritage, it disadvantages tribal communities who seek to apply the insights from atmospheric sciences to planning their own future. In a time of rapid environmental change and its impact on tribal lands and all lands, the need for connection between these two communities is especially urgent. In 2007, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research launched a new Community Building Program, in order to catalyze and coordinate activities that contribute to UCAR's strategic goal of developing a diverse atmospheric science workforce. A key goal of this program has been to look for partnerships with the American Indian community around climate change issues. The goal of these partnerships is to support North American tribal efforts to enhance their own scientific and adaptive capacity around climate change. In the early stages of this partnership, we have listened to some important messages from Indigenous communities: •Climate change, like all things related to the landscape, is intimately connected to identity and sovereignty • Scientific expertise is one among many skills indigenous people employ in their relation with their homelands • Climate change research and education are embedded in decision-making about economic development, energy, public health as well as cultural preservation, language, and tribal sovereignty This presentation will be an opportunity to check and extend these insights discuss and use them as a basis for a long-term partnership between UCAR and tribal communities.

  17. Building service capacity within a regional district mental health service: recommendations from an Indigenous mental health symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Diann S; Hunter, Keith

    2006-01-01

    In response to recent developments within the mental health services of south-east Queensland, the Toowoomba District Mental Health Service (TDMHS) has developed a Model of Service Delivery, which outlines the range of services provided for consumers across their lifespan. Indigenous consumers of the TDMHS come from a wide area of communities in the surrounding shires (Rural, remote and metropolitan areas (RRMA) 4-7). It was recognised by the service that Indigenous mental health consumers have unique needs and, because of these needs, this area of service delivery required greater attention and further development. In December 2004, a symposium was organised by the service to bring together a range of speakers and delegates working in the area of Indigenous mental health to discuss issues and work towards developing strategies to enable the service to better meet the needs of Indigenous consumers in this region of south-east Queensland. The symposium program consisted of keynote speakers and invited papers and culminated with an afternoon workshop that collated the symposium's main issues and themes around building service capacity for Indigenous mental health consumers. The objective of the workshop was 'Identifying ways to meet Indigenous mental health needs'. This workshop gave the delegates a chance to reflect, discuss and brainstorm the major issues of concern relating to this question. A group facilitator guided the discussion and organised the delegates into groups to evaluate, debate and propose recommendations for each of the major issues that emerged. The feedback and discussion arising from the workshop is presented. Sixteen major themes emerged from the workshop. Seven of these were voted by the participants as being dominant and in greatest need of discussion: (1) communication; (2) cultural respect; (3) culturally appropriate clinical tools; (4) supportive management; (5) patient compliance; (6) career structure; and (7) empowerment. These seven

  18. A new direction for water management? Indigenous nation building as a strategy for river health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Hemming

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous involvement in Australian water management is conventionally driven by a top-down approach by nonIndigenous government agencies, that asks "how do we engage Indigenous people?" and has culminated in the ineffective "consult" and "service delivery" processes evident in mainstream water management planning. This is a hopeful paper that identifies the critical importance of a "nation-based" approach for effective Indigenous engagement in water planning and policy through the work undertaken by the Ngarrindjeri Regional Authority (NRA in the Murray Futures program. The NRA is an Indigenous government in the "settled-south" of Australia. Over past decades, the NRA has developed a range of political technologies that act as tools for redeveloping Ngarrindjeri Nationhood after colonial disempowerment and dispossession. These tools enable better collaboration with nonIndigenous governments, especially in natural resource management policy and practice. In turn, this has better enabled the NRA to exercise a decision-making and planning authority over the lands and waters in its jurisdiction, therefore, more effectively exercising its ongoing duty of care as Country. This paper presents a case study of the Sugar Shack Complex Management Plan, codeveloped by the NRA and the South Australian Government in 2015, to demonstrate the benefits that accrue when Indigenous nations are resourced as authorities responsible for reframing water management and planning approaches to facilitate the equitable collaboration of Indigenous and nonIndigenous worldviews. As a marker of the success of this strategy, the Ngarrindjeri Yarluwar-Ruwe Program, in partnership with the South Australian government, recently won the Australian Riverprize 2015 for delivering excellence in Australian river management.

  19. Rethinking capacity building for knowledge mobilisation: developing multilevel capabilities in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislov, Roman; Waterman, Heather; Harvey, Gill; Boaden, Ruth

    2014-11-15

    Knowledge mobilisation in healthcare organisations is often carried out through relatively short-term projects dependent on limited funding, which raises concerns about the long-term sustainability of implementation and improvement. It is becoming increasingly recognised that the translation of research evidence into practice has to be supported by developing the internal capacity of healthcare organisations to engage with and apply research. This process can be supported by external knowledge mobilisation initiatives represented, for instance, by professional associations, collaborative research partnerships and implementation networks. This conceptual paper uses empirical and theoretical literature on organisational learning and dynamic capabilities to enhance our understanding of intentional capacity building for knowledge mobilisation in healthcare organisations. The discussion is structured around the following three themes: (1) defining and classifying capacity building for knowledge mobilisation; (2) mechanisms of capability development in organisational context; and (3) individual, group and organisational levels of capability development. Capacity building is presented as a practice-based process of developing multiple skills, or capabilities, belonging to different knowledge domains and levels of complexity. It requires an integration of acquisitive learning, through which healthcare organisations acquire knowledge and skills from knowledge mobilisation experts, and experience-based learning, through which healthcare organisations adapt, absorb and modify their knowledge and capabilities through repeated practice. Although the starting point for capability development may be individual-, team- or organisation-centred, facilitation of the transitions between individual, group and organisational levels of learning within healthcare organisations will be needed. Any initiative designed to build capacity for knowledge mobilisation should consider the

  20. Building Technological Capabilities in Ghanaian SMEs through Private Sector Development Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Jens Peter

    2005-01-01

    and related business entities to illustrate how the private sector programme of Danida has worked in Ghana. It looks into the direct effects of the programme, i.e. capability building and simultaneously shows how conventional evaluation procedures miss many of the derived effects of the programme....

  1. The collective capabilities as a methodological tool for assessing human welfare in indigenous territories of the Colombian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Acosta Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an integrating approach of conceptual issues to evaluate the wellbeing in indigenous communities. The approach recognizes the consensual absence of a “wellbeing” definition. Therefore, understanding the local concepts of wellbeing could help develop planning tools for decision-makers in indigenous societies contexts. The approach is based on the concept of capacities developed by A. Sen in which a group of human wellbeing indicators are constructed and where cultural issues might be included without affecting the power of the indicator. A study with Uitoto (múrui-muina-mɨnɨka and the called People of the Center indigenous groups of the Northern Amazonia has been done to discuss their particular idea of what wellbeing is. It is a concept the People of the Center summarizes in the word monifue (abundance. This concept is the result of the analysis of their symbolic and ritual contexts. The concept has been actualized through the time and today integrate issues of their contemporary life style. The paper describes some elements derived of this concept, and contributes to the conceptualization of issues that might be used in a valid model to describe the life style of these indigenous societies. The discussion of the paper is not based on technical issues of the model yet. The discussion define some limits where the variables to measure and relate should be placed. This is an important result about the understanding of the concept wellbeing of these indigenous societies and the elements that require to be transformed in concrete indicators.

  2. Innovation through Initiatives -- A Framework for Building New Capabilities in Public Sector Research Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffen, Charlette A.; Judd, Kathleen S.

    2004-12-01

    The accelerating pace of change in science and technology has resulted in new attention to the process of identifying and developing ideas that ultimately lead to new scientific capabilities and business opportunities for an organization. The need to refresh research programs and capabilities is as important in federally funded laboratories as it is for industry. This paper explores the critical success factors for new initiatives at a federal laboratory, and building on lessons learned through this study and in private industry, identifies a more systematic process that could potentially improve the effectiveness of these initiatives in achieving results.

  3. Towards sustainable urban water governance in Denmark: collective building of capabilities in local authorities

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    2016-01-01

    To address the climate adaptation of cities, today’s water managers need more than technical skills to drive sustainable urban water projects, which also stimulate demand for post-graduate education so that professionalisation of integrated sustainable water management in the public sector can be achieved. The ‘urban water platform’ was tested and is hereby presented as a course concept for building collective capabilities for integrated sustainable water design among local authorities in Den...

  4. Building Hybrid Knowledge at the Intercultural University of Veracruz, Mexico: An Anthropological Study of Indigenous Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Zuany, Rosa Guadalupe

    2009-01-01

    The "interculturalization" of educational institutions designed for, and sometimes by, indigenous peoples has reached the realm of higher education. In Mexico, "intercultural universities or colleges" are being created either by state governments, NGOs and community organizations or by academic institutions. In this paper, one…

  5. Building a Data Science capability for USGS water research and communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appling, A.; Read, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    Interpreting and communicating water issues in an era of exponentially increasing information requires a blend of domain expertise, computational proficiency, and communication skills. The USGS Office of Water Information has established a Data Science team to meet these needs, providing challenging careers for diverse domain scientists and innovators in the fields of information technology and data visualization. Here, we detail the experience of building a Data Science capability as a bridging element between traditional water resources analyses and modern computing tools and data management techniques. This approach includes four major components: 1) building reusable research tools, 2) documenting data-intensive research approaches in peer reviewed journals, 3) communicating complex water resources issues with interactive web visualizations, and 4) offering training programs for our peers in scientific computing. These components collectively improve the efficiency, transparency, and reproducibility of USGS data analyses and scientific workflows.

  6. Building the Foundations and Enterprise Capabilities for Digital Leadership: The Lego Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Sawy, Omar; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Amsinck, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    digital leadership as they undergo large organizational transformations and position themselves for the future. We define digital leadership for the enterprise as doing the right things for the strategic success of digitalization for the enterprise and its business ecosystem. How does an enterprise...... develop the internal capabilities for digital leadership in organizational transformation? What are the requisite digitalization moves around products, in marketing, with partners, within the enterprise business areas, and within the IT organization? How do these digitalization moves help enterprises...... insights can we provide to CIOs and CXOs in all industries about how to build the foundations for augmenting the enterprise capabilities for digital leadership? This paper seeks to provide such insights for next practices for digital leadership in organizational transformation while drawing on the decade...

  7. A comprehensive model to build improvement capability in a pediatric academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Gerry M; Schoettker, Pamela J; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Luzader, Carolyn; Kotagal, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center developed a comprehensive model to build quality improvement (QI) capability to support its goal to transform its delivery system through a series of training courses. Two online modules orient staff to basic concepts and terminology and prepare them to participate more effectively in QI teams. The basic program (Rapid Cycle Improvement Collaborative, RCIC) is focused on developing the capability to use basic QI tools and complete a narrow-scoped project in approximately 120 days. The Intermediate Improvement Science Series (I(2)S(2)) program is a leadership course focusing on improvement skills and developing a broader and deeper understanding of QI in the context of the organization and external environment. The Advanced Improvement Methods (AIM) course and Quality Scholars Program stimulate the use of more sophisticated methods and prepare Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and external faculty to undertake QI research. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems (AILS) sessions enable interprofessional care delivery system leadership teams to effectively lead a system of care, manage a portfolio of projects, and to deliver on CCHMC's strategic plan. Implementing these programs has shown us that 1) a multilevel curricular approach to building improvement capability is pragmatic and effective, 2) an interprofessional learning environment is critical to shifting mental models, 3) repetition of project experience with coaching and feedback solidifies critical skills, knowledge and behaviors, and 4) focusing first on developing capable interprofessional improvement leaders, versus engaging in broad general QI training across the whole organization, is effective. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expand the Modeling Capabilities of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Shirey

    2008-02-28

    EnergyPlus{trademark} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. Version 1.0 of EnergyPlus was released in April 2001, followed by semiannual updated versions over the ensuing seven-year period. This report summarizes work performed by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC) to expand the modeling capabilities of EnergyPlus. The project tasks involved implementing, testing, and documenting the following new features or enhancement of existing features: (1) A model for packaged terminal heat pumps; (2) A model for gas engine-driven heat pumps with waste heat recovery; (3) Proper modeling of window screens; (4) Integrating and streamlining EnergyPlus air flow modeling capabilities; (5) Comfort-based controls for cooling and heating systems; and (6) An improved model for microturbine power generation with heat recovery. UCF/FSEC located existing mathematical models or generated new model for these features and incorporated them into EnergyPlus. The existing or new models were (re)written using Fortran 90/95 programming language and were integrated within EnergyPlus in accordance with the EnergyPlus Programming Standard and Module Developer's Guide. Each model/feature was thoroughly tested and identified errors were repaired. Upon completion of each model implementation, the existing EnergyPlus documentation (e.g., Input Output Reference and Engineering Document) was updated with information describing the new or enhanced feature. Reference data sets were generated for several of the features to aid program users in selecting proper

  9. A Relationship Framework for Building Information Modeling (BIM Capability in Quantity Surveying Practice and Project Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Construction industry has suffered from poor project performance and it’s crucial to find out solution to improve this issue. Quantity surveyors (QSs play a key role in managing project cost. However, their method of performing tasks is tedious till affect the project performance. Building information modeling (BIM application is attaining attention in the construction industry as a mean to improve the project performance. However, the adoption is low among QSs due to limited study of the BIM’s capabilities in their profession. This research aims to identify the BIM capabilities in quantity surveying practices and examine its relationship with project performance by developing a relationship framework. Data were collected through questionnaire survey and interview in Malaysia. Questionnaire results revealed that several BIM capabilities were significantly correlated with project performance and they were validated through interview. The relationship framework will guide QSs to focus on the identified BIM capabilities for better project outcomes.La industria de la construcción ha sufrido históricamente desviaciones en las mediciones de los materiales empleados frente a las cantidades proyectadas. Los aparejadores juegan un papel clave en este aspecto como responsables de la recepción de materiales. Sin embargo, el trabajo de medición es tedioso hasta el punto de afectar al rendimiento del proyecto. La aplicación del Building Information Modeling (BIM está logrando mejorar este trabajo. Aun así, su utilización es baja entre los aparejadores debido a la escasa formación recibida sobre las posibilidades del BIM. Esta investigación busca identificar las capacidades del BIM aplicado a la medición de materiales y examinar su relación con el rendimiento del proyecto desarrollando un marco de relación. Mediante encuestas y entrevistas realizadas en Malasia, se obtuvieron datos que revelaron que varias capacidades de BIM se correlacionan

  10. Towards sustainable urban water governance in Denmark: collective building of capabilities in local authorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    2016-01-01

    To address the climate adaptation of cities, today’s water managers need more than technical skills to drive sustainable urban water projects, which also stimulate demand for post-graduate education so that professionalisation of integrated sustainable water management in the public sector can...... be achieved. The ‘urban water platform’ was tested and is hereby presented as a course concept for building collective capabilities for integrated sustainable water design among local authorities in Denmark. The course is an innovation because: 1) it invites urban planners, road and park managers and sewage...... managers to take part in a dialogue about sustainable urban water projects, while collectively exploring new design solutions; 2) it facilitates an appreciative communication between several disciplines; 3) it promotes careful planning in the early stages of an urban water construction project....

  11. Local governance responses to social inclusion for older rural Victorians: building resources, opportunities and capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterton, Rachel; Clune, Samantha; Warburton, Jeni; Martin, John

    2014-09-01

    To explore how local governance enables access to resources, creates opportunities and increases capability for older people in rural communities to experience social inclusion. Twenty-six semi-structured interviews were undertaken with community stakeholders across two rural communities in north-east Victoria. Stakeholders were drawn from local government, and a range of community groups and organisations, as identified in a scoping study. Through the provision of community resources (e.g. physical and human infrastructure, organisational partnerships), local services and supports offer social and productive environments for participation. They also build individual resources (e.g. health, skills, finances, networks) to enable older people to participate within these environments, and provide assistance to allow older people to use individual and community resources. Community resources are integral in facilitating the development of older people's individual resources, and opportunities and capabilities for participation. These enable greater choice in participation, and contribute to the sustainability of community resources serving ageing populations. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2013 ACOTA.

  12. Towards Joint Performance: Building Dynamic Capabilities for Public Critical Asset Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa-Jukka Vornanen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to present path the joint performance – how the build dynamic capabilities for public critical asset maintenance. The study examined this by finding out the Sand Cone model and Kano model content linkages to the 20 Finnish largest municipality’s Council’s Action Plans (caps. The study overall is based on a case study, supplemented by the content analysis and the survey. Referring to the content analysis of Finnish 20 largest municipalities previous and current Council’s decision-making 2012–2013, a common strategic objective is economic continuity. The case study explains the implementation to conduct multi-focused strategies to the common order fulfilment process. The dynamic capabilities conduct several strategic actions. The study utilized Critical Factor Index analysis to examine network partners. The most significant contributions of the paper are the task of resource allocation to achieving multi-focused strategic goals and an example how the task has been made of.

  13. It Is Only New Because It Has Been Missing for so Long: Indigenous Evaluation Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Clara; Chase, Malinda; Johnson, James; Mekiana, Debbie; McIntyre, Drena; Ruerup, Amelia; Kerr, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Despite 11,000 years of honing evaluation skills in order to thrive in some of the harshest climatic conditions on the planet, there are few Alaska Native program evaluators and until a recent exchange with New Zealand "Maori", there was no collective vision for building Alaska Native capacity in program evaluation. This article tells…

  14. Science, Technology and Innovation as Social Goods for Development: Rethinking Research Capacity Building from Sen's Capabilities Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormina, Maru

    2018-03-01

    Science and technology are key to economic and social development, yet the capacity for scientific innovation remains globally unequally distributed. Although a priority for development cooperation, building or developing research capacity is often reduced in practice to promoting knowledge transfers, for example through North-South partnerships. Research capacity building/development tends to focus on developing scientists' technical competencies through training, without parallel investments to develop and sustain the socioeconomic and political structures that facilitate knowledge creation. This, the paper argues, significantly contributes to the scientific divide between developed and developing countries more than any skills shortage. Using Charles Taylor's concept of irreducibly social goods, the paper extends Sen's Capabilities Approach beyond its traditional focus on individual entitlements to present a view of scientific knowledge as a social good and the capability to produce it as a social capability. Expanding this capability requires going beyond current fragmented approaches to research capacity building to holistically strengthen the different social, political and economic structures that make up a nation's innovation system. This has implications for the interpretation of human rights instruments beyond their current focus on access to knowledge and for focusing science policy and global research partnerships to design approaches to capacity building/development beyond individual training/skills building.

  15. Indigenous Technological Innovation : Capability and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    During its 1999 economic conference, the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China released a strategy for the development of the western region that included (among other things) revamping the infrastructure, reviewing fiscal policies, promoting trade and investment, and strengthening science and technology ...

  16. Building the foundations for sustainable development: a case for global investment in the capabilities of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Peter; Sweeny, Kim; Rasmussen, Bruce; Wils, Annababette; Friedman, Howard S; Mahon, Jacqueline; Patton, George C; Sawyer, Susan M; Howard, Eric; Symons, John; Stenberg, Karin; Chalasani, Satvika; Maharaj, Neelam; Reavley, Nicola; Shi, Hui; Fridman, Masha; Welsh, Alison; Nsofor, Emeka; Laski, Laura

    2017-10-14

    Investment in the capabilities of the world's 1·2 billion adolescents is vital to the UN's Sustainable Development Agenda. We examined investments in countries of low income, lower-middle income, and upper-middle income covering the majority of these adolescents globally to derive estimates of investment returns given existing knowledge. The costs and effects of the interventions were estimated by adapting existing models and by extending methods to create new modelling tools. Benefits were valued in terms of increased gross domestic product and averted social costs. The initial analysis showed high returns for the modelled interventions, with substantial variation between countries and with returns generally higher in low-income countries than in countries of lower-middle and upper-middle income. For interventions targeting physical, mental, and sexual health (including a human papilloma virus programme), an investment of US$4·6 per capita each year from 2015 to 2030 had an unweighted mean benefit to cost ratio (BCR) of more than 10·0, whereas, for interventions targeting road traffic injuries, a BCR of 5·9 (95% CI 5·8-6·0) was achieved on investment of $0·6 per capita each year. Interventions to reduce child marriage ($3·8 per capita each year) had a mean BCR of 5·7 (95% CI 5·3-6·1), with the effect high in low-income countries. Investment to increase the extent and quality of secondary schooling is vital but will be more expensive than other interventions-investment of $22·6 per capita each year from 2015 to 2030 generated a mean BCR of 11·8 (95% CI 11·6-12·0). Investments in health and education will not only transform the lives of adolescents in resource-poor settings, but will also generate high economic and social returns. These returns were robust to substantial variation in assumptions. Although the knowledge base on the impacts of interventions is limited in many areas, and a major research effort is needed to build a more complete

  17. Best Practices for National Cyber Security: Building a National Computer Security Incident Management Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Establishing a national computer security incident management capability can be an important step in managing that risk. In this document, this capability is...referred to as a National Computer Security Incident Response Team (National CSIRT), although the specific organizational form may vary among nations

  18. Contractor Development Models for Promoting Sustainable Building – a case for developing management capabilities of contractors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlungwana, Wilkin S

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Construction industry and indeed all small and medium-sized contractors play a significant socio-economic role in the developing countries. This paper highlights the importance of promoting sustainable building through the implementation...

  19. Money is Ammunition. Building Fiscal Triad Capability for the Brigade Combat Team

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sawyers, Milton L; Murfee, Michael W

    2006-01-01

    ...) assets - Finance, Resource Management and Contracting. The authors argue that Army Brigade Commanders must be provided Fiscal Triad capabilities that are either organic or directly apportioned to the Brigade...

  20. Building a Predictive Capability for Decision-Making that Supports MultiPEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Joshua Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-20

    Multi-phenomenological explosion monitoring (multiPEM) is a developing science that uses multiple geophysical signatures of explosions to better identify and characterize their sources. MultiPEM researchers seek to integrate explosion signatures together to provide stronger detection, parameter estimation, or screening capabilities between different sources or processes. This talk will address forming a predictive capability for screening waveform explosion signatures to support multiPEM.

  1. Use of Social Media in Inbound Open Innovation: Building Capabilities for Absorptive Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Ooms, W.; Bell, J.H.J.; Kok, R.A.W.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the use of social media in inbound open innovation on capabilities for absorptive capacity of companies. Seven explorative case studies were conducted in an R&D and business context of two large global high-tech companies. The results suggest that if the necessary conditions are met, social media usage increases the transparent, moderational and multi-directional interactions that in turn influence four capabilities for absorptive capacity: connectedness...

  2. Building capability throughout a change effort: leading the transformation of a police agency to community policing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, J Kevin

    2007-06-01

    This case describes a change effort to move a police agency to become a community policing organization. The community policing effort was seen as a means to make a transformational change to become a learning organization with the goal of improving the delivery of police services. The case describes the steps taken to meet the new vision of community policing as well as the steps taken to deal with the challenges or realities of trying to make change happen. The lens for this case is the leadership role across the stages of change (exploration, planning, implementation, monitoring and institutionalization) in building capacity within the organization to sustain the change effort. The capacity building focused on incorporating systems thinking into the mindset of the members of the organization, breaking down the command and control mindset by building a new norm around high involvement of committed teams, and developing skill sets to support continuous learning and improvement in order to align organizational systems. A key lesson learned is that effective leaders do not just prepare an organization prior to a change effort. They must have the patience to constantly build the capacity for change among organizational members throughout the various stages of the change effort.

  3. DYNAMIC CAPABILITIES AND CREATING ORGANIZATIONAL KNOWLEDGE: IMPORTANT LINKAGE FOR BUILDING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiono A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As a concept derived from the resource-based view, dynamic capabilities essentially have an important linkage with activities related to the creation of organizational knowledge. Using literature study method, this paper aims to discuss the linkage between the creation of dynamic knowledge capabilities and the creation of knowledge company. The study shows that the discussion of dynamic capabilities creation finally puts both learning and knowledge in an important position. Correspondingly, the relationship between a growth strategy that is generally chosen by the organization brings a consequence that the creation of organizational knowledge becomes something that can not be ignored. In order to make the process of knowledge creation in line with dynamic capabilities creation within a growth strategy creation framework, we need a dynamic process of knowledge creation. Among the various models of knowledge creation, SECI model still becomes a relevant model within organizational knowledge creation framework. In general, this study is still theoretical, therefore, more empirical subsequent discussions are expected.

  4. Use of Social Media in Inbound Open Innovation: Building Capabilities for Absorptive Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, W.; Bell, J.H.J.; Kok, R.A.W.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the use of social media in inbound open innovation on capabilities for absorptive capacity of companies. Seven explorative case studies were conducted in an R&D and business context of two large global high-tech companies. The results suggest that if the

  5. Building Micro-Foundations for the Routines, Capabilities, and Performance Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abell, Peter; Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2007-01-01

    they are best understood at the micro-level. Second, we provide a formal model that shows precisely why macro explanation is incomplete and which exemplifies how explicit micro-foundations may be built for notions of routines and capabilities and for how these impact firm performance....

  6. Building Server Capabilities - Company Level Innovation and Innovation Management in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi

    2012-01-01

    The twenty-first century is the century of the emerging economies, both in market growth and, just as importantly, in changes to business strategy. Rapid market growth is now experienced and the multinationals are reacting to the market by developing products to the taste of the local requirements...... for their decision making in encouraging operation activities in China. I will contribute scientifically to the discussion by developing theory on server capabilities considering the relationships and differences between the case companies....

  7. Building a computer-aided design capability using a standard time share operating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczanski, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes how an integrated system of engineering computer programs can be built using a standard commercially available operating system. The discussion opens with an outline of the auxiliary functions that an operating system can perform for a team of engineers involved in a large and complex task. An example of a specific integrated system is provided to explain how the standard operating system features can be used to organize the programs into a simple and inexpensive but effective system. Applications to an aircraft structural design study are discussed to illustrate the use of an integrated system as a flexible and efficient engineering tool. The discussion concludes with an engineer's assessment of an operating system's capabilities and desirable improvements.

  8. Indigenous homelessness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and scope of Indigenous homelessness in the Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. They argue that effective policy and support programs aimed at relieving Indigenous homelessness must be rooted in Indigenous conceptions of home, land, and kinship, and cannot ignore the context of systemic inequality......, institutionalization, landlessness, among other things, that stem from a history of colonialism. Indigenous Homelessness: Perspectives from Canada, New Zealand and Australia provides a comprehensive exploration of the Indigenous experience of homelessness. It testifies to ongoing cultural resilience and lays......Being homeless in one’s homeland is a colonial legacy for many Indigenous people in settler societies. The construction of Commonwealth nation-states from colonial settler societies depended on the dispossession of Indigenous peoples from their lands. The legacy of that dispossession and related...

  9. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-03-28

    California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and

  10. Building Postponement Capability

    OpenAIRE

    Takashima, Katsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The basic concept of postponement is to delay activities until the latest possible point in time when more accurate information is available. In the Bucklin-type postponement-speculation model of inventory decision, to shorten the delivery lead time or lessen the delivery lot size from suppliers to retail stores is considered postponement. In a competitive environment, a given retailer cannot gain a competitive advantage alone by conducting longer postponement than other retailers. This is be...

  11. Up close and real: living and learning in a remote community builds students' cultural capabilities and understanding of health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackrah, Rosalie D; Hall, Maeva; Fitzgerald, Kathryn; Thompson, Sandra C

    2017-07-06

    Rural and remote communities in Australia fare worse than their urban counterparts across major health indicators, with geographic isolation, restricted accessibility to health services, socioeconomic disadvantage, lifestyle and behavioural factors all implicated in poorer health outcomes. Health disparities, which are especially stark in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, underscore the urgent need to build a culturally responsive and respectful rural health workforce. Allied health student placements in settings with high Aboriginal populations provide opportunities for the development of cultural capabilities and observation of the causes and impact of health disparities. A service learning pedagogy underpinned by strong campus-community partnerships can contribute to effective situated learning. Positive placement experiences can also encourage future rural practice alleviating workforce shortages. This article reports on the first stage of a proposed longitudinal investigation into the impact of remote placements on clinical practice and employment choices. In-depth interviews were undertaken with health science students and recent graduates from Australian universities who spent up to 4 weeks at the remote community of Mt. Magnet (Badimaya country) in Western Australia. Interviews, which occurred between two and 12 months following the placement were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed for patterns of meaning. Factors which contributed to positive professional, personal and socially responsive learning experiences were identified. These included pre-placement cultural training to build understanding of the local Aboriginal community, peer support, community engagement, cultural exchanges and interprofessional collaboration. Highlights were associated with relationship-building in the community and opportunities to apply insights into Aboriginal cultural ways to clinical and community practice. The role of the

  12. Re-vitalizing an indigenous language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    languages to match standards defined in nation-building and, thereby, enabled latent possibilities for indigenous populations to re-vitalize their languages in connection with the United Nations Year for Indigenous Peoples in 1993, and the first United Nations Decade for Indigenous Peoples, 1995......The re-vitalization of indigenous languages depend on political and legal support and the imple-mentation of language rights depend on knowledge of vocabulary and grammar structures of the individual languages. Throughout the nineteenth century world, compilers of dictionaries adapted indigenous...

  13. Technological capability building in MNE-Related social businesses of less developed countries : the experience of Grameen-Danone foods in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peerally, J.A.; Figueiredo, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    Although there has been considerable research on firm-level technological capability building in the context of developing economies, there is a scarcity of studies which examine this issue in multinational enterprises’ socially motivated businesses located in less developed economies. This paper

  14. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  15. The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Azevedo, Ines Lima; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Lai, Judy

    2009-05-14

    The increasing concern about climate change as well as the expected direct environmental economic impacts of global warming will put considerable constraints on the US building sector, which consumes roughly 48percent of the total primary energy, making it the biggest single source of CO2 emissions. It is obvious that the battle against climate change can only be won by considering innovative building approaches and consumer behaviors and bringing new, effective low carbon technologies to the building / consumer market. However, the limited time given to mitigate climate change is unforgiving to misled research and / or policy. This is the reason why Lawrence Berkeley National Lab is working on an open source long range Stochastic Lite Building Module (SLBM) to estimate the impact of different policies and consumer behavior on the market penetration of low carbon building technologies. SLBM is designed to be a fast running, user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual interface. The tool is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies. It also incorporates consumer preferences and passive building systems as well as interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains). Furthermore, everything is based on service demand, e.g. a certain temperature or luminous intensity, instead of energy intensities. The core objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the practical approach used, to start a discussion process between relevant stakeholders and to build collaborations.

  16. LITERATURE IN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES AS ESSENTIAL TOOL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGOZI

    LITERATURE IN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES AS ESSENTIAL. TOOL FOR CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND NATION. BUILDING: THE CASE OF IGBO. Nonyelum .M.Obi. Nnamdi Azikiwe University Awka. Nigeria. Abstract. The study sets out to examine the policy of implementing literature in indigenous languages such as Igbo ...

  17. Conservation of Biological Diversity and Indigenous Traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conservation of Biological Diversity and Indigenous Traditional Knowledge as Exemplified by the Cases of Asia and Africa. ... For centuries, local/indigenous populations have used biodiversity as food, medicines, building materials and for other purposes. Traditional knowledge has been practised and passed on from one ...

  18. Indigenous religions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2009-01-01

    Dette essay diskuterer en publikation af James L. Cox med titlen From Primitive to Indigenous (2007). Bogen analyserer forskellige forfatteres holdninger til studiet af indfødte kulturers religioner. Cox's analyser tages op i dette essay og de problematiseres i forhold til mit eget arbejde....

  19. Learning and technological capability building in emerging economies: The case of the biomass power equipment industry in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulrich Elmer; Ockwell, David

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that the transfer of foreign technology to developing countries should be considered in light of broader processes of learning, technological capability, formation and industrial development. Previous studies that have looked at this in the context of cleantech...

  20. The Heavy Brigade Combat Team in COIN: An Assessment Capabilities to Clear-Hold-Build-and Sustain Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-11

    Committee Chair Thomas G. Clark, Ph.D. , Member Stephen L. Melton, M.P.A. , Member Lowell E. Solien, M.S. Accepted this... basketball team of Michael Jordans who can play any position. What we must do is be able to have this pentathlete team better organized, better led...infantry, and a large increase in wheeled capability to facilitate population centric operations. On Point II describes how armor and field

  1. Evaluation of building envelopes from the viewpoint of capability of controlling thermal environment; Onnetsu kankyo chosei noryoku ni yoru kenchiku gaihi no hyoka no kokoromi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, K.; Ono, S. [Taisei Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Shukuya, M. [Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    The ability that architectural space improves the thermal environment in comparison with outdoor environment is called the `capability of controlling thermal environment.` As the value becomes higher, the indoor thermal environment is more improved. In this paper, the controlling capability of six building envelopes with different window systems was compared. The heat transfer in the wall and window system is approximated using a lumped mass model of heat capacity to obtain a heat balance equation and combined with the heat balance equation in indoor air for backward difference. The wall surface temperature and indoor air temperature in a calculation model are then calculated. A radiation absorption coefficient is used for mutual radiation on each wall. In the model, the adjoining room or first- and second-floor rooms were made the same in conditions as the model on the assumption that the one-side lighted office in an RC reference floor is in the non-illumination and non-airconditioning state. In summer, the controlling capability remarkably varies depending on the window system. For the window facing the south, the annual capability is more advanced than in other directions and the indoor thermal environment is improved on the average. 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Empowering Indigenous Women

    OpenAIRE

    Quesada, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous People movements are present in Latin American regions since the 80’s (Betancur, 2011:7) In the case of Peru, the State has incorporated international treatments related to indigenous people rights, such as ILO 169 Convention as well as the United Nation’s Declaration of Indigenous people rights. (Chirif and García, 2011:116) Despite of this, indigenous people are still victims of racism, exploitation and discrimination nowadays. Recently, inside indigenous people own movement,...

  3. Indigenous Studies Speaks to Environmental Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Laurie; Middleton, Beth Rose; Gilmer, Robert; Grossman, Zoltán; Janis, Terry; Lucero, Stephanie; Morgan, Tukoroirangi; Watson, Annette

    2013-11-01

    This article describes the increasing connections between the fields of Indigenous studies and environmental management and examines some of the ways that an Indigenous studies perspective can guide thinking about environmental management. Indigenous groups have been involved in the management of environmental and natural resources on their lands since time immemorial. Indigenous groups have also become increasingly involved in Western practices of environmental management with the advent of co-management institutions, subsistence boards, traditional ecological knowledge forums, and environmental issues affecting Indigenous resources. Thus, it is an important time for scholarship that explores how Indigenous groups are both shaping and being affected by processes of environmental management. This article summarizes key findings and themes from eight papers situated at the intersection of these two fields of study and identify means by which environmental managers can better accommodate Indigenous rights and perspectives. It is the authors’ hope that increased dialog between Indigenous studies and environmental management can contribute to the building of sustainable and socially just environmental management practices.

  4. Indigenous identity in post-colonial Greenland

    OpenAIRE

    Auzane, Agnese; Wegens, caroline; Andersen, Amalie; Arendt, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This project examines how Greenlandic Inuit assert and negotiate their indigenous identity in contemporary, postcolonial Greenland. We analyse modernisation, urbanisation and nation-building patterns and developments, as well as their meaning for the indigenous identity of Greenlandic Inuit. We also examine the new forms of expression among Inuit youth. Greenlandic Inuit constitute a contemporary and highly urbanised society, as urban life has become a way of life for the majority...

  5. Extending a Mobile Device with Low-Cost 3d Modeling and Building-Scale Mapping Capabilities, for Application in Architecture and Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancona, M.; Clini, P.; Dellacasa, A.; Falzone, P.; La Camera, A.; Quattrini, R.; Sommariva, E.; Stephens, J.

    2015-02-01

    One of the most challenging problem in architecture is the automated construction of 3D (and 4D) digital models of cultural objects with the aim of implementing open data repositories, scientifically authenticated and responding to well accepted standards of validation, evaluation, preservation, publication, updating and dissemination. The realization of such an ambitious objective requires the adoption of special technological instruments. In this paper we plan to use portable devices (i.e. smartphones, tablets or PDAs eventually extended to wearable ones), extended with a small plug-in, for automatically extracting 3D models of single objects and building-scale mapping of the surrounding environment. At the same time, the device will provide the capability of inserting notes and observations. Where the instrument cannot be directly applied, for example for exploring the top of a complex building, we consider mounting our device, or using equivalent existing equipment, on a drone, in a modular approach for obtaining data de-facto interchangeable. The approach based on the expansion packs has the advantage of anticipating (or even promoting) future extensions of new mobile devices, when the spectrum of possible applications justify the corresponding increased costs. In order to experiment and verify this approach we plan to test it in two specific scenarios of the cultural heritage domain in which such devices seem particularly promising: Strada Nuova in Genoa and Palazzo Ducale in Urbino, both located in Italy.

  6. Defining 'Indigenous': Between Culture and Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Pritchard

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers a range of discourses on identity and the definition of culture. I have little doubt that, generally speaking, Indigenous people are quite capable of defining the meaning of ‘Indigenous person’ or ‘culture’ in a way that satisfies their specific immediate needs and interests. My concern here is with the definition of ‘Aboriginal or Indigenous person’ in Australian law and legislation and with the critical response, by members of the scientific community as well as cultural theorists, to references to a biological basis of identity.

  7. Indigenous Education in Mexico: Indigenous Students' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despagne, Colette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate whether, despite a shift in political and educational discourses over the last decades that suggests that Indigenous cultures and languages are recognized, any real change has occurred in terms of Indigenous education in Mexico. It is possible that official bilingual intercultural education is still…

  8. A participative evaluation model to refine academic support for first year Indigenous higher education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Rossingh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluative approach designed to provide a cycle of continuous improvement to retain Indigenous students during their first year of higher education.   The evaluation model operates in conjunction with a student academic enrichment program that is premised on valuing and respecting each student's background and life experience whilst building capability for learning success.  Data collected will be used for continual improvement of a newly developed innovative academic enrichment program that caters to the needs of Indigenous students.  The defining mechanisms of the model for measuring the first year experience are particularly meaningful for the Australian Centre For Indigenous Knowledges and Education as it moves into its inaugural year of operation in 2012. This preeminent time requires a flexible model to receive timely feedback in a reflexive environment where students guide the process as they continue their journey of accumulating knowledge and leave behind their contribution in shaping the landscape for future first year Indigenous students.  

  9. A Community Engaged Dental Curriculum: A Rural Indigenous Outplacement Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzar, Menaka A; Owen, Julie

    2016-04-26

    Indigenous people worldwide suffer from poor oral health as compared to non-Indigenous citizens. One of the approaches to bring about improvement in Indigenous oral health is to enhance the service provision by implementing oral health outplacement programmes. A case study of such a programme for dental students in Australia reports how an educational institution can successfully engage with an Indigenous oral health service to provide learning experiences to the students as well as deliver much needed services to the community. The assessment of this ongoing outplacement programme over the period of 2008-14, based on students' feedback, highlights some of the key beneficial outcomes. Students agreed that the Indigenous outplacement programme improved their understanding of Indigenous issues (mean ± SD: 4.10±0.8; 5 refers to strongly agree on 5-point scale) and increased the possibility that they will practise in Indigenous health (3.66±1.0). They were pleased with the assistance received by clinical supervisors and clinic staff at the Indigenous dental clinic (4.28±0.8). This programme has demonstrated that structured student outplacements are valuable in building relations across cultures especially with Indigenous communities. It has also shown that university engagement with the public health sector can be beneficial to both institutions. Significance for public healthAn oral health outreach programme is one of the suggested approaches to effectively address the endemic issues of poor oral health among Indigenous people around the world. An Indigenous dental clinical outplacement in Australia provides an example of beneficial outcomes of such an approach. It provides dental students with an opportunity to experience the health issues related to Australian Indigenous communities and prepare future graduates to work comfortably in the public health care system. Indigenous people also develop trust and feel comfortable in receiving oral health care services

  10. Indigenous Storytelling and Participatory Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Storytelling, in its various forms, has often been described as a practice with great emancipatory potential. In turn, Indigenous knowledge shows great promise in guiding a participatory action research (PAR) methodology. Yet these two approaches are rarely discussed in relation to one another, nor, has much been written in terms of how these two approaches may work synergistically toward a decolonizing research approach. In this article, I report on a community-driven knowledge translation activity, the Peoples’ International Health Tribunal, as an exemplar of how narrative and PAR approaches, guided by local Indigenous knowledge, have great potential to build methodologically and ethically robust research processes. Implications for building globally relevant research alliances and scholarship are further discussed, particularly in relation to working with Indigenous communities. PMID:28462305

  11. Capability Paternalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, R.J.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269266224

    A capability approach prescribes paternalist government actions to the extent that it requires the promotion of specific functionings, instead of the corresponding capabilities. Capability theorists have argued that their theories do not have much of these paternalist implications, since promoting

  12. FCJ-209 Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Pattern Thinking: An Expanded Analysis of the First Indigenous Robotics Prototype Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie Abdilla

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In November 2014, the lead researcher’s interest in the conceptual development of digital technology and her cultural connection to Indigenous Knowledge Systems created an opportunity to explore a culturally relevant use of technology with urban Indigenous youth: the Indigenous Robotics Prototype Workshop. The workshop achieved a sense of cultural pride and confidence in Indigenous traditional knowledge while inspiring the youth to continue with their engagement in coding and programming through building robots. Yet, the outcomes from the prototype workshop further revealed a need to investigate how Indigenous Knowledge Systems, and particularly Pattern Thinking, might hint toward a possible paradigm shift for the ethical and advanced design of new technologies. This article examines the implications of such a hypothetical shift in autonomous systems in robotics and artificial intelligence (AI, using the Indigenous Robotics Prototype Workshop as a case study and springboard.

  13. Indigeneity: global and local.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlan, Francesca

    2009-06-01

    The term indigenous, long used to distinguish between those who are "native" and their "others" in specific locales, has also become a term for a geocultural category, presupposing a world collectivity of "indigenous peoples" in contrast to their various "others." Many observers have noted that the stimuli for internationalization of the indigenous category originated principally from particular nation-states-Anglo-American settler colonies and Scandinavia. All, I argue, are relevantly political cultures of liberal democracy and weighty (in different ways) in international institutional affairs. However, international indigeneity has not been supported in any unqualified way by actions taken in the name of several nation-states that were among its main points of origin. In fact, staunch resistance to the international indigenous project has recently come from four of them. In 2007, the only four voting countries to reject the main product of international indigenist activity over the past 30 years, the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, were Australia, the United States, Canada, and New Zealand. In these locations, forms of "indigenous relationship" emerged that launched international indigeneity and that strongly influenced international perceptions of what "indigeneity" is and who "indigenous peoples" may be. Some other countries say the model of indigenous relationship that they see represented by the "establishing" set is inapplicable to themselves (but have nonetheless had to take notice of expanding internationalist indigenism). The apparently paradoxical rejection of the draft declaration by the establishing countries is consistent with the combination of enabling and constraining forces that liberal democratic political cultures offer.

  14. Capabilities for Strategic Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Distel, Andreas Philipp

    This dissertation explores capabilities that enable firms to strategically adapt to environmental changes and preserve competitiveness over time – often referred to as dynamic capabilities. While dynamic capabilities being a popular research domain, too little is known about what these capabilities...... on capabilities for sensing and seizing new business opportunities and reconfiguring corporate resources. More specifically, the dissertation examines the role of key organization members, such as knowledge workers and top managers, in defining and building these capabilities. Moreover, it investigates how...... empirical studies through the dynamic capabilities lens and develops propositions for future research. The second paper is an empirical study on the origins of firm-level absorptive capacity; it explores how organization-level antecedents, through their impact on individual-level antecedents, influence...

  15. Effect of dilution rate and nutrients addition on the fermentative capability and synthesis of aromatic compounds of two indigenous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in continuous cultures fed with Agave tequilana juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán-Marroquín, G A; Córdova, J; Valle-Rodríguez, J O; Estarrón-Espinosa, M; Díaz-Montaño, D M

    2011-11-15

    Knowledge of physiological behavior of indigenous tequila yeast used in fermentation process is still limited. Yeasts have significant impact on the productivity fermentation process as well as the sensorial characteristics of the alcoholic beverage. For these reasons a better knowledge of the physiological and metabolic features of these yeasts is required. The effects of dilution rate, nitrogen and phosphorus source addition and micro-aeration on growth, fermentation and synthesis of volatile compounds of two native Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, cultured in continuous fed with Agave tequilana juice were studied. For S1 and S2 strains, maximal concentrations of biomass, ethanol, consumed sugars, alcohols and esters were obtained at 0.04 h⁻¹. Those concentrations quickly decreased as D increased. For S. cerevisiae S1 cultures (at D=0.08 h⁻¹) supplemented with ammonium phosphate (AP) from 1 to 4 g/L, concentrations of residual sugars decreased from 29.42 to 17.60 g/L and ethanol increased from 29.63 to 40.08 g/L, respectively. The S1 culture supplemented with AP was then micro-aerated from 0 to 0.02 vvm, improving all the kinetics parameters: biomass, ethanol and glycerol concentrations increased from 5.66, 40.08 and 3.11 g/L to 8.04, 45.91 and 4.88 g/L; residual sugars decreased from 17.67 g/L to 4.48 g/L; and rates of productions of biomass and ethanol, and consumption of sugars increased from 0.45, 3.21 and 7.33 g/L·h to 0.64, 3.67 and 8.38 g/L·h, respectively. Concentrations of volatile compounds were also influenced by the micro-aeration rate. Ester and alcohol concentrations were higher, in none aerated and in aerated cultures respectively. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A community engaged dental curriculum: a rural Indigenous outplacement programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menaka A. Abuzar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Indigenous people worldwide suffer from poor oral health as compared to non-Indigenous citizens. One of the approaches to bring about improvement in Indigenous oral health is to enhance the service provision by implementing oral health outplacement programmes. A case study of such a programme for dental students in Australia reports how an educational institution can successfully engage with an Indigenous oral health service to provide learning experiences to the students as well as deliver much needed services to the community. Design and Methods. The assessment of this ongoing outplacement programme over the period of 2008-14, based on students’ feedback, highlights some of the key beneficial outcomes. Students agreed that the Indigenous outplacement programme improved their understanding of Indigenous issues (mean ± SD: 4.10±0.8; 5 refers to strongly agree on 5-point scale and increased the possibility that they will practise in Indigenous health (3.66±1.0. They were pleased with the assistance received by clinical supervisors and clinic staff at the Indigenous dental clinic (4.28±0.8. Conclusions. This programme has demonstrated that structured student outplacements are valuable in building relations across cultures especially with Indigenous communities. It has also shown that university engagement with the public health sector can be beneficial to both institutions.

  17. Evaluation of the K[Formula: see text]ts'iìhtła ("We Light the Fire") Project: building resiliency and connections through strengths-based creative arts programming for Indigenous youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanian, Sahar; Young, Stephanie K; Mantla, Mason; Daniels, Anita; Chatwood, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background The creative arts - music, film, visual arts, dance, theatre, spoken word, literature, among others - are gradually being recognised as effective health promotion tools to empower, engage and improve the health and well-being in Indigenous youth communities. Arts-based programming has also had positive impacts in promoting health, mental wellness and resiliency amongst youth. However, often times the impacts and successes of such programming are not formally reported on, as reflected by the paucity of evaluations and reports in the literature. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate a creative arts workshop for Tłįchǫ youth where youth explored critical community issues and found solutions together using the arts. We sought to identify the workshop's areas of success and challenge. Ultimately, our goal is to develop a community-led, youth-driven model to strengthen resiliency through youth engagement in the arts in circumpolar regions. Design Using a mixed-methods approach, we conducted observational field notes, focus groups, questionnaires, and reflective practice to evaluate the workshop. Four youth and five facilitators participated in this process overall. Results Youth reported gaining confidence and new skills, both artistic and personal. Many youth found the workshop to be engaging, enjoyable and culturally relevant. Youth expressed an interest in continuing their involvement with the arts and spreading their messages through art to other youth and others in their communities. Conclusions Engagement and participation in the arts have the potential to build resiliency, form relationships, and stimulate discussions for community change amongst youth living in the North.

  18. Evaluation of the Kòts'iìhtła (“We Light the Fire” Project: building resiliency and connections through strengths-based creative arts programming for Indigenous youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Fanian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The creative arts – music, film, visual arts, dance, theatre, spoken word, literature, among others – are gradually being recognised as effective health promotion tools to empower, engage and improve the health and well-being in Indigenous youth communities. Arts-based programming has also had positive impacts in promoting health, mental wellness and resiliency amongst youth. However, often times the impacts and successes of such programming are not formally reported on, as reflected by the paucity of evaluations and reports in the literature. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate a creative arts workshop for Tłįchǫ youth where youth explored critical community issues and found solutions together using the arts. We sought to identify the workshop’s areas of success and challenge. Ultimately, our goal is to develop a community-led, youth-driven model to strengthen resiliency through youth engagement in the arts in circumpolar regions. Design: Using a mixed-methods approach, we conducted observational field notes, focus groups, questionnaires, and reflective practice to evaluate the workshop. Four youth and five facilitators participated in this process overall. Results: Youth reported gaining confidence and new skills, both artistic and personal. Many youth found the workshop to be engaging, enjoyable and culturally relevant. Youth expressed an interest in continuing their involvement with the arts and spreading their messages through art to other youth and others in their communities. Conclusions: Engagement and participation in the arts have the potential to build resiliency, form relationships, and stimulate discussions for community change amongst youth living in the North.

  19. Evaluation of the Kts'iìhtła (“We Light the Fire”) Project: building resiliency and connections through strengths-based creative arts programming for Indigenous youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanian, Sahar; Young, Stephanie K.; Mantla, Mason; Daniels, Anita; Chatwood, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background The creative arts – music, film, visual arts, dance, theatre, spoken word, literature, among others – are gradually being recognised as effective health promotion tools to empower, engage and improve the health and well-being in Indigenous youth communities. Arts-based programming has also had positive impacts in promoting health, mental wellness and resiliency amongst youth. However, often times the impacts and successes of such programming are not formally reported on, as reflected by the paucity of evaluations and reports in the literature. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate a creative arts workshop for Tłįchǫ youth where youth explored critical community issues and found solutions together using the arts. We sought to identify the workshop’s areas of success and challenge. Ultimately, our goal is to develop a community-led, youth-driven model to strengthen resiliency through youth engagement in the arts in circumpolar regions. Design Using a mixed-methods approach, we conducted observational field notes, focus groups, questionnaires, and reflective practice to evaluate the workshop. Four youth and five facilitators participated in this process overall. Results Youth reported gaining confidence and new skills, both artistic and personal. Many youth found the workshop to be engaging, enjoyable and culturally relevant. Youth expressed an interest in continuing their involvement with the arts and spreading their messages through art to other youth and others in their communities. Conclusions Engagement and participation in the arts have the potential to build resiliency, form relationships, and stimulate discussions for community change amongst youth living in the North. PMID:26265489

  20. Evaluation of the Kòts'iìhtła ("We Light the Fire") Project: building resiliency and connections through strengths-based creative arts programming for Indigenous youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanian, Sahar; Young, Stephanie K; Mantla, Mason; Daniels, Anita; Chatwood, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The creative arts - music, film, visual arts, dance, theatre, spoken word, literature, among others - are gradually being recognised as effective health promotion tools to empower, engage and improve the health and well-being in Indigenous youth communities. Arts-based programming has also had positive impacts in promoting health, mental wellness and resiliency amongst youth. However, often times the impacts and successes of such programming are not formally reported on, as reflected by the paucity of evaluations and reports in the literature. The objective of this study was to evaluate a creative arts workshop for Tłįchǫ youth where youth explored critical community issues and found solutions together using the arts. We sought to identify the workshop's areas of success and challenge. Ultimately, our goal is to develop a community-led, youth-driven model to strengthen resiliency through youth engagement in the arts in circumpolar regions. Using a mixed-methods approach, we conducted observational field notes, focus groups, questionnaires, and reflective practice to evaluate the workshop. Four youth and five facilitators participated in this process overall. Youth reported gaining confidence and new skills, both artistic and personal. Many youth found the workshop to be engaging, enjoyable and culturally relevant. Youth expressed an interest in continuing their involvement with the arts and spreading their messages through art to other youth and others in their communities. Engagement and participation in the arts have the potential to build resiliency, form relationships, and stimulate discussions for community change amongst youth living in the North.

  1. Indigenous Storytelling in Namibia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Oral storytelling predates the written word and computer code by millennia and in passing it is easy to forget that oral storytelling has been part of all pasts of contemporary communities. While narratives and plots can take place in the metaphysical world, be presented with humor and seem like...... fairytales to outsiders with little relevance to the physical world, they are very functional and foundational for communities where storytelling is enacted. This paper debates concepts related to indigenous storytelling and its relevance to knowledge and learning for indigenous youths. In an attempt...... to understand indigenous youths’ own conception of storytelling the paper presents empirical data from a study with indigenous Khoisan children in Namibia. This is followed by a discussion of an effort of digitizing indigenous intangible cultural heritage in relation to technologies’ embodied bias...

  2. Engagement with indigenous peoples and honoring traditional knowledge systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Julie; Bennett, Bull; Chief, Karletta; Cochran, Patricia; Cozetto, Karen; Gough, Bob; Hiza-Redsteer, Margaret M.; Lynn, Kathy; Maynard, Nancy; Voggesser, Garrit

    2016-01-01

    The organizers of the 2014 US National Climate Assessment (NCA) made a concerted effort to reach out to and collaborate with Indigenous peoples, resulting in the most comprehensive information to date on climate change impacts to Indigenous peoples in a US national assessment. Yet, there is still much room for improvement in assessment processes to ensure adequate recognition of Indigenous perspectives and Indigenous knowledge systems. This article discusses the process used in creating the Indigenous Peoples, Land, and Resources NCA chapter by a team comprised of tribal members, agencies, academics, and non-governmental organizations, who worked together to solicit, collect, and synthesize traditional knowledges and data from a diverse array of Indigenous communities across the US. It also discusses the synergy and discord between traditional knowledge systems and science and the emergence of cross-cutting issues and vulnerabilities for Indigenous peoples. The challenges of coalescing information about climate change and its impacts on Indigenous communities are outlined along with recommendations on the types of information to include in future assessment outputs. We recommend that future assessments – not only NCA, but other relevant local, regional, national, and international efforts aimed at the translation of climate information and assessments into meaningful actions – should support integration of Indigenous perspectives in a sustained way that builds respectful relationships and effectively engages Indigenous communities. Given the large number of tribes in the US and the current challenges and unique vulnerabilities of Indigenous communities, a special report focusing solely on climate change and Indigenous peoples is warranted.This article is part of a special issue on “The National Climate Assessment: Innovations in Science and Engagement” edited by Katharine Jacobs, Susanne Moser, and James Buizer.

  3. Indigenous Existentialism and the Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Hokowhitu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article begins a discussion on indigenous existentialism. The theme developed as a result of engagement at the intersection between Indigenous Studies and Cultural Studies, and the realisation that cultural concepts often canonised within Indigenous Studies departments, such as tradition and authenticity (when exclusive, detract from the conception of indigenous culture as part of the immediate material reality of indigenous lives. In turn, when indigenous culture is too often defined only in relation to an imagined authentic past, indigenous existentialism is inhibited because indigenous people lack a conscious awareness of cultural immediacy. There is nothing more immediate than the body and, thus, I began to theorise indigenous existentialism through an analyses of the indigenous body, its genealogy, and its immediacy. To help me process this theorisation I engage with current Cultural Studies debates surrounding the analyses of the body. I conclude that an indigenous existentialism will recognise that the power of the body is still unknown.

  4. Indigenous health: designing a clinical orientation program valued by learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huria, Tania; Palmer, Suetonia; Beckert, Lutz; Lacey, Cameron; Pitama, Suzanne

    2017-10-05

    Indigenous health programs are seen as a curriculum response to addressing health disparities and social accountability. Several interrelated teaching approaches to cultural competency curricula have been recommended, however evidence of the impact of these on learner outcomes including engagement and self-reported competencies is limited. We aimed to explore undergraduate medical student perspectives of an indigenous health orientation program to inform curriculum strategies that promote learning and development of clinical skills. We analyzed quantitative and qualitative student evaluations (n = 602) of a three-day immersed indigenous health orientation program between 2006 and 2014 based on Likert-scale responses and open-text comments. We conducted a thematic analysis of narrative student experiences (n = 426). Overall, 509 of 551 respondents (92%) rated the indigenous health orientation program as extremely or highly valuable and most (87%) reported that the course strongly increased their interest in indigenous health. The features of the clinical course that enhanced value for learners included situated learning (learning environment; learning context); teaching qualities (enthusiasm and passion for Māori health; role-modelling); curriculum content (re-presenting Māori history; exploring Māori beliefs, values and practices; using a Māori health framework in clinical practice); teaching methodologies (multiple teaching methods; simulated patient interview); and building relationships with peers (getting to know the student cohort; developing professional working relationships). Undergraduate medical students valued an indigenous health program delivered in an authentic indigenous environment and that explicitly reframed historical notions of indigenous health to contextualize learning. Content relevant to clinical practice, faculty knowledge, and strengthened peer interactions combined to build learner confidence and self-reported indigenous health

  5. Towards an indigenous model of conflict resolution: Reinventing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reinventing women's roles as traditional peacebuilders in neo-colonial Africa. In building towards an ... noted that women's victimhood in conflict extends beyond the feminisation of violence to the feminisation of ... In building towards an indigenous theory of conflict resolution and peacebuilding, this paper therefore ...

  6. Capability ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe capability approach is one of the most recent additions to the landscape of normative theories in ethics and political philosophy. Yet in its present stage of development, the capability approach is not a full-blown normative theory, in contrast to utilitarianism, deontological

  7. Indigenous lunar construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Sture, Stein

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of local resources for the construction and operation of a lunar base can significantly reduce the cost of transporting materials and supplies from Earth. The feasibility of processing lunar regolith to form construction materials and structural components is investigated. A preliminary review of potential processing methods such as sintering, hot-pressing, liquification, and cast basalt techniques, was completed. The processing method proposed is a variation on the cast basalt technique. It involves liquification of the regolith at 1200-1300 C, casting the liquid into a form, and controlled cooling. While the process temperature is higher than that for sintering or hot-pressing (1000-1100 C), this method is expected to yield a true engineering material with low variability in properties, high strength, and the potential to form large structural components. A scenario for this processing method was integrated with a design for a representative lunar base structure and potential construction techniques. The lunar shelter design is for a modular, segmented, pressurized, hemispherical dome which could serve as habitation and laboratory space. Based on this design, estimates of requirements for power, processing equipment, and construction equipment were made. This proposed combination of material processing method, structural design, and support requirements will help to establish the feasibility of lunar base construction using indigenous materials. Future work will refine the steps of the processing method. Specific areas where more information is needed are: furnace characteristics in vacuum; heat transfer during liquification; viscosity, pouring and forming behavior of molten regolith; design of high temperature forms; heat transfer during cooling; recrystallization of basalt; and refinement of estimates of elastic moduli, compressive and tensile strength, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. The preliminary

  8. Indigenous language implementation and nation building: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It even emphasized the use of mother tongue at the kindergarten and nursery school levels, yet our educators at the kindergarten and nursery school merely pay lip-service to it. Despite the fact that the language policy on education emphasized the use of mother tongue at these levels as a medium of instruction, the English ...

  9. Indigenous language implementation and nation building: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The National Policy on Education has done well to cover education levels ranging from the early childhood/pre-primary, to the primary and the secondary school levels. It even emphasized the use of mother tongue at the kindergarten and nursery school levels. Yet our educators at the kindergarten and nursery school ...

  10. Mobile Technologies for Preservation of Indigenous Knowledge in Rural Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Zaman, Tariq; Jensen, Kasper Løvborg

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the opportunities of mobile technologies in three of our own development endeavors with rural communities, promoting the preservation of indigenous knowledge. We reflect upon and recognize the fact that the representation of indigenous knowledge will be transformed within...... the digitalization process under the limitations and capabilities of the tools. We believe that a continuation of local appropriation and co-design of tools will lead to an integrated, intuitive and non-intrusive indigenous knowledge preservation process within the local communities....

  11. Building ICT capabilities for clinical work in a sustainable healthcare system: approaches to bridging the higher education learning and teaching gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    There is a recognised gap in information and communications technology (ICT) learning and teaching in higher education for entry-level healthcare professionals. This paper proposes a research model for understanding the dimensions of this gap. We describe methodological approaches to understanding present practices, identifying levers for change and learning by doing. We discuss issues faced in getting started and sustaining momentum on the research that is an essential prerequisite to effectively build the ICT capacity required by the clinical workforce in a sustainable healthcare system.

  12. A decade of NHMRC People Support expenditure in review: is support for Indigenous health research increasing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon de la Barra, Sophia; Redman, Sally; Eades, Sandra; Lonsdale, Carey

    2009-01-05

    To investigate National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) support over the decade to 2006 for researchers studying Indigenous health and researchers who self-identified as Indigenous. Review of data on all recipients of People Support awards and Capacity Building Grants in Population Health Research who were researching Indigenous health or who self-identified as Indigenous between 1996 and 2006. Annual People Support and Capacity Building grants and expenditure, by broad research area, state or territory, administering institution, and Indigenous status (as self-identified by award recipients in their applications). Between 1996 and 2006, 134 People Support awards were made to researchers studying Indigenous health; of these, 27 (20%) were to researchers who self-identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. In 2006, about 2.9% of the annual expenditure on all People Support funding was for Indigenous health research, representing a doubling in the proportion of funds since 2001. There was no increase in the number of self-identified Indigenous researchers funded under People Support, but Capacity Building Grants increased the number of people from Indigenous backgrounds supported by the NHMRC, with funds allocated to 36 Indigenous researchers from 2002 to 2006, compared with 14 funded by People Support during the same period. Funding to support Indigenous health research through the People Support scheme has increased since the NHMRC adopted policy changes in 2002, but it has not reached the targeted expenditure of at least 5% of agency allocations. The Capacity Building Grants have been a more effective vehicle for funding researchers from Indigenous backgrounds.

  13. Capabilities for innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter; Nielsen, René Nesgaard; Bamberger, Simon Grandjean

    2012-01-01

    between employers and employees are expected to be of vital importance. This article will follow a resource-based perspective on developing dynamic capabilities in order to test the importance of enhancing human and organizational capabilities for innovation in firms. In particular, the article will focus...... on some of the important institutional conditions in Danish firms derived from the Nordic model, such as the formal and informal relations of cooperation between employers and employees in firms and their function in building capabilities for innovation. The foundation of the empirical analysis...... and in particular their ability to develop firm-specific innovative capabilities through employee participation and creation of innovative workplaces. In this article, we argue that national institutional conditions can play an enhancing or hampering role in this. Especially the norms and values governing relations...

  14. Global standards and local knowledge building: upgrading small producers in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Aleman, Paola

    2012-07-31

    Local knowledge building is a crucial factor for upgrading small producers and improving their market competitiveness and livelihoods. The rise of global standards affecting food safety and environmental sustainability in agriculture sparks debates on the impact on smallholders in developing countries. This article presents a perspective on the links of international standards to knowledge and institution building for developing the capabilities of small producers. Interacting with global practices, indigenous private and public actors create local institutions to develop capabilities for product and process innovations that contribute to economic development and enhance food security. Local innovation depends on collective strategic efforts through increasing networks among small producers and other organizations, including firms, nongovernmental organizations, and government, that foster knowledge circulation and bring diverse resources and support to build local capabilities.

  15. Petroleum hydrocarbon degrading capability of freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petroleum hydrocarbon degrading capability and growth profile of indigenous filamentous freshwater fungi from four (4) different streams were determined in vitro. The result indicated that the streams under investigation contained an average heterotrophic fungal count of 5.55 0.25x105 cfu ml-1 while the mean count of ...

  16. Capability approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal; Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    Lærebogen er den første samlede danske præsentation af den af Amartya Sen og Martha Nussbaum udviklede Capability Approach. Bogen indeholder en præsentation og diskussion af Sen og Nussbaums teoretiske platform. I bogen indgår eksempler fra såvel uddannelse/uddannelsespolitik, pædagogik og omsorg....

  17. ENTREPRENEURIAL CAPABILITIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Nielsen, Thorkild

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse entrepreneurship from an action research perspective. What is entrepreneurship about? Which are the fundamental capabilities and processes of entrepreneurship? To answer these questions the article includes a case study of a Danish entrepreneur and his networks...

  18. Using Indigenous Materials for Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    p. 701-709. 58. Remadnia, A., et al., Use of animal proteins as foaming agent in cementitious concrete composites manufactured with recycled PET...sheets and aerated concrete materials were developed using the indigenous inorganic binders and reinforcement systems, and were characterized...indigenous ferrocement skins and aerated concrete core. Structural designs were developed for these indigenous sandwich composite panels in typical

  19. Building a clinical leadership community to drive improvement: a multi-case educational study to inform 21st century clinical commissioning, professional capability and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Marion; Verner, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The new NHS requires transformational leadership; people with the knowledge and motivation to make effective change combined with an understanding of the system they work in. The aim of the Practice Leaders' Programme (PLP) is to generate the conditions needed to focus the energy and collaborative creativity required for innovation to enhance leadership skills across the health economy improving patient care. The PLP engaged 60 local leaders from central England in a new approach enabling them to influence others. It has informed educational policy and practice and helped change professional behaviours. Each participant implemented improvements in care and participated in six action learning sets (ALS) and up to six coaching sessions. Evidence of progress, learning and impact was identified in project reports, reflective diaries and evaluations. The ALS brought together key individuals from clinical and management disciplines across a diverse organisation to redesign a system by developing a shared vision for improving the quality of patient care. The links forged, the projects initiated, and the skills cultivated through the PLP produced ongoing benefits and outcomes beyond the course itself. Coaching sessions helped participants focus their efforts to achieve maximum impact and to become resilient in managing service change effectively. The programme has evolved over four years, building on recommendations from external evaluation which identified statistically significant increases in leadership competences. Further enhancement of this programme secured an International Health Improvement Award. Three key findings of positive impact have emerged; personal growth, service improvement, and legacy and sustainability.

  20. Indigenous Methodology in Understanding Indigenous Nurse Graduate Transition to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna L. M. Kurtz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing Indigenous health care professional presence in health care aims to reduce health inequities of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. Nurses are the largest health professional group and nurse graduates the main source of recruitment. The quality of graduate transition to practice is evident in the literature; however, little is reported about Indigenous new graduates. We describe using Indigenous methodology and two-eyed seeing (Indigenous and Western perspectives in exploring Indigenous transition experiences. Talking circles provided a safe environment for nurses, nurse educators and students, health managers, and policy makers to discuss Indigenous new graduate case scenarios. The methodology was critical in identifying challenges faced, recommendations for change, and a new collective commitment for cultural safety education, and ethical and respectful relationships within education, practice, and policy.

  1. Evaluation of the Kòts'iìhtła (“We Light the Fire”) Project: building resiliency and connections through strengths-based creative arts programming for Indigenous youth

    OpenAIRE

    Fanian, Sahar; Young, Stephanie K.; Mantla, Mason; Daniels, Anita; Chatwood, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The creative arts – music, film, visual arts, dance, theatre, spoken word, literature, among others – are gradually being recognised as effective health promotion tools to empower, engage and improve the health and well-being in Indigenous youth communities. Arts-based programming has also had positive impacts in promoting health, mental wellness and resiliency amongst youth. However, often times the impacts and successes of such programming are not formally reported on, as reflec...

  2. Evaluation of the Kts'iìhtła (“We Light the Fire”) Project: building resiliency and connections through strengths-based creative arts programming for Indigenous youth

    OpenAIRE

    Fanian, Sahar; Young, Stephanie K.; Mantla, Mason; Daniels, Anita; Chatwood, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Background The creative arts – music, film, visual arts, dance, theatre, spoken word, literature, among others – are gradually being recognised as effective health promotion tools to empower, engage and improve the health and well-being in Indigenous youth communities. Arts-based programming has also had positive impacts in promoting health, mental wellness and resiliency amongst youth. However, often times the impacts and successes of such programming are not formally reported on, as reflect...

  3. Deadly Choices empowering Indigenous Australians through social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail-Bell, Karen; Appo, Nathan; Haymes, Alana; Bond, Chelsea; Brough, Mark; Fredericks, Bronwyn

    2017-04-05

    The potential for health promotion through social networking sites (SNSs) is widely recognized. However, while health promotion prides itself in focusing on the social determinants of health, its partiality for persuading individuals to comply with health behaviours dominates the way health promotion utilizes SNSs. This paper contributes to an understanding of collaborative ways SNSs can work for health promotion agendas of self-determination and empowerment in an Indigenous Australia context. An ethnographic study was undertaken with Deadly Choices, an Indigenous-led health promotion initiative. The study involved participant observation of interactions on Deadly Choices SNSs between Deadly Choices and its online community members. Deadly Choices provides an example of SNSs providing a powerful tool to create a safe, inclusive and positive space for Indigenous people and communities to profile their healthy choices, according to Indigenous notions of health and identity. The study found five principles that underpin Deadly Choices' use of SNSs for health promotion. These are: create a dialogue; build community online and offline; incentivise healthy online engagement; celebrate Indigenous identity and culture; and prioritize partnerships. Deadly Choices SNSs empowers Indigenous people and communities to be health promoters themselves, which represents a power shift from health promotion practitioner to Indigenous people and communities and more broadly, an enactment of Indigenous self-determination on SNSs. Mainstream health promotion can learn from Indigenous health promotion practice regarding the use of SNSs for health promotion agendas. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Developing Collaborative Product Development Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Tran, Yen

    2012-01-01

    innovation strategies’. Our analyses suggest that developing such collaboration capabilities benefits from the search for complementary practices, the combination of learning styles, and the development of weak and strong ties. Results also underscore the crucial importance of co-evolution of multi......-level, simultaneous learning processes and highlight the role of human agency in capability development with partners. Building on our analyses, we advance propositions for future research and managerial practices on developing dynamic collaboration capabilities....

  5. Climate Change Vulnerability and the Use of Indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Climate Change Vulnerability and the Use of Indigenous Technologies for Adaptation among Smallholder Farming Communities in sub Saharan Africa. ... planting; mulching to retain soil moisture, texture and fertility; terrace building to prevent soil erosion; use of fertilizers; and prayers for God's intervention among others.

  6. Literature in indigenous languages as essential tool for child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literature in indigenous languages as essential tool for child development and nation building: the case of Igbo. ... This paper is therefore asserting that literature in Igbo language, which is the mothertongue, will play a vital role in laying such solid foundation which will help the children to become reasonable and ...

  7. Indigenous Australian Education and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Wendy

    1997-09-01

    This article focuses on the impact of colonisation and its associated impact on Indigenous teaching and learning. Western European institutions have dominated Indigenous ways of knowing and in Australia this has led to barriers which restrict the participation of Aboriginal people in education systems. Globally Indigenous people are attempting to bring into the introduced educational systems culturally appropriate teaching and learning practices so that a more holistic approach to education can become the norm rather than the exception. The relationship between Indigenous knowledge and western European concepts of knowledge and knowing need to placed in a framework of mutual interaction so that not only do Indigenous people benefit, but so do non-Indigenous educators and students.

  8. Building Afghan Research Capability | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Six world-class research teams to investigate overcoming therapeutic resistance in high fatality cancers. The world-class research teams will direct their focus towards new frontiers in cancer research. View moreSix world-class research teams to investigate overcoming therapeutic resistance in high fatality cancers ...

  9. Anger in Australian Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Peter; Mergler, Amanda; Furlong, Michael; Caltabiano, Nerina

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive pilot study examined the cultural differences in the dimensions of self-reported anger in Indigenous and non-Indigenous (Caucasian) students aged 10-13 years in Far North Queensland, Australia. The Multidimensional School Anger Inventory-Revised (MSAI-R) (Boman, Curtis, Furlong, & Smith, 2006) was used to measure affective,…

  10. The Double Binds of Indigeneity and Indigenous Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Ludlow

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During the twentieth century, indigenous peoples have often embraced the category of indigenous while also having to face the ambiguities and limitations of this concept. Indigeneity, whether represented by indigenous people themselves or others, tends to face a “double bind”, as defined by Gregory Bateson, in which “no matter what a person does, he can’t win.” One exit strategy suggested by Bateson is meta-communication—communication about communication—in which new solutions emerge from a questioning of system-internal assumptions. We offer case studies from Ecuador, Peru and Alaska that chart some recent indigenous experiences and strategies for such scenarios.

  11. Broadening Access to Geospatial Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Responding to the need for geospatial tool and data capabilities in HUBzero from various communities, a Purdue team is developing and integrating geospatial capabilities into the HUBzero software. Funded by the National Science Foundation’s Data Infrastructure Building Blocks (DIBBs) initiative, the follow-on program to the DataNet program, the GABBs project is a four-year software development effort aiming at enabling researchers, students and citizens to share geospatial data and tools onli...

  12. Indigenous knowledges driving technological innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilian Alessa; Carlos Andrade; Phil Cash Cash; Christian P. Giardina; Matt Hamabata; Craig Hammer; Kai Henifin; Lee Joachim; Jay T. Johnson; Kekuhi Kealiikanakaoleohaililani; Deanna Kingston; Andrew Kliskey; Renee Pualani Louis; Amanda Lynch; Daryn McKenny; Chels Marshall; Mere Roberts; Taupouri Tangaro; Jyl Wheaton-Abraham; Everett. Wingert

    2011-01-01

    This policy brief explores the use and expands the conversation on the ability of geospatial technologies to represent Indigenous cultural knowledge. Indigenous peoples' use of geospatial technologies has already proven to be a critical step for protecting tribal self-determination. However, the ontological frameworks and techniques of Western geospatial...

  13. Indigenous Empowerment through Collective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enn, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to an indigenous community that lives in the periphery of Taiwan. The Dao on Orchid Island have had to face serious abuse of their human rights in terms of ecological exploitation and environmental injustice. The article highlights the empowerment of the indigenous group through collective…

  14. Protecting indigenous land from mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borde, Radhika

    2017-01-01

    Support for indigenous peoples has been increasing over the last few decades. This can be seen internationally, as well as in several domestic contexts. The support for indigenous people has been linked to the increasingly prominent impetus to conserve the Earth’s biodiversity and environment.

  15. Indigenous rights, performativity and protest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanna, Philippe; Langdon, Esther Jean; Vanclay, Frank

    Protests to claim rights are a common practice among Indigenous peoples of the world, especially when their interests conflict with those of nation states and/or multinational corporations regarding the use of their lands and resources. Drawing on a case study of the National Indigenous Mobilization

  16. The Indigenous Old World Passifloras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, de W.J.J.O.

    1972-01-01

    A short revision of the indigenous Old World taxa in Passifiora in the form of a key, the enumeration of synonyms, descriptions, and an index accounting for all names proposed for the area. Examined specimens, distributional areas, and some notes are given. In the Old World 20 indigenous species are

  17. Indigenous education and heritage revitalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ke, Wen-Li

    2011-01-01

    The thesis (working title: 'Indigenous Education and Heritage Revitalization') focuses on the (possible) roles of tangible and intangible cultural heritage in the education of indigenous peoples in Taiwan, against the background of worldwide discussions and studies of the possibilities to create and

  18. INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE IMPLEMENTATION AND NATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGOZI

    Abstract. This paper dwells on the use of indigenous languages in the Nigerian education sector. The Nigerian Government at various times has proposed various forms of language policies to encourage and stimulate the growth and development of her over 400 indigenous languages, in order to free its citizens from the ...

  19. Prior indigenous technological species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jason T.

    2018-01-01

    One of the primary open questions of astrobiology is whether there is extant or extinct life elsewhere the solar system. Implicit in much of this work is that we are looking for microbial or, at best, unintelligent life, even though technological artefacts might be much easier to find. Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) work on searches for alien artefacts in the solar system typically presumes that such artefacts would be of extrasolar origin, even though life is known to have existed in the solar system, on Earth, for eons. But if a prior technological, perhaps spacefaring, species ever arose in the solar system, it might have produced artefacts or other technosignatures that have survived to present day, meaning solar system artefact SETI provides a potential path to resolving astrobiology's question. Here, I discuss the origins and possible locations for technosignatures of such a prior indigenous technological species, which might have arisen on ancient Earth or another body, such as a pre-greenhouse Venus or a wet Mars. In the case of Venus, the arrival of its global greenhouse and potential resurfacing might have erased all evidence of its existence on the Venusian surface. In the case of Earth, erosion and, ultimately, plate tectonics may have erased most such evidence if the species lived Gyr ago. Remaining indigenous technosignatures might be expected to be extremely old, limiting the places they might still be found to beneath the surfaces of Mars and the Moon, or in the outer solar system.

  20. Indigenous Contributions to Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhardt, R.

    2010-12-01

    Throughout the course of the Fourth International Polar Year(s), indigenous peoples have assumed a prominent role as significant partners in the pursuit of a broader and deeper understanding of the multifaceted dimensions of the human role in the Arctic region. Most salient in this partnership has been the substantial underlying differences in perspective, some political, some ideological, but most fundamental and intractable are the differences in world views, between those of the relative newcomers to the area (i.e. the miners, loggers, oil field workers, commercial fishermen, tourists, and even the occasional scientist), and the Native people with roots in the land that go back millennia. But no longer can these differences be cast in simplistic either/or terms, implying some kind of inherent dichotomy between those who live off the land vs. those tied to the cash economy, or traditional vs. modern technologies, or anecdotal vs. scientific evidence. These lines have been blurred with the realities that indigenous cultures are not static, and western structures are no longer dominant. Instead, we now have a much more fluid and dynamic situation in which once competing views of the world are striving toward reconciliation through new structures and frameworks that foster co-existence rather than domination and exploitation.

  1. Indigenous Brazilian Management Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zandra Balbinot

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research seeks to understand to what extent companies in emerging countries, specifically, Brazilian, adopt dominant management practices, the so-called Euro-American practices, possess their one, or show a syncretism between the two. Methods: Mixed research. One phase was to collect data using a survey about cultural dimensions adopted from GLOBE (House 1998 management practices and also from Brazilian academy. Another was to collect data through interviews, which were analyzed in parallel. Results: Of the seven dominant cultural dimensions, indigenous practices influenced two. Another three were influenced by dominant management practices. Two of the local dimensions, even with internationalization, merged practices with Brazilian cultural traits. Even so, the practices derived from Jeitinho diminished relative to the international relations and experience of managers. Conclusions: The paper shows the existence of powerful Brazilian Indigenous Managerial Practices such as personalism and formalism. These practices have great influence on international business negotiations. On the other hand, it also shows that there are still dominant managerial practices specially in the case of more internationalized Brazilian managers

  2. Indigenization of urban mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zimo; Lian, Defu; Yuan, Nicholas Jing; Xie, Xing; Rui, Yong; Zhou, Tao

    2017-03-01

    The identification of urban mobility patterns is very important for predicting and controlling spatial events. In this study, we analyzed millions of geographical check-ins crawled from a leading Chinese location-based social networking service (Jiepang.com), which contains demographic information that facilitates group-specific studies. We determined the distinct mobility patterns of natives and non-natives in all five large cities that we considered. We used a mixed method to assign different algorithms to natives and non-natives, which greatly improved the accuracy of location prediction compared with the basic algorithms. We also propose so-called indigenization coefficients to quantify the extent to which an individual behaves like a native, which depends only on their check-in behavior, rather than requiring demographic information. Surprisingly, the hybrid algorithm weighted using the indigenization coefficients outperformed a mixed algorithm that used additional demographic information, suggesting the advantage of behavioral data in characterizing individual mobility compared with the demographic information. The present location prediction algorithms can find applications in urban planning, traffic forecasting, mobile recommendation, and so on.

  3. Moving Toward Spatial Solutions in Marine Conservation with Indigenous Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie C. Ban

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Community and resource user support has often been declared as essential to achieving globally agreed targets for marine protection. Given that indigenous people in Canada have resource use rights, we engaged two indigenous communities in British Columbia for their views on marine planning and protected areas. We developed a three-phased approach for executing our research: building research partnerships, carrying out individual interviews, and holding community discussion sessions. Participants expressed a common goal of recovering depleted species and ensuring the sustainability of indigenous fishing. We found strong support for spatial protection measures, and significant overlaps amongst participants in the areas suggested for protection. The most common type of protection recommended by participants was the exclusion of commercial and recreational fisheries while allowing for indigenous fishing; this stands in contrast to the emphasis on strict no-take MPAs advocated in the literature. Similarities in the goal, and level and areas of protection point to a gap in conservation approaches: the conservation of important areas and resources to indigenous people, allowing the continued practice and adaptation of their culture.

  4. Indigenous Educational Attainment in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E. Gordon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the educational attainment of Indigenous peoples of working age (25 to 64 years in Canada is examined. This diverse population has typically had lower educational levels than the general population in Canada. Results indicate that, while on the positive side there are a greater number of highly educated Indigenous peoples, there is also a continuing gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. Data also indicate that the proportion with less than high school education declined, which corresponds with a rise of those with a PSE; the reverse was true in 1996. Despite these gains, however, the large and increasing absolute numbers of those without a high school education is alarming. There are intra-Indigenous differences: First Nations with Indian Status and the Inuit are not doing as well as non-Status and Métis peoples. Comparisons between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations reveal that the documented gap in post-secondary educational attainment is at best stagnant. Out of the data analysis, and based on the history of educational policy, we comment on the current reform proposed by the Government of Canada, announced in February of 2014, and propose several policy recommendations to move educational attainment forward.

  5. Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Tippo; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Heimericks, Koen H.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the Special Issue and discusses the microfoundations of routines and capabilities, including why a microfoundations view is needed and how it may inform work on organizational and competitive heterogeneity. Building on extant research, we identify three primary categories...

  6. Touring the Indigenous or Transforming Consciousness? Reflections on Teaching Indigenous Tourism at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins-Desbiolles, Freya

    2007-01-01

    The role of the non-Indigenous educator and researcher in education on Indigenous issues is becoming the subject of critical scrutiny. Indigenous academics are successfully turning the gaze on non-Indigenous peers and practices. This paper narrates some of the experiences of a non-Indigenous educator teaching an undergraduate elective Indigenous…

  7. Indigenous innovation in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Jun; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, China has earned the reputation of ‘manufacturing power house’ of the world. Chinese companies in their vast numbers have been very successful in exploiting their access to low-cost labour and have established themselves as unbeatable high volume low-cost manufacturing...... a foothold in these markets and to tap into the advanced technologies and concepts originating from this developed context. Another category of Chinese companies includes those who seek to move from routine transactional tasks to more innovation-intensive concepts while remaining in China and relying......, this paper seeks to advance our understanding of indigenous innovation in China and to identify its major drivers and impediments....

  8. Indigenous Research on Chinese Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping; Leung, Kwok; Chen, Chao C.

    2012-01-01

    We attempt to provide a definition and a typology of indigenous research on Chinese management as well as outline the general methodological approaches for this type of research. We also present an integrative summary of the four articles included in this special issue and show how they illustrate...... our definition and typology of indigenous research on Chinese management, as well as the various methodological approaches we advocate. Further, we introduce a commentary on the four articles from the perspective of engaged scholarship, and also three additional articles included in this issue....... Finally, we conclude with our suggestions for future indigenous research....

  9. Celebrating indigenous communities compassionate traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Holly

    2018-01-01

    Living in a compassionate community is not a new practice in First Nations communities; they have always recognized dying as a social experience. First Nations hold extensive traditional knowledge and have community-based practices to support the personal, familial, and community experiences surrounding end-of-life. However, western health systems were imposed and typically did not support these social and cultural practices at end of life. In fact, the different expectations of western medicine and the community related to end of life care has created stress and misunderstanding for both. One solution is for First Nations communities to develop palliative care programs so that people can receive care at home amongst their family, community and culture. Our research project "Improving End-of-Life Care in First Nations Communities" (EOLFN) was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research [2010-2015] and was conducted in partnership with four First Nations communities in Canada (see www.eolfn.lakeheadu.ca). Results included a community capacity development approach to support Indigenous models of care at end-of-life. The workshop will describe the community capacity development process used to develop palliative care programs in First Nations communities. It will highlight the foundation to this approach, namely, grounding the program in community values and principles, rooted in individual, family, community and culture. Two First Nations communities will share stories about their experiences developing their own palliative care programs, which celebrated cultural capacity in their communities while enhancing medical palliative care services in a way that respected and integrated with their community cultural practices. This workshop shares the experiences of two First Nations communities who developed palliative care programs by building upon community culture, values and principles. The underlying model guiding development is shared.

  10. Funding the Indigenous Rights Movement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael Johnson

    2016-01-01

    ... as a way to help inform funding partners about the realities in their communities. Foundation representatives and funders interested in human and Indigenous rights, mostly from the Americas, rounded out the audience...

  11. Drug Policy and Indigenous Peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Julian; Kapron, Mary

    2017-06-01

    This paper identifies the principal concerns of indigenous peoples with regard to current international treaties on certain psychoactive substances and policies to control and eradicate their production, trafficking, and sale. Indigenous peoples have a specific interest in the issue since their traditional lands have become integrated over time into the large-scale production of coca, opium poppy, and cannabis crops, in response to high demand from the American and European markets, among others. As a consequence, indigenous peoples are persecuted because of their traditional use of these and other plant-based narcotics and hallucinogens. They are also victims of the drug producers who remove them from their lands or forcibly recruit them into the production process. As indigenous peoples are caught in the violent world of illicit drug production, law enforcement often targets them first, resulting in disproportionate rates of criminalization and incarceration.

  12. Bridging indigenous and scientific knowledge

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mistry, J; Berardi, A

    2016-01-01

    ...s . A prerequisite for such community-owned solutions is indigenous knowledge, which is local and context-specific, transmitted orally or through imitation and demonstration, adaptive to changing...

  13. Environmentalism and Human Rights Legal Framework: The Continued Frontier of Indigenous Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Geneva E. B.

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous nations need to build a strategic resistance to disman­tle the legal status quo and assert their inherent sovereignty and human legal rights to destroy the settler colonial project of climate change. This type of resistance needs to be internalized within the Indigenous nation and actively asserted throughout local, state, national, and international legal systems. This article takes a two-step approach: first, it argues that Native nations must internalize resistance to the settle...

  14. Technological Capabilities of Brazilian Shipbuilding Suppliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Primo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Technological capabilities (TC play a key role in the competitiveness of firms in industrial sectors. Suppliers in emerging economies often acquire technological capabilities by operating and mastering technologies developed by others and then leveraging this learning to develop indigenous technologies. By reviewing research on firm specific technological capabilities, the development of global value chains and industrial clusters in emerging markets we discuss local suppliers’ insertion and upgrading in the supply chains of new large industrial enterprises. Using the Brazilian shipbuilding industry as context, we investigate and develop propositions related to the ability of local suppliers to develop technological capabilities that permit eventual insertion into the local supply chain. This research has applications for managers and policy makers from other emerging market countries seeking to increase local sourcing through development of local suppliers.

  15. Participatory action research opens doors: Mentoring Indigenous researchers to improve midwifery in urban Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Sophie D; Maidment, Sarah-Jade; Heinemann, Kayla M; Roe, Yvette L; Kildea, Sue V

    2017-11-08

    There is increasing demand for capacity building among the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) maternal and infant health workforce to improve health outcomes for mothers and babies; yet few studies describe the steps taken to mentor novice Indigenous researchers to contribute to creating a quality evidence-base in this space. The Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting study is a partnership project aimed at improving maternity services for Indigenous families in South East Queensland. To describe our experience setting up a Participatory Action Research team to mentor two young Indigenous women as research assistants on the Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting study. Case study reflecting on the first six months. Participatory Action Research was a very effective method to actively mentor and engage all team members in reflective, collaborative research practice, resulting in positive changes for the maternity care service. The research assistants describe learning to conduct interviews and infant assessments, as well as gaining confidence to build rapport with families in the study. Reflecting on the stories shared by the women participating in the study has opened up a whole new world and interest in studying midwifery and child health after learning the difficulties and strengths of families during pregnancy and beyond. We encourage others to use Participatory Action Research to enable capacity building in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander midwifery workforce and in health research more broadly. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Indigenous rights in the making: the United Nations declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Jérémie

    2007-01-01

    This article examines to what extent the recently adopted United Nations Declarations on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples participate to the development of indigenous peoples' international human rights.

  17. Indigenous people's detection of rapid ecological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Shankar; Lauer, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    When sudden catastrophic events occur, it becomes critical for coastal communities to detect and respond to environmental transformations because failure to do so may undermine overall ecosystem resilience and threaten people's livelihoods. We therefore asked how capable of detecting rapid ecological change following massive environmental disruptions local, indigenous people are. We assessed the direction and periodicity of experimental learning of people in the Western Solomon Islands after a tsunami in 2007. We compared the results of marine science surveys with local ecological knowledge of the benthos across 3 affected villages and 3 periods before and after the tsunami. We sought to determine how people recognize biophysical changes in the environment before and after catastrophic events such as earthquakes and tsunamis and whether people have the ability to detect ecological changes over short time scales or need longer time scales to recognize changes. Indigenous people were able to detect changes in the benthos over time. Detection levels differed between marine science surveys and local ecological knowledge sources over time, but overall patterns of statistically significant detection of change were evident for various habitats. Our findings have implications for marine conservation, coastal management policies, and disaster-relief efforts because when people are able to detect ecological changes, this, in turn, affects how they exploit and manage their marine resources. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. Indigenous burning as conservation practice: neotropical savanna recovery amid agribusiness deforestation in Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, James R; Brondízio, Eduardo S; Hetrick, Scott S; Coimbra, Carlos E A

    2013-01-01

    International efforts to address climate change by reducing tropical deforestation increasingly rely on indigenous reserves as conservation units and indigenous peoples as strategic partners. Considered win-win situations where global conservation measures also contribute to cultural preservation, such alliances also frame indigenous peoples in diverse ecological settings with the responsibility to offset global carbon budgets through fire suppression based on the presumed positive value of non-alteration of tropical landscapes. Anthropogenic fire associated with indigenous ceremonial and collective hunting practices in the Neotropical savannas (cerrado) of Central Brazil is routinely represented in public and scientific conservation discourse as a cause of deforestation and increased CO2 emissions despite a lack of supporting evidence. We evaluate this claim for the Xavante people of Pimentel Barbosa Indigenous Reserve, Brazil. Building upon 23 years of longitudinal interdisciplinary research in the area, we used multi-temporal spatial analyses to compare land cover change under indigenous and agribusiness management over the last four decades (1973-2010) and quantify the contemporary Xavante burning regime contributing to observed patterns based on a four year sample at the end of this sequence (2007-2010). The overall proportion of deforested land remained stable inside the reserve (0.6%) but increased sharply outside (1.5% to 26.0%). Vegetation recovery occurred where reserve boundary adjustments transferred lands previously deforested by agribusiness to indigenous management. Periodic traditional burning by the Xavante had a large spatial distribution but repeated burning in consecutive years was restricted. Our results suggest a need to reassess overreaching conservation narratives about the purported destructiveness of indigenous anthropogenic fire in the cerrado. The real challenge to conservation in the fire-adapted cerrado biome is the long

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of a training program that builds teachers' capability to identify and appropriately refer middle and high school students with mental health problems in Brazil: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Marlene A; Gadelha, Ary A; Moriyama, Taís S; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Bordin, Isabel A

    2014-02-28

    In Brazil, like many countries, there has been a failure to identify mental health problems (MHP) in young people and refer them to appropriate care and support. The school environment provides an ideal setting to do this. Therefore, effective programs need to be developed to train teachers to identify and appropriately refer children with possible MHP. We aimed to evaluate teachers' ability to identify and appropriately refer students with possible MHP, and the effectiveness of a psychoeducational strategy to build teachers' capability in this area. To meet the first objective, we conducted a case-control study using a student sample. To meet the second, we employed longitudinal design with repeated measures before and after introducing the psychoeducational strategy using a teacher sample. In the case control study, the Youth Self-Report was used to investigate internalizing and externalizing problems. Before training, teachers selected 26 students who they thought were likely to have MHP. Twenty-six non-selected students acted as controls and were matched by gender, age and grade. The underlying principle was that if teachers could identify abnormal behaviors among their actual students, those with some MHP would likely be among the case group and those without among the control group. In the longitudinal study, 32 teachers were asked to evaluate six vignettes that highlighted behaviors indicating a high risk for psychosis, depression, conduct disorder, hyperactivity, mania, and normal adolescent behavior. We calculated the rates of correct answers for identifying the existence of some MHP and the need for referral before and after training; teachers were not asked to identify the individual conditions. Teachers were already able to identify the most symptomatic students, who had both internalizing and externalizing problems, as possibly having MHP, but teachers had difficulty in identifying students with internalizing problems alone. At least 50.0% of teachers

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of a training program that builds teachers’ capability to identify and appropriately refer middle and high school students with mental health problems in Brazil: an exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In Brazil, like many countries, there has been a failure to identify mental health problems (MHP) in young people and refer them to appropriate care and support. The school environment provides an ideal setting to do this. Therefore, effective programs need to be developed to train teachers to identify and appropriately refer children with possible MHP. We aimed to evaluate teachers’ ability to identify and appropriately refer students with possible MHP, and the effectiveness of a psychoeducational strategy to build teachers’ capability in this area. Methods To meet the first objective, we conducted a case-control study using a student sample. To meet the second, we employed longitudinal design with repeated measures before and after introducing the psychoeducational strategy using a teacher sample. In the case control study, the Youth Self-Report was used to investigate internalizing and externalizing problems. Before training, teachers selected 26 students who they thought were likely to have MHP. Twenty-six non-selected students acted as controls and were matched by gender, age and grade. The underlying principle was that if teachers could identify abnormal behaviors among their actual students, those with some MHP would likely be among the case group and those without among the control group. In the longitudinal study, 32 teachers were asked to evaluate six vignettes that highlighted behaviors indicating a high risk for psychosis, depression, conduct disorder, hyperactivity, mania, and normal adolescent behavior. We calculated the rates of correct answers for identifying the existence of some MHP and the need for referral before and after training; teachers were not asked to identify the individual conditions. Results Teachers were already able to identify the most symptomatic students, who had both internalizing and externalizing problems, as possibly having MHP, but teachers had difficulty in identifying students with internalizing problems

  1. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. O. Hitzman; A. K. Stepp; D. M. Dennis; L. R. Graumann

    2003-03-31

    This research program is directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal is to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work is underway. Microbial cultures have been isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters with cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Field pilot studies are underway.

  2. Rights, goals, and capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hees, M.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses the relationship between rights and capabilities in order to get a better grasp of the kind of consequentialism that the capability theory represents. Capability rights have been defined as rights that have a capability as their object (rights to capabilities). Such a

  3. Rights, goals, and capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hees, M.V.B.P.M

    This article analyses the relationship between rights and capabilities in order to get a better grasp of the kind of consequentialism that the capability theory represents. Capability rights have been defined as rights that have a capability as their object (rights to capabilities). Such a

  4. Bringing "indigenous" ownership back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Peter

    2012-01-01

    understanding of how processes of exclusion interact with domestic politics in Zambia. It argues that the Citizens Economic Empowerment Commission, a new institution to bring ownership back to Zambians, builds on a long tradition of nationalist policies in Zambia, while its actual work is strictly related...... to the critique of the growing foreign dominance over the economy, and in particular of the upsurge in Chinese investments....

  5. Indigenous community insurance as an alternative financing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammed

    Indigenous Community Insurance (Iddirs) as an Alternative Health Care Financing Shimeles O. et al. 53 ... In Ethiopia, indigenous social institutions exist to help victims deal ..... that tie the Ethiopian population during catastrophic events for ...

  6. Adult Learning, Transformative Education, and Indigenous Epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, Diane

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes an innovative program that weaves together adult learning, transformative education, and indigenous epistemology in order to prepare Alaskan rural indigenous social service providers to better serve their communities.

  7. The World Indigenous Research Alliance (WIRA): Mediating and Mobilizing Indigenous Peoples' Educational Knowledge and Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitinui, Paul; McIvor, Onowa; Robertson, Boni; Morcom, Lindsay; Cashman, Kimo; Arbon, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    There is an Indigenous resurgence in education occurring globally. For more than a century Euro-western approaches have controlled the provision and quality of education to, and for Indigenous peoples. The World Indigenous Research Alliance (WIRA) established in 2012, is a grass-roots movement of Indigenous scholars passionate about making a…

  8. Indigenous health and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, James D

    2012-07-01

    Indigenous populations have been identified as vulnerable to climate change. This framing, however, is detached from the diverse geographies of how people experience, understand, and respond to climate-related health outcomes, and overlooks nonclimatic determinants. I reviewed research on indigenous health and climate change to capture place-based dimensions of vulnerability and broader determining factors. Studies focused primarily on Australia and the Arctic, and indicated significant adaptive capacity, with active responses to climate-related health risks. However, nonclimatic stresses including poverty, land dispossession, globalization, and associated sociocultural transitions challenge this adaptability. Addressing geographic gaps in existing studies alongside greater focus on indigenous conceptualizations on and approaches to health, examination of global-local interactions shaping local vulnerability, enhanced surveillance, and an evaluation of policy support opportunities are key foci for future research.

  9. Reassembling the Indigenous Public Sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Latimore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to provide an initial theoretical grounding to assess a practical project: a new software application that attempts to be a beneficial resource in the field of Indigenous representation. As a starting point, we are concerned to provide a theoretical ground for considering the inherited and shifting spaces of Indigenous media representation. To this end, this paper reconsiders the strengths and weaknesses of debates surrounding the ‘Indigenous public sphere’. This is used as grounds for critically understanding the relations that constitute this field. Following this, we consider how a more materialist approach to publics might enable a productive reconceptualization, and in particular how digital media initiatives and shifting news markets may be contributing to change. Finally, drawing on this model, we outline both the ‘Wakul app’ project, and how this framework might inform an assessment of its impact.

  10. The benefits of a life-first employment program for Indigenous Australian families: Implications for ‘Closing the Gap’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsey Brown

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There are significant and enduring inequities in education and employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. In taking a ‘life-first’ approach to service provision the Building Family Opportunities Program (BFO was able to successfully increase Indigenous Australians’ engagement with education and employment in South Australia. The evaluation of the BFO included quantitative administrative and survey data for 110 Indigenous families collected over a three year period, and qualitative data from interviews with 13 Indigenous jobseekers and focus groups with 24 case managers. Quantitative data revealed that similar proportions of Indigenous and non-Indigenous jobseekers achieved positive education/training and employment outcomes as a result of the program. Qualitative data were able to identify the strengths of this program as perceived by Indigenous families and case managers, including the practical and socio-emotional support offered to whole families, using a strengths-based, life-first approach. In the context of broader education and employment disadvantages experienced by Indigenous Australians, these results are significant and illustrate key lessons which can inform future policy and service delivery initiatives aiming to close the gap.

  11. Indigenous health program evaluation design and methods in Australia: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokuge, Kamalini; Thurber, Katherine; Calabria, Bianca; Davis, Meg; McMahon, Kathryn; Sartor, Lauren; Lovett, Raymond; Guthrie, Jill; Banks, Emily

    2017-10-01

    Indigenous Australians experience a disproportionately higher burden of disease compared to non-Indigenous Australians. High-quality evaluation of Indigenous health programs is required to inform health and health services improvement. We aimed to quantify methodological and other characteristics of Australian Indigenous health program evaluations published in the peer-reviewed literature. Systematic review of peer-reviewed literature (November 2009-2014) on Indigenous health program evaluation. We identified 118 papers describing evaluations of 109 interventions; 72.0% were university/research institution-led. 82.2% of evaluations included a quantitative component; 49.2% utilised quantitative data only and 33.1% used both quantitative and qualitative data. The most common design was a before/after comparison (30.5%, n=36/118). 7.6% of studies (n=9/118) used an experimental design: six individual-level and three cluster-randomised controlled trials. 56.8% (67/118) reported on service delivery/process outcomes (versus health or health risk factor outcomes) only. Given the number of Indigenous health programs that are implemented, few evaluations overall are published in the peer-reviewed literature and, of these, few use optimal methodologies such as mixed methods and experimental design. Implications for public health: Multiple strategies are required to increase high-quality, accessible evaluation in Indigenous health, including supporting stronger research-policy-practice partnerships and capacity building for evaluation by health services and government. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. INDIGENOUS SPACES IN COLONIAL DOCUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartira Ferraz Barbosa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The indigenous spaces constituted at the beginning of the colonial period represented a threat to the plans of implantation and development of the Portuguese-Brazilian colonial economy. Although little studied, they were distributed along the coast and inland of the captaincy of Pernambuco as the documents selected for this study point out. It is a question of the analysis of sources about cultures, spaces and indigenous frontiers, subjects that did not receive in-depth interpretations when studying the growth of Portuguese or Dutch colonial space.

  13. POSMODERN DAN SASTRA INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Furqan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Karya sastra Indigenous Australia adalah karya masyarakat native yang tinggal di negara bentukan penjajah (settler state. Setelah opresi yang dialami selama beberapa dekade, perkembangan sastra mereka baru saja menapaki puncak di awal abad ke-21 bersama dengan adanya perubahan kebijakan politis serta didukung oleh perkembangan teknologi, serta bersamaan dengan kondisi posmodern atau logika kapitalisme lanjut. Tulisan ini hendak mengelaborasi perjalanan singkat dan resistensi yang muncul dalam sastra Indigenous Australia hingga kini menghadapi kapitalisme yang canggih. Di era global sekaramg ini, banyak sekali permasalahan yang muncul bahkan ketika karya sastra tersebut mulai merekah, mulai dari persoalan tentang identitas, sejarah, otentisitas, persaingan global, dan logika masyarakat posmodern.

  14. A Typology of Indigenous Engagement in Australian Environmental Management: Implications for Knowledge Integration and Social-ecological System Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Hill

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous peoples now engage with many decentralized approaches to environmental management that offer opportunities for integration of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge (IEK and western science to promote cultural diversity in the management of social-ecological system sustainability. Nevertheless, processes of combining IEK with western science are diverse and affected by numerous factors, including the adaptive co-management context, the intrinsic characteristics of the natural resources, and the governance systems. We present a typology of Indigenous engagement in environmental management, derived through comparative analysis of 21 Australian case studies, and consider its implications for the integration of IEK with western science. Sociological and rational choice institutionalism underpin our analytical framework, which differentiates on three axes: (1 power sharing, incorporating decision making, rules definition, resource values and property rights; (2 participation, incorporating participatory processes, organizations engaged, and coordination approaches; (3 intercultural purpose, incorporating purposes of environmental management, Indigenous engagement, Indigenous development and capacity building. Our typology groups engagement into four types: Indigenous governed collaborations; Indigenous-driven co-governance; agency-driven co-governance; and agency governance. From our analysis of manifestations of knowledge integration across the types, we argue that Indigenous governance and Indigenous-driven co-governance provides better prospects for integration of IEK and western science for sustainability of social-ecological systems. Supporting Indigenous governance without, or with only a limited requirement for power sharing with other agencies sustains the distinct Indigenous cultural purposes underpinning IEK, and benefits knowledge integration. We conclude by advocating that the typology be applied to test its general effectiveness in

  15. Indigenous Knowledge Management Transfer Systems Across ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous knowledge transfer is becoming an increasingly important issue in the development fraternity as development practitioners seek answers to develop indigenous communities. This article reports on the findings of a study that was aimed at establishing how indigenous knowledge can be preserved and transferred ...

  16. Rowing upstream: Contextualising indigenous research processes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The umbrage has prompted robust calls from indigenous scholars and research ethicists to develop new paradigms of research that have a decolonizing agenda upholding Indigenous ethical archetype. This being a concept the article utilised descriptive and analytical approaches to examine how the indigenous research ...

  17. ENSHRINING INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE AS A PUBLIC GOOD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whether to pursue international legal measures to extend intellectual property rights to cover indigenous knowledge or to treat it as a public good is the subject of debate. This paper makes the case that investing indigenous knowledge as a public good is an ethical position compatible with the idea that indigenous and ...

  18. More Like Ourselves: Indigenous Capitalism through Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunten, Alexis Celeste

    2010-01-01

    Through a comparison of Indigenous-owned cultural tourism businesses in southeastern Alaska and New Zealand as well as secondary data examining Indigenous tourism across the Pacific, this article introduces the concept of "Indigenous capitalism" as a distinct strategy to achieve ethical, culturally appropriate, and successful Indigenous…

  19. Improving Substantive and Procedural Protections for Indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although REDD+ is one the leading proposals to address climate change, it lends itself to potentially harmful effects on indigenous people, if the regulating nation does not possess adequate policy for protections of their indigenous peoples. Indigenous peoples face the challenge of safeguarding access to their lands and ...

  20. Indigenous Training and Employment. Policy Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2017

    2017-01-01

    National Indigenous training and employment policy falls under the auspices of the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS), an initiative which covers all facets of Indigenous social, economic, health and well-being across multiple Australian Government departments. Two of the main aims of the Jobs, Land and Economy component of the IAS are to…

  1. Mobile Test Capabilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Power Mobile Test capabilities are utilized to conduct electrical power quality testing on aircraft and helicopters. This capability allows that the...

  2. Building Thermal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Hume L.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation is meant to be an overview of the model building process It is based on typical techniques (Monte Carlo Ray Tracing for radiation exchange, Lumped Parameter, Finite Difference for thermal solution) used by the aerospace industry This is not intended to be a "How to Use ThermalDesktop" course. It is intended to be a "How to Build Thermal Models" course and the techniques will be demonstrated using the capabilities of ThermalDesktop (TD). Other codes may or may not have similar capabilities. The General Model Building Process can be broken into four top level steps: 1. Build Model; 2. Check Model; 3. Execute Model; 4. Verify Results.

  3. Legacies of Resistance: Australian Indigenous Resistance Leaders in Indigenous Film, Theatre and Literature

    OpenAIRE

    MATTEO DUTTO

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous resistance to colonisation is a key theme in Australian Indigenous frontier histories, although most knowledge on these events is drawn from non-indigenous sources of information and framed within Western historiographies that can mask continuities between past and present. This thesis develops a decolonising framework to look at how Indigenous cultural producers are redressing this rift through retellings of their stories of Indigenous resistance leaders like Pemulwuy (Bidjigal), ...

  4. Empowering Indigenous Youth: Perspectives from a National Service Learning Program in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leemen Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Issues related to Indigenous higher education have received more attention in recent years. An important aspect has been the adjustment and development of more inclusive regulatory policies. This study explores the policy-enhancing role of non-profit organizations (NPOs in empowering Indigenous college students through an analysis of a nationwide service learning program initiated by a NPO based in Taiwan. The findings revealed the important role of NPOs in enhancing government policies by leveraging their knowledge base and resource networking in order to develop a service learning program for Indigenous youth, which aimed to develop their self-confidence and strengthen their ethnic identity. The article identified four themes that are essential for non-profit organizations in designing and implementing empowerment-based programs for Indigenous participants: developing resource networking partnerships, emphasizing responsibility, building effective mutual trust, and sustaining endeavors.

  5. Indigenous agroforestry in American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malala (Mike) Misa; Agnes M. Vargo

    1993-01-01

    Agroforestry exists in American Samoa as a system where indigenous trees and natural vegetation used for food, fuelwood, crafts and medicine are incorporated with traditional staple crops and livestock on a set piece of land, usually a mountainous slope. Most agroforests are taro-based (Colocasia esculenta). While nutritional, cultural, social,...

  6. Rethinking resilience from indigenous perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Dandeneau, Stéphane; Marshall, Elizabeth; Phillips, Morgan Kahentonni; Williamson, Karla Jessen

    2011-02-01

    The notions of resilience that have emerged in developmental psychology and psychiatry in recent years require systematic rethinking to address the distinctive cultures, geographic and social settings, and histories of adversity of indigenous peoples. In Canada, the overriding social realities of indigenous peoples include their historical rootedness to a specific place (with traditional lands, communities, and transactions with the environment) and the profound displacements caused by colonization and subsequent loss of autonomy, political oppression, and bureaucratic control. We report observations from an ongoing collaborative project on resilience in Inuit, Métis, Mi'kmaq, and Mohawk communities that suggests the value of incorporating indigenous constructs in resilience research. These constructs are expressed through specific stories and metaphors grounded in local culture and language; however, they can be framed more generally in terms of processes that include: regulating emotion and supporting adaptation through relational, ecocentric, and cosmocentric concepts of self and personhood; revisioning collective history in ways that valorize collective identity; revitalizing language and culture as resources for narrative self-fashioning, social positioning, and healing; and renewing individual and collective agency through political activism, empowerment, and reconciliation. Each of these sources of resilience can be understood in dynamic terms as emerging from interactions between individuals, their communities, and the larger regional, national, and global systems that locate and sustain indigenous agency and identity. This social-ecological view of resilience has important implications for mental health promotion, policy, and clinical practice.

  7. Indigenous Language in the Preservation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communication from his mother tongue. Therefore the primary aim is communication which is the process by which information is passed between individuals, organizations communities and nations. Language ensures unity, togetherness and development. Indigenous: Naturally existing in a place or country rather than.

  8. Electric Propulsion Research Building (EPRB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electric Propulsion Research Building (EPRB) capability centers on its suite of vacuum chambers, which are configured to meet the unique requirements related to...

  9. Indigenous populations health protection: A Canadian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Katya L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The disproportionate effects of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on many Canadian Aboriginal communities have drawn attention to the vulnerability of these communities in terms of health outcomes in the face of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. Exploring the particular challenges facing these communities is essential to improving public health planning. In alignment with the objectives of the Pandemic Influenza Outbreak Research Modelling (Pan-InfORM team, a Canadian public health workshop was held at the Centre for Disease Modelling (CDM to: (i evaluate post-pandemic research findings; (ii identify existing gaps in knowledge that have yet to be addressed through ongoing research and collaborative activities; and (iii build upon existing partnerships within the research community to forge new collaborative links with Aboriginal health organizations. The workshop achieved its objectives in identifying main research findings and emerging information post pandemic, and highlighting key challenges that pose significant impediments to the health protection and promotion of Canadian Aboriginal populations. The health challenges faced by Canadian indigenous populations are unique and complex, and can only be addressed through active engagement with affected communities. The academic research community will need to develop a new interdisciplinary framework, building upon concepts from ‘Communities of Practice’, to ensure that the research priorities are identified and targeted, and the outcomes are translated into the context of community health to improve policy and practice.

  10. Dynamic capabilities, Marketing Capability and Organizational Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Roseli Wünsch Takahashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study is to investigate the influence of dynamic capabilities on organizational performance and the role of marketing capabilities as a mediator in this relationship in the context of private HEIs in Brazil. As a research method we carried out a survey with 316 IES and data analysis was operationalized with the technique of structural equation modeling. The results indicate that the dynamic capabilities have influence on organizational performance only when mediated by marketing ability. The marketing capability has an important role in the survival, growth and renewal on educational services offerings for HEIs in private sector, and consequently in organizational performance. It is also demonstrated that mediated relationship is more intense for HEI with up to 3,000 students and other organizational profile variables such as amount of courses, the constitution, the type of institution and type of education do not significantly alter the results.

  11. Indigenous Storytelling and Participatory Action Research: Allies Toward Decolonization? Reflections From the Peoples' International Health Tribunal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caxaj, C Susana

    2015-01-01

    Storytelling, in its various forms, has often been described as a practice with great emancipatory potential. In turn, Indigenous knowledge shows great promise in guiding a participatory action research (PAR) methodology. Yet these two approaches are rarely discussed in relation to one another, nor, has much been written in terms of how these two approaches may work synergistically toward a decolonizing research approach. In this article, I report on a community-driven knowledge translation activity, the Peoples' International Health Tribunal, as an exemplar of how narrative and PAR approaches, guided by local Indigenous knowledge, have great potential to build methodologically and ethically robust research processes. Implications for building globally relevant research alliances and scholarship are further discussed, particularly in relation to working with Indigenous communities.

  12. Scientific Wealth in Middle East and North Africa: Productivity, Indigeneity, and Specialty in 1981-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Afreen; Stoppani, Jonathan; Anadon, Laura Diaz; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Several developing countries seek to build knowledge-based economies by attempting to expand scientific research capabilities. Characterizing the state and direction of progress in this arena is challenging but important. Here, we employ three metrics: a classical metric of productivity (publications per person), an adapted metric which we denote as Revealed Scientific Advantage (developed from work used to compare publications in scientific fields among countries) to characterize disciplinary specialty, and a new metric, scientific indigeneity (defined as the ratio of publications with domestic corresponding authors) to characterize the locus of scientific activity that also serves as a partial proxy for local absorptive capacity. These metrics-using population and publications data that are available for most countries-allow the characterization of some key features of national scientific enterprise. The trends in productivity and indigeneity when compared across other countries and regions can serve as indicators of strength or fragility in the national research ecosystems, and the trends in specialty can allow regional policy makers to assess the extent to which the areas of focus of research align (or not align) with regional priorities. We apply the metrics to study the Middle East and North Africa (MENA)-a region where science and technology capacity will play a key role in national economic diversification. We analyze 9.8 million publication records between 1981-2013 in 17 countries of MENA from Morocco to Iraq and compare it to selected countries throughout the world. The results show that international collaborators increasingly drove the scientific activity in MENA. The median indigeneity reached 52% in 2013 (indicating that almost half of the corresponding authors were located in foreign countries). Additionally, the regional disciplinary focus in chemical and petroleum engineering is waning with modest growth in the life sciences. We find repeated

  13. Scientific Wealth in Middle East and North Africa: Productivity, Indigeneity, and Specialty in 1981–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppani, Jonathan; Anadon, Laura Diaz; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Several developing countries seek to build knowledge-based economies by attempting to expand scientific research capabilities. Characterizing the state and direction of progress in this arena is challenging but important. Here, we employ three metrics: a classical metric of productivity (publications per person), an adapted metric which we denote as Revealed Scientific Advantage (developed from work used to compare publications in scientific fields among countries) to characterize disciplinary specialty, and a new metric, scientific indigeneity (defined as the ratio of publications with domestic corresponding authors) to characterize the locus of scientific activity that also serves as a partial proxy for local absorptive capacity. These metrics—using population and publications data that are available for most countries–allow the characterization of some key features of national scientific enterprise. The trends in productivity and indigeneity when compared across other countries and regions can serve as indicators of strength or fragility in the national research ecosystems, and the trends in specialty can allow regional policy makers to assess the extent to which the areas of focus of research align (or not align) with regional priorities. We apply the metrics to study the Middle East and North Africa (MENA)—a region where science and technology capacity will play a key role in national economic diversification. We analyze 9.8 million publication records between 1981–2013 in 17 countries of MENA from Morocco to Iraq and compare it to selected countries throughout the world. The results show that international collaborators increasingly drove the scientific activity in MENA. The median indigeneity reached 52% in 2013 (indicating that almost half of the corresponding authors were located in foreign countries). Additionally, the regional disciplinary focus in chemical and petroleum engineering is waning with modest growth in the life sciences. We find

  14. Developing Technological Capabilities in Agro-Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitfield, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the emergence and trajectory of a new agro-industry in Ghana, the pineapple export industry, using the technological capabilities approach. It explains the limited expansion of the industry and its declining competitiveness in the face of new competition by looking at how...... Ghanaian exporters developed technological capabilities initially and the incentives and disincentives to building on those capabilities. The article argues that at the heart of the industry's crisis was an inability to further develop technological capabilities. The crisis had systemic features that have...

  15. Buildings interoperability landscape - Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Dave B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephan, Eric G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Weimin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Corbin, Charles D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Widergren, Steven E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Buildings are an integral part of our nation’s energy economy. The advancement in information and communications technology (ICT) has revolutionized energy management in industrial facilities and large commercial buildings. As ICT costs decrease and capabilities increase, buildings automation and energy management features are transforming the small-medium commercial and residential buildings sectors. A vision of a connected world in which equipment and systems within buildings coordinate with each other to efficiently meet their owners’ and occupants’ needs, and where buildings regularly transact business with other buildings and service providers (such as gas and electric service providers) is emerging. However, while the technology to support this collaboration has been demonstrated at various degrees of maturity, the integration frameworks and ecosystems of products that support the ability to easily install, maintain, and evolve building systems and their equipment components are struggling to nurture the fledging business propositions of their proponents.

  16. Cultural Dimensions of Indigenous Participation in Vocational Education and Training: New Perspectives. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Alfred Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study provides new evidence on the inter-relationships between Indigenous Australians' association with their traditional culture and their engagement with vocational education and training. It builds on previous work to develop a "richer" measure of the concept of cultural attachment. This report discusses the links between…

  17. Start with the seed: Native crops, indigenous knowledge, and community seed systems prerequisites for food sovereignty

    Science.gov (United States)

    The dynamic conservation and sustainable utilization of native crop genetic resources are crucial for food sovereignty of Native American communities. Indigenous knowledge of crop diversity when linked to food traditions, local practices and social norms provide the basis for building sovereign comm...

  18. Enhancing Intercultural Engagement through Service Learning and Music Making with Indigenous Communities in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartleet, Brydie-Leigh; Sunderland, Naomi; Carfoot, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the potential for music making activities such as jamming, song writing, and performance to act as a medium for intercultural connection and relationship building during service learning programs with Indigenous communities in Australia. To set the context, the paper begins with an overview of current international…

  19. It Takes a Village: An Indigenous Atayal After-School Tutoring Program in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hui-Ju; Ho, Hsiu-Zu; Lam, Yeana W.

    2017-01-01

    The Boyo After-School Tutoring Program in Hsinchu County, Taiwan, is a unique training program developed by the Boyo Social Welfare Foundation. The primary focus of this nonprofit foundation, established in 2008, is providing tutoring and support to indigenous youths. The Boyo Foundation also serves to build the capacity of unemployed village…

  20. Contacts with mental health services before suicide: a comparison of Indigenous with non-Indigenous Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveticic, Jerneja; Milner, Allison; De Leo, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Most people who die by suicide never seek help, particularly members of ethnic minorities. This study compared the prevalence of contacts with mental health services, types of services accessed and factors related to help-seeking behaviors by Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. All suicides by Indigenous and non-Indigenous persons from Queensland, Australia, during the period 1994-2007 were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression models. Non-Indigenous suicide cases were almost two times more likely than Indigenous counterparts to have ever received help for mental health problems (43.3% vs. 23.8%). The most common source of help for Indigenous persons was inpatient care, while for non-Indigenous persons, it was general practitioners. Factors increasing the likelihood of service utilization by Indigenous persons were suicide attempt in last year, living in metropolitan area and not being married. Among non-Indigenous persons, these factors were recent communication of suicidal intent or suicide attempt, recent treatment for physical illness and problematic consumption of alcohol. Indigenous Australians die by suicide at a rate twice higher than the non-Indigenous population, yet they are significantly less likely to seek professional help for mental health concerns. Help-seeking behavior among Indigenous Australians at risk of suicide should be promoted thorough provision of culturally appropriate services. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Indigenous Australia and health rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ian

    2008-05-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant shift in public policy in relation to indigenous Australians. The new policy frameworks have been marked by an antipathy towards a policy discourse based on a human rights framework. This has also been associated with a shift from an approach based on "self-determination" to one founded on the idea of "mutual obligation". This article describes these developments in detail and considers the implications for human rights discourse.

  2. Circle of Courage Infusion into the Alberta Indigenous Games 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Dawn Marie

    2011-01-01

    Thousands of indigenous people from across North America came to the Enoch Cree Nation for the Alberta Indigenous Games, six days of sport, education, and cultural awakening. The vision of the Alberta Indigenous Games is to recognize the value and potential of Indigenous culture and the young people. Activities include sports, indigenous arts,…

  3. Responding to Indigenous Australian Sexual Assault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janya McCalman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous Australians experience a high prevalence of sexual assault, yet a regional sexual assault service found few Indigenous Australians accessed their services. This prompted exploration of how its services might be improved. A resultant systematic search of the literature is reported in this article. Seven electronic databases and seven websites were systematically searched for peer reviewed and gray literature documenting responses to the sexual assault of Indigenous Australians. These publications were then classified by response type and study type. Twenty-three publications met the inclusion criteria. They included studies of legal justice, media, and community-based and mainstream service responses for Indigenous survivors and perpetrators. We located program descriptions, measurement, and descriptive research, but no intervention studies. There is currently insufficient evidence to confidently prescribe what works to effectively respond to Indigenous Australian sexual assault. The study revealed an urgent need for researchers, Indigenous communities, and services to work together to develop the evidence base.

  4. Improving maternity services for Indigenous women in Australia: moving from policy to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kildea, Sue; Tracy, Sally; Sherwood, Juanita; Magick-Dennis, Fleur; Barclay, Lesley

    2016-10-17

    The well established disparities in health outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians include a significant and concerning higher incidence of preterm birth, low birth weight and newborn mortality. Chronic diseases (eg, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular and renal disease) that are prevalent in Indigenous Australian adults have their genesis in utero and in early life. Applying interventions during pregnancy and early life that aim to improve maternal and infant health is likely to have long lasting consequences, as recognised by Australia's National Maternity Services Plan (NMSP), which set out a 5-year vision for 2010-2015 that was endorsed by all governments (federal and state and territory). We report on the actions targeting Indigenous women, and the progress that has been achieved in three priority areas: The Indigenous maternity workforce; Culturally competent maternity care; and; Developing dedicated programs for "Birthing on Country". The timeframe for the NMSP has expired without notable results in these priority areas. More urgent leadership is required from the Australian government. Funding needs to be allocated to the priority areas, including for scholarships and support to train and retain Indigenous midwives, greater commitment to culturally competent maternity care and the development and evaluation of Birthing on Country sites in urban, rural and particularly in remote and very remote communities. Tools such as the Australian Rural Birth Index and the National Maternity Services Capability Framework can help guide this work.

  5. Towards an Indigenous Ecosystem Services Valuation Framework: A North Australian Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaljit Kaur Sangha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite calls by various international agencies, considerable work is still required to understand and incorporate the importance of earth's ecosystems for informing public policies. Savannas comprise nearly one third of global terrestrial ecosystems and support many local and Indigenous communities, but the value of their ecosystem services (ES is insufficiently understood. This study proposes an integrated ES valuation framework and applies it to assess ES for an Indigenous savanna estate in northern Australia, describing how capabilities along with biophysical and socio-cultural ES benefits play a vital role for peoples' wellbeing. We estimated the monetary value of ES by applying a conventional Basic Value Transfer (BVT method for biophysical benefits (USD 84 M y-1, and a wellbeing approach for valuing socio-cultural benefits and capabilities (USD 4 M y-1. The latter offers a relatively nominal estimate but underscores the importance of including peoples' capabilities in order to demonstrate wellbeing benefits for Indigenous people who regularly visit and utilize their lands. We explore two scenarios, Business as Usual (pastoral land use and ES-based economies (implying customary land use, particularly through fire management to project plausible broader benefits for the community over a longer term. This research describes how inclusion of Indigenous peoples' capabilities and socio-cultural values are critical for ES assessments, and indicates that an integrated approach is essential for appropriately informing local, regional and global development policies.

  6. Teachers' Attitudes to Including Indigenous Knowledges in the Australian Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Renee

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of the Australian National Curriculum containing the "Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures" Cross-Curriculum Priority (CCP) and "Intercultural Understanding" General Capability, there has been a renewed push to embed Indigenous content into secondary school subjects. This paper…

  7. Smoking cessation and tobacco prevention in Indigenous populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Esterman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article systematically reviews 91 smoking cessation and tobacco prevention studies tailored for Indigenous populations around the world, with a particular focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations in Australia. We identified several components of effective interventions, including the use of multifaceted programs that simultaneously address the behavioural, psychological and biochemical aspects of addiction, using resources culturally tailored for the needs of individual Indigenous populations. Pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation was effective when combined with culturally tailored behavioural interventions and health professional support, though it is generally underused in clinical practice. From a policy perspective, interventions of greater intensity, with more components, were more likely to be effective than those of lower intensity and shorter duration. For any new policy it is important to consider community capacity building, development of knowledge, and sustainability of the policy beyond guided implementation. Future research should address how the intervention can be supported into standard practice, policy, or translation into the front-line of clinical care. Investigations are also required to determine the efficacy of emerging therapies (such as e-cigarettes and the use of social media to tackle youth smoking, and under-researched interventions that hold promise based on non-Indigenous studies, such as the use of Champix. We conclude that more methodologically rigorous investigations are required to determine components of the less-successful interventions to aid future policy, practice and research initiatives.

  8. Taiwanese Indigenous Knowledge Categories and Their Distribution: A Survey of Indigenous Publications

    OpenAIRE

    Gu-Le-Le Lu; Mei-Mei Wu

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, indigenous knowledge has received significant attention in Taiwan. Yet, due to the lack of a clear definition and framework of indigenous knowledge, government ministries and social organizations at all levels face enormous challenges in legislation and policymaking concerning indigenous knowledge preservation, organization, and transmission. This research intends to analyze the scope of published indigenous knowledge contents in Taiwan. By taking a qualitative ap...

  9. Chapter Sixteen. Indigenous Peoples and Hunting Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Scott

    2017-01-01

    INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND HUNTING RIGHTS The incorporation of indigenous hunter-gatherer peoples and their territories into modern nation-states, historically without their informed consent, has long provided human rights challenges to states and local communities. In the evolving international human rights regime, it has been slowly recognized that indigenous peoples have inherent rights due to their presence on and use of their traditional territories prior to the arrival of the modern nation-...

  10. Weak recognition: Indigenous rights in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Fuentes; Maite Cea, de

    2017-01-01

    After seventeen years of debate, the Chilean Congress approved the ilo 169 Convention on indigenous rights that compels the State to consult indigenous communities on issues that directly affect them. As the political and economic conditions were unfavourable, this political outcome is surprising. Indeed, the legal status of the indigenous people in Chile is weaker than in the rest of Latin America. This article explains this outcome through a detailed description of institutional changes as ...

  11. Managing Cultural Commodification from an Indigenous Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Maui Solomon

    2013-01-01

    This presentation draws on examples from New Zealand and the Pacific to describe an Indigenous framework for protecting traditional users and their traditional knowledge. Maui Solomon is a Barrister and Indigenous Peoples Advocate with 22 years legal experience specializing in land and fishing claims, cultural and intellectual property, environmental law and Treaty/Indigenous Peoples Rights issues. Maui is also an IPinCH research team member.  

  12. Plant Provocations: Botanical Indigeneity and (Decolonial Imaginations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendran Kumarakulasingam

    Full Text Available Abstract Abstract: This paper examines the possibilities and limitations of an emergent global discourse of indigeneity to offer an oppositional praxis in the face of the depredations of settler colonialism in post-apartheid South Africa. Self-conscious articulations of indigeneity, we argue, reveal the fraught relationship between increasingly hegemonic and narrow understandings of the indigenous and the carceral logic of apartheid. We examine this by focusing on the meanings and attachments forged through indigenous plants in two realms: the world of indigenous gardening practised by white suburban dwellers and that of subsistence farming undertaken by rural black women. This juxtaposition reveals that in contrast to the pervasive resurrection of colonial time that defines metropolitan indigenous gardening, the social relations of a subsistence cultivator challenge the confines of colonial temporality, revealing a creative mode of dissent structured around dreams, ancestral knowledge, and the commons. Our exploration of struggles around botanical indigeneity suggests that anticolonial modes of indigeneity do not necessarily inhere in recognisable forms and that studies of the indigenous need to proceed beyond those that bear familial resemblance to emergent global understandings.

  13. Indigenous reclamation : oilsands sites can be reclaimed with naturally occurring seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D.L.M.

    2007-04-15

    Some oilsands sites are now being reclaimed through the use of indigenous seeds. This article discussed reclamation activities undertaken by Arctic Alpine, a company that is currently developing over 50 varieties of grasses and legume seed collections for use in oilsands remediation projects. The company's products have been used for reclamation and re-vegetation projects in various national and provincial parks, as well as at tailings ponds and mining sites in Canada and internationally. Before selecting the appropriate seeds, the sites are carefully evaluated in order to determine its latitude, longitude, altitude and ecosystem type. The existing undisturbed ecosystem botany surrounding the reclamation site is also examined. The commercial availability of appropriate indigenous species suitable for the re-vegetation of the site is also assessed. Indigenous seeds are ideal colonizers of disturbed sites as they help sites to attain an earlier balance with the surrounding landscape. Once they are established, indigenous seeds do not require irrigation, fertilization, or maintenance. The seeds are also resistant to indigenous pests and diseases, and will not become invasive. Arctic Alpine has continued to develop seed varieties that are capable of adapting to harsh northern winter conditions. Their grasses and legumes have been selected to quickly propagate in adverse conditions. While land use planners and regulators are increasingly interested in phytoremediation strategies, only a few oilsands reclamation projects are using indigenous seeds. It was concluded that a large increase in the number of projects using indigenous seeds is anticipated in the next 5 years, due to the fact that more and more indigenous seed varieties are now commercially available. 1 fig.

  14. Stimulating Parenting Practices in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Mexican Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Knauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Parenting may be influenced by ethnicity; marginalization; education; and poverty. A critical but unexamined question is how these factors may interact to compromise or support parenting practices in ethnic minority communities. This analysis examined associations between mothers’ stimulating parenting practices and a range of child-level (age; sex; and cognitive and socio-emotional development; household-level (indigenous ethnicity; poverty; and parental education; and community-level (economic marginalization and majority indigenous population variables among 1893 children ages 4–18 months in poor; rural communities in Mexico. We also explored modifiers of associations between living in an indigenous community and parenting. Key findings were that stimulating parenting was negatively associated with living in an indigenous community or family self-identification as indigenous (β = −4.25; SE (Standard Error = 0.98; β = −1.58; SE = 0.83 respectively. However; living in an indigenous community was associated with significantly more stimulating parenting among indigenous families than living in a non-indigenous community (β = 2.96; SE = 1.25. Maternal education was positively associated with stimulating parenting only in indigenous communities; and household crowding was negatively associated with stimulating parenting only in non-indigenous communities. Mothers’ parenting practices were not associated with child sex; father’s residential status; education; or community marginalization. Our findings demonstrate that despite greater community marginalization; living in an indigenous community is protective for stimulating parenting practices of indigenous mothers.

  15. An Indigenous Academic Perspective to Preserving and Promoting Indigenous Knowledge and Traditions: A Fiji Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Wahab

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous knowledge is multidimensional encompassing the beliefs, practices, arts, spirituality and other forms of traditional and cultural experiences that belong to Indigenous communities globally. In order to protect, preserve and recognize the knowledge of the Indigenous people of Fiji, known as the iTaukei, the University of Fiji has…

  16. Mechanical properties of wood-An indigenous building material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Applied Science and Technology. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 1-2 (1997) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Building Migrant Civil Society: Indigenous Mexicans in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Fox

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mexican migrants in the United States are still widely assumed to be an ethnically homogeneous population. Historically, most Mexican migrants did share many common characteristics, coming primarily from rural communities in the central-western part of the country. Over the last two decades, however, the Mexican migrant population has diversified dramatically, both socially and geographically.

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Indigenous Research Guidelines to Inform Genomic Research in Indigenous Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Maddock

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic research has potential benefits for improving health, such as identifying molecular characteristics of a disease, understanding disease prevalence and treatment, and developing treatments tailored to patients based on individual genetic characteristics of their disease. Indigenous people are often targeted for genetic research because genes are easier to study in communities that practice endogamy. Therefore, populations perceived to be more homogenous, such as Indigenous peoples, are ideal for genetic studies. While Indigenous communities remain the focal point of many genomic studies, some result in harm and unethical practice. Unfortunately, the harms of poorly formulated and unethical research involving Indigenous people have created barriers to participation that prevent critical and lifesaving research. These harms have led a number of Indigenous communities to develop guidelines for engaging with researchers to assist in safely bridging the gap between genetic research and Indigenous peoples.SPECIFIC AIMS: The specific aims of this study were: (1 to conduct an international review and comparison of Indigenous research guidelines that highlight topics regarding genetics and use of biological samples and identify commonalities and differences among ethical principles of concern to Indigenous peoples; and (2 develop policy recommendations for Indigenous populations interested in creating formal policies around the use of genetic information and protection of biological samples using data from specific aim 1.METHODS: A comparative analysis was performed to identify best research practices and recommendations for Indigenous groups from four countries: Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and the United States. The analysis examined commonalities in political relationships, which support self-determination among these Indigenous communities to control their data. Current international Indigenous guidelines were analyzed to review

  19. Energy Management and Control System: Desired Capabilities and Functionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatley, Darrel D.; Meador, Richard J.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.; Wouden, Carl

    2005-04-29

    This document discusses functions and capabilities of a typical building/facility energy management and control systems (EMCS). The overall intent is to provide a building operator, manager or engineer with basic background information and recommended functions, capabilities, and good/best practices that will enable the control systems to be fully utilized/optimized, resulting in improved building occupant quality of life and more reliable, energy efficient facilities.

  20. The challenges of maintaining indigenous ecological knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe McCarter

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased interest in indigenous ecological knowledge (IEK has led to concern that it is vulnerable amidst social and ecological change. In response, multiple authors have recommended the establishment of programs for the maintenance and revitalization of IEK systems. However, few studies have analyzed the methods, opportunities, and challenges of these programs. This is a critical gap, as IEK maintenance is challenging and will require layered and evidence-based solutions. We seek to build a foundation for future approaches to IEK maintenance. First, we present a systematic literature review of IEK maintenance programs (n = 39 and discuss the opportunities and challenges inherent in five broad groups of published approaches. Second, we use two case studies from the Republic of Vanuatu to illustrate these challenges in more depth. The first case study takes a community-based approach, which has inherent strengths (e.g., localized organization. It has, however, faced practical (e.g., funding and epistemological (changing modes of knowledge transmission challenges. The second case study seeks to facilitate IEK transmission within the formal school system. Although this model has potential, it has faced significant challenges (e.g., lack of institutional linkages. We conclude that supporting and strengthening IEK is important but that serious attention is needed to account for the social, situated, and dynamic nature of IEK. In closing, we use the review and case studies to propose four principles that may guide adaptive and flexible approaches for the future maintenance of IEK systems.

  1. Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-582 Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...Program Information Program Name Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) DoD Component Navy Joint Participants United States Marine Corps; United...dated June 16, 2004 CEC December 2015 SAR March 17, 2016 12:13:59 UNCLASSIFIED 5 Mission and Description Mission The Cooperative Engagement Capability

  2. Transconstitutional Talk Between the Indigenous Culture and the Brazilian Constitutional Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Escobar Teixeira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research seeks to comprehend the existing cultural conflicts in Brazilian Territory between the culture of certain indigenous cultures, which are similar to their own normative order and the Brazilian Constitutional Order, approaching for that the Law Project no. 1057/2007, which is about the infanticide in some indigenous traditions. It aims to analyse the matter under the Transconstitutional Theory as a means of building a transversal rationality that proposes a profitable dialog amongst the juridical orders. The result of the article points specifically to the mediation that seeks the litigation settlement, making possible a vision of otherness.

  3. The influence of indigenous status and community indigenous composition on obesity and diabetes among Mexican adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Pamela; Handley, Margaret A; Vargas Bustamante, Arturo; Schillinger, Dean

    2011-12-01

    In many high-income countries, indigenous populations bear a higher burden of obesity and diabetes than non-indigenous populations. Less is known about these patterns in lower- and middle-income countries. We assessed the hypothesis that obesity and diabetes were less prevalent among indigenous than non-indigenous adults in Mexico, home to the largest indigenous population in Latin America. We investigated socioeconomic explanations for differences. In a related line of inquiry, we examine whether adults in communities with higher versus lower percentages of indigenous residents were buffered against these conditions. We assessed whether differences were partially explained by lower development in higher-indigenous communities. Obesity was based on measured height and weight, and diabetes on a diagnosis from a healthcare professional. The analysis for obesity included 19 577 adults aged 20 and older from the Mexican Family Life Survey (2002), a nationally representative survey of Mexican households and communities; for diabetes, we restricted analysis to adults with health insurance. We used multilevel logistic regression to estimate the odds of obesity and diabetes by indigenous status and community percent indigenous. Results suggest that indigenous adults had significantly lower odds of obesity and diabetes than non-indigenous adults. This advantage was not explained by the lower socioeconomic status of indigenous individuals. A higher percentage of indigenous individuals in communities provided protection against obesity, although not for diabetes. Differences for obesity were not accounted for by community development. Findings suggest that an opportunity may exist to prevent disparities in obesity and diabetes from developing by indigenous characteristics in Mexico. Identifying the sources of protective effects of individual and community indigenous characteristics relative to these health conditions should be a priority, given global implications for

  4. INNOVATIVE MIOR PROCESS UTILIZING INDIGENOUS RESERVOIR CONSTITUENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.O. Hitzman; A.K. Stepp; D.M. Dennis; L.R. Graumann

    2003-09-01

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions and technologies for improving oil production. The goal was to identify and utilize indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work in model sandpack cores was conducted using microbial cultures isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters using cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Increased oil recovery in multiple model sandpack systems was achieved and the technology and results were verified by successful field studies. Direct application of the research results has lead to the development of a feasible, practical, successful, and cost-effective technology which increases oil recovery. This technology is now being commercialized and applied in numerous field projects to increase oil recovery. Two field applications of the developed technology reported production increases of 21% and 24% in oil recovery.

  5. Recognizing appropriate representation of indigenous knowledge in design practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelly, Meghan; Kennedy, Russell

    2016-01-01

    ... of indigenous culture. Incorporating indigenous symbols into visual communication design strategies impacts a wide range of stakeholders and therefore requires a sensitive approach with broad consultation in regard...

  6. Colorectal cancer among Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Queensland, Australia: Toward survival equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Suzanne P; Green, Adèle C; Bray, Freddie; Coory, Michael; Garvey, Gail; Sabesan, Sabe; Valery, Patricia C

    2016-06-01

    While Indigenous people in Queensland have lower colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality than the rest of the population, CRC remains the third most frequent cancer among Australian Indigenous people overall. This study aimed to investigate patterns of care and survival between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians with CRC. Through a matched-cohort design we compared 80 Indigenous and 85 non-Indigenous people all diagnosed with CRC and treated in Queensland public hospitals during 1998-2004 (frequency matched on age, sex, geographical remoteness). We compared clinical and treatment data (Pearson's chi-square) and all-cause and cancer survival (Cox regression analysis). Indigenous patients with CRC were not significantly more likely to have comorbidity, advanced disease at diagnosis or less treatment than non-Indigenous people. There was also no statistically significant difference in all-cause survival (HR 1.14, 95% CI 0.69, 1.89) or cancer survival (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.60, 1.69) between the two groups. Similar CRC mortality among Indigenous and other Australians may reflect both the lower incidence and adequate management. Increasing life expectancy and exposures to risk factors suggests that Indigenous people are vulnerable to a growing burden of CRC. Primary prevention and early detection will be of paramount importance to future CRC control among Indigenous Australians. Current CRC management must be maintained and include prevention measures to ensure that predicted increases in CRC burden are minimized. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Telematics Options and Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Cabell [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-05

    This presentation describes the data tracking and analytical capabilities of telematics devices. Federal fleet managers can use the systems to keep their drivers safe, maintain a fuel efficient fleet, ease their reporting burden, and save money. The presentation includes an example of how much these capabilities can save fleets.

  8. Indigenous Scripts Of African Languages | Meshesha | Indilinga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Africa there are a number of languages spoken, some of which have their own indigenous scripts that are used for writing. In this paper we assess these languages and present an in-depth script analysis for the Amharic writing system, one of the well-known indigenous scripts of Africa. Amharic is the official and working ...

  9. Haptoglobin Studies in Kenyan Indigenous Chickens | Maina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haptoglobin Studies in Kenyan Indigenous Chickens. J. O. Maina, M. Bhattacharjee, P. J. Aduma. Abstract. Haptoglobin polymorphism was found in indigenous chickens of Kenya. Haptoglobin was found to be in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. There was high average diversity recorded with respect to haptoglobin.

  10. Towards a critique of indigenous African religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Strijdom

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is argued that a postcolonial critique of the colonial study of religion should not preclude a critique of indigenous African religion itself. The latter may be developed from a human rights perspective and a critique of exclusionary views of indigeneity. The argument is illustrated by means of specific case studies.

  11. Children's stories: what knowledge constitutes indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intention was to design a science module on a topic that learners identified as relevant. The method employed was to ask learners to write stories on the topic in an effort to determine what indigenous knowledge held with regard to the topic. While the stories contained examples of indigenous knowledge, the majority of ...

  12. Research methods in indigenous mathematical Knowledge: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous games are an integral component of indigenous knowledge systems. These and other games in general are usually viewed from the narrow perspective of play, enjoyment and recreation. Even though these are important, there is more to games than just the three aesthetic aspects. Analysis of games reveals ...

  13. Curriculum enrichment through indigenous Zulu games | Roux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to document and analyze indigenous Zulu games for possible curriculum enrichment of physical education in schools and the promotion of cross-cultural interaction between learners. This necessitated the identification and description of indigenous Zulu games in order to assess their potential in

  14. Documenting indigenous knowledge about Africa's traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the global debates about indigenous knowledge and Africa's traditional medicine. It explores whether it is possible to document all the elements of indigenous knowledge about Africa's traditional medicine that is used for the treatment of diverse forms of sickness. Certain types of Africa's traditional ...

  15. Breeding program for indigenous chicken in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngeno, K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ngeno, K. (2015). Breeding program for indigenous chicken in Kenya. Analysis of diversity in indigenous chicken populations. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands The objective of this research was to generate knowledge required for the development of an

  16. Learning from Assessment: NAPLAN and Indigenous Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Gilah; Forgasz, Helen

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report trends over time of performance of non-Indigenous and Indigenous students on the Numeracy component of the NAPLAN tests. Possible links between student performance on the NAPLAN Numeracy test and the four components--Reading, Writing, Spelling, and Grammar--of the NAPLAN Literacy test were also explored. While the…

  17. Understanding the relationship between indigenous (traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous local communities have coexisted with their natural biological resources for millennia. This has entailed that the local people use a great deal of conservation methods to ensure that this coexistence does indeed exist to this present date. Invariably, as this happened, a huge wealth of sophisticated indigenous ...

  18. Gambling: A Poison Chalice for Indigenous Peoples'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    Indigenous populations are now being encouraged to be involved in the business of gambling as an operator or if not given that status, are actively encouraged to participate in gambling activities. Research both published and unpublished show that different indigenous populations often have a higher prevalence of problem and pathological gambling…

  19. Epistemological and methodological framework for indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current wave of interest in indigenous knowledge (IK) is mainly due to growing acknowledgement of the limitation on the part of conventional science in addressing environmental issues. Because indigenous people are keen observers of the climate system, from their many years of close interaction with the ...

  20. Indigenous community insurance as an alternative financing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammed

    and privatization against the poor. Therefore it is suggested that indigenous institutions should be encouraged to undertake community mobilization so as to generate sustainable resources. KEY WORDS: Indigenous community insurance, Health care financing, Jimma, Ethiopia. INTRODUCTION. Health insurance plays a ...

  1. Indigenous Knowledge Systems: implications for natural science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous Knowledge Systems: implications for natural science and technology teaching and learning. ... Journal Home > Vol 22, No 4 (2002) > ... Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS), as a broad framework of thinking about our local context, seeks to problematise the insufficient integration of the cultural-social and the ...

  2. Indigenous Angiosperm biodiversity of Olabisi Onabanjo University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The conservation of the genetic variability of the indigenous angiosperm community is a sine qua non. A survey of indigenous angiosperm biodiversity of the Olabisi Onabanjo University permanent site was undertaken. Plants collected were dried, poisoned and mounted on herbarium sheets, proper identification and ...

  3. Indigenous Ecological Knowledge and Modern Western Ecological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous knowledge is often dismissed as 'traditional and outdated', and hence irrelevant to modern ecological assessment. This theoretical paper critically examines the arguments advanced to elevate modern western ecological knowledge over indigenous ecological knowledge, as well as the sources and uses of ...

  4. Genetic characterization of Nigerian indigenous pig using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high genetic similarity observed in the indigenous pig samples in Ogbooro indicated a level of inbreeding of pig stocks in this locality which can be conserved as a genetic resource for breeding programmes for pure NIP in the future. Key words: Animal genetic resources, conservation, Nigeria indigenous pig, ...

  5. Indigenous Knowledge Practitioners' Sustainable Livelihood Practices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The theoretical framework is drawn from an indigenous knowledge perspective and Ahlberg's framework for sustainable development. Findings ... The authors argue for greater formal recognition and support from the city to help these women sustain their important indigenous knowledge for future generations. Keywords: ...

  6. Emancipatory Indigenous Knowledge Systems: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emancipatory Indigenous Knowledge Systems: implications for environmental education in South Africa. ... This knowledge is accorded low status because it belongs to a particular racial or ethnic group which often, it is assumed, lacks the necessary cultur al capital. Despite these negative perceptions of Indigenous ...

  7. Sonographic measurements of ocular biometry of indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sonographic measurements of ocular biometry of indigenous Nigerian dogs in Zaria, Nigeria. ... The dogs were adequately restrained physically and the structure of the ocular globe was evaluated at a depth of 4-6 cm. For each dog ... Keywords: Ultrasonography, Baseline Value, Nigerian indigenous Dog, Ocular Biometry ...

  8. Enhancing Participation of Indigenous People to Address ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    New research will help indigenous peoples in Latin America tackle the inequity, racial discrimination, and other barriers they face in accessing their right to health care. Geographic and language barriers, combined with ethnic and racial discrimination, are some of the reasons why indigenous peoples experience social ...

  9. Emancipatory Indigenous Knowledge Systems: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Despite these negative perceptions of Indigenous Knowledge, there is a growing realisation that this knowledge is part of the global heritage ... by Indigenous Knowledge Systems in education in general and environmental education in particular. ... ties of style, modes of thinking, and types of dispositions that are assigned ...

  10. Including People with Disabilities: An Indigenous Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan-Brown, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Being victims of racial prejudice, religious intolerance, poverty, disempowerment and language loss it could be expected that indigenous people would be supportive of the Inclusion Movement with its philosophy of valuing and acceptance of all people. This supposition is examined for Maori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand. In…

  11. Indigenous Control Methods for Parasites among Pastoralists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tree felling and bush burning were constraints to utilization of the control methods. The study concluded that indigenous control methods were well established and utilized by the respondents. It is recommended that laws banning bush burning and indiscriminate tree felling be re-enforced in order to preserve indigenous ...

  12. how colonialism underdeveloped nigerian indigenous languages

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    .

    2017-07-01

    Jul 1, 2017 ... childhood education. In other words, there is the propensity for better comprehension when the mother-tongue is used to teach. It is estimated that there are over two hundred and fifty indigenous languages in Nigeria. But unfortunately, these indigenous languages are not as viable as the English language.

  13. Dynamic Capabilities and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilden, Ralf; Gudergan, Siegfried P.; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic capabilities are widely considered to incorporate those processes that enable organizations to sustain superior performance over time. In this paper, we argue theoretically and demonstrate empirically that these effects are contingent on organizational structure and the competitive...... intensity in the market. Results from partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) analyses indicate that organic organizational structures facilitate the impact of dynamic capabilities on organizational performance. Furthermore, we find that the performance effects of dynamic capabilities...... are contingent on the competitive intensity faced by firms. Our findings demonstrate the performance effects of internal alignment between organizational structure and dynamic capabilities, as well as the external fit of dynamic capabilities with competitive intensity. We outline the advantages of PLS...

  14. The contribution of geography to disparities in preventable hospitalisations between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Timothy C; Randall, Deborah A; Falster, Michael O; Lujic, Sanja; Jorm, Louisa R

    2014-01-01

    To quantify the independent roles of geography and Indigenous status in explaining disparities in Potentially Preventable Hospital (PPH) admissions between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Analysis of linked hospital admission data for New South Wales (NSW), Australia, for the period July 1 2003 to June 30 2008. Age-standardised admission rates, and rate ratios adjusted for age, sex and Statistical Local Area (SLA) of residence using multilevel models. PPH diagnoses accounted for 987,604 admissions in NSW over the study period, of which 3.7% were for Indigenous people. The age-standardised PPH admission rate was 76.5 and 27.3 per 1,000 for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people respectively. PPH admission rates in Indigenous people were 2.16 times higher than in non-Indigenous people of the same age group and sex who lived in the same SLA. The largest disparities in PPH admission rates were seen for diabetes complications, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and rheumatic heart disease. Both rates of PPH admission in Indigenous people, and the disparity in rates between Indigenous than non-Indigenous people, varied significantly by SLA, with greater disparities seen in regional and remote areas than in major cities. Higher rates of PPH admission among Indigenous people are not simply a function of their greater likelihood of living in rural and remote areas. The very considerable geographic variation in the disparity in rates of PPH admission between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people indicates that there is potential to reduce unwarranted variation by characterising outlying areas which contribute the most to this disparity.

  15. ican Approaches to Building eace and Social Solidarity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    indigenous approaches to building peace and social solidarity in Africa. The Need for Building Peace: Understanding the Sources of. Conflict in Africa. At the core of the crisis within Africa's ..... This notion of ubuntu sheds light on the importance of peacemaking through the principles of reciprocity, inclusivity and a sense of ...

  16. Weak recognition: Indigenous rights in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Fuentes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After seventeen years of debate, the Chilean Congress approved the ilo 169 Convention on indigenous rights that compels the State to consult indigenous communities on issues that directly affect them. As the political and economic conditions were unfavourable, this political outcome is surprising. Indeed, the legal status of the indigenous people in Chile is weaker than in the rest of Latin America. This article explains this outcome through a detailed description of institutional changes as well as social pressures from the indigenous movement. These factors made right-wing sectors to adapt their discourses in order to accept Chile as a multicultural society. Moreover, a relevant part of the story is related to territorial differences among legislators. Discourse adaptation toward a soft recognition of indigenous rights is a likely outcome in a very conservative environmental setting.

  17. Organizational Strategic Learning Capability: Exploring the Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hanna; Sejong, Wendy; Valentine, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: How to build and enhance the strategic learning capability (SLC) of an organization becomes crucial to both research and practice. This study was designed with the purpose to conceptualize SLC by translating and interpreting the related literature to develop empirical dimensions that could be tested and used in a survey instrument.…

  18. Study Protocol - Accurate assessment of kidney function in Indigenous Australians: aims and methods of the eGFR Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotopoulos Sianna

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an overwhelming burden of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease among Indigenous Australians. In this high risk population, it is vital that we are able to measure accurately kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate is the best overall marker of kidney function. However, differences in body build and body composition between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians suggest that creatinine-based estimates of glomerular filtration rate derived for European populations may not be appropriate for Indigenous Australians. The burden of kidney disease is borne disproportionately by Indigenous Australians in central and northern Australia, and there is significant heterogeneity in body build and composition within and amongst these groups. This heterogeneity might differentially affect the accuracy of estimation of glomerular filtration rate between different Indigenous groups. By assessing kidney function in Indigenous Australians from Northern Queensland, Northern Territory and Western Australia, we aim to determine a validated and practical measure of glomerular filtration rate suitable for use in all Indigenous Australians. Methods/Design A cross-sectional study of Indigenous Australian adults (target n = 600, 50% male across 4 sites: Top End, Northern Territory; Central Australia; Far North Queensland and Western Australia. The reference measure of glomerular filtration rate was the plasma disappearance rate of iohexol over 4 hours. We will compare the accuracy of the following glomerular filtration rate measures with the reference measure: Modification of Diet in Renal Disease 4-variable formula, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation, Cockcroft-Gault formula and cystatin C- derived estimates. Detailed assessment of body build and composition was performed using anthropometric measurements, skinfold thicknesses, bioelectrical impedance and a sub-study used dual

  19. The story of rising voices: Facilitating collaboration between indigenous and western ways of knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Julie; Lazrus, Heather; Bennett, Shiloh-Kay; Chief, Karletta; Dhillon, Carla May; Gough, Bob; Kruger, Linda; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Petrovic, Stefan; Whyte, Kyle Powys; Companion, Michele; Chaiken, Miriam S.

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous community self-determination, cultures, and ways of life are at high risk from climate change impacts and ecological dispossession. Partnerships between experts with backgrounds in Indigenous and western knowledge may be productive and effective ways to reduce vulnerability and foster resilience. This chapter examines collaborations among scientific and Native American, Alaska Native, and Pacific Island communities to support climate solutions. We draw examples from the "Rising Voices: Collaborative Science with Indigenous Knowledge for Climate Solutions" program (Rising Voices) to examine how boundary organizations function cross-culturally to increase communities' adaptive capacity through knowledge exchange, as well as building the decision-making capacity needed to exercise sovereignty and make adaptive decisions in a changing climate.

  20. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  1. Indigenous Participation in Australian Sport: The Perils of the ‘Panacea’ Proposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Robert Evans

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The argument that participation in sport among disadvantaged populations can produce positive outcomes in wide range of areas has been a consistent theme in academic literature. It is argued that sport participation can promote women’s empowerment, sexuality, lifestyle, peacemaking, youth development, poverty reduction and conflict resolution. Similarly, in Australia, participation in sport among Indigenous Australians has been proffered as a ‘panacea’ for many Indigenous problems; from promoting better health and education outcomes, to encouraging community building, good citizenship and entrepreneurship. Parallel to this has been a focus on documenting and analysing sport participation among Indigenous Australians in elite sport which often concludes that Indigenous Australians have an innate and ‘natural ability’ in sports. These two assumptions, first, that sport participation can help realise a wide range of positive social outcomes; and second, that Indigenous Australians are natural athletes, have driven significant public investment in numerous sport focused programs. This paper questions these assumptions and outlines some of the challenges inherent with an emphasis on sport as a solution to Indigenous disadvantage. We highlight how participation in sport has often been tied to ambitious, ill-defined and, in terms of evaluation, often elusive social outcome goals. Second, we also argue that there is limited research to indicate that participation in either elite or grassroots level sport has led to any discernible social progress in addressing inequality. We contrast historical Indigenous participation in a range of sporting codes to demonstrate the influence of factors beyond the ‘natural ability’ and ‘born to play’ propositions. Finally, we outline six ‘perils’ associated with viewing sport as a panacea; including how privileging sport can not only perpetuate disadvantage by reinforcing stereotypes and also

  2. Cataract surgery coverage rates for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians: the National Eye Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Joshua; Xie, Jing; Keel, Stuart; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Crowston, Jonathan; Taylor, Hugh R; Dirani, Mohamed

    2017-09-18

    To determine cataract surgery coverage rates for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. National cross-sectional population-based survey. Thirty randomly selected Australian geographic sites, stratified by remoteness. 3098 non-Indigenous Australians aged 50 years or more and 1738 Indigenous Australians aged 40 years or more, recruited and examined in the National Eye Health Survey (NEHS) between March 2015 and April 2016. Participants underwent an interviewer-administered questionnaire that collected socio-demographic information and past ocular care history, including cataract surgery. For those with visual acuity worse than 6/12, anterior segment photography and slit lamp examinations were conducted. Cataract surgery coverage rates according to WHO and NEHS definitions; associated risk factors. Cataract surgery coverage rates calculated with the NEHS definition 1 of vision impairment (visual acuity worse than 6/12) were lower for Indigenous than non-Indigenous participants (58.5% v 88.0%; odds ratio [OR], 0.32; P World Health Organization definition (eligibility criterion: best-corrected visual acuity worse than 6/18), coverage rates were 92.5% and 98.9% for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians respectively. Greater age was significantly associated with higher cataract surgery coverage in Indigenous (OR, 1.41 per 10 years; P = 0.048) and non-Indigenous Australians (OR, 1.58 per 10 years; P = 0.004). The cataract surgery coverage rate was higher for non-Indigenous than Indigenous Australians, indicating the need to improve cataract surgery services for Indigenous Australians. The WHO definition of the coverage rate may overestimate the cataract surgery coverage rate in developed nations and should be applied with caution.

  3. Capabilities and social cohesion

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Lanzi

    2011-01-01

    The paper connects the concepts of well-being and social cohesion. By using Sen's capability approach to well-being, and analysing the socio-psychological literature on cohesiveness in groups and communities, we explain when social cohesion has positive effects on the development of social capabilities and human well-being. Furthermore, we discuss cases and conditions in which stronger social cohesion may delay the achievement of the kind of goals Sen has in mind. Finally, we suggest a multid...

  4. CASL Dakota Capabilities Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Brian M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Simmons, Chris [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-10

    The Dakota software project serves the mission of Sandia National Laboratories and supports a worldwide user community by delivering state-of-the-art research and robust, usable software for optimization and uncertainty quantification. These capabilities enable advanced exploration and riskinformed prediction with a wide range of computational science and engineering models. Dakota is the verification and validation (V&V) / uncertainty quantification (UQ) software delivery vehicle for CASL, allowing analysts across focus areas to apply these capabilities to myriad nuclear engineering analyses.

  5. Education and Innovative Capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Leiponen, Aija

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates the role of capabilities, acquired through education and on the job learning, in innovation. It is argued that education enhances learning and innovation because it provides employees with communication and interaction skills, and, more importantly, with abilities to receive, understand and utilize relevant knowledge, and solve problems. These dynamic capabilities are one of the sources of innovation. A dataset of 333 Finnish manufacturing firms is used to estimat...

  6. Toward an Integrative Framework of Indigenous Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping

    2012-01-01

    It has long been recognized that indigenous research should be helpful, if not essential, for an adequate understanding of local phenomena. The indigenous approach is consistent with, but extends beyond, the repeated calls for contextualizing management and organization research. However, the cha...... for indigenous research on Chinese management. To illustrate the framework, I show the value of yin-yang thinking by developing a cognitive frame, Yin-Yang Balance, to illustrate the unique and novel features of local perspective, including its application to case study method.......It has long been recognized that indigenous research should be helpful, if not essential, for an adequate understanding of local phenomena. The indigenous approach is consistent with, but extends beyond, the repeated calls for contextualizing management and organization research. However......, the challenges of indigenous research are enormous. The purpose of this article is to shed light on these challenges by providing an integrative framework of indigenous research. In particular, I seek to explicate the existing conceptual confusions and flesh out the appropriate methodological procedures...

  7. Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Sean

    2015-01-01

    While at the KSC, I was given the opportunity of assisting the Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office (SSCO) specifically the Propellant Transfer System (PTS) lead by my mentor, Brian Nufer. While waiting to test different components in the PTS, I was able to assist with testing for the Hose Management Assembly (HMA) and was able to work on a simulation in Labview. For the HMA, I was able to help with testing of a coating as well as to help test the durability of the pinch rollers in space. In Labview, I experimented with building a simulation for the PTS, to show where fluids and gases were flowing depending on which valves in the PTS were opened. Not all of the integrated parts required assembly level testing, which allowed me to test these parts individually by myself and document the results. I was also able to volunteer to assist project NEO, allowing me to gain some knowledge of cryogenic fluid systems.

  8. Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems - Vol 4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous knowledge and Western science: contradiction or cooperation · EMAIL FULL ... African indigenous knowledge - an academic and socio-cultural exploration for ... Intangible heritage: the production of indigenous knowledge in various ... Resource conservation and utilisation through indigenous knowledge in a ...

  9. Revolutionizing Environmental Education through Indigenous Hip Hop Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlewski, Julie; Porfilio, Brad J.

    2012-01-01

    Based upon the life histories of six Indigenous hip hop artists of the Beat Nation artist collective, this essay captures how Indigenous hip hop has the potential to revolutionize environmental education. Hip hop provides Indigenous youth an emancipatory space to raise their opposition to neocolonial controls of Indigenous territories that…

  10. Indigenous knowledge for school science: insights into the issue of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some research studies in South Africa have shown that existing intellectual property laws have managed to protect Indigenous Knowledge held by indigenous people. However, more needs to be done, particularly regarding the recognition of indigenous laws when protecting Indigenous Knowledge in research publications ...

  11. Preserving knowledge about indigenous cuisine for posterity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous cuisine plays a pivotal role in the nutrition and well-being of the Zimbabwean people. Zimbabwe has a wide array of indigenous cuisine which is gradually disappearing. Knowledge of the indigenous cuisine is disappearing due to modernisation and denigration of indigenous knowledge. In the Zimbabwean ...

  12. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  13. An experience of science teaching among members for indigenous communities: a need for open activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Helena Sasseron Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This a report of an indigenous teachers' trainning experience undertaken by the São Paulo State Education Secretariat for Terena, Kaingang, Krenak, Guarani e Tupi-Guarani ethnic groups. Bilingual and intercultural teaching is an old demand and has been made obligatory through the I996-Brazilian Education Legislation (LDB. The planning for an Indigenous Teachers Trainning Course started in 1999 and the first course was held in 2002. Sixty Indians graduated the 2,220-hour course - 360h of which were face-to-face teaching -In September 2003. The course was based on themes of interest of the students among which: garbage disposal, biodiversity, life cycles, solar system and electricity. The teaching group faced problemas when it chose to present non Indigenous concepts about the universe and were questioned by the students. They presented their interpretation of scientific concepts. These were the most productive and successful teaching/learning moments as they were dedicated to investigate problems according to the students' own perceptions and value system. The building of concepts and intellectual I development were the highlights of the activities and representative of the Indigenous world vision and their way of building scientific knowledge based on their own culture

  14. Use of Traditional Indigenous Medicine and Complementary Medicine Among Indigenous Cancer Patients in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jon; Valery, Patricia C; Sibbritt, David; Bernardes, Christina M; Broom, Alex; Garvey, Gail

    2015-07-01

    The cancer toll on Indigenous Australians is alarming with overall cancer incidence and mortality rates higher and the 5-year survival rate lower for Indigenous Australians compared with non-Indigenous Australians. Meanwhile, a range of approaches to health and illness-including both complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and traditional Indigenous medicine (TM)-are used by cancer patients. Little work has focused on Indigenous cancer patients with regard to CAM/TM use. This article reports findings from the first examination of the prevalence and profile of TM/CAM use and users among Indigenous Australians with cancer. A structured questionnaire was administered via face-to-face interviews to 248 Indigenous Australian cancer patients diagnosed with a range of cancer types. All received treatment and were recruited from 1 of 4 large hospitals located in Queensland, Australia. A substantial percentage (18.7%) of Indigenous cancer patients use at least one TM/CAM for support with their care, including traditional Indigenous therapy use (2.8%), visiting a traditional Indigenous practitioner (2.8%), CAM use (10.7%), visiting a CAM practitioner (2.4%), and attending relaxation/meditation classes (4.0%). Having a higher level of educational attainment was positively associated with CAM practitioner consultations (P = .015). Women with breast cancer were more likely to attend relaxation/meditation classes (P = .019). Men with genital organ cancer were more likely to use traditional Indigenous therapies (P = .017) and/or CAM (P = .002). A substantial percentage of Indigenous Australians reported using TM/CAM for their cancer care, and there is a need to expand examination of this area of health care using large-scale studies focusing on in-depth specific cancer(s). © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. The Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa J. Stoneham; Jodie Goodman; Mike Daube

    2014-01-01

    It is acknowledged that health outcomes for Australian Indigenous peoples are lower than those of non-Indigenous Australians. Research suggests negative media in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and impacts on the health of Indigenous Australians. This study examined the media portrayal of Indigenous Australian public health issues in selected media over a twelve month period and found that, overwhelmingly, the articles were negative...

  16. Campus Capability Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arsenlis, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bailey, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brase, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brenner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Camara, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carlton, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cheng, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chrzanowski, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); East, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Farrell, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferranti, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gursahani, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helms, L. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jeffries, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Larson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mercer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Skeate, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sueksdorf, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zucca, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ancria, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scott, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leininger, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gagliardi, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gash, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bronson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chung, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hobson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meeker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanchez, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zagar, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Quivey, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sommer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atherton, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Campus Capability Plan for 2018-2028. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is one of three national laboratories that are part of the National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNL provides critical expertise to strengthen U.S. security through development and application of world-class science and technology that: Ensures the safety, reliability, and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile; Promotes international nuclear safety and nonproliferation; Reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction; Supports U.S. leadership in science and technology. Essential to the execution and continued advancement of these mission areas are responsive infrastructure capabilities. This report showcases each LLNL capability area and describes the mission, science, and technology efforts enabled by LLNL infrastructure, as well as future infrastructure plans.

  17. Technological Capability's Predictor Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Maciel Reichert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the factors that influence in configuration of the technological capability of companies in sectors with medium-low technological intensity. To achieve the goal proposed in this article a survey was carried out. Based on the framework developed by Lall (1992 which classifies firms in basic, intermediate and advanced level of technological capability; it was found that the predominant technological capability is intermediate, with 83.7% of respondent companies (plastics companies in Brazil. It is believed that the main contribution of this study is the finding that the dependent variable named “Technological Capability” can be explained at a rate of 65% by six variables: development of new processes; selection of the best equipment supplier; sales of internally developed new technology to third parties; design and manufacture of equipment; study of the work methods and perform inventory control; and improvement of product quality.

  18. Taiwanese Indigenous Knowledge Categories and Their Distribution: A Survey of Indigenous Publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Le-Le Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, indigenous knowledge has received significant attention in Taiwan. Yet, due to the lack of a clear definition and framework of indigenous knowledge, government ministries and social organizations at all levels face enormous challenges in legislation and policymaking concerning indigenous knowledge preservation, organization, and transmission. This research intends to analyze the scope of published indigenous knowledge contents in Taiwan. By taking a qualitative approach to identifying the characteristics and ranges of indigenous knowledge in publications, it hopes to contribute to knowledge organization research and facilitate policymaking on indigenous knowledge preservation. In order to do so, indigenous related publications are collected and textual analysis is applied. The results show that indigenous knowledge related publications grew substantially and then stabilized in late 1990. “Exhibition of culture,” “cultural transmission and education,” and “livelihoods” are three major areas in terms of number of publications, while the categories in “media,” “legal rights,” and “interaction among tribes” have the least publications. Based on the findings, suggestions are made for future research on indigenous knowledge organization. [Article content in Chinese

  19. A systematic review of barriers and facilitators to participation in randomized controlled trials by Indigenous people from New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Marewa; Kira, Anette; Johnston, Vanessa; Walker, Natalie; Thomas, David; Chang, Anne B; Bullen, Chris; Segan, C J; Brown, Ngiare

    2015-03-01

    Many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are conducted each year but only a small proportion is specifically designed for Indigenous people. In this review we consider the challenges of participation in RCTs for Indigenous peoples from New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the United States and the opportunities for increasing participation. The literature was systematically searched for published articles including information on the barriers and facilitators for Indigenous people's participation in health-related RCTs. Articles were identified using a key word search of electronic databases (Scopus, Medline and EMBASE). To be included, papers had to include in their published work at least one aspect of their RCT that was either a barrier and/or facilitator for participation identified from, for example, design of intervention, or discussion sections of articles. Articles that were reviews, discussions, opinion pieces or rationale/methodology were excluded. Results were analysed inductively, allowing themes to emerge from the data. Facilitators enabling Indigenous people's participation in RCTs included relationship and partnership building, employing Indigenous staff, drawing on Indigenous knowledge models, targeted recruitment techniques and adapting study material. Challenges for participation included both participant-level factors (such as a distrust of research) and RCT-level factors (including inadequately addressing likely participant barriers (phone availability, travel costs), and a lack of recognition or incorporation of Indigenous knowledge systems. The findings from our review add to the body of knowledge on elimination of health disparities, by identifying effective and practical strategies for conducting and engaging Indigenous peoples with RCTs. Future trials that seek to benefit Indigenous peoples should actively involve Indigenous research partners, and respect and draw on pertinent Indigenous knowledge and values. This review has the potential to

  20. Sandia QIS Capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a broad set of capabilities in quantum information science (QIS), including elements of quantum computing, quantum communications, and quantum sensing. The Sandia QIS program is built atop unique DOE investments at the laboratories, including the MESA microelectronics fabrication facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) facilities (joint with LANL), the Ion Beam Laboratory, and ASC High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Sandia has invested $75 M of LDRD funding over 12 years to develop unique, differentiating capabilities that leverage these DOE infrastructure investments.

  1. Capability Handbook- offline metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Marhöfer, David Maximilian; Tosello, Guido

    This offline metrological capability handbook has been made in relation to HiMicro Task 3.3. The purpose of this document is to assess the metrological capability of the HiMicro partners and to gather the information of all available metrological instruments in the one single document. It provides...... a quick overview of what is possible today by the state of the art, what the HiMicro consortium can do and what metrological requirements we have concerning the HiMicro industrial demonstrators....

  2. Management Innovation Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Mie

    Management innovation is the implementation of a new management practice, process, technique or structure that significantly alters the way the work of management is performed. This paper presents a typology categorizing management innovation along two dimensions; radicalness and complexity. Then......, the paper introduces the concept of management innovation capabilities which refers to the ability of a firm to purposefully create, extend and modify its managerial resource base to address rapidly changing environments. Drawing upon behavioral theory of the firm and the dynamic capabilities framework......, the paper proposes a model of the foundations of management innovation. Propositions and implications for future research are discussed....

  3. Getting to Common Ground: A Comparison of Ontario, Canada’s Provincial Policy Statement and the Auckland Council Regional Policy Statement with Respect to Indigenous Peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser McLeod

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous rights are crucial to contemporary land use planning and policy in settler states. This article comparatively analyzes the manifest and latent content of the 2014 Provincial Policy Statement of Ontario, Canada (PPS and the 1999 Auckland Council Regional Policy Statement of Aotearoa New Zealand (ACRPS in order to evaluate their relative capacity to recognize the rights of Indigenous peoples. While the results show that jurisdiction is an impediment to fostering common ground between Indigenous peoples and settler states, the authors conclude that the PPS and the ACRPS serve vital roles in building dialogue and equitable planning outcomes.

  4. Honouring indigenous treaty rights for climate justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantyka-Pringle, C. S.; Westman, C. N.; Kythreotis, A. P.; Schindler, D. W.

    2015-09-01

    Expansion of the oil sands industry in Canada has caused land destruction and social friction. Canada could become a leader in climate governance by honouring treaty commitments made with indigenous peoples.

  5. Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The name Indilinga: stands for the "circular orientation" of indigenous African communities which is exhibited in their material culture and behaviour. The journal has been motivated by the need for a dependable expression for critical and ...

  6. Recruiting and retaining indigenous farmworker participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Stephanie; de Jesus Gonzalez, Carmen; Hall, Jennifer; Samples, Julie; Ventura, Santiago; Sanchez, Valentin; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information on the specific practices used to successfully recruit and retain indigenous and Latino farmworkers in research studies. This article describes the strategies used in a community-based participatory research project with indigenous agricultural workers. Participants were recruited through consulting with indigenous relatives and friends, identifying and meeting with indigenous leaders from hometown associations in countries of origin, and asking current participants to recruit fellow farmworkers. Adjustments were initiated to the second year protocol to enhance recruitment and retention. The difference in attrition rates between years one and two was statistically significant, a difference partially attributed to modifications to recruitment and retention protocol. Findings confirmed that active recruitment techniques and word-of-mouth recruitment were more effective than passive methods. Trust among academic, organization, and community partners, and shared language and culture between those doing the recruitment and the participants, contributed to sustained farmworker participation. PMID:23733354

  7. Book Review: Indigeneity, Globalization, and African Literature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Book Title: Indigeneity, Globalization, and African Literature: Personally Speaking. Book Author: Tanure Ojaide. Hampshire & New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2015. 291 pp. ISBN: 978-1-13754-220-5.

  8. Indigenous peoples and the new extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthias, Penelope Fay

    2016-01-01

    in the Bolivian Chaco reveals the ways in which indigenous territorial projects are becoming implicated in and being reimagined amidst the spatializing struggles of a hydrocarbon state. The tension between indigenous peoples’ desire for inclusion in a hydrocarbon-based national development project......A growing body of literature examines how the rise of “neo-extractivist” states in Latin America is reconfiguring the relationship between resources, nation, territory, and citizenship. However, the implications for indigenous territorial projects remain underexplored. Ethnographic research...... and their experiences of dispossession by an expanding hydrocarbon frontier has given rise to competing modes of “hydrocarbon citizenship” in the Guaraní territory Itika Guasu, where a vision of corporate-sponsored indigenous autonomy is pitted against new forms of state-funded development patronage. These dynamics...

  9. Colombia’s displaced indigenous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Escobar Cuero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous peoples are one of the most vulnerable groups within Colombia’s internally displaced population, and a lack of understanding of their culture and needs constitutes a major challenge to their protection and assistance.

  10. Recruiting and retaining indigenous farmworker participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Stephanie; de Jesus Gonzalez, Carmen; Hall, Jennifer; Samples, Julie; Ventura, Santiago; Sanchez, Valentin; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2014-10-01

    There is limited information on the specific practices used to successfully recruit and retain indigenous and Latino farmworkers in research studies. This article describes the strategies used in a community-based participatory research project with indigenous agricultural workers. Participants were recruited through consulting with indigenous relatives and friends, identifying and meeting with indigenous leaders from hometown associations in countries of origin, and asking current participants to recruit fellow farmworkers. Adjustments were initiated to the second year protocol to enhance recruitment and retention. The difference in attrition rates between years one and two was statistically significant, a difference partially attributed to modifications to recruitment and retention protocol. Findings confirmed that active recruitment techniques and word-of-mouth recruitment were more effective than passive methods. Trust among academic, organization, and community partners, and shared language and culture between those doing the recruitment and the participants, contributed to sustained farmworker participation.

  11. Genetic improvement in indigenous chicken of Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldegiorgiss, W.E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Wondmeneh Esatu Woldegiorgiss (2015). Genetic improvement in indigenous chicken of Ethiopia. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands This thesis considered various approaches to study the potential for improvement of village poultry production system using

  12. African indigenous plants with chemotherapeutic potentials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herbal-based and plant-derived products can be exploited with sustainable comparative and competitive advantage. This review presents some indigenous African plants with chemotherapeutic properties and possible ways of developing them into potent pharmacological agents using biotechnological approaches.

  13. The Nagoya Protocol and Indigenous Peoples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maria Yolanda Teran

    2016-01-01

      This article is about Indigenous peoples' involvement in the Nagoya Protocol negotiations from 2006 to 2010, as well as in its implementation to stop biopiracy in order to protect Pachamama, Mother...

  14. An empowerment intervention for Indigenous communities: an outcome assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchin, Irina; Jacups, Susan; Tsey, Komla; Lines, Katrina

    2015-08-21

    Empowerment programs have been shown to contribute to increased empowerment of individuals and build capacity within the community or workplace. To-date, the impact of empowerment programs has yet to be quantified in the published literature in this field. This study assessed the Indigenous-developed Family Wellbeing (FWB) program as an empowerment intervention for a child safety workforce in remote Indigenous communities by measuring effect sizes. The study also assessed the value of measurement tools for future impact evaluations. A three-day FWB workshop designed to promote empowerment and workplace engagement among child protection staff was held across five remote north Queensland Indigenous communities. The FWB assessment tool comprised a set of validated surveys including the Growth and Empowerment Measure (GEM), Australian Unity Wellbeing Index, Kessler psychological distress scale (K10) and Workforce engagement survey. The assessment was conducted pre-intervention and three months post-intervention. The analysis of pre-and post-surveys revealed that the GEM appeared to be the most tangible measure for detecting positive changes in communication, conflict resolution, decision making and life skill development. The GEM indicated a 17 % positive change compared to 9 % for the Australian Unity Wellbeing Index, 5 % for the workforce engagement survey and less than 1 % for K10. This study extended qualitative research and identified the best measurement tool for detecting the outcomes of empowerment programs. The GEM was found the most sensitive and the most tangible measure that captures improvements in communication, conflict resolution, decision making and life skill development. The GEM and Australian Unity Wellbeing Index could be recommended as routine measures for empowerment programs assessment among similar remote area workforce.

  15. Exporting by Migrants and Indigenous Entrepreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashourizadeh, Shayegheh; Schøtt, Thomas; Pişkinsüt Şengüler, Ece

    2016-01-01

    Migrants may become entrepreneurs in their host countries. They may utilize their dual embeddedness in both the home country and the host country, and also use transnational links to gain a competitive advantage in exporting compared to indigenous entrepreneurs. Migrant entrepreneurs’ advantage may...... around the world was surveyed in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, which reports on migration and exporting. Hierarchical linear modeling shows that migrant entrepreneurs export more than indigenous entrepreneurs, especially in the first generation, and especially among educated and male migrants...

  16. THE INDIGENOUS EDUCATIONAL AUTONOMY IN COLOMBIA

    OpenAIRE

    Molina Betancur, Carlos Mario; Universidad de Medellín

    2012-01-01

    The indigenous educational autonomy in Colombia is still a dream. The indigenous territories cannot be part of the administration of its resources, although significant advances has been done in the country to integrate the communities to the decisions of its people regarding the administration of its lands, the application of an autonomy justice and the respect of a proper culture. The concept that has been developed has been education inside its ethno-develop, that permit those communities ...

  17. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  18. a Capability approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    efforts towards gender equality in education as a means of achieving social justice. Over the years .... who, in exploring the idea of capabilities in support of the intrinsic importance of gender equality in education, came up ... Firstly, personal conversion factors (e.g. metabolism, physical condition, sex, gender, reading skills ...

  19. The Capability Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2011-01-01

    textabstract In its most general description, the capability approach is a flexible and multi-purpose normative framework, rather than a precise theory of well-being, freedom or justice. At its core are two normative claims: first, the claim that the freedom to achieve well-being is of primary

  20. a Capability approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    focus on personal and socio-environmental conversion factors that transform resources into functionings, and on the whole social and institutional context that affects the conversion factors and also the capability set directly (Sen, 2009; Unterhalter, 2007 and Robeyns, 2007). Applying this to the SMTs learning and teaching ...

  1. Visual Absorption Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Anderson; Jerry Mosier; Geoffrey Chandler

    1979-01-01

    Visual absorption capability (VAC) is a tool to assess a landscape's susceptibility to visual change caused by man's activities. This paper explores different descriptive approaches to VAC and addresses in depth the development of the VAC process used on the Klamath National Forest. Four biophysical factors were selected to assess VAC for the lands within the...

  2. Capabilities and Special Needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    into international consideration in relation to the implementation of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. As for the theoretical basis, the research makes use of the sociological open-ended and relational concepts of Pierre Bourdieu and the normative yardstick of the Capability Approach...

  3. Capabilities Composition (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-22

    and support , , processes (including ITIL v3) • Understanding of Governance is still evolving Engineering Acquisition and Operational Governance...L – Logistics • NC – Net-Centric • CPM – Capability Portfolio Management • ITIL v3 – Information Technology • ONR – Office of Naval Research

  4. Immunisation issues for Indigenous Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert; Andrews, Ross

    2014-10-01

    Vaccination has provided major benefits to the health of indigenous children in the face of continuing poorer socioeconomic conditions but several issues have been identified for improvement. While indigenous children are vaccinated at high rates for the standard schedule vaccines, vaccination is more commonly delayed. Coverage for 'targeted' vaccines is substantially lower, and data on coverage for indigenous adolescents is non-existent. Improved identification of indigenous clients by immunisation providers and the expansion of the childhood register are required. The progressive removal of early-acting Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines from schedules for indigenous children because of an international shortage raises the risk of disease re-emergence and highlights the need for vigilant surveillance including carriage. The expanded use of existing vaccines (influenza) and early adoption of new vaccines (higher valency pneumococcal conjugates) are needed to maximise benefits, in particular the potential to impact on non-invasive disease such as otitis media and non-bacteraemic pneumonia that are so prevalent in indigenous children. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. Capitalizing on capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Dave; Smallwood, Norm

    2004-06-01

    By making the most of organizational capabilities--employees' collective skills and fields of expertise--you can dramatically improve your company's market value. Although there is no magic list of proficiencies that every organization needs in order to succeed, the authors identify 11 intangible assets that well-managed companies tend to have: talent, speed, shared mind-set and coherent brand identity, accountability, collaboration, learning, leadership, customer connectivity, strategic unity, innovation, and efficiency. Such companies typically excel in only three of these capabilities while maintaining industry parity in the other areas. Organizations that fall below the norm in any of the 11 are likely candidates for dysfunction and competitive disadvantage. So you can determine how your company fares in these categories (or others, if the generic list doesn't suit your needs), the authors explain how to conduct a "capabilities audit," describing in particular the experiences and findings of two companies that recently performed such audits. In addition to highlighting which intangible assets are most important given the organization's history and strategy, this exercise will gauge how well your company delivers on its capabilities and will guide you in developing an action plan for improvement. A capabilities audit can work for an entire organization, a business unit, or a region--indeed, for any part of a company that has a strategy to generate financial or customer-related results. It enables executives to assess overall company strengths and weaknesses, senior leaders to define strategy, midlevel managers to execute strategy, and frontline leaders to achieve tactical results. In short, it helps turn intangible assets into concrete strengths.

  6. Unpacking rights in indigenous African societies: indigenous culture and the question of sexual and reproductive rights in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undie, Chi-Chi; Izugbara, Chimaraoke O

    2011-12-16

    Modern declarations on human rights have often proceeded without reference to the cultural content of rights, the existence of rights in African indigenous backgrounds, and the embodiment of certain key rights in the community itself. This paper is an attempt at developing an 'inventory' of rights in African cultures as a prelude to the generation both of a holistic theory of rights as well as a research agenda that can recognize the multifaceted nature of rights. We use an interpretive ethnographic approach built on three sources of data: 1) our continuing ethnographic work among two distinct ethnic groups in southeastern Nigeria - the Ubang and the Igbo; 2) informal conversational interviews with individuals from a range of African countries; and 3) a review of relevant literature based on African cultures which provides a context for some of the issues we raise. An examination of selected indigenous rights, entitlements, or privileges among the Ubang and Igbo illustrates indigenous culture as a key, but often neglected, axis of rights, as a critical framework for understanding human relationships with rights, and as a resource for, and challenge to, contemporary programmatic efforts focusing on universalized notions of rights. Understanding or interpreting rights in African settings within the framework defined by contemporary human rights discourse poses steep challenges to making progress in the realization of sexual and reproductive rights. Despite the potential dangers of privileging group rights over individual rights, when important rights are vested in the community; rights, entitlements, and privileges can also be recognized through community experiences, and realized through engagement with communities. Building on communal conceptualizations of rights in order to realize an even wider range of rights remains a largely unexplored strategy which holds promise for the achievement of sexual and reproductive health rights.

  7. Unpacking rights in indigenous African societies: indigenous culture and the question of sexual and reproductive rights in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern declarations on human rights have often proceeded without reference to the cultural content of rights, the existence of rights in African indigenous backgrounds, and the embodiment of certain key rights in the community itself. This paper is an attempt at developing an ‘inventory’ of rights in African cultures as a prelude to the generation both of a holistic theory of rights as well as a research agenda that can recognize the multifaceted nature of rights. Methods We use an interpretive ethnographic approach built on three sources of data: 1) our continuing ethnographic work among two distinct ethnic groups in southeastern Nigeria – the Ubang and the Igbo; 2) informal conversational interviews with individuals from a range of African countries; and 3) a review of relevant literature based on African cultures which provides a context for some of the issues we raise. Results An examination of selected indigenous rights, entitlements, or privileges among the Ubang and Igbo illustrates indigenous culture as a key, but often neglected, axis of rights, as a critical framework for understanding human relationships with rights, and as a resource for, and challenge to, contemporary programmatic efforts focusing on universalized notions of rights. Understanding or interpreting rights in African settings within the framework defined by contemporary human rights discourse poses steep challenges to making progress in the realization of sexual and reproductive rights. Conclusions Despite the potential dangers of privileging group rights over individual rights, when important rights are vested in the community; rights, entitlements, and privileges can also be recognized through community experiences, and realized through engagement with communities. Building on communal conceptualizations of rights in order to realize an even wider range of rights remains a largely unexplored strategy which holds promise for the achievement of sexual and reproductive

  8. Indigenous inexpensive practice models for skill development in neuroendoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitin Bajaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurosurgery is a branch having a tough learning curve. Residents generally get very less hands-on exposure for advanced procedures like neuroendoscopy. With the limited number of cadavers available and ethical issues associated with animal models, practice models, and simulators are becoming the able alternative. Most of these simulators are very costly. We tried to build indigenous inexpensive practice models that can help in developing most of the skills of neuroendoscopy. Materials and Methods: Models were built for learning hand-eye coordination, dexterity, instrument manipulation, cutting, fine dissection, keyhole concept, drilling, and simulation of laminectomy and ligamentum flavum resection. These were shown in the neuroendoscopic fellowship program conducted in authors' institute, and trainees' responses were recorded. Results: Both novice and experienced neuroendoscopic surgeons validated the models. There was no significant difference between their responses (P = 0.791. Conclusion: Indigenous innovative models can be used to learn and teach neuroendoscopic skills. The presented models were reliable, valid, eco-friendly, highly cost-effective, portable, easily made and can be kept in one's chamber for practicing.

  9. Indigenous Inexpensive Practice Models for Skill Development in Neuroendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Jitin; Yadav, Yad Ram; Pateriya, Anurag; Parihar, Vijay; Ratre, Shailendra; Dubey, Amitesh

    2017-01-01

    Neurosurgery is a branch having a tough learning curve. Residents generally get very less hands-on exposure for advanced procedures like neuroendoscopy. With the limited number of cadavers available and ethical issues associated with animal models, practice models, and simulators are becoming the able alternative. Most of these simulators are very costly. We tried to build indigenous inexpensive practice models that can help in developing most of the skills of neuroendoscopy. Models were built for learning hand-eye coordination, dexterity, instrument manipulation, cutting, fine dissection, keyhole concept, drilling, and simulation of laminectomy and ligamentum flavum resection. These were shown in the neuroendoscopic fellowship program conducted in authors' institute, and trainees' responses were recorded. Both novice and experienced neuroendoscopic surgeons validated the models. There was no significant difference between their responses (P = 0.791). Indigenous innovative models can be used to learn and teach neuroendoscopic skills. The presented models were reliable, valid, eco-friendly, highly cost-effective, portable, easily made and can be kept in one's chamber for practicing.

  10. Indigenous values and water markets: Survey insights from northern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakis, William D.; Grafton, R. Quentin; To, Hang

    2013-09-01

    Drawing upon on the literature on Indigenous values to water, water markets and the empirical findings from a survey of 120 Indigenous and non-Indigenous respondents across northern Australia, the paper makes important qualitative and statistical comparisons between Indigenous and non-Indigenous values to water markets. The study is the first comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous values to water markets based on the same survey instrument. Key results from Indigenous respondents include: (1) water markets are held to be an acceptable approach to managing water; (2) markets must be carefully designed to protect customary and ecological values; (3) the allocation of water rights need to encompass equity considerations; and (4) water and land rights should not be separated even if this enhances efficiency, as it runs counter to Indigenous holistic values. Overall, the survey results provide the basis for a proposed adaptive decision loop, which allows decision makers to incorporate stakeholder values in water markets.

  11. Leadership as a Personal Journey: An Indigenous Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kerrie; Hungerford, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Indigenous Australians have higher levels of mental illness, self-harm, suicide and substance abuse than non-Indigenous Australians, as well as more frequent contact with the criminal justice system. These indices point to the need for strong leadership to support Close the Gap programmes that have now been implemented across Australia. This article considers leadership as a journey of learning for Australian Indigenous leaders. Through the use of story, it is suggested that a situational leadership approach, incorporating the principles of mindfulness, provides the most appropriate framework for Indigenous leaders who work with Indigenous communities. Flexible approaches are needed to meet the needs of diverse Indigenous populations, and address the complex challenges involved, including lateral violence. Such flexibility will enable Indigenous leaders and communities to work together to achieve improvements in the health outcomes, not only for Indigenous Australians, but also for Indigenous populations worldwide.

  12. Management of Information and Infrastructure of Indigenous Community at Royal Belum State Park Using Geographical Information System: A Conceptual Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Zainon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Nowadays, an integrated location, descriptive inventory data and geographical information are required for a better decision making in Indigenous community management activities. The management system can improve productivity and to save time, money and man power. Conventional maps and Indigenous inventories on papers or spread sheet are lack of meeting these requirements which are not static and subjected to change rapidly. The Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Database Management (DBM System are capabilities and confined in manipulation of location and descriptive data, respectively. A GIS system is chosen in Management Information and Infrastructure of Indigenous Communities because its meets all the requirements that can help the authorities to managed the community. GIS able to manipulate location and descriptive data as well as the relationships between them are dynamic. This paper will discussed briefly the conceptual design of GIS activities and Indigenous community in Royal Belum State Park, Malaysia, then terminology and theoretical concepts of GIS, Indigenous community management and the link between them are reviewed.Keywords:  Management, information, infrastructure, conceptual design, Indigenous community 

  13. Management of Information and Infrastructure of Indigenous Community at Royal Belum State Park Using Geographical Information System: A Conceptual Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Zainon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Nowadays, an integrated location, descriptive inventory data and geographical information are required for a better decision making in Indigenous community management activities. The management system can improve productivity and to save time, money and man power. Conventional maps and Indigenous inventories on papers or spread sheet are lack of meeting these requirements which are not static and subjected to change rapidly. The Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Database Management (DBM System are capabilities and confined in manipulation of location and descriptive data, respectively. A GIS system is chosen in Management Information and Infrastructure of Indigenous Communities because its meets all the requirements that can help the authorities to managed the community. GIS able to manipulate location and descriptive data as well as the relationships between them are dynamic. This paper will discussed briefly the conceptual design of GIS activities and Indigenous community in Royal Belum State Park, Malaysia, then terminology and theoretical concepts of GIS, Indigenous community management and the link between them are reviewed. Keywords: Management, information, infrastructure, conceptual design, Indigenous community

  14. Gut indigenous microbiota and epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Arkadievich Shenderov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This review introduces and discusses data regarding fundamental and applied investigations in mammalian epigenomics and gut microbiota received over the last 10 years. Analysis of these data enabled the author first to come to the conclusion that the multiple low molecular weight substances of indigenous gut microbiota origin should be considered one of the main endogenous factors actively participating in epigenomic mechanisms that responsible for the mammalian genome reprogramming and post-translated modifications. Gut microecological imbalance coursed by various biogenic and abiogenic agents and factors can produce the different epigenetic abnormalities and the onset and progression of metabolic diseases associated. The author substantiates the necessity to create an international project ‘Human Gut Microbiota and Epigenomics’ that facilitates interdisciplinary collaborations among scientists and clinicians engaged in host microbial ecology, nutrition, metagenomics, epigenomics and metabolomics investigations as well as in diseases prevention and treatment. Some priority scientific and applied directions in the current omic technologies coupled with gnotobiological approaches are suggested that can open a new era in characterizing the role of the symbiotic microbiota small metabolic and signal molecules in the host epigenomics. Although discussed subject is only at an early stage its validation can open novel approaches in drug discovery studies.

  15. Bioethanol Production from Indigenous Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuka Roy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced rate of fossil fuel extraction is likely to deplete limited natural resources over short period of time. So search for alternative fuel is only the way to overcome this problem of upcoming energy crisis. In this aspect biofuel is a sustainable option. Agricultural lands cannot be compromised for biofuel production due to the requirement of food for the increasing population. Certain species of algae can produce ethanol during anaerobic fermentation and thus serve as a direct source for bioethanol production. The high content of complex carbohydrates entrapped in the cell wall of the microalgae makes it essential to incorporate a pre-treatment stage to release and convert these complex carbohydrates into simple sugars prior to the fermentation process. There have been researches on production of bioethanol from a particular species of algae, but this work was an attempt to produce bioethanol from easily available indigenous algae. Acid hydrolysis was carried out as pre-treatment. Gas Chromatographic analysis showed that 5 days’ fermentation by baker’s yeast had yielded 93% pure bioethanol. The fuel characterization of the bioethanol with respect to gasoline showed comparable and quite satisfactory results for its use as an alternative fuel.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v4i1.12182International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-1, Dec-Feb 2014/15, page: 112-120  

  16. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, L.M.

    2003-11-12

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2000, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/ts/htdocs/210/214/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized in the table at the bottom of this introduction.

  17. Sleep, performance and behaviour in Australian indigenous and non-indigenous children: an exploratory comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunden, Sarah; Chervin, Ronald D

    2010-01-01

    Sleep problems in Australian children are common and consequential but have not been investigated in Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (indigenous) children. This study compares sleep in indigenous and non-indigenous children and investigates potential effects on school performance and daytime behaviour. Subjects included 25 indigenous and 25 non-indigenous children (mean standard deviation (SD) age = 8.8 (1.4 years), range 7-11.11 years), in six Northern Territory primary schools. Parents completed the Sleep Disorders Scale for Children which produces a T-score (mean = 50 (SD = 10)) for behavioural sleep disorders, sleep disordered breathing, parasomnias, excessive daytime sleepiness and night sweating. Behaviour and school grades were assessed with the parent-reported Child Behaviour Checklist. Behavioural sleep problems of initiating and maintaining sleep, or parasomnias were commonly reported by both groups (24-40%), with indigenous children under 9 years reporting the most problems. No between-group differences were found in school performance. Significant relationships between sleep quality and behaviours were found, particularly for indigenous children. These data suggest that substantial numbers of Australian children - more than one third in this pilot sample - may suffer from significant sleep problems. To the extent that sleep problems may impair prefrontal cortical function, emotional regulation, and control of behaviour, confirmation of current findings could have particular import for indigenous children.

  18. Is disaster “normal” for indigenous people? Indigenous knowledge and coping practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, Dorothea; Baart, Judith; Haar, van der Gemma; Leeftink, Floor Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to debates on the value of indigenous knowledge for disaster risk reduction. Recent international policy papers advocate the importance of indigenous knowledge and calls for its recognition. The paper aims to explore these issues in the

  19. Group Capability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  20. Serving an Indigenous community: Exploring the cultural competence of medical students in a rural setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Hoong Wong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 2013, medical students from the International Medical University (IMU in Malaysia have been providing primary healthcare services, under the supervision of faculty members, to the indigenous people living in Kampung Sebir. The project has allowed the students to learn experientially within a rural setting. This study aims to examine the cultural competence of IMU medical students through an examination of their perspective of the indigenous people who they serve and the role of this community service in their personal and professional development. Students who participated in the project were required to complete a questionnaire after each community engagement activity to help them reflect on the above areas. We analysed the responses of students from January to December 2015 using a thematic analysis approach to identify overarching themes in the students’ responses. Students had differing perceptions of culture and worldviews when compared to the indigenous people. However, they lacked the self-reflection skills necessary to understand how such differences can affect their relationship with the indigenous people. Because of this, the basis of their engagement with the indigenous community (as demonstrated by their views of community service is focused on their agenda of promoting health from a student’s perspective rather than connecting and building relationships first. Students also lacked the appreciation that building cultural competency is a continuous process. The results show that the medical students have a developing cultural competence. The project in Kampung Sebir is an experiential learning platform of great value to provide insights into and develop the cultural competency of participating students. This study also reflects on the project itself, and how the relationship with stakeholders, the competence and diversity of academic staff, and the support of the university can contribute toward training in cultural

  1. “Makes you proud to be black eh?”: Reflections on meaningful Indigenous research participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Jenny

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This article outlines the meaningful participation of eight Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members employed as community researchers investigating the impact of pandemic influenza in rural and remote Indigenous communities in Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation is now a requirement of health research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. There is a growing literature on the different approaches to such involvement. Fundamental to this literature is an acknowledgement that Indigenous communities are no longer prepared to be research objects for external, mostly non-Indigenous researchers, and demand a role in decisions about what is researched and how it will be researched. In this paper, we describe the protracted process for site identification and recruitment and training of community researchers. We focus on the backgrounds of the Indigenous researchers and their motivations for involvement, and the strengths and challenges posed by Indigenous people researching in their own communities. Throughout the paper our concern is to document how genuine participation and the building of research capacity can occur. Discussion A key feature of the research was the employment, training and strengthening the capacity of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members in the role of community researchers. A series of training workshops were conducted in northern Australia and focussed on qualitative research methods, including data collection, data analysis and writing. The Indigenous researchers collected the community-based data, and worked in partnership with experienced academic researchers in the analysis and compilation of community reports. Parts of those community reports, as well as additional information supplied by the community researchers, forms the basis of this article. As the demand increases for involvement of Indigenous community

  2. [Adult mortality among indigenous and non-indigenous populations of Guatemala and Bolivia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, A

    1996-12-01

    "Use of the maternal orphanhood method permits comparison of adult female mortality levels between indigenous and non-indigenous population [in Guatemala and Bolivia].... Results show that in both countries adult female mortality is higher for the indigenous population. Comparison with infant mortality levels reveals differences in the mortality patterns between the two ethnic groups. In Guatemala--where estimates are more consistent--comparisons across time reveal a more rapid descent for infant than for adult mortality. As a consequence, differences in levels of adult mortality between indigenous and non-indigenous populations are higher than differences in infant mortality. In Bolivia estimates are not as consistent as in Guatemala." This paper was originally presented at the 1992 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America. (EXCERPT)

  3. Discovering indigenous science: Implications for science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, Gloria; Corsiglia, John

    2001-01-01

    Indigenous science relates to both the science knowledge of long-resident, usually oral culture peoples, as well as the science knowledge of all peoples who as participants in culture are affected by the worldview and relativist interests of their home communities. This article explores aspects of multicultural science and pedagogy and describes a rich and well-documented branch of indigenous science known to biologists and ecologists as traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). Although TEK has been generally inaccessible, educators can now use a burgeoning science-based TEK literature that documents numerous examples of time-proven, ecologically relevant, and cost effective indigenous science. Disputes regarding the universality of the standard scientific account are of critical importance for science educators because the definition of science is a de facto gatekeeping device for determining what can be included in a school science curriculum and what cannot. When Western modern science (WMS) is defined as universal it does displace revelation-based knowledge (i.e., creation science); however, it also displaces pragmatic local indigenous knowledge that does not conform with formal aspects of the standard account. Thus, in most science classrooms around the globe, Western modern science has been taught at the expense of indigenous knowledge. However, because WMS has been implicated in many of the world's ecological disasters, and because the traditional wisdom component of TEK is particularly rich in time-tested approaches that foster sustainability and environmental integrity, it is possible that the universalist gatekeeper can be seen as increasingly problematic and even counter productive. This paper describes many examples from Canada and around the world of indigenous people's contributions to science, environmental understanding, and sustainability. The authors argue the view that Western or modern science is just one of many sciences that need to be

  4. Simplified building model of districts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, F.G.H.; Bakker, L.G.; Lanceta, D.; Narmsara, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the setting of this paper, a building is represented by a simple model consisting of two thermal masses. Generic values were obtained for two unknown parameters in the model, capable of representing an office building, a single family dwelling and a multifamily dwelling, at three levels of

  5. Contributions of Science Education for construction of a positive alterity in relation to indigenous culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleise Helen Botelho Koeppe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the contributions of science education for building a positive alterity in relation to current Brazilian indigenous groups. Remote sensing and ethnobiology were the pedagogic tools used to achieve this goal. We analyzed the material produced by three research subjects, who exemplify the processes undertaken in class, in order to identify the epistemological obstacles that may hinder the process of reformulation of stereotypes and prejudices. We conclude that building a positive alterity is a gradual and continuous process and that different approaches in science education, accompanied by critical questioning can lead to overcoming epistemological obstacles constructed by school culture.

  6. Building technology entrepreneurship capabilities, an engineering education perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kleine, Kari; Giones, Ferran; Tegtmeier, Silke; Camargo, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Much has been discussed on the changing role of universities in society, in particular when examining the contribution of universities in the economic growth and societal development (Audretsch 2012). The transition from universities as research centers to universities as innovation drivers has left many co-existing models in place (Schmitz et al. 2016), making it difficult to identify and articulate valid response mechanisms to new societal challenges.The demand to respond to societal challe...

  7. Building technology entrepreneurship capabilities, an engineering education perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine, Kari; Giones, Ferran; Tegtmeier, Silke

    of the regular course activities. The development of attitudes towards entrepreneurial behavior is also activated through internal projects. For instance, as part of a master program, engineering students enroll in a business venturing course (the course receives different names in each institution), where...... and technology entrepreneurship education (STEE) share common elements, for instance there are similarities on the overall design, content, pedagogical methods, learning environment, and intended learning outcomes. Nevertheless, each program has specific elements related to outcomes assessment...... and technology. The strong connection with the region’s industry becomes an influencing factor on the design and implementation of the STEE. The overall theme for the pedagogical model in UL and SDU is organized around the student-subject-project triangle. Supporting problem-based learning is the preferred...

  8. Intellectual Capital and Organizational Renewal: Building Dynamic Capabilities through People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio de Biazzi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to deepen the understanding of management practices adopted by organizations characterizedby significant levels of participation and influence from their employees. Based on the assumption that thesuccessful utilization of such practices is circumstantial, a conceptual framework is proposed identifying theessential elements that should be dynamically aligned to allow organizational success in the long term. Differenttypes of work & participation practices – that arise from the adoption of the dimensions locus of knowledge andlocus of power – support the reasoning on how to align these elements and, consequently, how to lead theorganizational renewal and survival in the long run.

  9. Prerequisites for building a computer security incident response capability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mooi, M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available the CSIRT in a distributed campus model (rotating core services between campus teams) results in lower costs of operation for the central team. Possible challenges with this approach include the level of authority and a conflict of interest for campus staff... holistic view of the business requirements is provided by summarising the decisions required in each area. Index Terms—incident response, security team, CSIRT, CERT, establishing requirements. I. INTRODUCTION Popular IT news sites [1], [2], security...

  10. Building workforce capacity and capability for integrated working

    OpenAIRE

    Akehurst, Joy; Giles, Karen; Stronge, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Context – The NHS England (NHSE) Five Year Forward View (2015) aims to improve health, the quality of care and the predicted financial gap of 30 billion pounds by 2021. Strategic initiatives include prevention and self-care; enhancing primary care; efficiency measures; technology and innovation; workforce development; ‘local’, ‘joined up' services delivered ‘out of hospital’.In 2015, 29 ‘vanguard’ sites were chosen as part of the NHS New Care Models Programme to develop and test...

  11. Building climate adaptation capabilities through technology and community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D.; McWhirter, J.; Intsiful, J. D.; Cozzini, S.

    2011-12-01

    To effectively plan for adaptation to changes in climate, decision makers require infrastructure and tools that will provide them with timely access to current and future climate information. For example, climate scientists and operational forecasters need to access global and regional model projections and current climate information that they can use to prepare monitoring products and reports and then publish these for the decision makers. Through the UNDP African Adaption Programme, an infrastructure is being built across Africa that will provide multi-tiered access to such information. Web accessible servers running RAMADDA, an open source content management system for geoscience information, will provide access to the information at many levels: from the raw and processed climate model output to real-time climate conditions and predictions to documents and presentation for government officials. Output from regional climate models (e.g. RegCM4) and downscaled global climate models will be accessible through RAMADDA. The Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) is being used by scientists to create visualizations that assist the understanding of climate processes and projections, using the data on these as well as external servers. Since RAMADDA is more than a data server, it is also being used as a publishing platform for the generated material that will be available and searchable by the decision makers. Users can wade through the enormous volumes of information and extract subsets for their region or project of interest. Participants from 20 countries attended workshops at ICTP during 2011. They received training on setting up and installing the servers and necessary software and are now working on deploying the systems in their respective countries. This is the first time an integrated and comprehensive approach to climate change adaptation has been widely applied in Africa. It is expected that this infrastructure will enhance North-South collaboration and improve the delivery of technical support and services. This improved infrastructure will enhance the capacity of countries to provide a wide range of robust products and services in a timely manner.

  12. Towards sustainable public FM: collective building of capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov Galamba, Kirsten; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2016-01-01

    that less mature FM organisations needs it even more. The findings seem relevant beyond public FM organisations. Practical implications The produced framework for a sustainable FM code of conduct is useful for educational purposes as well as for strategic decision about FM organisations collective...

  13. Defining Army Capabilities to Meet Building Partnership Capacity Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    Obviously, these congruencies represent efficiencies Army forces must possess but at what level and on what scale. Taken in their totality, they represent...Army Regulation 11-31 clarifies these examples provided in the APS as being in congruence with regulation when it defines the following ways that the...support to those BCTs into account. Rough math puts the reduction closer to the range of 45,000 to 65,000 soldiers in terms of only the BCTs. For

  14. Building Visual Artists’ Resilience Capabilities: Current Educator Strategies and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Maree Siddins

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Enrolments in higher education programs in the creative and performing arts are increasing in many countries. Yet graduates of these degrees, who enter the broad sector known as the creative industries, face particular challenges in terms of securing long-term and sustainable employment. In addition, creative and performing artists face a range of mental challenges, caused by such factors as: the solitary nature of much creative practice, critical feedback by audiences and gatekeepers, or the general pressures associated with maintaining artistic relevance or integrity. The concepts of resilience and professional wellbeing are therefore highly relevant to those who pursue a career in creative industries, and while there has been an emerging body of work in this area, to date it has focussed on the performing arts area (e.g. music, theatre. Hence, in order to expand knowledge relevant to resilience and artists, this paper sets out to explore the extent to which current educators in the Australian context specifically address these issues within higher visual arts curricula; specifically the areas of illustration, design, film and photography. This was achieved via interviews with seventeen current academics working in these areas. The findings propose that higher education providers of programs in the visual arts consider placing a stronger emphasis on the embedded development of resilience and professional wellbeing capacities.

  15. Financial Capability and Asset Building in the Curricula: Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Vernon; Birkenmaier, Julie; Hageman, Sally A.

    2017-01-01

    Although social work education competencies include economic justice, and practice includes addressing client finances and assets, social work curricula lack an emphasis on these topics. Little is known about students' perceptions of the relevancy of this information or how well their program is preparing them for contemporary practice. This study…

  16. Building SAWE Capability as an ANSI Accredited Standards Developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerro, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Ed; Peterson, Eric; Griffiths, William T.; Brooks, Andy; Stratton, Bonnie; Attar, Jose

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a 2014 status of the Society of Allied Weight Engineers' process towards becoming an Accredited Standards Developer (ASD) under certification by the United States American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Included is material from the committee's 2013 International presentation, current status, and additional general background material. The document strives to serve as a reference point to assist SAWE Recommended Practice and Standards developers in negotiating United States Standards Strategy, international standards strategy, and the association of SAWE standards and recommended practices to those efforts. Required procedures for SAWE to develop and maintain Recommended Practices and ANSI/SAWE Standards are reviewed.

  17. ISOPHOT - Capabilities and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, D.; Klaas, U.; Abolins, J.

    1996-01-01

    ISOPHOT covers the largest wavelength range on ISO from 2.5 to 240 mu m. Its scientific capabilities include multi filter and multi-aperture photometry, polarimetry, imaging and spectrophotometry. All modes can optionally include a focal plane chopper. The backbone of the photometric calibration...... operating the instrument in space are continuously being implemented in the standard data reduction software packages available to every observer. Particular strengths of the instrument include the detectability of very cold sources, high resolution mapping and fast spectrophotometry. The far infrared...

  18. Sustainable Supply Chain Capabilities: Accumulation, Strategic Types and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Seung Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the cumulative sustainable supply chain (SC capabilities and their effects on supply chain performance, including economic, environmental, and social performance. Using empirical analyses with data from 198 small- and medium-sized suppliers in Korea, this paper provides evidence about the cumulative sustainable SC capabilities, indicating that economic, social, and environmental capabilities in the supply chain mutually reinforce each other rather than traded off. This study also presents the positive effect of cumulative sustainable SC capabilities on supply chain sustainability performance. This paper identifies four distinctive groups of cumulative capabilities: the laggard, environmental-focused, social-cautious, and all-round. This study provides a better understanding about sustainable capabilities and important guidelines for managers of suppliers and buyers who wish to build strong social/environmental management capabilities without compromising economic capability throughout the entire supply chain.

  19. OPSAID improvements and capabilities report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbgewachs, Ronald D.; Chavez, Adrian R.

    2011-08-01

    Process Control System (PCS) and Industrial Control System (ICS) security is critical to our national security. But there are a number of technological, economic, and educational impediments to PCS owners implementing effective security on their systems. Sandia National Laboratories has performed the research and development of the OPSAID (Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design), a project sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), to address this issue. OPSAID is an open-source architecture for PCS/ICS security that provides a design basis for vendors to build add-on security devices for legacy systems, while providing a path forward for the development of inherently-secure PCS elements in the future. Using standardized hardware, a proof-of-concept prototype system was also developed. This report describes the improvements and capabilities that have been added to OPSAID since an initial report was released. Testing and validation of this architecture has been conducted in another project, Lemnos Interoperable Security Project, sponsored by DOE/OE and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

  20. Distinctive marketing and information technology capabilities and strategic types : A cross-national investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Michael; Nason, Robert W.; Di Benedetto, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The authors examine the relationship between strategic type and development of distinctive marketing, market-linking, technology, and information technology (IT) capabilities to implement innovation strategy. They hypothesize that prospectors must build technical and IT capabilities, whereas

  1. Does fluoride in the water close the dental caries gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, R; Jamieson, L M; Ha, D; Ellershaw, A; Luzzi, L

    2015-09-01

    Indigenous children experience significantly more dental caries than non-Indigenous children. This study assessed if access to fluoride in the water closed the gap in dental caries between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children. Data from four states and two territories were sourced from the Child Dental Health Survey (CDHS) conducted in 2010. The outcomes were dental caries in the deciduous and permanent dentitions, and the explanatory variables were Indigenous status and access to fluoridated water (≥0.5 mg/L) prior to 2008. Dental caries prevalence and severity for Indigenous and non-Indigenous children, in both dentitions, was lower in fluoridated areas compared to non-fluoridated areas. Among non-Indigenous children, there was a 50.9% difference in mean dmft scores in fluoridated (1.70) compared to non-fluoridated (2.86) areas. The difference between Indigenous children in fluoridated (3.29) compared to non-fluoridated (4.16) areas was 23.4%. Among non-Indigenous children there was a 79.7% difference in the mean DMFT scores in fluoridated (0.68) compared to non-fluoridated (1.58) areas. The difference between Indigenous children in fluoridated (1.59) and non-fluoridated (2.23) areas was 33.5%. Water fluoridation is effective in reducing dental caries, but does not appear to close the gap between non-Indigenous children and Indigenous children. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  2. Sporting chance: Indigenous participation in Australian sport history

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorman, Sean

    2010-01-01

    For many non-Indigenous Australians the only time they have any engagement with Indigenous peoples, history or issues is through watching sport on television or being at a football match at ground like the MCG...

  3. Farmers' knowledge and experience of indigenous insect pest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers' knowledge and experience of indigenous insect pest control in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. ... Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems. Journal Home ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  4. The Coolangatta Statement on Indigenous Rights in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of American Indian Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents the 1996 revised Coolangatta Statement on Indigenous Rights in Education, a framework for discussing indigenous educational rights and self-determination, generated by an international task force. Lists task force members and fundamental principles for further discussion. (SV)

  5. Indigenous Women and the Land: Shifting language, action and culture

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa Belausteguigoitia Rius

    2011-01-01

    Marisa Belausteguigoitia Rius describes how indigenous and peasant women and through their discussions, actions and conversation illustrate how hope, equity and justice are possible in the painful and difficult history of indigenous struggles over land and rights in Mexico.

  6. Indigenous participation and representation in Venezuelan electoral processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luis Fernando ANGOSTO FERRÁNDEZ

    2012-01-01

    .... the participation of indigenous candidates and electors; 3. the maneuvers of political parties and civil organizations that attempt to channel and/or benefit from such indigenous representation and participation...

  7. Knowing the Unknown through the Known: The Case for Indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . It used this to express the place of existing knowledge hereafter referred to as indigenous knowledge, in sustainable development. The paper proceeded from the understanding of the concept of indigenous knowledge, its relevance, to an ...

  8. Conducting Indigenous Research in Western Knowledge Spaces: Aligning Theory and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Myra; Major, Jae

    2017-01-01

    Walking simultaneously in two worlds as an Indigenous researcher, navigating Indigenous and Western epistemologies/methodologies can have its challenges. Indigenous methodologies have become an important element of qualitative research and have been increasingly taken up by both Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers. Indigenous methodologies…

  9. Indigenous teacher training within an intercultural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Bergamaschi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Current analysis discusses indigenous teacher training foregrounded on the activities that involve teachers, Kaingang chiefs and government officials responsible for this policy in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The Specialization Course in Professional Education integrated to Fundamental Education, within the modality Education for Young People and Adults – A differentiated proposal for Amerindians, is the main objective of current study. The course is run by the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul and funded by the Secretary for Professional Education and Technology of the Brazilian Ministry of Education. Studies related to the research ‘Amerindian Education and Interculturality’ underlie the above-mentioned specialization course within a wider context of the formation of indigenous teachers and indigene school education.

  10. The prevalence and causes of vision loss in Indigenous Australians: the National Indigenous Eye Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Hugh R; Xie, Jing; Fox, Sarah; Dunn, Ross A; Arnold, Anna-Lena; Keeffe, Jill E

    2010-03-15

    To determine the prevalence and causes of vision loss in Indigenous Australians. A national, stratified, random cluster sample was drawn from 30 communities across Australia that each included about 300 Indigenous people of all ages. A sample of non-Indigenous adults aged > or = 40 years was also tested at several remote sites for comparison. Participants were examined using a standardised protocol that included a questionnaire (self-administered or completed with the help of field staff), visual acuity (VA) testing on presentation and after correction, visual field testing, trachoma grading, and fundus and lens photography. The data were collected in 2008. VA; prevalence of low vision and blindness; causes of vision loss; rates of vision loss in Indigenous compared with non-Indigenous adults. 1694 Indigenous children and 1189 Indigenous adults were examined, representing recruitment rates of 84% for children aged 5-15 years and 72% for adults aged > or = 40 years. Rates of low vision (VA or = 6/60) were 1.5% (95% CI, 0.9%-2.1%) in children and 9.4% (95% CI, 7.8%-11.1%) in adults. Rates of blindness (VA vision in both adults and children was refractive error. The principal causes of blindness in adults were cataract, refractive error and optic atrophy. Relative risks (RRs) of vision loss and blindness in Indigenous adults compared with adults in the mainstream Australian population were 2.8 and 6.2, respectively. By contrast, RRs of vision loss and blindness in Indigenous children compared with mainstream children were 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. Many causes of vision loss in our sample were readily avoidable. Better allocation of services and resources is required to give all Australians equal access to eye health services.

  11. Building calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne Christian; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion......Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion...

  12. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  13. Correcting Indigenous Australians' refractive error and presbyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjou, Mitchell D; Boudville, Andrea I; Taylor, Hugh R

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the barriers and solutions for refractive error and presbyopia vision correction for Indigenous Australians. A qualitative study, using semistructured interviews, focus groups, stakeholder workshops and consultation, conducted in community, private practice, hospital, non-government organization and government settings. Five hundred and thirty-one people participated in consultations. Data were collected at 21 sites across Australia. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 289 people working in Indigenous health and eye care sectors; focus group discussions with 81 community members; stakeholder workshops involving 86 individuals; and separate meetings with 75 people. Barriers were identified through thematic analysis and policy solutions developed through iterative consultation. Barriers and solutions to remedy Indigenous Australians' uncorrected refractive error and presbyopia. Indigenous Australians' uncorrected refractive error and presbyopia can be eliminated through improvement of primary care identification and referral of people with poor vision, increased availability of optometry services in Aboriginal Health Services, introduction of a nationally consistent Indigenous subsidized spectacle scheme and proper coordination, promotion and monitoring of these services. The refractive error and presbyopia correction needs of Indigenous Australians are immediately treatable by the simple provision of glasses. The workforce capacity exists to provide the eye exams to prescribe glasses and the cost is modest. What is required is identification of patients with refractive needs within community, referral to accessible optometry services, a good supply system for appropriate and affordable glasses and the coordination and integration of this service within a broader eye care system. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  14. The use of indigenous knowledge in development: problems and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, J.

    2005-01-01

    The use of indigenous knowledge has been seen by many as an alternative way of promoting development in poor rural communities in many parts of the world. By reviewing much of the recent work on indigenous knowledge, the paper suggests that a number of problems and tensions has resulted in indigenous knowledge not being as useful as hoped for or supposed. These include problems emanating from a focus on the (arte)factual; binary tensions between western science and indigenous knowledge system...

  15. A Community Engaged Dental Curriculum: A Rural Indigenous Outplacement Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Abuzar, Menaka A.; Julie Owen

    2016-01-01

    Background Indigenous people worldwide suffer from poor oral health as compared to non-Indigenous citizens. One of the approaches to bring about improvement in Indigenous oral health is to enhance the service provision by implementing oral health outplacement programmes. A case study of such a programme for dental students in Australia reports how an educational institution can successfully engage with an Indigenous oral health service to provide learning experiences to the students as well a...

  16. Oral health of Indigenous adult public dental patients in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, D S; Roberts-Thomson, K F; Spencer, A J

    2007-12-01

    Indigenous Australians have been reported in a range of studies to have worse health than non-Indigenous Australians. Among health care card holders, a financially disadvantaged group eligible for public-funded dental care, oral health may also be worse among Indigenous persons. The aims of this study were to examine the oral health of Indigenous compared to non-Indigenous adult public dental patients in terms of caries experience and periodontal status, controlling for age and gender of patient, type of care and geographic location. Patients were sampled randomly by state/territory dental services in 2001-2002. Dentists recorded oral health status at the initial visit of a course of care using written instructions. The samples were weighted in proportion to the numbers of public-funded dental patients for each state/territory. Multivariate logistic regression showed that the presence of periodontal pockets of 6+ mm was higher (P Indigenous compared to non-Indigenous patients (OR = 2.24, 1.34-3.76), after controlling for age and gender of patients, type of care and geographic location. Multivariate negative binomial regression analysis (RR: rate ratio) controlling for age and gender of patients, type of care and geographic location indicated that Indigenous patients had higher numbers of decayed teeth (RR = 1.42) and missing teeth (RR = 1.44) but lower numbers of filled teeth (RR = 0.51) compared to non-Indigenous patients (P Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients. Indigenous adult public dental patients had worse oral health status than non-Indigenous patients, with a higher percentage of Indigenous patients having periodontal pockets 6+ mm, and Indigenous patients having more decayed and missing teeth. Indigenous patients lack both timely and appropriate preventive and treatment services.

  17. Indigenous Participation in Intercultural Education: Learning from Mexico and Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Gemma Burford; Susanne Kissmann; Francisco J. Rosado-May; Alvarado Dzul, Santos H.; Marie K. Harder

    2012-01-01

    Intercultural education seeks to create a forum for integrating Western scientific knowledge and indigenous knowledge to address local and global challenges such as biocultural diversity conservation, natural resource management, and social justice for indigenous peoples. Intercultural education is based on learning together with, rather than learning about or from, indigenous communities. In the best examples, problem-based learning dissolves the dichotomy between indigenous and nonindigenou...

  18. Dangerous Dancing: A Commentary on Australian Indigenous Communication Futures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hugo Meadows

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous communities in Australia have fought for access to the airwaves, despite resistance from the dominant European population. The uncertainty of the government policymaking process has created challenges for Indigenous media producers in appropriating a range of media technologies to serve Indigenous interests. Indigenous-produced media provides a first level of service to communities across the continent but the struggle to maintain this complex communication system continues.

  19. Dangerous Dancing: A Commentary on Australian Indigenous Communication Futures

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hugo Meadows

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous communities in Australia have fought for access to the airwaves, despite resistance from the dominant European population. The uncertainty of the government policymaking process has created challenges for Indigenous media producers in appropriating a range of media technologies to serve Indigenous interests. Indigenous-produced media provides a first level of service to communities across the continent but the struggle to maintain this complex communication system continues. (au...

  20. Fractures in indigenous compared to non-indigenous populations: A systematic review of rates and aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L; Vogrin, Sara; Leslie, William D; Kinsella, Rita; Toombs, Maree; Duque, Gustavo; Hosking, Sarah M; Holloway, Kara L; Doolan, Brianna J; Williams, Lana J; Page, Richard S; Pasco, Julie A; Quirk, Shae E

    2017-06-01

    Compared to non-indigenous populations, indigenous populations experience disproportionately greater morbidity, and a reduced life expectancy; however, conflicting data exist regarding whether a higher risk of fracture is experienced by either population. We systematically evaluate evidence for whether differences in fracture rates at any skeletal site exist between indigenous and non-indigenous populations of any age, and to identify potential risk factors that might explain these differences. On 31 August 2016 we conducted a comprehensive computer-aided search of peer-reviewed literature without date limits. We searched PubMed, OVID, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and reference lists of relevant publications. The protocol for this systematic review is registered in PROSPERO, the International Prospective Register of systematic reviews (CRD42016043215). Using the World Health Organization reference population as standard, hip fracture incidence rates were re-standardized for comparability between countries. Our search yielded 3227 articles; 283 potentially eligible articles were cross-referenced against predetermined criteria, leaving 27 articles for final inclusion. Differences in hip fracture rates appeared as continent-specific, with lower rates observed for indigenous persons in all countries except for Canada and Australia where the opposite was observed. Indigenous persons consistently had higher rates of trauma-related fractures; the highest were observed in Australia where craniofacial fracture rates were 22-times greater for indigenous compared to non-indigenous women. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical risk factors, approximately a three-fold greater risk of osteoporotic fracture and five-fold greater risk of craniofacial fractures was observed for indigenous compared to non-indigenous persons; diabetes, substance abuse, comorbidity, lower income, locality, and fracture history were independently associated with an increased risk of fracture

  1. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  2. Building envelope

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This chapter describes the way building envelopes can contribute to developing green buildings and sets out some objectives that could be aimed for. It also proposes a number of approaches that can be used to help design green building envelopes...

  3. Healthy Buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Deborah

    Health problems related to school buildings can be categorized in five major areas: sick-building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and poor indoor air quality due to smoke, chemicals, and other pollutants. This paper provides an overview of these areas,…

  4. Structural Capability of an Organization toward Innovation Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Momeni, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    indicated that the advantages relying on the internal capabilities of organizations may determine the competitive position of organizations better than environmental opportunities do. Characteristics of firms shows that one of the most internal capabilities that lead the organizations to the strongest...... competitive advantage in the organizations is the innovation capability. The innovation capability is associated with other organizational capabilities, and many organizations have focused on the need to identify innovation capabilities.This research focuses on recognition of the structural aspect...... of innovation capability and proposes a conceptual framework based on a Qualitative Meta Synthesis of academic literature on organizations innovation capability. This is proposed for the development of the concept of innovation capability in the organizations and this paper includes an expert based validation...

  5. Indigenous counseling: A needed area in school counseling in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous counselling has not been given attention in Nigeria's school counselling programme. This counselling gap was created by European colonialism, which succeeded in developing in the minds of the African that anything indigenous is local, unscientific and unorthodox. Indigenous counselling is one of the ...

  6. Situating Indigenous Student Mobility within the Global Education Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prout, Sarah; Hill, Angela

    2012-01-01

    In Australia, as in other global contexts, Indigenous student education outcomes are well below those of their non-Indigenous counterparts. A more robust understanding of, and responsiveness to, Indigenous temporary mobilities is a critical step to redressing such educational inequalities. This paper draws together learnings from the papers in…

  7. African Indigenous Land Rights in a Private Ownership Paradigm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Os-trom's classification of goods leads to a definition of the commons (or common pool of resources) as "a class of resources for which exclusion is difficult and joint use in-volves subtractablity". ... KEYWORDS: Indigenous law; African indigenous land rights; property rights; African indigenous land tenure; the commons ...

  8. Contested Territories: Water Rights and the Struggles over Indigenous Livelihoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, R.A.; Duarte, B.; Manosalvas Nicolalde, R.; Mena Vásconez, P.A.; Roa Avendaño, T.; Vera-Delgado, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the threats to Indigenous water rights and territories in the Andean countries. It analyzes how water and water rights are embedded in Indigenous territories, and how powerful actors and intervention projects tend to undermine local societies and indigenous livelihoods by

  9. Indigenous Rights and the 1991-2000 Australian Reconciliation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gunstone

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The formal reconciliation process in Australia was conducted between 1991 and 2000 and aimed to reconcile Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples by 2001. In this paper, I detail the failure of both this reconciliation process and governments, in particular the Howard Government, to recognise Indigenous rights, such as sovereignty, a treaty, self-determination and land rights.

  10. The management of diabetes in indigenous Australians from primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark; Weekes, Andrew J; Thomas, Merlin C

    2007-10-25

    Indigenous Australians have high rates of diabetes and its complications. This study examines ethnic differences in the management of patients with type 2 diabetes in Australian primary care. Diabetes management and outcomes in Indigenous patients enrolled in the NEFRON study (n = 144) was systematically compared with that in non-Indigenous patients presenting consecutively to the same practitioner (n = 449), and the NEFRON cohort as a whole (n = 3893). Indigenous Australians with diabetes had high rates of micro- and macrovascular disease. 60% of Indigenous patients had an abnormal albumin to creatinine ratio compared to 33% of non-Indigenous patients (p Indigenous patients, Indigenous patients were more likely to have established macrovascular disease ((adjusted Odds ratio 2.7). This excess in complications was associated with poor glycemic control, with an HbA1c >or= 8.0%, observed in 55% of all Indigenous patients, despite the similar frequency use of oral antidiabetic agents and insulin. Smoking was also more common in Indigenous patients (38%vs 10%, p Indigenous patients. Although seeing the same doctors and receiving the same medications, glycaemic and smoking cessation targets remain unfulfilled in Indigenous patients. This cross-sectional study confirms Aboriginal ethnicity as a powerful risk factor for microvascular and macrovascular disease, which practitioners should use to identify candidates for intensive multifactorial intervention.

  11. The importance of indigenous games: The selected cases of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous games in South Africa risk extinction. The threat is created by the fact that old people in South Africa do not have enough time to transfer their skills and knowledge of indigenous games to the younger generation. The focus of this article is on identifying some of the problem areas regarding indigenous games.

  12. Educational Leadership and Indigeneity: Doing Things the Same, Differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohepa, Margie Kahukura (Ngapuhi)

    2013-01-01

    Educational leadership, it is argued, must play a critical role in improving student outcomes, especially those of minoritized and Indigenous students. In the process of improving education and schooling for Indigenous students, Indigenous educational leadership needs to be considered alongside educational leadership more generally. This article…

  13. African customary law and the protection of indigenous cultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... challenges. However, it argues that a genuine desire to safeguard indigenous cultural rights can engender the discovery of lasting solutions. Keywords: Indigenous knowledge, indigenous knowledge system, customary law, intellectual property rights, sui generis, delphi method, digital innovation South Africa (DISA) ...

  14. Community-Based Indigenous Digital Storytelling with Elders and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseke, Judy; Moore, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Indigenous digital storytelling and research are as much about the process of community relationships as they are about the development of digital products and research outcomes. Indigenous researchers, digital storytelling producers, and academics work in different communities with research collaborators who are indigenous community members,…

  15. Teaching Indigenous Geography in a Neo-Colonial World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jennifer; Hollinsworth, David

    2017-01-01

    Australian universities are increasingly embedding Indigenous content and perspectives within curriculum to promote Indigenous cultural competency. We present teaching challenges in an Indigenous geography course designed to present an engaged, intercultural learning experience. We critically reflect on student evaluations, informal discussions…

  16. Integration of indigenous knowledge and skills for the development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent writings on indigenous knowledge systems question the value of framing development planning in terms of the traditional knowledge and skills of indigenous people. Such thinking has brought about the notion of using indigenous knowledge as a significant resource, which could contribute to the increased ...

  17. Religious Institutions and Empowerment: The Case of Indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the role of indigenous religious institutions in the empowerment of people using the indigenous/traditional religions in Ghana as a case study. In this study, indigenous institutions refer to the structures or strategies including the worldview, beliefs and practices, customs, norms, values, etc. that are ...

  18. Status of Indigenous Tree Species in Girei Forest Reserve of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... sampled plot (p > 0.05). At this point of endangerment of the indigenous tree species, there is therefore a need for conservation strategies for future use of these indigenous trees and to reduce the effect of global warming on the earth surface. Keywords: Quantitative assessment, Global warming, Indigenous, Conservation, ...

  19. 408 Towards Church Indigenization: A Critical Examination of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    with Pentecostal/Charismatic persuasion that may want to adopt this policy in future. Below are a few problems .... The indigenization has brought about set back in the areas of man power. When the non-indigenous ... indigenes in almost all places in the northern Nigeria has had little or no attention in developing them; the ...

  20. Indigenous Ways with Literacies: Transgenerational, Multimodal, Placed, and Collective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kathy A.; Davis-Warra, John; Sewell, Marlene; Anderson, Mikayla

    2016-01-01

    This research describes some of the salient features of Indigenous ways of working with multimodal literacies in digital contexts of use that emerged within an Indigenous school community with the oversight of Aboriginal Elders. This is significant because the use of multimodal literacy practices among a growing number of Indigenous school…

  1. Protection of intellectual property rights of indigenous knowledge in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protection of intellectual property rights of indigenous knowledge in Tanzania : legal constraints and challenges. ... The new law on IPR and indigenous knowledge should, among other things, provide for a system that will recognize and protect the rights of an individual as well as communities of indigenous knowledge, ...

  2. Non-indigenous marine and estuarine species in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    An overview is presented of non-indigenous marine and estuarine plant and animal species recorded from The Netherlands. In this list both exotic species from outside NW Europe and non-indigenous species from elsewhere in NW Europe are enumerated. Species that have been suggested to be non-indigenous

  3. Indigenous Governance among the Southern Afar (ca. 1815-1974 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is to identify the elements of indigenous governance and the mechanisms of how this indigenous governance kept peace and stability in between 1815-1974. It also attempts to investigate how the status quo was affected by the internal and external factors that withered the dynamics of indigenous ...

  4. Building Project Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pemsel, Sofia; Wiewiora, Anna

    This research investigates the development of project competence, and particularly, three related dynamic capabilities (shifting, adapting, leveraging) that contribute to project competence development. In doing so, we make use of the emerging literature on knowledge governance and theorize how...... knowledge governance mechanisms can move the organization towards desired knowledge-based goals. A multiple-case study comprising 23 cases advances our understanding of the elements that trigger, enable, hamper, and drive shifting, leveraging and adapting. Finally, the paper offers a tentative framework...... of dynamic capability building promoting project competence development....

  5. rican Approaches to Building .eace and Social Solidarity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is necessary to examine whether there are other peacebuilding strategies that can be adopted to complement existing efforts to promote peace on the continent. This paper examines African indigenous approaches to building peace and promoting social solidarity. It will begin by looking at the reasons why it is necessary ...

  6. Achieving health SDG 3 in Africa through NGO capacity building ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... (PACFaH) mainstreams capacity building as an effective implementation strategy for 8 indigenous NGOs to deliver on - policy; budgetary; legislative; and administrative advocacy in four issue areas: 1) family planning; 2) nutrition; 3) routine immunization; and 4) reduction of under-5 deaths from diarrhea and pneumonia.

  7. Achieving Health SDG 3 in Africa through NGO Capacity Building ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    2016-09-01

    Sep 1, 2016 ... for Advocacy in Child and Family Health Project (PACFaH) mainstreams capacity building as an effective implementation strategy for 8 indigenous NGOs to ... represent a shift away from the old aid architecture of the MDGs. Unlike the ... the social accountability models anchoring the. MDG period. The new ...

  8. LHC Capabilities for Quarkonia

    CERN Document Server

    Petrushanko, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of the charmonium and bottomonium resonances in nucleus-nucleus collisions provides crucial information on high-density QCD matter. First, the suppression of quarkonia production is generally agreed to be one of the most direct probes of quark-gluon plasma formation. The observation of anomalous J/$\\psi$ suppression at the CERN-SPS and at RHIC is well established but the clarification of some important remaining questions requires equivalent studies of the $\\Upsilon$ family, only possible at the LHC energies. Second, the production of heavy-quarks proceeds mainly via gluon-gluon fusion processes and, as such, is sensitive to saturation of the gluon density at low-x in the nucleus. Measured departures from the expected vacuum quarkonia cross-sections in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC will thus provide valuable information not only on the thermodynamical state of the produced partonic medium, but also on the initial-state modifications of the nuclear parton distribution functions. The capabilities ...

  9. Mobile systems capability plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  10. Fractures in indigenous compared to non-indigenous populations: A systematic review of rates and aetiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Brennan-Olsen

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The observed paucity of data and suggestion of continent-specific differences indicate an urgent need for further research regarding indigenous status and fracture epidemiology and aetiology. Our findings also have implications for communities, governments and healthcare professionals to enhance the prevention of trauma-related fractures in indigenous persons, and an increased focus on modifiable lifestyle behaviours to prevent osteoporotic fractures in all populations.

  11. SEMIOTICS IN INDIGENOUS DANCE PERFORMANCES: EKELEKE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dean SPGS NAU

    The cultural influence on the indigenous dance defines its technique and style of expression, thereby .... audience response and production details that maybe otherwise unreported. The presentation frame is often the context in ... symbols for certain brand products in adverts. All these symbols in man's daily activities are all ...

  12. Integration Models for Indigenous Public Health Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Leanne; Lee, Vanessa; Robinson, Priscilla

    2017-01-01

    All graduates of Master of Public Health (MPH) programmes in Australia are expected to achieve a core set of Indigenous public health competencies designed to train "judgement safe practitioners". A curriculum framework document was developed alongside the competencies to assist programme providers to integrate appropriate Indigenous…

  13. Supporting indigenous women in science, technology, engineering ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    These programs, partly funded by Mexico's Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT) (National council of science and technology), have considerably improved the participation of indigenous people in the country's education system. However, there continue to be important challenges in advancement ...

  14. Antimicrobial agents deriving from indigenous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrelija, Cencic; Walter, Chingwaru

    2010-01-01

    Phytonutrients in many indigenous plants are receiving a lot of attention as they are important in antimicrobial and anticancer therapies. Tropical areas, especially India, South America and Africa, are the main sources of patentable plant products and have indigenous populations with well developed traditional medicinal knowledge. Phytochemicals, including carotenoids, phenolics, alkaloids, nitrogen-containing compounds, and organosulfur compounds, are receiving much attention as they impart important health benefits. This article gives an insight into some important phytochemicals, and analyses the ethical issues on property rights of plant products. Many patent applications have been lodged, and quite a number have been granted. Pharmaceutical industries are engaging in massive speculative bioprospecting on plant based phytochemicals and products, usually resulting in conflicts with indigenous populations. More focus is given here-in to Tylosema esculentum (marama) plant, found in drier parts of Southern Africa and known to contain high quantities of essential phytochemicals. Important phytochemicals in marama include fatty acid (mainly oleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, behenic acid), protein and phenolic acid components. The marama plant has high potential as a source of medical and cosmetic products. If conflicts surrounding property rights on plant based products are resolved, phytochemicals can be a good source of income for indigenous populations in areas where such plants are found.

  15. Indigenous Learning Preferences and Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchenham, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    This three-year research study examined the influence of interactive technologies on the math achievement of Indigenous students in Years 4, 5, 6 and 7 technology-equipped classrooms in a rural elementary school in British Columbia, Canada. Using a mixed-methods approach, the researcher conducted semistructured interviews and collected math…

  16. Comparative Physical Carcass Characteristics in the Indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicated highly significantly different (P<0.01), proportions of lean and fat significantly (P<0.05) different proportions of bone and skin in the carcasses of IND and LWXLD pig. The LWXLD pigs had more lean, and bone, less fat and skin, than the indigenous pigs. Carcass conformation was also clearly different in ...

  17. Documenting indigenous knowledge systems in Africa: prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous knowledge (IK) systems are very important for the communities from which they come from. Such knowledge dictates how people behave generally, how they relate with the land and other resources that they have, and how they make sense of the world around them. IK's importance is seemingly being ...

  18. Handbook of Indigenous Foods Involving Alkaline Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkar, P.K.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2014-01-01

    This book details the basic approaches of alkaline fermentation, provides a brief history, and offers an overview of the subject. The book discusses the diversity of indigenous fermented foods involving an alkaline reaction, as well as the taxonomy, ecology, physiology, and genetics of predominant

  19. Surveying technologies for integrating indigenous knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A sample of 39 teachers responded to a 23-item online survey that examined the technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge of teachers completing their teaching degree and their predispositions regarding the integration of IKS. Juxtaposed between traditional/indigenous technologies and modern/digital tools and ...

  20. Genetic diversity and relationships among indigenous Mozambican ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three indigenous Mozambican cattle breeds, namely the Angone, Landim and Bovino de Tete were characterized using six proteins, 13 autosomal microsatellite loci and one Y-specific microsatellite locus (INRA124). The Mashona breed from Zimbabwe was also studied to elucidate the origin of the Bovino de Tete cattle.

  1. Desiderata: Towards Indigenous Models of Vocational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T. L.; Pearce, Marina

    2011-01-01

    As a result of a relative lack of cross-cultural validity in most current (Western) psychological models, indigenous models of psychology have recently become a popular approach for understanding behaviour in specific cultures. Such models would be valuable to vocational psychology research with culturally diverse populations. Problems facing…

  2. The environmental integrity of African Indigenous Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS) are part and parcel of the individual practising within a specific community and environmental context. Westerners tend to view IKS as the African equivalent of Western science, technology and rationality. Such view is wrong as it can harm the place of IKS in traditional African ...

  3. Empowering Indigenous Industries for National Development: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Indigenous industries, which mainly depend on local resources, open job opportunities for the rural populace thus curbing the incidence of rural-urban migration ... in several studies have shown that conditions of rural people worsen as a result of the alien development strategies often imported from the industrial world.

  4. Indigenous practices of Traditional Health Practioners (THPs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous practices of Traditional Health Practioners (THPs) methods by mothers of children admitted to the Polokwane/Mankweng hospital complex, Limpopo ... practices and strengthen health education of community members and THPs with regard to the precautions to be taken when caring for HIV infected children.

  5. Managing Agricultural Indigenous And Exogenous Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing Agricultural Indigenous And Exogenous Knowledge Through Information And Communication Technologies For Poverty Reduction In Tanzania. ... Access to, and use of, ICTs provides new and faster ways of delivering and accessing information and knowledge that may improve productivity in a wide range of ...

  6. Chemical composition of Ricinodendron heudelotii : An indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ethnobotanical survey and germplasm collection of Ricinodendron heudelotii (Bail.) (an indigenous fruit tree) were carried out in six provinces of the humid rainforest zone in southern Cameroon. Fruit samples were collected at 40-50 km intervals along the main road network of the zone, from homegardens, food crop as ...

  7. Haptoglobin Phenotypes and Hypertension in Indigenous Zambians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the association between presence of haptoglobin phenotypes and hypertension in indigenous Zambian patients attending outpatient medical clinic at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. Methodology: The study was a descriptive, noninterventional, ...

  8. indigenous communication, religion and education as determinants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    Ayangunna, J. A. & Oyewo, B. A. members of the community preferred information dissemination on STIs/HIV/AIDS education through traditional, communication strategies. Indigenous communication involves the generality of the citizens in the society. It is authoritative. They are based on directives, news, advertising, public ...

  9. INDIGENOUS DISCOURSES IN THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... just after childbirth, immediately after a miscarriage and after the loss of a spouse. It is concluded that the persistent indigenous conceptions of AIDS observed in the study have important consequences for the prevention of the spread of AIDS that should be used in the campaign against HIV/AIDS, rather than dismissed by ...

  10. Democratic consolidation: Indigenous languages and Nigeria's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of effort towards democratic consolidation and in view of the developmental challenges confronting the nation, Goodluck Jonathan upon his election in 2011 as the President of Nigeria ... The paper thus concludes that the transformation agenda will fail, if urgent attention is not given to the indigenous languages.

  11. Trace Metals Bioaccumulation Potentials of Three Indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rapid increase in the number of industries may have increased the levels of trace metals in the soil. Phytoremediation of these polluted soils using indigenous grasses is now considered an alternative method in remediating these polluted soils. The present study investigated and compared the ability of three ...

  12. Frequencies of Some Morphological Features in Indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphological features of chicken genetic resources must be carefully identified and considered in developing breeding strategies. The study was carried out to determine the frequencies of morphological features in indigenous chickens of South-Western Nigeria, using Lagos, Ogun, Osun and Oyo States as case study.

  13. Indigenous Peoples, Life Projects and Globalization

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This book brings together very insightful analyses of indigenous experience and strategies in the context of globalization from several continents and a number of theoretical perspectives. There are broad similarities making this a common struggle but the solutions arise from people solving problems in local contexts.

  14. Swaziland Newspapers in Indigenous Languages | Mkhonza | Lwati ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses the history of newspapers that are in indigenous languages in Swaziland and looks at the role that they play in informing society. It argues that the newspaper is the main means for making people get involved in governance because it makes people know what is happening around them. It states that ...

  15. Indigenous communication, religion and education as determinants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined indigenous communication, religion and education as determinants of attitudes towards STIs/HIV/AIDS education in Igando Community Lagos State, Nigeria. A sample of 195 people was randomly selected from the population. The study used four hypotheses to test the respondents' attitude to the use of ...

  16. Indigenous Participation in VET: Understanding the Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackehurst, Maree; Polvere, Rose-Anne; Windley, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous educational and employment disadvantage is a much researched and discussed subject. The latest Prime Minister's Closing the Gap report (DPM&C 2017) shows that, while the gap is slowly decreasing in regard to participation in tertiary education, reducing employment disparity, particularly in remote areas, lags behind. This is despite…

  17. The Nagoya Protocol and Indigenous Peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Yolanda Teran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is about Indigenous peoples’ involvement in the Nagoya Protocol negotiations from 2006 to 2010, as well as in its implementation to stop biopiracy in order to protect Pachamama, Mother Earth, and to ensure our survival and the survival of coming generations. The Nagoya Protocol is an international instrument that was adopted in Nagoya, Japan in October 2010 by the Conference of Parties (COP 10 and ratified by 51 countries in Pyeongchang, South Korea in October 2014 at COP 12. This protocol governs access to genetic resources and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from their utilization (access and benefit sharing [ABS]. It has several articles related to Indigenous peoples and traditional knowledge, as well as: The interrelation and inseparable nature between genetic resources and traditional knowledge; The diversity of circumstances surrounding traditional knowledge ownership, including by country; The identification of traditional knowledge owners; The declaration of Indigenous peoples' human rights; and The role of women in the biodiversity process. In addition, this protocol lays out obligations on access, specifically participation in equitable benefit sharing, the accomplishment of prior and informed consent, and the mutually agreed terms and elaboration of a national legal ABS framework with the participation of Indigenous peoples and local communities in order to have well-defined roles, responsibilities, and times of negotiations.

  18. KENYAN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES IN EDUCATION: A WORLD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KENYAN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES IN EDUCATION: A WORLD OF POTENTIAL BENEFITS. ... Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa ... As a result of this early introduction of English as a medium of instruction, most Kenyan children are denied a chance of developing literacy in their mother ...

  19. Emancipatory Indigenous Knowledge Systems: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Despite these negative perceptions of Indigenous Knowledge, there is a growing realisation that this knowledge is part of the global heritage and a national .... partly true, because local (as per the broad definition of the above term 'local') ... global community (for example, global warming, war and AIDS). In this regard ...

  20. ASPECTS OF PUBERTY IN THE INDIGENOUS GILT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parameters relating to the onset oi puberty werc recorded ir a total of 120 indigenous gilts in two experiments In the first experiment dlts were reared from eight weeks of age on three planes,of nutrition estimated to provide 100 (Heh plane), 75 (Me-dium plan ) ^nd 50%. (Low plane) of the nutiient requirements for growth and ...

  1. Preserving, developing and promoting indigenous languages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the basis of literature from various fields an attempt is made to construct a holistic conceptual framework for reflection by LIS professionals. Some examples from South African projects are given to illustrate the possible roles of LIS in the preservation, development and promotion of indigenous languages. Innovation ...

  2. Ethical dimension of indigenous knowledge systems | Mutula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The World Summit on Information Society (WSIS) provided an opportunity for indigenous people to become part of an inclusive information society where everybody without distinction would have access to enhanced services including information and knowledge resources to improve their livelihood. Indeed WSIS Action ...

  3. Masihambisane, lessons learnt using participatory indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Cofimvaba; Eastern Cape; indigenous knowledge; participatory action research; .... knowledge systems (IKS) so as to benefit the school curriculum”, the research project to which we refer is aimed at developing teaching and learning materials for use in the classroom. ... Conceptual framework and methodology.

  4. documenting and disseminating agricultural indigenous knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eric

    addition to identifying the challenges faced in its management for sustainable food security in. Uganda's district ... (AIK) also goes by other names such as traditional knowledge, indigenous technical knowledge .... there are other benefits such as soil conservation and lower labour input compared to mechanised ploughing.

  5. The Relevance of Indigenous Knowledge to Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous knowledge is passed from generation to generation usually by word of mouth and cultural rituals, and has been the basis for agriculture, food preparation and conservation, health care, education, and a wide range of other activities that sustain a society and its environment in many parts of the world for many ...

  6. Biochemical characterization of indigenous Fulani and Yoruba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to characterize two indigenous chickens of Nigeria using protein markers; haemolglobin (HB) and carbonic anhydrase (CA). Separation of the two proteins was achieved by cellulose acetate electrophoresis and direct gene counting method was employed to interpret the result. Palentological ...

  7. Production Performance of Indigenous Chicken under Semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to evaluate four indigenous chicken – namely: Horasi, Kuchi, Naked neck and Frizzled in order to obtain grand-parent and parent stocks was carried out at Tanzania Livestock Research Institute, Mpwapwa district of Dodoma, Tanzania. The perfomance of the ecotypes were compared so as to come out with the best ...

  8. Assessment of Indigenous Knowledge Application among Livestock ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of Indigenous Knowledge Application among Livestock Farmers in Southern Ijaw Local Government Area of Bayelsa State. ... It is therefore suggested that farmers' level of education should be improved while efforts should be made to blend the traditional and conventional (improved) technologies livestock ...

  9. Case Study: Indigenous Knowledge and Data Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Neylon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The IDRC-funded project 'Empowering Indigenous Peoples and Knowledge Systems Related to Climate Change and Intellectual Property Rights' is part of the Open and Collaborative Science in Development Network (OCSDNet. The project “examiners processes of open and collaborative science related to indigenous peoples’ knowledge, climate change and intellectual property rights”. Natural Justice, the lead organisation has a strong ethical stance on the agency and control over knowledge being vested with the contributing project participants, communities of the Nama and Griqua peoples of the Western Cape of South Africa. The project focuses on questions of how climate change is affecting these communities, how do they produce and maintain knowledge relating to climate change, how that knowledge is characterised and shared (or not with wider publics, and how legal frameworks promote or hinder the agenda of these indigenous communities and their choices to communicate and collaborate with wider publics. Indigenous Knowledge is an area where ethical issues of informed consent, historical injustice, non-compatible epistemologies and political, legal, and economic issues all collide in ways that challenge western and Anglo-American assumptions about data sharing. The group seeks to strongly model and internally critique their own ethical stance in the process of their research, through for instance, using community contracts and questioning institutional informed consent systems.

  10. Risk Management Practices of Multinational and indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Construction projects' high uncertainty rates make them unattractive to non-risk takers. Construction companies are therefore necessarily risk takers, albeit, to varying degrees. This study made an inquiry into the risk management (RM) practices of multinational and indigenous construction companies (MCCs and ICCs, ...

  11. Inculcating entrepreneurial spirit through indigenous language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the above observations, this paper advocates the use and teaching of indigenous languages (Igbo) not only from primary and post-primary level but more importantly at the tertiary level- where there are untold number of undergraduates preparing to face the reality of life. The work collected five Igbo proverbs, ...

  12. Indigenous tooth powders = Covert lead poisoning?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hegde, Sapna; Shubha, A; Rao, B

    2013-01-01

    .../almond shell, coconut shell and its sheath, wood, coal and other powders (sand, common salt-powder and crystalline, brick and tile powder, tobacco, areca nut). [4] In addition, a variety of indigenous tooth powders are marketed which are very popular with the local people. Many of these age-old formulations of tooth powders may contain ha...

  13. On Southern African Indigenous Healing | Edwards | Indilinga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... role of rhythm, music, song, dance and various forms of empathy as for example facilitated in Nguni divine healing and San healing dances. The need for future in-depth research into related psychological themes and issues is identified and explicated. Keywords: Indigenous healing, illness prevention, health promotion.

  14. Indigenous Knowledge Systems: contestation, rhetorics and space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A postcolonial critical perspective is introduced to indicate the absolutisms on both sides and the tendency towards cultural and historical fixities. An attempt is also made to locate the border space of Indigenous Knowledge inquiry amidst present realities without becoming prone to new imbued epistemological fixities.

  15. Mobilising indigenous resources for anthropologically designed HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mobilising indigenous resources for anthropologically designed HIV-prevention and behaviour-change interventions in southern Africa. ... with traditional leaders and 'ritual specialists' to better understand cultural patterns and ways of working with, rather than against, culture and traditional leaders in HIV-prevention efforts.

  16. Indigenous knowledge systems and development | Higgs | Indilinga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indilinga: African Journal of Indigenous Knowledge Systems. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  17. benefits of indigenous language in the teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    randomly selected farmers in the study area and information was collected with the aid of structured ... importance of indigenous language use in the teaching and learning process was confirmed by farmers in the ... technologies to enhance farming activities of the adult farmers, is closely bound with the continued use of the ...

  18. Cultural tourism and identity : rethinking indigeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomaselli, K.G.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of cultural tourism and indigenous identity are fraught with questions concerning exploitation, entitlement, ownership and authenticity. Unease with the idea of leveraging a group identity for commercial gain is ever-present. This anthology articulates some of these debates from a multitude

  19. Cytogenetic characterization of Nigerian indigenous pig

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... chromosome pairs 1 – 7; metacentric chromosome pairs 8 to 12 and telocentric chromosome pairs 13 to 18 with submetacentric XX for female and XY for male. A detailed karyogram was constructed from the obtained results. Key words: Karyotype, Nombre fondamental, Nigerian indigenous pig.

  20. Indigenous Australian art in intercultural contact zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonore Wildburger

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article comments on Indigenous Australian art from an intercultural perspective. The painting Bush Tomato Dreaming (1998, by the Anmatyerre artist Lucy Ngwarai Kunoth serves as model case for my argument that art expresses existential social knowledge. In consequence, I will argue that social theory and art theory together provide tools for intercultural understanding and competence.

  1. Synergy between indigenous knowledge systems, modern health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is therefore eminent that sustainable health care development that can benefit all the people of this country should harness a synergy between indigenous health care systems, scientific research and modern health care methods. This article attempts to address the historical evolution of health care methods in South Africa ...

  2. Strangulation injury from indigenous rocking cradle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saha Abhijeet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigenously made rocking cradle is frequently used in rural India. We report strangulation from an indigenously made rocking cradle in an 11-month-old female child. The unique mode of injury and its mechanism have been discussed. Strangulation is an important cause of homicidal and suicidal injury in adults but in children it is usually accidental leading to death due to asphyxia as a result of partial hanging. In western countries, it is the third most common cause of accidental childhood deaths, 17% of them being due to ropes and cords. It ranks fourth amongst the causes of unintentional injury in children less than 1 year of age following roadside accidents, drowning and burns. However, in India, strangulation injury is under reported although indigenous rocking cradles are very commonly used in rural India, and they are even more dangerous than the cribs and adult beds as there are no safety mechanisms therein. We report a case of accidental strangulation following suspension from an indigenously made rocking cradle. The unique mode of injury has prompted us to report this case.

  3. Indigenous Fallow Management on Yap Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.V.C. Falanruw; Francis Ruegorong

    2002-01-01

    On Yap Island, indigenous management of the fallow in shifting agriculture has resulted in the development of site-stable taro patch and tree garden agroforestry systems. These systems are relatively sustainable and supportive of household economies , with some surplus for local market sales. however, a broad range of crops whose harvest is complementary to those...

  4. Indigenous Institutions and Their Role in Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience: Evidence from the 2009 Tsunami in American Samoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Rumbach

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Indigineity has emerged as an important area of focus for research and policy making on disaster risk reduction (DRR and resilience. Most research on indigeneity and DRR centers on indigenous knowledge and its integration with western scientific understandings of hazards and risk. Through a detailed case study of the 2009 tsunami in American Samoa, we argue that indigenous institutions also play a critical role in disaster risk reduction and resilience. Based on original data from semistructured interviews, village planning meetings, and focus group discussions, we describe how the indigenous institutions of fa'a Samoa, or the culture of Samoa, operated in a time of crisis by: (1 structuring emergency decision making and authority; (2 assigning roles and responsibilities during crises; (3 building effective lines of communication between villages and outside actors; (4 providing a system of accountability for vulnerable people; and (5 acting as gatekeepers to villages and mobilizing social groups to act. We then suggest some ways that indigenous institutions could be better leveraged to help create more resilient communities.

  5. Indigenous knowledge management to enhance community resilience to tsunami risk: lessons learned from Smong traditions in Simeulue island, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A.; Sakurai, A.; Munadi, K.

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge accumulation and production embedded in communities through social interactions meant that the Smong tradition of indigenous knowledge of tsunami risk successfully alerted people to the 2004 tsunami, on the island of Simeulue, in Aceh, Indonesia. Based on this practical example, an indigenous management model was developed for Smong information. This knowledge management method involves the transformation of indigenous knowledge into applicable ways to increase community resilience, including making appropriate decisions and taking action in three disaster phases. First, in the pre-disaster stage, the community needs to be willing to mainstream and integrate indigenous knowledge of disaster risk reduction issues into related activities. Second, during disasters, the Smong tradition should make the community able to think clearly, act based on informed decisions, and protect themselves and others by using their indigenous knowledge. Last, in the post-disaster phase, the community needs to be strong enough to face challenges and support each other and “building back better” efforts, using local resources. The findings for the Smong tradition provide valuable knowledge about community resilience. Primary community resilience to disasters is strongly related to existing knowledge that triggers appropriate decisions and actions during pre-disaster, disaster, and post-disaster phases.

  6. Gambling, housing conditions, community contexts and child health in remote indigenous communities in the Northern Territory, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Matthew

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent government reports have identified gambling, along with alcohol abuse, drug abuse and pornography, as contributing to child neglect and abuse in Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory (NT. These reports also identify gaps in empirical evidence upon which to base sound policy. To address this shortfall, data from ten remote Indigenous communities was analysed to determine the relationship between gambling problems, housing conditions, community contexts and child health in indigenous communities. Methods Logistic regression was used to assess associations between gambling problems, community contexts, housing conditions and child health. Separate multivariable models were developed for carer reported gambling problems in houses and six child health outcomes. Results Carer reported gambling problems in households across the ten communities ranged from 10% to 74%. Inland tropical communities had the highest level of reported gambling problems. Less access to a doctor in the community showed evidence of a multivariable adjusted association with gambling problems in houses. No housing variables showed evidence for a multivariable association with reported gambling problems. There was evidence for gambling problems having a multivariable adjusted association with carer report of scabies and ear infection in children. Conclusions The analyses provide evidence that gambling is a significant problem in Indigenous communities and that gambling problems in households is related to poor child health outcomes. A comprehensive (prevention, treatment, regulation and education public health approach to harm minimisation associated with gambling amongst the Indigenous population is required that builds on current normative community regulation of gambling.

  7. Impact of Personnel Capabilities on Organizational Innovation Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Momeni, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    One of the most dynamic capabilities that lead to the strongest competitive advantage in the organizations is the innovation capability. Analysing the development of a firm’s innovation capability is an important research project, and can help organizations to achieve competitive advantage in thi...

  8. Geographic distribution of isolated indigenous societies in Amazonia and the efficacy of indigenous territories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan C Kesler

    Full Text Available The headwaters of the Amazon Basin harbor most of the world's last indigenous peoples who have limited contact with encroaching colonists. Knowledge of the geographic distribution of these isolated groups is essential to assist with the development of immediate protections for vulnerable indigenous settlements. We used remote sensing to document the locations of 28 isolated villages within the four Brazilian states of Acre, Amazonas, Roraima, and Rondônia. The sites were confirmed during previous over-flights and by image evidence of thatched-roof houses; they are estimated to host over 1,700 individuals. Locational data were used to train maximum entropy models that identified landscape and anthropogenic features associated with the occurrence of isolated indigenous villages, including elevation, proximity to streams of five different orders, proximity to roads and settlements, proximity to recent deforestation, and vegetation cover type. Isolated villages were identified at mid elevations, within 20 km of the tops of watersheds and at greater distances from existing roads and trails. We further used model results, combined with boundaries of the existing indigenous territory system that is designed to protect indigenous lands, to assess the efficacy of the existing protected area network for isolated peoples. Results indicate that existing indigenous territories encompass all of the villages we identified, and 50% of the areas with high predicted probabilities of isolated village occurrence. Our results are intended to help inform policies that can mitigate against future external threats to isolated peoples.

  9. Reclaiming Indigenous identities: Culture as strength against suicide among Indigenous youth in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Brittany; Goodman, Ashley; DeBeck, Kora

    2017-06-16

    In Canada, Indigenous youth suicide represents one of several health disparities burdening Indigenous populations, and like many other of these disparities, can be understood as an expression of societal, historical, cultural and familial trauma. As the number of Indigenous youth who take their own lives every year in Canada continues to far exceed national averages, it appears that conventional suicide prevention efforts remain ineffective among this population. A growing body of research argues that conventional interventions, largely rooted in Western individual-level behavioural change frameworks, are culturally discordant with Indigenous paradigms. In response, some Indigenous communities are turning to cultural revitalization as a holistic community-driven response to suicide prevention and treatment. The following commentary explores the emerging evidence base for "culture as treatment" - a novel approach to suicide that emphasizes the significance of interconnectedness in healing, alongside the revitalization of traditional values to reclaim community wellness. In doing so, we seek to contribute to a changing discourse surrounding Indigenous youth suicide by acknowledging culture as strength against this national crisis.

  10. Integrating Biodiversity Management and Indigenous Biopiracy Protection to Promote Environmental Justice and Global Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Many potentially useful medicines arise from developing countries’ biodiverse environments and indigenous knowledge. However, global intellectual property rules have resulted in biopiracy, raising serious ethical concerns of environmental justice, exploitation, and health disparities in these populations. Furthermore, state-based approaches have not led to adequate biodiversity protection, management, or resource sharing, which affect access to lifesaving drugs. In response, country delegates adopted the Nagoya Protocol, which aims at promoting biodiversity management, combating biopiracy, and encouraging equitable benefits sharing with indigenous communities. However, the effectiveness of this framework in meeting these objectives remains in question. To address these challenges, we propose a policy building on the Nagoya Protocol that employs a World Health Organization–World Trade Organization Joint Committee on Bioprospecting and Biopiracy. PMID:22515858

  11. An indigenous and migrant critique of principles and innovation in education in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kěpa, Mere; Manu'Atu, Linitā

    2011-12-01

    This paper questions notions of individualism underpinning technocratic approaches to education that marginalise indigenous and migrant peoples' knowledges in tertiary education. Focusing on New Zealand ( Aotearoa) with its colonial and immigrant history, its Māori and Pacific Islander citizens, the authors ask whether education, as its process is being communicated there, leaves indigenous and migrant people vulnerable and marginalised in the dominant, English-speaking, New Zealand European ( Pākehā) mainstream society. The question is whether education refers to capacity-building and strengthening the potential of marginalised students' language and culture; or whether it is only geared towards sustaining English-language ascendancy and technical virtuosity. Taking on board the cultural heritage of Pacific Islanders ( Pasifika) resident in New Zealand, a new teacher training diploma was introduced by the Auckland University of Technology in 2004. Both authors are involved in the panel meetings ( Fono) where the papers presented during the diploma course are evaluated.

  12. Impact of ICT usage on indigenous peoples’ quality of life: Evidence from an Asian developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mahfuz Ashraf

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous communities across the world have been suffering disadvantages in several domains, e.g. erosion of land rights, language and other cultural aspects, while at the same time being discriminated against when prepared to integrate into the dominant cultures. It has been argued in the literature that information communication technologies (ICTs have the potential of contributing to addressing some of these disadvantages – both in terms of rebuilding what has been eroded and facilitating integration into non-Indigenous societies. In trying to understand how ICTs can be useful for these processes, it is important to do so from a conceptual framework that encompasses the multi-dimensionality of the issues faced by Indigenous communities. The conceptual frameworks frequently used in the ICT literature tend to focus on adoption, use and diffusion of technologies rather than how the use of ICTs affects the livelihoods of the users, which is the focus of this paper. The conceptual framework is informed by the capability approach (CA, in particular by the five freedoms identified in the seminal work of Amartya Sen (2001, “Development as Freedom” (DaF. Data were collected from a purposive sample in an Indigenous community in Bangladesh, using a qualitative method to map how ICTs had affected the lives of these community members The findings suggest that the participants perceived that ICTs had made positive contributions, particularly the benefits they gained from learning how to use computers in the domains that are relevant from the perspective of the five freedoms espoused in DaF. The findings reported in this paper are useful for policy formulation in Bangladesh. As the study is contextualised in a transitional economy setting and can therefore not be generalised, but we believe that the conceptual framework has much to offer future research designed to understand how ICTs can improve the livelihoods of Indigenous individuals and

  13. Chromosomal profile of indigenous pig (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guru Vishnu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the chromosomal profile of indigenous pigs by computing morphometric measurements. Materials and Methods: A cytogenetic study was carried out in 60 indigenous pigs to analyze the chromosomal profile by employing the short term peripheral blood lymphocyte culture technique. Results: The modal chromosome number (2n in indigenous pigs was found to be 38 and a fundamental number of 64 as in the exotic. First chromosome was the longest pair, and thirteenth pair was the second largest while Y-chromosome was the smallest in the karyotype of the pig. The mean relative length, arm ratio, centromeric indices and morphological indices of chromosomes varied from 1.99±0.01 to 11.23±0.09, 1.04±0.05 to 2.95±0.02, 0.51±0.14 to 0.75±0.09 and 2.08±0.07 to 8.08±0.15%, respectively in indigenous pigs. Sex had no significant effect (p>0.05 on all the morphometric measurements studied. Conclusion: The present study revealed that among autosomes first five pairs were sub metacentric, next two pairs were sub telocentric (6-7, subsequent five pairs were metacentric (8-12 and remaining six pairs were telocentric (13-18, while both allosomes were metacentric. The chromosomal number, morphology and various morphometric measurements of the chromosomes of the indigenous pigs were almost similar to those established breeds reported in the literature.

  14. Biomechanical implications of walking with indigenous footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Catherine; Stassijns, Gaetane; Cornelis, Wim; D'Août, Kristiaan

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates biomechanical implications of walking with indigenous "Kolhapuri" footwear compared to barefoot walking among a population of South Indians. Ten healthy adults from South India walked barefoot and indigenously shod at voluntary speed on an artificial substrate. The experiment was repeated outside, on a natural substrate. Data were collected from (1) a heel-mounted 3D-accelerometer recording peak impact at heel contact, (2) an ankle-mounted 3D-goniometer (plantar/dorsiflexion and inversion/eversion), and (3) sEMG electrodes at the m. tibialis anterior and the m. gastrocnemius medialis. Data show that the effect of indigenous footwear on the measured variables, compared to barefoot walking, is relatively small and consistent between substrates (even though subjects walked faster on the natural substrate). Walking barefoot, compared to shod walking yields higher impact accelerations, but the differences are small and only significant for the artificial substrate. The main rotations of the ankle joint are mostly similar between conditions. Only the shod condition shows a faster ankle rotation over the rapid eversion motion on the natural substrate. Maximal dorsiflexion in late stance differs between the footwear conditions on an artificial substrate, with the shod condition involving a less dorsiflexed ankle, and the plantar flexion at toe-off is more extreme when shod. Overall the activity pattern of the external foot muscles is similar. The indigenous footwear studied (Kolhapuri) seems to alter foot biomechanics only in a subtle way. While offering some degree of protection, walking in this type of footwear resembles barefoot gait and this type of indigenous footwear might be considered "minimal". © 2017 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Traumatic brain injury amongst indigenous people: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Ali; Townsend, Clare; Bishara, Jason

    2017-01-01

    To identify the types of research focusing on Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) amongst Indigenous people in order to (i) synthesise their findings and (ii) ascertain where research gaps exist. A systematic review using the PRISMA approach was employed. Eight databases were searched for peer-reviewed literature published at any date. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. The majority of studies focused on the prevalence or incidence of TBI amongst Indigenous people (n = 15). Twelve of these found Indigenous people had a higher prevalence or incidence of TBI compared to non-Indigenous people. Under-researched areas include (with number of articles identified in brackets): Indigenous level of injury or recovery (n = 2), neuropsychological assessment and TBI (n = 3), Indigenous perspectives of TBI (n = 2), Indigenous intervention for TBI (n = 1), and rehabilitation for TBI (n = 4). Published studies demonstrate that Indigenous people have a higher prevalence or incidence of TBI compared to non-Indigenous people. Limited studies explore culturally appropriate rehabilitation and intervention methods and Indigenous understandings of TBI. It is imperative that future research consider the nature and efficacy of culturally appropriate approaches and their contribution towards better outcomes for Indigenous people with TBI, and their families and communities.

  16. The Effect of Interaction Between White-rot Fungi and Indigenous Microorganisms on Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesche, C. in der [Institute of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Federal Agricultural Research Centre (Germany)], E-mail: carsten.wiesche@fal.de; Martens, R. [Institute of Agroecology, Federal Agricultural Research Centre (Germany); Zadrazil, F. [Institute of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Federal Agricultural Research Centre (Germany)

    2003-05-15

    White-rot fungi applied for soil bioremediation have to compete with indigenous soil microorganisms. The effect of competition on both indigenous soil microflora and white-rot fungi was evaluated with regard to degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with different persistence in soil. Sterile and non-sterile soil was artificially contaminated with {sup 14}C-labeled PAH consisting of three (anthracene), four (pyrene, benz[a]anthracene) and five fused aromatic rings (benzo[a]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene). The two fungi tested,Dichomitus squalens and Pleurotus ostreatus, produced similar amounts of ligninolytic enzymes in soil, but PAH mineralization by P. ostreatus was significantly higher. Compared to the indigenous soil microflora, P.ostreatus mineralized 5-ring PAH to a larger extent, while the indigenous microflora was superior in mineralizing 3-ring and 4-ring PAH. In coculture the special capabilities of both soil microflora and P. ostreatus were partly restricted due to antagonistic interactions, but essentially preserved. Thus, soil inoculation with P. ostreatus significantly increased the mineralization of high-molecular-weight PAH, and at the same time reduced the mineralization of anthracene and pyrene. Regarding the mineralization of low-molecular-weight PAH, the stimulation of indigenous soil microorganisms by straw amendment was more efficient than application of white-rot fungi.

  17. Application of nitrate to enhance biodegradation of gasoline components in soil by indigenous microorganisms under anoxic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su-Cai; Song, Yun; Wang, Dong; Wei, Wen-Xia; Yang, Yan; Men, Bin; Li, Jia-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic/anoxic biodegradation of hydrocarbons offers an attractive approach to the removal of these compounds from polluted environments such as aquifers, aquatic sediments, submerged soils and subsurface soils. The application of nitrate was investigated to accelerate the degradation of gasoline components such as mono-aromatic hydrocarbons and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil by indigenous microorganisms under anoxic condition. The addition of nitrate had little effect on the degradation of mono-aromatic hydrocarbons m- & p-xylene, o-xylene, sec-butylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, but facilitated the degradation of TPH (C6-C12) and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons toluene and ethylbenzene markedly. Furthermore, the more nitrate added, the higher the percentage of toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12) degraded after 180 days of anoxic incubation. Microorganisms capable of degrading toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12) with nitrate as the electron acceptor under anaerobic/anoxic condition are composed predominantly of Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- or Delta-proteobacteria. Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria were the main components of indigenous microorganisms, and accounted for 83-100% of the total amount of indigenous microorganisms in soil used in this study. Furthermore, the total amount of indigenous microorganisms increased with nitrate added. The addition of nitrate stimulated the growth of indigenous microorganisms, and therefore facilitated the degradation of toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12).

  18. Indigenous participation and representation in Venezuelan electoral processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando ANGOSTO FERRÁNDEZ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the Venezuelan regional elections of 2008 as a contextual event for the analysis of electoral strategies and results associated with the indigenous representation. Three factors intertwined in the electoral moment are analyzed: 1. the existence of minimum guaranteed representation for indigenous population in legislative organs; 2. the participation of indigenous candidates and electors; 3. the maneuvers of political parties and civil organizations that attempt to channel and/or benefit from such indigenous representation and participation. The description of the electoral context facilitates the identification of factors that, beyond the normative structure of the State, condition the agency of individuals and parties involved in electoral processes. Among those factors are the symbolic value of indigeneity in the current process of national identity re-definition, the interest of political parties in controlling the vote of the indigenous representation and the tendency towards the consolidation of professionalized elites within the indigenous activism.

  19. The indigenous space and marginalized peoples in the United Nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens

    For more than 20 years, Jens Dahl has observed and now analyzed how a relatively independent space, the Indigenous Space, has been constructed within the confines of the United Nations. In the UN, indigenous peoples have achieved more than any other group of people, minorities included. The book...... traces this to the ability of indigenous peoples to create consensus among themselves; the establishment of an indigenous caucus; and the construction of a global indigenousness in a continuously developing process in which contentious relationships and symbols have been constructed, reformulated......, negotiated and re-negotiated internally and with the states. In this process 'indigenous peoples' developed as a category and an evolving concept. Dahl looks into the ability of different indigenous representatives to make an impact on the UN processes and use achievements for purposes at home. Combining...

  20. Using Modern Technologies to Capture and Share Indigenous Astronomical Knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Nakata, N M; Warren, J; Byrne, A; Pagnucco, M; Harley, R; Venugopal, S; Thorpe, K; Neville, R; Bolt, R

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous Knowledge is important for Indigenous communities across the globe and for the advancement of our general scientific knowledge. In particular, Indigenous astronomical knowledge integrates many aspects of Indigenous Knowledge, including seasonal calendars, navigation, food economics, law, ceremony, and social structure. We aim to develop innovative ways of capturing, managing, and disseminating Indigenous astronomical knowledge for Indigenous communities and the general public for the future. Capturing, managing, and disseminating this knowledge in the digital environment poses a number of challenges, which we aim to address using a collaborative project involving experts in the higher education, library, and industry sectors. Using Microsoft's WorldWide Telescope and Rich Interactive Narratives technologies, we propose to develop software, media design, and archival management solutions to allow Indigenous communities to share their astronomical knowledge with the world on their terms and in a cult...

  1. The Portrayal of Indigenous Health in Selected Australian Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Stoneham

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that health outcomes for Australian Indigenous peoples are lower than those of non-Indigenous Australians. Research suggests negative media in relation to Indigenous Australians perpetuates racist stereotypes among the wider population and impacts on the health of Indigenous Australians. This study examined the media portrayal of Indigenous Australian public health issues in selected media over a twelve month period and found that, overwhelmingly, the articles were negative in their portrayal of Indigenous health. A total of 74 percent of the coverage of Australian Indigenous related articles were negative, 15 percent were positive, and 11 percent were neutral. The most common negative subject descriptors related to alcohol, child abuse, petrol sniffing, violence, suicide, deaths in custody, and crime.

  2. CONTEMPORARY INDIGENOUS LITERATURE: FORMS AND CONTENTS IN THE POETRY AND PROSE OF THE II LITERARY PARTY OF INDIGENOUS POETICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Goldemberg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing the forms and contents of the presentations made by indigenous performers and writers at the I Literary Party of Indigenous Poetics, this article exposes the challenges faced by traditional genre theories in tackling indigenous narratives and analyses how this “crisis” contributes to widening hierarchical and Western biased conceptions. On a stage open to contemporary indigenous expression, as is the literary party, the concepts of performance and storytelling, with the social function of maintaining tradition, continuous learning and transformation, better define this indigenous expression.

  3. Dentistry students' perceptions about an extramural experience with a Brazilian indigenous community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgarelli, Alexandre Favero; Roperto, Renato Cassio; Mestriner, Soraya Fernandes; Mestriner, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate dentistry students' perceptions about an extramural activity designed to deliver dental care to an indigenous community. This was a qualitative investigation involving 4 students of dentistry who had just had the experience of delivering treatment to indigenous Brazilian people. These students answered questions about the relevance of the experience to their personal and professional lives. We performed Content Analysis to data treatment and it was analysed by Social Representation Theory. Two social representations were reached: a) Being capable to promote oral health; b) Facing human feeling and respect each other. We concluded that participation in an extramural project improves the students' understanding of primary health care in dentistry. Such experiences help students develop a sense of cultural respect, comprehensive care, and to understand patients in their totality as social beings with their own values, beliefs, and attitudes regarding oral health care.

  4. Antifungal Activity of Selected Indigenous Pseudomonas and Bacillus from the Soybean Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, M.; Yaryura, P. M.; Montecchia, M. S.; Hernández, A. I.; Correa, O. S.; Pucheu, N. L.; Kerber, N. L.; García, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate and select indigenous soil Pseudomonas and Bacillus bacteria capable of developing multiple mechanisms of action related to the biocontrol of phytopathogenic fungi affecting soybean crops. The screening procedure consisted of antagonism tests against a panel of phytopathogenic fungi, taxonomic identification, detection by PCR of several genes related to antifungal activity, in vitro detection of the antifungal products, and root colonization assays. Two isolates, identified and designated as Pseudomonas fluorescens BNM296 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BNM340, were selected for further studies. These isolates protected plants against the damping-off caused by Pythium ultimum and were able to increase the seedling emergence rate after inoculation of soybean seeds with each bacterium. Also, the shoot nitrogen content was higher in plants when seeds were inoculated with BNM296. The polyphasic approach of this work allowed us to select two indigenous bacterial strains that promoted the early development of soybean plants. PMID:20016811

  5. Mycotoxins and cyanogenic glycosides in staple foods of three indigenous people of the Colombian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Gonzalo J; Krska, Rudolf; Sulyok, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the incidence and levels of mycotoxins in the main staple foods of three indigenous people of the Colombian Amazon. A total of 20 corn, 24 rice and 59 cassava samples were analysed by a multi-analyte liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method covering the major classes of mycotoxins. In addition, cassava samples were also analysed for cyanogenic glycosides. The indigenous Amazon communities tested are exposed to potentially carcinogenic mycotoxins (particularly aflatoxins), as well as other mycotoxins, mainly through the intake of locally grown corn. Citrinin content in this corn was unusually high and has not been reported elsewhere. Two cassava samples contained high levels of cyanogenic glycosides. It is strongly recommended not to grow corn in the Amazon but instead purchase it from vendors capable of guaranteeing mycotoxin levels below the maximum allowable concentration in Colombia.

  6. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  7. The development of capability indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anand, Paul; Hunter, Graham; Carter, Ian; Dowding, Keith; Guala, Francesco; Van Hees, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This paper is motivated by sustained interest in the capabilities approach to welfare economics combined with the paucity of economic statistics that measure capabilities at the individual level. Specifically, it takes a much discussed account of the normatively desirable capabilities constitutive

  8. The Capability to Hold Property

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, Rutger

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the question of whether a capability theory of justice (such as that of Martha Nussbaum) should accept a basic “capability to hold property.” Answering this question is vital for bridging the gap between abstract capability theories of justice and their institutional

  9. Characteristics of suicide mortality among indigenous and non-indigenous people in Roraima, Brazil, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Maximiliano Loiola Ponte de; Onety, Ricardo Tadeu da Silva

    2017-01-01

    to describe suicide characteristics and mortality rates among indigenous and non-indigenous people in Roraima, Brazil. descriptive study using data from the Mortality Information System (SIM) about the suicides in individuals over 10 years old, recorded in the period from 2009 to 2013; suicide mortality rates were adjusted by sex and age. 170 suicide cases were reported, being 17.1% among indigenous people; median ages were 24 years among indigenous and 29 among non-indigenous people; four municipalities concentrated 25/29 of the suicides among indigenous people; the 141 suicides among non-indigenous people were distributed in 13/15 municipalities in the state; suicide mortality rates were 15.0/100,000 among indigenous people and 8.6/100,000 among non-indigenous people. ethnic-racial peculiarities stood out in suicide mortality; among the indigenous people, rates were higher, younger ages prevailed and deaths were concentrated in a smaller number of municipalities, when compared to non-indigenous people.

  10. The magnitude of Indigenous and non-Indigenous oral health inequalities in Brazil, New Zealand and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Helena S; Haag, Dandara G; Kapellas, Kostas; Arantes, Rui; Peres, Marco A; Thomson, W M; Jamieson, Lisa M

    2017-10-01

    To compare the magnitude of relative oral health inequalities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous persons from Brazil, New Zealand and Australia. Data were from surveys in Brazil (2010), New Zealand (2009) and Australia (2004-06 and 2012). Participants were aged 35-44 years and 65-74 years. Indigenous and non-Indigenous inequalities were estimated by prevalence ratios (PR) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for sex, age and income. Outcomes included inadequate dentition, untreated dental caries, periodontal disease and the prevalence of "fair" or "poor" self-rated oral health in Australia and New Zealand, and satisfaction with mouth/teeth in Brazil (SROH). Irrespective of country, Indigenous persons had worse oral health than their non-Indigenous counterparts in all indicators. The magnitude of these ratios was greatest among Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, who, after adjustments, had 2.77 times the prevalence of untreated dental caries (95% CI 1.76, 4.37), 5.14 times the prevalence of fair/poor SROH (95% CI 2.53, 10.43). Indigenous people had poorer oral health than their non-Indigenous counterparts, regardless of setting. The magnitude of the relative inequalities was greatest among Indigenous Australians for untreated dental decay and poor SROH. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. MNE Entrepreneurial Capabilities at Intermediate Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoenen, Anne K.; Nell, Phillip Christopher; Ambos, Björn

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the entrepreneurial capabilities of MNE units at intermediate geographical levels, between the local subsidiary level and global corporate headquarters. In our conceptual development, we build on the entrepreneurship and MNE embeddedness literature to explain how MNE units...... at intermediate geographical levels differ from local subsidiaries and global corporate headquarters, and why those differences are important. We illustrate our arguments using data on European regional headquarters (RHQs). We find that RHQs' entrepreneurial capabilities depend on their external embeddedness...... and on the heterogeneous information that is generated through dissimilar markets within the region. Our study opens up for an interesting discussion of the independence of these mechanisms. In sum, we contribute to the understanding of the entrepreneurial role of intermediate units in general and RHQs in particular....

  12. Atmospheric Dispersion Capability for T2VOC

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric transport by variable-K theory dispersion has been added to T2VOC. The new code, T2VOCA, models flow and transport in the subsurface identically to T2VOC, but includes also the capability for modeling passive multicomponent variable-K theory dispersion in an atmospheric region assumed to be flat, horizontal, and with a logarithmic wind profile. The specification of the logarithmic wind profile in the T2VOC input file is automated through the use of a build code called ATMDISP...

  13. Space Technologies for Enhancing the Resilience and Sustainability of Indigenous Reindeer Husbandry in the Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Yurchak, Boris S.; Sleptsov, Yuri A.; Turi, Johan Mathis; Mathlesen, Svein D.

    2005-01-01

    To adapt successfully to the major changes - climate, environment, economic, social and industrial - which have taken place across the Arctic. in recent years, indigenous communities such as reindeer herders must become increasingly empowered with the best available technologies to add to their storehouse of traditional knowledge. Remotely-sensed data and observations are providing increased capabilities for monitoring, risk mapping, and surveillance of parameters critical to the characterization of pasture quality and migratory routes, such as vegetation distribution, snow cover, infrastructure development, and pasture damages due to fires. This paper describes a series of remote sensing capabilities, which are useful to reindeer husbandry, and gives the results of the first year of a project, "Reindeer Mapper", which is a remote sensing and GIs-based system to bring together space technologies with indigenous knowledge for sustainable reindeer husbandry in the Russian Arctic. In this project, reindeer herders and scientists are joining together to utilize technologies to create a system for collecting and sharing space-based and indigenous knowledge in the Russian Arctic. The "Reindeer Mapper" system will help make technologies more readily available to the herder community for observing, data collection and analysis, monitoring, sharing, communications, and dissemination of information - to be integrated with traditional, local knowledge. This paper describes some of the technologies which comprise the system including an intranet system to enable to the team members to work together and share information electronically, remote sensing data for monitoring environmental parameters important to reindeer husbandry (e.g., SAR, Landsat, AVHRR, MODIS), indigenous knowledge about important environmental parameters, acquisition of ground- based measurements, and the integration of all useful data sets for more informed decision-making.

  14. Capability-based computer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Henry M

    2014-01-01

    Capability-Based Computer Systems focuses on computer programs and their capabilities. The text first elaborates capability- and object-based system concepts, including capability-based systems, object-based approach, and summary. The book then describes early descriptor architectures and explains the Burroughs B5000, Rice University Computer, and Basic Language Machine. The text also focuses on early capability architectures. Dennis and Van Horn's Supervisor; CAL-TSS System; MIT PDP-1 Timesharing System; and Chicago Magic Number Machine are discussed. The book then describes Plessey System 25

  15. The Prevalence and Causes of Vision Loss in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians: The National Eye Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Joshua; Xie, Jing; Keel, Stuart; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Sandhu, Sukhpal Singh; Ang, Ghee Soon; Fan Gaskin, Jennifer; Crowston, Jonathan; Bourne, Rupert; Taylor, Hugh R; Dirani, Mohamed

    2017-12-01

    To conduct a nationwide survey on the prevalence and causes of vision loss in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Nationwide, cross-sectional, population-based survey. Indigenous Australians aged 40 years or older and non-Indigenous Australians aged 50 years and older. Multistage random-cluster sampling was used to select 3098 non-Indigenous Australians and 1738 Indigenous Australians from 30 sites across 5 remoteness strata (response rate of 71.5%). Sociodemographic and health data were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Trained examiners conducted standardized eye examinations, including visual acuity, perimetry, slit-lamp examination, intraocular pressure, and fundus photography. The prevalence and main causes of bilateral presenting vision loss (visual acuity causes of vision loss. The overall prevalence of vision loss in Australia was 6.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4-7.8). The prevalence of vision loss was 11.2% (95% CI, 9.5-13.1) in Indigenous Australians and 6.5% (95% CI, 5.3-7.9) in non-Indigenous Australians. Vision loss was 2.8 times more prevalent in Indigenous Australians than in non-Indigenous Australians after age and gender adjustment (17.7%, 95% CI, 14.5-21.0 vs. 6.4%, 95% CI, 5.2-7.6, P causes of vision loss were uncorrected refractive error (61.3%), cataract (13.2%), and age-related macular degeneration (10.3%). In Indigenous Australians, the leading causes of vision loss were uncorrected refractive error (60.8%), cataract (20.1%), and diabetic retinopathy (5.2%). In non-Indigenous Australians, increasing age (odds ratio [OR], 1.72 per decade) and having not had an eye examination within the past year (OR, 1.61) were risk factors for vision loss. Risk factors in Indigenous Australians included older age (OR, 1.61 per decade), remoteness (OR, 2.02), gender (OR, 0.60 for men), and diabetes in combination with never having had an eye examination (OR, 14.47). Vision loss is more prevalent in Indigenous Australians

  16. Transforming organizational capabilities in strategizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Offshored and networked enterprises are becoming an important if not leading organizational form and this development seriously challenges their organizational capabilities. More specifically, over the last years, SMEs have commenced entering these kinds of arrangements. As the organizational...... capabilities of SMEs are limited at the outset, even more emphasis is needed regarding the issues of developing relevant organizational capabilities. This paper aims at investigating how capabilities evolve during an offshoring process of more than 5 years in two Danish SMEs, i.e. not only short- but long......-term evolvements within the companies. We develop our framework of understanding organizational capabilities drawing on dynamic capability, relational capability and strategy as practice concepts, appreciating the performative aspects of developing new routines. Our two cases are taken from one author’s Ph...

  17. Currículo y construcción de identidad en contextos indígenas chilenos Currículo e construção de identidade em contextos indígenas chilenos Curriculum and Building Identity in Chilean Indigenous Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Rolando Turra-Díaz

    2012-04-01

    processos pedagógicos;pelo contrário, implementam em plenitude os programas de estudos ministeriais que consideram escassamente as formas culturais mapuche em sua proposta curricular.The results of a study on the construction and definition of curricula for education in history and social sciences in an intercultural indigenous context (Arauco Province, Chile are presented in this article. The effective incorporation of Mapuche cultural knowledge into school curricula was examined through an empirical-documentary study founded on the declaration of recognition of cultural diversity and the promotion of identity affirmation proposed in the principle guidelines to curriculum design that emerged from the educational reform in Chile at the end of the nineties. The results show educational communities in intercultural indigenous contexts have yet to design curricula of their own that incorporate the culture of indigenous-Mapuche students in their learning processes. On the contrary, they fully implement the ministry's syllabuses, which give little if any consideration to the Mapuche culture in the proposed curricula.

  18. Resource-Based Capability on Development Knowledge Management Capabilities of Coastal Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teniwut, Roberto M. K.; Hasyim, Cawalinya L.; Teniwut, Wellem A.

    2017-10-01

    Building sustainable knowledge management capabilities in the coastal area might face a whole new challenge since there are many intangible factors involved from openness on new knowledge, access and ability to use the latest technology to the various local wisdom that still in place. The aimed of this study was to identify and analyze the resource-based condition of coastal community in this area to have an empirical condition of tangible and intangible infrastructure on developing knowledge management capability coastal community in Southeast Maluku, Indonesia. We used qualitative and quantitative analysis by depth interview and questionnaire for collecting the data with multiple linear regression as our analysis method. The result provided the information on current state of resource-based capability of a coastal community in this Southeast Maluku to build a sustainability model of knowledge management capabilities especially on utilization marine and fisheries resources. The implication of this study can provide an empirical information for government, NGO and research institution to dictate on how they conducted their policy and program on developing coastal community region.

  19. Building sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mass Media

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available proactive,” Van Wyk says. “Demand for greener buildings is slowly beginning to increase among tenants. If asset managers do not take action, the value of assets will depreciate rapidly, and this will make the building obsolete within five years...

  20. Evidence for a comprehensive approach to Aboriginal tobacco control to maintain the decline in smoking: an overview of reviews among Indigenous peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Catherine; Perlen, Susan; Brennan, Sue; Rychetnik, Lucie; Thomas, David; Maddox, Raglan; Alam, Noore; Banks, Emily; Wilson, Andrew; Eades, Sandra

    2017-07-10

    Tobacco smoking is a leading cause of disease and premature mortality among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians. While the daily smoking prevalence among Indigenous Australians has declined significantly from 49% in 2001, it remains about three times higher than that of non-Indigenous Australians (39 and 14%, respectively, for age ≥15 years in 2014-15). This overview of systematic reviews aimed to synthesise evidence about reducing tobacco consumption among Indigenous peoples using a comprehensive framework for Indigenous tobacco control in Australia comprised of the National Tobacco Strategy (NTS) and National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan (NATSIHP) principles and priorities. MEDLINE, EMBASE, systematic review and Indigenous health databases were searched (2000 to Jan 2016) for reviews examining the effects of tobacco control interventions among Indigenous peoples. Two reviewers independently screened reviews, extracted data, and assessed review quality using Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews. Data were synthesised narratively by framework domain. Reporting followed the PRISMA statement. Twenty-one reviews of varying quality were included. There was generally limited Indigenous-specific evidence of effective interventions for reducing smoking; however, many reviewers recommended multifaceted interventions which incorporate Indigenous leadership, partnership and engagement and cultural tailoring. Under the NTS priority areas, reviewers reported evidence for brief smoking cessation interventions and pharmacological support, mass media campaigns (on knowledge and attitudes) and reducing affordability and regulation of tobacco sales. Aspects of intervention implementation related to the NATSIHP domains were less well described and evidence was limited; however, reviewers suggested that cultural tailoring, holistic approaches and building workforce capacity were important strategies to address

  1. Health needs of Australian Indigenous young people entering detention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolan, Ivan; Najman, Jackob M; Cherney, Adrian

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether there are different health needs associated with differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth in detention in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. All records of young people (aged 10 to 21 years) taken into detention in Brisbane Queensland over the period 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2009 were reviewed, and data were extracted documenting the mental health and related behaviours of those referred to the Mental Health, Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Service. International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems - Tenth Revision (ICD-10) criteria were applied to a clinical interview. ICD-10 diagnostic outcomes and reason for referral are presented by Indigenous status and age. Young male (under 14 years of age) Indigenous respondents are substantially over-represented in youth in detention. Indigenous youth in detention are disproportionately referred and diagnosed with a substance use problem. Referral and diagnosis of substance use problems was not as commonly found for non-Indigenous youth. Young Indigenous persons are substantially over-represented in those taken into detention in Queensland. This study shows significant differences in relation to mental health and substance use assessment outcomes for Indigenous and non-Indigenous young people in youth detention in Queensland. Further research focusing on service delivery for Indigenous young people should focus on their specific needs. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. The forsaken mental health of the Indigenous Peoples - a moral case of outrageous exclusion in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maldonado-Bouchard Sioui

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health is neglected in most parts of the world. For the Indigenous Peoples of Latin America, the plight is even more severe as there are no specific mental health services designed for them altogether. Given the high importance of mental health for general health, the status quo is unacceptable. Lack of research on the subject of Indigenous Peoples' mental health means that statistics are virtually unavailable. To illustrate their mental health status, one can nonetheless point to the high rates of poverty and extreme poverty in their communities, overcrowded housing, illiteracy, and lack of basic sanitary services such as water, electricity and sewage. At the dawn of the XXI century, they remain poor, powerless, and voiceless. They remain severely excluded from mainstream society despite being the first inhabitants of this continent and being an estimated of 48 million people. This paper comments, specifically, on the limited impact of the Pan American Health Organization's mental health initiative on the Indigenous Peoples of Latin America. Discussion The Pan American Health Organization's sponsored workshop "Programas y Servicios de Salud Mental en Communidades Indígenas" [Mental Health Programs and Services for the Indigenous Communities] in the city of Santa Cruz, Bolivia on July16 - 18, 1998, appeared promising. However, eleven years later, no specific mental health program has been designed nor developed for the Indigenous Peoples in Latin America. This paper makes four specific recommendations for improvements in the approach of the Pan American Health Organization: (1 focus activities on what can be done; (2 build partnerships with the Indigenous Peoples; (3 consider traditional healers as essential partners in any mental health effort; and (4 conduct basic research on the mental health status of the Indigenous Peoples prior to the programming of any mental health service. Summary The persistent neglect of

  3. The forsaken mental health of the Indigenous Peoples - a moral case of outrageous exclusion in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incayawar, Mario; Maldonado-Bouchard, Sioui

    2009-10-29

    Mental health is neglected in most parts of the world. For the Indigenous Peoples of Latin America, the plight is even more severe as there are no specific mental health services designed for them altogether. Given the high importance of mental health for general health, the status quo is unacceptable. Lack of research on the subject of Indigenous Peoples' mental health means that statistics are virtually unavailable. To illustrate their mental health status, one can nonetheless point to the high rates of poverty and extreme poverty in their communities, overcrowded housing, illiteracy, and lack of basic sanitary services such as water, electricity and sewage. At the dawn of the XXI century, they remain poor, powerless, and voiceless. They remain severely excluded from mainstream society despite being the first inhabitants of this continent and being an estimated of 48 million people. This paper comments, specifically, on the limited impact of the Pan American Health Organization's mental health initiative on the Indigenous Peoples of Latin America. The Pan American Health Organization's sponsored workshop "Programas y Servicios de Salud Mental en Communidades Indígenas" [Mental Health Programs and Services for the Indigenous Communities] in the city of Santa Cruz, Bolivia on July16 - 18, 1998, appeared promising. However, eleven years later, no specific mental health program has been designed nor developed for the Indigenous Peoples in Latin America. This paper makes four specific recommendations for improvements in the approach of the Pan American Health Organization: (1) focus activities on what can be done; (2) build partnerships with the Indigenous Peoples; (3) consider traditional healers as essential partners in any mental health effort; and (4) conduct basic research on the mental health status of the Indigenous Peoples prior to the programming of any mental health service. The persistent neglect of the Indigenous Peoples' mental health in Latin America

  4. Tuberculosis in indigenous children in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Gava

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assess the epidemiological aspects of tuberculosis in Brazilian indigenous children and actions to control it. METHODS: An epidemiological study was performed with 356 children from 0 to 14 years of age in Rondônia State, Amazon, Brazil, during the period 1997-2006. Cases of TB reported to the Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System were divided into indigenous and non-indigenous categories and analyzed according to sex, age group, place of residence, clinical form, diagnostic tests and treatment outcome. A descriptive analysis of cases and hypothesis test (χ² was carried out to verify if there were differences in the proportions of illness between the groups investigated. RESULTS: A total of 356 TB cases were identified (125 indigenous, 231 non-indigenous of which 51.4% of the cases were in males. In the indigenous group, 60.8% of the cases presented in children aged 0-4 years old. The incidence mean was much higher among indigenous; in 2001, 1,047.9 cases/100,000 inhabitants were reported in children aged < 5 years. Pulmonary TB was reported in more than 80% of the cases, and in both groups over 70% of the cases were cured. Cultures and histopathological exams were performed on only 10% of the patients. There were 3 cases of TB/HIV co-infection in the non-indigenous group and none in the indigenous group. The case detection rate was classified as insufficient or fair in more than 80% of the indigenous population notifications, revealing that most of the diagnoses were performed based on chest x-ray. CONCLUSIONS: The approach used in this study proved useful in demonstrating inequalities in health between indigenous and non-indigenous populations and was superior to the conventional analyses performed by the surveillance services, drawing attention to the need to improve childhood TB diagnosis among the indigenous population.

  5. Indigenous property rights and river management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, J

    2001-01-01

    The presence of indigenous property rights and interests arising from the survival of native title in Australia presents unique issues in the management of rivers and riverine lands. Existing common law and statutory tidal and non-tidal rights are a complex overlay of public and private property rights which are themselves undergoing significant change through the commodification of many natural resources by Commonwealth and State governments, such as marine species stock and non-tidal water. The melding of indigenous values and management practices with existing management regimes for rivers and riverine lands offers considerable potential for both sustainability of resource utilisation, and respect and recognition of native title with resultant predicted benefits in the vexed area of compensation.

  6. Early childhood caries in indigenous communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The oral health of Indigenous children of Canada (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) and the United States (American Indian, Alaska Native) is a major child health issue: there is a high prevalence of early childhood caries (ECC) and resulting adverse health effects in this community, as well as high rates and costs of restorative and surgical treatments under general anesthesia. ECC is an infectious disease that is influenced by multiple factors, including socioeconomic determinants, and requires a combination of approaches for improvement. This statement includes recommendations for preventive oral health and clinical care for young infants and pregnant women by primary health care providers, community-based health-promotion initiatives, oral health workforce and access issues, and advocacy for community water fluoridation and fluoride-varnish program access. Further community-based research on the epidemiology, prevention, management, and microbiology of ECC in Indigenous communities would be beneficial.

  7. Critical Indigenous Studies: From Difference to Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Andersen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of the discipline of Native Studies (in its various guises have attempted to produce a methodologically and theoretically distinctive body of scholarship to justify its existence in the field of academia. Critiquing Duane Champagne’s recent article published in a flagship journal for North American Native Studies, I argue that while establishing Native Studies as a discipline has little or nothing to do with securing Native Studies departments on university campuses, a place nonetheless exists for these departments. Marrying Native Studies literature on the importance of producing tribally specific knowledge with Australian-based Whiteness Studies literature focusing on the utility of indigeneity for denaturalising white privilege, I argue that the discipline of Native Studies should justify itself departmentally by teaching about the complex forms of local indigeneity upon which white privilege is reproduced.

  8. Indigenous tooth powders = covert lead poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Sapna; Shubha, A B; Rao, B Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to measure the concentration of lead in various indigenous preparations of tooth powders available and used locally in and around Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. Seven different brands of tooth powders manufactured and/or marketed locally were obtained from stores all over Udaipur city. Some home-made powders commonly used for cleaning teeth were also collected. The tooth powders were analyzed for lead content by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. All tooth powders tested were found to contain high levels of lead ranging from 21 ppm to 82 ppm, above the maximum permissible level of 20 ppm prescribed by the Bureau of Indian Standards. Indigenous tooth powders contain high levels of lead and thus may be a source of lead poisoning that is often overlooked.

  9. THE REPRESENTATION INDIGENOUS GUARANI MEMOIR IN BOOKS

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    Caroline Hermínio Maldonado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The works of authors memoir, researched this, depict the lifestyles Guarani and conflicts involving territorial disputes between the eighteenth and mid-twentieth century. They report experiences and seek their opinion about the relationship between indigenous people and migrants, as the authors themselves, who came to southern Ontario then on business and looking for productive land. From these works it is understood as the Indians managed to hide the regional history and justify their judgments about this population without considering the culture and without social organization. The research is to understand the phenomenon of invisibility to which they are subject, not only the Guarani, but the other indigenous peoples today the state of Mato Grosso do Sul.

  10. Correlates of preclinical cardiovascular disease in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians: a case control study

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    Shaw A Andrew

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high frequency of premature death from cardiovascular disease in indigenous Australians is often attributed to the high prevalence of risk factors, especially type II diabetes mellitus (DM. We evaluated the relationship of ethnicity to atherosclerotic burden, as evidenced by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT, independent of risk factor status. Methods We studied 227 subjects (147 men; 50 ± 13 y: 119 indigenous subjects with (IDM, n = 54, and without DM (InDM, n = 65, 108 Caucasian subjects with (CDM, n = 52, and without DM (CnDM, n = 56. IMT was measured according to standard methods and compared with clinical data and cardiovascular risk factors. Results In subjects both with and without DM, IMT was significantly greater in indigenous subjects. There were no significant differences in gender, body mass index (BMI, systolic blood pressure (SBP, or diastolic blood pressure (DBP between any of the groups, and subjects with DM showed no difference in plasma HbA1c. Cardiovascular risk factors were significantly more prevalent in indigenous subjects. Nonetheless, ethnicity (β = -0.34; p Conclusion Ethnicity appears to be an independent correlate of preclinical cardiovascular disease, even after correction for the high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in indigenous Australians. Standard approaches to control currently known risk factors are vital to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease, but in themselves may be insufficient to fully address the high prevalence in this population.

  11. INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES & PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE IN INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN THE SOUTHERN OF MATO GROSSO DO SUL

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    Marilze Tavares

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most part of indigenous adults in the Guarani communities of Mato Grosso do Sul is bilingual and has one of the indigenous languages, Guarani Kaiowá or Guarani Ñandeva, as their mother tongue and Portuguese as a second language; only a few elderly and young children still who do not go to school speak only the mother tongue. In this paper, we try to verify which impression the speakers have for each of these languages and the importance they attribute to each one of them. Data analysis showed that the mother tongue is closely related to the expression of their traditional culture; in general, the indigenous claim their languages are being transmitted to new generations, and therefore preserved in an appropriate manner in the two communities. The Portuguese is also considered very important by all informants and the main motivation for its teaching/learning is the need to contact with the non-indigenous population. These results may help us understand issues related to the future of these indigenous languages and Portuguese language in the investigated communities.

  12. Integrated Research and Capacity Building in Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemann, R. J.; Lerner-Lam, A.; Nyblade, A.

    2008-05-01

    There have been special opportunities over the past several years to improve the ways that newly-constructed geophysical observatories in Southeast Asia and the Americas are linked with educational and civil institutions. Because these opportunities have been only partially fulfilled, there remains the possibility that new networks will not fully address desired goals or even lose operational capabilities. In contrast, the AfricaArray project continues to progress towards goals for linkages among education, research, mitigation and observatories. With support from the Office of International Science and Education at the US National Science Foundation, we convened a workshop to explore lessons learned from the AfricaArray experience and their relevance to network development opportunities in other regions. We found closer parallels than we expected between geophysical infrastructure in the predominantly low income countries of Africa with low risk of geophysical disasters and the mostly middle-income countries of Southeast Asia and the Americas with high risk of geophysical disasters. Except in larger countries of South America, workshop participants reported that there are very few geophysicists engaged in research and observatory operations, that geophysical education programs are nearly non-existent even at the undergraduate university level, and that many monitoring agencies continue to focus on limited missions even though closer relationships researchers could facilitate new services that would make important contributions to disaster mitigation and sustainable operations. Workshop participants began discussing plans for international research collaborations that, unlike many projects of even the recent past, would include long-term capacity building and disaster mitigation among their goals. Specific project objectives would include national or regional hazard mapping, development of indigenous education programs, training to address the needs of local

  13. african indigenous and traditional vegetables in tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    has been shown in a study in Tanzania that people in the lowest quintile ate less than half (154 g day-1) of the vegetables compared to those in the highest quintile (317 g day-1). The terms “indigenous” and “traditional” are both used in this paper, as the term indigenous alone can be limiting. Ambrose-Oji (2012) discusses ...

  14. Nutritional composition of minor indigenous fruits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shajib, Md. Tariqul Islam; Kawser, Mahbuba; Miah, Md. Nuruddin

    2013-01-01

    In line of the development of a food composition database for Bangladesh, 10 minor indigenous fruits were analysed for their nutrient composition comprising ascorbic acid, carotenoids and mineral values. Nutrient data obtained have been compared with published data reported in different literatures...... values of these minor fruits would make awareness among the people for their mass consumption for healthy life and to grow more minor fruit trees from extinction in order to maintain biodiversity....

  15. Cryopreservation of South African indigenous goat semen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Semen was thereafter cryopreserved in straws using liquid nitrogen. Data were analysed using Stata® V10 software. South African indigenous goats had total sperm cell motility rate of 83.1%, progressive sperm cell motility of 49.3% and non-progressive sperm cell motility of 33.9%. Moreover, acidic semen pH of 6.4 and ...

  16. Sustainability and Entrepreneurship: Fostering Indigenous Entrepreneurship in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    OpenAIRE

    Raul Gouvea

    2014-01-01

    This article elaborates on the diverse entrepreneurial activities of indigenous communities in the Brazilian Amazon region. This article argues that further sustainability of the Brazilian Amazonian region is intrinsically linked to the entrepreneurial activities by indigenous communities in the Amazon region. Amazonian indigenous communities are under increasing economic and social pressure. Fostering sustainable indigenous entrepreneurship in these disadvantaged indigenous communities has t...

  17. [Pott's disease in a Colombian indigenous man].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Leonardo F; Murcia, Martha I; Arias, Jaime; Sánchez, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 2 million people die each year from tuberculosis. One third of the world´s population is estimated to be infected with the tuberculosis bacillus, although only 5-10% will develop the disease in their lifetime. The disease progression risk depends on endogenous and exogenous factors. Indigenous communities are a high-risk group for infection and development of tuberculosis. In addition to factors such as geographical isolation, social and cultural neglect and malnutrition, susceptibility to genetic polymorphisms has been identified in them. Spinal tuberculosis is the most destructive form of the disease, which represents approximately half of all cases of skeletal tuberculosis. The case of an HIV negative, indigenous Colombian man is presented. His diagnosis was done based on clinical and image findings, and it was confirmed with the rapid molecular assay Genotype MTBDRplus® and IS6110 PCR.The culture in solid media was negative after 16 weeks. We briefly discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment. Finally, we comment on some aspects of the situation of tuberculosis among indigenous Colombian communities.

  18. Origin of Volatiles in Earth: Indigenous Versus Exogenous Sources Based on Highly Siderophile, Volatile Siderophile, and Light Volatile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K. M.; Marin, N.; Nickodem, K.

    2015-01-01

    Origin of Earth's volatiles has traditionally been ascribed to late accretion of material after major differentiation events - chondrites, comets, ice or other exogenous sources. A competing theory is that the Earth accreted its volatiles as it was built, thus water and other building blocks were present early and during differentiation and core formation (indigenous). Here we discuss geochemical evidence from three groups of elements that suggests Earth's volatiles were acquired during accretion and did not require additional sources after differentiation.

  19. Mobility aspirations and indigenous belonging among Chakma students in Dhaka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Jacco; Gerharz, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, indigenous people from the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) in South-east Bangladesh have experienced increased social and spatial mobility. This article investigates how indigenous students from the CHT region who have migrated to Dhaka redefine indigenous belonging. By highlighting...... as well as the strategies employed by the students to counter them. Furthermore, the paper illustrates how indigenous students negotiate urban lifestyles and redefine modernity and indigeneity simultaneously and how migrants face exclusion based on static interpretations of people from the CHT as put...... for higher education to fulfil their aspirations for a better future. The paper also reveals the obstacles students experience in their everyday lives, mainly in the form of stereotypical, often racist talk. It discusses the structural disadvantages indigenous students face as members of ethnic minorities...

  20. Early Vocabulary Development of Australian Indigenous Children: Identifying Strengths

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    Brad M. Farrant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study sought to increase our understanding of the factors involved in the early vocabulary development of Australian Indigenous children. Data from the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children were available for 573 Indigenous children (291 boys who spoke English (M=37.0 months, SD=5.4 months, at wave 3. Data were also available for 86 children (51 boys who spoke an Indigenous language (M=37.1 months, SD=6.0 months, at wave 3. As hypothesised, higher levels of parent-child book reading and having more children’s books in the home were associated with better English vocabulary development. Oral storytelling in Indigenous language was a significant predictor of the size of children’s Indigenous vocabulary.