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Sample records for budworm heliothis virescens

  1. Survival and reproductive capacity of the tobacco budworm, heliothis virescens (lepidoptera:noctuidae), irradiated as diapausing and young nondiapausing pupae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proshold, F.I.; North, D.T.

    1978-01-01

    Pupal survival, mating, and sperm transfer in tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (F.), irradiated as diapause pupae, decreased proportionately with increasing doses of 3, 5, and 7.5 krad. Also, the fertility of tobacco budworms irradiated as nondiapause pupae and of the F 1 progeny of such males decreased with increasing dose. When the female partner received eupyrene sperm, insects irradiated while the pupae were in diapause were fertile as were their progeny. Therefore, it does not appear plausible to irradiate diapause pupae of our strain of tobacco budworms to obtain sterile insects for a release program. (author)

  2. (-)-Germacrene D increases attraction and oviposition by the tobacco budworm moth Heliothis virescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozuraitis, R; Stranden, M; Ramirez, M I; Borg-Karlson, A-K; Mustaparta, H

    2002-07-01

    The sesquiterpene germacrene D (GD) activates a major type of olfactory receptor neuron on the antennae of the heliothine moths. In Heliothis virescens females, 80% of the recordings have shown activity of one neuron type responding with high sensitivity and selectivity to GD. With the aim of determining the behavioural significance of this sesquiterpene, we have used a two-choice wind-tunnel to study the preference of mated H. virescens females for host plants with and without (-)-GD added. Tobacco plants containing dispensers with low release rate of (-)-GD had a greater attractiveness than tobacco plants without this substance. In addition, a significant increase of oviposition was found on the plants with (-)-GD.

  3. The plant sesquiterpene germacrene D specifically activates a major type of antennal receptor neuron of the tobacco budworm moth Heliothis virescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røstelien, T; Borg-Karlson, A K; Fäldt, J; Jacobsson, U; Mustaparta, H

    2000-04-01

    Plants release hundreds of volatiles that are important in interactions with insects or other organisms. However, knowledge is scarce as to which of the compounds are detected by the organism's olfactory receptor neurons. In the present study, single receptor neurons on the antennae of the tobacco budworm moth, Heliothis virescens, were screened for their sensitivities to naturally produced plant volatiles by the use of gas chromatography linked to electrophysiological recordings from single cells (GC-SCR). Plant volatiles, collected by aeration of host and non-host plants, were tested on each receptor neuron via parallel GC-columns. Thus, simultaneous recordings of the gas chromatogram and the neuron responses to each component were obtained. One type of receptor neuron, appearing in 80% of all experiments, responded with high sensitivity and selectivity to one particular component, present in host as well as non-host mixtures. The component, identified as a sesquiterpene hydrocarbon by linked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, was isolated from a sesquiterpene fraction of cubebe oil and identified by NMR as germacrene D. The purified compound was then re-tested via gas chromatography on the same receptor neuron type, verifying the identification. A weaker response to another sesquiterpene hydrocarbon was also recorded.

  4. The biochemical basis for l-canavanine tolerance by the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Melangeli, Coromoto; Rosenthal, Gerald A.; Dalman, Douglas L.

    1997-01-01

    The tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae), a destructive insect pest, is remarkably resistant to l-canavanine, l-2-amino-4-(guanidinooxy)butyric acid, an arginine antimetabolite that is a potent insecticide for nonadapted species. H. virescens employs a constitutive enzyme of the larval gut, known trivially as canavanine hydrolase (CH), to catalyze an irreversible hydrolysis of l-canavanine to l-homoserine and hydroxyguanidine. As such, it represents a new type of hydrolase, one ac...

  5. Perspective of using the sterile insect technique for Tobacco Budworms Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Cotton Bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in cotton crop as an alternative method of control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Gianni Queiroz

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1950s, scientists have used ionizing radiation to sterilize insects, which are released in nature to mate, but without any progeny. Known as the sterile insect technique (TIE), this method of insect control has traditionally used ionizing radiation to sterilize insects, a technique that does not generate residues, and can act in synergy with the other techniques within integrated pest management. For several years, Brazil has been fighting against the increase of pests, introducing new tactics and techniques within the IPM programs, to overcome the resistance of chemical products, such as: reducing the residues of agrochemicals; For some important crops of our country, we have a wide spectrum of pests occurring from the beginning to the end of the harvest, one of them is the cotton crop and among the key pests of this crop, we have some extremely important caterpillars, among them Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa armigera These species are morphologically similar, the second being identified a few years ago in Brazil. There are still no studies in Brazil using TIE as an additional tool for Lepidoptera, therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of doses of gamma radiation in the different phases of the evolutionary cycle of Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa armigera, as well as to evaluate the sterility in generation P And the ability of insects to irradiate with non-irradiated insects. The pupal phase presented the best result because 75 Gy achieved sterility in Heliothis virecens and 100 Gy sterilized Helicoverpa armigera, therefore it contemplated the phase and dose chosen to evaluate the competition between the irradiated insects and the normal insects of both species. Both Heliothis virecens and Helicoverpa armigera presented a satisfactory result, as the irradiated insects managed to significantly reduce the viability of the eggs in a ratio of 9: 1: 1. (author)

  6. Ocorrência de Serratia marcescens bizio sobre lagartas de Heliothis virescens (Fabr. Occurrence of Serratia marcescens bizio on Heliothis virescens (Fabr.

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    Margarida Fumiko Ito

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Observou-se, em laboratório, grande número de lagartas mortas em uma criação de Heliothis virescens (Fabr.. Dessas lagartas, isolou-se uma bactéria, posteriormente identificada como Serratia marcescens Bizio. O presente trabalho registra sua ocorrência e comprova-lhe a patogenicidade sobre aquelas lagartas.A large quantity of dead worms was observed in rearing of Heliothis virescens. A bacteria, later identified as Serratia marcescens Bizio, was isolated from the dead worms. The present work registers the occurrence and confirms the pathogenicity of S. marcescens on H. virescens.

  7. Perspective of using the sterile insect technique for Tobacco Budworms Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Cotton Bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in cotton crop as an alternative method of control; Perspectiva de utilizacao da Tecnica do Inseto Esteril para lagarta da maca Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) e lagarta do velho mundo Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) na cultura do algodoeiro como um metodo alternativo de controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Gianni Queiroz

    2017-07-01

    Since the 1950s, scientists have used ionizing radiation to sterilize insects, which are released in nature to mate, but without any progeny. Known as the sterile insect technique (TIE), this method of insect control has traditionally used ionizing radiation to sterilize insects, a technique that does not generate residues, and can act in synergy with the other techniques within integrated pest management. For several years, Brazil has been fighting against the increase of pests, introducing new tactics and techniques within the IPM programs, to overcome the resistance of chemical products, such as: reducing the residues of agrochemicals; For some important crops of our country, we have a wide spectrum of pests occurring from the beginning to the end of the harvest, one of them is the cotton crop and among the key pests of this crop, we have some extremely important caterpillars, among them Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa armigera These species are morphologically similar, the second being identified a few years ago in Brazil. There are still no studies in Brazil using TIE as an additional tool for Lepidoptera, therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of doses of gamma radiation in the different phases of the evolutionary cycle of Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa armigera, as well as to evaluate the sterility in generation P And the ability of insects to irradiate with non-irradiated insects. The pupal phase presented the best result because 75 Gy achieved sterility in Heliothis virecens and 100 Gy sterilized Helicoverpa armigera, therefore it contemplated the phase and dose chosen to evaluate the competition between the irradiated insects and the normal insects of both species. Both Heliothis virecens and Helicoverpa armigera presented a satisfactory result, as the irradiated insects managed to significantly reduce the viability of the eggs in a ratio of 9: 1: 1. (author)

  8. The biochemical basis for l-canavanine tolerance by the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melangeli, Coromoto; Rosenthal, Gerald A.; Dalman, Douglas L.

    1997-01-01

    The tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae), a destructive insect pest, is remarkably resistant to l-canavanine, l-2-amino-4-(guanidinooxy)butyric acid, an arginine antimetabolite that is a potent insecticide for nonadapted species. H. virescens employs a constitutive enzyme of the larval gut, known trivially as canavanine hydrolase (CH), to catalyze an irreversible hydrolysis of l-canavanine to l-homoserine and hydroxyguanidine. As such, it represents a new type of hydrolase, one acting on oxygen–nitrogen bonds (EC 3.13.1.1). This enzyme has been isolated from the excised gut of H. virescens and purified to homogeneity; it exhibits an apparent Km value for l-canavanine of 1.1 mM and a turnover number of 21.1 μmol·min−1·μmol−1. This enzyme has a mass of 285 kDa and is composed of two subunits with a mass of 50 kDa or 47.5 kDa. CH has a high degree of specificity for l-canavanine as it cannot function effectively with either l-2-amino-5-(guanidinooxy)pentanoate or l-2-amino-3-(guanidinooxy)propionate, the higher or lower homolog of l-canavanine, respectively. l-Canavanine derivatives such as methyl-l-canavanine, or l-canaline and O-ureido-l-homoserine, are not metabolized significantly by CH. PMID:9122181

  9. Gossypol toxicity and detoxification in Helicoverpa armigera and Heliothis virescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krempl, Corinna; Heidel-Fischer, Hanna M; Jiménez-Alemán, Guillermo Hugo; Reichelt, Michael; Menezes, Riya Christina; Boland, Wilhelm; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G; Joußen, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    Gossypol is a polyphenolic secondary metabolite produced by cotton plants, which is toxic to many organisms. Gossypol's aldehyde groups are especially reactive, forming Schiff bases with amino acids of proteins and cross-linking them, inhibiting enzyme activities and contributing to toxicity. Very little is known about gossypol's mode of action and its detoxification in cotton-feeding insects that can tolerate certain concentrations of this compound. Here, we tested the toxicity of gossypol and a gossypol derivative lacking free aldehyde groups (SB-gossypol) toward Helicoverpa armigera and Heliothis virescens, two important pests on cotton plants. Larval feeding studies with these two species on artificial diet supplemented with gossypol or SB-gossypol revealed no detectable toxicity of gossypol, when the aldehyde groups were absent. A cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP6AE14, is upregulated in H. armigera feeding on gossypol, and has been claimed to directly detoxify gossypol. However, using in vitro assays with heterologously expressed CYP6AE14, no metabolites of gossypol were detected, and further studies suggest that gossypol is not a direct substrate of CYP6AE14. Furthermore, larvae feeding on many other plant toxins also upregulate CYP6AE14. Our data demonstrate that the aldehyde groups are critical for the toxicity of gossypol when ingested by H. armigera and H. virescens larvae, and suggest that CYP6AE14 is not directly involved in gossypol metabolism, but may play a role in the general stress response of H. armigera larvae toward plant toxins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A single gene (yes controls pigmentation of eyes and scales in Heliothis virescens

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    Thomas M. Brown

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A yellow-eyed mutant was discovered in a strain of Heliothis virescens, the tobacco budworm, that already exhibited a mutation for yellow scale, y. We investigated the inheritance of these visible mutations as candidate markers for transgenesis. Yellow eye was controlled by a single, recessive, autosomal factor, the same type of inheritance previously known for y. Presence of the recombinant mutants with yellow scales with wild type eyes in test crosses indicated independent segregation of genes for these traits. The recombinant class with wild type scales and yellow eyes was completely absent and there was a corresponding increase of the double mutant parental class having yellow scales and yellow eyes. These results indicated that a single factor for yellow eye also controls yellow scales independently of y. This gene was named yes, for yellow eye and scale. We hypothesize that yes controls both eye and scale color through a deficiency in transport of pigment precursors in both the ommochrome and melanin pathways. The unlinked gene y likely controls an enzyme affecting the melanin pathway only. Both y and yes segregated independently of AceIn, acetylcholinesterase insensitivity, and sodium channel hscp, which are genes related to insecticide resistance.

  11. Genetic differentiation across North America in the generalist moth Heliothis virescens and the specialist H. subflexa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, A.T.; Classen, A.; Inglis, O.; Blanco, C.A.; López Jr., J.; Vargas, A.T.; Schal, C.; Heckel, D.G.; Schöfl, G.

    2011-01-01

    The two moth species Heliothis virescens (Hv) and H. subflexa (Hs) are closely related, but have vastly different feeding habits. Hv is a generalist and an important pest in many crops in the USA, while Hs is a specialist feeding only on plants in the genus Physalis. In this study, we conducted a

  12. Contemporary evolution of a Lepidopteran species, Heliothis virescens, in response to modern agricultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaptation to human-induced environmental change has the potential to profoundly influence the genomic architecture of affected species. This is particularly true in agricultural ecosystems, where anthropogenic selection pressure is strong. Heliothis virescens feeds on cotton in its larval stages a...

  13. Contemporary evolution of a Lepidopteran species, Heliothis virescens, in response to modern agricultural practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Megan L; DeYonke, Alexandra M; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Micinski, Stephen; Westbrook, John; Gould, Fred

    2018-01-01

    Adaptation to human-induced environmental change has the potential to profoundly influence the genomic architecture of affected species. This is particularly true in agricultural ecosystems, where anthropogenic selection pressure is strong. Heliothis virescens primarily feeds on cotton in its larval stages, and US populations have been declining since the widespread planting of transgenic cotton, which endogenously expresses proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). No physiological adaptation to Bt toxin has been found in the field, so adaptation in this altered environment could involve (i) shifts in host plant selection mechanisms to avoid cotton, (ii) changes in detoxification mechanisms required for cotton-feeding vs. feeding on other hosts or (iii) loss of resistance to previously used management practices including insecticides. Here, we begin to address whether such changes occurred in H. virescens populations between 1997 and 2012, as Bt-cotton cultivation spread through the agricultural landscape. For our study, we produced an H. virescens genome assembly and used this in concert with a ddRAD-seq-enabled genome scan to identify loci with significant allele frequency changes over the 15-year period. Genetic changes at a previously described H. virescens insecticide target of selection were detectable in our genome scan and increased our confidence in this methodology. Additional loci were also detected as being under selection, and we quantified the selection strength required to elicit observed allele frequency changes at each locus. Potential contributions of genes near loci under selection to adaptive phenotypes in the H. virescens cotton system are discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Ecdysteroidogenesis and development in Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): Focus on PTTH-stimulated pathways.

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    Scieuzo, Carmen; Nardiello, Marisa; Salvia, Rosanna; Pezzi, Marco; Chicca, Milvia; Leis, Marilena; Bufo, Sabino A; Vinson, S Bradleigh; Rao, Asha; Vogel, Heiko; Falabella, Patrizia

    2018-02-15

    Post-embryonic development and molting in insects are regulated by endocrine changes, including prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH)-stimulated ecdysone secretion by the prothoracic glands (PGs). In Lepidoptera, two pathways are potentially involved in PTTH-stimulated ecdysteroidogenesis, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/TOR). We investigated the potential roles of both these pathways in Heliothis virescens ecdysteroidogenesis. We identified putative proteins belonging to MAPK and PI3K/Akt/TOR signaling cascades, using transcriptomic analyses of PGs from last (fifth) instar larvae. Using western blots, we measured the phosphorylation of 4E-BP and S6K proteins, the main targets of TOR, following the in vitro exposure of PGs to brain extract containing PTTH (hereafter referred to as PTTH) and/or the inhibitors of MAPK (U0126), PI3K (LY294002) or TOR (rapamycin). Next, we measured ecdysone production, under the same experimental conditions, by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). We found that in Heliothis virescens last instar larvae, both pathways modulated PTTH-stimulated ecdysteroidogenesis. Finally, we analyzed the post-embryonic development of third and fourth instar larvae fed on diet supplemented with rapamycin, in order to better understand the role of the TOR pathway in larval growth. When rapamycin was added to the diet of larvae, the onset of molting was delayed, the growth rate was reduced and abnormally small larvae/pupae with high mortality rates resulted. In larvae fed on diet supplemented with rapamycin, the growth of PGs was suppressed, and ecdysone production and secretion were inhibited. Overall, the in vivo and in vitro results demonstrated that, similarly to Bombyx mori, MAPK and PI3K/Akt/TOR pathways are involved in PTTH signaling-stimulated ecdysteroidogenesis, and indicated the important role of TOR protein in H. virescens systemic growth. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa Toxin Resistance in Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

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    Pickett, Brian R; Gulzar, Asim; Ferré, Juan; Wright, Denis J

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory selection with Vip3Aa of a field-derived population of Heliothis virescens produced >2,040-fold resistance in 12 generations of selection. The Vip3Aa-selected (Vip-Sel)-resistant population showed little cross-resistance to Cry1Ab and no cross-resistance to Cry1Ac. Resistance was unstable after 15 generations without exposure to the toxin. F 1 reciprocal crosses between Vip3Aa-unselected (Vip-Unsel) and Vip-Sel insects indicated a strong paternal influence on the inheritance of resistance. Resistance ranged from almost completely recessive (mean degree of dominance [ h ] = 0.04 if the resistant parent was female) to incompletely dominant (mean h = 0.53 if the resistant parent was male). Results from bioassays on the offspring from backcrosses of the F 1 progeny with Vip-Sel insects indicated that resistance was due to more than one locus. The results described in this article provide useful information for the insecticide resistance management strategies designed to overcome the evolution of resistance to Vip3Aa in insect pests. IMPORTANCE Heliothis virescens is an important pest that has the ability to feed on many plant species. The extensive use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops or spray has already led to the evolution of insect resistance in the field for some species of Lepidoptera and Coleoptera. The development of resistance in insect pests is the main threat to Bt crops. The effective resistance management strategies are very important to prolong the life of Bt plants. Lab selection is the key step to test the assumption and predictions of management strategies prior to field evaluation. Resistant insects offer useful information to determine the inheritance of resistance and the frequency of resistance alleles and to study the mechanism of resistance to insecticides. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Revised status of Chloridea Westwood and [Duncan], 1841 for the Heliothis virescens species group and the monophyly of Schinia Hubner [1818] using total evidence data (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Heliothinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Heliothinae comprise some of the world’s most injurious agricultural pests. This study reanalyses a subsample of the Heliothis group of Cho et al. (2008) to determine the monophyly of Chloridea (Heliothis virescens and H. subflexa). Two nuclear gene regions, elongation factor-1a (EF-1a; 1240 bp)...

  17. Plant odorants interfere with detection of sex pheromone signals by male Heliothis virescens

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    Pablo ePregitzer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In many insects, mate finding relies on female-released sex pheromones, which have to be deciphered by the male olfactory system within an odorous background of plant volatiles present in the environment of a calling female. With respect to pheromone-mediated mate localization, plant odorants may be neutral, favorable or disturbing. Here we examined the impact of plant odorants on detection and coding of the major sex pheromone component, (Z-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald in the noctuid moth Heliothis virescens. By in vivo imaging the activity in the male antennal lobe, we monitored the interference at the level of olfactory sensory neurons (OSN to illuminate mixture interactions. The results show that stimulating the male antenna with Z11-16:Ald and distinct plant-related odorants simultaneously suppressed pheromone-evoked activity in the region of the macroglomerular complex (MGC, where Z11-16:Ald-specific OSNs terminate. Based on our previous findings that antennal detection of Z11-16:Ald involves an interplay of the pheromone binding protein HvirPBP2 and the pheromone receptor HR13, we asked if the plant odorants may interfere with any of the elements involved in pheromone detection. Using a competitive fluorescence binding assay, we found that the plant odorants neither bind to HvirPBP2 nor affect the binding of Z11-16:Ald to the protein. However, imaging experiments analyzing a cell line that expressed the receptor HR13 revealed that plant odorants significantly inhibited the Z11-16:Ald-evoked calcium responses. Together the results indicate that, plant odorants can interfere with the signaling process of the major sex pheromone component at the receptor level. Consequently, it can be assumed that plant odorants in the environment may reduce the firing activity of pheromone-specific OSNs in H. virescens and thus affect mate localization.

  18. Baculovirus Induced Transcripts in Hemocytes from the Larvae of Heliothis virescens

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    Holly J.R. Popham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Using RNA-seq digital difference expression profiling methods, we have assessed the gene expression profiles of hemocytes harvested from Heliothis virescens that were challenged with Helicoverpa zea single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HzSNPV. A reference transcriptome of hemocyte-expressed transcripts was assembled from 202 million 42-base tags by combining the sequence data of all samples, and the assembled sequences were then subject to BLASTx analysis to determine gene identities. We used the fully sequenced HzSNPV reference genome to align 477,264 Illumina sequence tags from infected hemocytes in order to document expression of HzSNPV genes at early points during infection. A comparison of expression profiles of control insects to those lethally infected with HzSNPV revealed differential expression of key cellular stress response genes and genes involved in lipid metabolism. Transcriptional regulation of specific insect hormones in baculovirus-infected insects was also altered. A number of transcripts bearing homology to retroviral elements that were detected add to a growing body of evidence for extensive invasion of errantiviruses into the insect genome. Using this method, we completed the first and most comprehensive gene expression survey of both baculoviral infection and host immune defense in lepidopteran larvae.

  19. Antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus-1 in vitro by myristoylated-peptide from Heliothis virescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ourth, Donald D.

    2004-01-01

    An insect antiviral compound was purified from Heliothis virescens larval hemolymph by gel-filtration high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and C-18 reverse-phase HPLC and its structure was determined by mass spectrometry. The antiviral compound is an N-myristoylated-peptide containing six amino acids with calculated molecular weight of 916 Da. The N-terminus contains the fatty acid myristoyl, and the C-terminus contains histidine with two methyl groups giving the histidine a permanent positive charge. The remainder of the compound is essentially non-polar. The structure of the compound corresponds with the 'myristate plus basic' motif expressed by certain viral proteins in their binding to the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane to initiate viral assembly and budding from a host cell. The insect antiviral compound may inhibit viral assembly and/or budding of viruses from host cells that could include the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus-1 that use this motif for exit from a host cell. Using the formazan assay, the myristoylated-peptide was effective against HIV-1, with a nine times increase in the viability and protection in vitro of treated CEM-SS cells when compared with infected but untreated control cells

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin Cry1Ac domain III enhances activity against Heliothis virescens in some, but not all Cry1-Cry1Ac hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karlova, R.B.; Weemen, W.M.J.; Naimov, S.; Ceron, J.; Dukiandjiev, S.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the role of domain III of Bacillus thuringiensis d-endotoxin Cry1Ac in determining toxicity against Heliothis virescens. Hybrid toxins, containing domain III of Cry1Ac with domains I and II of Cry1Ba, Cry1Ca, Cry1Da, Cry1Ea, and Cry1Fb, respectively, were created. In this way Cry1Ca,

  1. Digital, three-dimensional average shaped atlas of the heliothis virescens brain with integrated gustatory and olfactory neurons

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    Pål Kvello

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We use the moth Heliothis virescens as model organism for studying the neural network involved in chemosensory coding and learning. The constituent neurons are characterised by intracellular recordings combined with staining, resulting in a single neuron identified in each brain preparation. In order to spatially relate the neurons of different preparations a common brain framework was required. We here present an average shaped atlas of the moth brain. It is based on 11 female brain preparations, each stained with a fluorescent synaptic marker and scanned in confocal laser-scanning microscope. Brain neuropils of each preparation were manually reconstructed in the computer software AMIRA, followed by generating the atlas using the Iterative Shape Average Procedure. To demonstrate the application of the atlas we have registered two olfactory and two gustatory interneurons, as well as the axonal projections of gustatory receptor neurons into the atlas, visualising their spatial relationships. The olfactory interneurons, showing the typical morphology of inner-tract antennal lobe projection neurons, projected in the calyces of the mushroom body and laterally in the protocerebral lobe. The two gustatory interneurons, responding to sucrose and quinine respectively, projected in different areas of the brain. The wide projections of the quinine responding neuron included a lateral area adjacent to the projections of the olfactory interneurons. The sucrose responding neuron was confined to the suboesophageal ganglion with dendritic arborizations overlapping the axonal projections of the gustatory receptor neurons on the proboscis. By serving as a tool for the integration of neurons, the atlas offers visual access to the spatial relationship between the neurons in three dimensions, and thus facilitates the study of neuronal networks in the Heliothis virescens brain. The moth standard brain is accessible at http://www.nt.ntnu.no/users/kvello/H_virescens_standardbrain/

  2. Alpha-arylphorin is a mitogen in the Heliothis virescens midgut cell secretome upon Cry1Ac intoxication

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    Anais Castagnola

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Insecticidal crystal (Cry proteins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt target cells in the midgut epithelium of susceptible larvae. While the mode of action of Cry toxins has been extensively investigated, the midgut response to Cry intoxication and its regulation are not well characterized. In this work, we describe the secreted proteome (secretome of primary mature midgut cell cultures from Heliothis virescens larvae after exposure to Cry1Ac toxin compared to control buffer treatment. The Cry1Ac-induced secretome caused higher proliferation and differentiation and an overall reduction in total cell mortality over time in primary H. virescens midgut stem cell cultures when compared to treatment with control buffer secretome. Differential proteomics identified four proteins with significant differences in abundance comparing Cry1Ac-treated and control secretomes. The most significant difference detected in the Cry1Ac secretome was an arylphorin subunit alpha protein not detected in the control secretome. Feeding of purified alpha-arylphorin to H. virescens larvae resulted in midgut hyperplasia and significantly reduced susceptibility to Cry1Ac toxin compared to controls. These data identify alpha-arylphorin as a protein with a new putative role in the midgut regeneration process in response to Cry1Ac intoxication and possibly pathogen/abiotic stress, identifying alpha-arylphorin as a potential gene to target with insecticidal gene silencing for pest control.

  3. Activity in neurons of a putative protocerebral circuit representing information about a ten component plant odour blend in Heliothis virescens.

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    Bjarte Bye Løfaldli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The olfactory pathway in the insect brain is anatomically well described from the antennal lobe to the mushroom bodies and the lateral protocerebrum in several species. Less is known about the further connections of the olfactory network in protocerebrum and how information about relevant plant odorants and mixtures are represented in this network, resulting in output information mediated by descending neurons. In the present study we have recorded intracellularly followed by dye injections from neurons in the lateral- and superior protocerebrum of the moth, Heliothis virescens. As relevant stimuli, we have used selected primary plant odorants and mixtures of them. The results provide the morphology and physiological responses of neurons involved in a putative circuit connecting the mushroom body lobes, the superior and the lateral protocerebrum, as well as input to superior and lateral protocerebrum by one multiglomerular antennal lobe neuron and output from the lateral protocerebrum by one descending neuron. All neurons responded to one particular mixture of ten primary plant odorants, some of them also to single odorants of the mixture. Altogether, the physiological data indicate integration in protocerebral neurons of information from several of the receptor neuron types functionally described in this species.

  4. Spatial Distribution of Eggs of Alabama argillacea Hübner and Heliothis virescens Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae on Bt and non-BtCotton

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    TATIANA R. RODRIGUES

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Among the options to control Alabama argillacea (Hübner, 1818 and Heliothis virescens (Fabricius, 1781 on cotton, insecticide spraying and biological control have been extensively used. The GM'Bt' cotton has been introduced as an extremely viable alternative, but it is yet not known how transgenic plants affect populations of organisms that are interrelated in an agroecosystem. For this reason, it is important to know how the spatial arrangement of pests and beneficial insect are affected, which may call for changes in the methods used for sampling these species. This study was conducted with the goal to investigate the pattern of spatial distribution of eggs of A. argillacea and H. virescens in DeltaOpalTM (non-Bt and DP90BTMBt cotton cultivars. Data were collected during the agricultural year 2006/2007 in two areas of 5,000 m2, located in in the district of Nova América, Caarapó municipality. In each sampling area, comprising 100 plots of 50 m2, 15 evaluations were performed on two plants per plot. The sampling consisted in counting the eggs. The aggregation index (variance/mean ratio, Morisita index and exponent k of the negative binomial distribution and chi-square fit of the observed and expected values to the theoretical frequency distribution (Poisson, Binomial and Negative Binomial Positive, showed that in both cultivars, the eggs of these species are distributed according to the aggregate distribution model, fitting the pattern of negative binomial distribution.

  5. Evaluación de aislamientos nativos de Beauveria bassiana y Metarhizium anisopliae para el control del gusano del fruto Heliothis virescens (Fabricius 1771) en el cultivo de tomate Solanum lycopersicum (Mill) en Guasave, Sinaloa

    OpenAIRE

    Gaxiola Castro, Luis Alberto

    2014-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se evaluaron en laboratorio 10 aislamientos nativos de hongos entomopatógenos, tres de M. anisopliae y siete de B. bassiana sobre larvas de segundo y tercer estadío de gusano del fruto (Heliothis virescens) provenientes de una cría axénica; los dos aislamientos más patogénicos fueron B. bassiana con clave B1 y B2, por presentar mortalidad de larvas superior a 55%. Con estos mismos aislamientos se realizó un bioensayo para determinar la DL50 y la TL50. También se evaluó ...

  6. RNA-Seq Study of Microbially Induced Hemocyte Transcripts from Larval Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent S. Shelby

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Larvae of the tobacco budworm are major polyphagous pests throughout the Americas. Development of effective microbial biopesticides for this and related noctuid pests has been stymied by the natural resistance mediated innate immune response. Hemocytes play an early and central role in activating and coordinating immune responses to entomopathogens. To approach this problem we completed RNA-seq expression profiling of hemocytes collected from larvae following an in vivo challenge with bacterial and fungal cell wall components to elicit an immune response. A de novo exome assembly was constructed by combination of sequence tags from all treatments. Sequence tags from each treatment were aligned separately with the assembly to measure expression. The resulting table of differential expression had > 22,000 assemblies each with a distinct combination of annotation and expression. Within these assemblies > 1,400 were upregulated and > 1,500 downregulated by immune activation with bacteria or fungi. Orthologs to innate immune components of other insects were identified including pattern recognition, signal transduction pathways, antimicrobial peptides and enzymes, melanization and coagulation. Additionally orthologs of components regulating hemocytic functions such as autophagy, apoptosis, phagocytosis and nodulation were identified. Associated cellular oxidative defenses and detoxification responses were identified providing a comprehensive snapshot of the early response to elicitation.

  7. Differential arrestment of Trichogramma wasps to extreme sex pheromone types of the noctuid moth Heliothis virescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Huigens, M.E.; Orr, D.; Groot, A.T.

    2014-01-01

    1. Chemical espionage in nature may occur when predators or parasitoids home in on animal or plant communication signals. Parasitoid wasps are known to use pheromones emitted by adults hosts to locate host eggs, larvae or pupae. The response of Trichogramma egg parasitoids to a synthetic sex

  8. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-19

    Mar 19, 2007 ... 1Department of Botany, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000, Nairobi, Kenya. 2Department of Chemistry, Egerton University, P.O. Box 536, ..... antennal receptor neuron of the tobacco budworm moth. Heliothis virescens (Rostelien et al., 2000). It is known that plants ...

  9. Computer simulation for integrated pest management of spruce budworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll B. Williams; Patrick J. Shea

    1982-01-01

    Some field studies of the effects of various insecticides on the spruce budworm (Choristoneura sp.) and their parasites have shown severe suppression of host (budworm) populations and increased parasitism after treatment. Computer simulation using hypothetical models of spruce budworm-parasite systems based on these field data revealed that (1)...

  10. Chemical ecology of moths : Role of semiochemicals in host location by Ectomyelois ceratoniae and mate guarding by Heliothis virescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosseini, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Semiochemical-based behavioral manipulation has been increasingly implemented in Integrated Pest Management (IPM) as an environmentally friendly strategy. For many pest species, however, efficient methods have yet to be developed. An efficient sex pheromone attractant is missing in management of the

  11. Helicopter Propwash Dislodges Few Spruce Budworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel T. Jennings; Mark W. Houseweart; Mark W. Houseweart

    1986-01-01

    Propwash treatments from a low-flying Bell 47-G2 helicopter dislodged few spruce budworm larvae and pupae from host balsam-fir trees. After propwash treatments, both larval-pupal densities on branch samples and in drop-tray collections near the ground were not significantly different between treated and control plots. Significantly more larvae were found in the lower...

  12. Labeling Feral Spruce Budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Populations With Rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Wayne; Eveleigh, Eldon; Silk, Peter; Forbes, Glen

    2016-04-01

    Rubidium (Rb) is a trace element that occurs naturally in low concentrations and is easily absorbed by plants, making it a useful tool for labeling insect defoliators, such as spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens). Balsam fir trees (Abies balsamea (L.) Miller) injected with either 8 or 16 g per tree of rubidium chloride (RbCl) showed quick uptake and distribution throughout the crown, with no negative effects on tree shoot growth or spruce budworm survival and development. Adult spruce budworm that fed as larvae on trees injected with RbCl were clearly labeled, with significantly higher Rb concentrations than the background levels found in adults that fed as larvae on control trees. Rb concentrations in feral spruce budworm adults for both the 8 g (9 µg/g) and 16 g (25 µg/g) per tree treatments were at least five times lower than those in laboratory-reared adults on 1,000 µg/g RbCl diet (125 µg/g); survival, development, pupal weight, sex ratio, and mating status of spruce budworm were not adversely affected by Rb treatment. Egg masses laid by feral females that fed as larvae on Rb-labeled trees were also labeled with Rb. Injecting trees with RbCl is a viable technique for labeling feral spruce budworm populations to help distinguish local populations from immigrants to better evaluate the success of early intervention strategies such as mating disruption. © Crown copyright 2016.

  13. Red-breasted nuthatches detect early increases in spruce budworm populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlette S. Crawford; Daniel T. Jennings; Timothy L. Stone

    1990-01-01

    Early suppression .of increasing spruce budworm populations is essential to prevent epidemics; however, early changes in budworm numbers are difficult to detect. An effective and inexpensive method to detect early increases is needed. Red-breasted nuthatches eat more spruce budworm larvae and pupae as the insect increases in number. We estimated the number of large...

  14. Anomiopus Westwood (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae: novas espécies do grupo virescens Anomiopus Westwood (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae: new species of the virescens group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Luzia Canhedo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Três novas espécies de Anomiopus Westwood, 1842 são acrescentadas ao grupo virescens: A. lunatipes sp. nov. (Brasil: Amazonas, A. paraguaiensis sp. nov. (Paraguai e A. tuberifrons sp. nov. (Brasil: Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul e São Paulo. Chave para as espécies do grupo virescens é fornecida.Three new species of Anomiopus Westwood, 1842 are added to the virescensgroup: A. lunatipes sp. nov. (Brazil: Amazonas, A. paraguaiensis sp. nov. (Paraguai and A. tuberifrons sp. nov. (Brazil: Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul and São Paulo. A key to the species of the group virescens is provided.

  15. Short communication: Algal leaf spot associated with Cephaleuros virescens (Trentepohliales, Ulvophyceae on Nephelium lappaceum in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANURAG SUNPAPAO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Sunpapao A, Pitaloka MK, Arikit S. 2015. Algal leaf spot associated with Cephaleuros virescens (Trentepohliales, Ulvophyceae on Nephelium lappaceum in Thailand. Biodiversitas 17: 31-35. Algal leaf spot disease of Nephelium lappaceum (rambutan was observed in southern Thailand. The algae were isolated on Bold’s basal medium (BBM and identified based on appearance of the lesions, algal morphology and molecular properties. Characteristics of the filamentous thallus cells, sporangiophores, sporangia, gametes and zoospores were clarified. A portion of the 18S small subunit rRNA was amplified to validate the morphological identification by sequence similarity. To summarize the main results, the plant parasite causing algal leaf spot was identified as Cephaleuros virescens, and in sequencing-based phylogenetic analysis the Cephaleuros PSU-R5.1 isolate from rambutan grouped with the algae in genus Cephaleuros. This confirms C. virescens as a causal organism of algal leaf spot disease on rambutan in southern Thailand.

  16. Integrated permanent plot and aerial monitoring for the spruce budworm decision support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    David A. MacLean

    2000-01-01

    Spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clem.) outbreaks cause severe mortality and growth loss of spruce and fir forest over ranch of eastern North America. The Spruce Budworm Decision Support System (DSS) links prediction and interpretation models to the ARC/1NFO GIS, under an ArcView graphical user interface. It helps forest managers predict...

  17. Some effects of predaceous birds and ants on the western spruce budworm on conifer seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert W. Campbell; Clinton E. Carlson; Leon J. Theroux; Thomas H. Egan

    1984-01-01

    Effects of predaceous birds and ants on the western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis, were studied on seedlings of western larch and Douglas-fir in western Montana. On western larch, both birds and ants reduced survival of larval budworm (instars IV-VI). On Douglas-fir, larval survival on one site was reduced by ants but not by birds. On a second site,...

  18. Studies of occurrence of pod borer Heliothis viriplaca in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to determine the seasonal occurrence of Heliothis viriplaca as well as the best timing of sprays in relation to the phenology of chickpea, light-traps and monitoring methods were applied. All experiments were conducted in two research stations (Mahidasht and Sararood) in 2003 and 2004. The results of adult moths ...

  19. Dampak Andrografolid dan Dua Jenis Insektisida Sintetik sebagai Penghambat Makan Nephotettix virescens, terhadap Transmisi Virus Tungro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Widiarta

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of andrographolide and two synthetic insecticides of pymetrozine and imidacloprid, an antifeedant against N. virescens (Distant, to the rice virus transmission were tested using test tube inoculation method in the green house under natural photoperiod and average temperature of 28.5oC. The root of tungro diseased plant were soaked for 24 hours into tested materials before acquisition feeding to test virus acquisition inhibition, while root of rice seedlings were soaked into tested material for 24 hours before inoculation feeding to test virus inoculation inhibition. The results of studies showed that andrographolide, pymetrozine, and imidacloprid significantly reduced virus acquisition and virus inoculation by N. virescens. Pymetrozine and andrographolide treatments to the tungro diseased plants at concentration of 20 ppm significantly reduced proportion of viruliferous vector to become 17% in average. The increasing concentration into 40 ppm of both materials did not significantly reduce proportion of viruliferous vector. Imidacloprid at concentration of 0.01 and 0.02 ppm, completey inhibited feeding acquisition. Pymetrozine and andrographolide treatment at concentration of 20 ppm to the rice seedlings reduced significantly virus transmission by N. virescens to become 69% in average. The increasing concentration of pymetrozine up to 40 ppm did not reduce virus transmission rate. Imidacloprid at concentration of 0.01 ppm and 0.02 ppm reduced virus transmission to become 25% and 39%, respectively. It was concluded that imidacloprid was the most effective antifeedant reducing virus transmission by N. virescens among tested chemicals. Key words: antifeedant, N. virescens, rice tungro virus disease

  20. Effects of aerially applied mexacarbate on western spruce budworm larvae and their parasites in Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll B. Williams; Patrick J. Shea; Mark D. McGregor

    1979-01-01

    In tests on the Bitterroot National Forest, Montana, in 1965 and 1966, mexacarbate, aerially applied at the rate of 0.15 lb a.i./gal/acre (68.04 g a.iJ3.785 1/0.404 ha), killed about 90 percent of the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) populations. More parasitized budworm larvae survived treatments than nonparasitized.

  1. User's guide to the weather model: a component of the western spruce budworm modeling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. P. Kemp; N. L. Crookston; P. W. Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A stochastic model useful in simulating daily maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation developed by Bruhn and others has been adapted for use in the western spruce budworm modeling system. This document describes how to use the weather model and illustrates some aspects of its behavior.

  2. Two-dimensional wavelet analysis of spruce budworm host basal area in the Border Lakes landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick M. James; Brian R. Sturtevant; Phil Townsend; Pete Wolter; Marie-Josee. Fortin

    2011-01-01

    Increases in the extent and severity of spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clem.) outbreaks over the last century are thought to be the result of changes in forest structure due to forest management. A corollary of this hypothesis is that manipulations of forest structure and composition can be used to reduce future forest vulnerability....

  3. Comparing modern and presettlement forest dynamics of a subboreal wilderness: does spruce budworm enhance fire risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, Brian R; Miranda, Brian R; Shinneman, Douglas J; Gustafson, Eric J; Wolter, Peter T

    2012-06-01

    Insect disturbance is often thought to increase fire risk through enhanced fuel loadings, particularly in coniferous forest ecosystems. Yet insect disturbances also affect successional pathways and landscape structure that interact with fire disturbances (and vice-versa) over longer time scales. We applied a landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS-II) to evaluate the relative strength of interactions between spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) outbreaks and fire disturbances in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) in northern Minnesota (USA). Disturbance interactions were evaluated for two different scenarios: presettlement forests and fire regimes vs. contemporary forests and fire regimes. Forest composition under the contemporary scenario trended toward mixtures of deciduous species (primarily Betula papyrifera and Populus spp.) and shade-tolerant conifers (Picea mariana, Abies balsamea, Thuja occidentalis), with disturbances dominated by a combination of budworm defoliation and high-severity fires. The presettlement scenario retained comparatively more "big pines" (i.e., Pinus strobus, P. resinosa) and tamarack (L. laricina), and experienced less budworm disturbance and a comparatively less-severe fire regime. Spruce budworm disturbance decreased area burned and fire severity under both scenarios when averaged across the entire 300-year simulations. Contrary to past research, area burned and fire severity during outbreak decades were each similar to that observed in non-outbreak decades. Our analyses suggest budworm disturbances within forests of the BWCA have a comparatively weak effect on long-term forest composition due to a combination of characteristics. These include strict host specificity, fine-scaled patchiness created by defoliation damage, and advance regeneration of its primary host, balsam fir (A. balsamea) that allows its host to persist despite repeated disturbances. Understanding the nature of the three-way interaction between

  4. Comparing modern and presettlement forest dynamics of a subboreal wilderness: Does spruce budworm enhance fire risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, Brian R.; Miranda, Brian R.; Shinneman, Douglas J.; Gustafson, Eric J.; Wolter, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Insect disturbance is often thought to increase fire risk through enhanced fuel loadings, particularly in coniferous forest ecosystems. Yet insect disturbances also affect successional pathways and landscape structure that interact with fire disturbances (and vice-versa) over longer time scales. We applied a landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS-II) to evaluate the relative strength of interactions between spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) outbreaks and fire disturbances in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) in northern Minnesota (USA). Disturbance interactions were evaluated for two different scenarios: presettlement forests and fire regimes vs. contemporary forests and fire regimes. Forest composition under the contemporary scenario trended toward mixtures of deciduous species (primarily Betula papyrifera and Populus spp.) and shade-tolerant conifers (Picea mariana, Abies balsamea, Thuja occidentalis), with disturbances dominated by a combination of budworm defoliation and high-severity fires. The presettlement scenario retained comparatively more “big pines” (i.e., Pinus strobus, P. resinosa) and tamarack (L. laricina), and experienced less budworm disturbance and a comparatively less-severe fire regime. Spruce budworm disturbance decreased area burned and fire severity under both scenarios when averaged across the entire 300-year simulations. Contrary to past research, area burned and fire severity during outbreak decades were each similar to that observed in non-outbreak decades. Our analyses suggest budworm disturbances within forests of the BWCA have a comparatively weak effect on long-term forest composition due to a combination of characteristics. These include strict host specificity, fine-scaled patchiness created by defoliation damage, and advance regeneration of its primary host, balsam fir (A. balsamea) that allows its host to persist despite repeated disturbances. Understanding the nature of the three-way interaction

  5. Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis and parasitoids of late-instar larvae of the spruce budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmaker, A.; Cusson, M.; Frankenhuyzen, van K.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner var. kurstaki and parasitoids that attack late instars of the eastern spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens). In a petri-dish arena, females of Tranosema rostrale rostrale (Brishke) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) were

  6. The genetic architecture of ecological adaptation: intraspecific variation in host plant use by the lepidopteran crop pest Chloridea virescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Sara J; Gould, Fred; Hopper, Keith R

    2018-03-01

    Intraspecific variation in ecologically important traits is a cornerstone of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. The evolution and maintenance of this variation depends on genetic architecture, which in turn determines responses to natural selection. Some models suggest that traits with complex architectures are less likely to respond to selection than those with simple architectures, yet rapid divergence has been observed in such traits. The simultaneous evolutionary lability and genetic complexity of host plant use in the Lepidopteran subfamily Heliothinae suggest that architecture may not constrain ecological adaptation in this group. Here we investigate the response of Chloridea virescens, a generalist that feeds on diverse plant species, to selection for performance on a novel host, Physalis angulata (Solanaceae). P. angulata is the preferred host of Chloridea subflexa, a narrow specialist on the genus Physalis. In previous experiments, we found that the performance of C. subflexa on P. angulata depends on many loci of small effect distributed throughout the genome, but whether the same architecture would be involved in the generalist's adoption of P. angulata was unknown. Here we report a rapid response to selection in C. virescens for performance on P. angulata, and establish that the genetic architecture of intraspecific variation is quite similar to that of the interspecific differences in terms of the number, distribution, and effect sizes of the QTL involved. We discuss the impact of genetic architecture on the ability of Heliothine moths to respond to varying ecological selection pressures.

  7. Proceedings, forest defoliator--host interactions: A comparison between gypsy moth and spruce budworms; 1983 April 5-7; New Haven, CT: Summary of Life History and Hosts of the Spruce Budworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Talerico; Michael Montgomery

    1983-01-01

    The Canada/U.S. Spruce Budworms Program in cooperation with the Center for Biological Control of Northeastern Forest Insects and Diseases of the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station co-sponsored this Forest Defoliator-Host Interaction Workshop.This invitational workshop was limited to investigators of the spruce bud worms and gypsy moth in the Forest Service,...

  8. Long-distance dispersal of spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens) in Minnesota (USA) and Ontario (Canada) via the atmospheric pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian R. Sturtevant; Gary L. Achtemeier; Joseph J. Charney; Dean P. Anderson; Barry J. Cooke; Phillip A. Townsend

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal can play an important role in the population dynamics of forest insects, but the role of long-distance immigration and emigration remains unclear due to the difficulty of quantifying dispersal distance and direction. We designed an agent-based spruce budworm flight behavior model that, when interfaced with temperature, wind speed, and precipitation output...

  9. Simulated western spruce budworm defoliation reduces torching and crowning potential: A sensitivity analysis using a physics-based fire model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory M. Cohn; Russell A. Parsons; Emily K. Heyerdahl; Daniel G. Gavin; Aquila Flower

    2014-01-01

    The widespread, native defoliator western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) reduces canopy fuels, which might affect the potential for surface fires to torch (ignite the crowns of individual trees) or crown (spread between tree crowns). However, the effects of defoliation on fire behaviour are poorly understood. We used a physics-based fire model to...

  10. Nutritional pyhsiology of the eastern spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, infected with Nosema fumiferanae, and interactions with dietary nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; G.L. Nordin

    1988-01-01

    Female eastern spurce budworm larvae, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), inoculated with a medium lethal spore dosage of the microsporidium. Nosema fumiferanae (Thomson) exhibited significant reductions in a consumptive index (CI), nitrogen consumptive index (NCI), relative growth rate (RGR), and gross(...

  11. Euxesta spp. NEW PEST IN Zea mays L. VAR. rugosa: ASSOCIATION WITH Heliothis zea ATTACKS IN SPRING AND SUMMER SEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Curis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The "corn silk fly" of maize (Euxesta spp. Loew, 1868 appeared in 2005 in Santa Fe (Argentina, causing damage to the ears. The attacks are related to temperature, crop growth stage and previous attack of other pests. For this new pest, we determined the species present, the damage on Bt sweet corn plantings in two seasons (August and February, the association of attacks with Heliothis zea (Boddie, 1850 and the presence of parasitoids. Larvae counts of H. zea and Euxesta spp. began in the phenological stage of R2 and ended in R5 and consisted of removing at random from each batch (three for each planting season four ears. In laboratory we determined the percentage of damage on the ears and number of larvae of Euxesta spp. and H. zea, discriminated by size. Fly was identified as E. eluta, damage was greatest in the early spring planting corn. Attacks were correlated with H. zea.

  12. Rearing parasitoids of spruce budworm from northern Alberta. Forest management note No. 61

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Numerous species of parasitic flies and wasps attack spruce budworm (SBW) throughout its geographic range and at all immature stages, but little is known about these dynamics in northern Alberta. This note gives the results of a study on rearing parasitoids from northern Alberta. Parasitoids sampled lay eggs on SBW larvae, live as larvae in the host body, and emerge from older larvae or pupae. Sampling techniques therefore include examination of the incidence of egg laying, the presence of parasitoid larvae in the host, and the emergence of adult parasitoids. In this study, large numbers of SBW larvae were individually reared to obtain adult parasitoids, but extensive dissection of SBW larvae was avoided, and results were obtained using limited time and materials.

  13. Growth-melt asymmetry in ice crystals under the influence of spruce budworm antifreeze protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertaya, Natalya [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Celik, Yeliz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); DiPrinzio, Carlos L [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Wettlaufer, J S [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); Davies, Peter L [Department of Biochemistry, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Braslavsky, Ido [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2007-10-17

    Here we describe studies of the crystallization behavior of ice in an aqueous solution of spruce budworm antifreeze protein (sbwAFP) at atmospheric pressure. SbwAFP is an ice binding protein with high thermal hysteresis activity, which helps protect Choristoneura fumiferana (spruce budworm) larvae from freezing as they overwinter in the spruce and fir forests of the north eastern United States and Canada. Different types of ice binding proteins have been found in many other species. They have a wide range of applications in cryomedicine and cryopreservation, as well as the potential to protect plants and vegetables from frost damage through genetic engineering. However, there is much to learn regarding the mechanism of action of ice binding proteins. In our experiments, a solution containing sbwAFP was rapidly frozen and then melted back, thereby allowing us to produce small single crystals. These maintained their hexagonal shapes during cooling within the thermal hysteresis gap. Melt-growth-melt sequences in low concentrations of sbwAFP reveal the same shape transitions as are found in pure ice crystals at low temperature (-22 deg. C) and high pressure (2000 bar) (Cahoon et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 255502); while both growth and melt shapes display faceted hexagonal morphology, they are rotated 30 deg. relative to one another. Moreover, the initial melt shape and orientation is recovered in the sequence. To visualize the binding of sbwAFP to ice, we labeled the antifreeze protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and observed the sbwAFP-GFP molecules directly on ice crystals using confocal microscopy. When cooling the ice crystals, facets form on the six primary prism planes (slowest growing planes) that are evenly decorated with sbwAFP-GFP. During melting, apparent facets form on secondary prism planes (fastest melting planes), leaving residual sbwAFP at the six corners of the hexagon. Thus, the same general growth-melt behavior of an apparently

  14. Avaliação da mutagênese e genotoxicidade em Eigenmannia virescens (Teleostei: Gymnotiformes expostos ao benzeno Avaliation of mutagenicity and gentotoxicity in Eigenmannia virescens (Teleostei: Gymnotiformes exposed to benzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Bücker

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Os efeitos de substâncias genotóxicas sobre o genoma de peixes tem sido objeto de muitos estudos, sobretudo daqueles que buscam estabelecer a resposta dos genes aos estímulos ambientais. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo realizar um estudo sobre mutagenicidade e genotoxicidade em peixes elétricos da espécie Eingenmannia virescens, pela exposição ao benzeno (50ppm, utilizando as técnicas da Freqüência de Micronúcleos (MNs e o Ensaio do Cometa. Foram coletadas amostras do sangue de dez peixes em diferentes tempos de exposição: T0, 24h, 48h, 72h, 96h e 360h (15 dias. Para a análise das lâminas no Teste do MN, foram contadas 1.000 células e estipulada a freqüência de ocorrência de MNs. Para análise do Ensaio do Cometa a contagem foi feita estipulando quatro classes de danos: I - II - III - IV, e para a análise estatística foram atribuídos valores numéricos (ranques de 0 a 3, respectivamente, verificando diferenças significativas para a soma dos ranques em todos os tempos de exposição em relação ao T0. No Teste do Micronúcleo não foi possível detectar efeitos mutagênicos significativos nos eritrócitos analisados. No entanto, para o Ensaio do Cometa os resultados sugerem ação genotóxica do benzeno, devido a um aumento gradual no número de células com maiores classes de danos de acordo com maior tempo de exposição, indicando um efeito tempo-dependente. Estes resultados sugerem maior sensibilidade do Ensaio do Cometa que o Teste do MN.The effects of genotoxic substances on fishes genome have been object of many studies, especially those which attempt to establish the responses of genes to environmental stimulus. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mutagenicity and genotoxicity in electric fishes of species Eingenmannia virescens, under to benzene exposure (50ppm, utilizing Micronuclei Test (MNs and Comet Assay techniques. Ten fish blood samples were collected in different times of exposure: T0

  15. The spruce budworm and forest: a qualitative comparison of ODE and Boolean models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina Robeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boolean and polynomial models of biological systems have emerged recently as viable companions to differential equations models. It is not immediately clear however whether such models are capable of capturing the multi-stable behaviour of certain biological systems: this behaviour is often sensitive to changes in the values of the model parameters, while Boolean and polynomial models are qualitative in nature. In the past few years, Boolean models of gene regulatory systems have been shown to capture multi-stability at the molecular level, confirming that such models can be used to obtain information about the system’s qualitative dynamics when precise information regarding its parameters may not be available. In this paper, we examine Boolean approximations of a classical ODE model of budworm outbreaks in a forest and show that these models exhibit a qualitative behaviour consistent with that derived from the ODE models. In particular, we demonstrate that these models can capture the bistable nature of insect population outbreaks, thus showing that Boolean models can be successfully utilized beyond the molecular level.

  16. Técnica de amostragem para comparar o dano causado pela lagarta-da-espiga, Heliothis zea (Boddie, em cultivares de milho Sampling techniques to compare the damage by Heliothis zea (Boddie in corn varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Nagai

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, realizado no Instituto Agronômico, determinou-se o tamanho da amostra para estudos de danos causados pela lagarta-da-espiga, Heliothis zea (Boddie, avaliados pelo método de Widstrom. Foram utilizados dados de dois experimentos de campo, com um cultivar resistente (Asteca Prolífico VRPE VII, um suscetível (híbrido duplo IAC Hmd 7974, o 'Maya XVI' e o híbrido simples HS 7777, em 1978/79 e 1979/80. O critério para estimar o tamanho da amostra foi de que esse tamanho permitisse detectar uma diferença de 10 ou de 20% da média geral entre médias de danos, em cultivares de milho, e avaliar o dano médio por cultivar com erro-padrão de 10 ou de 20% da média. Para definir o processo de amostragem, utilizou-se o método de componentes de variância, estimados a partir de dois modelos matemáticos. O tamanho da amostra foi bastante variável entre cultivares, sendo maior no resistente. Entre os possíveis tamanhos mínimos de amostra para detectar uma diferença de 10% da média geral entre médias de danos de tratamentos, podem ser utilizados seis blocos com quatro linhas de 24 plantas; para uma diferença de 20% de média, cinco blocos com três linhas de seis plantas são suficientes. Para estimar a média de danos por cultivar, com erro-padrão de 10% de média, são necessários sete blocos com quatro linhas de 30 plantas, no cultivar Asteca, e cinco blocos com duas linhas de 24 plantas nos cultivares Hmd 7974, HS 7777 e Maya e, com erro-padrão de 20% de média, cinco blocos de três linhas com doze plantas, no 'Asteca', e cinco blocos com duas linhas de seis plantas nos demais cultivares.A study was made to determine the sample size for research on corn resistance to corn ear worm Heliothis zea (Boddie. The damage was measured using the Widstrom centimeter scale. The criteria used to select the sample sizes were such that a difference between two treatments of ten percent or twenty percent of the overall mean should be

  17. Benefit-cost analysis of spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clem.) control: incorporating market and non-market values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Yew; Lantz, Van A; Hennigar, Chris R; MacLean, David A

    2012-01-01

    This study employs a benefit-cost analysis framework to estimate market and non-market benefits and costs of controlling future spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) outbreaks on Crown forest lands in New Brunswick, Canada. We used: (i) an advanced timber supply model to project potential timber volume saved, timber value benefits, and costs of pest control efforts; and (ii) a recent contingent valuation method analysis that evaluated non-market benefits (i.e., changes in recreation opportunities and existence values) of controlling future spruce budworm outbreaks in the Province. A total of six alternative scenarios were evaluated, including two uncontrolled future budworm outbreak severities (moderate vs. severe) and, for each severity, three control program levels (protecting 10%, 20%, or 40% of the susceptible Crown land forest area). The economic criteria used to evaluate each scenario included benefit-cost ratios and net present values. Under severe outbreak conditions, results indicated that the highest benefit-cost ratio (4.04) occurred when protecting 10% (284,000 ha) of the susceptible area, and the highest net present value ($111 M) occurred when protecting 20% (568,000 ha) of the susceptible area. Under moderate outbreak conditions, the highest benefit-cost ratio (3.24) and net present value ($58.7 M) occurred when protecting 10% (284,000 ha) of the susceptible area. Inclusion of non-market values generally increased the benefit-cost ratios and net present values of the control programs, and in some cases, led to higher levels of control being supported. Results of this study highlight the importance of including non-market values into the decision making process of forest pest management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathways and consequences of contaminant flux to Acadian flycatchers (Empidonax virescens) in urbanizing landscapes of Ohio, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowse, Linnea M; Rodewald, Amanda D; Sullivan, S Mažeika P

    2014-07-01

    A prevalent environmental contaminant, mercury (Hg) is mobile and persistent in aquatic systems, where it often occurs in its bioavailable form methylmercury. Because methylmercury can bioaccumulate in aquatic insects and then transfer to terrestrial food webs, riparian consumers reliant upon aquatic emergent insects, should be disproportionately affected. Using the aerial insectivore Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) as a focal species, we examined (1) the extent to which total Hg loads in breeding flycatchers affected body condition and reproductive output and (2) potential pathways of contaminant flux in 19 riparian forest fragments distributed across an urban-to-rural landscape gradient in Ohio, USA. From April-August 2011-2012, we collected blood samples from adult (n=76) and nestling (n=17 from 7 nests) flycatchers, monitored their annual reproductive success (i.e., total number of fledglings), and sampled water, sediment, and aquatic emergent insects at each site. Hg concentrations in adult flycatcher blood (47 to 584 μg/kg, x¯=211.8, SD=95.5) were low relative to published advisory levels and not related to body condition. However, even at low concentrations, blood Hg was negatively related to reproductive success, with a 0.83 decline in the number of fledglings per μg/kg (loge) increase of blood Hg. Adult flycatchers had 11× greater concentrations of blood Hg than their offspring. Hg levels in flycatcher blood were not predicted by Hg concentrations in sediment, water, or aquatic emergent insects, with the exception of rural landscapes alone, in which flycatcher Hg was negatively related to sediment Hg. In addition to illustrating the difficulty of predicting exposure pathways that may vary among landscape contexts, our study provides evidence that even trace levels of contaminants may impair reproductive success of free-living songbirds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Life-history traits maintain the genomic integrity of sympatric species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) group on an isolated forest island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa M. Lumley; Felix A.H. Sperling

    2011-01-01

    Identification of widespread species collected from islands can be challenging due to the potential for local ecological and phenotypic divergence in isolated populations. We sought to determine how many species of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) complex reside in Cypress Hills, an isolated remnant coniferous forest in western Canada....

  20. The use of weather surveillance radar and high-resolution three dimensional weather data to monitor a spruce budworm mass exodus flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan Boulanger; Frédéric Fabry; Alamelu Kilambi; Deepa S. Pureswaran; Brian R. Sturtevant; Rémi. Saint-Amant

    2017-01-01

    The likely spread of the current spruce budworm (SBW; Choristoneura fumiferana [Clem.]) outbreak fromhigh to low density areas brings to the forefront a pressing need to understand its dispersal dynamics and to document mass exodus flights in relation to weather patterns. In this study, we used the weather surveillance radar of Val d'Irène in...

  1. Rearing Glypta Fumiferanae [hym.:Ichneumonida] on a multivoltine laboratory colony of the Western Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura Occidentalis) [LEP.:Tortricidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy Rappaport; Marion Page

    1985-01-01

    Methods were devloped for rearing Glypta fumiferanae Viereck on a nondiapausing laboratory colony of the western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman. Both host and parasite are univoltine and undergo diapause in nature. In this study, the parasite's voltinism was synchronized with that of a nondiapausing...

  2. Historical patterns of spruce budworm defoliation and bark beetle outbreaks in North American conifer forests: an atlas and description of digital maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Williams; Richard A. Birdsey

    2003-01-01

    This atlas presents maps of historical defoliation by the eastern and western spruce budworms and historical outbreaks of the mountain and southern pine beetles during the past half century. The maps encompass various regions of the conterminous United States and eastern Canada. This publication also serves as documentation for an extended set of digital maps, which...

  3. Developmental and reproductive responses of the spruce budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) parasitoid Tranosema rostrale (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) to temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehausen, M Lukas; Régnière, Jacques; Martel, Véronique; Smith, Sandy M

    2017-04-01

    The temperature-dependent development and survival of immatures, as well as adult longevity and potential fecundity of the endoparasitoid Tranosema rostrale (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) parasitizing spruce budworm Choristoneura fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) larvae was investigated under laboratory conditions at several constant temperatures ranging from 5 to 30°C. Maximum likelihood modeling approaches were used to estimate thermal responses in development, survival, and longevity. A model describing the effect of temperature on potential fecundity of the parasitoid was also developed taking oogenesis and oosorption into account. In-host and pupal development rates of the parasitoid increased with temperature up to 25°C, and decreased thereafter. Immature survival was highest below 20°C, and rapidly decreased at higher temperatures. Adult longevity decreased exponentially with increasing temperature for both males and females. Highest potential fecundity was reached at 10°C. Considering survival and potential fecundity, the parasitoid seems best adapted to cool temperatures below 20°C. Simulations of the life-history traits under variable temperature regimes indicate that temperature fluctuations decrease survival and increase realised fecundity compared to constant temperatures. The temperature-dependent fecundity model developed can be applied to other non-host-feeding synovigenic parasitoids. The equations and parameter estimates provided in this paper can be used to build comprehensive models predicting the seasonal phenology of this parasitoid and spruce budworm parasitism under changing climatic conditions. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Helicoverpa zea and Bt cotton in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Randall G; Jackson, Ryan E

    2012-01-01

    Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), the bollworm or corn earworm, is the most important lepidopteran pest of Bt cotton in the United States. Corn is the preferred host, but the insect feeds on most flowering crops and wild host plants. As a cotton pest, bollworm has been closely linked to the insecticide-resistance prone Heliothis virescens (F.), tobacco budworm. Immature stages of the two species are difficult to separate in field environments. Tobacco budworm is very susceptible to most Bt toxins, and Bt cotton is considered to be "high dose." Bollworm is less susceptible to Bt toxins, and Bt cotton is not "high dose" for this pest. Bt cotton is routinely sprayed with traditional insecticides for bollworm control. Assays of bollworm field populations for susceptibility to Bt toxins expressed in Bt cotton have produced variable results since pre-deployment of Bt cottons in 1988 and 1992. Analyses of assay response trends have been used by others to suggest that field resistance has evolved to Bt toxins in bollworm, but disagreement exists on definitions of field resistance and confidence of variable assay results to project changes in susceptibility of field populations. Given historical variability in bollworm response to Bt toxins, erratic field control requiring supplemental insecticides since early field testing of Bt cottons, and dramatic increases in corn acreage in cotton growing areas of the Southern US, continued vigilance and concern for resistance evolution are warranted.

  5. Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Genn. , Stern. : Aleyrodidae) infestation patterns as influenced by cotton, weather and Heliothis: hypotheses testing by using simulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgaertner, J.; Delucchi, V.; Von Arx, R.; Rubli, D.

    1986-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci Genn. is an important pest on cotton in the Sudan Gezira. A population model based on the age-specific and time-varying life table approach has been constructed and validated for B. tabaci and the cotton variety Barac. Simulation experiments indicate that weather conditions are favourable for whitefly development until late autumn, when the bolls of early sown Barac open. Host plant quality, as measured by leaf age structure, is a very important factor in the B. tabaci life system. Reduced photosynthesis decreases and delays yield formation, but appears to have little effect on whitefly infestation levels at the time the bolls open. Simulated damage caused by Heliothis larvae to fruiting structures alters the growth of the plants, changes the age structures of the leaves and suggests increased whitefly numbers at the time of boll opening. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Simulium (Psilopelmia virescens, a new black-fly species (Diptera: Simuliidae from the southwestern region of the state of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Hamada

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The last-instar larva, pupa, male and female of Simulium virescens sp. nov. are described and illustrated. This species has a peculiar larva, which has an elongated head capsule and light-green colour. The first thoracic segment has tubercle on its dorsal region and the third thoracic segment has one pair of tubercles; the first to the fourth abdominal segments have one pair of tubercles on each segment. Until now this new species had only been collected at the type locality, which is on the middle stretch of the Correntina River in the southwestern portion of the state of Bahia, Brazil. Females were voraciously biting humans during the field work. This new species represents the second species of Simulium(Psilopelmia in Brazil and the first registered outside of the Brazilian Amazon Region.

  7. Seasonal variation of degree-day accumulation in relation to phenology of western spruce budworm, Douglas-fir tussock moth, and host trees in northeastern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd E. Wickman

    1988-01-01

    The annual variation of degree-days and early summer phenology of Douglas-fir tussock moth, western spruce budworm, and their host trees was monitored over five to six seasons at two locations in the Blue Mountains. Accumulated degree-days and the phenology of bud burst and larval development were consistent and comparable at the two sites. Either degree-days or shoot...

  8. Case history of population change in a `bacillus thuringiensis`-treated versus an untreated outbreak of the western spruce budworm. Forest Service research note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.R.; Paul, H.G.

    1996-09-01

    Larval densities of the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) were monitored for 12 years (1984-95) on permanent sample plots in northeastern Oregon. The time series spanned a period of general budworm infestations when populations increased rapidly from low densities, plateaued for a time at high-outbreak densities, and then declind suddenly. Midway through the period (1988), an area with half of the sample plots was sprayed with the microbial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) in an operational suppression project. The other sample plots were part of an untreated area. In the treated area, B.t. spray reduced numbers of larvae by more than 90 percent; however, populations returned to an outbreak density within 3 years. In the untreated area, populations remained at outbreak densities and continued to fluctuate due to natural feedback processes. Natural decline of the population (1992-95) in the monitored area was largely unexplained and coincided with an overall collapse of the budworm outbreak in the Blue Mountains.

  9. Effects of climate change on fire and spruce budworm disturbance regimes and consequences on forest biomass production in eastern Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, S.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of spruce budworm (SBW) outbreaks and wildfires are expected to change as climatic change progresses. The effects of an altered, combined interaction between SBW and fire may be of greater importance than the individual effect of either on forest biomass production. The objectives of this study are to define current fire and SBW regimes in eastern Canada and relate the characteristics of each regime based upon climate model outputs for 2050 and 2100. The study also attempts to evaluate the impact of predicted changes in SBW and fire disturbance regimes on forest dynamics. The methodology used in the study included data from the Canadian Large Fire Database and historical records of SBW outbreaks. Spatial and environmental variables were presented along with climate models. The analysis was conducted using constrained ordination techniques, and canonical correspondence and redundancy analysis. Projected disturbance regimes were presented for both fire and SBW. The effects of the regimes on biomass productivity were also examined, using a Landscape Disturbance Simulator (LAD). It was concluded that this model will help evaluate the consequences of changes imposed by climatic change on both disturbances individually, as well as their interaction. 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  10. Genetic transformation, recovery, and characterization of fertile soybean transgenic for a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis cryIAc gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C N; Adang, M J; All, J N; Boerma, H R; Cardineau, G; Tucker, D; Parrott, W A

    1996-09-01

    Somatic embryos of jack, a Glycine max (L.) Merrill cultivar, were transformed using microprojectile bombardment with a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein gene (Bt cryIAc) driven by the 35S promoter and linked to the HPH gene. Approximately 10 g of tissue was bombarded, and three transgenic lines were selected on hygromycin-containing media and converted into plants. The recovered lines contained the HPH gene, but the Bt gene was lost in one line. The plasmid was rearranged in the second line, and the third line had two copies, one of which was rear-ranged. The CryIAc protein accumulated up to 46 ng mg-1 extractable protein. In detached-leaf bioassays, plants with an intact copy of the Bt gene, and to a lesser extent those with the rearranged copy, were protected from damage from corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), soybean looper (Pseudoplusia includens), tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens), and velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis). Corn earworm produced less than 3% defoliation on transgenic plants, compared with 20% on the lepidopteran-resistant breeding line GatIR81-296, and more than 40% on susceptible cultivars. Unlike previous reports of soybean transformation using this technique, all plants were fertile. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a soybean transgenic for a highly expressed insecticidal gene.

  11. Insect radiosensitivity: dose curves and dose-fractionation studies of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm of 4 insect species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaChance, L.E.; Graham, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    Males of 4 species of insects: Musca domestica L. (housefly) (Diptera), Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (milkweed bug) (Hemiptera), Anagasta kuhniella (Zeller) (mealmoth) (Lepidoptera) and Heliothis virescens (Fab.) (tobacco budworm) (Lepidoptera) were irradiated as adults. Dose-response curves for the induction of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm were constructed. The curves were analyzed mathematically and compared with theoretical computer simulated curves requiring 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 'hits' for the induction of a dominant lethal mutation. The 4 species belonging to 3 different orders of insects showed a wide range in radiation sensitivity and vastly different dose-response curves. When the data were analyzed by several mathematical models the authors found that a logistic response curve gave reasonably good fit with vastly different parameters for the 4 species. Dose-fractionation experiments showed no reduction in the frequency of lethal mutations induced in any species when an acute dose was fractionated into 2 equal exposures separated by an 8-h period. (Auth.)

  12. A specific affinity reagent to distinguish aldehyde dehydrogenases and oxidases. Enzymes catalyzing aldehyde oxidation in an adult moth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasayco, M.L.; Prestwich, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and oxidase (AO) enzymes from the tissue extracts of male and female tobacco budworm moth (Heliothis virescens) were identified after electrophoretic protein separation. AO activity was visualized using formazan- or horseradish peroxidase-mediated staining coupled to the AO-catalyzed oxidation of benzaldehyde. A set of six soluble AO enzymes with isoelectric points from pI 4.6 to 5.3 were detected primarily in the antennal extracts. Partially purified antennal AO enzymes also oxidized both (Z)-9-tetradecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal, the two major pheromone components of this moth. ALDH activity was detected using a tritium-labeled affinity reagent based on a known irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme. This labeled vinyl ketone, [3H](Z)-1,11-hexadecadien-3-one, was synthesized and used to covalently modify the soluble ALDH enzymes from tissue extracts. Molecular subunits of potential ALDH enzymes were visualized in the fluorescence autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of the antenna, head, and leg tissues. Covalent modification of these protein subunits decreased specifically in the presence of excess pheromone aldehyde or benzaldehyde. Labeled vinyl ketones are thus novel tools for the identification of molecular subunits of ALDH enzymes

  13. Wood Anatomy and Insect Defoliator Systems: Is there an anatomical response to sustained feeding by the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on Douglas-fir (Pseudotusga menziesii)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, Jodi; Gärtner, Holger; Alfaro, René; Smith, Dan

    2013-04-01

    The western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) is the most widespread and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in western North America, and has a long-term coexistence with its primary host tree, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Franco). Western spruce budworm (WSB) outbreaks usually last for several years, and cause reductions in annual growth, stem defects, and regeneration delays. In British Columbia, the WSB is the second most damaging insect after the mountain pine beetle, and sustained and/or severe defoliation can result in the mortality of host trees. Numerous studies have used tree rings to reconstruct WSB outbreaks across long temporal scales, to evaluate losses in stand productivity, and examine isotope ratios. Although some studies have looked at the impacts of artificial defoliation on balsam fir in eastern North America, there has been no prior research on how WSB outbreaks affect the anatomical structure of the stem as described by intra-annual wood density and potential cell size variations. The objective of this study was to anatomically examine the response of Douglas-fir to sustained WSB outbreaks in two regions of southern British Columbia. We hypothesize that the anatomical intra-annual characteristics of the tree rings, such as cell wall thickness, latewood cell size, and/or lumen area changes during sustained WSB outbreaks. To test this hypothesis we sampled four permanent sample plots in coastal and dry interior sites, which had annually resolved defoliation data collected over a 7-12 year period. At each site diameter-at-breast height (cm), height (m), and crown position were recorded and three increment cores were extracted from 25 trees. Increment cores were prepared to permit anatomical and x-ray density analyses. For each tree, a 15µm thick micro section was cut from the radial plane. Digital images of the micro sections were captured and processed. In each annual ring, features such as cell lumen area (µm2

  14. Distribution of 32P in laboratory colonies of Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) after feeding on labeled Heliothis zeal (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) eggs: an explanation of discrepancies encountered in field predation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuessly, G.S.; Sterling, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    Factors responsible for low recovery rates of radioactive Solenopsis invicta Buren following placement of 32 P-labeled Heliothis zea (Boddie) eggs on cotton in field predation tests were investigated using laboratory colonies of the ants. S. invicta workers became radioactive while handling labeled eggs by rupturing the egg chorion or by picking up labeled substances present on the surface of eggs. Foragers that removed the eggs from the plants picked up significantly more of the label than did workers that were sampled from the colonies between 12 and 72 h after egg introduction. Percentage of workers that became labeled over time was much lower with the solid live food than in other studies that used powdered food sources. Problems in finding labeled ants in the field may have been associated with low mean levels of 32 P per ant, together with difficulty in locating and isolating labeled ants from the population. Results indicate that egg predation rates estimated from counts per minute per predator have high variability, and suggest fairly large errors in estimates of eggs consumed per ant. Use of recovery rates of labeled predators to improve estimation of predation rates is discussed

  15. Distribution of /sup 32/P in laboratory colonies of Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) after feeding on labeled Heliothis zeal (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) eggs: an explanation of discrepancies encountered in field predation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuessly, G.S.; Sterling, W.L.

    1986-12-01

    Factors responsible for low recovery rates of radioactive Solenopsis invicta Buren following placement of /sup 32/P-labeled Heliothis zea (Boddie) eggs on cotton in field predation tests were investigated using laboratory colonies of the ants. S. invicta workers became radioactive while handling labeled eggs by rupturing the egg chorion or by picking up labeled substances present on the surface of eggs. Foragers that removed the eggs from the plants picked up significantly more of the label than did workers that were sampled from the colonies between 12 and 72 h after egg introduction. Percentage of workers that became labeled over time was much lower with the solid live food than in other studies that used powdered food sources. Problems in finding labeled ants in the field may have been associated with low mean levels of /sup 32/P per ant, together with difficulty in locating and isolating labeled ants from the population. Results indicate that egg predation rates estimated from counts per minute per predator have high variability, and suggest fairly large errors in estimates of eggs consumed per ant. Use of recovery rates of labeled predators to improve estimation of predation rates is discussed.

  16. Radiation induced F1 sterility in the management of lepidopterous pests: concept, overview and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwalkar, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    The phenomenon of F1 or inherited sterility has been observed in a number of important pests which include Heliothis virescens, H. Zea, Trichoplusia ni etc.. Key findings that have advanced in the development of radiation sterilization technique are reviewed. 2 refs

  17. A proteomic analysis of short-term exposure to fipronil in larvae of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... planthopper: Application to the study of carbamate toxicity. Insect. Biochem. Mol. 34(5): 425-432. Shelby KS, Popham HJR (2009). Analysis of ESTs generated from immune-stimulated hemocytes of larval Heliothis virescens. J. Inverteb. Pathol. 101(2): 86-95. Song KH, Jung MK, Eum JH, Hwang IC, Han SS ...

  18. Characterization of Baculovirus Insecticides Expressing Tailored Bacillus thuringiensis CryIA(b) Crystal Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, John W M; Knoester, Marga; Weijts, Franci; Groffen, Sander J A; Hu, Zhihong; Bosch, Dirk; Vlak, Just M.

    1995-01-01

    Full-length, truncated, and mature forms of the CryIA(b) insecticidal crystal protein gene of Bacillus thuringiensis were engineered into the p10 locus of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV). A signal sequence of Heliothis virescens juvenile hormone esterase was introduced at

  19. 77 FR 47287 - Bacillus thuringiensis eCry3.1Ab Protein in Corn; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ...) only if EPA determines that the exemption is ``safe.'' Section 408(c)(2)(A)(ii) of FFDCA defines ``safe.... Refinement of Heliothis virescens and Trichoplusiani Specificity Domains on Cry1A(c). Journal of Biological... Federal Register. This final rule is not a ``major rule'' as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). List of Subjects...

  20. A residue in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I in insect and mammalian sodium channels regulate differential sensitivities to pyrethroid insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Eugênio E.; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. Pyrethroid insecticides exert their toxic action by modifying the gating of sodium channels. A valine to methionine mutation in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I (IS6) of sodium channels from tobacco budworms (Heliothis virescens) has been shown to alter channel gating and reduce insect sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroids. A valine to leucine substitution was subsequently reported in pyrethroid-resistant bedbug populations. Intriguingly, pyrethroid-resistant mammalian sodium channels possess an isoleucine at the corresponding position. To determine whether different substitutions at this position alter channel gating and confer pyrethroid resistance, we made valine to methionine, isoleucine or leucine substitutions at the corresponding position, V409, in a cockroach sodium channel and examined the gating properties and pyrethroid sensitivity of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. All three mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to three pyrethroids (permethrin, cismethrin and deltamethrin). V409M, but not V409I or V409L, caused 6-7 mV depolarizing shifts in the voltage dependences of both activation and inactivation. V409M and V409L slowed channel activation kinetics and accelerated open-state deactivation kinetics, but V409I did not. Furthermore, the substitution of isoleucine with valine, but not with methionine nor leucine, at the corresponding position in a rat skeletal muscle sodium channel, rNav1.4, enhanced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin. Collectively, our study highlights an important role of residues at 409 in regulating not only sodium channel gating, but also the differential sensitivities of insect and mammalian sodium channels to pyrethroids. PMID:23764339

  1. Optimal Cotton Insecticide Application Termination Timing: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, T W; Zapata, S D

    2016-08-01

    The concept of insecticide termination timing is generally accepted among cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) researchers; however, exact timings are often disputed. Specifically, there is uncertainty regarding the last economic insecticide application to control fruit-feeding pests including tarnished plant bug (Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)), boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis), bollworm (Helicoverpa zea), tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens), and cotton fleahopper (Pseudatomoscelis seriatus). A systematic review of prior studies was conducted within a meta-analytic framework. Nine publicly available articles were amalgamated to develop an optimal timing principle. These prior studies reported 53 independent multiple means comparison field experiments for a total of 247 trial observations. Stochastic plateau theory integrated with econometric meta-analysis methodology was applied to the meta-database to determine the shape of the functional form of both the agronomic optimal insecticide termination timing and corresponding yield potential. Results indicated that current university insecticide termination timing recommendations are later than overall estimated timing suggested. The estimated 159 heat units (HU) after the fifth position above white flower (NAWF5) was found to be statistically different than the 194 HU termination used as the status quo recommended termination timing. Insecticides applied after 159 HU may have been applied in excess, resulting in unnecessary economic and environmental costs. Empirical results also suggested that extending the insecticide termination time by one unit resulted in a cotton lint yield increase of 0.27 kilograms per hectare up to the timing where the plateau began. Based on economic analyses, profit-maximizing producers may cease application as soon as 124 HU after NAWF5. These results provided insights useful to improve production systems by applying inputs only when benefits were expected to be in excess of the

  2. A multisensory centrifugal neuron in the olfactory pathway of heliothine moths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xin-Cheng; Pfuhl, Gerit; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    We have characterized, by intracellular recording and staining, a unique type of centrifugal neuron in the brain olfactory center of two heliothine moth species; one in Heliothis virescens and one in Helicoverpa armigera. This unilateral neuron, which is not previously described in any moth, has...... showed that the centrifugal neuron is, in each brain hemisphere, one within a small group of neurons having their somata clustered. In both species the neuron was excited during application of non-odorant airborne signals, including transient sound pulses of broad bandwidth and air velocity changes....... Additional responses to odors were recorded from the neuron in Heliothis virescens. The putative biological significance of the centrifugal antennal-lobe neuron is discussed with regard to its morphological and physiological properties. In particular, a possible role in multisensory processes underlying...

  3. Mannose Phosphate Isomerase Isoenzymes in Plutella xylostella Support Common Genetic Bases of Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins in Lepidopteran Species

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero, Salvador; Ferré, Juan; Escriche, Baltasar

    2001-01-01

    A strong correlation between two mannose phosphate isomerase (MPI) isoenzymes and resistance to Cry1A toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis has been found in a Plutella xylostella population. MPI linkage to Cry1A resistance had previously been reported for a Heliothis virescens population. The fact that the two populations share similar biochemical, genetic, and cross-resistance profiles of resistance suggests the occurrence of homologous resistance loci in both species.

  4. Antifeedant Activity and High Mortality in the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae) Induced by Biostable Insect Kinin Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    modulate digestive enzyme release [13,14,20,33,28,41], and inter- estingly they can also inhibit weight gain in larvae of the tobacco budworm (Heliothis...modern insecticides, making a search for alternative strategies urgent [7]. Furthermore aphids are not sensitive to the toxins from the bacterium Bacillus ...Life Sci 2003;17:61–4. [14] Harshini S, Nachman RJ, Sreekumar S. Inhibition of digestive enzyme release by neuropeptides in larvae of Opisinia

  5. Métodos de analise dos danos da lagarta da espiga¹, em médias de gerações envolvendo IAC Maya e Zapalote Chico Method for analysis of damage of the corn earworm heliothis zea in generation means from IAC Maya and Zapalote Chico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alberto Marques Rezende

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available O milho Zapalote Chico 2451 (ZC 2451, referido na literatura como a melhor fonte de resistência à lagarta da espiga, Heliothis zea (Boddie, 1850, e o IAC Maya XII foram observados em condições de campo, juntamente com as gerações F1, e F2 resultantes do cruzamento de ambos, bem como os respectivos retrocruzamentos da população F1, para cada um dos pais, a fim de estudar métodos de análises de dados obtidos através da escala de dano revista por WIDSTROM e, conseqüentemente, fornecer subsídios para trabalhos de estudo da herança da resistência envolvendo esse cruzamento. Para analisar os dados, dividiram-se as notas de dano em quatro classes distintas agrupadas duas a duas, zero mais 1 e > 2, e zero e > 1, e aplicou-se o método do quiquadrado (c2 para verificar qual divisão melhor se ajustava. Os resultados revelaram que o grupo das classes zero mais 1 e > 2 apresentou melhor uniformidade dos dados entre as repetições dentro de cada tratamento. A análise da variância para cada classe de dano, separadamente, apresentou valores de F altamente significativos para as classes zero e zero mais 1, enquanto para as classes > 1 e > 2, os mesmos não permitiram diferenciar os tratamentos. Entre as classes zero e zero mais 1, esta última revelou maior significância e melhor precisão dos dados. O milho ZC 2451, quando comparado com a variedade IAC Maya XII, exibiu boa resistência à lagarta da espiga nas condições de Campinas (SP, resistência essa relacionada com fatores de não preferência e/ou antibiose, devido ã maior porcentagem de espigas não danificadas do ZC 2451.The line Zapalote Chico 2451 (ZC 2451 resistant to the corn earworm, Heliothis zea, the commercial synthetic Brazilian variety IAC Maya XII, the F1 and F2 obtained with their cross, and the two back crosses between the F1 and both parents, were planted in the field in a randomized block with 10 replications. The earworm damage done to the ears was graded

  6. Lepidoptera associated with western spruce budworm: introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Stevens; V. M. Carolin; George P. Markin

    1984-01-01

    Field workers doing surveys, control operations, and research on western spruce bud worm often encounter other kinds of foliage-feeding larvae, some of which closely resemble western spruce bud worm , Workers must be able to distinguish between the different species and groups.

  7. Processing of Pheromone Information in Related Species of Heliothine Moths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente G. Berg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In heliothine moths, the male-specific olfactory system is activated by a few odor molecules, each of which is associated with an easily identifiable glomerulus in the primary olfactory center of the brain. This arrangement is linked to two well-defined behavioral responses, one ensuring attraction and mating behavior by carrying information about pheromones released by conspecific females and the other inhibition of attraction via signal information emitted from heterospecifics. The chance of comparing the characteristic properties of pheromone receptor proteins, male-specific sensory neurons and macroglomerular complex (MGC-units in closely-related species is especially intriguing. Here, we review studies on the male-specific olfactory system of heliothine moths with particular emphasis on five closely related species, i.e., Heliothis virescens, Heliothis subflexa, Helicoverpa zea, Helicoverpa assulta and Helicoverpa armigera.

  8. Effects of adult feeding on the reproduction and longevity of Noctuidae, Crambidae, Tortricidae and Elachistidae species; Efeito da alimentacao da fase adulta na reproducao e longevidade de especies de Noctuidae, Crambidae, Tortricidae e Elachistidae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milano, Patricia; Berti Filho, Evoneo; Parra, Jose R. P.; Consoli, Fernando L., E-mail: patmilano@gmail.co, E-mail: eberti@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: jrpparra@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: fconsoli@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia e Acarologia; Oda, Melissa L., E-mail: melissa.oda@gmail.co [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Florestais

    2010-04-15

    This research evaluates the effect of the adult diet on the reproduction of Anticarsia gemmatalis Hubner, Heliothis virescens (Fabr.), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Noctuidae), Diatraea saccharalis (Fabr.) (Crambidae), Gymnandrosoma aurantianum Lima (Tortricidae) and Stenoma catenifer Walsingham (Elachistidae). Adults of all species were fed either water or a 10% honey solution. The egg viability for the 1{sup st} and 2{sup n}d egg masses, adult fecundity, longevity, number of mating and the ovigeny index (OI) (degree of ovarian maturation) were evaluated. Fecundity of A. gemmatalis and H. virescens was drastically reduced when females were fed only on water. Egg viability from both 1{sup st} and 2{sup nd} egg masses was variable between treatments. Females of A. gemmatalis, H. virescens and S. frugiperda, and males of some species had a reduced longevity when fed only on water. The number of matings was higher for A. gemmatalis and D. saccharalis when fed on water only. The OI was < 1.0 for all species evaluated indicating that all females may develop new oocytes as they age. Based on the OI and the reduced fecundity of A. gemmatalis and H. virescens, one observes that adult feeding is important for the reproduction of both species, and the IO is not a good parameter to indicate such condition. Spodoptera frugiperda, G. aurantianum, D. saccharalis and S. catenifer do not require any source of carbohydrates as adults to sustain their reproduction. (author)

  9. Evaluación y selección de un protocolo vía Agrobacterium para la incorporación de resistencia al cogollero en la variedad de tomate Unapal-Arreboles Evaluation and selection of a protocol for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tomato variety Unapal-Arreboles for resistance to budworm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Ramírez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó y seleccionó una metodología para la transformación genética de la variedad de tomate UNAPAL-Arreboles con el gen cry1Ab para la incorporación de resistencia al cogollero (Tuta absoluta, utilizando el sistema de Agrobacterium. Se regeneraron 59 plantas transgénicas a partir de 3.200 explantes (1.84%. La integración estable, expresión y herencia de los genes nptII y gus-intrón, se demostraron mediante análisis histoquímico y molecular en los clones To28, To33 y To47 y en la correspondiente generación T1. Sin embargo, los análisis molecular e inmunológico indicaron ausencia del gen cry1Ab sugiriendo que la secuencia de este gen se puede haber modificado.A plant transformation methodology was selected and evaluated to incorporate the cry1Ab gene by Agrobacterium-mediate genetic transformation into tomato variety UNAPAL-Arreboles for resistance to budworm (Tuta absoluta. A total of 59 transgenic plants were regenerated from 3.200 explants (1.84%. Histochemical gus assay and molecular analysis of three independent events To28, To33 and To47 and corresponding T1 derived generations, demonstrate the stable integration, expression and inheritance of the nptII and gus-intron genes. However, the molecular and immunological analysis of these same clones, indicate that the cry1Ab gene is not present in the transformed plants, suggesting that the sequence of this gene may be modified as result of possible recombinant events.

  10. Functional expression of lepidopteran-selective neurotoxin in baculovirus: potential for effective pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra, Wudayagiri; Hackett, Kevin J; Buckley, Ellen; Hammock, Bruce D

    2006-02-01

    Recombinant baculovirus expressing insect-selective neurotoxins derived from venomous animals are considered as an attractive alternative to chemical insecticides for efficient insect control agents. Recently we identified and characterized a novel lepidopteran-selective toxin, Buthus tamulus insect-selective toxin (ButaIT), having 37 amino acids and eight half cysteine residues from the venom of the South Indian red scorpion, Mesobuthus tamulus. The synthetic toxin gene containing the ButaIT sequence in frame to the bombyxin signal sequence was engineered into a polyhedrin positive Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) genome under the control of the p10 promoter. Toxin expression in the haemolymph of infected larvae of Heliothis virescens and also in an insect cell culture system was confirmed by western blot analysis using antibody raised against the GST-ButaIT fusion protein. The recombinant NPV (ButaIT-NPV) showed enhanced insecticidal activity on the larvae of Heliothis virescens as evidenced by a significant reduction in median survival time (ST50) and also a greater reduction in feeding damage as compared to the wild-type AcMNPV.

  11. The basic principles of the application of sterile insect technique for area-wide insect pest control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singgih Sutrisno

    2006-01-01

    Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) is a new insect pest control technique, potential, and compatible to other techniques. This technique includes irradiation of insect colony in the laboratory using gamma, n, or x-rays and then release them in the field periodically to obtain the increase of sterility probability level from the first generation to the dependence as the result the decrease of the fertility level in the field. The effect the release of sterile insects ( 9:1 ratio to the male indigenous and reproductive potential every single female of each generation reproduce 5 females ) to the insect reduction population model is conceptually discussed. From one million of the female parental decrease to be 26, 316; 1,907; 10; and 0 insects at the first, second, third, and the forth progeny respectively. Then if sterile insect technique integrated with chemical technique (insecticide) 90% kill, it will be much more effective compared to the application sterile insect technique only. From the number of one million population of insects will decrease to be 2,632; 189; and 0 insects at the first, second, and the third progeny respectively. In the Lepidoptera insects was found a phenomenon of inherited sterility. According to Knipling (1970) the inherited sterility in the first offspring caused by chromosome translocation in the gamete . In the individual of heterozygote will be die and in the homozygotes is still alive. Interspecific hybrid sterility first time was found by Laster (1972) from a cross between males Heliothis virescens (F) and females Heliothis subflexa Guenee. Male moths of the first offspring from the cross between H. virescens and H. subflexa is sterile and the females still remain fertile. If the female moths of the first offspring back crossed with male H. virescens the phenomenon of sterility always found will same situation as mention earlier the male offspring is sterile and the females is fertile ( the male F2 will be sterile and the females will

  12. Spruce Budworms Handbook: shigometry – a reference guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex L. Shigo; Walter C. Shortle

    1985-01-01

    This guide explains how to test the condition of living trees or wood products by use of the Shigometer and gives instructions for its use. The guide is in three parts: (1) An introduction on operating principles and applications, (2) an example of the procedure, and (3) a photo guide that gives details on the procedure and background information needed to use it....

  13. Kraft pulp from budworm-infested jack pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Y. Zhu; Gary C. Myers

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the quality of kraft pulp from bud-worm-infested jack pine. The logs were classified as merchantable live, suspect, or merchantable dead. Raw materials were evaluated through visual inspection, analysis of the chemical composition, SilviScan measurement of the density, and measurement of the tracheid length. Unbleached pulps were then refined using...

  14. Unbiased transcriptional comparisons of generalist and specialist herbivores feeding on progressively defenseless Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Govind

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbivore feeding elicits dramatic increases in defenses, most of which require jasmonate (JA signaling, and against which specialist herbivores are thought to be better adapted than generalist herbivores. Unbiased transcriptional analyses of how neonate larvae cope with these induced plant defenses are lacking.We created cDNA microarrays for Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens separately, by spotting normalized midgut-specific cDNA libraries created from larvae that fed for 24 hours on MeJA-elicited wild-type (WT Nicotiana attenuata plants. These microarrays were hybridized with labeled probes from neonates that fed for 24 hours on WT and isogenic plants progressively silenced in JA-mediated defenses (N: nicotine; N/PI: N and trypsin protease inhibitors; JA: all JA-mediated defenses. H. virescens neonates regulated 16 times more genes than did M. sexta neonates when they fed on plants silenced in JA-mediated defenses, and for both species, the greater the number of defenses silenced in the host plant (JA > N/PI > N, the greater were the number of transcripts regulated in the larvae. M. sexta larvae tended to down-regulate while H. virescens larvae up- and down-regulated transcripts from the same functional categories of genes. M. sexta larvae regulated transcripts in a diet-specific manner, while H. virescens larvae regulated a similar suite of transcripts across all diet types.The observations are consistent with the expectation that specialists are better adapted than generalist herbivores to the defense responses elicited in their host plants by their feeding. While M. sexta larvae appear to be better adapted to N. attenuata's defenses, some of the elicited responses remain effective defenses against both herbivore species. The regulated genes provide novel insights into larval adaptations to N. attenuata's induced defenses, and represent potential targets for plant-mediated RNAi to falsify hypotheses about the process of adaptation.

  15. Анализ этологических и репродуктивных особенностей и динамики развития популяции Heliothis armigera на протяжении сезона

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Валерия КЕПТИНАРЬ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Information on the fertility of female cotton bollworms and the viability of their laid eggs makes it possible to predict the number of next generation in the crop fields and the harm that this population may cause to the harvest. During the vegetative season of 2016 (the 1st decade of May - the 3rd decade of September, a seasonal monitoring of the Heliothis armigera pest population was carried out using a light trap installed in the immediate vicinity of a soybean field. Due to the conducted research, the emergence and peaks of the cotton bollworm flight were recorded, sex ratio wes determined, as well as reproductive and copulative potential of females were estimated. It was established that in the climatic conditions of the Republic of Moldova, Heliothis armigera pest develops in three generations. The duration of generation development is from the 3rd decade of May to the 3rd decade of September. Male-female ratio was 58% males to 42% females. The copulative and reproductive potential of this pest depends on the succession of generations. The reproductive potential of the first generation was 37.8%, 40.1% for the second generation and 22.1% for the third generation. The copulative potential of H. armigera females was of 65.0% paired 1-2 times and only 35.0% were paired 3-5 times. Реферат. Сведения о плодовитости самок хлопковой совки и жизнеспособности отложенных ими яиц предоставляет возможность прогнозировать численность последующего поколения на участках сельскохозяйственных культур и ту опасность, которую эта популяция нанесет урожаю. На протяжении вегетативного сезона 2016 года (Iдекада мая – III декада сентября был проведен

  16. High Concentrations of Chlorantraniliprole Reduce Its Compatibility with a Key Predator, Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, P R R; Torres, J B; Michaud, J P; Rodrigues, A R S

    2017-10-01

    Diamides are a novel insecticide group that act by disrupting insect muscle contraction. Recommended field rates (FRs) vary greatly among target pests and cropping systems, leading to variable risks for non-target organisms. We evaluated the toxicity of chlorantraniliprole to the predator Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) by exposure to residues, topical application, and consumption of contaminated food. We also estimated lethal concentrations (LCs) of chlorantraniliprole in two target pests, cotton leafworm, Alabama argillacea (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), and tobacco budworm, Chloridea virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), by exposing larvae to treated cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., leaves and assessed residual activity at various intervals after application to cotton plants. Exposure to dried residues and ingestion of treated moth eggs resulted in similar toxicity to H. convergens, whereas topical application was a less toxic route of exposure. Regardless of exposure route, the LC50s and LC90s obtained for H. convergens were higher than those calculated for the pests. Residues at the upper limit of the LC90 for C. virescens remained effective against this pest for up to 16 d, while exhibiting minor impacts on H. convergens. In contrast, the FR concentration of C. virescens caused significant mortality in H. convergens. The results suggest that the current FR for C. virescens is too high to be safe for H. convergens, and given the LCs observed for this pest in the present study, trials to explore the potential efficacy of lower FRs are justified. Depending on the concentration and route of exposure, this insecticide has the potential to be compatible with H. convergens. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Sound-sensitive neurons innervate the ventro-lateral protocerebrum of the heliothine moth brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfuhl, Gerit; Zhao, Xin Cheng; Ian, Elena

    2014-01-01

    -sensitive neurons in the moth brain. During intracellular recordings from the lateral protocerebrum in the brain of three noctuid moth species, Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa assulta, we found an assembly of neurons responding to transient sound pulses of broad bandwidth. The majority...... of the auditory neurons ascended from the ventral cord and ramified densely within the anterior region of the ventro-lateral protocerebrum. The physiological and morphological characteristics of these auditory neurons were similar. We detected one additional sound-sensitive neuron, a brain interneuron with its......Many noctuid moth species perceive ultrasound via tympanic ears that are located at the metathorax. Whereas the neural processing of auditory information is well studied at the peripheral and first synaptic level, little is known about the features characterizing higher order sound...

  18. Comparing Behavior and Clock Gene Expression between Caterpillars, Butterflies, and Moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepoth, Natalie; Ke, Gao; de Roode, Jacobus C; Groot, Astrid T

    2018-02-01

    Circadian behavior is widely observed in insects; however, the mechanisms that drive its evolution remain a black box. While circadian activity rhythms are well characterized in adults within the order Lepidoptera (i.e., most butterfly species are day active, while most moths are night active), much less is known about daily activity and clock gene expression in the larval stage. Additionally, direct comparison of clock gene expression between day-active and night-active species reared together has not been quantified. Our study characterized the daily rhythms of caterpillar feeding and activity in addition to the gene expression of 2 central circadian clock genes, period ( per) and timeless ( tim), in larvae and adults of the day-active butterfly Danaus plexippus and the night-active moth Heliothis virescens. We found that neither Danaus nor Heliothis caterpillars are strictly diurnal or nocturnal like their adult counterparts; however, we found that slight rhythms in feeding and activity can arise in response to external forces, such as temperature and host plant. Expression levels differed between genes, between butterfly larvae and adults, and between butterfly and moth species, even though expression levels of both per and tim oscillated with a similar phase over 24 hours across all treatments. Our study, the first of its kind to investigate circadian timekeeper gene expression in 2 life stages and 2 species, highlights interesting differences in core clock gene expression patterns that could have potential downstream effects on circadian rhythms.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of a Baculovirus Associated with the Insect Parasitoid Wasp, Cotesia marginiventris, or Its Host, Trichoplusia ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasela, James J.; McIntosh, Arthur H.; Shelby, Kent S.; Long, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (MNPV) was isolated from Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae that had been stung by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). The wild type virus was plaque purified by infecting a Heliothis subflexa (BCIRL- HsAM1) cell line and isolating several clones. The mean estimated genomic size of this virus based on PstI, BstEII, StyI, HindIII restriction profiles was estimated to be 106 ± 2.5 kbp (mean±SE). A clone designated as TnMNPV/CmBCL9 was used in bioassays against several lepidopteran pests and in comparative studies with the baculoviruses AcMNPV, AgMNPV, AfMNPV, PxMNPV and HzSNPV of Autographa califomica, Anticarsia gemmatalis, Anagrapha falcifera, Plutella xylostella, and Helicoverpa zea, respectively. Infectivity studies showed that TnMNPV/CmBCL9 was highly infectious for Heliothis subflexa and T. ni, with an LC50 value 0.07 occlusion bodies/mm2 in both species and also infectious for H. zea and Heliothis virescens with LC50 values of 0.22 and 0.27 occlusion bodies/mm2, respectively. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the isolate and selected baculoviruses revealed profiles that were very similar to AfMNPV but different from the restriction endonuclease profiles of the other baculoviruses. Hybridization studies suggest that the TnMNPV/CmBCL9 was closely related to AfMNPV and AcMNPV-HPP. Further support for this comes from a phylogenetic analysis employing a split-graphs network, comparing the polh, egt, and p10 genes from TnMNPV/CmBCL9 with those from other baculoviruses and suggests that this virus is closely related to the AcMNPV variants, AfMNPV and RoMNPV of Rachiplusia ou. PMID:20334593

  20. Reduced levels of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase are common to lepidopteran strains resistant to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Jakka, Siva Rama Krishna; Ning, Changming; Liu, Chenxi; Wu, Kongming; Jackson, Jerreme; Gould, Fred; Blanco, Carlos; Portilla, Maribel; Perera, Omaththage; Adang, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Development of insect resistance is one of the main concerns with the use of transgenic crops expressing Cry toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Identification of biomarkers would assist in the development of sensitive DNA-based methods to monitor evolution of resistance to Bt toxins in natural populations. We report on the proteomic and genomic detection of reduced levels of midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (mALP) as a common feature in strains of Cry-resistant Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda when compared to susceptible larvae. Reduced levels of H. virescens mALP protein (HvmALP) were detected by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis in Cry-resistant compared to susceptible larvae, further supported by alkaline phosphatase activity assays and Western blotting. Through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) we demonstrate that the reduction in HvmALP protein levels in resistant larvae are the result of reduced transcript amounts. Similar reductions in ALP activity and mALP transcript levels were also detected for a Cry1Ac-resistant strain of H. armigera and field-derived strains of S. frugiperda resistant to Cry1Fa. Considering the unique resistance and cross-resistance phenotypes of the insect strains used in this work, our data suggest that reduced mALP expression should be targeted for development of effective biomarkers for resistance to Cry toxins in lepidopteran pests.

  1. Interactions between the jasmonic and salicylic acid pathway modulate the plant metabolome and affect herbivores of different feeding types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, R; Heise, A-M; Persicke, M; Müller, C

    2014-07-01

    The phytohormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) mediate induced plant defences and the corresponding pathways interact in a complex manner as has been shown on the transcript and proteine level. Downstream, metabolic changes are important for plant-herbivore interactions. This study investigated metabolic changes in leaf tissue and phloem exudates of Plantago lanceolata after single and combined JA and SA applications as well as consequences on chewing-biting (Heliothis virescens) and piercing-sucking (Myzus persicae) herbivores. Targeted metabolite profiling and untargeted metabolic fingerprinting uncovered different categories of plant metabolites, which were influenced in a specific manner, indicating points of divergence, convergence, positive crosstalk and pronounced mutual antagonism between the signaling pathways. Phytohormone-specific decreases of primary metabolite pool sizes in the phloem exudates may indicate shifts in sink-source relations, resource allocation, nutrient uptake or photosynthesis. Survival of both herbivore species was significantly reduced by JA and SA treatments. However, the combined application of JA and SA attenuated the negative effects at least against H. virescens suggesting that mutual antagonism between the JA and SA pathway may be responsible. Pathway interactions provide a great regulatory potential for the plant that allows triggering of appropriate defences when attacked by different antagonist species. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Relação entre toxicidade de proteínas Vip3Aa e sua capacidade de ligação a receptores intestinais de lepidópteros-praga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Cristina Marucci

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumo:O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a toxicidade de novas proteínas Vip3Aa e sua capacidade de ligação a vesículas de membrana da microvilosidade apical (VMMA do intestino de lagartas neonatas de Spodoptera frugiperda, Anticarsia gemmatalise Heliothis virescens. Proteínas expressas pelos genes vip3Aa42 e vip3Aa43 mostraram-se tóxicas a S. frugiperda (CL50 de 78,2 e 113 ng cm-2, respectivamente e A. gemmatalis(CL50 de 239,2 e 57,5 ng cm-2, respectivamente, e pouco tóxicas a H. virescens (CL50>5.000 ng cm-2. Os ensaios de ligação às VMMA mostraram que as proteínas unem-se de forma efetiva aos receptores nas vesículas das espécies avaliadas, mas essa capacidade de ligação somente é efetiva na ativação da toxicidade para as populações avaliadas de S. frugiperdae A. gemmatalis.

  3. Reduced levels of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase are common to lepidopteran strains resistant to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes

    Full Text Available Development of insect resistance is one of the main concerns with the use of transgenic crops expressing Cry toxins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Identification of biomarkers would assist in the development of sensitive DNA-based methods to monitor evolution of resistance to Bt toxins in natural populations. We report on the proteomic and genomic detection of reduced levels of midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (mALP as a common feature in strains of Cry-resistant Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda when compared to susceptible larvae. Reduced levels of H. virescens mALP protein (HvmALP were detected by two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE analysis in Cry-resistant compared to susceptible larvae, further supported by alkaline phosphatase activity assays and Western blotting. Through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR we demonstrate that the reduction in HvmALP protein levels in resistant larvae are the result of reduced transcript amounts. Similar reductions in ALP activity and mALP transcript levels were also detected for a Cry1Ac-resistant strain of H. armigera and field-derived strains of S. frugiperda resistant to Cry1Fa. Considering the unique resistance and cross-resistance phenotypes of the insect strains used in this work, our data suggest that reduced mALP expression should be targeted for development of effective biomarkers for resistance to Cry toxins in lepidopteran pests.

  4. The role of herbivore- and plant-related experiences in intraspecific host preference of a relatively specialized parasitoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawo, Tolulope; Fadamiro, Henry

    2017-09-06

    Parasitoids use odor cues from infested plants and herbivore hosts to locate their hosts. Specialist parasitoids of generalist herbivores are predicted to rely more on herbivore-derived cues than plant-derived cues. Microplitis croceipes (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a relatively specialized larval endoparasitoid of Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), which is a generalist herbivore on several crops including cotton and soybean. Using M. croceipes/H. virescens as a model system, we tested the following predictions about specialist parasitoids of generalist herbivores: (i) naive parasitoids will show innate responses to herbivore-emitted kairomones, regardless of host plant identity and (ii) herbivore-related experience will have a greater influence on intraspecific oviposition preference than plant-related experience. Inexperienced (naive) female M. croceipes did not discriminate between cotton-fed and soybean-fed H. virescens in oviposition choice tests, supporting our first prediction. Oviposition experience alone with either host group influenced subsequent oviposition preference while experience with infested plants alone did not elicit preference in M. croceipes, supporting our second prediction. Furthermore, associative learning of oviposition with host-damaged plants facilitated host location. Interestingly, naive parasitoids attacked more soybean-fed than cotton-fed host larvae in two-choice tests when a background of host-infested cotton odor was supplied, and vice versa. This suggests that plant volatiles may have created an olfactory contrast effect. We discussed ecological significance of the results and concluded that both plant- and herbivore-related experiences play important role in parasitoid host foraging. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Disposable Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-Coated Fused Silica Optical Fibers for Sampling Pheromones of Moths.

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    Rik Lievers

    Full Text Available In the past decades, the sex pheromone composition in female moths has been analyzed by different methods, ranging from volatile collections to gland extractions, which all have some disadvantage: volatile collections can generally only be conducted on (small groups of females to detect the minor pheromone compounds, whereas gland extractions are destructive. Direct-contact SPME overcomes some of these disadvantages, but is expensive, the SPME fiber coating can be damaged due to repeated usage, and samples need to be analyzed relatively quickly after sampling. In this study, we assessed the suitability of cheap and disposable fused silica optical fibers coated with 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS by sampling the pheromone of two noctuid moths, Heliothis virescens and Heliothis subflexa. By rubbing the disposable PDMS fibers over the pheromone glands of females that had called for at least 15 minutes and subsequently extracting the PDMS fibers in hexane, we collected all known pheromone compounds, and we found a strong positive correlation for most pheromone compounds between the disposable PDMS fiber rubs and the corresponding gland extracts of the same females. When comparing this method to volatile collections and the corresponding gland extracts, we generally found comparable percentages between the three techniques, with some differences that likely stem from the chemical properties of the individual pheromone compounds. Hexane extraction of cheap, disposable, PDMS coated fused silica optical fibers allows for sampling large quantities of individual females in a short time, eliminates the need for immediate sample analysis, and enables to use the same sample for multiple chemical analyses.

  6. Assessment of Lupin Induced Mutants for Quality Traits and Susceptibility to Callosbruchus chinensis and Heliothis armigera insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, A.I.; Boshra, S.A.; Mehany, A.L.; Darwish, A.A.; Kharrab, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess 23 induced mutants and two parental varieties Giza1 and Giza2 in the three generations (M3, M4, and M5) for seed quality traits, and susceptibility to two insects i.e C. chinnensis and H.armigera. The obtained results exhibited highly significant decrease for alkaloid content of mutants 20 and 23 as compared with the two local varieties. Most of mutants and Giza 2 showed marked increase for protein content as compared with Giza1, however, the increase did not reach the level of significance for the most mutants as compared with Giza2 in the three generations. Except of M4 generation. marked resistance for infestations with C.chinensis and H.armigera was obtained for mutants 1, 5 and 11 in the three generations. However, for total infestation with the two insects, resistance was obtained in mutants 4 and 10. Except of mutant lines 1, 5 and 11, all mutants showed higher loss percentage than that of the local varieties

  7. Modeling insect disturbance across forested landscapes: Insights from the spruce budworm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian R. Sturtevant; Barry J. Cooke; Daniel D. Kneeshaw; David A. MacLean

    2015-01-01

    Insects are important disturbance agents affecting temperate and boreal biomes (Wermelinger 2004; Johnson et al. 2005; Cooke et al. 2007; Raffa et al. 2008). Defoliating insects in particular have historically affected a staggering area of North American forests, particularly across the boreal biome (Fig. 5.1). Principal among these boreal forest defoliators is the...

  8. Characterization of EST-based SSR loci in the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.M.T. Brunet; D. Doucet; B.R. Sturtevant; F.A.H. Sperling

    2013-01-01

    After identifying 114 microsatellite loci from Choristoneura fumiferana expressed sequence tags, 87 loci were assayed in a panel of 11 wild-caught individuals, giving 29 polymorphic loci. Further analysis of 20 of these loci on 31 individuals collected from a single population in northern Minnesota identified 14 in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

  9. Construction and sequence sampling of deep-coverage, large-insert BAC libraries for three model lepidopteran species

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    Zhao Shaying

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manduca sexta, Heliothis virescens, and Heliconius erato represent three widely-used insect model species for genomic and fundamental studies in Lepidoptera. Large-insert BAC libraries of these insects are critical resources for many molecular studies, including physical mapping and genome sequencing, but not available to date. Results We report the construction and characterization of six large-insert BAC libraries for the three species and sampling sequence analysis of the genomes. The six BAC libraries were constructed with two restriction enzymes, two libraries for each species, and each has an average clone insert size ranging from 152–175 kb. We estimated that the genome coverage of each library ranged from 6–9 ×, with the two combined libraries of each species being equivalent to 13.0–16.3 × haploid genomes. The genome coverage, quality and utility of the libraries were further confirmed by library screening using 6~8 putative single-copy probes. To provide a first glimpse into these genomes, we sequenced and analyzed the BAC ends of ~200 clones randomly selected from the libraries of each species. The data revealed that the genomes are AT-rich, contain relatively small fractions of repeat elements with a majority belonging to the category of low complexity repeats, and are more abundant in retro-elements than DNA transposons. Among the species, the H. erato genome is somewhat more abundant in repeat elements and simple repeats than those of M. sexta and H. virescens. The BLAST analysis of the BAC end sequences suggested that the evolution of the three genomes is widely varied, with the genome of H. virescens being the most conserved as a typical lepidopteran, whereas both genomes of H. erato and M. sexta appear to have evolved significantly, resulting in a higher level of species- or evolutionary lineage-specific sequences. Conclusion The high-quality and large-insert BAC libraries of the insects, together

  10. Contributions of gut bacteria to Bacillus thuringiensis-induced mortality vary across a range of Lepidoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Nichole A; Robinson, Courtney J; McMahon, Matthew D; Holt, Jonathan; Handelsman, Jo; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2009-01-01

    Background Gut microbiota contribute to the health of their hosts, and alterations in the composition of this microbiota can lead to disease. Previously, we demonstrated that indigenous gut bacteria were required for the insecticidal toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis to kill the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. B. thuringiensis and its associated insecticidal toxins are commonly used for the control of lepidopteran pests. A variety of factors associated with the insect host, B. thuringiensis strain, and environment affect the wide range of susceptibilities among Lepidoptera, but the interaction of gut bacteria with these factors is not understood. To assess the contribution of gut bacteria to B. thuringiensis susceptibility across a range of Lepidoptera we examined larval mortality of six species in the presence and absence of their indigenous gut bacteria. We then assessed the effect of feeding an enteric bacterium isolated from L. dispar on larval mortality following ingestion of B. thuringiensis toxin. Results Oral administration of antibiotics reduced larval mortality due to B. thuringiensis in five of six species tested. These included Vanessa cardui (L.), Manduca sexta (L.), Pieris rapae (L.) and Heliothis virescens (F.) treated with a formulation composed of B. thuringiensis cells and toxins (DiPel), and Lymantria dispar (L.) treated with a cell-free formulation of B. thuringiensis toxin (MVPII). Antibiotics eliminated populations of gut bacteria below detectable levels in each of the insects, with the exception of H. virescens, which did not have detectable gut bacteria prior to treatment. Oral administration of the Gram-negative Enterobacter sp. NAB3, an indigenous gut resident of L. dispar, restored larval mortality in all four of the species in which antibiotics both reduced susceptibility to B. thuringiensis and eliminated gut bacteria, but not in H. virescens. In contrast, ingestion of B. thuringiensis toxin (MVPII) following antibiotic treatment

  11. Identification, characterization and expression of a defensin-like antifungal peptide from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z-Z; Shi, M; Ye, X-Q; Chen, M-Y; Chen, X-X

    2013-06-01

    Defensins are a class of small and diverse cysteine-rich proteins which have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. We identified and characterized a full-length cDNA encoding a putative defensin-like peptide from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci by RACE and quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR. The full-length cDNA, named Btdef, was 388 bp long and contained an open reading frame of 228 bp. The putative mature Btdef had 46 amino acids with a molecular weight of 5.06 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed significant homology with insect defensins from Heliothis virescens (76%) and Galleria mellonella (75%). The predicted mature form of Btdef was expressed as a recombinant peptide in Escherichia coli. Antimicrobial assays of the purified product indicated that Btdef was most active against fungi. qRT-PCR analyses indicated that Btdef mRNA was constitutively expressed in different tissues of B. tabaci, including fat body, midgut, ovaries and salivary gland, and was induced by fungal infection. Btdef mRNA expression was also significantly altered after feeding on different host plants, indicating that diet affects immune defences in B. tabaci. These results describe for the first time the basic properties of a defensin-like peptide from B. tabaci that probably plays an important role in the immune response against pathogens. © 2013 Royal Entomological Society.

  12. The sensory neurone membrane protein SNMP1 contributes to the sensitivity of a pheromone detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregitzer, P; Greschista, M; Breer, H; Krieger, J

    2014-12-01

    Male moths detect female-released sex pheromones with extraordinary sensitivity. The remarkable sensory ability is based on a cooperative interplay of pheromone binding proteins in the lymph of hair-like sensilla trichodea and pheromone receptors in the dendrites of sensory neurones. Here we examined whether in Heliothis virescens the so-called 'sensory neurone membrane protein 1' (SNMP1) may contribute to responsiveness to the pheromone component, (Z)-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald). By means of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization we demonstrated that SNMP1 is in fact present in cells expressing the Z11-16:Ald receptor HR13 and the dendrites of sensory neurones. To assess a possible function of SNMP1 we monitored the responsiveness of cell lines that expressed HR13 alone or the combination SNMP1/HR13 to stimulation with Z11-16:Ald by calcium imaging. It was found that SNMP1/HR13 cells were 1000-fold more sensitive to pheromone stimulation compared with HR13 cells. In contrast, cells that expressed HR13 and the non-neuronal SNMP2-type showed no change in pheromone sensitivity. Overall, our reconstitution experiments demonstrate that the presence of SNMP1 significantly increases the HR13-based responsiveness of cells to Z11-16:Ald, suggesting that SNMP1 also contributes to the response of the antennal neurones and thus to the remarkable sensitivity of the pheromone detection system. © 2014 The Royal Entomological Society.

  13. Synthesis and metabolism of pheromones and pheromone analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Y.S.

    1987-01-01

    [9, 10- 3 H 2 ]Z9-14:Ac was synthesized at high specific activity ( 3 H, 58 Ci/mmole) by partial tritiation of the corresponding alkyne and was converted to the labeled Z9-14:OH and Z9-14:Al to study tissue specificity of acetate esterase (E), alcohol oxidase (OX), and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in male and female Heliothis virescens. Soluble and membrane-associated enzyme activities were determined by radio-TLC assays. Compounds of the tritium-labeled Z11-16 series were synthesized and their in vitro fates examined as well. In order to achieve an alternative approach in which (1) pheromone receptor proteins would be stoichiometrically and irreversibly modified, or (2) pheromone-catabolizing enzymes are inactivated by tight-binding or irreversible inhibitors, we have designed analogues of pheromones of lepidopterous insect pests and assayed their biological activity in vitro and in vivo. Various fluorinated molecules such as acyl fluorides, fluoroolefins, 2-fluoro aldehydes, 2,2-difluoro aldehydes and trifluoromethyl ketones were synthesized. The synthesis of some other functional groups such as cyclopropanones, cyclopropanols, cyclopropyl carbinols, cyclopropyl aldehydes and Michael acceptors will also be discussed

  14. Transfer of Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab proteins from genetically engineered Bt cotton to herbivores and predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissle, Michael; Romeis, Jörg

    2017-04-04

    With the cultivation of Bt cotton, the produced insecticidal Cry proteins are ingested by herbivores and potentially transferred along the food chain to natural enemies, such as predators. In laboratory experiments with Bollgard II cotton, concentrations of Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab were measured in Lepidoptera larvae (Spodoptera littoralis, Heliothis virescens), plant bugs (Euschistus heros), aphids (Aphis gossypii), whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci), thrips (Thrips tabaci, Frankliniella occidentalis), and spider mites (Tetranychus urticae). Tritrophic experiments were conducted with caterpillars of S. littoralis as prey and larvae of ladybird beetles (Harmonia axyridis, Adalia bipunctata) and lacewings (Chrysoperla carnea) as predators. Immunological measurements (ELISA) indicated that herbivores feeding on Bt cotton contained 5%-50% of the Bt protein concentrations in leaves except whiteflies and aphids, which contained no or only traces of Bt protein, and spider mites, which contained 7 times more Cry1Ac than leaves. Similarly, predators contained 1%-30% of the Cry protein concentration in prey. For the nontarget risk assessment, this indicates that Bt protein concentrations decrease considerably from one trophic level to the next in the food web, except for spider mites that contain Bt protein concentrations higher than those measured in the leaves. Exposure of phloem sucking hemipterans is negligible. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Cotton Defense Induction Patterns Under Spatially, Temporally and Quantitatively Varying Herbivory Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenring, Michael; Meissle, Michael; Hagenbucher, Steffen; Naranjo, Steven E; Wettstein, Felix; Romeis, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    In its defense against herbivores, cotton ( Gossypium sp.) relies in part on the production of a set of inducible, non-volatile terpenoids. Under uniform damage levels, in planta allocation of induced cotton terpenoids has been found to be highest in youngest leaves, supporting assumptions of the optimal defense theory (ODT) which predicts that plants allocate defense compounds to tissues depending on their value and the likelihood of herbivore attack. However, our knowledge is limited on how varying, and thus more realistic, damage levels might affect cotton defense organization. We hypothesized that the allocation of terpenoids and densities of terpenoid-storing glands in leaves aligns with assumptions of the ODT, even when plants are subjected to temporally, spatially and quantitatively varying caterpillar ( Heliothis virescens ) damage. As expected, cotton plants allocated most of their defenses to their youngest leaves regardless of damage location. However, defense induction in older leaves varied with damage location. For at least 14 days after damage treatments ended, plants reallocated defense resources from previously young leaves to newly developed leaves. Furthermore, we observed a positive hyperbolic relationship between leaf damage area and both terpenoid concentrations and gland densities, indicating that cotton plants can fine-tune defense allocation. Although it appears that factors like vascular constraints and chemical properties of individual defense compounds can affect defense levels, our results overall demonstrate that induced defense organization of cotton subjected to varying damage treatments is in alignment with key assumptions of the ODT.

  16. (-)-Germacrene D receptor neurones in three species of heliothine moths: structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranden, M; Liblikas, I; König, W A; Almaas, T J; Borg-Karlson, A-K; Mustaparta, H

    2003-07-01

    Specificity of olfactory receptor neurones plays an important role in food and host preferences of a species, and may have become conserved or changed in the evolution of polyphagy and oligophagy. We have identified a major type of plant odour receptor neurones responding to the sesquiterpene germacrene D in three species of heliothine moths, the polyphagous Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa armigera and the oligophagous Helicoverpa assulta. The neurones respond with high sensitivity and selectivity to (-)-germacrene D, as demonstrated by screening via gas chromatography with numerous mixtures of plant volatiles. Germacrene D was present in both host and non-host plants, but only in half of the tested species. The specificity of the neurones was similar in the three species, as shown by the "secondary" responses to a few other sesquiterpenes. The effect of (-)-germacrene D was about ten times stronger than that of the (+)-enantiomer, which again was about ten times stronger than that of (-)-alpha-ylangene. Weaker effects were obtained for (+)-beta-ylangene, (+)-alpha-copaene, beta-copaene and two unidentified sesquiterpenes. The structure-activity relationship shows that the important properties of (-)-germacrene D in activating the neurones are the ten-membered ring system and the three double bonds acting as electron-rich centres, in addition to the direction of the isopropyl-group responsible for the different effects of the germacrene D enantiomers.

  17. Synthesis and metabolism of pheromones and pheromone analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.S.

    1987-01-01

    (9, 10-/sup 3/H/sub 2/)Z9-14:Ac was synthesized at high specific activity (/sup 3/H, 58 Ci/mmole) by partial tritiation of the corresponding alkyne and was converted to the labeled Z9-14:OH and Z9-14:Al to study tissue specificity of acetate esterase (E), alcohol oxidase (OX), and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in male and female Heliothis virescens. Soluble and membrane-associated enzyme activities were determined by radio-TLC assays. Compounds of the tritium-labeled Z11-16 series were synthesized and their in vitro fates examined as well. In order to achieve an alternative approach in which (1) pheromone receptor proteins would be stoichiometrically and irreversibly modified, or (2) pheromone-catabolizing enzymes are inactivated by tight-binding or irreversible inhibitors, we have designed analogues of pheromones of lepidopterous insect pests and assayed their biological activity in vitro and in vivo. Various fluorinated molecules such as acyl fluorides, fluoroolefins, 2-fluoro aldehydes, 2,2-difluoro aldehydes and trifluoromethyl ketones were synthesized. The synthesis of some other functional groups such as cyclopropanones, cyclopropanols, cyclopropyl carbinols, cyclopropyl aldehydes and Michael acceptors will also be discussed.

  18. The effect of Erynia radicans on food consumption, utilization and fecundity by the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul K. A. Mohamed; Lucius Lewis; Denise Lewis

    1985-01-01

    In food consumption and utilization studies, observations were confined to a period of 5 days after which mortality of Erynia radicans larvae began to occur. Mortality due to the fungus was 76 and 83% in male and female larvae, respectively. In control larvae the pupation rate was over 95%. Control larvae of both sexes consumed significantly (P = 0....

  19. Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD-1 and midgut bacteria in larvae of gypsy moth and spruce budworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Frankenhuyzen, Kees; Liu, Yuehong; Tonon, Amanda

    2010-02-01

    We examined interaction between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD-1 (Foray 48B) and larval midgut bacteria in two lepidopteran hosts, Lymantria dispar and Choristoneura fumiferana. The pathogen multiplied in either moribund (C. fumiferana) or dead (L. dispar) larvae, regardless of the presence of midgut bacteria. Inoculation of L. dispar resulted in a pronounced proliferation of enteric bacteria, which did not contribute to larval death because B. thuringiensis was able to kill larvae in absence of midgut bacteria. Sterile, aureomycin- or ampicillin-treated larvae were killed in a dose-dependent manner but there was no mortality among larvae treated with the antibiotic cocktail used by Broderick et al. (2006, 2009). These results do not support an obligate role of midgut bacteria in insecticidal activity of HD-1. The outcome of experiments on the role of midgut bacteria may be more dependent on which bacterial species are dominant at the time of experimentation than on host species per se. The L. dispar cohorts used in our study had a microflora, that was dominated by Enterococcus and Staphylococcus and lacked Enterobacter. Another factor that can confound experimental results is the disk-feeding method for inoculation, which biases mortality estimates towards the least susceptible portion of the test population. (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Performance of the Forest Vegetation Simulator in managed white spruce plantations influenced by eastern spruce budworm in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Russell; Anthony W. D' Amato; Michael A. Albers; Christopher W. Woodall; Klaus J. Puettmann; Michael R. Saunders; Curtis L. VanderSchaaf

    2015-01-01

    Silvicultural strategies such as thinning may minimize productivity losses from a variety of forest disturbances, including forest insects. This study analyzed the 10-year postthinning response of stands and individual trees in thinned white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) plantations in northern Minnesota, USA, with light to moderate defoliation...

  1. Biologia do ectoparasitóide Bracon hebetor Say, 1857 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae em sete espécies de lepidópteros Biology of the ectoparasitoid Bracon hebetor Say, 1857 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae on seven lepidopteran species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina Magro

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Bracon hebetor Say, 1857 é um ectoparasitóide larval de várias espécies de piralídeos que atacam grãos armazenados, sendo considerado um agente potencial de controle biológico dessas pragas. Assim, a biologia de B. hebetor foi estudada em condições controladas de temperatura (25 ± 2°C, umidade relativa (60 ± 10% e fotoperíodo (fotofase de 14 horas, sobre sete espécies de lepidópteros, Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller, Corcyra cephalonica Stainton e Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier (hospedeiros naturais e Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, Heliothis virescens (Fabricius, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (insetos criados rotineiramente no laboratório de Biologia de Insetos da ESALQ/USP, para determinar o melhor hospedeiro para sua criação em laboratório. A duração e a viabilidade do ciclo biológico (ovo-adulto foram afetadas, dependendo do hospedeiro utilizado. A. kuehniella e C. cephalonica foram hospedeiros semelhantes para a criação de B. hebetor, produzindo insetos com duração de ciclo de 12,8 dias, viabilidade em torno de 90% e ótima capacidade de paralisação e parasitismo. D. saccharalis foi o único hospedeiro não natural que proporcionou resultados semelhantes àqueles obtidos sobre as três traças hospedeiras naturais. Quanto à agressividade, D. saccharalis produziu insetos com capacidade de paralisação e parasitismo semelhantes àqueles criados sobre as traças S. cerealella e C. cephalonica.Bracon hebetor Say, 1857 is a larval ectoparasitoid of several species of pyralids which attack stored grains, therefore a potential biological control agent of these pests. To determine the best host for laboratory rearing, the biology of B. hebetor was studied under controlled temperature conditions (25 ± 2°C, relative humidity (60 ± 10% and photoperiod (14-hour photophase on seven lepidopteran larvae: natural hosts Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller, Corcyra cephalonica Stainton and Sitotroga

  2. Representation of pheromones, interspecific signals, and plant odors in higher olfactory centers; mapping physiologically identified antennal-lobe projection neurons in the male heliothine moth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Cheng eZhao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the primary olfactory centre of the moth brain, for example, a few enlarged glomeruli situated dorsally, at the entrance of the antennal nerve, are devoted to information about female-produced substances whereas a set of more numerous ordinary glomeruli receives input about general odorants. Heliothine moths are particularly suitable for studying central chemosensory mechanisms not only because of their anatomically separated systems for plant odours and pheromones but also due to their use of female-produced substances in communication across the species. Thus, the male-specific system of heliothine moths includes two sub arrangements, one ensuring attraction and mating behavior by carrying information about pheromones released by conspecifics, and the other reproductive isolation via signal information emitted from heterospecifics. Based on previous tracing experiments, a general chemotopic organization of the male-specific glomeruli has been demonstrated in a number of heliothine species. As compared to the well explored organization of the moth antennal lobe, demonstrating a non-overlapping representation of the biologically relevant stimuli, less is known about the neural arrangement residing at the following synaptic level, i.e. the mushroom body calyces and the lateral horn. In the study presented here, we have labelled physiologically characterized antennal-lobe projection neurons in males of the two heliothine species, Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa assulta, for the purpose of mapping their target regions in the protocerebrum. In order to compare the representation of plant odours, pheromones, and interspecific signals in the higher brain regions of each species, we have created standard brain atlases and registered three-dimensional models of distinct uniglomerular projection neuron types into the relevant atlas.

  3. An ABC transporter mutation is correlated with insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Gahan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt-expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field.

  4. An ABC transporter mutation is correlated with insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahan, Linda J; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G

    2010-12-16

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt-expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field.

  5. Moth sex pheromone receptors and deceitful parapheromones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingxi Xu

    Full Text Available The insect's olfactory system is so selective that male moths, for example, can discriminate female-produced sex pheromones from compounds with minimal structural modifications. Yet, there is an exception for this "lock-and-key" tight selectivity. Formate analogs can be used as replacement for less chemically stable, long-chain aldehyde pheromones, because male moths respond physiologically and behaviorally to these parapheromones. However, it remained hitherto unknown how formate analogs interact with aldehyde-sensitive odorant receptors (ORs. Neuronal responses to semiochemicals were investigated with single sensillum recordings. Odorant receptors (ORs were cloned using degenerate primers, and tested with the Xenopus oocyte expression system. Quality, relative quantity, and purity of samples were evaluated by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We identified olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs housed in trichoid sensilla on the antennae of male navel orangeworm that responded equally to the main constituent of the sex pheromone, (11Z,13Z-hexadecadienal (Z11Z13-16Ald, and its formate analog, (9Z,11Z-tetradecen-1-yl formate (Z9Z11-14OFor. We cloned an odorant receptor co-receptor (Orco and aldehyde-sensitive ORs from the navel orangeworm, one of which (AtraOR1 was expressed specifically in male antennae. AtraOR1•AtraOrco-expressing oocytes responded mainly to Z11Z13-16Ald, with moderate sensitivity to another component of the sex pheromone, (11Z,13Z-hexadecadien-1-ol. Surprisingly, this receptor was more sensitive to the related formate than to the natural sex pheromone. A pheromone receptor from Heliothis virescens, HR13 ( = HvirOR13 showed a similar profile, with stronger responses elicited by a formate analog than to the natural sex pheromone, (11Z-hexadecenal thus suggesting this might be a common feature of moth pheromone receptors.

  6. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew K; Raymond-Delpech, Valerie; Thany, Steeve H; Gauthier, Monique; Sattelle, David B

    2006-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission and play roles in many cognitive processes. They are under intense research as potential targets of drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Invertebrate nAChRs are targets of anthelmintics as well as a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is one of the most beneficial insects worldwide, playing an important role in crop pollination, and is also a valuable model system for studies on social interaction, sensory processing, learning, and memory. We have used the A. mellifera genome information to characterize the complete honey bee nAChR gene family. Comparison with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae shows that the honey bee possesses the largest family of insect nAChR subunits to date (11 members). As with Drosophila and Anopheles, alternative splicing of conserved exons increases receptor diversity. Also, we show that in one honey bee nAChR subunit, six adenosine residues are targeted for RNA A-to-I editing, two of which are evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster and Heliothis virescens orthologs, and that the extent of editing increases as the honey bee lifecycle progresses, serving to maximize receptor diversity at the adult stage. These findings on Apis mellifera enhance our understanding of nAChR functional genomics and provide a useful basis for the development of improved insecticides that spare a major beneficial insect species.

  7. Electroantennogram response of the parasitoid, Microplitis croceipes to host-related odors: The discrepancy between relative abundance and level of antennal responses to volatile compound [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolulope Morawo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Herbivores emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs after feeding on plants. Parasitoids exploit these VOCs as odor cues to locate their hosts. In nature, host-related odors are emitted as blends of various compounds occurring in different proportions, and minor blend components can sometimes have profound effects on parasitoid responses. In a previous related study, we identified and quantified VOCs emitted by cotton plant-fed Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae larvae, an herbivore host of the parasitoid Microplitis croceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae. In the present study, the olfactory response of female M. croceipes to synthetic versions of 15 previously identified compounds was tested in electroantennogram (EAG bioassays. Using M. croceipes as a model species, we further asked the question: does the relative abundance of a volatile compound match the level of antennal response in parasitoids? Female M. croceipes showed varying EAG responses to test compounds, indicating different levels of bioactivity in the insect antenna. Eight compounds, including decanal, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 2-ethylhexanol, tridecane, tetradecane, α-farnesene and bisabolene, elicited EAG responses above or equal to the 50th percentile rank of all responses. Interestingly, decanal, which represented only 1% of the total amount of odors emitted by cotton-fed hosts, elicited the highest (0.82 mV EAG response in parasitoids. On the other hand, (E-β-caryophyllene, the most abundant (29% blend component, elicited a relatively low (0.17 mV EAG response. The results suggest that EAG response to host-related volatiles in parasitoids is probably more influenced by the ecological relevance or functional role of the compound in the blend, rather than its relative abundance.

  8. Electroantennogram response of the parasitoid, Microplitis croceipes to host-related odors: The discrepancy between relative abundance and level of antennal responses to volatile compound [version 2; referees: 3 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolulope Morawo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Herbivores emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs after feeding on plants. Parasitoids exploit these VOCs as odor cues to locate their hosts. In nature, host-related odors are emitted as blends of various compounds occurring in different proportions, and minor blend components can sometimes have profound effects on parasitoid responses. In a previous related study, we identified and quantified VOCs emitted by cotton plant-fed Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae larvae, an herbivore host of the parasitoid Microplitis croceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae. In the present study, the olfactory response of female M. croceipes to synthetic versions of 15 previously identified compounds was tested in electroantennogram (EAG bioassays. Using M. croceipes as a model species, we further asked the question: does the relative abundance of a volatile compound match the level of antennal response in parasitoids? Female M. croceipes showed varying EAG responses to test compounds, indicating different levels of bioactivity in the insect antenna. Eight compounds, including decanal, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 2-ethylhexanol, tridecane, tetradecane, α-farnesene and bisabolene, elicited EAG responses above or equal to the 50th percentile rank of all responses. Interestingly, decanal, which represented only 1% of the total amount of odors emitted by cotton-fed hosts, elicited the highest (0.82 mV EAG response in parasitoids. On the other hand, (E-β-caryophyllene, the most abundant (29% blend component, elicited a relatively low (0.17 mV EAG response. The results suggest that EAG response to host-related volatiles in parasitoids is probably more influenced by the ecological relevance or functional role of the compound in the blend, rather than its relative abundance.

  9. Electroantennogram response of the parasitoid, Microplitis croceipes to host-related odors: The discrepancy between relative abundance and level of antennal responses to volatile compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawo, Tolulope; Burrows, Matthew; Fadamiro, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Herbivores emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after feeding on plants. Parasitoids exploit these VOCs as odor cues to locate their hosts. In nature, host-related odors are emitted as blends of various compounds occurring in different proportions, and minor blend components can sometimes have profound effects on parasitoid responses. In a previous related study, we identified and quantified VOCs emitted by cotton plant-fed Heliothis virescens  (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae, an herbivore host of the parasitoid Microplitis croceipes  (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). In the present study, the olfactory response of female M . croceipes to synthetic versions of 15 previously identified compounds was tested in electroantennogram (EAG) bioassays. Using M. croceipes as a model species, we further asked the question: does the relative abundance of a volatile compound match the level of antennal response in parasitoids? Female M. croceipes showed varying EAG responses to test compounds, indicating different levels of bioactivity in the insect antenna. Eight compounds, including decanal, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 2-ethylhexanol, tridecane, tetradecane, α-farnesene and bisabolene, elicited EAG responses above or equal to the 50 th percentile rank of all responses. Interestingly, decanal, which represented only 1% of the total amount of odors emitted by cotton-fed hosts, elicited the highest (0.82 mV) EAG response in parasitoids. On the other hand, ( E )-β-caryophyllene, the most abundant (29%) blend component, elicited a relatively low (0.17 mV) EAG response. The results suggest that EAG response to host-related volatiles in parasitoids is probably more influenced by the ecological relevance or functional role of the compound in the blend, rather than its relative abundance.

  10. Diet micronutrient balance matters: How the ratio of dietary sterols/steroids affects development, growth and reproduction in two lepidopteran insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiangfeng; Grebenok, Robert J; Behmer, Spencer T

    2014-08-01

    Insects lack the ability to synthesize sterols de novo so they acquire this essential nutrient from their food. Cholesterol is the dominant sterol found in most insects, but in plant vegetative tissue it makes up only a small fraction of the total sterol profile. Instead, plants mostly contain phytosterols; plant-feeding insects generate the majority of their cholesterol by metabolizing phytosterols. However, not all phytosterols are readily converted to cholesterol, and some are even deleterious when ingested above a threshold level. In a recent study we showed that caterpillars reared on tobacco accumulating novel sterols/steroids exhibited reduced performance, even when suitable sterols were present. In the current study we examined how the dominant sterols (cholesterol and stigmasterol) and steroids (cholestanol and cholestanone) typical of the modified tobacco plants affected two insect herbivores (Heliothis virescens and Helicoverpa zea). The sterols/steroids were incorporated into synthetic diets singly, as well as in various combinations, ratios and amounts. For each insect species, a range of performance values was recorded for two generations, with the eggs from the 1st-generation adults as the source of neonates for the 2nd-generation. Performance on the novel steroids (cholestanol and cholestanone) was extremely poor compared to suitable sterols (cholesterol and stigmasterol). Additionally, performance tended to decrease as the ratio of the novel dietary steroids increased. We discuss how the balance of different dietary sterols/steroids affected our two caterpillar species, relate this back to recent studies on sterol/steroid metabolism in these two species, and consider the potential application of sterol/steroid modification in crops. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sex-linked pheromone receptor genes of the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, are in tandem arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yasukochi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuning of the olfactory system of male moths to conspecific female sex pheromones is crucial for correct species recognition; however, little is known about the genetic changes that drive speciation in this system. Moths of the genus Ostrinia are good models to elucidate this question, since significant differences in pheromone blends are observed within and among species. Odorant receptors (ORs play a critical role in recognition of female sex pheromones; eight types of OR genes expressed in male antennae were previously reported in Ostrinia moths. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened an O. nubilalis bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library by PCR, and constructed three contigs from isolated clones containing the reported OR genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis using these clones as probes demonstrated that the largest contig, which contained eight OR genes, was located on the Z chromosome; two others harboring two and one OR genes were found on two autosomes. Sequence determination of BAC clones revealed the Z-linked OR genes were closely related and tandemly arrayed; moreover, four of them shared 181-bp direct repeats spanning exon 7 and intron 7. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of tandemly arrayed sex pheromone receptor genes in Lepidoptera. The localization of an OR gene cluster on the Z chromosome agrees with previous findings for a Z-linked locus responsible for O. nubilalis male behavioral response to sex pheromone. The 181-bp direct repeats might enhance gene duplications by unequal crossovers. An autosomal locus responsible for male response to sex pheromone in Heliothis virescens and H. subflexa was recently reported to contain at least four OR genes. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that generation of additional copies of OR genes can increase the potential for male moths to acquire altered specificity for pheromone components, and accordingly

  12. Review of Vaccinia Virus and Baculovirus Viability Versus Virucides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buckley, Patricia E; O'Connell, Kevin P; Ouellette, Gary D

    2008-01-01

    .... This review summarizes what is known about the susceptibility to virucides of two candidate viral simulants, the baculoviruses Cydia pomonella granulovirus and Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis...

  13. Suppression of RNAi by dsRNA-degrading RNaseIII enzymes of viruses in animals and plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Weinheimer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Certain RNA and DNA viruses that infect plants, insects, fish or poikilothermic animals encode Class 1 RNaseIII endoribonuclease-like proteins. dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease activity of the RNaseIII of rock bream iridovirus infecting fish and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt crinivirus (SPCSV infecting plants has been shown. Suppression of the host antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway has been documented with the RNaseIII of SPCSV and Heliothis virescens ascovirus infecting insects. Suppression of RNAi by the viral RNaseIIIs in non-host organisms of different kingdoms is not known. Here we expressed PPR3, the RNaseIII of Pike-perch iridovirus, in the non-hosts Nicotiana benthamiana (plant and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode and found that it cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds-siRNA molecules that are pivotal in the host RNA interference (RNAi pathway and thereby suppresses RNAi in non-host tissues. In N. benthamiana, PPR3 enhanced accumulation of Tobacco rattle tobravirus RNA1 replicon lacking the 16K RNAi suppressor. Furthermore, PPR3 suppressed single-stranded RNA (ssRNA--mediated RNAi and rescued replication of Flock House virus RNA1 replicon lacking the B2 RNAi suppressor in C. elegans. Suppression of RNAi was debilitated with the catalytically compromised mutant PPR3-Ala. However, the RNaseIII (CSR3 produced by SPCSV, which cleaves ds-siRNA and counteracts antiviral RNAi in plants, failed to suppress ssRNA-mediated RNAi in C. elegans. In leaves of N. benthamiana, PPR3 suppressed RNAi induced by ssRNA and dsRNA and reversed silencing; CSR3, however, suppressed only RNAi induced by ssRNA and was unable to reverse silencing. Neither PPR3 nor CSR3 suppressed antisense-mediated RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster. These results show that the RNaseIII enzymes of RNA and DNA viruses suppress RNAi, which requires catalytic activities of RNaseIII. In contrast to other viral silencing suppression proteins, the RNaseIII enzymes are

  14. Recent field experiences with Bacillus thuringiensis in Canada and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald N. Morris

    1985-01-01

    The CANUSA working group on the use of B.t. against the spruce budworm has prepared a document entitled "Guidelines for the operational use of Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) against the spruce budworm" following six years of extensive cooperative field trials in Canada and the U.S.A. (Morris et al 1984). The document summarized below (Table...

  15. Variation in phenology and monoterpene patterns of defoliated and nondefoliated Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Marie Muzika; Judith Engle; Catherine Parks; Boyd. Wickman

    1993-01-01

    Foliage was collected from paired Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) trees characterized as either "resistant" or "susceptible" western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) attack. Resistant trees produced more...

  16. How many taxa can be recognized within the complex Tillandsia capillaris (Bromeliaceae, Tillandsioideae)? Analysis of the available classifications using a multivariate approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Lucía V; Galetto, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Tillandsia capillaris Ruiz & Pav., which belongs to the subgenus Diaphoranthema is distributed in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, northern and central Argentina, and Chile, and includes forms that are difficult to circumscribe, thus considered to form a complex. The entities of this complex are predominantly small-sized epiphytes, adapted to xeric environments. The most widely used classification defines 5 forms for this complex based on few morphological reproductive traits: Tillandsia capillaris Ruiz & Pav. f. capillaris, Tillandsia capillaris f. incana (Mez) L.B. Sm., Tillandsia capillaris f. cordobensis (Hieron.) L.B. Sm., Tillandsia capillaris f. hieronymi (Mez) L.B. Sm. and Tillandsia capillaris f. virescens (Ruiz & Pav.) L.B. Sm. In this study, 35 floral and vegetative characters were analyzed with a multivariate approach in order to assess and discuss different proposals for classification of the Tillandsia capillaris complex, which presents morphotypes that co-occur in central and northern Argentina. To accomplish this, data of quantitative and categorical morphological characters of flowers and leaves were collected from herbarium specimens and field collections and were analyzed with statistical multivariate techniques. The results suggest that the last classification for the complex seems more comprehensive and three taxa were delimited: Tillandsia capillaris (=Tillandsia capillaris f. incana-hieronymi), Tillandsia virescens s. str. (=Tillandsia capillaris f. cordobensis) and Tillandsia virescens s. l. (=Tillandsia capillaris f. virescens). While Tillandsia capillaris and Tillandsia virescens s. str. co-occur, Tillandsia virescens s. l. is restricted to altitudes above 2000 m in Argentina. Characters previously used for taxa delimitation showed continuous variation and therefore were not useful. New diagnostic characters are proposed and a key is provided for delimiting these three taxa within the complex.

  17. Essential oils-oriented fenvalerate analogues: syntheses, characterization and biological evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, H.; Li, H.

    2016-01-01

    A series of essential oils oriented ester derivatives have been designed, synthesized and characterized based on the skeleton of fenvalerate. The preliminary bioassay results indicated that some of the newly synthesized compounds showed better insecticidal activities against Pyrausta nubilalis and Heliothis armigera than that of the control trans-prallethrin chloride. (author)

  18. Agricultural production - Phase 2. Indonesia. Insect ecology studies and insect pest control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, B.

    1992-01-01

    This document reviews the activities of the Pest Control Research Group in Indonesia. Pests under study are the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella), the rice stem borer (Chilo suppressalis), the sugar cane borer (Chilo auricilius), bean flies (Agromyza spp.), tobacco insects (Heliothis armigera and Spodoptera litura) and cotton insects, especially the pink bollworm

  19. Natural control of Helicoverpa armigera in smallholder crops in East Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den H.

    1993-01-01

    The African bollworm, Helicoverpa (=Heliothis) armigera , is one of the worst agricultural pests in Africa, attacking a variety of food and cash crops. For development of sustainable pest management, it is essential to study the ecology and natural

  20. People’s Republic of China Scientific Abstracts, Number 171

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-07

    wax moth, Galleria mellonella, the armyworm, Leucania separata, the cotton bollworm, Heliothis armigera, and the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae... Myzus persicae qingfengmycin was better than blasticidin S, The factor causing mortality in different insect species has been tested and discussed

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... been shown to be regulated by a cephalic endocrine peptidic factor: pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN), having 33 amino acid residues. Antisera against synthetic Heliothis zea-PBAN were developed. Using these polyclonals, immunoreactivity was mapped in the nervous system of Achaea janata.

  2. The infectivity of polyhedra of nuclear polyhedrosis virus (N.P.V.) after passage through gut of an insectpredator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, A G

    1980-07-15

    Polyhedral inclusion bodies (P.I.B) of a nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis punctigera (Lep.) were found in excreta of Nabis tasmanicus (Het.), a predator of H. punctigera. An immunofluorescent counting method was used to estimate numbers of P.I.B. Bioassays demonstrated that no loss of infectivity occurred during passage through the gut.

  3. a study on light trap catches of some rice pests in relation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    case of Leptocoriza acuta Thunberg, no other factor but rainfall had positive correlation of order 0.857 with population build up in the fourth week of September. Key words/phrases: Meteorological factors, path analysis, regression analysis, rice insect pests. INTRODUCTION. Green leafhopper Nephotettix virescens Dist.

  4. Parents or predators: Examining intraseasonal variation in nest survival for migratory passerine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin Hirsch-Jacobson; W. Andrew Cox; Emily E. Tewes; Frank R., III Thompson; John. Faaborg

    2012-01-01

    For birds, risk of nest predation can vary within a breeding season, but few data exist that explain why such variation occurs. We investigated intraseasonal variation of nest survival of the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) in Midwestern forests and tested whether four of the adults' reproductive strategies (clutch size, nest...

  5. Landscape forest cover and edge effects on songbird nest predation vary by nest predator

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Andrew Cox; Frank R. III Thompson; John. Faaborg

    2012-01-01

    Rates of nest predation for birds vary between and within species across multiple spatial scales, but we have a poor understanding of which predators drive such patterns. We video-monitored nests and identified predators at 120 nests of the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) and the Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) at eight...

  6. GC–MS profile, anti-seizure and anti-pyretic activities of palm kernel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PURPOSE: Palm kernel nut oil (PKNO) from palm fruit of a rare breed of Elaeis guineensis (virescens), and one of the species belonging to the Elaeis genre of arecaceae family was subjected to Gas chromatography - Mass spectroscopic studies as well as anti-seizure and anti-pyretic studies. It is used in South-Eastern part ...

  7. A study on light trap catches of some rice pests in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of meteorological factors on the population build up of green leafhopper Nephotettix virescens Dist (Cicadellidae, Hemiptera), plant hoppers Cofana spectra Dist (Delphacidae, Hemiptera) and C. yasumatsui Young (Kolla mimica, Hemiptera) and rice gundhi bug Leptocoriza acuta Thunberg (Alydidae, Hemiptera) ...

  8. Losing Chlordimeform Use in Cotton Production. Its Effects on the Economy and Pest Resistance. Agricultural Economic Report Number 587.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Craig; Suguiyama, Luis

    This report examines the economic implications of losing chlordimeform use on cotton and considers chlordimeform's role in managing the resistance of bollworms and tobacco budworms to synthetic pyrethroids. It estimates changes in prices, production, acreage, consumer expenditures, aggregate producer returns, regional crop effects, and returns to…

  9. Effects of forest disturbance and soil depth on digestible energy for moose and white-tailed deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlette S. Crawford; R. A. Lautenschlager; Martin R. Stokes; Timothy L. Stone

    1993-01-01

    Spruce budworm defoliation, clearcutting for salvage, and prescribed burning of clearcut areas on deep and shallow soils influenced deer and moose foraging in eastern Maine spruce-fir forests from 1980 to 1984. Plant standing crop biomass, seasonal plant selection by tractable moose and white-tailed deer, and digestible energy for deer and moose were determined for...

  10. A review of the regeneration dynamics of North American boreal forest tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. F. Greene; John C. Zasada; L. Sirois; D. Kneeshaw; H. Morin; I. Charron; M. J. Simard

    1999-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biotic parameters that are crucial to an understanding of the recruitment dynamics of North American boreal tree species following natural (fire, budworm infestation, windthrow) or human-induced (clearcut, partial cut) disturbances. The parameters we emphasize are (i) the production of seeds and asexual stems (both of...

  11. Estimation of forest structural parameters using 5 and 10 meter SPOT-5 satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter T. Wolter; Phillip A. Townsend; Brian R. Sturtevant

    2009-01-01

    Large areas of forest in the US and Canada are affected by insects and disease each year. Over the past century, outbreaks of the Eastern spruce budworm have become more frequent and severe. The notion of designing a more pest resistant landscape through prescriptive management practices hinges on our ability to effectively model forest?insect dynamics at regional...

  12. The forest ecosystem of southeast Alaska: 2. Forest insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Hard

    1974-01-01

    Southeast Alaska's remaining virgin forests have few insect pests. The black-headed budworm and the hemlock sawfly, both western hemlock defoliators, are the most important species. They kill some trees, kill tops in others, and cause growth loss, but stands survive their attacks. Extensive conversion of virgin stands to second growth may result in an increase in...

  13. Dispersal of forest insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  14. Multi-sensor data fusion for estimating forest species composition and abundance in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter P. Wolter; Phillip A. Townsend

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude, duration, and frequency of forest disturbance caused by the spruce budworm and forest tent caterpillar in northern Minnesota and neighboring Ontario, Canada have increased over the last century due to a shift in forest species composition linked to historical fire suppression, forest management, and pesticide application that has fostered increased...

  15. Forest insect conditions in the Northeast - 1953

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. E. Waters; T. McIntyre

    1954-01-01

    The budworm was present in small numbers throughout the entire spruce-fir region of Maine in 1953; but, as in 1952, noticeable defoliation was restricted mostly to two areas - the vicinity of Madawaska Lake and the Fish River Lake-Beavertail Pond area.

  16. Minnesota's forest resources in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick D. Miles; Gary J. Brand; Manfred E. Mielke

    2006-01-01

    This report presents forest statistics based on the five annual inventory panels measured from 2000 through 2004. Forest area is estimated at 16.2 million acres or 32 percent of the total land area in the State. Important pests in Minnesota forests include the forest tent caterpillar and spruce budworm.

  17. Untersuchungen zum Vorkommen von Myxobakterien in von Meerwasser beeinflußten Substraten unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Insel Helgoland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückert, G.

    1984-03-01

    Representatives of the family Myxococcaceae, Myxococcus fulvus and M. virescens as well as Archangium gephyra could be isolated from marine sediments (depth range 5 58 m), collected near the island of Helgoland (North Sea); dunes and rudiments of salt marshes additionally yielded M. coralloides and the rare species Melittangium licenicola and M. boletus (Cystobacteriaceae). In soil samples from the island, M. fulvus, M. virescens, M. coralloides, A. gephyra, Cystobacter fuscus and Stigmatella erecta were found. These results were confirmed by data, obtained from the coastal zone of the island of Amrum and marine sediments from various regions. On the other hand samples from shallow fresh water (depth range 0.3 1 m) proved to be richer in species. It is assumed that the myxobacteria found in marine sediments occur as resting cells.

  18. Holocene occurrence of Lophodermium piceae, a black spruce needle endophyte and possible paleoindicator of boreal forest health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, J. P. Paul; Payette, Serge

    2007-01-01

    Holocene occurrences of conifer needle endophytes have not previously been reported. We report the fossil remains of Lophodermium piceae (Fckl.) Hoehn., a fungal endophyte of black spruce ( Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) needles, in macrofossils dating back to 8000 cal yr BP. Spruce budworm head capsules and L. piceae remains were found preceding charcoal layers delineating the transformation of four spruce-moss forest sites to spruce-lichen woodland. As L. piceae is found solely on senescent needles, its increased presence during these transformation periods likely indicates that the forests were in decline due to the spruce budworm ( Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.)) when they burned. Future paleoecological studies incorporating needle fungi observations could be used to investigate the historical occurrence of tree disease and the role of fungi in forest health and decline.

  19. Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Assessing the Functions of Headwater Slope Wetlands on the South Carolina Coastal Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Climate The climate of South Carolina is most influenced by its latitude and its proximity to the Atlantic Ocean to the east and the Appalachian...such as the prothonotary warbler (Protonotaria citrea) and Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens), are associated with forested wetlands within the...virens), Kentucky warbler (Oporornis formosus), and summer tanager (Piranga rubra) breed in wetlands within the subclass, but winter primarily in

  20. Suitability of Invertebrate and Vertebrate Cells in a Portable Impedance-Based Toxicity Sensor: Temperature Mediated Impacts on Long-Term Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    tobacco budworm Concanav Sua1B: mosquito Concanav S2: fruit fly Concanav Vertebrate non-mammalian cells FHM: fathead minnow Collagen ICR134: northern...Richman, A., Hans-Michael, M., Kaftos, F.C., 1997. Molecular immune responses of the mosquito anopheles gambiae to bacteria and malaria parasites...V., Cuzin, F., Rassoulzadegan, M., 1993. Expression in transgenic mice of the large T-antigen of polyomavirus induces Sertoli cell tumors and allows

  1. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the central region of Ontario, 1993. Information report No. O-X-438

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Central Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine false webworm, budworms, shoot borers, leafcutters, armillaria root rot and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers forest decline, frost injury, salt and wind damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  2. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the central region of Ontario, 1994. Information report No. O-X-448. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Central Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine false webworm, budworms, shoot borers, leafcutters, armillaria root rot and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers forest decline, frost injury, salt and wind damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  3. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the northeast region of Ontario, 1993. Information report No. O-X-436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Northeast Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine spittlebug, birch skeletonizer, eastern spruce budworm, armillaria root rot, spruce needle rusts, and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers frost damage, ice damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  4. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the northeast region of Ontario, 1994. Information report No. O-X-447. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    Report summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Northeast Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine spittlebug, birch skeletonizer, eastern spruce budworm, armillaria root rot, spruce needle rusts, and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers frost damage, ice damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  5. Results of forest insect and disease surveys in the northeast region of Ontario, 1992. Information report No. O-X-430. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Report for 1992 summarizing forest damage by insects, diseases and abiotic conditions in the Northeast Region of Ontario. Textual descriptions of pests are accompanied by maps and statistical tables. Pest conditions covered include pine spittlebug, birth skeletonizer, eastern spruce budworm, armillaria root rot, spruce needle rusts, and other diseases and insects. Abiotic damage reported on covers frost damage, ice damage, and winter drying. Forest health reports and special surveys are also described.

  6. Wisconsin's forest resources in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry

    2006-01-01

    Results of the 2000-2004 annual inventory of Wisconsin show about 16.0 million acres of forest land, more than 22.1 billion cubic feet of live volume on forest land, and nearly 593 million dry tons of all live aboveground tree biomass on timberland. Populations of jack pine budworm are increasing, and it remains a significant pest in Wisconsin forests. A complete...

  7. Possível fonte de resistência ao caruncho (Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky, 1855 em Milho-de-palha(Zea Mays, L. A possible source of resistance to Sitophilus zeamais in corn in the husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alberto Marques Rezende

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se em condições de laboratório o comportamento, em relação ao Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky 1855 (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, de milhos sintéticos (composto flint, composto dent. e centralmex, híbridos comerciais (Ag 152 e Hmd 7974, pipoca comercial (pirapoca e um milho supostamente resistente (acre. Analisaram-se as correlações. existentes entre o comprimento da palha além da ponta da espiga, compacidade, dureza do grão, ataque de Heliothis zea Boddie, 1850 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, com o ataque de Sitophilus zeamais. Os resultados sugerem que o fator mais importante na resistência do milho-em-palha, a Sitophilus zeamais é a compacidade da mesma, vindo em segundo lugar o furo causado pela saída da lagarta Heliothis zea que atinge o solo para entrar no estádio de pupa.Under laboratory conditions and artificial infestations, it was demonstrated that the open pollinated corn variety Acre collected in the Amazonas region was less infested by Sitophilus zeamais than six other corn germplasms (synthetics and hybrids utilized as checks. The Acre has longer husks beyond the tip, more compact husks, is a flint type corn and had the lowest percentage of ears with exit holes made by the Heliothis zea caterpillar. It is probable that the favorable combination of these four characteristics in only one variety explains its lower degree of infestation by the rice weevil. The compactness of the husk was the factor that showed the highest correlation with the degree of infestation by the weevil.

  8. Review of Vaccinia Virus and Baculovirus Viability Versus Virucides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    pp 850- 853. Ignoffo, C.M.; Dutky, S.R. The Effect of Sodium Hypochlorite on the Viability and Infectivity of Bacillus and Beauveria Spores and...1977, 6, pp 411-415. Ignoffo, C.M.; Hostetter, D.L.; Pinnell, R.E. Stability of Baciluus thuringiensis and Baculovirus heliothis on Soybean Foliage...of Fecal or Respiratory Origin. http://www.iapmo.org/common/ pdf /lSS-Rome/Sobsey Environ Report.pdf. (Accessed 2003). 44 Stara, J.; Kocourek, F

  9. Fish stomach contents in benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TH. Tupinambás

    Full Text Available The choice of sampling gears to assess benthic macroinvertebrate communities depends on environmental characteristics, study objectives, and cost effectiveness. Because of the high foraging capacity and diverse habitats and behaviors of benthophagous fishes, their stomach contents may offer a useful sampling tool in studies of benthic macroinvertebrates, especially in large, deep, fast rivers that are difficult to sample with traditional sediment sampling gear. Our objective was to compare the benthic macroinvertebrate communities sampled from sediments with those sampled from fish stomachs. We collected benthic macroinvertebrates and fish from three different habitat types (backwater, beach, riffle in the wet season, drying season, and dry season along a single reach of the Grande River (Paraná River Basin, southeast Brazil. We sampled sediments through use of a Petersen dredge (total of 216 grabs and used gill nets to sample fish (total of 36 samples. We analyzed the stomach contents of three commonly occurring benthophagous fish species (Eigenmannia virescens, Iheringichthys labrosus, Leporinus amblyrhynchus. Chironomids dominated in both sampling methods. Macroinvertebrate taxonomic composition and abundances from fish stomachs differed from those from sediment samples, but less so from riffles than from backwater and beach habitats. Macroinvertebrate taxa from E. virescens stomachs were more strongly correlated with sediment samples from all three habitats than were those from the other two species. The species accumulation curves and higher mean dispersion values, compared with with sediment samples suggest that E. virescens is more efficient than sediment samples and the other fish studied at collecting benthic taxa. We conclude that by analyzing the stomach contents of benthophagous fishes it is possible to assess important characteristics of benthic communities (dispersion, taxonomic composition and diversity. This is especially true

  10. Disruption of male oriental fruit moth to calling females in a wind tunnel by different concentrations of synthetic pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C J; Lucuik, G S

    1996-11-01

    Disruption of male Oriental fruit moth orientation to calling females was studied in a wind tunnel by surrounding calling female moths with septa loaded with synthetic pheromone. At the lowest loadings, 0.01 and 0.1µg, which produced release rates well below those of calling females, some males flew to septa instead of the females. At loadings of 1 and 10µg, which produced release rates close to those of a calling female, more than half the males flew to septa instead of the females, but there was little evidence of habituation at any of these loadings. At higher loadings, 100 and 1000µg, upwind flight of males was arrested, and many males remained inactive, indicating habituation. Preexposure of the males for 3 hr to ambient pheromone concentrations in the tunnel had no significant effect on numbers of disrupted males. However, at the 1000-µg loading, most of the males that had been preexposed to the synthetic pheromone remained inactive. This may indicate a higher level of habituation than among males that had not been preexposed, most of which flew, although they subsequently showed flight arrestment. Levels of disruption were similar to those found for the spruce budworm in comparable experiments. In both species, less than 1% of the males were able to locate females when time-averaged concentrations of synthetic pheromone were above 20 ng/m(3). However, levels of inactivity and flight arrestment were higher among male Oriental fruit moths than among male spruce budworms, which may explain why Oriental fruit moths are more susceptible to disruption than are spruce budworms.

  11. DELIMITACIÓN DE LAS ESPECIES ARGENTINAS DEL GENERO INGA (MIMOSOIDEAE MEDIANTE TÉCNICAS NUMÉRICAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Zapater

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ingais represented in Argentina by six species and one variety. However doubts emerge about thevalidity of these taxa. Phenetic relationships were studied among 75 specimens belonging to the sevenrecognized taxa, in order to evaluate their validity. A morphological matrix of 46 characters was ana-lyzed by clustering and conglomerate methods. The dendrogram and the principal components analyses(PCA show six groups, consequently six species can be clearly recognized:I. saltensis, I. marginata,I. laurina, I. virescens, I. affinis, andI. uraguensis. A key for the identification of species is presentedtogether with distribution maps in Argentina.

  12. Notes on holotypes of hermit crabs (Decapoda: Anomura: Paguroidea) deposited in the collection of Zoological Museum of RAS (Saint-Petersburg, Russia) with remarks on hermit crab diversity along the Russian coast of the Sea of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Ivan

    2016-04-20

    The holotype of Clibanarius sachalinicus Kobjakova, 1955 and Clibanarius hirsutimanus Kobjakova, 1971 in the collection of Zoological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences (Saint-Petersburg, Russia) are examined. As a result, Clibanarius hirsutimanus Kobjakova, 1971 is found to be a species of Areopaguristes nigroapiculus (Komai, 2009) while Clibanarius sachalinicus Kobjakova, 1955 is a species of Clibanarius virescens (Krauss, 1843). Remarks on a single record of Diogenes penicillatus Stimpson, 1858 from Shamora Bay (Usury Bay) of the Sea of Japan as well as current faunal list of hermit crabs from the Russian coasts of the Sea of Japan are also presented in the paper.

  13. Forest pest conditions in the maritimes in 1992. Information report No. M-X-183E. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magasi, L.P.; Cormier, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Review of the status of forest insects and diseases in the Maritimes Region in 1992, along with forecast conditions for 1993 when appropriate. Describes pests and problems of conifers, hardwoods, and high value areas such as nurseries, seed orchards, plantations, and Christmas tree areas and summarizes control operations against spruce budworm and Sirococcus shoot blight. A chapter on forest health monitoring brings together the various aspects of work dealing with changes in forest conditions. Forest insect monitoring systems, such as pheromones and light traps, are briefly described. A list of reports and publications relating to forest pest conditions is included.

  14. Forest pest conditions in the maritimes in 1991. Information report No. M-X-181E. Annual publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magasi, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    This report reviews the status of forest insects and diseases in the Maritimes region in 1991 and forecasts conditions for 1992, when appropriate. Pests and problems of conifers, hardwoods, and high-value areas, such as nurseries, seed orchards, plantations, and Christmas tree areas, are described as observed in 1991. Control operations against spruce budworm, hemlock looper, and Sirococcus shoot blight are summarized. A section on forest health monitoring brings together the various aspects of work dealing with changes in forest conditions, some of which are still unexplained. Forest insect monitoring systems, pheromones, and light traps are briefly described. A list of reports and publications relating to forest pest conditions is included.

  15. Diversity of leaf endophytic fungi in mangrove plants of northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderley Costa, Isabella P M; Maia, Leonor Costa; Cavalcanti, Maria Auxiliadora

    2012-07-01

    With the aim of increasing the knowledge about endophytic fungi, a group of microorganisms with high biotechnological potential and a valuable source of useful metabolites, a survey in leaves of mangrove plants (Avicennia schaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle) was performed at the Itamaracá Island, PE, Brazil. Leaves were collected, during two seasons, dry and rainy, superficially sterilized and fragments maintained in Petri dishes with Potato dextrose agar (PDA) at 28(o) ± 2(o) C until isolation of the fungi. Fourty taxa were isolated: 25 species representing 19 genera and 15 morphotypes determined as Mycelia sterilia. Leaves of L. racemosa hosted the highest number of colony forming units (CFU) and taxa. Guignardia sp. and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides were the most frequently isolated, while Glomerella cingulata was the only species found in association with the three host plants. The proportional importance of each fungus differed among hosts. The similarity of fungi species between the two seasons reached only 4.2%, and that between the hosts was also low, with the maximum (A. schaueriana x L. racemosa) reaching 24.2%. Sphaerosporium, as well as Chloridium virescens var. virescens, Microsphaeropsis arundinis, Penicillium pinophilum, Periconia cambrensis, Phoma herbarum, P. diachenii, P. obscurans, Sordaria prolifica and Torula elisii are reported for the first time as endophytic in tropical regions.

  16. Diversity of leaf endophytic fungi in mangrove plants of Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella P. M. Wanderley Costa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of increasing the knowledge about endophytic fungi, a group of microorganisms with high biotechnological potential and a valuable source of useful metabolites, a survey in leaves of mangrove plants (Avicennia schaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle was performed at the Itamaracá Island, PE, Brazil. Leaves were collected, during two seasons, dry and rainy, superficially sterilized and fragments maintained in Petri dishes with Potato dextrose agar (PDA at 28º ± 2º C until isolation of the fungi. Fourty taxa were isolated: 25 species representing 19 genera and 15 morphotypes determined as Mycelia sterilia. Leaves of L. racemosa hosted the highest number of colony forming units (CFU and taxa. Guignardia sp. and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides were the most frequently isolated, while Glomerella cingulata was the only species found in association with the three host plants. The proportional importance of each fungus differed among hosts. The similarity of fungi species between the two seasons reached only 4.2%, and that between the hosts was also low, with the maximum (A. schaueriana x L. racemosa reaching 24.2%. Sphaerosporium, as well as Chloridium virescens var. virescens, Microsphaeropsis arundinis, Penicillium pinophilum, Periconia cambrensis, Phoma herbarum, P. diachenii, P. obscurans, Sordaria prolifica and Torula elisii are reported for the first time as endophytic in tropical regions.

  17. Diversity of leaf endophytic fungi in mangrove plants of northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderley Costa, Isabella P. M.; Maia, Leonor Costa; Cavalcanti, Maria Auxiliadora

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of increasing the knowledge about endophytic fungi, a group of microorganisms with high biotechnological potential and a valuable source of useful metabolites, a survey in leaves of mangrove plants (Avicennia schaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle) was performed at the Itamaracá Island, PE, Brazil. Leaves were collected, during two seasons, dry and rainy, superficially sterilized and fragments maintained in Petri dishes with Potato dextrose agar (PDA) at 28o ± 2o C until isolation of the fungi. Fourty taxa were isolated: 25 species representing 19 genera and 15 morphotypes determined as Mycelia sterilia. Leaves of L. racemosa hosted the highest number of colony forming units (CFU) and taxa. Guignardia sp. and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides were the most frequently isolated, while Glomerella cingulata was the only species found in association with the three host plants. The proportional importance of each fungus differed among hosts. The similarity of fungi species between the two seasons reached only 4.2%, and that between the hosts was also low, with the maximum (A. schaueriana x L. racemosa) reaching 24.2%. Sphaerosporium, as well as Chloridium virescens var. virescens, Microsphaeropsis arundinis, Penicillium pinophilum, Periconia cambrensis, Phoma herbarum, P. diachenii, P. obscurans, Sordaria prolifica and Torula elisii are reported for the first time as endophytic in tropical regions. PMID:24031941

  18. METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE DAN ANDROGRAPHIS PANICULATA TERHADAP SERANGGA BUKAN HAMA SASARAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dini Yuliani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Metarhizium anisopliae and Andrographis paniculata to the natural enemies of Nephotettix virescens and non-target insect pests. This research was conducted in tungro endemic areas in Subang District, West Java in the wet season 2013/2014. The method of research used a split plot design with four replications. The main plot was IR66, Inpari 9, and Ciherang varieties. Subplot was the application of M. anisopliae, A. paniculata, and control. Observations were carried out five times started at nursery (2 weeks after seedling, 14, 28, 42, and 56 days after planting using insect nets, double swing 10 times on each plot observations. The results show M. anisopliae and A. paniculata not adversely affect on non-target insect pests such as Chironomid and natural enemies of N. virescens namely Lycosa pseudoannulata, Cyrtorhinus lividipennis, Sepedon sp., damselfly, Tipulidae sp., Telenomus sp., dragonfly, and Tetrastichus sp.. Efficacy of M. anisopliae and A. paniculata as one of the control strategies that are environmentally friendly and proved not harmful to non-target insect pests.

  19. High Tensile Strength of Engineered β-Solenoid Fibrils via Sonication and Pulling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zeyu; Parker, Amanda S; Peralta, Maria D R; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M; Cox, Daniel L; Toney, Michael D

    2017-11-07

    We present estimates of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) for two engineered β-solenoid protein mutant fibril structures (spruce budworm and Rhagium inquisitor antifreeze proteins) derived from sonication-based measurements and from force pulling molecular dynamics simulations, both in water. Sonication experiments generate limiting scissioned fibrils with a well-defined length-to-width correlation for the mutant spruce budworm protein and the resultant UTS estimate is 0.66 ± 0.08 GPa. For fibrils formed from engineered R. inquisitor antifreeze protein, depending upon geometry, we estimate UTSs of 3.5 ± 3.2-5.5 ± 5.1 GPa for proteins with interfacial disulfide bonds, and 1.6 ± 1.5-2.5 ± 2.3 GPa for the reduced form. The large error bars for the R. inquisitor structures are intrinsic to the broad distribution of limiting scission lengths. Simulations provide pulling velocity-dependent UTSs increasing from 0.2 to 1 GPa in the available speed range, and 1.5 GPa extrapolated to the speeds expected in the sonication experiments. Simulations yield low-velocity values for the Young's modulus of 6.0 GPa. Without protein optimization, these mechanical parameters are similar to those of spider silk and Kevlar, but in contrast to spider silk, these proteins have a precisely known sequence-structure relationship. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a novel-type transgenic cotton plant for control of cotton bollworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Zijing; Hou, Guangming; Hua, Jinping; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2016-08-01

    The transgenic Bt cotton plant has been widely planted throughout the world for the control of cotton budworm Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner). However, a shift towards insect tolerance of Bt cotton is now apparent. In this study, the gene encoding neuropeptide F (NPF) was cloned from cotton budworm H. armigera, an important agricultural pest. The npf gene produces two splicing mRNA variants-npf1 and npf2 (with a 120-bp segment inserted into the npf1 sequence). These are predicted to form the mature NPF1 and NPF2 peptides, and they were found to regulate feeding behaviour. Knock down of larval npf with dsNPF in vitro resulted in decreases of food consumption and body weight, and dsNPF also caused a decrease of glycogen and an increase of trehalose. Moreover, we produced transgenic tobacco plants transiently expressing dsNPF and transgenic cotton plants with stably expressed dsNPF. Results showed that H. armigera larvae fed on these transgenic plants or leaves had lower food consumption, body size and body weight compared to controls. These results indicate that NPF is important in the control of feeding of H. armigera and valuable for production of potential transgenic cotton. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Starch Hydrolysis, Polyphenol Contents, and In Vitro Alpha Amylase Inhibitory Properties of Some Nigerian Foods As Affected by Cooking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sani Saidu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cooking on starch hydrolysis, polyphenol contents, and in vitro α-amylase inhibitory properties of mushrooms (two varieties Russula virescens and Auricularia auricula-judae, sweet potato (Ipomea batatas, and potato (Solanum tuberosum was investigated. The total, resistant, and digestible starch contents of the raw and cooked food samples (FS ranged from 6.4 to 64.9; 0 to 10.1; and 6.4 to 62.7 g/100 g, respectively, while their percentages of starch digestibility (DS values expressed as percentages of total starch hydrolyzed ranged from 45.99 to 100. Raw and boiled unpeeled potato, raw and boiled peeled potato, raw A. auricula-judae, and sweet potato showed mild to high α-amylase inhibition (over a range of concentration of 10–50 mg/mL, which was lower than that of acarbose (that had 69% inhibition of α-amylase over a range of concentration of 2–10 mg/mL, unlike raw R. virescens, boiled A. auricula-judae, and boiled sweet potatoes that activated α-amylase and boiled R. virescens that gave 0% inhibition. The FS contained flavonoids and phenols in addition. The significant negative correlation (r = −0.55; P = 0.05 between the α-amylase inhibitory properties of the raw and cooked FS versus their SD indicates that the α-amylase inhibitors in these FS also influenced the digestibility of their starches. In addition, the significant positive correlation between the α-amylase inhibitory properties of the raw and cooked FS versus their resistant starch (RS (r = 0.59; P = 0.01 contents indicates that the RS constituents of these FS contributed to their α-amylase inhibitory properties. The study showed the usefulness of boiled unpeeled potato, boiled potato peeled, and raw sweet potato as functional foods for people with type 2 diabetes.

  2. New occurrences and noteworthy records on distribution of birds in Santa Catarina, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Barcellos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Most ornithological fieldworks in the state of Santa Catarina concentrate on the eastern half of state, while the middle-west lacks information. Between March 2000 and May 2002 a bird inventory was made in the influence areas of the hydroelectric power plants of Machadinho and Barra Grande, along the right banks of the Uruguai and Pelotas rivers, on Santa Catarina State territory. We carried out ad libitum surveys, point count sampling, and capture with mist nets. We present seventy-two noteworthy records for Santa Catarina, including three new occurrences for the state (Cypseloides senex, Polioptila dumicola e Procacicus solitarius, three species whose available information was only in general bibliography (Amazona pretrei, Ramphastos toco e Capsiempis flaveola, four whose records are the first in the last 40 years (Megascops sanctaecatarinae, Macropsalis forcipata Phyllomyias virescens e Corytops delalandi, and 63 species first cited for the eastern section of the Uruguai river valley.

  3. An annotated checklist of hermit crabs (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura of Indian waters with three new records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigneshkumar N. Trivedi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The annotated checklist of hermit crabs occurring in the Indian waters has been compiled based on published literature and specimens collected by us along the Indian coastline from 2010 to 2016. The checklist records 112 species belonging to 26 genera and five families. The east coast of India, with 81 species is more diverse than the west coast of India (73 species. Maximum species diversity was recorded from coastal areas of Tamil Nadu state (50 species whereas the least number of species were reported from coastal areas of Maharashtra state (7 species. Distribution of three species belonging to the family Diogenidae namely Areopaguristes perspicax (Nobili, 1906, Clibanarius virescens (Krauss, 1843, and Diogenes lophochir (Morgan, 1989 is for the first time recorded in Indian waters.

  4. Permanent genetic resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 December 2011-31 January 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M C; Arnoux, E; Bell, James J; Bernadou, Abel; Bino, Giorgia; Blatrix, R; Bourguet, Denis; Carrea, Cecilia; Clamens, Anne-Laure; Cunha, Haydée A; d'Alençon, E; Ding, Yi; Djieto-Lordon, C; Dubois, M P; Dumas, P; Eraud, C; Faivre, B; Francisco, F O; Françoso, E; Garcia, M; Gardner, Jonathan P A; Garnier, S; Gimenez, S; Gold, John R; Harris, D J; He, Guangcun; Hellemans, B; Hollenbeck, Christopher M; Jing, Shengli; Kergoat, G J; Liu, Bingfang; McDowell, Jan R; McKey, D; Miller, Terrence L; Newton, Erica; Pagenkopp Lohan, Katrina M; Papetti, Chiara; Paterson, Ian; Peccoud, J; Peng, Xinxin; Piatscheck, F; Ponsard, Sergine; Reece, Kimberly S; Reisser, Céline M O; Renshaw, Mark A; Ruzzante, Daniel E; Sauve, M; Shields, Jeffrey D; Solé-Cava, Antonio; Souche, E L; Van Houdt, J K J; Vasconcellos, Anderson; Volckaert, F A M; Wang, Shuzhen; Xiao, Jie; Yu, Hangjin; Zane, Lorenzo; Zannato, Barbara; Zemlak, Tyler S; Zhang, Chunxiao; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Xi; Zhu, Lili

    2012-05-01

    This article documents the addition of 473 microsatellite marker loci and 71 pairs of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sequencing primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Barteria fistulosa, Bombus morio, Galaxias platei, Hematodinium perezi, Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (a.k.a. M. abdominalis Fab., M. grandii Goidanich or M. gifuensis Ashmead), Micropogonias furnieri, Nerita melanotragus, Nilaparvata lugens Stål, Sciaenops ocellatus, Scomber scombrus, Spodoptera frugiperda and Turdus lherminieri. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Barteria dewevrei, Barteria nigritana, Barteria solida, Cynoscion acoupa, Cynoscion jamaicensis, Cynoscion leiarchus, Cynoscion nebulosus, Cynoscion striatus, Cynoscion virescens, Macrodon ancylodon, Menticirrhus americanus, Nilaparvata muiri and Umbrina canosai. This article also documents the addition of 116 sequencing primer pairs for Dicentrarchus labrax. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Wood anatomy of Argyroxiphium (Asteraceae): adaptive radiation and ecological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlquist, S.

    1997-01-01

    Wood anatomy shows close correlation with ecology: A. kauense, A. sandwicense (stem), and A. virescens, which occur in dry localities, show xeromorphic wood patterns. The most mesomorphic woods are those of the bog species A. grayanum and root wood of A. sandwicense. The wood of A. caliginis is xeromorphic, despite the bog habitat of the species, a fact explainable if A. caliginis is a recent entrant into the bog habitat Libriform wall thickness appears correlated with habit. Quantitative features of stem woods of Argyroxiphium are comparable to woods ranging from desert to moist montane forest areas in California. The similarities to woods from each Californian habitat are correlative to the relative moisture availability of the respective Hawaiian habitats of the Argyroxiphium species. (author)

  6. Cucullanus maldivensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Cucullanidae) and some other adult nematodes from marine fishes off the Maldive Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Frantisek; Lorber, Julia; Konecný, Robert

    2008-05-01

    Marine fishes were collected from off the Maldive Islands in March, 2005. From amongst the material collected, the nematode Cucullanus maldivensis n. sp. is described from the intestine of a lutjanid fish, the black and white snapper Macolor niger (Forsskål). This species is morphologically and biometrically most similar to C. bourdini Petter & Le Bel, 1992, differing from it principally in the protruding vulval lips, the location of the first pair of pre-anal papillae, the absence of an elevated cloacal region, and having distinctly larger eggs (51-57 x 33-36 microm). Additionally, adult females of the nematodes Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) sp. and Camallanus sp. from the green jobfish Aprion virescens Valenciennes (Lutjanidae) and the rainbow runner Elegatis bipinnulata (Quoy & Gaimard) (Carangidae), respectively, were collected. These camallanids are illustrated and measurements are provided, but they were not identified or described in detail as no males were collected.

  7. Some biophysical changes in the chloroplasts of a Dracaena radiation-mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palamine, Maria Teresa L.; Cureg, Rommel Gavino A.; Domingo, Zenaida B.; Marbella, Lucia J.; Lapade, Avalina G.; Deocaris, Custer C.

    2005-01-01

    Chlorophyll mutation is one of the most frequent phenotypes observed during radiation induced mutation breeding of Dracaena sanderiana var. virescens (common name: green cornplant). Spectral analysis of a stable mutant line irradiated at 20 Gy indicated a decreased ratio in chlorophylls a/b (0.74 + 0.104) compared with the wild-type mother plant (1.18 + 0.0665). Calorimetry of isolated chloroplast preparations showed a major difference in thermotropic transition in the range of -50 o C to 100 o C at T p of 64 o C and an enthalpy of -9.68 kJ/g in the chlorophyll-mutant. As these results are consistent with the mutation phenotype and the role played by chlorophyll in lamellar organization, our study shows an interesting application of biophysics in horticulture. (Author)

  8. Hippoboscidae (Diptera, Hippoboscoidea no Estado do Paraná, Brasil: chaves de identificação, hospedeiros e distribuição geográfica Hippoboscidae (Diptera, Hippoboscoidea in the State of Paraná, Brazil: keys, hosts and geographic distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Graciolli

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the louse flies species (Diptera, Hippoboscidae in the State of Paraná, Brazil was carried out. Keys to eight genera and 15 species found are given. The following species are recorded for the first time in Paraná: Lipoptena (Lipoptenella guimaraesi Bequaert, 1957; Stipolmetopoda legtersi Bequaert, 1955; Icosta (Ornithopomus latifacies Bequaert, 1955; Icosta (Ornithpomus rufiventris (Bigot, 1885; Icosta (Ardmoeca albipennis (Say, 1823 and Olfersia bisulcata Macquart, 1847. Baryphthengus ruficapillus (Vieillot, 1818 (Momotidae and Ciccaba virgata Carbin, 1849 (Strigidae are new host records for Ornithoica vicina (Walker, 1849 and I. (Ardmoeca albipennis; Chiroxiphia caudata (Shaw, 1793 and Schiffornis virescens (Lafresnaye, 1838 (Pipridae for Ornithoctona fusciventris (Wiedemann, 1830 and Gallus gallus domesticus (Linnaeus, 1758 (Phasianidae for S. legtersi.

  9. Parasites of Harmonia axyridis: current research and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haelewaters, Danny; Zha, Serena Y.; Clusella-Trullas, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) has been introduced widely for biological control of agricultural pests. Harmonia axyridis has established in four continents outside of its native range in Asia and it is considered an invasive alien species (IAS). Despite a large body of work...... on invasion ecology, establishment mechanisms of IAS and their interactions with natural enemies remain open questions. Parasites, defined as multicellular organisms that do not directly kill the host, could potentially play an important role in regulating host populations. This study presents a review...... of the parasites of H. axyridis, discussing their distributions and effects on host populations across the host’s native and invasive range. These parasites are: Hesperomyces virescens Thaxt. fungi, Coccipolipus hippodamiae (McDaniel and Morrill) mites, and Parasitylenchus bifurcatus Poinar and Steenberg nematodes....

  10. Molecular identification of the fish fauna from the pantanal flood plain area in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro-Dias, Cristiane Kioko; Costa Silva, Guilherme José da; Ashikaga, Fernando Yuldi; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    The Pantanal is under the influence of the Paraguay River flood regime is considered to be one of the largest wetlands of the world, and has rich biodiversity, including fishes. Until now, the identification of fish species in this biome has only considered the morphological characteristics of individuals, and the present work aimed to identify the fish species of the Pantanal region through the DNA barcode methodology for investigating the biodiversity in this region. The genetic analysis of 638 samples via the GMYC approach identified 137 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to 127 species that have previously been described according to their morphological characteristics. Data suggest that 10 cases of morphospecies (Eigenmannia trileneata, E. virescens, Pimelodella gracilis, Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus, Brachyhypopomus sp., Ancistrus sp., Hyphessobrycon eques, Jupiaba acanthogaster, and Serrapinnus calliurus) represent complexes of cryptic species, and the number of species described in the Pantanal region has thus potentially been underestimated.

  11. Climatic change and indigenous and non-indigenous ravagers : a new reality?; Changements climatiques et les ravageurs indigenes et exotiques : une nouvelle realite?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regniere, J.; Cooke, B.; Logan, J.A.; Carroll, A.; Safranyik, L. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Canadian Forest Service

    2005-07-01

    The impact that climate change may have on ecological diversity was discussed with particular reference to the movement of indigenous and non-indigenous insects that are harmful to trees. Insects in particular, are more likely to evolve rapidly and adapt to ecological change. Those with a high rate of reproduction and which can move long distances will colonize new habitats and survive a wide range of bio-physical conditions. This PowerPoint presentation included a series of graphs, tables and charts to illustrate the increased presence of various harmful insects in northern forests, including the balsam twig aphid, balsam gall midge, gypsy moth, hemlock looper, western spruce budworm, and forest tent caterpillar. It was shown that large changes in ecosystems are expected to occur at northern latitudes and higher altitudes. tabs., figs.

  12. An algorithm for engineering regime shifts in one-dimensional dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, James P. L.

    2018-01-01

    Regime shifts are discontinuous transitions between stable attractors hosting a system. They can occur as a result of a loss of stability in an attractor as a bifurcation is approached. In this work, we consider one-dimensional dynamical systems where attractors are stable equilibrium points. Relying on critical slowing down signals related to the stability of an equilibrium point, we present an algorithm for engineering regime shifts such that a system may escape an undesirable attractor into a desirable one. We test the algorithm on synthetic data from a one-dimensional dynamical system with a multitude of stable equilibrium points and also on a model of the population dynamics of spruce budworms in a forest. The algorithm and other ideas discussed here contribute to an important part of the literature on exercising greater control over the sometimes unpredictable nature of nonlinear systems.

  13. Biology and ecomorphology of stream fishes from the rio Mogi-Guaçu basin, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiane M. Ferreira

    Full Text Available The córrego Paulicéia is a direct tributary of the rio Mogi-Guaçu, located in Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, State of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. This stream runs inside a savannah-like (cerrado environment and it associated vegetation. Biological and ecomorphological aspects of its fish community were studied in three stretches of the stream, denominated herein as the upper, middle and lower courses. The fish fauna recorded in this study consisted of 15 species, belonging to five orders and nine families, based in a total of 715 collected individuals representing 1,450 kg of biomass. The most important abiotic factors related to the occurrence and distribution of the fish fauna were the substrate, current speed, and presence or absence of riparian vegetation. The analysis of 336 stomach contents of 13 species demonstrated that 65% of food items are autochthonous, 32% allochthonous, and 3% are of unknown origin. Four alimentary guilds could be identified, based on the predominant food items: omnivores with tendency to insectivory - Astyanax paranae, A. fasciatus and Piabina argentea; larvivores - Corydoras difluviatilis, Cetopsorhamdia iheringi, Phenacorhamdia tenebrosa, Characidium gomesi, Eigenmannia virescens, and Rhamdia quelen; periphyton feeders - Hisonotus sp., Hypostomus ancistroides and Synbranchus marmoratus; and piscivore - Hoplias malabaricus. Reproductions data are presented for Astyanax altiparanae and Hisontus sp. Three ecomorphological groups could be established, based on swimming, feeding, and microhabitat strategies: nektonic (A. fasciatus, A. paranae, Bryconamericus stramineus, P. argentea, H. malabaricus and Phallotorynus jucundus, benthic (C. gomesi, P. tenebrosa, C. iheringi, R. quelen, C. difluviatilis, H. ancistroides and Hisonotus sp., and necktobenthic (E. virescens and S. marmoratus.

  14. A Three-Year Field Validation Study to Improve the Integrated Pest Management of Hot Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hoon Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To improve the integrated pest management (IPM of hot pepper, field study was conducted in Hwasung from 2010 to 2012 and an IPM system was developed to help growers decide when to apply pesticides to control anthracnose, tobacco budworm, Phytophthora blight, bacterial wilt, and bacterial leaf spot. The three field treatments consisted of IPM sprays following the forecast model advisory, a periodic spray at 7-to-10-day intervals, and no spray (control. The number of annual pesticide applications for the IPM treatment ranged from six to eight, whereas the plots subjected to the periodic treatment received pesticide 11 or 12 times annually for three years. Compared to the former strategy, our improved IPM strategy features more intense pest management, with frequent spraying for anthracnose and mixed spraying for tobacco budworm or Phytophthora blight. The incidences for no pesticide control in 2010, 2011, and 2012 were 91, 97.6, and 41.4%, respectively. Conversely, the incidences for the IPM treatment for those years were 7.6, 62.6, and 2%, and the yields from IPM-treated plots were 48.6 kg, 12.1 kg, and 48.8 kg. The incidence and yield in the IPM-treated plots were almost the same as those of the periodic treatment except in 2011, in which no unnecessary sprays were given, meaning that the IPM control was quite successful. From reviewing eight years of field work, sophisticated forecasts that optimize pesticide spray timing reveal that reliance on pesticides can be reduced without compromising yield. Eco-friendly strategies can be implemented in the pest management of hot pepper.

  15. A comparison of alternative plant mixes for conservation bio-control by native beneficial arthropods in vegetable cropping systems in Queensland Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, S A; Midmore, D J; Syeda, S S; Reid, D J

    2010-02-01

    Cucurbit crops host a range of serious sap-sucking insect pests, including silverleaf whitefly (SLW) and aphids, which potentially represent considerable risk to the Australian horticulture industry. These pests are extremely polyphagous with a wide host range. Chemical control is made difficult due to resistance and pollution, and other side-effects are associated with insecticide use. Consequently, there is much interest in maximising the role of biological control in the management of these sap-sucking insect pests. This study aimed to evaluate companion cropping alongside cucurbit crops in a tropical setting as a means to increase the populations of beneficial insects and spiders so as to control the major sap-sucking insect pests. The population of beneficial and harmful insects, with a focus on SLW and aphids, and other invertebrates were sampled weekly on four different crops which could be used for habitat manipulation: Goodbug Mix (GBM; a proprietary seed mixture including self-sowing annual and perennial herbaceous flower species); lablab (Lablab purpureus L. Sweet); lucerne (Medicago sativa L.); and niger (Guizotia abyssinica (L.f.) Cass.). Lablab hosted the highest numbers of beneficial insects (larvae and adults of lacewing (Mallada signata (Schneider)), ladybird beetles (Coccinella transversalis Fabricius) and spiders) while GBM hosted the highest numbers of European bees (Apis mellifera Linnaeus) and spiders. Lucerne and niger showed little promise in hosting beneficial insects, but lucerne hosted significantly more spiders (double the numbers) than niger. Lucerne hosted sig-nificantly more of the harmful insect species of aphids (Aphis gossypii (Glover)) and Myzus persicae (Sulzer)) and heliothis (Heliothis armigera Hübner). Niger hosted significantly more vegetable weevils (Listroderes difficillis (Germar)) than the other three species. Therefore, lablab and GBM appear to be viable options to grow within cucurbits or as field boundary crops to

  16. The fish fauna in tropical rivers: The case of the Sorocaba river basin, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welber Senteio Smith

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey was carried out on the fish species in the Sorocaba River basin, the main tributary of the left margin of the Tietê River, located in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. The species were collected with gill nets. After identification of the specimens, their relative abundance, weight and standard length were determined. Up to the present moment there are not any studies that focus this subject in this hydrographic basin. Fifty-three species, distributed in eighteen families and six orders were collected. Characiformes were represented by twenty-eight species, Siluriformes by seventeen species, the Gymnotiformes by three species, Perciformes and Cyprinodontiformes by two species, and the Synbranchiformes by one species. Among the collected species there were two exotic. The most abundant species were Astyanax fasciatus and Hypostomus ancistroides. In relation to total weight the most representative species were Hoplias malabaricus and Hypostomus ancistroides. Cyprinus carpio, Prochilodus lineatus, Schizodon nasutus and Hoplias malabaricus were the most representative species in relation to average weight. Largest standard length were recorded for Sternopygus macrurus, Steindachnerina insculpta, Eigenmannia aff. virescens and Cyprinus carpioSe realizó un análisis de las especies de peces de la cuenca del Río Sorocaba, el principal tributario de la margen izquierda del Río Tietê, localizado en el estado de Sao Paulo, Brasil. Las especies fueron recolectadas con redes agalleras. Luego de la identificación de los especímenes, fue determinada su abundancia relativa, peso, y longitud estandar. Hasta el presente, no hay ningún otro estudio que analice estos aspectos en dicha cuenca hidrográfica. Fueron recolectados 55 especies, distribuidas en 18 familias y 6 ordenes. Los Characiformes estuvieron representados por 28 especies, Siluriformes por 17 especies, Gymnotiformes por 3 especies, Perciformes y Cyprinodontiformes por 2 especies, y

  17. Membracidos de Colombia - I. Revisión parcial de las especies del género Alchisme Kirkaldy (Homoptera: Membracidae: Hoplophorioninae Membracidos de Colombia - I. Revisión parcial de las especies del género Alchisme Kirkaldy (Homoptera: Membracidae: Hoplophorioninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restrepo Mejía Ruben

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available Se revisó el género Alchisme Kirkaldy. De las diecinueve especies anotadas por Metcalf (1965 no se obtuvieron especímenes de A. apicalis (Walker, A. costaricensis Goding, A. elevata Goding, A. laticornis Funkhouser, A. pinguicornisFunkhouser, A. recurva (Stäl, A. spinosa Funkhouser y A. truncaticornis (Germar. Se incluyen las descripciones originales de estas especies y tentativamente se localizan en la clave presentada. Se redescriben: A. bos (Fairmaire, A. fastidiosa (Fairmaire, A. grossa (Fairmaire, A. inermis (Fairmaire, A. nigrocarinata (Fairmaire, A. rubrocostata (Spinola, A. turrita (Germar, A. ustulata (Fairmaire, A. virescens (Fairmaire y A. nigrocarinata var. tridentata (Fairmaire, para la cual se usa su combinación original A. tridentata (Fairmaire. Se sinonimizóa A. projecta Funkhouser en favor de A. bos (Fairmaire.Se ilustran las principales características del pronoto y de los genitales de los machos; se observaron y se obtuvieron fotografías de los edeagos en un microscopio electrónico "rastreador" (Scanning Electro Microscope, las cualesse incluyen como parte de las ilustraciones. Se analizó la distribución geográfica del género y se ilustró por medio de mapas.The genus Alchisme Kirkaldy was revised. From nineteen species listed by Metcalf (1965 not specimens were obtained of eight of them. Original descriptions of these species are included and tentatively are localized in the key.  A redescription is given for the species A. bos (Fairmaire, A. fastidiosa (Fairmaire, A. grossa (Fairmaire, A. inermis (Fairmaire, A. nigrocarinata (Fairmaire, A. rubrocostata (Spinola, A. turrita (Germar, A. ustulata (Fairmaire, A. virescens (Fairmaire y A. nigrocarinata var. tridentata (Fairmaire, for which was used the original combination A. tridentata (Fairmaire. A. projecta Funkhouser was synonymized in A. bos (Fairmaire. The main pronotum characters and male genitalia are illustred; Scanning Electro Microscope pictures of the

  18. Photoprotection of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki from ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, E.; Rozen, H.; Joseph, T.; Braun, S.; Margulies, L.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD1 at 300-350 nm for up to 12 hr using a photochemical reactor results in a rapid loss of its toxicity to larvae of Heliothis armigera. Photoprotection of the toxic component was obtained by adsorption of cationic chromophores such as acriflavin (AF), methyl green, and rhodamine B to B. thuringiensis. AF gave the best photoprotection and a level of 0.42 mmol/g dye absorbed per gram of B. thuringiensis was highly toxic even after 12 hr of ultraviolet (uv) irradiation as compared to the control (77.5 and 5% of insect mortality, respectively). Ultraviolet and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic studies indicate molecular interactions between B. thuringiensis and AF. The nature of these interactions and energy or charge transfer as possible mechanisms of photoprotection are discussed. It is speculated that tryptophan residues are essential for the toxic effect of B. thuringiensis. It is suggested that photoprotection is attained as energy is transferred from the excited tryptophan moieties to the chromophore molecules

  19. Comparison of seed yielding performance of deltamethrin unprotected and protected plants of five cowpea cultivars at Foumbot, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parh, LA.

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Losses in seed yields due to damage by seed insect pests were studied on unsprayed and sprayed cowpea plants at Foumbot, located in the western highland savanna zone of Cameroon, in 1988 and 1989. Major pests recorded in the study site were Melanagromyza vignalis Spencer (Diptera : Agromyzidae, Marucatestulalis Geyer (Lepidoptera : Pyralidae, Cydia ptychora Meyrick (Lepidoptera : Tortricidae, Heliothis armigera Hubner (Lepidoptera : Noctuidae, Aphis craccivora Koch (Homoptera : Aphididae, Apion species (Coleoptera : Curculionidae, Coreid bugs (Heteroptera : Coreidae, and Bruchids (Coleoptera : Bruchidae. Yields of undamaged cowpea seeds from unsprayed and sprayed plants of local cultivars acquired from Badun, Melong, Foumbot and Befang were comparable with those from MA 2/1, an improved cultivar from the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture that has been released in Cameroon by the Institute for Agronomie Research. Melanagromyza, Maruca and Coreid bugs caused 70-80 % of seed damage on unsprayed and sprayed plants. Fortnightly spraying of plants with deltamethrin at 12.5g. a. i./ha, significantly reduced yield loss due to damage by Maruca sp., the overall loss in seed yields/ha and % loss of potential seed yield, in all five cowpea cultivars used in this study. However, deltamethrin appeared ineffective in reducing seed yield loss caused by Melanagromyza and Coreid bugs.

  20. DNA Barcoding the Heliothinae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) of Australia and Utility of DNA Barcodes for Pest Identification in Helicoverpa and Relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew; Gopurenko, David

    2016-01-01

    Helicoverpa and Heliothis species include some of the world's most significant crop pests, causing billions of dollars of losses globally. As such, a number are regulated quarantine species. For quarantine agencies, the most crucial issue is distinguishing native species from exotics, yet even this task is often not feasible because of poorly known local faunas and the difficulties of identifying closely related species, especially the immature stages. DNA barcoding is a scalable molecular diagnostic method that could provide the solution to this problem, however there has been no large-scale test of the efficacy of DNA barcodes for identifying the Heliothinae of any region of the world to date. This study fills that gap by DNA barcoding the entire heliothine moth fauna of Australia, bar one rare species, and comparing results with existing public domain resources. We find that DNA barcodes provide robust discrimination of all of the major pest species sampled, but poor discrimination of Australian Heliocheilus species, and we discuss ways to improve the use of DNA barcodes for identification of pests.

  1. DNA Barcoding the Heliothinae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae of Australia and Utility of DNA Barcodes for Pest Identification in Helicoverpa and Relatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mitchell

    Full Text Available Helicoverpa and Heliothis species include some of the world's most significant crop pests, causing billions of dollars of losses globally. As such, a number are regulated quarantine species. For quarantine agencies, the most crucial issue is distinguishing native species from exotics, yet even this task is often not feasible because of poorly known local faunas and the difficulties of identifying closely related species, especially the immature stages. DNA barcoding is a scalable molecular diagnostic method that could provide the solution to this problem, however there has been no large-scale test of the efficacy of DNA barcodes for identifying the Heliothinae of any region of the world to date. This study fills that gap by DNA barcoding the entire heliothine moth fauna of Australia, bar one rare species, and comparing results with existing public domain resources. We find that DNA barcodes provide robust discrimination of all of the major pest species sampled, but poor discrimination of Australian Heliocheilus species, and we discuss ways to improve the use of DNA barcodes for identification of pests.

  2. Bt Cry1Ie Toxin Does Not Impact the Survival and Pollen Consumption of Chinese Honey Bees, Apis cerana cerana (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ping-Li; Jia, Hui-Ru; Jack, Cameron J; Geng, Li-Li; Liu, Feng; Hou, Chun-Sheng; Diao, Qing-Yun; Ellis, James D

    2016-12-01

    The cry1Ie gene may be a good candidate for the development of Bt maize because over-expression of Cry1Ie is highly toxic to Lepidopteran pests such as Heliothis armigera Hübner and Ostrinia furnacalis Guenée. The Bt cry1Ie gene also has no cross resistance with other insecticidal proteins such as Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ah, or Cry1F. Chinese honey bees (Apis cerana cerana) are potentially exposed to insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops expressing Cry1Ie toxin via the collection of IRGM crop pollen. In this study, we tested whether Chinese honey bee workers are negatively affected by sugar syrup containing 20, 200, or 20,000 ng/ml Cry1Ie toxin and 48 ng/ml imidacloprid under controlled laboratory conditions. Our results demonstrated that the Cry1Ie toxin does not adversely impact survival and pollen consumption of Chinese honey bees. However, imidacloprid decreases Chinese honey bee survival and the total pollen consumption on the 5th, 6th, and 18th d of exposure. The described bioassay is suitable to assess the effects of GM expressed toxins against honey bee. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. p13 from group II baculoviruses is a killing-associated gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Qi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available p13 gene was first described in Leucania separata multinuclearpolyhedrosis virus (Ls-p13 several years ago, but the functionof P13 protein has not been experimentally investigated todate. In this article, we indicated that the expression of p13from Heliothis armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus(Ha-p13 was regulated by both early and late promoter.Luciferase assay demonstrated that the activity of Ha-p13promoter with hr4 enhancer was more than 100 times inheterologous Sf9 cells than that in nature host Hz-AM1 cells.Both Ls-P13 and Ha-P13 are transmembrane proteins. Confocalmicroscopic analysis showed that both mainly located in thecytoplasm membrane at 48 h. Results of RNA interferenceindicated that Ha-p13 was a killing-associated gene for hostinsects H. armigera. The AcMNPV acquired the mentionedkilling activity and markedly accelerate the killing rate whenexpressing Ls-p13. In conclusion, p13 is a killing associatedgene in both homologous and heterologous nucleopolyhedrovirus.

  4. Regulation analysis of AcMNPV-mediated expression of a Chinese scorpion neurotoxin under the IE1, P10 and PH promoter in vivo and its use as a potential bio-insecticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuejun; Li, Xing; Du, Jun; Zheng, Shuhua; Liang, Aihua

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the regulation mechanism of AcMNPV (Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus)-mediated expression of BmK IT under IE1, P10 and PH promoters in the larva of Heliothis armigera.. The transcription level of BmK IT gene in midgut and epidermal tissue was analyzed by quantitative PCR. The start time of transcription of recombinant BmK IT gene was early under the regulation of IE promoter, whereas transcription of BmK IT was high under the regulation of P10 promoter in the midgut tissue of infected larvae. TdT-UTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay showed the degree of apoptotic cell death in the midgut tissue of AcMNPV-BmK IT-transfected insect larvae was higher than that in the AcMNPV treatment group at 8 h post-infection. The time-effect relationship between the insect's humoral immunity and regulation of promoters was confirmed in the phenoloxidase activity assay. The anti-insect mechanism and regulation of different promoters in AcMNPV-BmK IT at molecular and cellular levels provide an experimental basis for the development of recombinant baculovirus biopesticides.

  5. Development of radiolabelling method for natural juvenile hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Takashi; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Kotaki, Toyomi

    1999-01-01

    Juvenile hormone binding protein (JHBP) has been attention because of its high specificity. In this study, labelling method for juvenile hormone (JH) was investigated to develop a new JH assay system. Since there exist several kinds of homologues of JH, it was necessary to establish a labelling method for each homologue. Purification of JHBP from silk gland was attempted using labelled epoxy farnesyl diazoacetate (EFDA), an optical affinity labelling agent. The cytosol from silk gland was purified using ion-exchange chromatography and gel-filtration one and optical affinity labelling with 3 H-EFDA was performed by UV exposure for 2 min. The final preparation of JHBP showed a single peak on polyacrylamide-electrophoresis and the protein was demonstrated to consist of two subunits (MW of 22000 and 36000). Then, natural JH was prepared from male accessory gland of a silk worm and purified by thin-layer chromatography after labelling with S-adenosyl-methionine. The yield was 5%. Excessive expression of JHBP cDNA isolated from Heliothis virescence was performed in E. coli using a expression vector, resulting to express a protein fused with glutathione transferase and the protein was purified by glutathione affinity gel chromatography. The fusion protein thus obtained from E. coli was confirmed to be positive for anti-JHBP antibody and it can specifically bind JHI. Thus, it became possible to produce homogeneous JHBP in any time. (M.N.)

  6. An ecological and floristic study of the diatoms in Babolrud river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Jafari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilithic diatoms are a division of Bacillariophyceae which live on stone and hard surfaces. This study was aimed to investigate the population dynamics of diatoms in Babolrud river. Samples were collected from 5 stations from May 2012 through September 2012 in a monthly interval. Temperature, pH, NO3-, PO4- and (EC were measured for each sampling. Samples were prepared using Patrick and Reimer procedure. 72 taxa were identified, among which 33 taxa (46% were cosmopolitan or widely distributed. The genera with the highest species were Navicula (12, Nitzschia (9, Achnanthes (9, Cymbella (8 and Gomphonema (6. The decrease in diatoms diversity from upstream toward downstream can be regarded as an indicator of increasing water pollution. Trends in distribution of diatom species in the sampling sites were explained by variations in environmental parameters such as conductivity, pH, temperature, nitrate and phosphate. In highly contaminated sites of the Babolrud River, species such as Gomphonema olivaceum, Navicula pupula, Nitzschia flexa and Pinnularia major were observed, while individuals of Achnanthes clevei, Achnanthes deflexa, Cymbella affinis and Fragilaria virescens were found in sampling sites with relatively less environmental perturbation. We concluded that diatoms can be used as quantitative indicators of environmental conditions in lotic systems.

  7. Length-based assessment of coral reef fish populations in the main and northwestern Hawaiian islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc O Nadon

    Full Text Available The coral reef fish community of Hawaii is composed of hundreds of species, supports a multimillion dollar fishing and tourism industry, and is of great cultural importance to the local population. However, a major stock assessment of Hawaiian coral reef fish populations has not yet been conducted. Here we used the robust indicator variable "average length in the exploited phase of the population ([Formula: see text]", estimated from size composition data from commercial fisheries trip reports and fishery-independent diver surveys, to evaluate exploitation rates for 19 Hawaiian reef fishes. By and large, the average lengths obtained from diver surveys agreed well with those from commercial data. We used the estimated exploitation rates coupled with life history parameters synthesized from the literature to parameterize a numerical population model and generate stock sustainability metrics such as spawning potential ratios (SPR. We found good agreement between predicted average lengths in an unfished population (from our population model and those observed from diver surveys in the largely unexploited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Of 19 exploited reef fish species assessed in the main Hawaiian Islands, 9 had SPRs close to or below the 30% overfishing threshold. In general, longer-lived species such as surgeonfishes, the redlip parrotfish (Scarus rubroviolaceus, and the gray snapper (Aprion virescens had the lowest SPRs, while short-lived species such as goatfishes and jacks, as well as two invasive species (Lutjanus kasmira and Cephalopholis argus, had SPRs above the 30% threshold.

  8. Origin of the H genome in StH-genomic Elymus species based on the single-copy nuclear gene DMC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Genlou; Zhang, Xiaodi

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the H haplome in Elymus could originate from different diploid Hordeum species, however, which diploid species best represent the parental species remains unanswered. The focus of this study seeks to pinpoint the origin of the H genome in Elymus. Allopolyploid Elymus species that contain the StH genome were analyzed together with diploid Hordeum species and a broad sample of diploid genera in the tribe Triticeae using DMC1 sequences. Both parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses well separated the American Hordeum species, except Hordeum brachyantherum subsp. californicum, from the H genome of polyploid Elymus species. The Elymus H-genomic sequences were formed into different groups. Our data suggested that the American Horedeum species, except H. brachyantherum subsp. californicum, are not the H-genomic donor to the Elymus species. Hordeum brevisubulatum subsp. violaceum was the progenitor species to Elymus virescens, Elymus confusus, Elymus lanceolatus, Elymus wawawaiensis, and Elymus caninus. Furthermore, North American H. brachyantherum subsp. californicum was a progenitor of the H genome to Elymus hystrix and Elymus cordilleranus. The H genomes in Elymus canadensis, Elymus sibiricus, and Elymus multisetus were highly differentiated from the H genome in Hordeum and other Elymus species. The H genome in both North American and Eurasian Elymus species was contributed by different Hordeum species.

  9. Survey of ciguatera at Enewetak and Bikini, Marshall Islands, with notes on the systematics and food habits of ciguatoxic fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, J.E.

    1980-04-01

    A total of 551 specimens of 48 species of potentially ciguatoxic fishes from Enewetak and 256 specimens of 23 species from Bikini, Marshall Islands, were tested for ciguatoxin by feeding liver or liver and viscera from these fishes to mongooses at 10% body weight (except for sharks, when only muscle tissue was used). The fishes are representatives of the following families: Orectolobidae, Carcharhinidae, Dasyatidae, Muraenidae, Holocentridae, Sphyraenidae, Mugilidae, Serranidae, Lutjanidae, Lethrinidae, Carangidae, Scombridae, Labridae, Scaridae, Acanthuridae, and Balistidae. The species selected were all ones for which toxicity can be expected, including the worst offenders from reports of ciguatera throughout Oceania; only moderate to large-sized adults were tested. In all, 37.3% of the fishes from Enewetak and 19.7% from Bikini gave a positive reaction for ciguatoxin. Because liver and other viscera are more toxic than muscle, the percentage of positive reactions at the level which might cause illness in humans eating only the flesh of these fishes collectively would drop to 16.2 for Enewetak and 1.4 for Bikini. This level of toxicity is not regarded as high for Pacific islands, in general. Because ciguatoxin is acquired through feeding, the food habits of these fishes were investigated. Most of the highly toxic species, including seven of the eight causing severe illness or death in the test animals (Lycodontis javanicus, Cephalopholis argus, Epinephelus hoedtii, E. microdon, Plectropomus leopardus, Aprion virescens, and Lutjanus bohar) are primarily piscivorous.

  10. Host use and seasonality of Culex (Melanoconion) iolambdis (Diptera: Culicidae) from eastern Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, Erik M; Stenn, Tanise; Acevedo, Carolina; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D

    2016-12-01

    Culex (Melanoconion) iolambdis (Dyar, 1918) is a mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) species found throughout much of tropical America, including southern Florida. Relatively few reports are available regarding the ecology of Cx. iolambdis, despite its widespread distribution and putative involvement in transmission of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. To quantify habitat and host utilization, adults of Cx. iolambdis were sampled from resting shelters at a field site in Vero Beach, Florida, over a 12-month period. Culex iolambdis (1109 males, 3072 females) constituted more than half (56.76%) of all mosquitoes sampled (24 species) and was active year-round. Unfed females and gravid females of Cx. iolambdis were significantly more abundant in mangrove habitat, while males and blood-fed females were not. PCR-based bloodmeal analysis of 305 females revealed that Cx. iolambdis has very wide host breadth, feeding on birds (37.0% overall), reptiles (26.6%), amphibians (23.3%) and mammals (13.1%). Green heron (Butorides virescens), Southern leopard frog (Lithobates sphenocephala) and American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) were the most commonly fed upon hosts. Bloodmeals from different host classes varied significantly with season, suggesting that Cx. iolambdis may play a role in the amplification and epidemic transmission of zoonotic arboviruses affecting human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Length-based assessment of coral reef fish populations in the main and northwestern Hawaiian islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadon, Marc O; Ault, Jerald S; Williams, Ivor D; Smith, Steven G; DiNardo, Gerard T

    2015-01-01

    The coral reef fish community of Hawaii is composed of hundreds of species, supports a multimillion dollar fishing and tourism industry, and is of great cultural importance to the local population. However, a major stock assessment of Hawaiian coral reef fish populations has not yet been conducted. Here we used the robust indicator variable "average length in the exploited phase of the population ([Formula: see text])", estimated from size composition data from commercial fisheries trip reports and fishery-independent diver surveys, to evaluate exploitation rates for 19 Hawaiian reef fishes. By and large, the average lengths obtained from diver surveys agreed well with those from commercial data. We used the estimated exploitation rates coupled with life history parameters synthesized from the literature to parameterize a numerical population model and generate stock sustainability metrics such as spawning potential ratios (SPR). We found good agreement between predicted average lengths in an unfished population (from our population model) and those observed from diver surveys in the largely unexploited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Of 19 exploited reef fish species assessed in the main Hawaiian Islands, 9 had SPRs close to or below the 30% overfishing threshold. In general, longer-lived species such as surgeonfishes, the redlip parrotfish (Scarus rubroviolaceus), and the gray snapper (Aprion virescens) had the lowest SPRs, while short-lived species such as goatfishes and jacks, as well as two invasive species (Lutjanus kasmira and Cephalopholis argus), had SPRs above the 30% threshold.

  12. Mesohabitat use of threatened hemlock forests by breeding birds of the Delaware River basin in northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R.M.; Redell, L.A.; Bennett, R.M.; Young, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Avian biodiversity may be at risk in eastern parks and forests due to continued expansion of the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), an exotic homopteran insect native to East Asia. To assess avian biodiversity, mesohabitat relations, and the risk of species loss with declining hemlock forests in Appalachian park lands, 80 randomly distributed fixed-radius plots were established in which territories of breeding birds were estimated on four forest-terrain types (hemlock and hardwood benches and ravines) in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Both species richness and number of territories were higher in hardwood than hemlock forest types and in bench than ravine terrain types. Four insectivorous species, Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens), blue-headed vireo (Vireo solitarius), black-throated green warbler (Dendroica virens), and Blackburnian warbler (Dendroica fusca), showed high affinity for hemlock forest type and exhibited significantly greater numbers of territories in hemlock than hardwood sites. These species are hemlock-associated species at risk from continued hemlock decline in the Delaware River valley and similar forests of the mid-Atlantic east slope. Two of these species, the blue-headed vireo and Blackburnian warbler, appeared to specialize on ravine mesohabitats of hemlock stands, the vireo a low-to-mid canopy species, the warbler a mid-to-upper canopy forager. Unchecked expansion of the exotic adelgid and subsequent hemlock decline could negatively impact 3,600 pairs from the park and several million pairs from northeastern United States hemlock forests due to elimination of preferred habitat.

  13. Diversity and prevalence of hemoparasites of wading birds in southern Florida, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Coker

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Relatively few studies on hemoparasites have been conducted on wading birds in the families Ardeidae and Threskiornithidae (order Pelecaniformes, especially in the United States. In this study, we obtained baseline data on the prevalence and genetic diversity of haemosporidian parasites in wading birds opportunistically sampled from southern Florida, USA. We detected blood parasites in White Ibis (Eudocimus albus, Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus, Green Heron (Butorides virescens, and Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja with several novel host-parasite relationships. Infected birds had low parasitemias (average 0.77%, range 0–4% suggesting that infections were chronic. Despite the low sample sizes for several of our sampled species, these data highlight the diversity of parasites in this understudied group of birds and suggest that additional studies are needed to investigate the potential impacts of these parasites on their health, especially since southern Florida is becoming increasingly urbanized which can alter parasite transmission or host susceptibility. Keywords: Avian malaria, Florida, Haemoproteus plataleae, haemosporidia, Pelicaniformes, Plasmodium, Wading birds, White Ibis

  14. Revisão de Alchisme Kirkaldy (Hemiptera, Membracidae, Membracinae, Hoplophorionini Revision of Alchisme Kirkaldy (Hemiptera, Membracidae, Membracinae, Hoplophorionini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio J. Creão-Duarte

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty four (34 species of Alchisme Kirkaldy, 1904 are presented with descriptions, illustrations, and key for identification, except for two of them which were not seen, A. truncaticornis (Germar, 1835 and A. intermedia (Distant, 1881. The following nomenclatural changes are introduced: Achisme intermedia (Distant, 1881, sp. rev.; A. testacea (Fairmaire, 1846, sp. rev.; Alchisme apicalis (Walker, 1851 = A. costaricensis Goding, 1929, syn.n.; A. inermis (Fairmaire, 1846 = Triquetra nigrocarinala Fairmaire, 1846, syn.n.; A. rubrocostata (Spinola, 1852 = A. neuquina Remes-Lenicov, 1978, syn.n.; A. turrita (Germar, 1835 = Triquetra submaculata Buckton, 1901, syn.n.; A. ustulata (Fairmaire, 1846 = Triquetra virgata Fairmaire, 1846, syn.n.; A. virescens (Fairmaire, 1846 = Alchisme spinosa Funkhouser, 1940, syn.n.; Alchisme banosiensis sp.n. (from Ecuador; A. bordoni sp.n. (from Venezuela; A. colombiana sp.n. (from Colombia; A. salta sp.n. (from Argentina; A. cultellata sp.n. (from Venezuela; A. deflexa sp.n. (from Venezuela; A. erecta sp.n. (from Venezuela; A. frontomaculata sp.n. (from Brazil; A. goiana sp.n. (from Brazil; A. henryi sp.n. (from Venezuela; A. insolita sp.n. (from Colombia; A. mackameyi sp.n. (from Ecuador; A. onorei sp.n. (from Ecuador; A. schuhi sp.n. (from Peru.

  15. The tribe Acutalini Fowler (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae: new genera, new species and some nomenclatural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino M Sakakibara

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The tribe Acutalini Fowler is redescribed as well as the genera Acutalis Fairmaire, Euritea Stål, and Thrasymedes Kirkaldy. The following new taxa and nomenclatural changes are presented: Thrasymedes mexicana sp.n. (from Mexico, Oaxaca; Bordonia gen.n., with B. venezuelana sp.n. (type-species (from Venezuela, Portachuelo, B. clypeata sp.n. (from Colombia, Cuesta Boba, B. majuscula sp.n. (from Venezuela, Portachuelo, and Cornutalis gen.n., with C. cauca sp.n. (type-species (from Colombia, Cauca, and C. validu sp.n. (from Ecuador, Sto. Domingo. Acutalis fusconervosa Fairmaire, 1846 = Horiola venosa Walker, 1858, syn.n.; Euritea munda (Walker, 1858 = Stictolobus nitidus Funkhouser, 1940, syn.n.; Bordonia nigricosta (Goding, 1926, comb.n.; Bordonia virescens (Funkhouser, 1940, comb.n.. One species is transferred to Smiliinae-Ceresini: Tapinolobus curvispina (Walker, 1858, comb.n. (formerly in Thrasymedes = Tapinolobus fasciatus Sakakibara, 1969, syn.n.; another one is transferred to Darninae-Cymbomorphini: Eumela darnioides (Walker, 1858, comb.n. (formerly in Euritea.

  16. Sequence analysis of ORF IV RTBV isolated from tungro infected Oryza sativa L. cv Ciherang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastilestari, Bernadetta Rina; Astuti, Dwi; Estiati, Amy; Nugroho, Satya

    2015-09-01

    The Effort to increase rice production is often constrained by pest and disease such as Tungro. The Tungro disease is caused by the joint infection with two dissimilar viruses; a bacil-form-DNA virus, the Rice tungro bacilliform virus(RTBV) and the spherical RNA virus, Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) and transmitted by Green leafhopper (Nephotettix virescens). The symptom of disease is caused by the presence of RTBV. The genome of RTBV consists of four Open reading frames (ORFs) which encode functional proteins. Of the four, ORF IV is unique because it exists only in RTBV. The most efficient method of generating disease resistance plants is to look for natural sources of resistance genes in wild or germplasm and then transfer the gene and the accompanying resistance in cultivated crop varieties. The aim of this study is, therefore, to isolate and analyze of 1170 bp gene of ORF 4 of Tungro virus isolated from an Indonesian rice cultivar, Ciherang (Oryza sativa L. cv Indica). DNA sequencing analysis using BLAST showed 94% similarity with the reference sequence gen bank Acc.M65026.1. The comparisons and mutation analysis of DNA sequences were discussed in this research.

  17. Ultrastructural and molecular characterization of diversity among small araphid diatoms all lacking rimoportulae. I. Five new genera, eight new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun L; Ashworth, Matt P; Witkowski, Andrzej; Lobban, Christopher S; Zgłobicka, Izabela; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J; Qin, Song

    2016-12-01

    Pennate diatoms are important contributors to primary production in freshwater and marine habitats. But the extent of their diversity, ecology, and evolution is still largely unknown. This is particularly evident among the clades of pennate diatoms without raphe slits, whose diversity is likely underestimated due to their small size and features that can be difficult to discern under light microscopy. In this study, we described five new araphid genera with eight new species based on morphological observations (light and electron microscopy) and molecular data (nuclear-encoded small subunit ribosomal RNA and chloroplast-encoded rbcL and psbC): Serratifera varisterna, Hendeyella rhombica, H. dimeregrammopsis, H. lineata, Psammotaenia lanceolata, Castoridens striata, C. hyalina, and Cratericulifera shandongensis. We also transferred Dimeregramma dubium to Hendeyella dubia. Phylogenetic analysis of the molecular data revealed that all the newly established taxa fell into a monophyletic group, with Fragilariforma virescens located at the base. The group was composed by two subclades: one comprising Castoridens, Cratericulifera, and Plagiostriata, and the larger including also the rest of the new genera plus some of the smallest known diatoms, such as Nanofrustulum, Opephora, Pseudostaurosira, Staurosirella, and Staurosira with a high level of support. This study enhances the general knowledge on the phylogeny and biodiversity of a group of small araphid diatoms that have been generally poorly described both by electron microscopy and DNA sequence data. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  18. Evolutionary stability of mutualism: interspecific population regulation as an evolutionarily stable strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Schultz, Stewart T.

    2004-01-01

    Interspecific mutualisms are often vulnerable to instability because low benefit : cost ratios can rapidly lead to extinction or to the conversion of mutualism to parasite–host or predator–prey interactions. We hypothesize that the evolutionary stability of mutualism can depend on how benefits and costs to one mutualist vary with the population density of its partner, and that stability can be maintained if a mutualist can influence demographic rates and regulate the population density of its partner. We test this hypothesis in a model of mutualism with key features of senita cactus (Pachycereus schottii) – senita moth (Upiga virescens) interactions, in which benefits of pollination and costs of larval seed consumption to plant fitness depend on pollinator density. We show that plants can maximize their fitness by allocating resources to the production of excess flowers at the expense of fruit. Fruit abortion resulting from excess flower production reduces pre–adult survival of the pollinating seed–consumer, and maintains its density beneath a threshold that would destabilize the mutualism. Such a strategy of excess flower production and fruit abortion is convergent and evolutionarily stable against invasion by cheater plants that produce few flowers and abort few to no fruit. This novel mechanism of achieving evolutionarily stable mutualism, namely interspecific population regulation, is qualitatively different from other mechanisms invoking partner choice or selective rewards, and may be a general process that helps to preserve mutualistic interactions in nature.

  19. Radiocesium dynamics in herons inhabiting a contaminated reservoir system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombey, A.H.; Paine, D.; McFarlane, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The little blue heron (Florida caerulea) and the green heron (Butorides virescens) nest at a radionuclide-contaminated reservoir on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Green herons distributed their nests singly along the periphery of the reservoir but fed their nestlings exclusively upon amphibians collected from adjacent uncontaminated Carolina bays. Radiocesium burdens in green heron nestlings did not exceed 5 pCi/g wet wt. and 12 regurgitated food pellets averaged 0.2 pCi/g. Twelve pairs of little blue herons established a heronry upon a small island and fed their nestlings fish and amphibians foraged from within the differentially radionuclide-contaminated reservoir system. Nestlings within the same nest did not exhibit significant differences in body burdens, and the maximum radiocesium burden determined was 27.4 pCi/g wet wt. Substantial differences were found between nestlings from different nests however. The radiocesium level of 43 regurgitated food pellets had a high correlation with observed levels in the nestlings, and variation in food contamination is believed to be the major contributor in the observed variation in the nestlings. The variable contamination of primary prey species was correlated with the differentially contaminated foraging sites and indicates that adult little blue herons tended to spatially partition the available foraging areas. (author)

  20. Selectable antibiotic resistance marker gene-free transgenic rice harbouring the garlic leaf lectin gene exhibits resistance to sap-sucking planthoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Subhadipa; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Mondal, Hossain A; Das, Sampa

    2010-03-01

    Rice, the major food crop of world is severely affected by homopteran sucking pests. We introduced coding sequence of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin, ASAL, in rice cultivar IR64 to develop sustainable resistance against sap-sucking planthoppers as well as eliminated the selectable antibiotic-resistant marker gene hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) exploiting cre/lox site-specific recombination system. An expression vector was constructed containing the coding sequence of ASAL, a potent controlling agent against green leafhoppers (GLH, Nephotettix virescens) and brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens). The selectable marker (hpt) gene cassette was cloned within two lox sites of the same vector. Alongside, another vector was developed with chimeric cre recombinase gene cassette. Reciprocal crosses were performed between three single-copy T(0) plants with ASAL- lox-hpt-lox T-DNA and three single-copy T(0) plants with cre-bar T-DNA. Marker gene excisions were detected in T(1) hybrids through hygromycin sensitivity assay. Molecular analysis of T(1) plants exhibited 27.4% recombination efficiency. T(2) progenies of L03C04(1) hybrid parent showed 25% cre negative ASAL-expressing plants. Northern blot, western blot and ELISA showed significant level of ASAL expression in five marker-free T(2) progeny plants. In planta bioassay of GLH and BPH performed on these T(2) progenies exhibited radical reduction in survivability and fecundity compared with the untransformed control plants.

  1. Visitation by wild and managed bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) to eastern U.S. native plants for use in conservation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuell, Julianna K; Fiedler, Anna K; Landis, Douglas; Isaacs, Rufus

    2008-06-01

    Addition of floral resources to agricultural field margins has been shown to increase abundance of beneficial insects in crop fields, but most plants recommended for this use are non-native annuals. Native perennial plants with different bloom periods can provide floral resources for bees throughout the growing season for use in pollinator conservation projects. To identify the most suitable plants for this use, we examined the relative attractiveness to wild and managed bees of 43 eastern U.S. native perennial plants, grown in a common garden setting. Floral characteristics were evaluated for their ability to predict bee abundance and taxa richness. Of the wild bees collected, the most common species (62%) was Bombus impatiens Cresson. Five other wild bee species were present between 3 and 6% of the total: Lasioglossum admirandum (Sandhouse), Hylaeus affinis (Smith), Agapostemon virescens (F.), Halictus ligatus Say, and Ceratina calcarata/dupla Robertson/Say. The remaining wild bee species were present at bees (Apis mellifera L.) was nearly identical to that of B. impatiens. All plant species were visited at least once by wild bees; 9 were highly attractive, and 20 were moderately attractive. Honey bees visited 24 of the 43 plant species at least once. Floral area was the only measured factor accounting for variation in abundance and richness of wild bees but did not explain variation in honey bee abundance. Results of this study can be used to guide selection of flowering plants to provide season-long forage for conservation of wild bees.

  2. Growth Response of Northern White-Cedar (Thuja occidentalis to Natural Disturbances and Partial Cuts in Mixedwood Stands of Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Ruel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis is a species of high commercial and ecological value, the abundance of which has been declining since the middle of the 19th century. Very little information regarding its silviculture in mixedwood stands is currently available, even though a significant portion of wood resources comes from these stands. The present study is a retrospective analysis of white-cedar growth in partially harvested mixedwood stands of western Quebec, Canada. Eight stands distributed across two regions were analyzed. Dendrochronological approaches examined long-term diameter growth for sample white-cedar trees and stems of associated species. These approaches were used to reconstruct stand characteristics at the time of harvesting, together with local harvesting intensity. The study demonstrated white-cedar’s capacity to maintain good growth for long periods of time and at large tree sizes. Accession to the upper canopy positions occurs through repeated episodes of suppression/release, most of which seem to be associated with spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana outbreaks. White-cedar response to partial harvesting varies with tree size, residual basal area and species composition. Growth response was generally stronger for small trees, even though large trees still maintained the best diameter growth. Growth of white-cedar was negatively affected by an increase in softwood proportion in basal area. Growth responses to harvesting could be sustained for a period of 20 years.

  3. Genes, enzymes and chemicals of terpenoid diversity in the constitutive and induced defence of conifers against insects and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Insects select their hosts, but trees cannot select which herbivores will feed upon them. Thus, as long-lived stationary organisms, conifers must resist the onslaught of varying and multiple attackers over their lifetime. Arguably, the greatest threats to conifers are herbivorous insects and their associated pathogens. Insects such as bark beetles, stem- and wood-boring insects, shoot-feeding weevils, and foliage-feeding budworms and sawflies are among the most devastating pests of conifer forests. Conifer trees produce a great diversity of compounds, such as an enormous array of terpenoids and phenolics, that may impart resistance to a variety of herbivores and microorganisms. Insects have evolved to specialize in resistance to these chemicals -- choosing, feeding upon, and colonizing hosts they perceive to be best suited to reproduction. This review focuses on the plant-insect interactions mediated by conifer-produced terpenoids. To understand the role of terpenoids in conifer-insect interactions, we must understand how conifers produce the wide diversity of terpenoids, as well as understand how these specific compounds affect insect behaviour and physiology. This review examines what chemicals are produced, the genes and proteins involved in their biosynthesis, how they work, and how they are regulated. It also examines how insects and their associated pathogens interact with, elicit, and are affected by conifer-produced terpenoids.

  4. The role of analytical science in natural resource decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan

    1993-09-01

    There is a continuing debate about the proper role of analytical (positivist) science in natural resource decision making. Two diametrically opposed views are evident, arguing for and against a more extended role for scientific information. The debate takes on a different complexion if one recognizes that certain kinds of problem, referred to here as “wicked” or “trans-science” problems, may not be amenable to the analytical process. Indeed, the mistaken application of analytical methods to trans-science problems may not only be a waste of time and money but also serve to hinder policy development. Since many environmental issues are trans-science in nature, then it follows that alternatives to analytical science need to be developed. In this article, the issues involved in the debate are clarified by examining the impact of the use of analytical methods in a particular case, the spruce budworm controversy in New Brunswick. The article ends with some suggestions about a “holistic” approach to the problem.

  5. Antennal transcriptomes of three tortricid moths reveal putative conserved chemosensory receptors for social and habitat olfactory cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Francisco; Witzgall, Peter; Walker, William B.

    2017-01-01

    Insects use chemical signals to find mates, food and oviposition sites. The main chemoreceptor gene families comprise odorant receptors (ORs), ionotropic receptors (IRs) and gustatory receptors (GRs). Understanding the evolution of these receptors as well as their function will assist in advancing our knowledge of how chemical stimuli are perceived and may consequently lead to the development of new insect management strategies. Tortricid moths are important pests in horticulture, forestry and agriculture around the globe. Here, we characterize chemoreceptors from the three main gene families of three economically important tortricids, based on male antennal transcriptomes using an RNA-Seq approach. We identified 49 ORs, 11 GRs and 23 IRs in the green budworm moth, Hedya nubiferana; 49 ORs, 12 GRs and 19 IRs in the beech moth, Cydia fagiglandana; and 48 ORs, 11 GRs and 19 IRs in the pea moth, Cydia nigricana. Transcript abundance estimation, phylogenetic relationships and molecular evolution rate comparisons with deorphanized receptors of Cydia pomonella allow us to hypothesize conserved functions and therefore candidate receptors for pheromones and kairomones. PMID:28150741

  6. Climate change effects on insect outbreaks and management opportunities for carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLean, D.A. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada); Gray, D.; Porter, K.B.; MacKinnon, W.; Budd, M.; Beaton, K. [Natural Resources Canada, Fredericton, NB (Canada)]|[Canadian Forest Service, Atlantic Forestry Centre, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Fleming, R.A. [Canadian Forest Service, Sault Ste. Marie, ON (Canada); Volney, J. [Natural Resources Canada, Edmonton, AB (Canada)]|[Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2002-10-01

    Forest fires and pest outbreaks are 2 major natural disturbances that significantly impact carbon balances. This paper describes an ongoing project aimed at quantifying the effect of insect disturbances on the carbon sink potential of Canada's forests. Each year, outbreaks of forest insects and diseases in Canada cause losses of 80 to 110 million m{sup 3} of timber, compared to 25 million m{sup 3}/year lost to fire. Outbreaks of insects and the severity and extent of forest fires will be influenced by climate change. This paper provides background information, plans and the current status of the project entitled Greenhouse gases, sources and sinks call. The objectives are to: (1) develop a modeling system to analyze the effects of climate change on pest outbreak dynamics and carbon sequestration patterns on a large regional scale, (2) predict the extent and impact of future insect disturbance regimes on forest carbon sink potential, (3) use scenario planning analyses to quantify effects of enhanced management and protection against pests on carbon sequestration, and (4) estimate probable effects of climate change on pest outbreaks and carbon sequestration opportunities from enhanced management programs. The Spruce Budworm Decision Support System was the methodology used to forecast the effects of pest outbreaks. The results are expected to help in the development of a national action program on forest sinks and contribute to Canada's efforts to meet its commitment under the Kyoto Protocol to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Combined action of sex pheromone and wasp Apanteles gelechiidivoris in greenhouse Tomato crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Jessica; Munoz, Laura; Rodriguez, Daniel; Cantor, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The Tomato budworm, Tuta absoluta, is considered main pest of Tomato crops. Control of this pest is performed with hemicals, although, there are other strategies such as biological and ethological control. In Colombia there is not precedent that combines both strategies: ethological control with sexual pheromone and biological control with Apanteles gelechiidivoris, for the control of this pest in Tomato crops. In this work four different treatments under greenhouse conditions were evaluated including biological control with A. gelechiidivoris, ethological control with sexual pheromone traps, and combined action of both controls and traditional control (chemicals). The experiments aimed to developing a control strategy to reduce populations of T. absoluta. This was done sampling a plant every to 2 meters. From each plant a sample composed by one leaf by stratum was taken and the variables number of total larvae of third instar and parasited and number of captured adults for trap. The maximum parasitism in the population of susceptible larvae was 86.38 % and for total population of larvae was 68.75 %. The combined action of pheromone traps and A. gelechiidivoris presented a greater efficiency and permanence on the control of larvae of T. absoluta.

  8. Antioxidant enzymes in Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval): are they enhanced to protect gut tissues during oxidative stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Natraj; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2006-01-01

    The Egyptian armyworm Spodoptera littoralis is a polyphagous insect attacking a number of plant species including those belonging to the Solanaceae and Cruciferaceae families. Its digestive physiology must therefore adapt to the food plant to ensure maximum extraction of nutrients with minimum trade-off in terms of growth retardation by pro-oxidant allelochemicals. To investigate this, the caterpillars of S. littoralis were fed on a semi-artificial diet (Manduca Premix-Heliothis Premix) and for 24 h on potato plants (Solanum tuberosum), respectively, at the mature 6th instar, and the levels of oxidative radicals and antioxidant enzymes in their guts were compared. The gut pH, standard redox potential (Eh) and electron availability (pe) revealed that oxidizing conditions prevail which promote oxidation of pro-oxidant allelochemicals in foliage. Oxidative stress in the foregut and midgut tissue and the gut contents was assessed from the generation of superoxide radical, total peroxide content and protein carbonyl content. Antioxidant defense was measured by the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APOX) and glutathione S-transferase peroxidase (GSTpx). A significant (p enzymes SOD (in midgut tissues), CAT (in foregut, midgut tissue and contents), APOX (in foregut contents, midgut tissue and contents) and GSTpx (in foregut tissues) was recorded on the plant diet in comparison to the semi-artificial diet. The pro-oxidant allelochemicals in the plant diet are thus eliminated by the insect at the expense of up-regulation of antioxidative enzymes in response to increased oxidative stress from oxidizable allelochemicals. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that increased concentrations of antioxidants form an important component of the defense of herbivorous insects against both exogenous and endogenous oxidative radicals.

  9. Use of backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and X-ray microscopy in demonstrating physiological cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, I.D.; Worrill, N.A.; Winters, C.A.; Mullarkey, K.

    1988-01-01

    The cytochemical localization of enzymatic activity by means of backscattered electron imaging (BEI) is reviewed and the application of BEI to changes in acid phosphatase and ATPase distribution during physiological (programmed) cell death in Heliothis midgut is explored. Programmed cell death entails the release of nascent free acid phosphatase as extracisternal hydrolase. This shift can readily be detected by means of the atomic number contrast imparted by BEI of the lead phosphatase reaction product, thus enabling the distribution of dying cells to be mapped. BEI is particularly useful in this context as it allows the examination of bulk specimens at low magnification. Death of cells is also accompanied by a collapse in ATPase activity which shows up as cytochemically negative areas in the X-ray microscope and by means of BEI. Acid phosphatase in normal cells is localized in the apical microvilli and lysosomes. Senescent or dying cells, however, clearly show a basally situated free hydrolase which migrates throughout the cell. Parallel TEM results confirm that this enzyme is ribosomal and extracisternal rather than lysosomal in origin. ATPase activity is largely limited to the apical microvilli, although there is some activity associated with the basal plasma membranes. The apical ATPase, however is partially resistant to ouabain. Young and mature cells are positive although in the latter case some microvilli may be lost as the cells acquire a negative cap or dome. Inhibition by bromotetramizole indicates that apical activity is not to any significant extent contributed to by alkaline phosphatase. Degenerate or dead cells are negative and can be seen as a mozaic of black patches among normal cells when imaged by means of BEI or X-ray microscopy

  10. Effectiveness of Microbial and Chemical Insecticides for Supplemental Control of Bollworm on Bt and Non-Bt Cottons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, N S; Luttrell, R G; Allen, K C; Perera, O P; Parys, K A

    2017-06-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of microbial and chemical insecticides for supplemental control of bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), on non-Bt (DP1441RF) and Bt (DP1321B2RF) cottons. Neonate and 3rd instar larvae survival was evaluated on leaf tissue treated with microbial and chemical insecticides including a commercial formulation of Bacillus thuringiensis (Dipel), a Heliothis (Helicoverpa) nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV; Gemstar), λ-cyhalothrin (Karate Z), and chlorantraniliprole (Prevathon). Residual activity of insecticides was measured in a small plot field experiment. The performance of microbial insecticides, with the exception of a mid-rate of Dipel with neonate larvae, was comparable with that of chemical treatments on non-Bt cotton leaves with regard to 1st and 3rd instar bollworm mortality at 10 d and pupal eclosion at 20-d post treatment. Production-level field evaluations of supplemental bollworm control in non-Bt and Bt cottons with NPV, λ-cyhalothrin, and chlorantraniliprole were also conducted. During both years of the field study, all chemical and microbial treatments were successful in suppressing bollworm larval densities in non-Bt cotton below economic threshold levels. Overall, net returns above bollworm control, regardless of treatment, were negatively correlated with larval abundance and plant damage. In addition, there was no economic benefit for supplemental control of bollworms in Bt cotton at the larval densities observed during this study. These data provide benchmark comparisons for insect resistance management with microbial and chemical insecticides in Bt and non-Bt cottons and strategic optimization of the need to spray non-Bt and Bt cotton in IRM programs. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. DNA BARCODING IKAN HIAS INTRODUKSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melta Rini Fahmi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifikasi spesies menjadi tantangan dalam pengelolaan ikan hias introduksi baik untuk tujuan budidaya maupun konservasi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan identifikasi molekuler ikan hias introduksi yang beredar di pembudidaya dan pasar ikan hias Indonesia dengan menggunakan barcode DNA gen COI. Sampel ikan diperoleh dari pembudidaya dan importir ikan hias di kawasan Bandung dan Jakarta. Total DNA diekstraksi dari jaringan sirip ekor dengan menggunakan metode kolom. Amplifikasi gen target dilakukan dengan menggunakan primer FishF1, FishF2, FishR1, dan FishR2. Hasil pembacaan untai DNA disejajarkan dengan sekuen yang terdapat pada genbank melalui program BLAST. Identifikasi dilakukan melalui kekerabatan pohon filogenetik dan presentasi indeks kesamaan dengan sekuen genbank. Hasil identifikasi menunjukkan sampel yang diuji terbagi menjadi lima grup, yaitu: Synodontis terdiri atas lima spesies, Corydoras: empat spesies, Phseudoplatystoma: tiga spesies, Botia: tiga spesies, dan Leporinus: tiga spesies dengan nilai boostrap 99-100. Indeks kesamaan sekuen menunjukkan sebanyak 11 spesies memiliki indeks kesamaan 99%-100% dengan data genbank yaitu Synodontis decorus, Synodontis eupterus, Synodontis greshoffi, Botia kubotai, Botia lohachata, Rasbora erythromicron, Corydoras aeneus, Gyrinocheilus aymonieri, Eigenmannia virescens, Leporinus affinis, Phractocephalus hemioliopterus. Dua spesies teridentifikasi sebagai hasil hibridisasi (kawin silang yaitu Leopard catfish (100% identik dengan Pseudoplatystoma faciatum dan Synodontis leopard (100% identik dengan Synodontis notatus. Hasil analisis nukleotida penciri diperoleh tujuh nukleotida untuk Synodontis decora, 10 nukleotida untuk Synodontis tanganyicae, 13 nukleotida untuk Synodontis euterus, empat nukleotida untuk Synodontis notatus, dan 14 untuk Synodontis grashoffi. Kejelasan identifikasi spesies ikan menjadi kunci utama dalam budidaya, perdagangan, manajemen, konservasi, dan pengembangan

  12. Action potential energetics at the organismal level reveal a trade-off in efficiency at high firing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John E; Gilmour, Kathleen M; Moorhead, Mayron J; Perry, Steve F; Markham, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The energetic costs of action potential (AP) production constrain the evolution of neural codes and brain networks. Cellular-level estimates of AP-related costs are typically based on voltage-dependent Na(+) currents that drive active transport by the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase to maintain the Na(+) and K(+) ion concentration gradients necessary for AP production. However, these estimates of AP cost have not been verified at the organismal level. Electric signaling in the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia virescens requires that specialized cells in an electric organ generate APs with large Na(+) currents at high rates (200-600 Hz). We measured these currents using a voltage-clamp protocol and then estimated the energetic cost at the cellular level using standard methods. We then used this energy-intensive signaling behavior to measure changes in whole-animal energetics for small changes in electric discharge rate. At low rates, the whole-animal measure of AP cost was similar to our cellular-level estimates. However, AP cost increased nonlinearly with increasing firing rates. We show, with a biophysical model, that this nonlinearity can arise from the increasing cost of maintaining AP amplitude at high rates. Our results confirm that estimates of energetic costs based on Na(+) influx are appropriate for low baseline firing rates, but that extrapolating to high firing rates may underestimate true costs in cases in which AP amplitude does not decrease. Moreover, the trade-off between energetic cost and firing rate suggests an additional constraint on the evolution of high-frequency signaling in neuronal systems.

  13. Proximate compositions and bioactive compounds of edible wild and cultivated mushrooms from Northeast Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amporn Srikram

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mushrooms are known as an excellent source of nutrients including macronutrients and bioactive compounds. Nutritional values were investigated involving proximate analysis, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, total phenol content (TPC and total flavonoid content (TFC of 10 edible wild mushroom species—Amanita calyptroderma Ark. et al., Amanita princeps Corner et Bas, A., Astraeus odoratus, Heimiella retispora (Pat. et. Bak. Boedijn., Mycoamaranthus cambodgensis (Pat. Trappe, Russula alboareolata Hongo, Russula cyanoxantha Schaeff.ex.Fr., Russula emetic (Schaeff. ex Fr. S.F.Gray., Russula virescens (Schaeff. fr., Termitomyces clypeatus Heim—and five cultivated mushroom species—Auricularia auricula-judae, Lentinus polychrous Lev., Lentinus squarrosulus Mont., Pleurotus sajor-caju (Fr. Sing, Volvariella vovacea (Bull. Ex.Fr. Sing. From the proximate analysis, the moisture contents of both wild and cultivated mushrooms ranged from 84.15% fresh weight (FW to 90.21% FW. The ash, crude protein, fat, crude fiber and carbohydrate contents of both wild and cultivated mushrooms were in the dry weight ranges 2.56–13.96%, 11.16–50.29%, 1.43–21.94%, 2.11–38.11% and 9.56–59.73%, respectively, and the contents of macronutrients in the mushrooms varied by variety. Wild mushrooms had a high fiber content compared to cultivated mushrooms. The contents of biologically active compounds of both wild and cultivated mushrooms also varied depending on the variety. Values for the TAC, TPC and TFC of wild mushrooms were higher than those of cultivated mushrooms. In conclusion, the proximate analysis for both wild and cultivated mushrooms was variety dependent and wild mushrooms contained a higher fiber content and more biologically active compounds than cultivated mushrooms.

  14. Biodiversidad de Heteroptera (Hemiptera acuáticas y semiacuáticas de la Patagonia argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia MELO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Las Heteroptera acuáticas y semiacuáticas (infraórdenes Nepomorpha, Gerromorpha y Leptopodomorpha no presentan una alta diversidad específica en Argentina, hasta el momento se han registrado 208 especies. Carlos Berg en 1881, publica el primer trabajo que hace referencia a heterópteros de la Patagonia, en el que lista los insectos recolectados durante la Campaña del Desierto. Desde principios de la década del ’60, las Heteroptera acuáticas han sido estudiadas principalmente por A.O. Bachmann y colaboradores. Hasta el momento, se han registrado 36 especies pertenecientes a las familias Corixidae, Notonectidae, Belostomatidae, Gelastocoridae, Naucoridae y Nepidae (Nepomorpha; Hydrometridae, Veliidae y Mesoveliidae (Gerromorpha, y Saldidae (Leptopodomorpha. La mayoría de estas especies extienden su distribución geográfica hacia el norte de la Argentina, excepto Sigara (Tropocorixa egbertae Hungerford, S. (T. trimaculata (Le Guillou, S. (T. vuriloche Bachmann, S. (T. forciceps (Spinola, Trichocorixa milicorum Bachmann (Corixidae, Notonecta (Paranecta virescens Blanchard, N. (P. fazi Hungerford, N. (P. vereertbruggheni Hungerford (Notonectidae, Pseudosaldula bergi (Haglund y P. paralia (Torres, P. angusta (Drake & Carvalho, P. sola (Drake & Carvalho, P. doeringi (Drake & Carvalho y Saldula differata Drake & Carvalho (Saldidae, que son exclusivas de la Patagonia. El conocimiento de la diversidad de Heteroptera acuáticas y semiacuáticas en la Patagonia es bueno y, por los datos recogidos, su estado de conservación es aceptable ya que aproximadamente el 40% de la especies encontradas en áreas naturales protegidas son exclusivas de la región y representan cerca del 40 % del número de especies exclusivas de la Patagonia.

  15. Declining Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) populations are associated with landscape-specific reductions in brood parasitism and increases in songbird productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, W Andrew; Thompson, Frank R; Root, Brian; Faaborg, John

    2012-01-01

    Many songbird species have experienced significant population declines, partly because of brood parasitism by the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), which is positively associated with increasing landscape forest cover in the midwestern United States. However, cowbirds are also experiencing long-term population declines, which should reduce parasitism pressure and thus increase productivity of host species. We used 20 years of nest monitoring data from five sites in Missouri across a gradient of landscape forest cover to assess temporal trends in the rate and intensity of brood parasitism for Acadian Flycatchers (Empidonax virescens), Indigo Buntings (Passerina cyanea), and Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis). We evaluated whether there were concomitant changes in fledging brood size, nest survival, a combination of the two metrics (i.e., host young produced per nest attempt), and whether such changes were more substantial with decreasing landscape forest cover. Parasitism rates and intensities declined substantially during 1991-2010. Fledging brood size and nest survival rates were positively associated with landscape forest cover, confirming the fragmentation hypothesis for Midwest forest birds. Declining parasitism rates were associated with increased fledging brood sizes, with more pronounced increases as landscape forest cover decreased. Nest survival increased insubstantially across time during laying and incubation, but not during the nestling stage. The best predictor of nest survival was parasitism status, with parasitized nests surviving at lower rates than unparasitized nests. Overall, productivity increased during 1991-2010, with more pronounced increases associated with lower levels of landscape forest cover. The negative effects of cowbirds on nest survival in addition to fledging brood size in less forested landscapes suggest that cowbirds may be a primary cause of forest fragmentation effects on songbird productivity in the Midwest. Our

  16. Ecology of mangroves in the Jewfish Chain, Exuma, Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, L. V.; Yocom, Thomas G.; Forbes, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    The structure and function of mangrove communities in the Jewfish Chain, Exumas, Bahamas, were investigated for 3-1/2 years. Mangrove vegetation in the Jewfish Chain is similar to that in all the Caribbean-Florida area; Rhizophora mangle L. dominates and is interspersed with Avicennia germinans (L.) Lamk. and Laguncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn. There is no apparent zonation of these three species. The mangrove communities in the Jewfish Chain occur only where they are protected from prevailing winds, storms, and tides, although all are periodically devastated by hurricanes. We found little or no evidence of coast building within these protected locations. The importance of the mangroves appears to be in providing protection and food for other flora and fauna within this unique ecosystem. Twenty-four species of algae were found in the mangroves, 9 of which had not previously been reported from the Bahamas. Distribution of these algae appears to be correlated to incident solar radiation, desiccation, and tide level. A total of 56 species of fish were found in the mangroves, 2 of which were not previously known from the Bahamas. Many fish taken were juveniles, suggesting that mangroves are a nursery ground for numerous species. Nine species of molluscs were found. Each species had a distinct distribution pattern relative to distance from the seaward edge of the mangroves, as well as a distinct vertical distribution pattern. Seventeen species of decapod crustaceans were recorded. Though several species of birds were noted in the mangroves, three species were most abundant: the white-crowned pigeon (Columba leucocephala) uses the mangrove for nesting but feeds in nearby shrub-thorn communities; the gray kingbird (Tyrannus dominicensis) and green heron (Butorides virescens) nest and feed in the mangroves. Our data do not completely describe a stereotyped mangrove community in the Bahamas, but they do give an indication of community structure and suggest several

  17. The marine macroalgae of Helgoland (North Sea): an annotated list of records between 1845 and 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Inka; Kuhlenkamp, Ralph

    2000-12-01

    The earliest known records of marine macroalgae from Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) date from the mid-19th century. Since then, 274 marine macroalgal species have been reported: 77 species of Chlorophycota, 100 species of Phaeophycota and 97 species of Rhodophycota. Additionally 11 species were only recorded as drift and 51 species as doubtful for Helgoland. The remains of the herbarium of Paul Kuckuck, the first curator for botany at the Helgoland Biological Station between 1892 and 1914, are still located there and consist of 173 macroalgal species from Helgoland. On comparing this 100-year-old herbarium and other old sources with recent macroalgal records, it became clear that changes in species composition have occurred. After World War II, several species such as Arthrocladia villosa, Corynophlaea crispa, Cutleria multifida, Eudesme virescens, Mesogloia vermiculata, Sporochnus pedunculatus, Antithamnion cruciatum, Apoglossum ruscifolium, Chondria dasyphylla, Helminthora divaricata, Jania rubens and Osmundea ramosissima were not found again. Other species such as Dictyota dichotoma, Leathesia difformis, Stictyosiphon soriferus, Helminthocladia calvadosii and Scinaia furcellata became very rare . Significantly, perhaps, most of these species have a heteromorphic life history with the appearance of the macroscopic phase restricted to (spring and) summer. Many new species of green algae were recorded for Helgoland after 1959, due to new substrata and the research activities of Peter Kornmann, curator for botany after 1959, and Paul-Heinz Sahling his technical assistant. Introductions of species during the considered time period were: Bonnemaisonia hamifera, Codium fragile, Mastocarpus stellatus and Sargassum muticum. Type material of the following species is located at the Marine Biological Station at Helgoland: Mikrosyphar porphyrae, Porphyra insolita and Ulva tenera.

  18. Breeding birds in managed forests on public conservation lands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Wilson, R. Randy

    2017-01-01

    Managers of public conservation lands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley have implemented forest management strategies to improve bottomland hardwood habitat for target wildlife species. Through implementation of various silvicultural practices, forest managers have sought to attain forest structural conditions (e.g., canopy cover, basal area, etc.) within values postulated to benefit wildlife. We evaluated data from point count surveys of breeding birds on 180 silviculturally treated stands (1049 counts) that ranged from 1 to 20 years post-treatment and 134 control stands (676 counts) that had not been harvested for >20 years. Birds detected during 10-min counts were recorded within four distance classes and three time intervals. Avian diversity was greater on treated stands than on unharvested stands. Of 42 commonly detected species, six species including Prothonotary Warbler (Prothonotaria citrea) and Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) were indicative of control stands. Similarly, six species including Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) and Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) were indicative of treated stands. Using a removal model to assess probability of detection, we evaluated occupancy of bottomland forests at two spatial scales (stands and points within occupied stands). Wildlife-forestry treatment improved predictive models of species occupancy for 18 species. We found years post treatment (range = 1–20), total basal area, and overstory canopy were important species-specific predictors of occupancy, whereas variability in basal area was not. In addition, we used a removal model to estimate species-specific probability of availability for detection, and a distance model to estimate effective detection radius. We used these two estimated parameters to derive species densities and 95% confidence intervals for treated and unharvested stands. Avian densities differed between treated and control stands for 16 species, but only Common Yellowthroat

  19. Species-specific variation in nesting and postfledging resource selection for two forest breeding migrant songbirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianna M A Jenkins

    Full Text Available Habitat selection is a fundamental component of community ecology, population ecology, and evolutionary biology and can be especially important to species with complex annual habitat requirements, such as migratory birds. Resource preferences on the breeding grounds may change during the postfledging period for migrant songbirds, however, the degree to which selection changes, timing of change, and whether all or only a few species alter their resource use is unclear. We compared resource selection for nest sites and resource selection by postfledging juvenile ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla and Acadian flycatchers (Empidonax virescens followed with radio telemetry in Missouri mature forest fragments from 2012-2015. We used Bayesian discrete choice modeling to evaluate support for local vegetation characteristics on the probability of selection for nest sites and locations utilized by different ages of postfledging juveniles. Patterns of resource selection variation were species-specific. Resource selection models indicated that Acadian flycatcher habitat selection criteria were similar for nesting and dependent postfledging juveniles and selection criteria diverged when juveniles became independent from adults. After independence, flycatcher resource selection was more associated with understory foliage density. Ovenbirds differed in selection criteria between the nesting and postfledging periods. Fledgling ovenbirds selected areas with higher densities of understory structure compared to nest sites, and the effect of foliage density on selection increased as juveniles aged and gained independence. The differences observed between two sympatric forest nesting species, in both the timing and degree of change in resource selection criteria over the course of the breeding season, illustrates the importance of considering species-specific traits and postfledging requirements when developing conservation efforts, especially when foraging guilds or

  20. Assessing the reliability of thermography to infer internal body temperatures of lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Frederico M; Carretero, Miguel A; Silva, Francisco; Sannolo, Marco

    2016-12-01

    For many years lizard thermal ecology studies have relied on the use of contact thermometry to obtain internal body temperature (T b ) of the animals. However, with progressing technology, an interest grew in using new, less invasive methods, such as InfraRed (IR) pyrometry and thermography, to infer T b of reptiles. Nonetheless few studies have tested the reliability of these new tools. The present study tested the use of IR cameras as a non-invasive tool to infer T b of lizards, using three differently body-sized lacertid species (Podarcis virescens, Lacerta schreiberi and Timon lepidus). Given the occurrence of regional heterothermy, we pairwise compared thermography readings of six body parts (snout, eye, head, dorsal, hind limb, tail base) to cloacal temperature (measured by a thermometer-associated thermocouple probe) commonly employed to measure T b in field and lab studies. The results showed moderate to strong correlations (R 2 =0.84-0.99) between all body parts and cloacal temperature. However, despite the readings on the tail base showed the strongest correlation in all three species, it was the eye where the absolute values and pattern of temperature change most consistently followed the cloacal measurements. Hence, we concluded that the eye would be the body location whose IR camera readings more closely approximate that of the animal's internal environment. Alternatively, other body parts can be used, provided that a careful calibration is carried out. We provide guidelines for future research using thermography to infer Tb of lizards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Declining Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater populations are associated with landscape-specific reductions in brood parasitism and increases in songbird productivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Andrew Cox

    Full Text Available Many songbird species have experienced significant population declines, partly because of brood parasitism by the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater, which is positively associated with increasing landscape forest cover in the midwestern United States. However, cowbirds are also experiencing long-term population declines, which should reduce parasitism pressure and thus increase productivity of host species. We used 20 years of nest monitoring data from five sites in Missouri across a gradient of landscape forest cover to assess temporal trends in the rate and intensity of brood parasitism for Acadian Flycatchers (Empidonax virescens, Indigo Buntings (Passerina cyanea, and Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis. We evaluated whether there were concomitant changes in fledging brood size, nest survival, a combination of the two metrics (i.e., host young produced per nest attempt, and whether such changes were more substantial with decreasing landscape forest cover. Parasitism rates and intensities declined substantially during 1991-2010. Fledging brood size and nest survival rates were positively associated with landscape forest cover, confirming the fragmentation hypothesis for Midwest forest birds. Declining parasitism rates were associated with increased fledging brood sizes, with more pronounced increases as landscape forest cover decreased. Nest survival increased insubstantially across time during laying and incubation, but not during the nestling stage. The best predictor of nest survival was parasitism status, with parasitized nests surviving at lower rates than unparasitized nests. Overall, productivity increased during 1991-2010, with more pronounced increases associated with lower levels of landscape forest cover. The negative effects of cowbirds on nest survival in addition to fledging brood size in less forested landscapes suggest that cowbirds may be a primary cause of forest fragmentation effects on songbird productivity in the

  2. Systematics of the Podarcis hispanicus complex (Sauria, Lacertidae) III: valid nomina of the western and central Iberian forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geniez, Philippe; Sá-Sousa, Paulo; Guillaume, Claude P; Cluchier, Alexandre; Crochet, Pierre-André

    2014-05-05

    Recent genetic works have suggested that the Iberian wall lizard Podarcis hispanicus (Steindachner, 1870) sensu lato is a species complex. Several forms have already been elevated to species rank and linked to available nomina, but at least three still have to be formally named, including the western Iberian forms currently designated as Podarcis hispanicus "type 1A", "type 1B" and "type 2". The aim of the present work is to assign a valid nomen to these taxa. Using multivariate analyses, we first checked that the morphological differences reported in Portugal between type 1 and type 2 are maintained over their distribution range. We then investigated phenotypic differentiation between type 1A and type 1B, which were found to be so similar that identification based on phenotype is currently not advisable. We propose to treat type 1 and type 2 as distinct species because of their level of genetic and phenotypic divergence, large area of distribution and ample evidence for reduced or absent introgression in contact zones. We maintain type 1A and 1B as subspecies for the time being, pending further analyses of their contact zone. The valid nomen for "Podarcis hispanica type 1 (sensu lato)" is Lacerta muralis guadarramae Boscá, 1916 which becomes Podarcis guadarramae (Boscá, 1916). Lineage type 1A is here described as a new taxon: P. guadarramae lusitanicus ssp. nov., inhabiting northern Portugal and northwestern Spain. The type 1B lineage corresponds to the nominotypical subspecies that inhabits Spain, mostly the Central Iberian Mountains. We were unable to locate an available nomen for "Podarcis hispanica type 2", which is here described as Podarcis virescens sp. nov. This species is widely distributed in the plains and plateaus of central and parts of south-western Spain as well as central and southern Portugal.

  3. Patogenisitas Virus Tungro pada Varietas Tetua Padi Tahan Tungro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Heru Praptana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tungro is one of the major diseases in rice which has become a constraint in increasing rice production in Indonesia. Tungro is caused by infection of two different viruses, i.e. Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV and Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV, both of which can only be transmitted by green leafhoppers Nephotettix virescens (Distant in a semipersistent manner. Since there is an indication of the existance of virulence variation of tungro viruses from different areas and the specific relationship between resistance of varieties and tungro viruses isolates, it is important to study the pathogenicity of tungro viruses from some endemic areas in Indonesia. This study aimed to identify the pathogenicity of tungro viruses from several endemic areas in Indonesia in some resistant varieties. One susceptible variety i.e. TN1 and ten resistant varieties were used in the study. Surveys and collection of infected plants and green leafhoppers were done in tungro endemic areas, namely West Java, Central Java, Yogyakarta, Central Sulawesi, West Sulawesi, South Sulawesi, Bali and West Nusa Tenggara. Artificial transmission using the test tube method was used in the pathogenicity test. Green leafhoppers caught from the field were used as transmitters.. The pathogenicity of tungro viruses were identified by the values of the incidence of tungro and the diseases indexes (DI. The result showed that difference in pathogenicity of tungro viruses in some resistant varieties was observed. Isolates from Central Java, Central Sulawesi and West Nusa Tenggara were able to infect all of resistant varieties and the pathogenicity of Central Java isolate was the highest among the other isolates.

  4. Development of radiolabeling method for natural juvenile hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Takashi; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Kotaki, Toyomi

    2000-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a new assay method for accurate determination of juvenile hormone (JH) using radioisotope. A new measuring method for JH was designed based on the principle of molecular competition. Namely, JH-binding protein in the insect was used to form a selective binding to JH. At first, corpus allatum was cultured in a medium containing 3 H or 14 C epoxyfarnesyldiazoacetate (EFDA), which is a photoaffinity labeling reagent and JH binding protein (JHBP) was purified using 3 H or 14 C labeled EFDA. Since several kinds of JH homologues different in the molecular structure have been known, it was needed to establish each labeling method appropriate to those homologues. Then, an assay method for micro-quantitative measurement of JH was established utilizing the competition between labeled natural JH and JHBP. Thus, the authors succeeded in the overexpression of the blood JHBA of kind of tabaco moth, H.virescens and also in cloning and overexpression of JHBP in the silk worm. It was confirmed that these JHBPs specifically bind to 3 H labeled JH3, leading to stable supply of blood JHBP. Thus, accurate assay for JH concentration became possible by the use of the labeled JH with natural configuration and the blood JHBP. In the course of this study, several findings were obtained as follows: The JHBP of a sting bug was different from the previously reported ones. The regulation of JH synthesis in the corpus allatum was closely related to the control of diapause in several insects. The JHBP isolated from the cytosol of silk gland was a new protein in respect of amino acid sequence. (M.N.)

  5. Development of radiolabeling method for natural juvenile hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Takashi; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Kotaki, Toyomi [National Inst. of Sericultural and Entomological Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a new assay method for accurate determination of juvenile hormone (JH) using radioisotope. A new measuring method for JH was designed based on the principle of molecular competition. Namely, JH-binding protein in the insect was used to form a selective binding to JH. At first, corpus allatum was cultured in a medium containing {sup 3}H or {sup 14}C epoxyfarnesyldiazoacetate (EFDA), which is a photoaffinity labeling reagent and JH binding protein (JHBP) was purified using {sup 3}H or {sup 14}C labeled EFDA. Since several kinds of JH homologues different in the molecular structure have been known, it was needed to establish each labeling method appropriate to those homologues. Then, an assay method for micro-quantitative measurement of JH was established utilizing the competition between labeled natural JH and JHBP. Thus, the authors succeeded in the overexpression of the blood JHBA of kind of tabaco moth, H.virescens and also in cloning and overexpression of JHBP in the silk worm. It was confirmed that these JHBPs specifically bind to {sup 3}H labeled JH3, leading to stable supply of blood JHBP. Thus, accurate assay for JH concentration became possible by the use of the labeled JH with natural configuration and the blood JHBP. In the course of this study, several findings were obtained as follows: The JHBP of a sting bug was different from the previously reported ones. The regulation of JH synthesis in the corpus allatum was closely related to the control of diapause in several insects. The JHBP isolated from the cytosol of silk gland was a new protein in respect of amino acid sequence. (M.N.)

  6. Survey of Soybean Insect Pollinators: Community Identification and Sampling Method Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, K A; O'Neal, M E

    2015-06-01

    Soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, flowers can be a source of nectar and pollen for honey bees, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), wild social and solitary bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea), and flower-visiting flies (Diptera). Our objectives were to describe the pollinator community in soybean fields, determine which sampling method is most appropriate for characterizing their abundance and diversity, and gain insight into which pollinator taxa may contact soybean pollen. We compared modified pan traps (i.e., bee bowls), yellow sticky traps, and sweep nets for trapping pollinators in Iowa soybean fields when soybeans were blooming (i.e., reproductive stages R1-R6) during 2011 and 2012. When all trap type captures were combined, we collected 5,368 individuals and at least 50 species. Per trap type, the most pollinators were captured in bee bowls (3,644 individuals, 44 species), yellow sticky traps (1,652 individuals, 32 species), and sweep nets (66 individuals, 10 species). The most abundant species collected include Agapostemon virescens F. and Lasioglossum (Dialictus) species (Hymenoptera: Halictidae), Melissodes bimaculata Lepeletier (Hymenoptera: Apidae), and Toxomerus marginatus Say (Diptera: Syrphidae). To determine if these pollinators were foraging on soybean flowers, we looked for soybean pollen on the most abundant bee species collected that had visible pollen loads. We found soybean pollen alone or intermixed with pollen grains from other plant species on 29 and 38% of the bees examined in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Our data suggest a diverse community of pollinators-composed of mostly native, solitary bees-visit soybean fields and forage on their flowers within Iowa. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Model-specification uncertainty in future forest pest outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Yan; Gray, David R; Cooke, Barry J; De Grandpré, Louis

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will modify forest pest outbreak characteristics, although there are disagreements regarding the specifics of these changes. A large part of this variability may be attributed to model specifications. As a case study, we developed a consensus model predicting spruce budworm (SBW, Choristoneura fumiferana [Clem.]) outbreak duration using two different predictor data sets and six different correlative methods. The model was used to project outbreak duration and the uncertainty associated with using different data sets and correlative methods (=model-specification uncertainty) for 2011-2040, 2041-2070 and 2071-2100, according to three forcing scenarios (RCP 2.6, RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). The consensus model showed very high explanatory power and low bias. The model projected a more important northward shift and decrease in outbreak duration under the RCP 8.5 scenario. However, variation in single-model projections increases with time, making future projections highly uncertain. Notably, the magnitude of the shifts in northward expansion, overall outbreak duration and the patterns of outbreaks duration at the southern edge were highly variable according to the predictor data set and correlative method used. We also demonstrated that variation in forcing scenarios contributed only slightly to the uncertainty of model projections compared with the two sources of model-specification uncertainty. Our approach helped to quantify model-specification uncertainty in future forest pest outbreak characteristics. It may contribute to sounder decision-making by acknowledging the limits of the projections and help to identify areas where model-specification uncertainty is high. As such, we further stress that this uncertainty should be strongly considered when making forest management plans, notably by adopting adaptive management strategies so as to reduce future risks. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Global Change Biology © 2015 Published by John

  8. UPEI (University of Prince Edward Island) wood chip boiler to feed second Charlottetown area district heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    A new $4.3 million district heating system will deliver heat to 31 subscribers from UPEI's wood-fired heating plant. The plan is to convert UPEI's own campus-wide heat distribution system from steam to more efficient hot water. The total plant output is 13.7 MW, enough to heat the campus and the 31 subcribers' buildings. During the 1987-88 fiscal year, the more northern part of the system will be completed. A year later the system will be extended south. When finished, the project will displace nearly 2 million l of fuel oil annually with just over 7000 green tonnes of wood chips. Hot water from the UPEI boiler plant travels along each route though buried insulated pipes. At the end of a run, the water reverses direction and returns to the boiler in another insulated pipe. It passes through small cylindrical heat exchangers in each building. Boiler and burner maintenance costs are eliminated. Once the user is familiar with the system, the old boiler and hot water tanks can be removed - making space available for other purposes. District heating is virtually noiseless. Insurance costs go down in many cases when boilers and combustion systems are no longer used. The Island's currently underutilized wood resource will be put to better use. These woodchips are made from wood that has been damaged by budworm and other diseases, or wood that is overmature. The project has sound environmental benefits ranging from reduced sulpher emissions to the possible long-term benefit of eliminating a number of underground fuel storage tanks and their potential for leaks.

  9. Decadal-scale ecosystem memory reveals interactive effects of drought and insect defoliation on boreal forest productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itter, M.; D'Orangeville, L.; Dawson, A.; Kneeshaw, D.; Finley, A. O.

    2017-12-01

    Drought and insect defoliation have lasting impacts on the dynamics of the boreal forest. Impacts are expected to worsen under global climate change as hotter, drier conditions forecast for much of the boreal increase the frequency and severity of drought and defoliation events. Contemporary ecological theory predicts physiological feedbacks in tree responses to drought and defoliation amplify impacts potentially causing large-scale productivity losses and forest mortality. Quantifying the interactive impacts of drought and insect defoliation on regional forest health is difficult given delayed and persistent responses to disturbance events. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate forest growth responses to interactions between drought and insect defoliation by species and size class. Delayed and persistent responses to past drought and defoliation were quantified using empirical memory functions allowing for improved detection of interactions. The model was applied to tree-ring data from stands in Western (Alberta) and Eastern (Québec) regions of the Canadian boreal forest with different species compositions, disturbance regimes, and regional climates. Western stands experience chronic water deficit and forest tent caterpillar (FTC) defoliation; Eastern stands experience irregular water deficit and spruce budworm (SBW) defoliation. Ecosystem memory to past water deficit peaked in the year previous to growth and decayed to zero within 5 (West) to 8 (East) years; memory to past defoliation ranged from 8 (West) to 12 (East) years. The drier regional climate and faster FTC defoliation dynamics (compared to SBW) likely contribute to shorter ecosystem memory in the West. Drought and defoliation had the largest negative impact on large-diameter, host tree growth. Surprisingly, a positive interaction was observed between drought and defoliation for large-diameter, non-host trees likely due to reduced stand-level competition for water. Results highlight the

  10. Novel use of aliphatic n-methyl ketones as a fumigant and alternative to methyl bromide for insect control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiwei; Dhammi, Anirudh; van Kretschmar, Jaap B; Vargo, Edward L; Apperson, Charles S; Michael Roe, R

    2018-03-01

    Fumigants like phosphine, methyl bromide and sulfuryl fluoride are highly effective for the control of structural, storage and agricultural arthropod pests. Unfortunately, many of these synthetic compounds are highly toxic to people, many pests have developed resistance to these compounds and methyl bromide, the 'gold standard' for fumigants, was de-registered because of its contribution to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. Alternative fumigant chemistry is needed. Several plant species produce n-aliphatic methyl ketones to prevent plant herbivory. To examine the use of methyl ketones as a fumigant, structure-mortality studies were conducted using the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, as a model. A new easy-to-use, inexpensive and disposable bioassay system was developed for this study. The LC 50 values for heptanone, octanone, nonanone and undecanone were 4.27, 5.11, 5.26 and 8.21 µg/cm 3 of ambient air, respectively. Although heptanone, octanone and nonanone were more effective than undecanone, subsequent research was conducted with 2-undecanone because this compound already has US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registration as a biopesticide. In dose-response field studies, 12.4 mL of undecanone injected into mounds was the lowest application rate that produced no ant activity in the mound with no re-establishment of ants. Reagent grade undecanone was more cost-effective than methyl bromide for fire ants, adult German cockroaches and tobacco budworm eggs, but slightly more expensive for adult flour beetles. The naturally occurring methyl ketone undecanone has the potential to be an alternative to current fumigants for a variety of pest applications. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Do insect outbreaks reduce the severity of subsequent forest fires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigs, Garrett W.; Zald, Harold S. J.; Campbell, John L.; Keeton, William S.; Kennedy, Robert E.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the causes and consequences of rapid environmental change is an essential scientific frontier, particularly given the threat of climate- and land use-induced changes in disturbance regimes. In western North America, recent widespread insect outbreaks and wildfires have sparked acute concerns about potential insect-fire interactions. Although previous research shows that insect activity typically does not increase wildfire likelihood, key uncertainties remain regarding insect effects on wildfire severity (i.e., ecological impact). Recent assessments indicate that outbreak severity and burn severity are not strongly associated, but these studies have been limited to specific insect or fire events. Here, we present a regional census of large wildfire severity following outbreaks of two prevalent bark beetle and defoliator species, mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and western spruce budworm (Choristoneura freemani), across the US Pacific Northwest. We first quantify insect effects on burn severity with spatial modeling at the fire event scale and then evaluate how these effects vary across the full population of insect-fire events (n = 81 spanning 1987-2011). In contrast to common assumptions of positive feedbacks, we find that insects generally reduce the severity of subsequent wildfires. Specific effects vary with insect type and timing, but both insects decrease the abundance of live vegetation susceptible to wildfire at multiple time lags. By dampening subsequent burn severity, native insects could buffer rather than exacerbate fire regime changes expected due to land use and climate change. In light of these findings, we recommend a precautionary approach when designing and implementing forest management policies intended to reduce wildfire hazard and increase resilience to global change.

  12. Induced production of chitinase to enhance entomotoxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis employing starch industry wastewater as a substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Khanh Dang; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Valéro, J R; Surampalli, R Y

    2009-11-01

    Induced production of chitinase during bioconversion of starch industry wastewater (SIW) to Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki HD-1 (Btk) based biopesticides was studied in shake flask as well as in computer-controlled fermentors. SIW was fortified with different concentrations (0%; 0.05%; 0.1%; 0.2%; 0.3% w/v) of colloidal chitin and its consequences were ascertained in terms of Btk growth (total cell count and viable spore count), chitinase, protease and amylase activities and entomotoxicity. At optimum concentration of 0.2% w/v colloidal chitin, the entomotoxicity of fermented broth and suspended pellet was enhanced from 12.4x10(9) (without chitin) to 14.4x10(9) SBU/L and from 18.2x10(9) (without chitin) to 25.1x10(9) SBU/L, respectively. Further, experiments were conducted for Btk growth in a computer-controlled 15 L bioreactor using SIW as a raw material with (0.2% w/v chitin, to induce chitinase) and without fortification of colloidal chitin. It was found that the total cell count, spore count, delta-endotoxin concentration (alkaline solubilised insecticidal crystal proteins), amylase and protease activities were reduced whereas the entomotoxicity and chitinase activity was increased with chitin fortification. The chitinase activity attained a maximum value at 24 h (15 mU/ml) and entomotoxicity of suspended pellet reached highest (26.7x10(9) SBU/L) at 36 h of fermentation with chitin supplementation of SIW. In control (without chitin), the highest value of entomotoxicity of suspended pellet (20.5x10(9) SBU/L) reached at 48 h of fermentation. A quantitative synergistic action of delta-endotoxin concentration, spore concentration and chitinase activity on the entomotoxicity against spruce budworm larvae was observed.

  13. A naturally occurring plant cysteine protease possesses remarkable toxicity against insect pests and synergizes Bacillus thuringiensis toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinidi Mohan

    Full Text Available When caterpillars feed on maize (Zea maize L. lines with native resistance to several Lepidopteran pests, a defensive cysteine protease, Mir1-CP, rapidly accumulates at the wound site. Mir1-CP has been shown to inhibit caterpillar growth in vivo by attacking and permeabilizing the insect's peritrophic matrix (PM, a structure that surrounds the food bolus, assists in digestion and protects the midgut from microbes and toxins. PM permeabilization weakens the caterpillar defenses by facilitating the movement of other insecticidal proteins in the diet to the midgut microvilli and thereby enhancing their toxicity. To directly determine the toxicity of Mir1-CP, the purified recombinant enzyme was directly tested against four economically significant Lepidopteran pests in bioassays. Mir1-CP LC(50 values were 1.8, 3.6, 0.6, and 8.0 ppm for corn earworm, tobacco budworm, fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer, respectively. These values were the same order of magnitude as those determined for the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Bt-CryIIA. In addition to being directly toxic to the larvae, 60 ppb Mir1-CP synergized sublethal concentrations of Bt-CryIIA in all four species. Permeabilization of the PM by Mir1-CP probably provides ready access to Bt-binding sites on the midgut microvilli and increases its activity. Consequently, Mir1-CP could be used for controlling caterpillar pests in maize using non-transgenic approaches and potentially could be used in other crops either singly or in combination with Bt-toxins.

  14. The genome of the nucleopolyhedrosis-causing virus from Tipula oleracea sheds new light on the Nudiviridae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bézier, Annie; Thézé, Julien; Gavory, Frederick; Gaillard, Julien; Poulain, Julie; Drezen, Jean-Michel; Herniou, Elisabeth A

    2015-03-01

    A large double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) virus that produces occlusion bodies, typical of baculoviruses, has been described to infect crane fly larvae of the genus Tipula (Diptera, Tipulidae). Because of a lack of genomic data, this virus has remained unclassified. Electron microscopy of an archival virus isolated from Tipula oleracea, T. oleracea nudivirus (ToNV), showed irregularly shaped occlusion bodies measuring from 2 to 5 μm in length and 2 μm in middiameter, filled with rod-shape virions containing single nucleocapsids within a bilayer envelope. Whole-genome amplification and Roche 454 sequencing revealed a complete circular genome sequence of 145.7 kb, containing five direct repeat regions. We predicted 131 open reading frames, including a homolog of the polyhedrin gene encoding the major occlusion body protein of T. paludosa nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV). BLAST searches demonstrated that ToNV had 21 of the 37 baculovirus core genes but shared 52 genes with nudiviruses (NVs). Phylogenomic analyses indicated that ToNV clearly belongs to the Nudiviridae family but should probably be assigned to a new genus. Among nudiviruses, ToNV was most closely related to the Penaeus monodon NV and Heliothis zea NV clade but distantly related to Drosophila innubia NV, the other nudivirus infecting a Diptera. Lastly, ToNV was found to be most closely related to the nuvidirus ancestor of bracoviruses. This was also reflected in terms of gene content, as ToNV was the only known exogenous virus harboring homologs of the Cc50C22.6 and 27b (Cc50C22.7) genes found in the nudiviral genomic cluster involved in bracovirus particle production. The Nudiviridae is a family of arthropod dsDNA viruses from which striking cases of endogenization have been reported (i.e., symbiotic bracoviruses deriving from a nudivirus and the endogenous nudivirus of the brown planthopper). Although related to baculoviruses, relatively little is known about the genomic diversity of exogenous nudiviruses. Here

  15. Evaluation of two cotton varieties CRSP1 and CRSP2 for genetic transformation efficiency, expression of transgenes Cry1Ac + Cry2A, GT gene and insect mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfan Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the transgene with a desirable character in crop plant is the ultimate goal of transgenic research. Transformation of two Bt genes namely Cry1Ac and Cry2A cloned as separate cassette under 35S promoter in pKHG4 plant expression vector was done by using shoot apex cut method of Agrobacterium. Molecular confirmation of putative transgenic cotton plants for Cry1Ac, Cry2A and GT gene was done through PCR and ELISA. Transformation efficiency of CRSP-1 and CRSP-2 was calculated to be 1.2 and 0.8% for Cry1Ac while 0.9 and 0.6% for Cry2A and 1.5 and 0.7% for GTG respectively. CRSP-1 was found to adopt natural environment (acclimatized earlier than CRSP-2 when exposed to sunlight for one month. Expression of Cry1Ac, Cry2A and GTG was found to be 1.2, 1 and 1.3 ng/μl respectively for CRSP-1 as compared to CRSP-2 where expression was recorded to be 0.9, 0.5 and 0.9 ng/μl respectively. FISH analysis of the transgenic CRSP-1 and CRSP-2 demonstrated the presence of one and two copy numbers respectively. Similarly, the response of CRSP-1 against Glyphosate @1900 ml/acre was far better with almost negligible necrotic spot and efficient growth after spray as compared to CRSP-2 where some plants were found to have necrosis and negative control where the complete decay of plant was observed after seven days of spray assay. Similarly, almost 100% mortality of 2nd instar larvae of Heliothis armigera was recorded after three days in CRSP-1 as compared CRSP-2 where insect mortality was found to be less than 90%. Quantitatively speaking non transgenic plants were found with 23–90% leaf damage by insect, while CRSP-1 was with less than 5% and CRSP-2 with 17%. Taken together CRSP1 was found to have better insect control and weedicide resistance along with its natural ability of genetic modification and can be employed by the valuable farmers for better insect control and simultaneously for better production.

  16. Evaluation of two cotton varieties CRSP1 and CRSP2 for genetic transformation efficiency, expression of transgenes Cry1Ac + Cry2A, GT gene and insect mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arfan; Ahmed, Shafique; Ahmad Nasir, Idrees; Rao, Abdul Qayyum; Ahmad, Saghir; Husnain, Tayyab

    2016-03-01

    Expression of the transgene with a desirable character in crop plant is the ultimate goal of transgenic research. Transformation of two Bt genes namely Cry1Ac and Cry2A cloned as separate cassette under 35S promoter in pKHG4 plant expression vector was done by using shoot apex cut method of Agrobacterium. Molecular confirmation of putative transgenic cotton plants for Cry1Ac, Cry2A and GT gene was done through PCR and ELISA. Transformation efficiency of CRSP-1 and CRSP-2 was calculated to be 1.2 and 0.8% for Cry1Ac while 0.9 and 0.6% for Cry2A and 1.5 and 0.7% for GTG respectively. CRSP-1 was found to adopt natural environment (acclimatized) earlier than CRSP-2 when exposed to sunlight for one month. Expression of Cry1Ac, Cry2A and GTG was found to be 1.2, 1 and 1.3 ng/μl respectively for CRSP-1 as compared to CRSP-2 where expression was recorded to be 0.9, 0.5 and 0.9 ng/μl respectively. FISH analysis of the transgenic CRSP-1 and CRSP-2 demonstrated the presence of one and two copy numbers respectively. Similarly, the response of CRSP-1 against Glyphosate @1900 ml/acre was far better with almost negligible necrotic spot and efficient growth after spray as compared to CRSP-2 where some plants were found to have necrosis and negative control where the complete decay of plant was observed after seven days of spray assay. Similarly, almost 100% mortality of 2nd instar larvae of Heliothis armigera was recorded after three days in CRSP-1 as compared CRSP-2 where insect mortality was found to be less than 90%. Quantitatively speaking non transgenic plants were found with 23-90% leaf damage by insect, while CRSP-1 was with less than 5% and CRSP-2 with 17%. Taken together CRSP1 was found to have better insect control and weedicide resistance along with its natural ability of genetic modification and can be employed by the valuable farmers for better insect control and simultaneously for better production.

  17. Environmental Distribution and Diversity of Insecticidal Proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier, R.

    2007-01-01

    , however, the B. thuringiensis isolates BTRX-23 to BTRX-30 have two distinct protein profiles corresponding to 130 kDa and 68 kDa. These results show that there may be more than one B. thuringiensis strain that can infect Bombyx mori. The preliminary bioassay against second instar larvae of Heliothis armigera showed varying mortality rate. In conclusion, despite the ubiquitous presence of B. thuringiensis strains in different environments, specifically the sericulture environment supports B. thuringiensis in a significant manner compared to other environments. Further the ICPs produced by different strains of B. thuringiensis are unique in terms of the protein profile and hence may also differ in their insecticidal activities.

  18. Synaptic plasticity can produce and enhance direction selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Carver

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The discrimination of the direction of movement of sensory images is critical to the control of many animal behaviors. We propose a parsimonious model of motion processing that generates direction selective responses using short-term synaptic depression and can reproduce salient features of direction selectivity found in a population of neurons in the midbrain of the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia virescens. The model achieves direction selectivity with an elementary Reichardt motion detector: information from spatially separated receptive fields converges onto a neuron via dynamically different pathways. In the model, these differences arise from convergence of information through distinct synapses that either exhibit or do not exhibit short-term synaptic depression--short-term depression produces phase-advances relative to nondepressing synapses. Short-term depression is modeled using two state-variables, a fast process with a time constant on the order of tens to hundreds of milliseconds, and a slow process with a time constant on the order of seconds to tens of seconds. These processes correspond to naturally occurring time constants observed at synapses that exhibit short-term depression. Inclusion of the fast process is sufficient for the generation of temporal disparities that are necessary for direction selectivity in the elementary Reichardt circuit. The addition of the slow process can enhance direction selectivity over time for stimuli that are sustained for periods of seconds or more. Transient (i.e., short-duration stimuli do not evoke the slow process and therefore do not elicit enhanced direction selectivity. The addition of a sustained global, synchronous oscillation in the gamma frequency range can, however, drive the slow process and enhance direction selectivity to transient stimuli. This enhancement effect does not, however, occur for all combinations of model parameters. The ratio of depressing and nondepressing synapses

  19. Using biodiversity of diatoms to identify hydrological connectivity in the hillslope-riparian zone-stream system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, C. E.; Martínez-Carreras, N.; Ector, L.; Hlubikova, D.; Frentress, J.; McDonnell, J. J.; Hoffmann, L.; Pfister, L.

    2012-04-01

    very intense rainfall events cause a single-tailed rather small rise of the hydrograph in the Weierbach. Mixing diagrams suggest a very brief and intense switch from groundwater to soil water contribution. Almost simultaneously to incoming precipitation, terrestrial diatom abundance increases to 20-30% inside the stream. Species composition was also seasonally structured. During winter season (November 2010 and January 2011 events) the diatom drift was characterized and dominated by colony forming species (e.g. Fragilaria nevadensis Linares-Cuesta & Sánchez-Castillo and Fragilariforma virescens (Ralfs) Williams & Round), while summer events were characterized by a large number of small aerophytic species (i.e. Chamaepinnularia evanida (Hustedt) Lange-Bertalot, Eolimna tantula (Hustedt) Lange-Bertalot, Navicula obsoleta Hustedt, Navicula parsura Hustedt and Stauroneis thermicola (Petersen) Lund). Chemical tracers suggest a substantial role of soil water contributions to storm hydrographs in the Weierbach, regardless of the season, with overland flow playing no prominent role at all. Meanwhile, terrestrial diatom abundance in drift samples strongly increases during precipitation events, suggesting a rapid onset of connectivity between the soil surface and the stream. We assume the terrestrial diatoms to be mobilized during precipitation and eventually flushed to the stream through a subsurface network of macropores in the shallow soils and cracks in the fractured and weathered schistose bedrock.

  20. Do diatoms run downhill? Using biodiversity of terrestrial and aquatic diatoms to identify hydrological connectivity between aquatic zones in Luxembourg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, L.; Wetzel, C. E.; Martinez-Carreras, N.; Frentress, J.; Ector, L.; Hoffmann, L.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Diatoms are siliceous unicellular algae, and range in size between a few and more than 500 micrometers. Diatoms are spread worldwide, live in many aquatic habitats, have many life forms and their short generation time make them respond rapidly to environmental changes. Their taxonomic diversity represents a valuable tool to assess water quality as each taxon has specific responses to environmental factors. Recently, diatoms have been used as tracers to detect the onset/cessation of surface runoff through binary classification of terrestrial and aquatic species in the Attert basin in Luxembourg. In order to continue the validation of these first results, we have collected samples during rain events at different seasons of the year using automatic stream water samplers, grab samples of diatoms from various terrestrial and subaerial substrates (bryophytes, litter and leaves), as well as from aquatic habitats (epilithon, epipelon and drift samples). This new type of information will be used to constrain assumptions of the conventional tracer-based hydrograph separation technique (i.e. using geochemistry and stable isotopes). The first results concerning the diatom flora, based on 39 samples, revealed 152 species belonging to 38 genera. The most species-rich genera were Pinnularia (15.8% - 24 taxa), Eunotia (13.2% - 20 taxa), Gomphonema (8.6% - 13 taxa), Navicula (7.2% - 11 taxa) and Stauroneis (5.3% - 8 taxa). The flora are mainly composed of oligotrophic and/or acidophilic taxa (32.0%), ubiquitous (14.0%) or poorly known ecologically species (43.0%). The most important taxa found in drift samples were Fragilariforma virescens, Fragilaria capucina sensu lato, Planothidium lanceolatum, Eunotia minor, Achnanthidium kranzii, Karayevia oblongella and Eunotia incisa. In the riparian zone (n = 10), 102 species were observed, with Eunotia exigua var. tenella, Eunotia botuliformis and Pinnularia perirrorata being among the most frequent. Epilithic samples from the main channel

  1. Macrodactylini (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Melolonthinae: primary types of type species and taxonomic changes to the generic classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juares Fuhrmann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Type series for 35 type species of Macrodactylini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae are studied and taxonomic changes are proposed. The following 35 lectotypes are designated: Agaocnemis pruina Moser, 1918; Amphicrania ursina Burmeister, 1855; Anomalochilus singularis Blanchard, 1850; Anomalonyx uruguayensis Moser, 1921; Aulanota sulcipennis Moser, 1924; Barybas nanus Blanchard, 1850; Barybas volvulus Burmeister, 1855; Calodactylus tibialis Blanchard, 1850; Ceraspis pruinosa LePeletier de Saint-Fargeau & Audinet-Serville, 1828; Ceratolontha venezuelae Arrow, 1948; Chariodactylus chacoensis Moser, 1919; Clavipalpus dejeani Laporte, 1832; Corminus canescens Burmeister, 1855; Ctenotis obesa Burmeister, 1855; Ctilocephala pellucens Burmeister, 1855; Demodema fallax Blanchard, 1850; Euryaspis gaudichaudii Blanchard, 1851; Faula cornuta Blanchard, 1850; Gama grandicornis Blanchard, 1850; Gastrohoplus mirabilis Moser, 1921; Mallotarsus spadiceus Blanchard, 1850; Manodactylus gaujoni Moser, 1919; Manopus biguttatus Conte de Castelnau, 1840; Melolontha rufipennis Fabricius, 1801; Oedichira pachydactyla Burmeister, 1855; Pachycerus castaneipennis Guérin-Méneville, 1831; Pachylotoma viridis Blanchard, 1850; Pectinosoma elongata Arrow, 1913; Philochlaenia virescens Blanchard, 1842; Plectris tomentosa LePeletier de Saint-Fargeau & Audinet-Serville, 1828; Pseudohercitis viridiaenea Moser, 1921; Rhinaspoides aeneofusca Moser, 1919; Schizochelus flavescens Blanchard, 1850; Serica marmorea Guérin-Méneville, 1831; and Ulomenes hypocrita Blanchard, 1850. The following six genera are revalidated: Byrasba Harold, 1869 (formerly a synonym of Rhinaspis Perty, 1833; Euryaspis Blanchard, 1851 (formerly a synonym of Plectris LePeletier de Saint-Fargeau & Audinet-Serville, 1828; Junkia Dalla Torre, 1913 (formerly a synonym of Plectris; Faula Blanchard, 1850 (formerly a synonym of Ceraspis LePeletier de Saint-Fargeau & Audinet-Serville, 1828; Paulosawaya

  2. Mesoionic Pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidinone Insecticides: From Discovery to Triflumezopyrim and Dicloromezotiaz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenming

    2017-09-19

    virescens (Distant), GLH), but also against representative lepidoptera species Diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus), DBM) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), FAW). Further optimization based on 3 led to discovery of triflumezopyrim (4), with a 5-pyrimidinylmethyl group, as a potent hopper insecticide for rice usage. Optimization of the substituents on the pyrido- moiety of 3 resulted in discovery of dicloromezotiaz (5) as a lepidoptera insecticide. In this Account, we present the discovery and optimization of mesoionic pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidinone insecticides toward the identification of triflumezopyrim (4) and dicloromezotiaz (5). We hope that knowledge and lessons derived from this discovery program will provide valuable information for future agrochemical and drug discovery. Our successful discovery and commercialization development of two novel insecticides based on meosoionic pyrido[1,2-a]pyridiminones may also stimulate interests of scientists from other disciplines to adopt this uncommon yet intriguing heterocycle ring system in pharmaceutical and other material science discovery research.

  3. Effect of sunlight radiation, rainfall and droplet spectra of sprays on persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis deposits after application of DiPel 76AF formulation onto conifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, A.; Sundaram, K.M.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Effect of sunlight radiation, rainfall and droplet spectra of sprays on per ‐sistence of a Bacillus thuringiensis subspp. kurstaki (Btk) formulation, DiPel? 76AF, was examined after application onto spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] foliage. The investigation consisted of three studies: (i) Study I: a laboratory microcosm study to examine the photostability of DiPel 76AF deposits on foliage after different periods of exposure to two radiation intensities, (ii) Study II: a laboratory microcosm study to examine the rainfastness of foliar deposits after exposure to different amounts of rainfall consisting of two separate droplet spectra, and (iii) Study III: a field microcosm study to investigate the influence of two different droplet spectra of DiPel 76AF sprays on foliar persistence of Btk under natural weathering conditions. In all studies, persistence of Btk was investigated both by bioassay [using spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens)] and total protein assay.The findings of Study I indicated that bioactivity of foliar deposits decreased with increasing duration of exposure to radiation, and with increasing radiation intensity. The half‐life (DT 50 , the exposure period required for 50% of the initial bioactivity to disappear) was 5.1 d for the low intensity, and 3.9 d for the higher intensity. In contrast with the bioassay results, the total protein levels [determined by the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method] showed no decrease with increasing duration of exposure, or with increasing radiation intensity.The findings of Study II indicated that bioactivity of foliar deposits decreased with increasing cumulative rainfall. A new term, RF 50 [the amount of rain (in mm) required to washoff 50% of the initial deposit], was introduced to understand the relationship between rainfall intensity and reduction in bioactivity. When the same amount of rain was applied in different droplet sizes, the RF 50 value was high (5.2 mm) for the small rain droplets