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Sample records for buds reveals links

  1. A Link between ORC-Origin Binding Mechanisms and Origin Activation Time Revealed in Budding Yeast

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    Hoggard, Timothy; Shor, Erika; Müller, Carolin A.; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication origins are selected in G1-phase when the origin recognition complex (ORC) binds chromosomal positions and triggers molecular events culminating in the initiation of DNA replication (a.k.a. origin firing) during S-phase. Each chromosome uses multiple origins for its duplication, and each origin fires at a characteristic time during S-phase, creating a cell-type specific genome replication pattern relevant to differentiation and genome stability. It is unclear whether ORC-origin interactions are relevant to origin activation time. We applied a novel genome-wide strategy to classify origins in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on the types of molecular interactions used for ORC-origin binding. Specifically, origins were classified as DNA-dependent when the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo could be explained by the affinity of ORC for origin DNA in vitro, and, conversely, as ‘chromatin-dependent’ when the ORC-DNA interaction in vitro was insufficient to explain the strength of ORC-origin binding in vivo. These two origin classes differed in terms of nucleosome architecture and dependence on origin-flanking sequences in plasmid replication assays, consistent with local features of chromatin promoting ORC binding at ‘chromatin-dependent’ origins. Finally, the ‘chromatin-dependent’ class was enriched for origins that fire early in S-phase, while the DNA-dependent class was enriched for later firing origins. Conversely, the latest firing origins showed a positive association with the ORC-origin DNA paradigm for normal levels of ORC binding, whereas the earliest firing origins did not. These data reveal a novel association between ORC-origin binding mechanisms and the regulation of origin activation time. PMID:24068963

  2. Electron tomography reveals the steps in filovirus budding.

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    Sonja Welsch

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg and Ebola, are non-segmented negative-strand RNA viruses causing severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality rates in humans and nonhuman primates. The sequence of events that leads to release of filovirus particles from cells is poorly understood. Two contrasting mechanisms have been proposed, one proceeding via a "submarine-like" budding with the helical nucleocapsid emerging parallel to the plasma membrane, and the other via perpendicular "rocket-like" protrusion. Here we have infected cells with Marburg virus under BSL-4 containment conditions, and reconstructed the sequence of steps in the budding process in three dimensions using electron tomography of plastic-embedded cells. We find that highly infectious filamentous particles are released at early stages in infection. Budding proceeds via lateral association of intracellular nucleocapsid along its whole length with the plasma membrane, followed by rapid envelopment initiated at one end of the nucleocapsid, leading to a protruding intermediate. Scission results in local membrane instability at the rear of the virus. After prolonged infection, increased vesiculation of the plasma membrane correlates with changes in shape and infectivity of released viruses. Our observations demonstrate a cellular determinant of virus shape. They reconcile the contrasting models of filovirus budding and allow us to describe the sequence of events taking place during budding and release of Marburg virus. We propose that this represents a general sequence of events also followed by other filamentous and rod-shaped viruses.

  3. Electron tomography reveals the steps in filovirus budding.

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    Welsch, Sonja; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Krähling, Verena; Riches, James D; Becker, Stephan; Briggs, John A G

    2010-04-29

    The filoviruses, Marburg and Ebola, are non-segmented negative-strand RNA viruses causing severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality rates in humans and nonhuman primates. The sequence of events that leads to release of filovirus particles from cells is poorly understood. Two contrasting mechanisms have been proposed, one proceeding via a "submarine-like" budding with the helical nucleocapsid emerging parallel to the plasma membrane, and the other via perpendicular "rocket-like" protrusion. Here we have infected cells with Marburg virus under BSL-4 containment conditions, and reconstructed the sequence of steps in the budding process in three dimensions using electron tomography of plastic-embedded cells. We find that highly infectious filamentous particles are released at early stages in infection. Budding proceeds via lateral association of intracellular nucleocapsid along its whole length with the plasma membrane, followed by rapid envelopment initiated at one end of the nucleocapsid, leading to a protruding intermediate. Scission results in local membrane instability at the rear of the virus. After prolonged infection, increased vesiculation of the plasma membrane correlates with changes in shape and infectivity of released viruses. Our observations demonstrate a cellular determinant of virus shape. They reconcile the contrasting models of filovirus budding and allow us to describe the sequence of events taking place during budding and release of Marburg virus. We propose that this represents a general sequence of events also followed by other filamentous and rod-shaped viruses.

  4. A fate map of the murine pancreas buds reveals a multipotent ventral foregut organ progenitor.

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    Jesse R Angelo

    Full Text Available The definitive endoderm is the embryonic germ layer that gives rise to the budding endodermal organs including the thyroid, lung, liver and pancreas as well as the remainder of the gut tube. DiI fate mapping and whole embryo culture were used to determine the endodermal origin of the 9.5 days post coitum (dpc dorsal and ventral pancreas buds. Our results demonstrate that the progenitors of each bud occupy distinct endodermal territories. Dorsal bud progenitors are located in the medial endoderm overlying somites 2-4 between the 2 and 11 somite stage (SS. The endoderm forming the ventral pancreas bud is found in 2 distinct regions. One territory originates from the left and right lateral endoderm caudal to the anterior intestinal portal by the 6 SS and the second domain is derived from the ventral midline of the endoderm lip (VMEL. Unlike the laterally located ventral foregut progenitors, the VMEL population harbors a multipotent progenitor that contributes to the thyroid bud, the rostral cap of the liver bud, ventral midline of the liver bud and the midline of the ventral pancreas bud in a temporally restricted manner. This data suggests that the midline of the 9.5 dpc thyroid, liver and ventral pancreas buds originates from the same progenitor population, demonstrating a developmental link between all three ventral foregut buds. Taken together, these data define the location of the dorsal and ventral pancreas progenitors in the prespecified endodermal sheet and should lead to insights into the inductive events required for pancreas specification.

  5. A Fate Map of the Murine Pancreas Buds Reveals a Multipotent Ventral Foregut Organ Progenitor

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    Angelo, Jesse R.; Guerrero-Zayas, Mara-Isel; Tremblay, Kimberly D.

    2012-01-01

    The definitive endoderm is the embryonic germ layer that gives rise to the budding endodermal organs including the thyroid, lung, liver and pancreas as well as the remainder of the gut tube. DiI fate mapping and whole embryo culture were used to determine the endodermal origin of the 9.5 days post coitum (dpc) dorsal and ventral pancreas buds. Our results demonstrate that the progenitors of each bud occupy distinct endodermal territories. Dorsal bud progenitors are located in the medial endoderm overlying somites 2–4 between the 2 and 11 somite stage (SS). The endoderm forming the ventral pancreas bud is found in 2 distinct regions. One territory originates from the left and right lateral endoderm caudal to the anterior intestinal portal by the 6 SS and the second domain is derived from the ventral midline of the endoderm lip (VMEL). Unlike the laterally located ventral foregut progenitors, the VMEL population harbors a multipotent progenitor that contributes to the thyroid bud, the rostral cap of the liver bud, ventral midline of the liver bud and the midline of the ventral pancreas bud in a temporally restricted manner. This data suggests that the midline of the 9.5 dpc thyroid, liver and ventral pancreas buds originates from the same progenitor population, demonstrating a developmental link between all three ventral foregut buds. Taken together, these data define the location of the dorsal and ventral pancreas progenitors in the prespecified endodermal sheet and should lead to insights into the inductive events required for pancreas specification. PMID:22815796

  6. Trichomes control flower bud shape by linking together young petals.

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    Tan, Jiafu; Walford, Sally-Anne; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Llewellyn, Danny

    2016-06-20

    Trichomes are widespread in plants and develop from surface cells on different tissues(1). They have many forms and functions, from defensive spines to physical barriers that trap layers of air to insulate against desiccation, but there is growing evidence that trichomes can also have developmental roles in regulating flower structure(2,3). We report here that the trichomes on petals of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., are essential for correct flower bud shape through a mechanical entanglement of the trichomes on adjacent petals that anchor the edges to counter the opposing force generated by asymmetric expansion of overlapping petals. Silencing a master regulator of petal trichomes, GhMYB-MIXTA-Like10 (GhMYBML10), by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed petal trichome growth and resulted in flower buds forming into abnormal corkscrew shapes that exposed developing anthers and stigmas to desiccation damage. Artificially gluing petal edges together could partially restore correct bud shape and fertility. Such petal 'Velcro' is present in other Malvaceae and perhaps more broadly in other plant families, although it is not ubiquitous. This mechanism for physical association between separate organs to regulate flower shape and function is different from the usual organ shape control(4) exerted through cell-to-cell communication and differential cell expansion within floral tissues(5,6).

  7. Induction of ectopic taste buds by SHH reveals the competency and plasticity of adult lingual epithelium

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    Castillo, David; Seidel, Kerstin; Salcedo, Ernesto; Ahn, Christina; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Klein, Ophir D.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Taste buds are assemblies of elongated epithelial cells, which are innervated by gustatory nerves that transmit taste information to the brain stem. Taste cells are continuously renewed throughout life via proliferation of epithelial progenitors, but the molecular regulation of this process remains unknown. During embryogenesis, sonic hedgehog (SHH) negatively regulates taste bud patterning, such that inhibition of SHH causes the formation of more and larger taste bud primordia, including in regions of the tongue normally devoid of taste buds. Here, using a Cre-lox system to drive constitutive expression of SHH, we identify the effects of SHH on the lingual epithelium of adult mice. We show that misexpression of SHH transforms lingual epithelial cell fate, such that daughter cells of lingual epithelial progenitors form cell type-replete, onion-shaped taste buds, rather than non-taste, pseudostratified epithelium. These SHH-induced ectopic taste buds are found in regions of the adult tongue previously thought incapable of generating taste organs. The ectopic buds are composed of all taste cell types, including support cells and detectors of sweet, bitter, umami, salt and sour, and recapitulate the molecular differentiation process of endogenous taste buds. In contrast to the well-established nerve dependence of endogenous taste buds, however, ectopic taste buds form independently of both gustatory and somatosensory innervation. As innervation is required for SHH expression by endogenous taste buds, our data suggest that SHH can replace the need for innervation to drive the entire program of taste bud differentiation. PMID:24993944

  8. Screening the budding yeast genome reveals unique factors affecting K2 toxin susceptibility.

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    Elena Servienė

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how biotoxins kill cells is of prime importance in biomedicine and the food industry. The budding yeast (S. cerevisiae killers serve as a convenient model to study the activity of biotoxins consistently supplying with significant insights into the basic mechanisms of virus-host cell interactions and toxin entry into eukaryotic target cells. K1 and K2 toxins are active at the cell wall, leading to the disruption of the plasma membrane and subsequent cell death by ion leakage. K28 toxin is active in the cell nucleus, blocking DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression, thereby triggering apoptosis. Genome-wide screens in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae identified several hundred effectors of K1 and K28 toxins. Surprisingly, no such screen had been performed for K2 toxin, the most frequent killer toxin among industrial budding yeasts. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted several concurrent genome-wide screens in S. cerevisiae and identified 332 novel K2 toxin effectors. The effectors involved in K2 resistance and hypersensitivity largely map in distinct cellular pathways, including cell wall and plasma membrane structure/biogenesis and mitochondrial function for K2 resistance, and cell wall stress signaling and ion/pH homeostasis for K2 hypersensitivity. 70% of K2 effectors are different from those involved in K1 or K28 susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE: Our work demonstrates that despite the fact that K1 and K2 toxins share some aspects of their killing strategies, they largely rely on different sets of effectors. Since the vast majority of the host factors identified here is exclusively active towards K2, we conclude that cells have acquired a specific K2 toxin effectors set. Our work thus indicates that K1 and K2 have elaborated different biological pathways and provides a first step towards the detailed characterization of K2 mode of action.

  9. Comparative live-cell imaging analyses of SPA-2, BUD-6 and BNI-1 in Neurospora crassa reveal novel features of the filamentous fungal polarisome.

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    Alexander Lichius

    Full Text Available A key multiprotein complex involved in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and secretory machinery required for polarized growth in fungi, is the polarisome. Recognized core constituents in budding yeast are the proteins Spa2, Pea2, Aip3/Bud6, and the key effector Bni1. Multicellular fungi display a more complex polarized morphogenesis than yeasts, suggesting that the filamentous fungal polarisome might fulfill additional functions. In this study, we compared the subcellular organization and dynamics of the putative polarisome components BUD-6 and BNI-1 with those of the bona fide polarisome marker SPA-2 at various developmental stages of Neurospora crassa. All three proteins exhibited a yeast-like polarisome configuration during polarized germ tube growth, cell fusion, septal pore plugging and tip repolarization. However, the localization patterns of all three proteins showed spatiotemporally distinct characteristics during the establishment of new polar axes, septum formation and cytokinesis, and maintained hyphal tip growth. Most notably, in vegetative hyphal tips BUD-6 accumulated as a subapical cloud excluded from the Spitzenkörper (Spk, whereas BNI-1 and SPA-2 partially colocalized with the Spk and the tip apex. Novel roles during septal plugging and cytokinesis, connected to the reinitiation of tip growth upon physical injury and conidial maturation, were identified for BUD-6 and BNI-1, respectively. Phenotypic analyses of gene deletion mutants revealed additional functions for BUD-6 and BNI-1 in cell fusion regulation, and the maintenance of Spk integrity. Considered together, our findings reveal novel polarisome-independent functions of BUD-6 and BNI-1 in Neurospora, but also suggest that all three proteins cooperate at plugged septal pores, and their complex arrangement within the apical dome of mature hypha might represent a novel aspect of filamentous fungal polarisome architecture.

  10. Correlation of epiphyllous bud differentiation with foliar senescence in crassulacean succulent Kalanchoe pinnata as revealed by thidiazuron and ethrel application.

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    Jaiswal, Sarita; Sawhney, Sudhir

    2006-05-01

    Leaves of Kalanchoe pinnata have crenate margins with each notch bearing a dormant bud competent to develop into a healthy plantlet. Leaf detachment is a common signal for inducing two contrastingly different leaf-based processes, i.e. epiphyllous bud development into plantlet and foliar senescence. To investigate differentiation of bud and its correlation, if any, with foliar senescence, thidiazuron (TDZ), having cytokinin activity and ethrel (ETH), an ethylene releasing compound, were employed. The experimental system was comprised of marginal leaf discs, each harbouring an epiphyllous bud. Most of the growth characteristics of plantlet developing from the epiphyllous bud were significantly inhibited by TDZ but promoted by ETH. The two regulators modulated senescence in a manner different for leaf discs and plantlet leaves. Thus, TDZ caused a complete retention whereas ETH a complete loss of chlorophyll in the leaf discs. In contrast, the former resulted in a complete depletion of chlorophyll from the plantlet leaves producing an albino effect, while the latter reduced it by 50% only. In combined dispensation of the two regulators, the effect of TDZ was expressed in majority of responses studied. The results presented in this investigation clearly show that the foliar processes of epiphyllous bud differentiation and senescence are interlinked as TDZ that delayed senescence inhibited epiphyllous bud differentiation and ETH that hastened senescence promoted it. A working hypothesis to interpret responsiveness of the disc-bud composite on lines of a source-sink duo, has been proposed.

  11. In silico analysis of 3 expansin gene promoters reveals 2 hubs controlling light and cytokinins response during bud outgrowth.

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    Roman, Hanaé; Girault, Tiffanie; Le Gourrierec, José; Leduc, Nathalie

    2017-02-01

    Bud outgrowth is under the intricate control of environmental and endogenous factors. In a recent paper, 1 we demonstrated that light perceived by Rosa buds triggers cytokinins (CK) synthesis within 3 hours in the adjacent node followed by their transport to the bud. There, CK control expression of a set of major genes (strigolactones-, auxin-, sugar sink strength-, cells division and elongation-related genes) leading to bud outgrowth in light. Conversely, under dark condition, CK accumulation and transport to the bud are repressed and no bud outgrowth occurs. In this paper, we show that the 3 expansin genes RhEXPA1,2,3 are under the control of both light and CK during bud outgrowth. In silico analysis of promoter sequences highlights 2 regions enriched in light and CK cis-regulatory elements as well as a specific cis-element in pRhEXPA3, potentially responsible for the expression patterns observed in response to CK and light.

  12. CRISPR/Cas9 cleavages in budding yeast reveal templated insertions and strand-specific insertion/deletion profiles.

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    Lemos, Brenda R; Kaplan, Adam C; Bae, Ji Eun; Ferrazzoli, Alexander E; Kuo, James; Anand, Ranjith P; Waterman, David P; Haber, James E

    2018-02-13

    Harnessing CRISPR-Cas9 technology provides an unprecedented ability to modify genomic loci via DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and repair. We analyzed nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair induced by Cas9 in budding yeast and found that the orientation of binding of Cas9 and its guide RNA (gRNA) profoundly influences the pattern of insertion/deletions (indels) at the site of cleavage. A common indel created by Cas9 is a 1-bp (+1) insertion that appears to result from Cas9 creating a 1-nt 5' overhang that is filled in by a DNA polymerase and ligated. The origin of +1 insertions was investigated by using two gRNAs with PAM sequences located on opposite DNA strands but designed to cleave the same sequence. These templated +1 insertions are dependent on the X-family DNA polymerase, Pol4. Deleting Pol4 also eliminated +2 and +3 insertions, which are biased toward homonucleotide insertions. Using inverted PAM sequences, we also found significant differences in overall NHEJ efficiency and repair profiles, suggesting that the binding of the Cas9:gRNA complex influences subsequent NHEJ processing. As with events induced by the site-specific HO endonuclease, CRISPR-Cas9-mediated NHEJ repair depends on the Ku heterodimer and DNA ligase 4. Cas9 events are highly dependent on the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, independent of Mre11's nuclease activity. Inspection of the outcomes of a large number of Cas9 cleavage events in mammalian cells reveals a similar templated origin of +1 insertions in human cells, but also a significant frequency of similarly templated +2 insertions.

  13. Role of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC: is tumor budding the missing link?

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    Eva eKaramitopoulou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC ranks as the fourth commonest cause of cancer death while its incidence is increasing worldwide. For all stages, survival at 5 years is <5%. The lethal nature of pancreatic cancer is attributed to its high metastatic potential to the lymphatic system and distant organs. Lack of effective therapeutic options contributes to the high mortality rates of PDAC. Recent evidence suggests that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT plays an important role to the disease progression and development of drug resistance in PDAC. Tumor budding is thought to reflect the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which allows neoplastic epithelial cells to acquire a mesenchymal phenotype thus increasing their capacity for migration and invasion and help them become resistant to apoptotic signals. In a recent study by our own group the presence and prognostic significance of tumor budding in PDAC were investigated and an association between high-grade budding and aggressive clinicopathological features of the tumors as well as worse outcome of the patients was found. The identification of EMT phenotypic targets may help identifying new molecules so that future therapeutic strategies directed specifically against them could potentially have an impact on drug resistance and invasiveness and hence improve the prognosis of PDAC patients. The aim of this short review is to present an insight on the morphological and molecular aspects of EMT and on the factors that are involved in the induction of EMT in PDAC.

  14. Proteomics reveals key proteins participating in growth difference between fall dormant and non-dormant alfalfa in terminal buds.

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    Du, Hongqi; Shi, Yinghua; Li, Defeng; Fan, Wenna; Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guoqiang; Wang, Chengzhang

    2017-12-08

    To explore the molecular mechanism of growth differences between fall dormant (FD) and non-FD alfalfa, we conducted iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics on terminal buds of Maverick (FD) and Cuf101 (non-FD) cultivars, identified differential abundance protein species (DAPS) and verified expression profiling of certain corresponding mRNA by qRT-PCR. A total of 3872 protein species were annotated. Of the 90 DAPS, 56 and 34 were respectively up- and down-accumulated in Maverick, compared to Cuf101. They were grouped into 35 functional categories and enriched in seven pathways. Of which, auxin polar transport was up-regulated, while phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, pyruvate metabolism and transportation, vitamin B1 synthesis process and flavonoid biosynthesis were down-regulated in Maverick, comparing with Cuf101. In Maverick, mRNA abundances of l-asparaginase, chalcone and stilbene synthase family protein, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase-like protein, thiazole biosynthetic enzyme, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 beta subunit, and aldo/keto reductase family oxidoreductase were significantly lower at FD than at other stages, and lower than in Cuf101. We also observed opposite mRNA profiles of thiazole biosynthetic enzyme, chalcone and stilbene synthase family protein, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 beta subunit in both cultivars from summer to autumn. Our results suggest that these DAPS could play important roles in growth difference between FD and non-FD alfalfa. Up to now, as far as we know, currently the proteins related with the growth differences between FD and non-FD alfalfa cultivars in autumn have not yet been identified in terminal buds. This study identified the protein species expressed in alfalfa terminal buds, selected differentially abundant protein species in terminal buds between Maverick (FD) and Cuf101 (non-FD) cultivars in autumn and identified the important protein species participated in the growth differences. This study lays a foundation for further investigation

  15. A Geometrically-Constrained Mathematical Model of Mammary Gland Ductal Elongation Reveals Novel Cellular Dynamics within the Terminal End Bud.

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    Ingrid Paine

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics is often used to model biological systems. In mammary gland development, mathematical modeling has been limited to acinar and branching morphogenesis and breast cancer, without reference to normal duct formation. We present a model of ductal elongation that exploits the geometrically-constrained shape of the terminal end bud (TEB, the growing tip of the duct, and incorporates morphometrics, region-specific proliferation and apoptosis rates. Iterative model refinement and behavior analysis, compared with biological data, indicated that the traditional metric of nipple to the ductal front distance, or percent fat pad filled to evaluate ductal elongation rate can be misleading, as it disregards branching events that can reduce its magnitude. Further, model driven investigations of the fates of specific TEB cell types confirmed migration of cap cells into the body cell layer, but showed their subsequent preferential elimination by apoptosis, thus minimizing their contribution to the luminal lineage and the mature duct.

  16. A Geometrically-Constrained Mathematical Model of Mammary Gland Ductal Elongation Reveals Novel Cellular Dynamics within the Terminal End Bud.

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    Paine, Ingrid; Chauviere, Arnaud; Landua, John; Sreekumar, Amulya; Cristini, Vittorio; Rosen, Jeffrey; Lewis, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Mathematics is often used to model biological systems. In mammary gland development, mathematical modeling has been limited to acinar and branching morphogenesis and breast cancer, without reference to normal duct formation. We present a model of ductal elongation that exploits the geometrically-constrained shape of the terminal end bud (TEB), the growing tip of the duct, and incorporates morphometrics, region-specific proliferation and apoptosis rates. Iterative model refinement and behavior analysis, compared with biological data, indicated that the traditional metric of nipple to the ductal front distance, or percent fat pad filled to evaluate ductal elongation rate can be misleading, as it disregards branching events that can reduce its magnitude. Further, model driven investigations of the fates of specific TEB cell types confirmed migration of cap cells into the body cell layer, but showed their subsequent preferential elimination by apoptosis, thus minimizing their contribution to the luminal lineage and the mature duct.

  17. Presence of a large β(1-3)glucan linked to chitin at the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mother-bud neck suggests involvement in localized growth control.

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    Cabib, Enrico; Blanco, Noelia; Arroyo, Javier

    2012-04-01

    Previous results suggested that the chitin ring present at the yeast mother-bud neck, which is linked specifically to the nonreducing ends of β(1-3)glucan, may help to suppress cell wall growth at the neck by competing with β(1-6)glucan and thereby with mannoproteins for their attachment to the same sites. Here we explored whether the linkage of chitin to β(1-3)glucan may also prevent the remodeling of this polysaccharide that would be necessary for cell wall growth. By a novel mild procedure, β(1-3)glucan was isolated from cell walls, solubilized by carboxymethylation, and fractionated by size exclusion chromatography, giving rise to a very high-molecular-weight peak and to highly polydisperse material. The latter material, soluble in alkali, may correspond to glucan being remodeled, whereas the large-size fraction would be the final cross-linked structural product. In fact, the β(1-3)glucan of buds, where growth occurs, is solubilized by alkali. A gas1 mutant with an expected defect in glucan elongation showed a large increase in the polydisperse fraction. By a procedure involving sodium hydroxide treatment, carboxymethylation, fractionation by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose, and fractionation by size chromatography on Sephacryl columns, it was shown that the β(1-3)glucan attached to chitin consists mostly of high-molecular-weight material. Therefore, it appears that linkage to chitin results in a polysaccharide that cannot be further remodeled and does not contribute to growth at the neck. In the course of these experiments, the new finding was made that part of the chitin forms a noncovalent complex with β(1-3)glucan.

  18. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation

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    Timothy Hoggard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS, and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1 present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM, which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may

  19. Physiological differences between bud breaking and flowering after dormancy completion revealed by DAM and FT/TFL1 expression in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia).

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    Ito, Akiko; Saito, Takanori; Sakamoto, Daisuke; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Bai, Songling; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying bud breaking (scale leaf elongation) and flowering in the lateral flower buds of Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai 'Kosui') are unknown. To more fully characterize these processes, we treated pear trees with different amounts of chilling initiated at different times. Chilling for ∼900 h at 6 °C always induced bud breaking (scale elongation in ≥70% lateral flower bud) when provided between October and February, whereas chilling provided earlier (between October and December) was less effective on flowering (floret growth and development) than later chilling and the flowering rate increased with longer chilling durations. During chilling, the expression of pear DAMs (PpMADS13-1, 13-2 and 13-3) in lateral flower buds decreased as chilling accumulated irrespective of the timing of chilling. In addition, pear TFL1 (PpTFL1-1a) in the lateral flower buds was expressed at higher levels when the time interval for chilling was earlier. On the other hand, during forcing at 15 °C after chilling, the expression pattern of all three PpMADS13 genes was similar among the treatments, and the expression levels seemed lower in the treatment where scale leaves of the lateral flower bud elongated faster, whereas pear FT (PpFT2a) was expressed at higher levels in the buds whose flower clusters elongated more vigorously during forcing. From these results, we infer that flowering time may be mediated via the balance of flowering-related genes FT and TFL1, whereas bud breaking may be regulated via the DAM genes in Japanese pear. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Field and laboratory investigations of budding in the tetillid sponge Cinachyrella cavernosa

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    Singh, A.; Thakur, N.L.

    regression analysis of physico-chemical factors revealed temperature as the most prominent factor regulating the intensity of budding. Based on size and morphology, three stages of sponge buds were defined. The production of buds was found to be asynchronous...

  1. Digital gene expression analysis of male and female bud transition in Metasequoia reveals high activity of MADS-box transcription factors and hormone-mediated sugar pathways

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    Ying eZhao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metasequoiaglyptostroboidies is a famous redwood tree of ecological and economic importance, and requires more than 20 years of juvenile-to-adult transition before producing female and male cones. Previously, we induced reproductive buds using a hormone solution in juvenile Metasequoia trees as young as5-to-7years old. In the current study, hormone-treated shoots found in female and male buds were used to identify candidate genes involved in reproductive bud transition in Metasequoia. Samples from hormone-treated cone reproductive shoots and naturally occurring non-cone setting shoots were analyzed using 24 digital gene expression (DGE tag profiles using Illumina, generating a total of 69,520 putative transcripts. Next, 32 differentially and specifically expressed transcripts were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, including the upregulation of MADS-box transcription factors involved in male bud transition and flowering time control proteins involved in female bud transition. These differentially expressed transcripts were associated with 243 KEGG pathways. Among the significantly changed pathways, sugar pathways were mediated by hormone signals during the vegetative-to-reproductive phase transition, including glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and sucrose and starch metabolism pathways. Key enzymes were identified in these pathways, including alcohol dehydrogenase (NAD and glutathione dehydrogenase for the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway, and glucanphosphorylase for sucrose and starch metabolism pathways. Our results increase our understanding of the reproductive bud transition in gymnosperms. In addition, these studies on hormone-mediated sugar pathways increase our understanding of the relationship between sugar and hormone signaling during female and male bud initiation in Metasequoia.

  2. Direct imaging of RAB27B-enriched secretory vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal acinar cells reveals origins on a nascent vesicle budding site.

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    Lilian Chiang

    Full Text Available This study uses YFP-tagged Rab27b expression in rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells, which are polarized secretory epithelial cells, to characterize early stages of secretory vesicle trafficking. Here we demonstrate the utility of YFP-Rab27b to delineate new perspectives on the mechanisms of early vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal gland acinar cells, where information is significantly limited. Protocols were developed to deplete the mature YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle pool in the subapical region of the cell, and confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to track vesicle replenishment. This analysis revealed a basally-localized organelle, which we termed the "nascent vesicle site," from which nascent vesicles appeared to emerge. Subapical vesicular YFP-Rab27b was co-localized with p150(Glued, a component of the dynactin cofactor of cytoplasmic dynein. Treatment with the microtubule-targeted agent, nocodazole, did not affect release of mature secretory vesicles, although during vesicle repletion it significantly altered nascent YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle localization. Instead of moving to the subapical region, these vesicles were trapped at the nascent vesicle site which was adjacent to, if not a sub-compartment of, the trans-Golgi network. Finally, YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles which reached the subapical cytoplasm appeared to acquire the actin-based motor protein, Myosin 5C. Our findings show that Rab27b enrichment occurs early in secretory vesicle formation, that secretory vesicles bud from a visually discernable nascent vesicle site, and that transport from the nascent vesicle site to the subapical region requires intact microtubules.

  3. Taste buds in the palatal mucosa of snakes | Berkhoudt | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An examination of the oral mucosa of Crotalus and several Scolecophidia revealed the presence of taste buds. The taste buds in these two divergent groups of snakes are similar in appearance, and correspond to previous descriptions of gustatory organs in other reptiles. Few taste buds were present in any specimen, and ...

  4. Whole-Transcriptome Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes in the Vegetative Buds, Floral Buds and Buds of Chrysanthemum morifolium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Liu

    Full Text Available Chrysanthemum morifolium is an important floral crop that is cultivated worldwide. However, due to a lack of genomic resources, very little information is available concerning the molecular mechanisms of flower development in chrysanthemum.The transcriptomes of chrysanthemum vegetative buds, floral buds and buds were sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. A total of 15.4 Gb of reads were assembled into 91,367 unigenes with an average length of 739 bp. A total of 43,137 unigenes showed similarity to known proteins in the Swissprot or NCBI non-redundant protein databases. Additionally, 25,424, 24,321 and 13,704 unigenes were assigned to 56 gene ontology (GO categories, 25 EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG categories, and 285 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways, respectively. A total of 1,876 differentially expressed genes (DEGs (1,516 up-regulated, 360 down-regulated were identified between vegetative buds and floral buds, and 3,300 DEGs (1,277 up-regulated, 1,706 down-regulated were identified between floral buds and buds. Many genes encoding important transcription factors (e.g., AP2, MYB, MYC, WRKY, NAC and CRT as well as proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, protein kinase activity, plant hormone signal transduction, and the defense responses, among others, were considerably up-regulated in floral buds. Genes involved in the photoperiod pathway and flower organ determination were also identified. These genes represent important candidate genes for molecular cloning and functional analysis to study flowering regulation in chrysanthemum.This comparative transcriptome analysis revealed significant differences in gene expression and signaling pathway components between the vegetative buds, floral buds and buds of Chrysanthemum morifolium. A wide range of genes was implicated in regulating the phase transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. These results should aid researchers in the study of

  5. Whole-Transcriptome Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes in the Vegetative Buds, Floral Buds and Buds of Chrysanthemum morifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Sun, Ming; Du, Dongliang; Pan, Huitang; Cheng, Tangren; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Qixiang

    2015-01-01

    Chrysanthemum morifolium is an important floral crop that is cultivated worldwide. However, due to a lack of genomic resources, very little information is available concerning the molecular mechanisms of flower development in chrysanthemum. The transcriptomes of chrysanthemum vegetative buds, floral buds and buds were sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. A total of 15.4 Gb of reads were assembled into 91,367 unigenes with an average length of 739 bp. A total of 43,137 unigenes showed similarity to known proteins in the Swissprot or NCBI non-redundant protein databases. Additionally, 25,424, 24,321 and 13,704 unigenes were assigned to 56 gene ontology (GO) categories, 25 EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG) categories, and 285 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways, respectively. A total of 1,876 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (1,516 up-regulated, 360 down-regulated) were identified between vegetative buds and floral buds, and 3,300 DEGs (1,277 up-regulated, 1,706 down-regulated) were identified between floral buds and buds. Many genes encoding important transcription factors (e.g., AP2, MYB, MYC, WRKY, NAC and CRT) as well as proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, protein kinase activity, plant hormone signal transduction, and the defense responses, among others, were considerably up-regulated in floral buds. Genes involved in the photoperiod pathway and flower organ determination were also identified. These genes represent important candidate genes for molecular cloning and functional analysis to study flowering regulation in chrysanthemum. This comparative transcriptome analysis revealed significant differences in gene expression and signaling pathway components between the vegetative buds, floral buds and buds of Chrysanthemum morifolium. A wide range of genes was implicated in regulating the phase transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. These results should aid researchers in the study of flower

  6. Floral Initiation in Response to Planting Date Reveals the Key Role of Floral Meristem Differentiation Prior to Budding in Canola (Brassica napus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaofeng; Zhang, Dongqing; Yu, Huasheng; Lin, Baogang; Fu, Ying; Hua, Shuijin

    2016-01-01

    In Brassica napus, floral development is a decisive factor in silique formation, and it is influenced by many cultivation practices including planting date. However, the effect of planting date on floral initiation in canola is poorly understood at present. A field experiment was conducted using a split plot design, in which three planting dates (early, 15 September, middle, 1 October, and late, 15 October) served as main plot and five varieties differing in maturity (1358, J22, Zhongshuang 11, Zheshuang 8, and Zheyou 50) employed as subplot. The purpose of this study was to shed light on the process of floral meristem (FM) differentiation, the influence of planting date on growth period (GP) and floral initiation, and silique formation. The main stages of FM developments can be divided into four stages: first, the transition from shoot apical meristem to FM; second, flower initiation; third, gynoecium and androecium differentiation; and fourth, bud formation. Our results showed that all genotypes had increased GPs from sowing to FM differentiation as planting date was delayed while the GPs from FM differentiation to budding varied year by year except the very early variety, 1358. Based on the number of flowers present at the different reproductive stages, the flowers produced from FM differentiation to budding closely approximated the final silique even though the FM differentiated continuously after budding and peaked generally at the middle flowering stage. The ratio of siliques to maximum flower number ranged from 48 to 80%. These results suggest that (1) the period from FM differentiation to budding is vital for effective flower and silique formation although there was no significant correlation between the length of the period and effective flowers and siliques, and (2) the increased number of flowers from budding were generally ineffective. Therefore, maximizing flower numbers prior to budding will improve silique numbers, and reducing FM degeneration should

  7. "Missing Link" Revealing Fast-Spinning Pulsar Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    telescope during a large sky survey in 1998, and had been observed in visible light by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in 1999, revealing a Sun-like star. When observed again in 2000, the object had changed dramatically, showing evidence for a rotating disk of material, called an accretion disk, surrounding the neutron star. By May of 2002, the evidence for this disk had disappeared. "This strange behavior puzzled astronomers, and there were several different theories for what the object could be," said Ingrid Stairs of the University of British Columbia, who has been visiting the Australia Telescope National Facility and Swinburne University this year. The 2007 GBT observations showed that the object is a millisecond pulsar, spinning 592 times per second. "No other millisecond pulsar has ever shown evidence for an accretion disk," Archibald said. "We know that another type of binary-star system, called a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB), also contains a fast-spinning neutron star and an accretion disk, but these don't emit radio waves. We've thought that LMXBs probably are in the process of getting spun up, and will later emit radio waves as a pulsar. This object appears to be the 'missing link' connecting the two types of systems," she explained. "It appears this thing has flipped from looking like an LMXB to looking like a pulsar, as it experienced an episode during which material pulled from the companion star formed an accretion disk around the neutron star. Later, that mass transfer stopped, the disk disappeared, and the pulsar emerged," said Scott Ransom of the NRAO. The scientists have studied J1023 in detail with the GBT, with the Westerbork radio telescope in the Netherlands, with the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, and with the Parkes radio telescope in Australia. Their results indicate that the neutron star's companion has less than half the Sun's mass, and orbits the neutron star once every four hours and 45 minutes. "This system gives us an unparalled 'cosmic

  8. Axillary bud development in chrysanthemum

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiter, de, H.

    1996-01-01


    Each chrysanthemum cutting originates from an axillary bud. For an improvement of the cultivation of cuttings or more specific their quality, it is necessary that the development of an axillary bud can be controlled as good as possible. Axillary bud development can be distinguished into axillary bud formation and axillary bud outgrowth. The effect of assimilates, position and age of axillary buds, and temperature on formation and outgrowth of the axillary buds and the subsequent cu...

  9. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of polyploid giant cancer cells and budding progeny cells reveals several distinct pathways for ovarian cancer development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwu Zhang

    Full Text Available Polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs are a morphologically distinct subgroup of human tumor cells with increased nuclear size or multiple nuclei, but they are generally considered unimportant because they are presumed to be nondividing and thus nonviable. We have recently shown that these large cancer cells are not only viable but also can divide asymmetrically and yield progeny cancer cells with cancer stem-like properties via budding division. To further understand the molecular events involved in the regulation of PGCCs and the generation of their progeny cancer cells, we comparatively analyzed the proteomic profiles of PGCCs, PGCCs with budding daughter cells, and regular control cancer cells from the HEY and SKOv3 human ovarian cancer cell lines with and without CoCl2. We used a high-throughput iTRAQ-based proteomic methodology coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the differentiated regulated proteins. We performed Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses to validate the differences in the expression patterns of a variety of proteins between PGCCs or budding PGCCs and regular cancer cells identified by iTRAQ approach and also a selected group of proteins from the literature. The differentially regulated proteins included proteins involved in response to hypoxia, stem cell generation, chromatin remodeling, cell-cycle regulation, and invasion and metastasis. In particular, we found that HIF-1alpha and its known target STC1 are upregulated in PGCCs. In addition, we found that a panel of stem cell-regulating factors and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition regulatory transcription factors were upregulated in budding PGCCs, whereas expression of the histone 1 family of nucleosomal linker proteins was consistently lower in PGCCs than in control cells. Thus, proteomic expression patterns provide valuable insight into the underlying mechanisms of PGCC formation and the relationship

  10. Systematic Definition of Protein Constituents along the Major Polarization Axis Reveals an Adaptive Reuse of the Polarization Machinery in Pheromone-Treated Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Polarizing cells extensively restructure cellular components in a spatially and temporally coupled manner along the major axis of cellular extension. Budding yeast are a useful model of polarized growth, helping to define many molecular components of this conserved process. Besides budding, yeast cells also differentiate upon treatment with pheromone from the opposite mating type, forming a mating projection (the ‘shmoo’) by directional restructuring of the cytoskeleton, localized vesicular transport and overall reorganization of the cytosol. To characterize the proteomic localization changes accompanying polarized growth, we developed and implemented a novel cell microarray-based imaging assay for measuring the spatial redistribution of a large fraction of the yeast proteome, and applied this assay to identify proteins localized along the mating projection following pheromone treatment. We further trained a machine learning algorithm to refine the cell imaging screen, identifying additional shmoo-localized proteins. In all, we identified 74 proteins that specifically localize to the mating projection, including previously uncharacterized proteins (Ycr043c, Ydr348c, Yer071c, Ymr295c, and Yor304c-a) and known polarization complexes such as the exocyst. Functional analysis of these proteins, coupled with quantitative analysis of individual organelle movements during shmoo formation, suggests a model in which the basic machinery for cell polarization is generally conserved between processes forming the bud and the shmoo, with a distinct subset of proteins used only for shmoo formation. The net effect is a defined ordering of major organelles along the polarization axis, with specific proteins implicated at the proximal growth tip. PMID:19053807

  11. Small RNA and PARE sequencing in flower bud reveal the involvement of sRNAs in endodormancy release of Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia 'Kosui').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Songling; Saito, Takanori; Ito, Akiko; Tuan, Pham Anh; Xu, Ying; Teng, Yuanwen; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2016-03-15

    In woody perennial plants, including deciduous fruit trees, such as pear, endodormancy is a strategy for surviving the cold winter. A better understanding of the mechanism underlying the endodormancy phase transition is necessary for developing countermeasures against the effects of global warming. In this study, we analyzed the sRNAome of Japanese pear flower buds in endodormant and ecodormant stages over two seasons by implementing of RNA-seq and degradome-sequencing. We identified 137 conserved or less conserved miRNAs and 50 pear-specific miRNAs. However, none of the conserved microRNAs or pear-specific miRNAs was differentially expressed between endodormancy and ecodormancy stages. On the contrast, 1540 of 218,050 loci that produced sRNAs were differentially expressed between endodormancy and ecodormancy, suggesting their potential roles on the phase transition from endodormancy to ecodomancy. We also characterized a multifunctional miRNA precursor MIR168, which produces two functional miR168 transcripts, namely miR168.1 and miR168.2; cleavage events were predominantly mediated by the non-conserved variant miR168.2 rather than the conserved variant miR168.1. Finally, we showed that a TAS3 trans-acting siRNA triggered phased siRNA within the ORF of one of its target genes, AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 4, via the analysis of phased siRNA loci, indicating that siRNAs are able to trigger phased siRNAs in pear. We analyzed the sRNAome of pear flower bud during dormant phase transition. Our work described the sRNA profiles of pear winter buds during dormant phase transition, showing that dormancy release is a highly coordinated physiological process involving the regulation of sRNAs.

  12. What Are Taste Buds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs What Are Taste Buds? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Are Taste Buds? Print A A A en español ¿Qué ... Did you ever wonder why your favorite foods taste so good? Well, you can thank your taste ...

  13. Tumor budding in colorectal cancer--ready for diagnostic practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelzer, Viktor H; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Tumor budding is an important additional prognostic factor for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Defined as the presence of single tumor cells or small clusters of up to 5 cells in the tumor stroma, tumor budding has been likened to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Based on well-designed retrospective studies, tumor budding is linked to adverse outcome of CRC patients in 3 clinical scenarios: (1) in malignant polyps, detection of tumor buds is a risk factor for lymph node metastasis indicating the need for colorectal surgery; (2) tumor budding in stage II CRC is a highly adverse prognostic indicator and may aid patient selection for adjuvant therapy; (3) in the preoperative setting, presence of tumor budding in biopsy material may help to identify high-risk rectal cancer patients for neoadjuvant therapy. However, lack of consensus guidelines for standardized assessment still limits reporting in daily diagnostic practice. This article provides a practical and comprehensive overview on tumor budding aimed at the practicing pathologist. First, we review the prognostic value of tumor budding for the management of colon and rectal cancer patients. Second, we outline a practical, evidence-based proposal for the assessment of tumor budding in the daily sign-out. Last, we summarize the current knowledge of the molecular characteristics of high-grade budding tumors in the context of personalized treatment approaches and biomarker discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assembly and budding of Ebolavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Noda

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Ebolavirus is responsible for highly lethal hemorrhagic fever. Like all viruses, it must reproduce its various components and assemble them in cells in order to reproduce infectious virions and perpetuate itself. To generate infectious Ebolavirus, a viral genome-protein complex called the nucleocapsid (NC must be produced and transported to the cell surface, incorporated into virions, and then released from cells. To further our understanding of the Ebolavirus life cycle, we expressed the various viral proteins in mammalian cells and examined them ultrastructurally and biochemically. Expression of nucleoprotein alone led to the formation of helical tubes, which likely serve as a core for the NC. The matrix protein VP40 was found to be critical for transport of NCs to the cell surface and for the incorporation of NCs into virions, where interaction between nucleoprotein and the matrix protein VP40 is likely essential for these processes. Examination of virus-infected cells revealed that virions containing NCs mainly emerge horizontally from the cell surface, whereas empty virions mainly bud vertically, suggesting that horizontal budding is the major mode of Ebolavirus budding. These data form a foundation for the identification and development of potential antiviral agents to combat the devastating disease caused by this virus.

  15. Assembly and budding of Ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Takeshi; Ebihara, Hideki; Muramoto, Yukiko; Fujii, Ken; Takada, Ayato; Sagara, Hiroshi; Kim, Jin Hyun; Kida, Hiroshi; Feldmann, Heinz; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2006-09-01

    Ebolavirus is responsible for highly lethal hemorrhagic fever. Like all viruses, it must reproduce its various components and assemble them in cells in order to reproduce infectious virions and perpetuate itself. To generate infectious Ebolavirus, a viral genome-protein complex called the nucleocapsid (NC) must be produced and transported to the cell surface, incorporated into virions, and then released from cells. To further our understanding of the Ebolavirus life cycle, we expressed the various viral proteins in mammalian cells and examined them ultrastructurally and biochemically. Expression of nucleoprotein alone led to the formation of helical tubes, which likely serve as a core for the NC. The matrix protein VP40 was found to be critical for transport of NCs to the cell surface and for the incorporation of NCs into virions, where interaction between nucleoprotein and the matrix protein VP40 is likely essential for these processes. Examination of virus-infected cells revealed that virions containing NCs mainly emerge horizontally from the cell surface, whereas empty virions mainly bud vertically, suggesting that horizontal budding is the major mode of Ebolavirus budding. These data form a foundation for the identification and development of potential antiviral agents to combat the devastating disease caused by this virus.

  16. Tumor Budding, uPA, and PAI-1 in Colorectal Cancer: Update of a Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Jochen; Franz, Simon; Schaller, Tina; Schenkirsch, Gerhard; Kriening, Bernadette; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Rüth, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Aims. The prognostic role of the proteases uPA and PAI-1, as well as tumor budding, in colon cancer, has been investigated previously. Methods. We provide 6-year follow-up data and results of the validation set. The initial test set and validation set consisted of 55 colon cancers and 68 colorectal cancers, respectively. Tissue samples were analyzed for uPA and PAI-1 using a commercially available Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Tumor budding was analyzed on cytokeratin-stained slides. Survival analyses were performed using cut-offs that were determined previously. Results. uPA was not prognostic for outcome. PAI-1 showed a trend towards reduced cancer specific survival in PAI-1 high-grade cases (68 versus 83 months; P = 0.091). The combination of high-grade PAI-1 and tumor budding was associated with significantly reduced cancer specific survival (60 versus 83 months; P = 0.021). After pooling the data from both sets, multivariate analyses revealed that the factors pN-stage, V-stage, and a combination of tumor budding and PAI-1 were independently prognostic for the association with distant metastases. Conclusions. A synergistic adverse effect of PAI-1 and tumor budding in uni- and multivariable analyses was found. PAI-1 could serve as a target for anticancer therapy. PMID:28286517

  17. Tumor Budding, uPA, and PAI-1 in Colorectal Cancer: Update of a Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Märkl

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The prognostic role of the proteases uPA and PAI-1, as well as tumor budding, in colon cancer, has been investigated previously. Methods. We provide 6-year follow-up data and results of the validation set. The initial test set and validation set consisted of 55 colon cancers and 68 colorectal cancers, respectively. Tissue samples were analyzed for uPA and PAI-1 using a commercially available Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Tumor budding was analyzed on cytokeratin-stained slides. Survival analyses were performed using cut-offs that were determined previously. Results. uPA was not prognostic for outcome. PAI-1 showed a trend towards reduced cancer specific survival in PAI-1 high-grade cases (68 versus 83 months; P=0.091. The combination of high-grade PAI-1 and tumor budding was associated with significantly reduced cancer specific survival (60 versus 83 months; P=0.021. After pooling the data from both sets, multivariate analyses revealed that the factors pN-stage, V-stage, and a combination of tumor budding and PAI-1 were independently prognostic for the association with distant metastases. Conclusions. A synergistic adverse effect of PAI-1 and tumor budding in uni- and multivariable analyses was found. PAI-1 could serve as a target for anticancer therapy.

  18. In vitro inhibition activity of polyphenol-rich extracts from Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry (Clove) buds against carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes and Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen Adeniyi; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2012-10-01

    To investigate and compare the inhibitory properties of free and bound phenolic extracts of clove bud against carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes (alpha-amylase & alpha-glucosidase) and Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas in vitro. The free phenolics were extracted with 80% (v/v) acetone, while bound phenolics were extracted from the alkaline and acid hydrolyzed residue with ethyl acetate. Then, the interaction of the extracts with alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase was subsequently assessed. Thereafter, the total phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of the extracts were determined. The result revealed that both extracts inhibited alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. However, the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the extracts were significantly (Pclove elicits therapeutic effect on type 2 diabetes.

  19. In vitro inhibition activity of polyphenol-rich extracts from Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry (Clove) buds against carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes and Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen Adeniyi; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate and compare the inhibitory properties of free and bound phenolic extracts of clove bud against carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes (alpha-amylase & alpha-glucosidase) and Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation in rat pancreas in vitro. Methods The free phenolics were extracted with 80% (v/v) acetone, while bound phenolics were extracted from the alkaline and acid hydrolyzed residue with ethyl acetate. Then, the interaction of the extracts with alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase was subsequently assessed. Thereafter, the total phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of the extracts were determined. Results The result revealed that both extracts inhibited alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. However, the alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the extracts were significantly (Pclove elicits therapeutic effect on type 2 diabetes. PMID:23569846

  20. Reactivation from latency displays HIV particle budding at plasma membrane, accompanying CD44 upregulation and recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sano Kouichi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been accepted that HIV buds from the cell surface in T lymphocytes, whereas in macrophages it buds into intracellular endosomes. Recent studies, on the other hand, suggest that HIV preferentially buds from the cell surface even in monocytic cells. However, most studies are based on observations in acutely infected cells and little is known about HIV budding concomitant with reactivation from latency. Such studies would provide a better understanding of a reservoir for HIV. Results We observed HIV budding in latently infected T lymphocytic and monocytic cell lines following TNF-α stimulation and examined the upregulation of host factors that may be involved in particle production. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that reactivation of latently infected J1.1 cells (latently infected Jurkat cells with HIV-1 and U1 cells (latently infected U937 cells with HIV-1 displayed HIV particle budding predominantly at the plasma membrane, a morphology that is similar to particle budding in acutely infected Jurkat and U937 cells. When mRNA expression levels were quantified by qRT-PCR, we found that particle production from reactivated J1.1 and U1 cells was accompanied by CD44 upregulation. This upregulation was similarly observed when Jurkat and U937 cells were acutely infected with HIV-1 but not when just stimulated with TNF-α, suggesting that CD44 upregulation was linked with HIV production but not with cell stimulation. The molecules in endocytic pathways such as CD63 and HRS were also upregulated when U1 cells were reactivated and U937 cells were acutely infected with HIV-1. Confocal microscopy revealed that these upregulated host molecules were recruited to and accumulated at the sites where mature particles were formed at the plasma membrane. Conclusion Our study indicates that HIV particles are budded at the plasma membrane upon reactivation from latency, a morphology that is similar to particle budding in acute

  1. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Drastic Changes in Fungal Communities in the Phyllosphere of Norway Spruce (Picea abies) Following Invasion of the Spruce Bud Scale (Physokermes piceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkis, Audrius; Marčiulynas, Adas; Gedminas, Artūras; Lynikienė, Jūratė; Povilaitienė, Aistė

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diversity and composition of fungal communities in damaged and undamaged shoots of Norway spruce (Picea abies) following recent invasion of the spruce bud scale (Physokermes piceae) in Lithuania. Sampling was done in July 2013 and included 50 random lateral shoots from ten random trees in each of five visually undamaged and five damaged 40-50-year-old pure stands of P. abies. DNA was isolated from 500 individual shoots, subjected to amplification of the internal transcribed spacer of fungal ribosomal DNA (ITS rDNA), barcoded and sequenced. Clustering of 149,426 high-quality sequences resulted in 1193 non-singleton contigs of which 1039 (87.1 %) were fungal. In total, there were 893 fungal taxa in damaged shoots and 608 taxa in undamaged shoots (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, 431 (41.5 %) fungal taxa were exclusively in damaged shoots, 146 (14.0 %) were exclusively in undamaged shoots, and 462 (44.5 %) were common to both types of samples. Correspondence analysis showed that study sites representing damaged and undamaged shoots were separated from each other, indicating that in these fungal communities, these were largely different and, therefore, heavily affected by P. piceae. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that invasive alien tree pests may have a profound effect on fungal mycobiota associated with the phyllosphere of P. abies, and therefore, in addition to their direct negative effect owing physical damage of the tissue, they may also indirectly determine health, sustainability and, ultimately, distribution of the forest tree species.

  2. Analyses of N-linked glycans of PrPSc revealed predominantly 2,6-linked sialic acid residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2017-11-01

    Mammalian prions (PrPSc ) consist of misfolded, conformationally altered, self-replicating states of the sialoglycoprotein called prion protein or PrPC . Recent studies revealed that the sialylation status of PrPSc plays a major role in evading innate immunity and infecting a host. Establishing the type of linkage by which sialic acid residues are attached to galactose is important, as it helps to identify the sialyltransferases responsible for sialylating PrPC and outline strategies for manipulating the sialyation status of PrPSc . Using enzymatic treatment with sialidases and lectin blots, this study demonstrated that in N-linked glycans of PrPSc , the sialic acid residues are predominantly alpha 2,6-linked. High percentages of alpha 2,6-linked sialic acids were observed in PrPSc of three prion strains 22L, RML, and ME7, as well as PrPSc from brain, spleen, or N2a cells cultured in vitro. Moreover, the variation in the percentage of alpha 2,3- versus 2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be relatively minor between brain-, spleen-, or cell-derived PrPSc , suggesting that the type of linkage is independent of tissue type. Based on the current results, we propose that sialyltransferases of St6Gal family, which is responsible for attaching sialic acids via alpha 2,6-linkages to N-linked glycans, controls sialylation of PrPC and PrPSc . © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. "Bud, Not Buddy."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the award-winning book "Bud, Not Buddy" written by Christopher Paul Curtis. Lists different versions of the book; suggests learning activities; lists sources for biographical information and interviews with Curtis, teacher guides, professional articles, and other Depression era novels; and provides a citation for the author's…

  4. Tumor budding correlates with poor prognosis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Huang, Hongzhang; Huang, Zhiquan; Wang, Anxun; Chen, Xiaohua; Huang, Lei; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiqiang

    2011-08-01

    Tumor budding is a readily detectable histopathological feature and has been recognized as an adverse prognostic factor in several human cancers. However, the prognostic value of tumor budding in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation of tumor budding with the clinicopathologic features, and the known molecular biomarkers (E-cadherin and Vimentin), as well as to evaluate its prognostic significance for TSCC. Archival clinical samples of 230 patients with TSCC were examined for tumor budding. Immunohistochemistry analyses were performed to examine the expression of E-cadherin and Vimentin. Statistical analyses were carried out to assess the correlation of tumor budding with clinicopathologic parameters and patient survival. The potential association between tumor budding and alterations of E-cadherin and Vimentin expression was also assessed. Of the 230 TSCC cases examined, tumor budding was observed in 165 cases (71.7%), with a mean tumor bud count of 7.5 (range from 1 to 48 buds). High-intensity budding (≥5 tumor buds) was observed in 111 cases (48.3%). Statistical analysis revealed that tumor budding was associated with tumor size (P tumor budding and the deregulation of E-cadherin (P Tumor budding, which associates with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a frequent event and appears to be an independent prognostic factor in TSCC. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Axillary bud development in chrysanthemum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, de H.A.

    1996-01-01


    Each chrysanthemum cutting originates from an axillary bud. For an improvement of the cultivation of cuttings or more specific their quality, it is necessary that the development of an axillary bud can be controlled as good as possible. Axillary bud development can be distinguished into

  6. Efficient reverse genetics reveals genetic determinants of budding and fusogenic differences between Nipah and Hendra viruses and enables real-time monitoring of viral spread in small animal models of henipavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Tatyana; Park, Arnold; Hill, Terence E; Pernet, Olivier; Beaty, Shannon M; Juelich, Terry L; Smith, Jennifer K; Zhang, Lihong; Wang, Yao E; Vigant, Frederic; Gao, Junling; Wu, Ping; Lee, Benhur; Freiberg, Alexander N

    2015-01-15

    growing numbers of novel henipavirus-like viruses. Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are recently emergent zoonotic and highly lethal pathogens with pandemic potential. Although differences have been observed between NiV and HeV replication and pathogenesis, the molecular basis for these differences has not been examined. In this study, we established a highly efficient system to reverse engineer changes into replication-competent NiV and HeV, which facilitated the generation of reporter-expressing viruses and recombinant NiV-HeV chimeras with substitutions in the genes responsible for viral exit (the M gene, critical for assembly and budding) and viral entry (the G [attachment] and F [fusion] genes). These chimeras revealed differences in the budding and fusogenic properties of the M and G proteins, respectively, which help explain previously observed differences between NiV and HeV. Finally, to facilitate future in vivo studies, we monitored the replication and spread of a bioluminescent reporter-expressing NiV in susceptible mice; this is the first time such in vivo imaging has been performed under BSL-4 conditions. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Variable and complex food web structures revealed by exploring missing trophic links between birds and biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwae, Tomohiro; Miyoshi, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Shinya; Ichimi, Kazuhiko; Hosoya, Jun; Amano, Tatsuya; Moriya, Toshifumi; Kondoh, Michio; Ydenberg, Ronald C; Elner, Robert W

    2012-04-01

    Food webs are comprised of a network of trophic interactions and are essential to elucidating ecosystem processes and functions. However, the presence of unknown, but critical networks hampers understanding of complex and dynamic food webs in nature. Here, we empirically demonstrate a missing link, both critical and variable, by revealing that direct predator-prey relationships between shorebirds and biofilm are widespread and mediated by multiple ecological and evolutionary determinants. Food source mixing models and energy budget estimates indicate that the strength of the missing linkage is dependent on predator traits (body mass and foraging action rate) and the environment that determines food density. Morphological analyses, showing that smaller bodied species possess more developed feeding apparatus to consume biofilm, suggest that the linkage is also phylogenetically dependent and affords a compelling re-interpretation of niche differentiation. We contend that exploring missing links is a necessity for revealing true network structure and dynamics. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  8. The prognostic value of tumor budding in invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fenli; Cao, Wei; Wang, Yili; Li, Linrui; Zhang, Guanjun; Wang, Zhuo

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the prognostic value of tumor budding in 160 cases of operable invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified (IDC-NOS). The number of buds was counted in H&E slides with a maximal invasive margin in a 0.950mm(2) field of vision (200×). According to a cut-off score selected by ROC analysis, the cohort was dichotomized into a low (0-7 budding foci, 107 cases, 66.9%) and a high-grade budding group (8 or more budding foci, 53 cases, 33.1%). The inter-observer test showed a good reproducibility with 0.717 as the К value. High-grade budding was significantly associated with the presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (P=0.001), larger tumor size (P=0.014), and worse clinical outcome (Pbudded cells at the margin displayed epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like molecular phenotype and decreased proliferative activity. Survival analyses revealed that tumor budding (HR 4.275, Ptumor size (HR 2.468, P=0.002), node status (HR 2.362, Ptumor budding is a reproducible, significant, and independent histopathological prognostic factor in IDC-NOS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor Budding in Breast Carcinoma: Relation to E-Cadherin, MMP-9 Expression, and Metastasis Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Putu Sriwidyani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumor budding is a histopathologic entity refers to small cluster of cancer cells at the invasive edge of tumor. It was assumed that tumor budding is linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, an early event in metastasis. Objective: This study aimed to find out the correlation of tumor budding with E-cadherin and MMP-9 expression and risk of metastasis in breast carcinoma. Method: We investigated 35 cases breast carcinoma with metastasis and 35 cases without metastasis. The number of tumor budding was counted in cytokeratin-stained slides with 400x magnification (0.57 mm2. Result: Cut-off point by ROC analysis was 11 and the patient was categorized into low grade (0-10 buds and high grade (11 or more buds tumor budding. Inter-observer agreement was good with K value 0.914. Low level of E-cadherin was not significantly correlated with high grade tumor budding (p=0.660, meanwhile high level of MMP-9 was significantly correlated with high grade tumor budding (p=0.001. High grade tumor budding was a significant, independent risk factor of metastasis in breast carcinoma (OR=38.2, 95% CI 7.5-193.7, p<0.001. Conclusion: In conclusion, tumor budding grade is related to level of MMP-9 but has no correlation E-cadherin expression. High grade tumor budding is an independent risk factor of metastasis in breast carcinoma.

  10. Axillary bud development in rose

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelis - van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Axillary buds form the basis of flower production of a rose crop. Within a rose crop there exists an undesired large variation in shoot number and size, which affects flower yield. Part of this variation may be traced back to early variation in axillary buds. The aim of the research reported in this thesis was to enlarge the knowledge and insight in the development of axillary buds. It was investigated to what extent the growth of an axillary bud into a shoot can be influenced during...

  11. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingchang; Day, Felix R.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Na, Jianbo; Bataille, Veronique; Cousminer, Diana L.; Dastani, Zari; Drong, Alexander W.; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Hedman, Åsa K.; Haring, Robin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Iles, Mark M.; Justice, Anne E.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lagou, Vasiliki; Li, Rui; Li, Xin; Locke, Adam; Lu, Chen; Mägi, Reedik; Perry, John R. B.; Pers, Tune H.; Qi, Qibin; Sanna, Marianna; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Scott, William R.; Shungin, Dmitry; Teumer, Alexander; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Walker, Ryan W.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zhang, Mingfeng; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Zhihong; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bellis, Claire; Bonnefond, Amélie; Borodulin, Katja; Buchman, Aron S.; Cederholm, Tommy; Choh, Audrey C.; Choi, Hyung Jin; Curran, Joanne E.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; Enneman, Anke W.; Eury, Elodie; Evans, Daniel S.; Forsen, Tom; Friedrich, Nele; Fumeron, Frédéric; Garcia, Melissa E.; Gärtner, Simone; Han, Bok-Ghee; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Ittermann, Till; Kent, Jack W.; Kolcic, Ivana; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lahti, Jari; Leach, Irene Mateo; Lee, Christine G.; Lee, Jong-Young; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loh, Marie; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Michaëlsson, Karl; Nalls, Mike A.; Nielson, Carrie M.; Oozageer, Laticia; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Polašek, Ozren; Ripatti, Samuli; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Shin, Chan Soo; Narančić, Nina Smolej; Spira, Dominik; Srikanth, Priya; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Sung, Yun Ju; Swart, Karin M. A.; Taittonen, Leena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tikkanen, Emmi; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Verweij, Niek; Wright, Alan F.; Yu, Lei; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Eklund, Niina; Forrester, Terrence; Grarup, Niels; Jackson, Anne U.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lichtner, Peter; Luan, Jian'an; Mahajan, Anubha; Männistö, Satu; Palmer, Cameron D.; Ried, Janina S.; Scott, Robert A.; Stancáková, Alena; Wagner, Peter J.; Demirkan, Ayse; Döring, Angela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kühnel, Brigitte; Mangino, Massimo; Mcknight, Barbara; Menni, Cristina; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Oostra, Ben A.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Song, Kijoung; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; White, Charles C.; Boehnke, Michael; Boettcher, Yvonne; Cooper, Richard S.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Hingorani, Aroon; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; Linneberg, Allan; Luke, Amy; Mckenzie, Colin A.; Palotie, Aarno; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Strauch, Konstantin; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bennett, David A.; Bertram, Lars; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Bouchard, Claude; Campbell, Harry; Cho, Nam H.; Cummings, Steven R.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Demuth, Ilja; Eckardt, Rahel; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H.; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hastie, Nicholas; Heliövaara, Markku; Hofman, Albert; Jordan, Joanne M.; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Knekt, Paul B.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lind, Lars; Liu, Yongmei; Orwoll, Eric S.; Osmond, Clive; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rice, Treva K.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Towne, Bradford; Tranah, Gregory J.; Tremblay, Angelo; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Harst, Pim; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma S.; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F.; Yengo, Loïc; Bishop, D. Timothy; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Chambers, John C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Dehghan, Abbas; Deloukas, Panos; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fox, Caroline; Furey, Terrence S.; Franke, Lude; Han, Jiali; Hunter, David J.; Karjalainen, Juha; Karpe, Fredrik; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Bishop, Julia A. N.; North, Kari E.; Ohlsson, Claes; Ong, Ken K.; Prokopenko, Inga; Richards, J. Brent; Schadt, Eric E.; Spector, Tim D.; Widén, Elisabeth; Willer, Cristen J.

    2016-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8), of which eight were previously associated with increased overall adiposity (BMI, BF%) and four (in or near COBLL1/GRB14, IGF2BP1, PLA2G6, CRTC1) were novel associations with BF%. Seven loci showed a larger effect on BF% than on BMI, suggestive of a primary association with adiposity, while five loci showed larger effects on BMI than on BF%, suggesting association with both fat and lean mass. In particular, the loci more strongly associated with BF% showed distinct cross-phenotype association signatures with a range of cardiometabolic traits revealing new insights in the link between adiposity and disease risk. PMID:26833246

  12. Transcriptome analysis of chestnut (Castanea sativa) tree buds suggests a putative role for epigenetic control of bud dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, María Estrella; Rodríguez, Roberto; Cañal, María Jesús; Toorop, Peter E

    2011-09-01

    Recent papers indicated that epigenetic control is involved in transitions in bud dormancy, purportedly controlling gene expression. The present study aimed to identify genes that are differentially expressed in dormant and non-dormant Castanea sativa buds. Two suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries were constructed to characterize the transcriptomes of dormant apical buds of C. sativa, and buds in which dormancy was released. A total of 512 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated in a forward and reverse subtractive hybridization experiment. Classification of these ESTs into functional groups demonstrated that dormant buds were predominantly characterized by genes associated with stress response, while non-dormant buds were characterized by genes associated with energy, protein synthesis and cellular components for development and growth. ESTs for a few genes involved in different forms of epigenetic modification were found in both libraries, suggesting a role for epigenetic control in bud dormancy different from that in growth. Genes encoding histone mono-ubiquitinase HUB2 and histone acetyltransferase GCN5L were associated with dormancy, while a gene encoding histone H3 kinase AUR3 was associated with growth. Real-time RT-PCR with a selection of genes involved in epigenetic modification and stress tolerance confirmed the expression of the majority of investigated genes in various stages of bud development, revealing a cyclical expression pattern concurring with the growth seasons for most genes. However, senescing leaves also showed an increased expression of several of the genes associated with dormancy, implying pleiotropy. Furthermore, a comparison between these subtraction cDNA libraries and the poplar bud dormancy transcriptome and arabidopsis transcriptomes for seed dormancy and non-dormancy indicated a common basis for dormancy in all three systems. Bud dormancy and non-dormancy in C. sativa were characterized by distinct sets of genes

  13. Histopathologic features of the tumor budding in adenocarcinoma of the lung: tumor budding as an index to predict the potential aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoko; Ishii, Genichiro; Kojima, Motohiro; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Otsuka, Hajime; Otaki, Yoichi; Aokage, Keiju; Yanagi, Shingo; Nagai, Kanji; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2010-09-01

    The term tumor budding has been applied to single cells or small clusters of up to four cells within the stromal tissue at the invasive margin of colorectal cancers. This morphologic feature is increasingly being recognized as an adverse prognostic factor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathologic significance of tumor budding in adenocarcinomas of the lung. We investigated the relationship between tumor budding and clinicopathologic parameters of adenocarcinomas of the lung and the prognostic significance of tumor budding by reviewing the cases of 201 consecutive patients who had undergone complete resection of adenocarcinoma of the lung measuring 30 mm or less in diameter. We examined immunohistochemical profile of budding cells (BCs) by immunohistochemical staining with 14 antibodies. Tumor budding was observed in 78 (43.1%) of the 181 cases with invasive adenocarcinoma. The presence of tumor budding was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (p = 0.005), pathologic stage (p tumor budding and the predominant histologic subtype revealed that the predominant papillary subtype was significantly associated with the presence of tumor budding (p = 0.0023), whereas the predominant bronchioloalveolar carcinoma subtype was significantly associated with the absence of tumor budding (p budding and the group without budding was 67.5% and 88.3%, respectively, and difference was significant (p = 0.0057). Compared with cancer cells forming nests, BCs displayed reduced expression of cellular adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin (p tumor budding was significant independent prognostic factor of the small-sized adenocarcinoma of the lung. Our data showed that tumor budding in adenocarcinoma of the lung is a distinct morphologic feature that has biologic and prognostic significance.

  14. Axillary bud development in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis - van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Axillary buds form the basis of flower production of a rose crop. Within a rose crop there exists an undesired large variation in shoot number and size, which affects flower yield. Part of this variation may be traced back to early variation in axillary buds. The aim of the research

  15. Tumor budding in colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert Bektaş, Sevda; Inan Mamak, Gülsün; Cırış, Ibrahim Metin; Bozkurt, Kemal Kürşat; Kapucuoğlu, Nilgün

    2012-01-01

    In colorectal carcinomas, tumor budding has been defined as the presence of isolated single tumor cells or small cell clusters in the stroma at the invasive tumor margin. In this study, the relationship between tumor budding density at the invasive tumor margin and pathological parameters is investigated. Haematoxylin and eosin stained slides of 73 cases with colorectal carcinoma were retrospectively evaluated for the presence and intensity of tumor budding by 2 observers. After the specimens were assessed, the highest density of tumor budding area was counted in a microscopic field of x200. Cases were separated into 2 groups according to tumor budding density as low grade ( tumor invasion, histological grade, vascular invasion and lymph node involvement was investigated. Of the 73 colorectal carcinoma cases, 33 (45.2%) had low and 40 (54.8%) had high grade tumor budding density, respectively. There was a statistically significant relationship between high grade tumor budding density and histological grade (p=0.042), lymph node involvement (p=0.0001) and vascular invasion (p=0.0034). High grade tumor budding density is associated with aggressive phenotypical features in colorectal carcinoma.

  16. Intersubspecific subcongenic mouse strain analysis reveals closely linked QTLs with opposite effects on body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollah, Md Bazlur R; Ishikawa, Akira

    2011-06-01

    A previous genome-wide QTL study revealed many QTLs affecting postnatal body weight and growth in an intersubspecific backcross mouse population between the C57BL/6J (B6) strain and wild Mus musculus castaneus mice captured in the Philippines. Subsequently, several closely linked QTLs for body composition traits were revealed in an F(2) intercross population between B6 and B6.Cg-Pbwg1, a congenic strain on the B6 genetic background carrying the growth QTL Pbwg1 on proximal chromosome 2. However, no QTL affecting body weight has been duplicated in the F(2) population, except for mapping an overdominant QTL that causes heterosis of body weight. In this study, we developed 17 intersubspecific subcongenic strains with overlapping and nonoverlapping castaneus regions from the B6.Cg-Pbwg1 congenic strain in order to search for and genetically dissect QTLs affecting body weight into distinct closely linked loci. Phenotypic comparisons of several developed subcongenic strains with the B6 strain revealed that two closely linked but distinct QTLs that regulate body weight, named Pbwg1.11 and Pbwg1.12, are located on an 8.9-Mb region between D2Mit270 and D2Mit472 and on the next 3.6-Mb region between D2Mit205 and D2Mit182, respectively. Further analyses using F(2) segregating populations obtained from intercrosses between B6 and each of the two selected subcongenic strains confirmed the presence of these two body weight QTLs. Pbwg1.11 had an additive effect on body weight at 6, 10, and 13 weeks of age, and its castaneus allele decreased it. In contrast, the castaneus allele at Pbwg1.12 acted in a dominant fashion and surprisingly increased body weight at 6, 10, and 13 weeks of age despite the body weight of wild castaneus mice being 60% of that of B6 mice. These findings illustrate the complex genetic nature of body weight regulation and support the importance of subcongenic mouse analysis to dissect closely linked loci.

  17. Intratumoral budding as a potential parameter of tumor progression in mismatch repair-proficient and mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Giger, Olivier; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Patsouris, Efstratios S; Peros, George; Terracciano, Luigi M; Zlobec, Inti

    2011-12-01

    In colorectal cancer, tumor budding at the invasive front (peritumoral budding) is an established prognostic parameter and decreased in mismatch repair-deficient tumors. In contrast, the clinical relevance of tumor budding within the tumor center (intratumoral budding) is not yet known. The aim of the study was to determine the correlation of intratumoral budding with peritumoral budding and mismatch repair status and the prognostic impact of intratumoral budding using 2 independent patient cohorts. Following pancytokeratin staining of whole-tissue sections and multiple-punch tissue microarrays, 2 independent cohorts (group 1: n = 289; group 2: n = 222) with known mismatch repair status were investigated for intratumoral budding and peritumoral budding. In group 1, intratumoral budding was strongly correlated to peritumoral budding (r = 0.64; P budding was associated with right-sided location (P = .024), advanced T stage (P = .001) and N stage pN (P tumor margin (P = .003), and shorter survival time (P = .014). In mismatch repair-deficient cancers, high intratumoral budding was linked to higher tumor grade (P = .004), vascular invasion (P = .009), infiltrating tumor margin (P = .005), and more unfavorable survival time (P = .09). These associations were confirmed in group 2. High-grade intratumoral budding was a poor prognostic factor in univariate (P budding is an independent prognostic factor, supporting the future investigation of intratumoral budding in larger series of both preoperative and postoperative rectal and colon cancer specimens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ubiquitin is part of the retrovirus budding machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Akash; Chau, Vincent; Wills, John W.

    2000-11-01

    Retroviruses contain relatively large amounts of ubiquitin, but the significance of this finding has been unknown. Here, we show that drugs that are known to reduce the level of free ubiquitin in the cell dramatically reduced the release of Rous sarcoma virus, an avian retrovirus. This effect was suppressed by overexpressing ubiquitin and also by directly fusing ubiquitin to the C terminus of Gag, the viral protein that directs budding and particle release. The block to budding was found to be at the plasma membrane, and electron microscopy revealed that the reduced level of ubiquitin results in a failure of mature virus particles to separate from each other and from the plasma membrane during budding. These data indicate that ubiquitin is actually part of the budding machinery.

  19. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals Converging Molecular Mechanisms that Link Different POPs to Common Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Patricia; Perlina, Ally; Mumtaz, Moiz; Fowler, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have identified statistical associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metabolic diseases, but testable hypotheses regarding underlying molecular mechanisms to explain these linkages have not been published. We assessed the underlying mechanisms of POPs that have been associated with metabolic diseases; three well-known POPs [2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), 2,2´,4,4´,5,5´-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 4,4´-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE)] were studied. We used advanced database search tools to delineate testable hypotheses and to guide laboratory-based research studies into underlying mechanisms by which this POP mixture could produce or exacerbate metabolic diseases. For our searches, we used proprietary systems biology software (MetaCore™/MetaDrug™) to conduct advanced search queries for the underlying interactions database, followed by directional network construction to identify common mechanisms for these POPs within two or fewer interaction steps downstream of their primary targets. These common downstream pathways belong to various cytokine and chemokine families with experimentally well-documented causal associations with type 2 diabetes. Our systems biology approach allowed identification of converging pathways leading to activation of common downstream targets. To our knowledge, this is the first study to propose an integrated global set of step-by-step molecular mechanisms for a combination of three common POPs using a systems biology approach, which may link POP exposure to diseases. Experimental evaluation of the proposed pathways may lead to development of predictive biomarkers of the effects of POPs, which could translate into disease prevention and effective clinical treatment strategies. Ruiz P, Perlina A, Mumtaz M, Fowler BA. 2016. A systems biology approach reveals converging molecular mechanisms that link different POPs to common metabolic diseases. Environ

  20. A factor linking floral organ identity and growth revealed by characterization of the tomato mutant unfinished flower development (ufd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Poyatos-Pertíñez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Floral organogenesis requires coordinated interactions between genes specifying floral organ identity and those regulating growth and size of developing floral organs. With the aim to isolate regulatory genes linking both developmental processes (i.e. floral organ identity and growth in the tomato model species, a novel mutant altered in the formation of floral organs was further characterized. Under normal growth conditions, floral organ primordia of mutant plants were correctly initiated, however, they were unable to complete their development impeding the formation of mature and fertile flowers. Thus, the growth of floral buds was blocked at an early stage of development; therefore, we named this mutant as unfinished flower development (ufd. Genetic analysis performed in a segregating population of 543 plants showed that the abnormal phenotype was controlled by a single recessive mutation. Global gene expression analysis confirmed that several MADS-box genes regulating floral identity as well as other genes participating in cell division and different hormonal pathways were affected in their expression patterns in ufd mutant plants. Moreover, ufd mutant inflorescences showed higher hormone contents, particularly ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC and strigol compared to wild type. Such results indicate that UFD may have a key function as positive regulator of the development of floral primordia once they have been initiated in the four floral whorls. This function should be performed by affecting the expression of floral organ identity and growth genes, together with hormonal signalling pathways.

  1. Revealing species-specific trophic links in soil food webs: molecular identification of scarab predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juen, A; Traugott, M

    2007-04-01

    Soil food webs are particularly important in terrestrial systems, but studying them is difficult. Here we report on the first study to apply a molecular approach to identify species-specific trophic interactions in below-ground food webs. To identify the invertebrate predator guild of the garden chafer Phyllopertha horticola (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae) whose root-feeding larvae can be highly abundant in grasslands, a specific DNA marker was developed. It allowed detection of P. horticola egg and white grub meals within the gut content of Poecilus versicolor (Coleoptera, Carabidae) larvae for up to 24 h post-feeding. Soil samples from an alpine grassland revealed a diverse below-ground macro-invertebrate community with earthworms, P. horticola larvae, and centipedes as well as beetle larvae as the most abundant detritivores, herbivores, and predators, respectively. Garden chafer DNA was detected in 18.6%, 4.1%, and 4.4% of field-collected Geophilidae (n = 124), beetle larvae (n = 159), and Lithobiidae (n = 49), respectively. We conclude that most of the investigated predators actively preyed on P. horticola, as secondary predation is unlikely to be detected in below-ground systems. Moreover, scavenging most likely contributes only to a small percentage of the revealed trophic links due to the low availability of carrion. Sampling date did not influence prey detection rates, indicating that both P. horticola eggs and larvae were preyed on. Only 2.7% of the below-ground predators tested positive for earthworms, an alternative, highly abundant prey, suggesting that P. horticola represents an important prey source for centipedes and predatory beetle larvae during summer within the soil food web.

  2. Neuronal Migration and Axonal Pathways Linked to Human Fetal Insular Development Revealed by Diffusion MR Tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Avilash; Takahashi, Emi

    2017-08-31

    The insula is a multimodal sensory integration structure that, in addition to serving as a gateway between somatosensory areas and limbic structures, plays a crucial role in autonomic nervous system function. While anatomical studies following the development of the insula have been conducted, currently, no studies have been published in human fetuses tracking the development of neuronal migration or of white matter tracts in the cortex. In this study, we aimed to follow the neuronal migration and subsequent maturation of axons in and around the insula in human fetal ages. Using high-angular resolution diffusion magnetic resonance imaging tractography, major white matter pathways to/from the insula and its surrounding operculum were identified at a number of time points during human gestation. Pathways likely linked to neuronal migration from the ventricular zone to the inferior frontal gyrus, superior temporal region, and the insular cortex were detected in the earliest gestational age studied (15 GW). Tractography reveals neuronal migration to areas surrounding the insula occurred at different time points. These results, in addition to demonstrating key time points for neuronal migration, suggest that neurons and axonal fiber pathways underlying the insula and its surrounding gyri mature differentially despite their relationship during cortical folding. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Tumor budding, a novel prognostic indicator for predicting stage progression in T1 bladder cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Keishiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Mikami, Shuji; Ogihara, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-09-01

    Tumor budding has been defined as an isolated single cancer cell or a cluster composed of fewer than five cancer cells scattered in the stroma. It is a strong predictor for lymph node metastasis in T1 colorectal cancer. We introduced this concept to T1 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer and evaluated whether tumor budding could have a prognostic impact on the clinical outcome. We identified 121 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed T1 bladder cancer between 1994 and 2014 at Keio University Hospital. All slides were re-reviewed by a dedicated uropathologist. Budding foci were counted under ×200 magnification. When the number of budding foci was 10 or more, tumor budding was defined as positive. The relationship between tumor budding and clinical outcomes was assessed using a multivariate analysis. The median follow-up was 52 months. Tumor budding was positive in 21 patients (17.4%). Tumor budding was significantly associated with T1 substaging, tumor architecture and lymphovascular invasion. The 5-year progression-free survival rate in T1 bladder cancer patients with tumor budding was 53.8%, which was significantly lower than that in patients without tumor budding (88.4%, P = 0.001). A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that tumor budding was independently associated with stage progression (P = 0.002, hazard ratio = 4.90). In a subgroup of patients treated with bacillus Calmette-Guérin instillation (n = 88), tumor budding was also independently associated with stage progression (P = 0.003, hazard ratio = 5.65). Tumor budding may be a novel indicator for predicting stage progression in T1 bladder cancer, and would likely be easily introduced in clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. Phenology of perennial, native grass, belowground axillary buds in the northern mixed-grass prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Morgan L; Vermeire, Lance T; Ganguli, Amy C; Hendrickson, John R

    2017-06-01

    Vegetative reproduction from belowground bud banks is the primary driver of grassland systems. Despite the importance of bud banks, the timing of recruitment and the crucial link between formation and maintenance is unknown. We assessed patterns of belowground bud development, dormancy, and mortality associated with three perennial native grasses in the northern Great Plains. Temperature and soil moisture were measured below the soil surface to determine relationships with belowground bud development. Blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis) generated more buds over winter that remained dormant; whereas, C3 species needle-and-thread (Hesperostipa comata) and western wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii), maintained limited dormant buds throughout winter. Soil temperature was a good predictor for C4 species bud production; whereas, soil moisture was a reliable predictor for C3 buds. Distinct differences existed between C4 species blue grama and C3 species needle-and-thread, whereas C3 species western wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii) was intermediate, indicating there is likely a species-specific continuum between the C3 and C4 extremes rather than a stark difference. The ability to predict belowground bud development is a novel insight to native perennial grasses. Native grass species' strategies and adaptability regarding belowground bud bank size and bud phenology are important factors optimizing tiller recruitment given the variable growing conditions. Patterns of bud dormancy and development will provide insight to the underlying mechanisms by which management practices and fluctuations in precipitation amount and growing season length can alter mixed-grass prairie plant community dynamics. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  5. Thidiazuron-induced in vitro bud organogenesis of the date palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the present was to enhance the frequency of plant regeneration in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cv. Hillawi. ... studies revealed that adventitious buds were formed directly from epidermal cells without callus formation, and adventitious buds were developed from meristematic cells in shoot tip tissues.

  6. Proposal for a 10-high-power-fields scoring method for the assessment of tumor budding in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitopoulou, Eva; Zlobec, Inti; Kölzer, Viktor; Kondi-Pafiti, Agathi; Patsouris, Efstratios S; Gennatas, Konstantin; Lugli, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Although tumor budding is linked to adverse prognosis in colorectal cancer, it remains largely unreported in daily diagnostic work due to the absence of a standardized scoring method. Our aim was to assess the inter-observer agreement of a novel 10-high-power-fields method for assessment of tumor budding at the invasive front and to confirm the prognostic value of tumor budding in our setting of colorectal cancers. Whole tissue sections of 215 colorectal cancers with full clinico-pathological and follow-up information were stained with cytokeratin AE1/AE3 antibody. Presence of buds was scored across 10-high-power fields at the invasive front by two pathologists and two additional observers were asked to score 50 cases of tumor budding randomly selected from the larger cohort. The measurements were correlated to the patient and tumor characteristics. Inter-observer agreement and correlation between observers' scores were excellent (Ptumor budding and the remaining 70% of the patients were entered into the analysis. High-grade budding was defined as an average of ≥10 buds across 10-high-power fields. High-grade budding was associated with a higher tumor grade (Ptumor border configuration (Ptumor budding has independent prognostic value and shows excellent inter-observer agreement. Like the BRE and Gleason scores in breast and prostate cancers, respectively, tumor budding could be a basis for a prognostic score in colorectal cancer.

  7. Coevolutionary patterning of teeth and taste buds

    OpenAIRE

    Bloomquist, R.F.; Parnell, N; Phillips, K A; Fowler, T E; Yu, Tian; Sharpe, Paul T.; Streelman, J T

    2015-01-01

    Teeth and taste buds are iteratively patterned structures that line the oro-pharynx of vertebrates. Biologists do not fully understand how teeth and taste buds develop from undifferentiated epithelium or how variation in organ density is regulated. These organs are typically studied independently because of their separate anatomical location in mammals: teeth on the jaw margin and taste buds on the tongue. However, in many aquatic animals like bony fishes, teeth and taste buds are colocalized...

  8. Foamy Virus Budding and Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Lindemann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Like all other viruses, a successful egress of functional particles from infected cells is a prerequisite for foamy virus (FV spread within the host. The budding process of FVs involves steps, which are shared by other retroviruses, such as interaction of the capsid protein with components of cellular vacuolar protein sorting (Vps machinery via late domains identified in some FV capsid proteins. Additionally, there are features of the FV budding strategy quite unique to the spumaretroviruses. This includes secretion of non-infectious subviral particles and a strict dependence on capsid-glycoprotein interaction for release of infectious virions from the cells. Virus-like particle release is not possible since FV capsid proteins lack a membrane-targeting signal. It is noteworthy that in experimental systems, the important capsid-glycoprotein interaction could be bypassed by fusing heterologous membrane-targeting signals to the capsid protein, thus enabling glycoprotein-independent egress. Aside from that, other systems have been developed to enable envelopment of FV capsids by heterologous Env proteins. In this review article, we will summarize the current knowledge on FV budding, the viral components and their domains involved as well as alternative and artificial ways to promote budding of FV particle structures, a feature important for alteration of target tissue tropism of FV-based gene transfer systems.

  9. Development and growth potential of axillary buds in roses as affected by bud age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of axillary bud age on the development and potential for growth of the bud into a shoot was studied in roses. Age of the buds occupying a similar position on the plant varied from 'subtending leaf just unfolded' up to 1 year later. With increasing age of the axillary bud its dry mass,

  10. Adventitious bud regeneration from the stigma of Sinapis alba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Zenkteler

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Stigmas isolated from flower buds of 'Nakielska' variety of Sinapis alba were used to develop a micropropagation method suitable for breeding of new cultivars. The origin of adventitious bud regeneration was studied on MS medium, under stimulation by bezylaminopurine (BAP in combination with 2,4-D - dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D. Histological analysis showed the structure of Sinapis stigma (composed from four types of tissue: papillae, transmitting tissue, parenchyma and vascular bundles and revealed that numerous meristematic centers developed from parenchyma cells in close vicinity of vascular bundles. Buds very quickly appeared on the surface of initial explants and later formed multiplantlets that were easily rooted in the soil.

  11. Genetic Diversity and Differentiation of Ammophila arenaria (L.) Link as Revealed by ISSR Markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Echeverria, S.; Freitas, H.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2008-01-01

    Ammophila arenaria (L.) Link (marram grass) is the most important sand-fixing plant species along the northwestern European and Mediterranean coast, and it is also planted worldwide for sand dune stabilization. In spite of the intense use of this species in foredune restoration and stabilization

  12. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Yingchang; Day, Felix R; Gustafsson, Stefan; Buchkovich, Martin L; Na, Jianbo; Bataille, Veronique; Cousminer, Diana L; Dastani, Zari; Drong, Alexander W; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M; Falchi, Mario; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Hedman, Åsa K; Haring, Robin; Hysi, Pirro G; Iles, Mark M; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lagou, Vasiliki; Li, Rui; Li, Xin; Locke, Adam; Lu, Chen; Mägi, Reedik; Perry, John R B; Pers, Tune H; Qi, Qibin; Sanna, Marianna; Schmidt, Ellen M; Scott, William R; Shungin, Dmitry; Teumer, Alexander; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Walker, Ryan W; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zhang, Mingfeng; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Zhihong; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Bakker, Stephan J L; Bellis, Claire; Bonnefond, Amélie; Borodulin, Katja; Buchman, Aron S; Cederholm, Tommy; Choh, Audrey C; Choi, Hyung Jin; Curran, Joanne E; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; De Jager, Philip L; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; Enneman, Anke W; Eury, Elodie; Evans, Daniel S; Forsen, Tom; Friedrich, Nele; Fumeron, Frédéric; Garcia, Melissa E; Gärtner, Simone; Han, Bok-Ghee; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Ittermann, Till; Kent, Jack W; Kolcic, Ivana; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lahti, Jari; Mateo Leach, Irene; Lee, Christine G; Lee, Jong-Young; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loh, Marie; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Michaëlsson, Karl; Nalls, Mike A; Nielson, Carrie M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Polašek, Ozren; Ripatti, Samuli; Sarzynski, Mark A; Shin, Chan Soo; Narančić, Nina Smolej; Spira, Dominik; Srikanth, Priya; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Sung, Yun Ju; Swart, Karin M A; Taittonen, Leena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tikkanen, Emmi; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Schoor, Natasja M; Verweij, Niek; Wright, Alan F; Yu, Lei; Zmuda, Joseph M; Eklund, Niina; Forrester, Terrence; Grarup, Niels; Jackson, Anne U; Kristiansson, Kati; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lichtner, Peter; Luan, Jian'an; Mahajan, Anubha; Männistö, Satu; Palmer, Cameron D; Ried, Janina S; Scott, Robert A; Stancáková, Alena; Wagner, Peter J; Demirkan, Ayse; Döring, Angela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kiel, Douglas P; Kühnel, Brigitte; Mangino, Massimo; Mcknight, Barbara; Menni, Cristina; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Oostra, Ben A; Shuldiner, Alan R; Song, Kijoung; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; White, Charles C; Boehnke, Michael; Boettcher, Yvonne; Cooper, Richard S; Forouhi, Nita G; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Hingorani, Aroon; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; Linneberg, Allan; Luke, Amy; Mckenzie, Colin A; Palotie, Aarno; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Strauch, Konstantin; Tayo, Bamidele O; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bennett, David A; Bertram, Lars; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Bouchard, Claude; Campbell, Harry; Cho, Nam H; Cummings, Steven R; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Demuth, Ilja; Eckardt, Rahel; Eriksson, Johan G; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hastie, Nicholas; Heliövaara, Markku; Hofman, Albert; Jordan, Joanne M; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Knekt, Paul B; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lind, Lars; Liu, Yongmei; Orwoll, Eric S; Osmond, Clive; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Towne, Bradford; Tranah, Gregory J; Tremblay, Angelo; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Harst, Pim; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma S; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F; Yengo, Loïc; Bishop, D Timothy; Borecki, Ingrid B; Chambers, John C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Dehghan, Abbas; Deloukas, Panos; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fox, Caroline; Furey, Terrence S; Franke, Lude; Han, Jiali; Hunter, David J; Karjalainen, Juha; Karpe, Fredrik; Kaplan, Robert C; Kooner, Jaspal S; McCarthy, Mark I; Murabito, Joanne M; Morris, Andrew P; Bishop, Julia A N; North, Kari E; Ohlsson, Claes; Ong, Ken K; Prokopenko, Inga; Richards, J Brent; Schadt, Eric E; Spector, Tim D; Widén, Elisabeth; Willer, Cristen J; Yang, Jian; Ingelsson, Erik; Mohlke, Karen L; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Pospisilik, John Andrew; Zillikens, M Carola; Lindgren, Cecilia; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas Oskari; Loos, Ruth J F

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)), of which eight

  13. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Yingchang; Day, Felix R.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Na, Jianbo; Bataille, Veronique; Cousminer, Diana L.; Dastani, Zari; Drong, Alexander W.; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Hedman, Åsa K.; Haring, Robin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Iles, Mark M.; Justice, Anne E.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lagou, Vasiliki; Li, Rui; Li, Xin; Locke, Adam; Lu, Chen; Mägi, Reedik; Perry, John R. B.; Pers, Tune H.; Qi, Qibin; Sanna, Marianna; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Scott, William R.; Shungin, Dmitry; Teumer, Alexander; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Walker, Ryan W.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zhang, Mingfeng; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Zhihong; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bellis, Claire; Bonnefond, Amélie; Borodulin, Katja; Buchman, Aron S.; Cederholm, Tommy; Choh, Audrey C.; Choi, Hyung Jin; Curran, Joanne E.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; de Jager, Philip L.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; Enneman, Anke W.; Eury, Elodie; Evans, Daniel S.; Forsen, Tom; Friedrich, Nele; Fumeron, Frédéric; Garcia, Melissa E.; Gärtner, Simone; Han, Bok-Ghee; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Ittermann, Till; Kent, Jack W.; Kolcic, Ivana; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lahti, Jari; Mateo Leach, Irene; Lee, Christine G.; Lee, Jong-Young; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loh, Marie; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Michaëlsson, Karl; Nalls, Mike A.; Nielson, Carrie M.; Oozageer, Laticia; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Polašek, Ozren; Ripatti, Samuli; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Shin, Chan Soo; Narančić, Nina Smolej; Spira, Dominik; Srikanth, Priya; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Sung, Yun Ju; Swart, Karin M. A.; Taittonen, Leena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tikkanen, Emmi; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Verweij, Niek; Wright, Alan F.; Yu, Lei; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Eklund, Niina; Forrester, Terrence; Grarup, Niels; Jackson, Anne U.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lichtner, Peter; Luan, Jian'an; Mahajan, Anubha; Männistö, Satu; Palmer, Cameron D.; Ried, Janina S.; Scott, Robert A.; Stancáková, Alena; Wagner, Peter J.; Demirkan, Ayse; Döring, Angela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kühnel, Brigitte; Mangino, Massimo; McKnight, Barbara; Menni, Cristina; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Oostra, Ben A.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Song, Kijoung; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; White, Charles C.; Boehnke, Michael; Boettcher, Yvonne; Cooper, Richard S.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Hingorani, Aroon; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; Linneberg, Allan; Luke, Amy; McKenzie, Colin A.; Palotie, Aarno; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Strauch, Konstantin; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bennett, David A.; Bertram, Lars; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Bouchard, Claude; Campbell, Harry; Cho, Nam H.; Cummings, Steven R.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Demuth, Ilja; Eckardt, Rahel; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H.; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hastie, Nicholas; Heliövaara, Markku; Hofman, Albert; Jordan, Joanne M.; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Knekt, Paul B.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lind, Lars; Liu, Yongmei; Orwoll, Eric S.; Osmond, Clive; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rice, Treva K.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Towne, Bradford; Tranah, Gregory J.; Tremblay, Angelo; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Harst, Pim; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma S.; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F.; Yengo, Loïc; Bishop, D. Timothy; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Chambers, John C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Dehghan, Abbas; Deloukas, Panos; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fox, Caroline; Furey, Terrence S.; Franke, Lude; Han, Jiali; Hunter, David J.; Karjalainen, Juha; Karpe, Fredrik; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Bishop, Julia A. N.; North, Kari E.; Ohlsson, Claes; Ong, Ken K.; Prokopenko, Inga; Richards, J. Brent; Schadt, Eric E.; Spector, Tim D.; Widén, Elisabeth; Willer, Cristen J.; Yang, Jian; Ingelsson, Erik; Mohlke, Karen L.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Pospisilik, John Andrew; Zillikens, M. Carola; Lindgren, Cecilia; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas Oskari; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2016-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P <5 × 10(-8)), of which eight

  14. [Migration between rural and urban areas, 1960-1970: what is revealed by linked census data?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasbrenn, K

    1983-06-01

    Internal migration trends in Norway are analyzed for the period 1960 to 1970. Four types of migration are identified: rural-urban, urban-rural, urban-urban, and rural-rural. The data are taken from official sources, and the study is based on linked census data for 1960 and 1970. (summary in ENG)

  15. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8), of which eight

  16. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Lu (Yingchang); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTo increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (Po5108), of which

  17. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Yingchang; Day, Felix R; Gustafsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)), of which eigh...

  18. 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality scores - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality score...s Data detail Data name 5'-end sequences of budding yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality score...or-capping method, the sequence quality score generated by the Phred software, and links to SGD, dbEST and U...es. FASTA format. Quality Phred's quality score About This Database Database Desc...g yeast full-length cDNA clones and quality scores - Budding yeast cDNA sequencing project | LSDB Archive ...

  19. Proteomics reveals dynamic assembly of repair complexes during bypass of DNA cross-links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räschle, Markus; Smeenk, Godelieve; Hansen, Rebecca K

    2015-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) block replication fork progression by inhibiting DNA strand separation. Repair of ICLs requires sequential incisions, translesion DNA synthesis, and homologous recombination, but the full set of factors involved in these transactions remains unknown. We devised...... a technique called chromatin mass spectrometry (CHROMASS) to study protein recruitment dynamics during perturbed DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts. Using CHROMASS, we systematically monitored protein assembly and disassembly on ICL-containing chromatin. Among numerous prospective DNA repair factors, we...

  20. Genes Linked to Production of Secondary Metabolites in Talaromyces atroroseus Revealed Using CRISPR-Cas9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Petersen, Thomas Isbrandt; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig

    2017-01-01

    -based genome editing to identify a new gene in T. atroroseus responsible for production of polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrid products, hence, linking fungal secondary metabolites to their genetic origin in a species where no genetic engineering has previously been performed.......The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future...

  1. Comparative Genome Analyses of Vibrio anguillarum Strains Reveal a Link with Pathogenicity Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; D'Alvise, Paul; Xu, Ruiqi

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is a marine bacterium that can cause vibriosis in many fish and shellfish species, leading to high mortalities and economic losses in aquaculture. Although putative virulence factors have been identified, the mechanism of pathogenesis of V. anguillarum is not fully understood...... a link between genotype and virulence characteristics of Vibrio anguillarum, which can be used to unravel the molecular evolution of V. anguillarum and can also be important from survey and diagnostic perspectives. Importance : Comparative genome analysis of strains of a pathogenic bacterial species can...

  2. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yingchang; Day, Felix R.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Na, Jianbo; Bataille, Veronique; Cousminer, Diana L.; Dastani, Zari; Drong, Alexander W.; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Hedman, Åsa K.

    2016-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)), of which eight were previously associated with increased overall adiposity (BMI, BF%) and four (in or near COBLL1/GRB14, IGF2BP1, PLA2G6, CRTC1) were novel associations with BF%. Seven loci showed a larger effe...

  3. Involvement of EARLY BUD-BREAK, an AP2/ERF Transcription Factor Gene, in Bud Break in Japanese Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) Lateral Flower Buds: Expression, Histone Modifications and Possible Target Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh Tuan, Pham; Bai, Songling; Saito, Takanori; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Akiko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2016-05-01

    In the Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) 'Kosui', three developmental stages of lateral flower buds have been proposed to occur during ecodormancy to the flowering phase, i.e. rapid enlargement, sprouting and flowering. Here, we report an APETALA2/ethylene-responsive factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor gene, named pear EARLY BUD-BREAK (PpEBB), which was highly expressed during the rapid enlargement stage occurring prior to the onset of bud break in flower buds. Gene expression analysis revealed that PpEBB expression was dramatically increased during the rapid enlargement stage in three successive growing seasons. PpEBB transcript levels peaked 1 week prior to onset of bud break in 'Kosui' potted plants treated with hydrogen cyanamide or water under forcing conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR showed that higher levels of active histone modifications (trimethylation of the histone H3 tail at Lys4) in the 5'-upstream and start codon regions of the PpEBB gene were associated with the induced expression level of PpEBB during the rapid enlargement stage. In addition, we provide evidence that PpEBB may interact with and regulate pear four D-type cyclin (PpCYCD3) genes during bud break in 'Kosui' lateral flower buds. PpEBB significantly increased the promoter activities of four PpCYCD3 genes in a dual-luciferase assay using tobacco leaves. Taken together, our findings uncovered aspects of the bud break regulatory mechanism in the Japanese pear and provided further evidence that the EBB family plays an important role in bud break in perennial plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Coevolutionary patterning of teeth and taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, Ryan F; Parnell, Nicholas F; Phillips, Kristine A; Fowler, Teresa E; Yu, Tian Y; Sharpe, Paul T; Streelman, J Todd

    2015-11-03

    Teeth and taste buds are iteratively patterned structures that line the oro-pharynx of vertebrates. Biologists do not fully understand how teeth and taste buds develop from undifferentiated epithelium or how variation in organ density is regulated. These organs are typically studied independently because of their separate anatomical location in mammals: teeth on the jaw margin and taste buds on the tongue. However, in many aquatic animals like bony fishes, teeth and taste buds are colocalized one next to the other. Using genetic mapping in cichlid fishes, we identified shared loci controlling a positive correlation between tooth and taste bud densities. Genome intervals contained candidate genes expressed in tooth and taste bud fields. sfrp5 and bmper, notable for roles in Wingless (Wnt) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, were differentially expressed across cichlid species with divergent tooth and taste bud density, and were expressed in the development of both organs in mice. Synexpression analysis and chemical manipulation of Wnt, BMP, and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways suggest that a common cichlid oral lamina is competent to form teeth or taste buds. Wnt signaling couples tooth and taste bud density and BMP and Hh mediate distinct organ identity. Synthesizing data from fish and mouse, we suggest that the Wnt-BMP-Hh regulatory hierarchy that configures teeth and taste buds on mammalian jaws and tongues may be an evolutionary remnant inherited from ancestors wherein these organs were copatterned from common epithelium.

  5. HtrA3 stromal expression is correlated with tumor budding in stage II colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forse, Catherine L; Rahimi, Mahdi; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Assarzadegan, Naziheh; Dawson, Heather; Grin, Andrea; Kennedy, Erin; O'Connor, Brenda; Messenger, David E; Riddell, Robert H; Kirsch, Richard; Karagiannis, George S

    2017-08-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established adverse prognostic factor in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). It may represent a form of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. High-temperature requirement A3 (HtrA3) is an inhibitor of the bone morphogenetic protein pathway, the suppression of which has been linked to EMT. Since HtrA3 is highly expressed in the desmoplastic stroma at the CRC invasive front, we sought to evaluate the relationship between tumor budding and HtrA3 expression in 172 stage II CRC resection specimens. All tumors were evaluated for tumor budding, with the highest budding slide selected for pan-keratin (CK) and HtrA3 immunohistochemistry. Representative areas of tumor core and invasive front, including budding and non-budding areas, were marked on CK stained slides, and then evaluated on HtrA3 stained slides. HtrA3 expression in tumor cells (tHtrA3) and peritumoral stroma (sHtrA3) was assessed for staining percentage and intensity (the product yielding a final score). Tumors with high-grade tumor budding (HGTB) showed increased expression of sHtrA3 in budding areas compared to non-budding areas at the invasive front (Ptumors compared to minimally budding tumors (Ptumor core (but not invasive front) was significantly associated with decreased 5-year overall survival on univariate analysis (P<0.05), but not multivariate analysis. HtrA3 expression in the peritumoral stroma of patients with stage II CRC is associated with HGTB and may be a novel marker of poor outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Krebs cycle metabolon: structural evidence of substrate channeling revealed by cross-linking and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Minteer, Shelley

    2015-02-02

    It has been hypothesized that the high metabolic flux in the mitochondria is due to the self-assembly of enzyme supercomplexes (called metabolons) that channel substrates from one enzyme to another, but there has been no experimental confirmation of this structure or the channeling. A structural investigation of enzyme organization within the Krebs cycle metabolon was accomplished by in vivo cross-linking and mass spectrometry. Eight Krebs cycle enzyme components were isolated upon chemical fixation, and interfacial residues between mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and aconitase were identified. Using constraint protein docking, a low-resolution structure for the three-enzyme complex was achieved, as well as the two-fold symmetric octamer. Surface analysis showed formation of electrostatic channeling upon protein-protein association, which is the first structural evidence of substrate channeling in the Krebs cycle metabolon. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cryptic diversity of African tigerfish (genus Hydrocynus reveals palaeogeographic signatures of linked neogene geotectonic events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A M Goodier

    Full Text Available The geobiotic history of landscapes can exhibit controls by tectonics over biotic evolution. This causal relationship positions ecologically specialized species as biotic indicators to decipher details of landscape evolution. Phylogeographic statistics that reconstruct spatio-temporal details of evolutionary histories of aquatic species, including fishes, can reveal key events of drainage evolution, notably where geochronological resolution is insufficient. Where geochronological resolution is insufficient, phylogeographic statistics that reconstruct spatio-temporal details of evolutionary histories of aquatic species, notably fishes, can reveal key events of drainage evolution. This study evaluates paleo-environmental causes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA based phylogeographic records of tigerfishes, genus Hydrocynus, in order to reconstruct their evolutionary history in relation to landscape evolution across Africa. Strong geographical structuring in a cytochrome b (cyt-b gene phylogeny confirms the established morphological diversity of Hydrocynus and reveals the existence of five previously unknown lineages, with Hydrocynus tanzaniae sister to a clade comprising three previously unknown lineages (Groups B, C and D and H. vittatus. The dated phylogeny constrains the principal cladogenic events that have structured Hydrocynus diversity from the late Miocene to the Plio-Pleistocene (ca. 0-16 Ma. Phylogeographic tests reveal that the diversity and distribution of Hydrocynus reflects a complex history of vicariance and dispersals, whereby range expansions in particular species testify to changes to drainage basins. Principal divergence events in Hydrocynus have interfaced closely with evolving drainage systems across tropical Africa. Tigerfish evolution is attributed to dominant control by pulses of geotectonism across the African plate. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence estimates among the ten mtDNA lineages illustrates where and when local

  8. The YPLGVG sequence of the Nipah virus matrix protein is required for budding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lianying

    2008-11-01

    . Conclusion These data indicate that the YPLGVG motif within the NiV M protein plays an important role in M budding; however, involvement of any specific components of the cellular MVB sorting pathway in henipavirus budding remains to be demonstrated. Further investigation of henipavirus assembly and budding may yet reveal a novel mechanism(s of viral assembly and release that could be applicable to other enveloped viruses or have therapeutic implications.

  9. Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Novel Mutations in X-linked Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N; Nguyen, Thong T; Manoj, Jesna; Stawiski, Eric W; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Wang, Weiru; Raja, Remya; Ramprasad, Vedam Laxmi; Gupta, Ravi; Murugan, Sakthivel; Kadandale, Jayarama S; Prasad, T S Keshava; Reddy, Kavita; Peterson, Andrew; Pandey, Akhilesh; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Girimaji, Satish Chandra; Gowda, Harsha

    2017-05-01

    Robust diagnostics for many human genetic disorders are much needed in the pursuit of global personalized medicine. Next-generation sequencing now offers new promise for biomarker and diagnostic discovery, in developed as well as resource-limited countries. In this broader global health context, X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is an inherited genetic disorder that is associated with a range of phenotypes impacting societies in both developed and developing countries. Although intellectual disability arises due to diverse causes, a substantial proportion is caused by genomic alterations. Studies have identified causal XLID genomic alterations in more than 100 protein-coding genes located on the X-chromosome. However, the causes for a substantial number of intellectual disability and associated phenotypes still remain unknown. Identification of causative genes and novel mutations will help in early diagnosis as well as genetic counseling of families. Advent of next-generation sequencing methods has accelerated the discovery of new genes involved in mental health disorders. In this study, we analyzed the exomes of three families from India with nonsyndromic XLID comprising seven affected individuals. The affected individuals had varying degrees of intellectual disability, microcephaly, and delayed motor and language milestones. We identified potential causal variants in three XLID genes, including PAK3 (V294M), CASK (complex structural variant), and MECP2 (P354T). Our findings reported in this study extend the spectrum of mutations and phenotypes associated with XLID, and calls for further studies of intellectual disability and mental health disorders with use of next-generation sequencing technologies.

  10. Genome-wide association study of metabolic traits reveals novel gene-metabolite-disease links.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Rueedi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic traits are molecular phenotypes that can drive clinical phenotypes and may predict disease progression. Here, we report results from a metabolome- and genome-wide association study on (1H-NMR urine metabolic profiles. The study was conducted within an untargeted approach, employing a novel method for compound identification. From our discovery cohort of 835 Caucasian individuals who participated in the CoLaus study, we identified 139 suggestively significant (P<5×10(-8 and independent associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP and metabolome features. Fifty-six of these associations replicated in the TasteSensomics cohort, comprising 601 individuals from São Paulo of vastly diverse ethnic background. They correspond to eleven gene-metabolite associations, six of which had been previously identified in the urine metabolome and three in the serum metabolome. Our key novel findings are the associations of two SNPs with NMR spectral signatures pointing to fucose (rs492602, P = 6.9×10(-44 and lysine (rs8101881, P = 1.2×10(-33, respectively. Fine-mapping of the first locus pinpointed the FUT2 gene, which encodes a fucosyltransferase enzyme and has previously been associated with Crohn's disease. This implicates fucose as a potential prognostic disease marker, for which there is already published evidence from a mouse model. The second SNP lies within the SLC7A9 gene, rare mutations of which have been linked to severe kidney damage. The replication of previous associations and our new discoveries demonstrate the potential of untargeted metabolomics GWAS to robustly identify molecular disease markers.

  11. High-resolution mapping reveals links of HP1 with active and inactive chromatin components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzo de Wit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 is commonly seen as a key factor of repressive heterochromatin, even though a few genes are known to require HP1-chromatin for their expression. To obtain insight into the targeting of HP1 and its interplay with other chromatin components, we have mapped HP1-binding sites on Chromosomes 2 and 4 in Drosophila Kc cells using high-density oligonucleotide arrays and the DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID technique. The resulting high-resolution maps show that HP1 forms large domains in pericentric regions, but is targeted to single genes on chromosome arms. Intriguingly, HP1 shows a striking preference for exon-dense genes on chromosome arms. Furthermore, HP1 binds along entire transcription units, except for 5' regions. Comparison with expression data shows that most of these genes are actively transcribed. HP1 target genes are also marked by the histone variant H3.3 and dimethylated histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2, which are both typical of active chromatin. Interestingly, H3.3 deposition, which is usually observed along entire transcription units, is limited to the 5' ends of HP1-bound genes. Thus, H3.3 and HP1 are mutually exclusive marks on active chromatin. Additionally, we observed that HP1-chromatin and Polycomb-chromatin are nonoverlapping, but often closely juxtaposed, suggesting an interplay between both types of chromatin. These results demonstrate that HP1-chromatin is transcriptionally active and has extensive links with several other chromatin components.

  12. HIV Pol inhibits HIV budding and mediates the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gan

    Full Text Available The prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding posits that the viral Gag protein drives budding, and that the Gag p6 peptide plays an essential role by recruiting host-cell budding factors to sites of HIV assembly. HIV also expresses a second Gag protein, p160 Gag-Pol, which lacks p6 and fails to bud from cells, consistent with the prevailing hypothesis of HIV budding. However, we show here that the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is not caused by the absence of p6, but rather, by the presence of Pol. Specifically, we show that (i the budding defect of Gag-Pol is unaffected by loss of HIV protease activity and is therefore an intrinsic property of the Gag-Pol polyprotein, (ii the N-terminal 433 amino acids of Gag and Gag-Pol are sufficient to drive virus budding even though they lack p6, (iii the severe budding defect of Gag-Pol is caused by a dominant, cis-acting inhibitor of budding in the HIV Pol domain, and (iv Gag-Pol inhibits Gag and virus budding in trans, even at normal levels of Gag and Gag-Pol expression. These and other data support an alternative hypothesis of HIV budding as a process that is mediated by the normal, non-viral pathway of exosome/microvesicle biogenesis.

  13. [Impact of TDZ and NAA on adventitious bud induction and cluster bud multiplication in Tulipa edulis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Fang; Xu, Chao; Zhu, Zai-Biao; Yang, He-Tong; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Xu, Hong-jian; Ma, Hong-Jian; Zhao, Gui-Hua

    2014-08-01

    To explore the method of explants directly induced bud and establish the tissue culture system of mutiple shoot by means of direct organogenesis, core bud and daughter bulbs (the top of bud stem expanded to form daughter bulb) of T. edulis were used as explants and treated with thidiazuron (TDZ) and 1-naphthlcetic acid (NAA). The results showed that the optimal medium for bud inducted form core bud and daughter bulb were MS + TDZ 2.0 mg x L(-1) + NAA 4.0 mg x L(-1) and MS +TDZ 2.0 mg x L(-1) + NAA 2.0 mg x L(-1) respectively, both of them had a bud induction rate of 72.92%, 79.22%. The optimal medium for cluster buds multiplication was MS + TDZ 0.2 mg x L(-1) + NAA 0.2 mg x L(-1), and proliferation coefficient was 2.23. After proliferation, cluster buds rooting occurred on MS medium with IBA 1.0 mg x L(-1) and the rooting rate was 52.6%, three to five seedlings in each plant. Using core bud and daughter bulb of T. edulis, the optimum medium for adventitious bud directly inducted from daughter bulb, core bud and cluster bud multiplication were screened out and the tissue culture system of multiple shoot by means of direct organogenesis was established.

  14. Exoproteome analysis reveals higher abundance of proteins linked to alkaline stress in persistent Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychli, Kathrin; Grunert, Tom; Ciolacu, Luminita; Zaiser, Andreas; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin

    2016-02-02

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, responsible for listeriosis a rare but severe infection disease, can survive in the food processing environment for month or even years. So-called persistent L. monocytogenes strains greatly increase the risk of (re)contamination of food products, and are therefore a great challenge for food safety. However, our understanding of the mechanism underlying persistence is still fragmented. In this study we compared the exoproteome of three persistent strains with the reference strain EGDe under mild stress conditions using 2D differential gel electrophoresis. Principal component analysis including all differentially abundant protein spots showed that the exoproteome of strain EGDe (sequence type (ST) 35) is distinct from that of the persistent strain R479a (ST8) and the two closely related ST121 strains 4423 and 6179. Phylogenetic analyses based on multilocus ST genes showed similar grouping of the strains. Comparing the exoproteome of strain EGDe and the three persistent strains resulted in identification of 22 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 16 proteins. Six proteins were significantly increased in the persistent L. monocytogenes exoproteomes, among them proteins involved in alkaline stress response (e.g. the membrane anchored lipoprotein Lmo2637 and the NADPH dehydrogenase NamA). In parallel the persistent strains showed increased survival under alkaline stress, which is often provided during cleaning and disinfection in the food processing environments. In addition, gene expression of the proteins linked to stress response (Lmo2637, NamA, Fhs and QoxA) was higher in the persistent strain not only at 37 °C but also at 10 °C. Invasion efficiency of EGDe was higher in intestinal epithelial Caco2 and macrophage-like THP1 cells compared to the persistent strains. Concurrently we found higher expression of proteins involved in virulence in EGDe e.g. the actin-assembly-inducing protein ActA and the

  15. Network analysis reveals ecological links between N-fixing bacteria and wood-decaying fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Hoppe

    Full Text Available Nitrogen availability in dead wood is highly restricted and associations with N-fixing bacteria are thought to enable wood-decaying fungi to meet their nitrogen requirements for vegetative and generative growth. We assessed the diversity of nifH (dinitrogenase reductase genes in dead wood of the common temperate tree species Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies from differently managed forest plots in Germany using molecular tools. By incorporating these genes into a large compilation of published nifH sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analyses of deduced proteins we verified the presence of diverse pools corresponding to functional nifH, almost all of which are new to science. The distribution of nifH genes strongly correlated with tree species and decay class, but not with forest management, while higher fungal fructification was correlated with decreasing nitrogen content of the dead wood and positively correlated with nifH diversity, especially during the intermediate stage of wood decay. Network analyses based on non-random species co-occurrence patterns revealed interactions among fungi and N-fixing bacteria in the dead wood and strongly indicate the occurrence of at least commensal relationships between these taxa.

  16. Network Analysis Reveals Ecological Links between N-Fixing Bacteria and Wood-Decaying Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Björn; Kahl, Tiemo; Karasch, Peter; Wubet, Tesfaye; Bauhus, Jürgen; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen availability in dead wood is highly restricted and associations with N-fixing bacteria are thought to enable wood-decaying fungi to meet their nitrogen requirements for vegetative and generative growth. We assessed the diversity of nifH (dinitrogenase reductase) genes in dead wood of the common temperate tree species Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies from differently managed forest plots in Germany using molecular tools. By incorporating these genes into a large compilation of published nifH sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analyses of deduced proteins we verified the presence of diverse pools corresponding to functional nifH, almost all of which are new to science. The distribution of nifH genes strongly correlated with tree species and decay class, but not with forest management, while higher fungal fructification was correlated with decreasing nitrogen content of the dead wood and positively correlated with nifH diversity, especially during the intermediate stage of wood decay. Network analyses based on non-random species co-occurrence patterns revealed interactions among fungi and N-fixing bacteria in the dead wood and strongly indicate the occurrence of at least commensal relationships between these taxa. PMID:24505405

  17. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Meng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient–host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control and hippocampus (cognitive processing from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  18. A Metagenomic Investigation of the Duodenal Microbiota Reveals Links with Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Angelakis

    Full Text Available Few studies have tested the small intestine microbiota in humans, where most nutrient digestion and absorption occur. Here, our objective was to examine the duodenal microbiota between obese and normal volunteers using metagenomic techniques.We tested duodenal samples from five obese and five normal volunteers using 16S rDNA V6 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq deep sequencing. The predominant phyla of the duodenal microbiota were Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, whereas Bacteroidetes were absent. Obese individuals had a significant increase in anaerobic genera (p < 0.001 and a higher abundance of genes encoding Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (p = 0.0018 compared to the control group. Obese individuals also had a reduced abundance of genes encoding sucrose phosphorylase (p = 0.015 and 1,4-alpha-glucan branching enzyme (p = 0.05. Normal weight people had significantly increased FabK (p = 0.027, and the glycerophospholipid metabolism pathway revealed the presence of phospholipase A1 only in the control group (p = 0.05.The duodenal microbiota of obese individuals exhibit alterations in the fatty acid and sucrose breakdown pathways, probably induced by diet imbalance.

  19. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingying; Ying, Zhe; Noble, Emily; Zhao, Yuqi; Agrawal, Rahul; Mikhail, Andrew; Zhuang, Yumei; Tyagi, Ethika; Zhang, Qing; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Morselli, Marco; Orozco, Luz; Guo, Weilong; Kilts, Tina M; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Young, Marian F; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Yang, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient-host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control) and hippocampus (cognitive processing) from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary School Age Students' Spontaneous Comments about Math Reveal Emerging Dispositions Linked to Later Mathematics Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle M. M. Mazzocco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To longitudinally explore children's developing beliefs towards mathematics, we asked 207 children to define “math” and “reading” at grades 2 and 3 and coded for spontaneous references to likability or difficulty of math (or reading in their definitions. We found that children attributed more difficulty to math than to reading despite their relatively neutral comments on the likability of either subject. Children described math and reading with comparable degrees of specificity, but girls' definitions were more specific than boys'. Relative to their peers, children with mathematics learning disability (MLD provided less specific definitions overall, were more likely to describe math as more difficult than reading, and were more likely to show a decrease in likability ratings of math (but not reading from grades 2 to 3. Grade 2 ratings predicted math ability at grade 3, more so than predictors from grade 3. These findings, although based on informal analyses not intended to substitute for validated assessments of disposition, support the notions that distinct aspects of dispositions towards math emerge in early childhood, are revealed through casual discourse, and are predictive of later math achievement outcomes. This further supports current interests in developing formal measures of academic disposition in early childhood.

  1. Repellence of the red bud borer (Resseliella oculiperda) to grafted apple trees by impregnation of budding tape with essential oils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, van R.W.H.M.; Linden, van der A.; Swarts, H.J.; Visser, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The red bud borer Resseliella oculiperda (Rübs.) is a pest insect of apple trees when rootstocks are grafted with scion buds by shield budding. The female midges are attracted to the wounds of the grafted buds where they lay their eggs. The larvae feed on the cambium and destroy the buds completely

  2. Tumor budding at the invasive front of colorectal cancer may not be associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Noriyuki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Eizuka, Makoto; Tsuchida, Koudai; Sugimoto, Ryo; Mue, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Masamichi; Osakabe, Mitsumasa; Uesugi, Noriyuki; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Otsuka, Kouki; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    Tumor budding is thought to reflect the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the molecular mechanism linking tumor buds and the EMT remains unclear. Here, we examined the induction of tumor budding and EMT and their association with EMT-related proteins (ZEB1, TWIST, SNAIL, and SLUG) in colorectal cancer (CRC). Immunohistochemical expression of pan-cytokeratin was examined for identification of tumor budding in 101 CRCs. Grading of tumor budding was classified into low- and high-grade groups. Tissue microarray was conducted to identify tumor budding sites. The expression of E-cadherin, ZEB1, TWIST, SNAIL, and SLUG was examined in areas of tumor budding and the surrounding tumor stroma using a double-immunostaining method. Specifically, pan-cytokeratin and EMT-related proteins were assessed by double immunostaining. Low or no expression of E-cadherin was found in areas of tumor budding. Moreover, ZEB1, TWIST, SNAIL, and SLUG were not expressed in regions of tumor budding. However, the expression level of ZEB1 in the stromal cells surrounding tumor budding was significantly more frequent than that of TWIST, SNAI, and SLUG. In addition, the expression of EMT-related proteins in surrounding stromal cells was significantly greater in areas of high-grade tumor budding than in low-grade areas. Our present results suggest that EMT-related proteins play a minor role in forming tumor buds. In addition, our findings suggest the existence of subtypes of stromal cells in CRC with phenotypical and functional heterogeneity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Distributed Modeling Reveals the Ecohydrological Dynamics Linked with Woody Plant Encroachment in the Sonoran Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierini, N. A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Anderson, C.; Saripalli, S.; Robles-Morua, A.

    2012-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment is an important issue facing semiarid ecosystems in the southwestern United States that is associated with grazing pressures, fire suppression, and the invasion of shrub species into historical grasslands. In this study, we present observational and distributed modeling activities conducted in two small rangeland watersheds of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, Arizona. This Sonoran Desert landscape is representative of the vegetation shift from grasslands to a woody savanna due to the encroachment of velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina). The paired basins are similar in size and in close proximity, leading to equivalent meteorological and soil conditions. Nevertheless, they vary substantially in mesquite cover, with one basin having undergone a removal treatment several decades ago, while the other watershed represents the regional encroachment process. This distinction presents an excellent case study for analyzing the effects of mesquite encroachment on dryland ecohydrological dynamics. Observational datasets are obtained from a high-resolution environmental sensor network consisting of six rain gauges, twenty-one soil moisture and temperature profiles, five channel runoff flumes and an eddy covariance tower with a complete set of radiation, energy, carbon and water fluxes. In addition, high-resolution digital terrain models and image orthomosaics were obtained from a piloted aircraft with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) with a digital camera. These two remote sensing platforms allowed characterizing the topography, stream network and plant species distributions at a high resolution (designed to reveal the influence of the mesquite encroachment patterns on the watershed dynamics. Through the spatiotemporal analysis of model outputs, we identify how and when mesquite trees affect the spatial patterns of energy and water fluxes and their linkage to runoff production. As a result, the

  4. Proteomic Profiling Analysis Reveals a Link between Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis and Complement Activation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, D D; Hu, B; Tang, H Y; Sun, Y Y; Liu, B; Tian, Q M; Bi, H S

    2017-05-01

    Uveitis is an autoimmune disease that usually damages the vision function, leading to poor visual quality in patients. As an autoimmune ocular inflammatory disease, the pathogenesis of uveitis is associated with abnormal expression of some proteins and aberrant regulation of multiple signalling pathways. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we induced an experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) model in rats. We determined the levels of C3a and membrane attack complex C5b-9 (soluble C5b-9, sC5b-9) in both plasma and aqueous humour, identified the differentially expressed proteins in plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and employed bioinformatics algorithms to analyse differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasma. The results demonstrate that there were 168 differentially expressed plasma proteins in EAU rats versus control subjects. The levels of sC5b-9 and C3a were elevated in the plasmas and aqueous humours of EAU rats. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed that the differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasma were mainly involved in metabolic and immune processes. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation, database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery (DAVID) and protein-protein interaction analyses revealed that the differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasmas were closely associated with complement and coagulation cascades, metabolic pathways, NF-kappa B, PI3K-Akt, Toll-like receptors and autophagy. Overall, the differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasmas are mainly involved in the complement and coagulation cascades. The pathogenesis of uveitis closely correlates with complement activation. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  5. Crystal structures of Lys-63-linked tri- and di-ubiquitin reveal a highly extended chain architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Stephen D; Grasty, Kimberly C; Hernandez-Cuebas, Lisa; Loll, Patrick J

    2009-12-01

    The covalent attachment of different types of poly-ubiquitin chains signal different outcomes for the proteins so targeted. For example, a protein modified with Lys-48-linked poly-ubiquitin chains is targeted for proteasomal degradation, whereas Lys-63-linked chains encode nondegradative signals. The structural features that enable these different types of chains to encode different signals have not yet been fully elucidated. We report here the X-ray crystal structures of Lys-63-linked tri- and di-ubiquitin at resolutions of 2.3 and 1.9 A, respectively. The tri- and di-ubiquitin species adopt essentially identical structures. In both instances, the ubiquitin chain assumes a highly extended conformation with a left-handed helical twist; the helical chain contains four ubiquitin monomers per turn and has a repeat length of approximately 110 A. Interestingly, Lys-48 ubiquitin chains also adopt a left-handed helical structure with a similar repeat length. However, the Lys-63 architecture is much more open than that of Lys-48 chains and exposes much more of the ubiquitin surface for potential recognition events. These new crystal structures are consistent with the results of solution studies of Lys-63 chain conformation, and reveal the structural basis for differential recognition of Lys-63 versus Lys-48 chains. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Identification of differentially expressed sequences in bud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method conducted to generate large-scale expressed sequence tags (EST) was designed to identify gene candidates related to the morphological and physiological differences between the stage before bud differentiation and the stage of bud differentiation of lily. The results ...

  7. Acetylated H4 histone and genomic DNA methylation patterns during bud set and bud burst in Castanea sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Ma Estrella; Hasbún, Rodrigo; Valera, Ma José; Meijón, Mónica; Valledor, Luis; Rodríguez, Jose L; Toorop, Peter E; Cañal, Ma Jesús; Rodríguez, Roberto

    2009-09-01

    The relationships between genomic DNA cytosine methylation, histone H4 acetylation and bud dormancy in Castanea sativa are described. Acetylated H4 histone and genomic DNA methylation patterns showed opposite abundance patterns during bud set and bud burst. Increased and decreased methylation levels in the apical buds coincided with bud set and bud burst, respectively. Intermediate axillary buds were characterized by constant levels of DNA methylation during burst of apical buds and reduced fluctuation in DNA methylation throughout the year, which coincided with the absence of macro-morphological changes. Furthermore, acetylated histone H4 (AcH4) levels from apical buds were higher during bud burst than during bud set, as was demonstrated by immunodetection. Results were validated with three additional C. sativa provenances. Thus, global DNA methylation and AcH4 levels showed opposite patterns and coincided with changes in bud dormancy in C. sativa.

  8. Distinct roles of Hand2 in initiating polarity and posterior Shh expression during the onset of mouse limb bud development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Galli

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The polarization of nascent embryonic fields and the endowment of cells with organizer properties are key to initiation of vertebrate organogenesis. One such event is antero-posterior (AP polarization of early limb buds and activation of morphogenetic Sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling in the posterior mesenchyme, which in turn promotes outgrowth and specifies the pentadactylous autopod. Inactivation of the Hand2 transcriptional regulator from the onset of mouse forelimb bud development disrupts establishment of posterior identity and Shh expression, which results in a skeletal phenotype identical to Shh deficient limb buds. In wild-type limb buds, Hand2 is part of the protein complexes containing Hoxd13, another essential regulator of Shh activation in limb buds. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that Hand2-containing chromatin complexes are bound to the far upstream cis-regulatory region (ZRS, which is specifically required for Shh expression in the limb bud. Cell-biochemical studies indicate that Hand2 and Hoxd13 can efficiently transactivate gene expression via the ZRS, while the Gli3 repressor isoform interferes with this positive transcriptional regulation. Indeed, analysis of mouse forelimb buds lacking both Hand2 and Gli3 reveals the complete absence of antero-posterior (AP polarity along the entire proximo-distal axis and extreme digit polydactyly without AP identities. Our study uncovers essential components of the transcriptional machinery and key interactions that set-up limb bud asymmetry upstream of establishing the SHH signaling limb bud organizer.

  9. Cytokinins Are Initial Targets of Light in the Control of Bud Outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Hanaé; Girault, Tiffanie; Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Brouard, Nathalie; Pěnčík, Aleš; Novák, Ondřej; Vian, Alain; Sakr, Soulaiman; Lothier, Jérémy; Le Gourrierec, José; Leduc, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Bud outgrowth is controlled by environmental and endogenous factors. Through the use of the photosynthesis inhibitor norflurazon and of masking experiments, evidence is given here that light acts mainly as a morphogenic signal in the triggering of bud outgrowth and that initial steps in the light signaling pathway involve cytokinins (CKs). Indeed, in rose (Rosa hybrida), inhibition of bud outgrowth by darkness is suppressed solely by the application of CKs. In contrast, application of sugars has a limited effect. Exposure of plants to white light (WL) induces a rapid (after 3-6 h of WL exposure) up-regulation of CK synthesis (RhIPT3 and RhIPT5), of CK activation (RhLOG8), and of CK putative transporter RhPUP5 genes and to the repression of the CK degradation RhCKX1 gene in the node. This leads to the accumulation of CKs in the node within 6 h and in the bud at 24 h and to the triggering of bud outgrowth. Molecular analysis of genes involved in major mechanisms of bud outgrowth (strigolactone signaling [RwMAX2], metabolism and transport of auxin [RhPIN1, RhYUC1, and RhTAR1], regulation of sugar sink strength [RhVI, RhSUSY, RhSUC2, and RhSWEET10], and cell division and expansion [RhEXP and RhPCNA]) reveal that, when supplied in darkness, CKs up-regulate their expression as rapidly and as intensely as WL Additionally, up-regulation of CKs by WL promotes xylem flux toward the bud, as evidenced by Methylene Blue accumulation in the bud after CK treatment in the dark. Altogether, these results suggest that CKs are initial components of the light signaling pathway that controls the initiation of bud outgrowth. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Limb patterning genes and heterochronic development of the emu wing bud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Smith

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The forelimb of the flightless emu is a vestigial structure, with greatly reduced wing elements and digit loss. To explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the evolution of vestigial wings and loss of flight in the emu, key limb patterning genes were examined in developing embryos. Methods Limb development was compared in emu versus chicken embryos. Immunostaining for cell proliferation markers was used to analyze growth of the emu forelimb and hindlimb buds. Expression patterns of limb patterning genes were studied, using whole-mount in situ hybridization (for mRNA localization and RNA-seq (for mRNA expression levels. Results The forelimb of the emu embryo showed heterochronic development compared to that in the chicken, with the forelimb bud being retarded in its development. Early outgrowth of the emu forelimb bud is characterized by a lower level of cell proliferation compared the hindlimb bud, as assessed by PH3 immunostaining. In contrast, there were no obvious differences in apoptosis in forelimb versus hindlimb buds (cleaved caspase 3 staining. Most key patterning genes were expressed in emu forelimb buds similarly to that observed in the chicken, but with smaller expression domains. However, expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh mRNA, which is central to anterior–posterior axis development, was delayed in the emu forelimb bud relative to other patterning genes. Regulators of Shh expression, Gli3 and HoxD13, also showed altered expression levels in the emu forelimb bud. Conclusions These data reveal heterochronic but otherwise normal expression of most patterning genes in the emu vestigial forelimb. Delayed Shh expression may be related to the small and vestigial structure of the emu forelimb bud. However, the genetic mechanism driving retarded emu wing development is likely to rest within the forelimb field of the lateral plate mesoderm, predating the expression of patterning genes.

  11. Vacuum structure revealed by over-improved stout-link smearing compared with the overlap analysis for quenched QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Leinweber, D.; Moran, P. [Adelaide Univ., SA (AU). Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM); Koller, K. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Sektion Physik; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Weinberg, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-01-11

    A detailed comparison is made between the topological structure of quenched QCD as revealed by the recently proposed over-improved stout-link smearing in conjunction with an improved gluonic definition of the topological density on one hand and a similar analysis made possible by the overlap-fermionic topological charge density both with and without variable ultraviolet cutoff {lambda}{sub cut}. The matching is twofold, provided by fitting the density-density two-point functions on one hand and by a point-by-point fitting of the topological densities according to the two methods. We point out the similar cluster structure of the topological density for moderate smearing and 200 MeV<{lambda}{sub cut}<600 MeV, respectively. We demonstrate the relation of the gluonic topological density for extensive smearing to the location of the overlap zero modes and the lowest overlap non-zero mode as found for the unsmeared configurations. (orig.)

  12. Model thrombi formed under flow reveal the role of factor XIII-mediated cross-linking in resistance to fibrinolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, N J; Koikkalainen, J S; Fraser, S R; Duthie, K M; Griffin, M; Mitchell, J; Watson, H G; Booth, N A

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Activated factor XIII (FXIIIa), a transglutaminase, introduces fibrin–fibrin and fibrin–inhibitor cross-links, resulting in more mechanically stable clots. The impact of cross-linking on resistance to fibrinolysis has proved challenging to evaluate quantitatively. Methods:We used a whole blood model thrombus system to characterize the role of cross-linking in resistance to fibrinolytic degradation. Model thrombi, which mimic arterial thrombi formed in vivo, were prepared with incorporated fluorescently labeled fibrinogen, in order to allow quantification of fibrinolysis as released fluorescence units per minute. Results:A site-specific inhibitor of transglutaminases, added to blood from normal donors, yielded model thrombi that lysed more easily, either spontaneously or by plasminogen activators. This was observed both in the cell/platelet-rich head and fibrin-rich tail. Model thrombi from an FXIII-deficient patient lysed more quickly than normal thrombi; replacement therapy with FXIII concentrate normalized lysis. In vitro addition of purified FXIII to the patient's preprophylaxis blood, but not to normal control blood, resulted in more stable thrombi, indicating no further efficacy of supraphysiologic FXIII. However, addition of tissue transglutaminase, which is synthesized by endothelial cells, generated thrombi that were more resistant to fibrinolysis; this may stabilize mural thrombi in vivo. Conclusions:Model thrombi formed under flow, even those prepared as plasma ‘thrombi’, reveal the effect of FXIII on fibrinolysis. Although very low levels of FXIII are known to produce mechanical clot stability, and to achieve γ-dimerization, they appear to be suboptimal in conferring full resistance to fibrinolysis. PMID:20586921

  13. In vitro PROLIFERATION ABILITY OF AXILLARY BUDS IN Musa spp

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    plantain until recently where it was shown with the variety Big Ebanga that axillary buds could equally serve ... As axillary buds have shown mass propagation abilities in Big Ebanga, this explant is tested ... types of buds after four to five sub cultures in all the varieties except for CRBP 39 where the axillary bud exhibits.

  14. The Inside-Out Mechanism of Dicers from Budding Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Weinberg; K Nakanishi; D Patel; D Bartel

    2011-12-31

    The Dicer ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes process long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct RNA interference. Here, we describe the structure and activity of a catalytically active fragment of Kluyveromyces polysporus Dcr1, which represents the noncanonical Dicers found in budding yeasts. The crystal structure revealed a homodimer resembling that of bacterial RNase III but extended by a unique N-terminal domain, and it identified additional catalytic residues conserved throughout eukaryotic RNase III enzymes. Biochemical analyses showed that Dcr1 dimers bind cooperatively along the dsRNA substrate such that the distance between consecutive active sites determines the length of the siRNA products. Thus, unlike canonical Dicers, which successively remove siRNA duplexes from the dsRNA termini, budding-yeast Dicers initiate processing in the interior and work outward. The distinct mechanism of budding-yeast Dicers establishes a paradigm for natural molecular rulers and imparts substrate preferences with ramifications for biological function.

  15. The Inside-Out Mechanism of Dicers from Budding Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, David E.; Nakanishi, Kotaro; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Bartel, David P. (Whitehead); (MSKCC)

    2011-09-20

    The Dicer ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzymes process long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct RNA interference. Here, we describe the structure and activity of a catalytically active fragment of Kluyveromyces polysporus Dcr1, which represents the noncanonical Dicers found in budding yeasts. The crystal structure revealed a homodimer resembling that of bacterial RNase III but extended by a unique N-terminal domain, and it identified additional catalytic residues conserved throughout eukaryotic RNase III enzymes. Biochemical analyses showed that Dcr1 dimers bind cooperatively along the dsRNA substrate such that the distance between consecutive active sites determines the length of the siRNA products. Thus, unlike canonical Dicers, which successively remove siRNA duplexes from the dsRNA termini, budding-yeast Dicers initiate processing in the interior and work outward. The distinct mechanism of budding-yeast Dicers establishes a paradigm for natural molecular rulers and imparts substrate preferences with ramifications for biological function.

  16. Electron and excitation energy transfers in covalently linked donor-acceptor dyads: mechanisms and dynamics revealed using quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Giannini, Samuele; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2017-12-20

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET), hole transfer (HT), charge recombination (CR) and energy transfer (EET) are fundamental mechanisms, which occur in both natural and artificial light harvesting systems. Here, we present a computational strategy which determines ET, HT, CR and EET rates in a consistent way and merges them in a kinetic model to reproduce the net excited state dynamics. The effects of the solvent are included in all steps of the calculations making the present strategy a useful tool for a rational design of charge and energy transfer processes in complex systems. An application to covalently linked zinc and free-base porphyrin-naphthalenediimide dyads is presented. For each of the two systems, ultrafast optical spectroscopy experiments have shown a specific photophysics with different processes taking place simultaneously. The model reveals that such a diversity is mainly due to the different relative stability of the charge-separated state, while the electronic couplings for charge and energy transfer processes are quite similar in the two dyads.

  17. Combined transcriptome and metabolome analyses of metformin effects reveal novel links between metabolic networks in steroidogenic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udhane, Sameer S; Legeza, Balazs; Marti, Nesa; Hertig, Damian; Diserens, Gaëlle; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Vermathen, Peter; Flück, Christa E

    2017-08-17

    Metformin is an antidiabetic drug, which inhibits mitochondrial respiratory-chain-complex I and thereby seems to affect the cellular metabolism in many ways. It is also used for the treatment of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder in women. In addition, metformin possesses antineoplastic properties. Although metformin promotes insulin-sensitivity and ameliorates reproductive abnormalities in PCOS, its exact mechanisms of action remain elusive. Therefore, we studied the transcriptome and the metabolome of metformin in human adrenal H295R cells. Microarray analysis revealed changes in 693 genes after metformin treatment. Using high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS-NMR), we determined 38 intracellular metabolites. With bioinformatic tools we created an integrated pathway analysis to understand different intracellular processes targeted by metformin. Combined metabolomics and transcriptomics data analysis showed that metformin affects a broad range of cellular processes centered on the mitochondrium. Data confirmed several known effects of metformin on glucose and androgen metabolism, which had been identified in clinical and basic studies previously. But more importantly, novel links between the energy metabolism, sex steroid biosynthesis, the cell cycle and the immune system were identified. These omics studies shed light on a complex interplay between metabolic pathways in steroidogenic systems.

  18. Chemometric analysis reveals links in the formation of fragrant bio-molecules during agarwood (Aquilaria malaccensis) and fungal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Supriyo; Dehingia, Madhusmita; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Khan, Mojibur

    2017-03-14

    Fragrant agarwood, arguably the costliest wood in the world, is formed by plant-fungal interactions in Aquilaria spp. However, very little is known about this fragrant outcome of interaction. Therefore, mimicking the ancient traditions of agarwood production in Assam (Northeast India), a chemometric assessment of the agarwood-fungus interaction was made by chemical profiling (GC-MS) coupled with statistical analysis (principal component, correlation network analysis) across three platforms, viz. callus, juvenile plants and resinous wood-chips with an associated Fusarium. In the study of callus-fungus interaction, increased accumulation of key aroma compounds such as pentatriacontane {fold change (log2FC) = 3.47)}, 17-pentatriacontene (log2FC = 2.95), tetradecane, 2-methyl- (log2FC = 1.10) over callus and activation of pathways related to defense and secondary metabolism indicated links to aroma production. Study on fungal interactions in juvenile plants and resinous wood-chips indicated formation of terpenoid precursors (e.g. farnesol, geranylgeraniol acetate) and agarwood sesquiterpenes (e.g. agarospirol, γ-eudesmol). Correlation network analysis revealed the possible regulation of sesquiterpene biosynthesis involving squalene. Also a direct role of fungus in aroma (e.g. dodecane, 4-methyl-, tetracosane) was highlighted. Appearance of fragrant molecules unknown to agarwood during interaction featured as a new possibility for future research.

  19. Shrinkage of ipsilateral taste buds and hyperplasia of contralateral taste buds following chorda tympani nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-ke Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological changes that occur in the taste buds after denervation are not well understood in rats, especially in the contralateral tongue epithelium. In this study, we investigated the time course of morphological changes in the taste buds following unilateral nerve transection. The role of the trigeminal component of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the taste buds was also examined. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection and unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection. Rats were allowed up to 42 days of recovery before being euthanized. The taste buds were visualized using a cytokeratin 8 antibody. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers were quantified and compared among groups. No significant difference was detected between the chorda tympani nerve transection and chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection groups. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers on the ipsilateral side all decreased significantly compared with control. On the contralateral side, the number of taste buds remained unchanged over time, but they were larger, and taste receptor cells were more numerous postoperatively. There was no evidence for a role of the trigeminal branch of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the anterior taste buds.

  20. Complex bud architecture and cell-specific chemical patterns enable supercooling of Picea abies bud primordial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bud primordia of Picea abies, despite a frozen shoot, stay ice free down to -50 °C by a mechanism termed supercooling whose biophysical and biochemical requirements are poorly understood. Bud architecture was assessed by 3D-reconstruction, supercooling and freezing patterns by infrared video thermog...

  1. Differentiated dynamics of bud dormancy and growth in temperate fruit trees relating to bud phenology adaptation, the case of apple and almond trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yaacoubi, Adnane; Malagi, Gustavo; Oukabli, Ahmed; Citadin, Idemir; Hafidi, Majida; Bonhomme, Marc; Legave, Jean-Michel

    2016-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the characterization of bud dormancy and growth dynamics for temperate fruit species in temperate and mild cropping areas, although this is an appropriate framework to anticipate phenology adaptation facing future warming contexts which would potentially combine chill declines and heat increases. To examine this issue, two experimental approaches and field observations were used for high- and low-chill apple cultivars in temperate climate of southern France and in mild climates of northern Morocco and southern Brazil. Low-chill almond cultivars offered an additional relevant plant material for comparison with apple in northern Morocco. Divergent patterns of dormancy and growth dynamics were clearly found in apple tree between southern France and southern Brazil. Divergences were less pronounced between France and Morocco. A global view outlined main differences in the dormancy chronology and intensity, the transition between endordormancy and ecodormancy and the duration of ecodormancy. A key role of bud rehydration in the transition period was shown. High-chill cultivars would be submitted in mild conditions to heterogeneous rehydration capacities linked to insufficient chill fulfillment and excessive forcing linked to high temperatures. This would favor bud competitions and consequently excessive flowering durations and weak flowering. Low chilling requirements in apple and almond would conversely confer biological capacities to tolerate superficial dormancy and abrupt transition from endordormancy to ecodormancy without important heterogeneous rehydration states within buds. It may also assume that low-chill cultivars can also tolerate high temperatures during ecodormancy as well as extended flowering durations.

  2. Taste buds as peripheral chemosensory processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Taste buds are peripheral chemosensory organs situated in the oral cavity. Each taste bud consists of a community of 50-100 cells that interact synaptically during gustatory stimulation. At least three distinct cell types are found in mammalian taste buds - Type I cells, Receptor (Type II) cells, and Presynaptic (Type III) cells. Type I cells appear to be glial-like cells. Receptor cells express G protein-coupled taste receptors for sweet, bitter, or umami compounds. Presynaptic cells transduce acid stimuli (sour taste). Cells that sense salt (NaCl) taste have not yet been confidently identified in terms of these cell types. During gustatory stimulation, taste bud cells secrete synaptic, autocrine, and paracrine transmitters. These transmitters include ATP, acetylcholine (ACh), serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), and GABA. Glutamate is an efferent transmitter that stimulates Presynaptic cells to release 5-HT. This chapter discusses these transmitters, which cells release them, the postsynaptic targets for the transmitters, and how cell-cell communication shapes taste bud signaling via these transmitters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrating nap and night-time sleep into sleep patterns reveals differential links to health-relevant outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Jaime K; Wolf, Jutta M

    2016-04-01

    Both night-time sleep and nap behaviour have been linked consistently to health outcomes. Although reasons for napping are usually tied to night-time sleep, the majority of studies assess their effects independently. The current study thus aimed to examine the health relevance of patterns of sleep behaviour that take into account both night-time and daytime sleep habits. Night-time sleep, recorded during 7 days via actigraphy from 313 participants (aged 34-82 years) of the Midlife in the United States II Biomarker study, was assessed. Blood and urine specimens were assayed for noradrenaline, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein. Participants self-reported nap behaviour, depressive symptoms, perceived chronic stress and the presence of medical symptoms and conditions. Overall, nappers (n = 208) showed elevated waist-hip ratios, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels compared to non-nappers and reported more physiological symptoms and conditions (all P ≤ 0.019). Within nappers, cluster analysis revealed three patterns of sleep behaviour-infrequent nappers with good night-time sleep, frequent nappers with good night-time sleep and nappers with poor night-time sleep. Nappers with poor night-time sleep thereby exhibited elevated noradrenaline levels, depressive symptoms and perceived stress scores compared to other groups (all P ≤ 0.041). These findings support the idea that nap-health relationships are complex, in that frequency of napping and accumulation of nap sleep is not related linearly to health consequences. Assessing nap behaviour in conjunction with night-time sleep behaviour appeared crucial to elucidate further the health relevance of napping, particularly in terms of psychological health outcomes, including chronic stress and depressive symptoms. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Characterization of the immunophenotype of the tumor budding and its prognostic implications in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Genichiro; Nagai, Kanji; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Takahashi, Yusuke; Matsumura, Yuki; Kojima, Motohiro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Goto, Koichi; Niho, Seiji; Takashima, Hiroshi; Inoue, Hiromasa; Ohe, Yuichiro; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2012-06-01

    Tumor budding is morphologically defined as infiltration by small clusters of cancer cells. While the biological properties of budding cells in adenocarcinoma (decreased expression of adhesion molecules and of differentiation markers) have been elucidated, those of the cells in squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) of the lung still remain to be clarified. We examined the clinicopathological data of 217 patients with SqCC of the lung. Furthermore we evaluated the immunohistochemical properties of the budding cells. Tumor budding was observed in 83 (38.2%) patients. A statistically significant difference was observed in overall 5-year survival rates between the cases showing tumor budding and the cases not showing budding (45.6% vs. 64.0%, pbudding cells (BCs) exhibited reduced expression levels of the cellular adhesion molecules (E-cadherin; p=0.004, β-catenin; p=0.002) and increased expression levels of laminin-5γ2 (p=0.001). On the other hand, no significant differences in the staining scores for differentiation markers (p63 and podoplanin) were found between BCs and cancer cells forming nests. Multivariate analysis revealed that tumor budding was a significant independent prognostic factor in patients with SqCC of the lung (p=0.022). Tumor budding is an independent adverse prognostic factor in patients with SqCC of the lung. Although budding cells in SqCC exhibited reduced expression levels of the cellular adhesion molecules, the expression levels of specific differentiation markers were retained, suggesting that the budding mechanism in SqCC may differ, at least in part, from that in adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular contacts for chlorosome envelope proteins revealed by cross-linking studies with chlorosomes from Chlorobium tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hui; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A

    2006-01-01

    type and mutants lacking a single chlorosome protein were cross-linked with the zero-length cross-linker 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide (EDC) and analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Similar cross-linking products were observed when the time and temperature were varied or when EDC...... was replaced with glutaraldehyde. Specific interactions between chlorosome proteins in cross-linked products were identified by immunoblotting with polyclonal antibodies raised against recombinant chlorosome proteins. We confirmed these interactions by demonstrating that these products were missing...... in appropriate mutants. Confirming the location of CsmA in the paracrystalline baseplate, cross-linking showed that CsmA forms dimers, trimers, and homomultimers as large as dodecamers and that CsmA directly interacts with the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein. Cross-linking further suggests that the precursor form...

  6. ALIX is a Lys63-specific polyubiquitin binding protein that functions in retrovirus budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlatshahi, Dara P; Sandrin, Virginie; Vivona, Sandro; Shaler, Thomas A; Kaiser, Stephen E; Melandri, Francesco; Sundquist, Wesley I; Kopito, Ron R

    2012-12-11

    The diversity of ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent signaling is attributed to the ability of this small protein to form different types of covalently linked polyUb chains and to the existence of Ub binding proteins that interpret this molecular syntax. We used affinity capture/mass spectrometry to identify ALIX, a component of the ESCRT pathway, as a Ub binding protein. We report that the V domain of ALIX binds directly and selectively to K63-linked polyUb chains, exhibiting a strong preference for chains composed of more than three Ub. Sequence analysis identified two potential Ub binding sites on a single α-helical surface within the coiled-coil region of the V domain. Mutation of these putative Ub binding sites inhibited polyUb binding to the isolated V domain in vitro and impaired budding of lentiviruses. These data reveal an important role for K63 polyUb binding by ALIX in retroviral release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The bud break process and its variation among local populations of boreal black spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sergio; Bousquet, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Phenology of local populations can exhibit adaptations to the current environmental conditions resulting from a close interaction between climate and genotype. The bud break process and its variations among populations were analyzed in greenhouse by monitoring the growth resumption in black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP] seedlings originating from seeds of five stands across the closed boreal forest in Quebec, Canada. Bud break lasted 15 days and occurred earlier and quicker in northern provenances. Provenance explained between 10.2 and 32.3% of the variance in bud break, while the families accounted for a smaller but still significant part of the variance. The late occurrence of one phenological phase corresponded to a delayed occurrence of the others according to linear relationships. A causal model was proposed in the form of a chain of events with each phase of bud break being related to the previous and successive one, while no link was observed between non-adjacent phases. The adaptation of black spruce populations along the latitudinal gradient points toward a strategy based on rapid physiological processes triggered by temperature increase inducing high metabolic activity. The variation observed in bud break reflects an evolutionary trade-off between maximization of security and taking advantage of the short growing season. This work provides evidence of the phenological adaptations of black spruce to its local environmental conditions while retaining sizeable genetic diversity within populations. Because of the multigenic nature of phenology, this diversity should provide some raw material for adaptation to changing local environmental conditions.

  8. Induction of adventitious buds on buds of Norway spruce (picea abies) grown in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Arnold, S.; Eriksson, T.

    1979-01-01

    Isolated resting vegetative buds of P. abies were cultured on a defined medium to which auxins or cytokinins were added. At concentrations of 10 to the power of -6 to 10 to the power of -4 M, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) or 6-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-ylamino)-purine (2iP) induced formation of adentitious bud primordia; these arose from meristems formed de novo in the needle primordia. Adventitious buds developed when these buds were transferred to medium lacking cytokinin. At lower concentrations of BAP or 2iP, only elongation of needle primordia was induced; at higher concentrations, buds were killed. Other growth regulators induced only needle primordia elongation and were also lethal at higher concentrations. No major differences were found in the ability to form adventitious buds among buds from: a 75-year-old hedge, 5-year-old greenhouse-grown plants, and trees in a stand near Uppsala, Sweden ranging in age from 5 to 50 year old.

  9. Activation of the retroviral budding factor ALIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Qianting; Landesman, Michael B; Chung, Hyo-Young; Dierkers, Adam; Jeffries, Cy M; Trewhella, Jill; Hill, Christopher P; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2011-09-01

    The cellular ALIX protein functions within the ESCRT pathway to facilitate intralumenal endosomal vesicle formation, the abscission stage of cytokinesis, and enveloped virus budding. Here, we report that the C-terminal proline-rich region (PRR) of ALIX folds back against the upstream domains and auto-inhibits V domain binding to viral late domains. Mutations designed to destabilize the closed conformation of the V domain opened the V domain, increased ALIX membrane association, and enhanced virus budding. These observations support a model in which ALIX activation requires dissociation of the autoinhibitory PRR and opening of the V domain arms.

  10. Molecular cytogenetics and DNA sequence analysis of an apomixis-linked BAC in Paspalum simplex reveal a non pericentromere location and partial microcolinearity with rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calderini, O.; Chang, S.B.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Busti, A.; Paolocci, F.; Arcioni, S.; Vries, de S.C.; Abma-Henkens, M.H.C.; Klein Lankhorst, R.M.; Donnison, I.S.; Pupilli, F.

    2006-01-01

    Apomixis in plants is a form of clonal reproduction through seeds. A BAC clone linked to apomictic reproduction in Paspalum simplex was used to locate the apomixis locus on meiotic chromosome preparations. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation revealed the existence of a single locus embedded in a

  11. Identification and Quality Assessment of Chrysanthemum Buds by CE Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Xing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and efficient fingerprinting method for chrysanthemum buds was developed with the aim of establishing a quality control protocol based on biochemical makeup. Chrysanthemum bud samples were successively extracted by water and alcohol. The fingerprints of the chrysanthemum buds samples were obtained using capillary electrophoresis and electrochemical detection (CE-ED employing copper and carbon working electrodes to capture all of the chemical information. 10 batches of chrysanthemum buds were collected from different regions and various factories to establish the baseline fingerprint. The experimental data of 10 batches electropherogram buds by CE were analyzed by correlation coefficient and the included angle cosine methods. A standard chrysanthemum bud fingerprint including 24 common peaks was established, 12 from each electrode, which was successfully applied to identify and distinguish between chrysanthemum buds from 2 other chrysanthemum species. These results demonstrate that fingerprint analysis can be used as an important criterion for chrysanthemum buds quality control.

  12. Total RNA quality of lyophilized and cryopreserved dormant grapevine buds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Vanessa García-Baldenegro

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: High-quality RNA that is useful for downstream applications was obtained from freeze-dried dormant grapevine bud tissue, similarly to the RNA obtained from cryopreserved dormant grapevine buds.

  13. Tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma assessed by cytokeratin immunostaining and budding areas: possible involvement of c-Met.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keisuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Aoki, Mikiko; Hamasaki, Makoto; Koga, Kaori; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Yuichi; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2014-11-01

    Tumor budding/sprouting has been shown to be an independent adverse prognostic factor in T1 and T3N0 colorectal carcinomas, however, its assessment could be improved by more accurate identification of budding carcinoma cells and consideration of budding areas. Moreover, tumor budding mechanisms are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the identification of budding tumor cells by either H&E staining alone or H&E with immunohistochemistry and developed a scoring system based on budding grades and areas. We examined whether the budding score correlated with clinicopathologic features and prognosis and the association between tumor budding/sprouting and c-Met protein expression and phosphorylation and MET gene copy numbers because c-Met is known to play an important role in colorectal carcinoma tumorigenesis. Cytokeratin immunohistochemistry could identify tumors with shorter disease-free survival (DFS) from the low-grade budding group assessed with H&E alone. High budding scores based on budding grade and area were more significantly correlated with DFS than scores obtained using the budding grade alone. In tumors with a high budding score, c-Met expression and phosphorylation levels and MET gene copy numbers were significantly increased at the invasive front compared with those in superficial tumor portions. This study showed for the first time that high levels of phospho-c-Met at the invasive front were significantly associated with a high budding score and shorter DFS. In conclusion, a budding score assessed by budding grades and budding-positive areas correlates highly with clinicopathologic aggressive features of colorectal carcinoma. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Sprouting of dormant buds on border trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.R., Jr. Trimble; H. Clay Smith; H. Clay Smith

    1970-01-01

    As part of an evaluation of silvicultura1 systems used in managing Appalachian hardwoods, we are studying degrade of border trees surrounding harvest-cut openings made in the patch cutting and group selection systems. One facet of this research dealt with determining what portion of visually evident dormant buds on border tree boles sprouted when the openings were cut...

  15. Stages of flower bud development in Iris pumila and between-habitat morphological differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barišić-Klisarić Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies revealed significant phenotypic plasticity and between-population differentiation in flower morphometric traits of Iris pumila in response to environmental variability between natural shade and exposed habitats. Since these habitats differed in flowering times as well, in this work we investigated at which stages of flower bud development differences between open and shaded habitats start to appear. Our analysis detected several groups of trait development patterns through the I. pumila bud development in two contrasting habitats, with stem length being the most suitable trait for application in further analyses of so-called “shade avoidance syndrome���.

  16. Bipolar budding in yeasts - an electron microscope study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreger-van Rij, N.J.W.; Veenhuis, M.

    1971-01-01

    Bud formation in yeasts with bipolar budding was studied by electron microscopy of thin sections. Budding in yeasts of the species Saccharomycodes ludwigii, Hanseniaspora valbyensis and Wickerhamia fluorescens resulted in concentric rings of scar ridges on the wall of the mother cell. The wall

  17. Overhead irrigation increased winter chilling and floral bud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eucalyptus nitens requires a sufficiently cold winter to produce flower buds. In areas in South Africa where E. nitens commercial plantations as well as breeding and production seed orchards are located, winter chilling is often insufficient for floral bud initiation. Hence, under such conditions, E. nitens floral bud and seed ...

  18. Spaceflight enhances cell aggregation and random budding in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Crabbé

    Full Text Available This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans-induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation, which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p. infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the

  19. Release of apical dominance in potato tuber is accompanied by programmed cell death in the apical bud meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Buskila, Yossi; Lopesco, Yael; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Saad, Inbal; Holdengreber, Vered; Belausov, Eduard; Zemach, Hanita; Ori, Naomi; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2012-04-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber, a swollen underground stem, is used as a model system for the study of dormancy release and sprouting. Natural dormancy release, at room temperature, is initiated by tuber apical bud meristem (TAB-meristem) sprouting characterized by apical dominance (AD). Dormancy is shortened by treatments such as bromoethane (BE), which mimics the phenotype of dormancy release in cold storage by inducing early sprouting of several buds simultaneously. We studied the mechanisms governing TAB-meristem dominance release. TAB-meristem decapitation resulted in the development of increasing numbers of axillary buds with time in storage, suggesting the need for autonomous dormancy release of each bud prior to control by the apical bud. Hallmarks of programmed cell death (PCD) were identified in the TAB-meristems during normal growth, and these were more extensive when AD was lost following either extended cold storage or BE treatment. Hallmarks included DNA fragmentation, induced gene expression of vacuolar processing enzyme1 (VPE1), and elevated VPE activity. VPE1 protein was semipurified from BE-treated apical buds, and its endogenous activity was fully inhibited by a cysteinyl aspartate-specific protease-1-specific inhibitor N-Acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-CHO (Ac-YVAD-CHO). Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the TAB-meristem of BE-treated tubers: a knob-like body in the vacuole, development of cytoplasmic vesicles, and budding-like nuclear segmentations. Treatment of tubers with BE and then VPE inhibitor induced faster growth and recovered AD in detached and nondetached apical buds, respectively. We hypothesize that PCD occurrence is associated with the weakening of tuber AD, allowing early sprouting of mature lateral buds.

  20. Effect of temperature on development and growth potential of axillary buds in roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of temperature during axillary bud formation on axillary bud development and subsequent shoot growth was investigated. Growth potential of the axillary buds was studied either in situ, by pruning the parent shoot above the bud, or in isolation, by grafting the bud or by culturing the bud

  1. Ontogeny of axillary buds and shoots in roses: Leaf initiation and pith development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The ontogeny of an axillary bud (in the middle region of a shoot) from initiation up to flowering of the subsequent shoot was studied. The first secondary buds appeared in the axillary bud (primary bud) when the leaf subtending the primary bud unfolded. By that time, the primary bud contained seven

  2. Architecture of the RNA polymerase II-TFIIF complex revealed by cross-linking and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhuo Angel; Jawhari, Anass; Fischer, Lutz

    2010-01-01

    Higher-order multi-protein complexes such as RNA polymerase II (Pol II) complexes with transcription initiation factors are often not amenable to X-ray structure determination. Here, we show that protein cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) has now sufficiently advanced as a tool to ex...

  3. Letter: Variable and complex food web structures revealed by exploring missing trophic links between birds and biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuwae, T.; Miyoshi, E.; Hosokawa, S.; Amano, T.; Moriya, T.; Kondoh, M.; Ydenberg, R.C.; Elner, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Food webs are comprised of a network of trophic interactions and are essential to elucidating ecosystem processes and functions. However, the presence of unknown, but critical networks hampers understanding of complex and dynamic food webs in nature. Here, we empirically demonstrate a missing link,

  4. Organization of Subunits in the Membrane Domain of the Bovine F-ATPase Revealed by Covalent Cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer; Ding, ShuJing; Walpole, Thomas B; Holding, Andrew N; Montgomery, Martin G; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2015-05-22

    The F-ATPase in bovine mitochondria is a membrane-bound complex of about 30 subunits of 18 different kinds. Currently, ∼85% of its structure is known. The enzyme has a membrane extrinsic catalytic domain, and a membrane intrinsic domain where the turning of the enzyme's rotor is generated from the transmembrane proton-motive force. The domains are linked by central and peripheral stalks. The central stalk and a hydrophobic ring of c-subunits in the membrane domain constitute the enzyme's rotor. The external surface of the catalytic domain and membrane subunit a are linked by the peripheral stalk, holding them static relative to the rotor. The membrane domain contains six additional subunits named ATP8, e, f, g, DAPIT (diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues), and 6.8PL (6.8-kDa proteolipid), each with a single predicted transmembrane α-helix, but their orientation and topography are unknown. Mutations in ATP8 uncouple the enzyme and interfere with its assembly, but its roles and the roles of the other five subunits are largely unknown. We have reacted accessible amino groups in the enzyme with bifunctional cross-linking agents and identified the linked residues. Cross-links involving the supernumerary subunits, where the structures are not known, show that the C terminus of ATP8 extends ∼70 Å from the membrane into the peripheral stalk and that the N termini of the other supernumerary subunits are on the same side of the membrane, probably in the mitochondrial matrix. These experiments contribute significantly toward building up a complete structural picture of the F-ATPase. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Relationship of actin and tubulin distribution to bud growth in wild- type and morphogenetic-mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of actin in wild-type cells and in morphogenetic mutants of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was explored by staining cells with fluorochrome-labeled phallotoxins after fixing and permeabilizing the cells by several methods. The actin appeared to be localized in a set of cortical spots or patches, as well as in a network of cytoplasmic fibers. Bundles of filaments that may possibly correspond to the fibers visualized by fluorescence were observed with the electron microscope. The putative actin spots were concentrated in small and medium-sized buds and at what were apparently the sites of incipient bud formation on unbudded cells, whereas the putative actin fibers were generally oriented along the long axes of the mother-bud pairs. In several morphogenetic mutants that form multiple, abnormally elongated buds, the actin patches were conspicuously clustered at the tips of most buds, and actin fibers were clearly oriented along the long axes of the buds. There was a strong correlation between the occurrence of active growth at particular bud tips and clustering of actin spots at those same tips. Near the end of the cell cycle in wild- type cells, actin appeared to concentrate (as a cluster of spots or a band) in the neck region connecting the mother cell to its bud. Observations made using indirect immunofluorescence with a monoclonal anti-yeast-tubulin antibody on the morphogenetic mutant cdc4 (which forms multiple, abnormally elongated buds while the nuclear cycle is arrested) revealed the surprising occurrence of multiple bundles of cytoplasmic microtubules emanating from the one duplicated spindle-pole body per cell. It seems that most or all of the buds contain one or more of these bundles of microtubules, which often can be seen to extend to the very tips of the buds. These observations are consistent with the hypotheses that actin, tubulin, or both may be involved in the polarization of growth and localization of cell-wall deposition

  6. Revealing a Novel Otubain-like Enzyme from Leishmania infantum with Deubiquitinating Activity toward K48-linked Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Clênia S.; Guido, Bruna C.; Pereira, Jhonata L.; Nolasco, Diego O.; Corrêa, Rafael; Magalhães, Kelly G.; Motta, Flávia N.; Santana, Jaime M.; Grellier, Philippe; Bastos, Izabela M. D.

    2017-03-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) play an important role in regulating a variety of eukaryotic processes. In this context, exploring the role of deubiquitination in Leishmania infantum could be a promising alternative to search new therapeutic targets for leishmaniasis. Here we present the first characterization of a DUB from L. infantum, otubain (OtuLi), and its localization within parasite. The recombinant OtuLi (rOtuLi) showed improved activity on lysine 48 (K48)-linked over K63-linked tetra-ubiquitin (Ub) and site-directed mutations on amino acids close to the catalytic site (F82) or involved in Ub interaction (L265 and F182) caused structural changes as shown by molecular dynamics, resulting in a reduction or loss of enzyme activity, respectively. Furthermore, rOtuLi stimulates lipid droplet biogenesis (an inflammatory marker) in peritoneal macrophages and induces IL-6 and TNF-α secretion in peritoneal macrophages, both proinflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest that OtuLi is a cytoplasmic enzyme with K48-linked substrate specificity that could play a part in proinflammatory response in stimulated murine macrophages.

  7. Epithelial mesenchymal transition and tumor budding in aggressive colorectal cancer: Tumor budding as oncotarget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is proposed as a critical mechanism for the acquisition of malignant phenotypes by epithelial cells. In colorectal cancer, tumor cells having undergone EMT are histologically represented by the presence of tumor buds defined as single cells or small clusters of de-differentiated tumor cells at the invasive front. Tumor budding is not a static, histological feature rather it represents a snap-shot of a dynamic process undertaken by an aggressive tumor with the potential to disseminate and metastasize. Strong, consistent evidence shows that tumor budding is a predictor of lymph node metastasis, distant metastatic disease, local recurrence, worse overall and disease-free survival time and an independent prognostic factor. Moreover, the International Union against Cancer (UICC) recognizes tumor budding as a highly relevant, additional prognostic parameter. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting the implementation of tumor budding into diagnostic pathology and patient management and additionally to illustrate its worthiness as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:21317460

  8. A plasma-membrane E-MAP reveals links of the eisosome with sphingolipid metabolism and endosomal trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguilar, Pablo S; Fröhlich, Florian; Rehman, Michael

    2010-01-01

    . Here, we used a quantitative genetic interaction map, or E-MAP, to functionally interrogate a set of approximately 400 genes involved in various aspects of plasma-membrane biology, including endocytosis, signaling, lipid metabolism and eisosome function. From this E-MAP, we derived a set of 57......,799 individual interactions between genes functioning in these various processes. Using triplet genetic motif analysis, we identified a new component of the eisosome, Eis1, and linked the poorly characterized gene EMP70 to endocytic and eisosome function. Finally, we implicated Rom2, a GDP/GTP exchange factor...

  9. ESCRT-independent budding of HIV-1 gag virus-like particles from Saccharomyces cerevisiae spheroplasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Norgan

    Full Text Available Heterologous expression of HIV-1 Gag in a variety of host cells results in its packaging into virus-like particles (VLPs that are subsequently released into the extracellular milieu. This phenomenon represents a useful tool for probing cellular factors required for viral budding and has contributed to the discovery of roles for ubiquitin ligases and the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs in viral budding. These factors are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and have been studied extensively in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryote previously utilized as a host for the production of VLPs. We used heterologous expression of HIV Gag in yeast spheroplasts to examine the role of ESCRTs and associated factors (Rsp5, a HECT ubiquitin ligase of the Nedd4 family; Bro1, a homolog of Alix; and Vps4, the AAA-ATPase required for ESCRT function in all contexts/organisms investigated in the generation of VLPs. Our data reveal: 1 characterized Gag-ESCRT interaction motifs (late domains are not required for VLP budding, 2 loss of function alleles of the essential HECT ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 do not display defects in VLP formation, and 3 ESCRT function is not required for VLP formation from spheroplasts. These results suggest that the egress of HIV Gag from yeast cells is distinct from the most commonly described mode of exit from mammalian cells, instead mimicking ESCRT-independent VLP formation observed in a subset of mammalian cells. As such, budding of Gag from yeast cells appears to represent ESCRT-independent budding relevant to viral replication in at least some situations. Thus the myriad of genetic and biochemical tools available in the yeast system may be of utility in the study of this aspect of viral budding.

  10. Transcriptome analysis reveals mucin 4 to be highly associated with periodontitis and identifies pleckstrin as a link to systemic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundmark, Anna; Davanian, Haleh; Båge, Tove; Johannsen, Gunnar; Koro, Catalin; Lundeberg, Joakim; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2015-01-01

    The multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis, which is characterized by destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, has also been implicated as a risk factor for various systemic diseases. Although periodontitis has been studied extensively, neither disease-specific biomarkers nor therapeutic targets have been identified, nor its link with systemic diseases. Here, we analyzed the global transcriptome of periodontitis and compared its gene expression profile with those of other inflammatory conditions, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ulcerative colitis (UC). Gingival biopsies from 62 patients with periodontitis and 62 healthy subjects were subjected to RNA sequencing. The up-regulated genes in periodontitis were related to inflammation, wounding and defense response, and apoptosis, whereas down-regulated genes were related to extracellular matrix organization and structural support. The most highly up-regulated gene was mucin 4 (MUC4), and its protein product was confirmed to be over-expressed in periodontitis. When comparing the expression profile of periodontitis with other inflammatory diseases, several gene ontology categories, including inflammatory response, cell death, cell motion, and homeostatic processes, were identified as common to all diseases. Only one gene, pleckstrin (PLEK), was significantly overexpressed in periodontitis, CVD, RA, and UC, implicating this gene as an important networking link between these chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26686060

  11. Parallel Comparison of N-Linked Glycopeptide Enrichment Techniques Reveals Extensive Glycoproteomic Analysis of Plasma Enabled by SAX-ERLIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totten, Sarah M; Feasley, Christa L; Bermudez, Abel; Pitteri, Sharon J

    2017-03-03

    Protein glycosylation is of increasing interest due to its important roles in protein function and aberrant expression with disease. Characterizing protein glycosylation remains analytically challenging due to its low abundance, ion suppression issues, and microheterogeneity at glycosylation sites, especially in complex samples such as human plasma. In this study, the utility of three common N-linked glycopeptide enrichment techniques is compared using human plasma. By analysis on an LTQ-Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer, electrostatic repulsion hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography using strong anion exchange solid-phase extraction (SAX-ERLIC) provided the most extensive N-linked glycopeptide enrichment when compared with multilectin affinity chromatography (M-LAC) and Sepharose-HILIC enrichments. SAX-ERLIC enrichment yielded 191 unique glycoforms across 72 glycosylation sites from 48 glycoproteins, which is more than double that detected using other enrichment techniques. The greatest glycoform diversity was observed in SAX-ERLIC enrichment, with no apparent bias toward specific glycan types. SAX-ERLIC enrichments were additionally analyzed by an Orbitrap Fusion Lumos mass spectrometer to maximize glycopeptide identifications for a more comprehensive assessment of protein glycosylation. In these experiments, 829 unique glycoforms were identified across 208 glycosylation sites from 95 plasma glycoproteins, a significant improvement from the initial method comparison and one of the most extensive site-specific glycosylation analysis in immunodepleted human plasma to date. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005655.

  12. Diminished swelling of cross-linked aromatic oligoamide surfaces revealing a new fouling mechanism of reverse-osmosis membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Wang; Kumar, Rajender; Herzberg, Moshe; Kasher, Roni

    2015-06-02

    Swelling of the active layer of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has an important effect on permeate water flux. The effects of organic- and biofouling on the swelling of the RO membrane active layer and the consequent changes of permeate flux are examined here. A cross-linked aromatic oligoamide film that mimics the surface chemistry of an RO polyamide membrane was synthesized stepwise on gold-coated surfaces. Foulant adsorption to the oligoamide film and its swelling were measured with a quartz crystal microbalance, and the effects of fouling on the membrane's performance were evaluated. The foulants were extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from fouled RO membranes and organic compounds of ultrafiltration permeate (UFP) from a membrane bioreactor used to treat municipal wastewater. The adsorbed foulants affected the swelling of the cross-linked oligoamide film differently. EPS had little effect on the swelling of the oligoamide film, whereas UFP significantly impaired swelling. Permeate flux declined more rapidly under UFP fouling than it did under EPS. Foulant adsorption was shown to diminish swelling of the aromatic oligoamide surfaces. Among the already known RO membrane fouling mechanisms, a novel RO fouling mechanism is proposed, in which foulant-membrane interactions hinder membrane swelling and thus increase hydraulic resistance.

  13. Tumor budding and laminin5-γ2 in squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal are associated with shorter survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okado, Yasuko; Aoki, Mikiko; Hamasaki, Makoto; Koga, Kaori; Sueta, Takayuki; Shiratsuchi, Hideki; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakagawa, Takashi; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) is rare, usually presents at an advanced stage, and is a more aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. The University of Pittsburgh TNM staging system commonly used in prognostication is not perfect, and more accurate biomarkers predicting prognosis are needed. Tumor budding is an established negative prognostic factor at the invasive front in colorectal cancer. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies showed that laminin 5-γ2 (Ln5-γ2) is expressed at the invasive front in tumor or tumor budding cells. We assessed the prognostic significance of tumor budding and Ln5-γ2 expression by performing Ln5-γ2 immunohistochemistry and evaluated the degree of tumor budding in pre-treatment biopsy specimens, and investigated their correlations to clinicopathological parameters in patients with SCC of the EAC. Patients whose tumors had high budding grade and Ln5-γ2 expression had significantly shorter survival times. Budding grade was significantly correlated with Ln5-γ2 expression. Multivariate analysis revealed that high budding grade predicted poorer prognosis regardless of disease stage. Our results suggested that budding grade and Ln5-γ2 expression can be used as indicators of poor prognosis in patients with SCC of the EAC.

  14. Exome capture reveals ZNF423 and CEP164 mutations, linking renal ciliopathies to DNA damage response signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaki, Moumita; Airik, Rannar; Ghosh, Amiya K

    2012-01-01

    identify by whole-exome resequencing, mutations of MRE11, ZNF423, and CEP164 as causing NPHP-RC. All three genes function within the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. We demonstrate that, upon induced DNA damage, the NPHP-RC proteins ZNF423, CEP164, and NPHP10 colocalize to nuclear foci positive for TIP60......, known to activate ATM at sites of DNA damage. We show that knockdown of CEP164 or ZNF423 causes sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and that cep164 knockdown in zebrafish results in dysregulated DDR and an NPHP-RC phenotype. Our findings link degenerative diseases of the kidney and retina, disorders......Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RC) are degenerative recessive diseases that affect kidney, retina, and brain. Genetic defects in NPHP gene products that localize to cilia and centrosomes defined them as "ciliopathies." However, disease mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we...

  15. Truncated power laws reveal a link between low-level behavioral processes and grouping patterns in a colonial bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Jovani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Departures from power law group size frequency distributions have been proposed as a useful tool to link individual behavior with population patterns and dynamics, although examples are scarce for wild animal populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied a population of Lesser kestrels (Falco naumanni breeding in groups (colonies from one to ca. 40 breeding pairs in 10,000 km(2 in NE Spain. A 3.5 fold steady population increase occurred during the eight-year study period, accompanied by a geographical expansion from an initial subpopulation which in turn remained stable in numbers. This population instability was mainly driven by first-breeders, which are less competitive at breeding sites, being relegated to breed solitarily or in small colony sizes, and disperse farther than adults. Colony size frequency distributions shifted from an initial power law to a truncated power law mirroring population increase. Thus, we hypothesized that population instability was behind the truncation of the power law. Accordingly, we found a power law distribution through years in the initial subpopulation, and a match between the power law breakpoint (at ca. ten pairs and those colony sizes from which the despotic behavior of colony owners started to impair the settlement of newcomers. Moreover, the instability hypothesis was further supported by snapshot data from another population of Lesser kestrels in SW Spain suffering a population decline. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Appropriate analysis of the scaling properties of grouping patterns has unraveled the link between local agonistic processes and large-scale (population grouping patterns in a wild bird population.

  16. An in vivo photo-cross-linking approach reveals a homodimerization domain of Aha1 in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Berg

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in almost any biological processes. Therefore, there is a particular need for methods which describe the interactions of a defined target protein in its physiological context. Here we report a method to photo-cross-link interacting proteins in S. cerevisiae by using the non-canonical amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (pAzpa. Based on the expanded genetic code the photoreactive non-canonical amino acid pAzpa was site-specifically incorporated at eight positions into a domain of Aha1 that was previously described to bind Hsp90 in vitro to function as a cochaperone of Hsp90 and activates its ATPase activity. In vivo photo-cross-linking to the cognate binding partner of Aha1 was carried out by irradiation of mutant strains with UV light (365 nm to induce covalent intermolecular bonds. Surprisingly, an interaction between Aha1 and Hsp90 was not detected, although, we could confirm binding of suppressed pAzpa containing Aha1 to Hsp90 by native co-immunoprecipitation. However, a homodimer consisting of two covalently crosslinked Aha1 monomers was identified by mass spectrometry. This homodimer could also be confirmed using p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine, another photoreactive non-canonical amino acid. Crosslinking was highly specific as it was dependent on irradiation using UV light, the exact position of the non-canonical amino acid in the protein sequence as well as on the addition of the non-canonical amino acid to the growth medium. Therefore it seems possible that an interaction of Aha1 with Hsp90 takes place at different positions than previously described in vitro highlighting the importance of in vivo techniques to study protein-protein interactions. Accordingly, the expanded genetic code can easily be applied to other S. cerevisiae proteins to study their interaction under physiological relevant conditions in vivo.

  17. An In Vivo Photo-Cross-Linking Approach Reveals a Homodimerization Domain of Aha1 in S. cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Michael; Michalowski, Annette; Palzer, Silke; Rupp, Steffen; Sohn, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in almost any biological processes. Therefore, there is a particular need for methods which describe the interactions of a defined target protein in its physiological context. Here we report a method to photo-cross-link interacting proteins in S. cerevisiae by using the non-canonical amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (pAzpa). Based on the expanded genetic code the photoreactive non-canonical amino acid pAzpa was site-specifically incorporated at eight positions into a domain of Aha1 that was previously described to bind Hsp90 in vitro to function as a cochaperone of Hsp90 and activates its ATPase activity. In vivo photo-cross-linking to the cognate binding partner of Aha1 was carried out by irradiation of mutant strains with UV light (365 nm) to induce covalent intermolecular bonds. Surprisingly, an interaction between Aha1 and Hsp90 was not detected, although, we could confirm binding of suppressed pAzpa containing Aha1 to Hsp90 by native co-immunoprecipitation. However, a homodimer consisting of two covalently crosslinked Aha1 monomers was identified by mass spectrometry. This homodimer could also be confirmed using p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine, another photoreactive non-canonical amino acid. Crosslinking was highly specific as it was dependent on irradiation using UV light, the exact position of the non-canonical amino acid in the protein sequence as well as on the addition of the non-canonical amino acid to the growth medium. Therefore it seems possible that an interaction of Aha1 with Hsp90 takes place at different positions than previously described in vitro highlighting the importance of in vivo techniques to study protein-protein interactions. Accordingly, the expanded genetic code can easily be applied to other S. cerevisiae proteins to study their interaction under physiological relevant conditions in vivo. PMID:24614167

  18. An in vivo photo-cross-linking approach reveals a homodimerization domain of Aha1 in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Michael; Michalowski, Annette; Palzer, Silke; Rupp, Steffen; Sohn, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an essential role in almost any biological processes. Therefore, there is a particular need for methods which describe the interactions of a defined target protein in its physiological context. Here we report a method to photo-cross-link interacting proteins in S. cerevisiae by using the non-canonical amino acid p-azido-L-phenylalanine (pAzpa). Based on the expanded genetic code the photoreactive non-canonical amino acid pAzpa was site-specifically incorporated at eight positions into a domain of Aha1 that was previously described to bind Hsp90 in vitro to function as a cochaperone of Hsp90 and activates its ATPase activity. In vivo photo-cross-linking to the cognate binding partner of Aha1 was carried out by irradiation of mutant strains with UV light (365 nm) to induce covalent intermolecular bonds. Surprisingly, an interaction between Aha1 and Hsp90 was not detected, although, we could confirm binding of suppressed pAzpa containing Aha1 to Hsp90 by native co-immunoprecipitation. However, a homodimer consisting of two covalently crosslinked Aha1 monomers was identified by mass spectrometry. This homodimer could also be confirmed using p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine, another photoreactive non-canonical amino acid. Crosslinking was highly specific as it was dependent on irradiation using UV light, the exact position of the non-canonical amino acid in the protein sequence as well as on the addition of the non-canonical amino acid to the growth medium. Therefore it seems possible that an interaction of Aha1 with Hsp90 takes place at different positions than previously described in vitro highlighting the importance of in vivo techniques to study protein-protein interactions. Accordingly, the expanded genetic code can easily be applied to other S. cerevisiae proteins to study their interaction under physiological relevant conditions in vivo.

  19. Assessment of tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma: correlation with β-catenin nuclear expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendi, S; Al-Gendi, A

    2011-03-01

    Tumor budding (TB) is showing increasing promise as a colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosticator that is independent of TNM staging. β-Catenin is a component of the Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway that is bound to membrane-associated E-cadherin and is essential for its correct position and function. This study was designed to detect TB in 44 resected primary CRC cases and also to compare β-catenin expression in the tumor budding sites (TBS) and in the tumor center. Tumor budding was assessed in both H&E and pankeratin immunostained sections. Agreement between TB scoring using pancytokeratin and H&E was tested. Also, typing of the tumor margin and determination of degree of cytoplasmic pseudo-fragmentation was done. Tumor budding, cytoplasmic pseudofragments and β-catenin expression were related to known CRC prognosticators. Ten tumors (22.7%) showed low grade (LG) budding and 34 tumors (77.3%) showed high grade (HG) budding. The 34 HG budding tumors were further subdivided into moderate and severe (n=13, n=21, respectively) budding cancers. Twenty nine tumors (65.9%) showed LG cytoplasmic pseudofragments and 15 tumors (34.1%) showed HG pseudofragments. Scoring of TB on H&E and pankeratin stained sections revealed moderate agreement (Kappa=.558; p=tumor center (p=.005, p=.000, respectively). In opposition, membranous β-catenin expression was significantly higher in the tumor center than in TBS (p=.001). Although, nuclear β-catenin accumulation at TBS was noted, yet, it did not relate significantly with both TB and cytoplasmic pseudofragments around TBS (p=.649; p=.675, respectively). Also, nuclear β-catenin immunoreactivity did not relate significantly with the various clinicopathological variables. Pankeratin immunostaining facilitates typing of CRC invasive margin, and determination of the degree of TB and cytoplasmic pseudo-fragmentation. β-Catenin expression differs significantly between tumor center and TBS in CRC. Cut-offs for TB assessment should be unified

  20. Oral microbiomes from hunter-gatherers and traditional farmers reveal shifts in commensal balance and pathogen load linked to diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassalle, Florent; Spagnoletti, Matteo; Fumagalli, Matteo; Shaw, Liam; Dyble, Mark; Walker, Catherine; Thomas, Mark G; Bamberg Migliano, Andrea; Balloux, Francois

    2017-11-22

    Maladaptation to modern diets has been implicated in several chronic disorders. Given the higher prevalence of disease such as dental caries and chronic gum diseases in industrialized societies, we sought to investigate the impact of different subsistence strategies on oral health and physiology, as documented by the oral microbiome. To control for confounding variables such as environment and host genetics, we sampled saliva from three pairs of populations of hunter-gatherers and traditional farmers living in close proximity in the Philippines. Deep shotgun sequencing of salivary DNA generated high-coverage microbiomes along with human genomes. Comparing these microbiomes with publicly available data from individuals living on a Western diet revealed that abundance ratios of core species were significantly correlated with subsistence strategy, with hunter-gatherers and Westerners occupying either end of a gradient of Neisseria against Haemophilus, and traditional farmers falling in between. Species found preferentially in hunter-gatherers included microbes often considered as oral pathogens, despite their hosts' apparent good oral health. Discriminant analysis of gene functions revealed vitamin B5 autotrophy and urease-mediated pH regulation as candidate adaptations of the microbiome to the hunter-gatherer and Western diets, respectively. These results suggest that major transitions in diet selected for different communities of commensals and likely played a role in the emergence of modern oral pathogens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The link between behavioural type and natal dispersal propensity reveals a dispersal syndrome in a large herbivore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeffe, L.; Morellet, N.; Bonnot, N.; Gaillard, J. M.; Cargnelutti, B.; Verheyden-Tixier, H.; Vanpé, C.; Coulon, A.; Clobert, J.; Bon, R.; Hewison, A. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    When individuals disperse, they modify the physical and social composition of their reproductive environment, potentially impacting their fitness. The choice an individual makes between dispersal and philopatry is thus critical, hence a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the decision to leave the natal area is crucial. We explored how combinations of behavioural (exploration, mobility, activity and stress response) and morphological (body mass) traits measured prior to dispersal were linked to the subsequent dispersal decision in 77 roe deer Capreolus capreolus fawns. Using an unusually detailed multi-trait approach, we identified two independent behavioural continuums related to dispersal. First, a continuum of energetic expenditure contrasted individuals of low mobility, low variability in head activity and low body temperature with those that displayed opposite traits. Second, a continuum of neophobia contrasted individuals that explored more prior to dispersal and were more tolerant of capture with those that displayed opposite traits. While accounting for possible confounding effects of condition-dependence (body mass), we showed that future dispersers were less neophobic and had higher energetic budgets than future philopatric individuals, providing strong support for a dispersal syndrome in this species. PMID:25030983

  2. Transcriptional program of ciliated epithelial cells reveals new cilium and centrosome components and links to human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona A Hoh

    Full Text Available Defects in the centrosome and cilium are associated with a set of human diseases having diverse phenotypes. To further characterize the components that define the function of these organelles we determined the transcriptional profile of multiciliated tracheal epithelial cells. Cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells undergoing differentiation in vitro were derived from mice expressing GFP from the ciliated-cell specific FOXJ1 promoter (FOXJ1:GFP. The transcriptional profile of ciliating GFP+ cells from these cultures was defined at an early and a late time point during differentiation and was refined by subtraction of the profile of the non-ciliated GFP- cells. We identified 649 genes upregulated early, when most cells were forming basal bodies, and 73 genes genes upregulated late, when most cells were fully ciliated. Most, but not all, of known centrosome proteins are transcriptionally upregulated early, particularly Plk4, a master regulator of centriole formation. We found that three genes associated with human disease states, Mdm1, Mlf1, and Dyx1c1, are upregulated during ciliogenesis and localize to centrioles and cilia. This transcriptome for mammalian multiciliated epithelial cells identifies new candidate centrosome and cilia proteins, highlights similarities between components of motile and primary cilia, and identifies new links between cilia proteins and human disease.

  3. Exome capture reveals ZNF423 and CEP164 mutations, linking renal ciliopathies to DNA damage response signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Moumita; Airik, Rannar; Ghosh, Amiya K.; Giles, Rachel H.; Chen, Rui; Slaats, Gisela G.; Wang, Hui; Hurd, Toby W.; Zhou, Weibin; Cluckey, Andrew; Gee, Heon-Yung; Ramaswami, Gokul; Hong, Chen-Jei; Hamilton, Bruce A.; Červenka, Igor; Ganji, Ranjani Sri; Bryja, Vitezslav; Arts, Heleen H.; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Oud, Machteld M.; Letteboer, Stef J.F.; Roepman, Ronald; Husson, Hervé; Ibraghimov-Beskrovnaya, Oxana; Ysunaga, Takayuki; Walz, Gerd; Eley, Lorraine; Sayer, John A.; Schermer, Bernhard; Liebau, Max C.; Benzing, Thomas; Le Corre, Stephanie; Drummond, Iain; Joles, Jaap A.; Janssen, Sabine; Allen, Susan J.; Natarajan, Sivakumar; O Toole, John F.; Attanasio, Massimo; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Nayir, Ahmet; Stoetzel, Corinne; Dollfus, Helene; Massoudi, Rustin; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Andreoli, Sharon P.; Doherty, Dan G.; Lindstrad, Anna; Golzio, Christelle; Katsanis, Nicholas; Pape, Lars; Abboud, Emad B.; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.; Lewis, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Omran, Heymut; Lee, Eva; Wang, Shaohui; Sekiguchi, JoAnn M.; Saunders, Rudel; Johnson, Colin A.; Garner, Elizabeth; Vanselow, Katja; Andersen, Jens S.; Shlomai, Joseph; Nurnberg, Gudrun; Nurnberg, Peter; Levy, Shawn; Smogorzewska, Agata; Otto, Edgar A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RC) are degenerative recessive diseases that affect kidney, retina and brain. Genetic defects in NPHP gene products that localize to cilia and centrosomes defined them as ‘ciliopathies’. However, disease mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we identify by whole exome resequencing, mutations of MRE11, ZNF423, and CEP164 as causing NPHP-RC. All three genes function within the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, hitherto not implicated in ciliopathies. We demonstrate that, upon induced DNA damage, the NPHP-RC proteins ZNF423, CEP164 and NPHP10 colocalize to nuclear foci positive for TIP60, known to activate ATM at sites of DNA damage. We show that knockdown of CEP164 or ZNF423 causes sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, and that cep164 knockdown in zebrafish results in dysregulated DDR and an NPHP-RC phenotype. We identify TTBK2, CCDC92, NPHP3 and DVL3 as novel CEP164 interaction partners. Our findings link degenerative diseases of kidney and retina, disorders of increasing prevalence, to mechanisms of DDR. PMID:22863007

  4. Analysis of temporal transcription expression profiles reveal links between protein function and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Cen; Lees, Jonathan G; Minneci, Federico; Orengo, Christine A; Jones, David T

    2017-10-01

    Accurate gene or protein function prediction is a key challenge in the post-genome era. Most current methods perform well on molecular function prediction, but struggle to provide useful annotations relating to biological process functions due to the limited power of sequence-based features in that functional domain. In this work, we systematically evaluate the predictive power of temporal transcription expression profiles for protein function prediction in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results show significantly better performance on predicting protein function when transcription expression profile-based features are integrated with sequence-derived features, compared with the sequence-derived features alone. We also observe that the combination of expression-based and sequence-based features leads to further improvement of accuracy on predicting all three domains of gene function. Based on the optimal feature combinations, we then propose a novel multi-classifier-based function prediction method for Drosophila melanogaster proteins, FFPred-fly+. Interpreting our machine learning models also allows us to identify some of the underlying links between biological processes and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

  5. Expression Profile of Nuclear Receptors along Male Mouse Nephron Segments Reveals a Link between ERRβ and Thick Ascending Limb Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krid, Halla; Dorison, Aude; Salhi, Amel; Cheval, Lydie; Crambert, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family orchestrates many functions related to reproduction, development, metabolism, and adaptation to the circadian cycle. The majority of these receptors are expressed in the kidney, but their exact quantitative localization in this ultrastructured organ remains poorly described, making it difficult to elucidate the renal function of these receptors. In this report, using quantitative PCR on microdissected mouse renal tubules, we established a detailed quantitative expression map of nuclear receptors along the nephron. This map can serve to identify nuclear receptors with specific localization. Thus, we unexpectedly found that the estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) is expressed predominantly in the thick ascending limb (TAL) and, to a much lesser extent, in the distal convoluted tubules. In vivo treatment with an ERR inverse agonist (diethylstilbestrol) showed a link between this receptor family and the expression of the Na+,K+-2Cl− cotransporter type 2 (NKCC2), and resulted in phenotype presenting some similarities with the Bartter syndrom (hypokalemia, urinary Na+ loss and volume contraction). Conversely, stimulation of ERRβ with a selective agonist (GSK4716) in a TAL cell line stimulated NKCC2 expression. All together, these results provide broad information regarding the renal expression of all members of the nuclear receptor family and have allowed us to identify a new regulator of ion transport in the TAL segments. PMID:22457827

  6. Analysis of temporal transcription expression profiles reveal links between protein function and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cen Wan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate gene or protein function prediction is a key challenge in the post-genome era. Most current methods perform well on molecular function prediction, but struggle to provide useful annotations relating to biological process functions due to the limited power of sequence-based features in that functional domain. In this work, we systematically evaluate the predictive power of temporal transcription expression profiles for protein function prediction in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results show significantly better performance on predicting protein function when transcription expression profile-based features are integrated with sequence-derived features, compared with the sequence-derived features alone. We also observe that the combination of expression-based and sequence-based features leads to further improvement of accuracy on predicting all three domains of gene function. Based on the optimal feature combinations, we then propose a novel multi-classifier-based function prediction method for Drosophila melanogaster proteins, FFPred-fly+. Interpreting our machine learning models also allows us to identify some of the underlying links between biological processes and developmental stages of Drosophila melanogaster.

  7. The proteomic profile of Stichodactyla duerdeni secretion reveals the presence of a novel O-linked glycopeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassoli, Juliana Silva; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Oliveira, Joacir Stolarz

    2013-01-01

    duerdeni from Brazilian coast. We used a combination of offline RPC-MALDI-TOF and online nano-RPC-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap proteomic techniques as well as functional bioassays. The mucus was milked by electric stimulation and fractionated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 yielding 5 main fractions. The low......, a new peptide of 3431Da, named U-SHTX-Sdd1, was purified and completely sequenced by automated Edman's degradation and tandem mass spectrometry. An analysis of U-SHTX-Sdd1 revealed a modified O-HexNAc-Threonine at position 1, which, at the best of our knowledge, constitutes the first sea anemone toxin...... present in sea anemone secretions, the number of reported primary sequences is still low. Thus, to access the scenery of protein components from S. duerdeni mucus, including their biological functions, a robust proteomic approach was used together with bioinformatic tools. The demonstrated strategy...

  8. Functional Roles of Neural Preparatory Processes in a Cued Stroop Task Revealed by Linking Electrophysiology with Behavioral Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Ding, Mingzhou; Kluger, Benzi M

    2015-01-01

    performance provides a functional link between neural markers and the cognitive processes they index.

  9. Removal of unwanted variation reveals novel patterns of gene expression linked to sleep homeostasis in murine cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Jason R; Koberstein, John N; Watson, Adam J; Zapero, Nikolai; Risso, Davide; Speed, Terence P; Frank, Marcos G; Peixoto, Lucia

    2016-10-25

    Why we sleep is still one of the most perplexing mysteries in biology. Strong evidence indicates that sleep is necessary for normal brain function and that sleep need is a tightly regulated process. Surprisingly, molecular mechanisms that determine sleep need are incompletely described. Moreover, very little is known about transcriptional changes that specifically accompany the accumulation and discharge of sleep need. Several studies have characterized differential gene expression changes following sleep deprivation. Much less is known, however, about changes in gene expression during the compensatory response to sleep deprivation (i.e. recovery sleep). In this study we present a comprehensive analysis of the effects of sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery sleep on gene expression in the mouse cortex. We used a non-traditional analytical method for normalization of genome-wide gene expression data, Removal of Unwanted Variation (RUV). RUV improves detection of differential gene expression following sleep deprivation. We also show that RUV normalization is crucial to the discovery of differentially expressed genes associated with recovery sleep. Our analysis indicates that the majority of transcripts upregulated by sleep deprivation require 6 h of recovery sleep to return to baseline levels, while the majority of downregulated transcripts return to baseline levels within 1-3 h. We also find that transcripts that change rapidly during recovery (i.e. within 3 h) do so on average with a time constant that is similar to the time constant for the discharge of sleep need. We demonstrate that proper data normalization is essential to identify changes in gene expression that are specifically linked to sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Our results provide the first evidence that recovery sleep is comprised of two waves of transcriptional regulation that occur at different times and affect functionally distinct classes of genes.

  10. Removal of unwanted variation reveals novel patterns of gene expression linked to sleep homeostasis in murine cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R. Gerstner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Why we sleep is still one of the most perplexing mysteries in biology. Strong evidence indicates that sleep is necessary for normal brain function and that sleep need is a tightly regulated process. Surprisingly, molecular mechanisms that determine sleep need are incompletely described. Moreover, very little is known about transcriptional changes that specifically accompany the accumulation and discharge of sleep need. Several studies have characterized differential gene expression changes following sleep deprivation. Much less is known, however, about changes in gene expression during the compensatory response to sleep deprivation (i.e. recovery sleep. Results In this study we present a comprehensive analysis of the effects of sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery sleep on gene expression in the mouse cortex. We used a non-traditional analytical method for normalization of genome-wide gene expression data, Removal of Unwanted Variation (RUV. RUV improves detection of differential gene expression following sleep deprivation. We also show that RUV normalization is crucial to the discovery of differentially expressed genes associated with recovery sleep. Our analysis indicates that the majority of transcripts upregulated by sleep deprivation require 6 h of recovery sleep to return to baseline levels, while the majority of downregulated transcripts return to baseline levels within 1–3 h. We also find that transcripts that change rapidly during recovery (i.e. within 3 h do so on average with a time constant that is similar to the time constant for the discharge of sleep need. Conclusions We demonstrate that proper data normalization is essential to identify changes in gene expression that are specifically linked to sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Our results provide the first evidence that recovery sleep is comprised of two waves of transcriptional regulation that occur at different times and affect functionally

  11. Analysis of Candida albicans mutants defective in the Cdk8 module of mediator reveal links between metabolism and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allia K Lindsay

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans biofilm formation is a key virulence trait that involves hyphal growth and adhesin expression. Pyocyanin (PYO, a phenazine secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibits both C. albicans biofilm formation and development of wrinkled colonies. Using a genetic screen, we identified two mutants, ssn3Δ/Δ and ssn8Δ/Δ, which continued to wrinkle in the presence of PYO. Ssn8 is a cyclin-like protein and Ssn3 is similar to cyclin-dependent kinases; both proteins are part of the heterotetrameric Cdk8 module that forms a complex with the transcriptional co-regulator, Mediator. Ssn3 kinase activity was also required for PYO sensitivity as a kinase dead mutant maintained a wrinkled colony morphology in the presence of PYO. Furthermore, similar phenotypes were observed in mutants lacking the other two components of the Cdk8 module-Srb8 and Srb9. Through metabolomics analyses and biochemical assays, we showed that a compromised Cdk8 module led to increases in glucose consumption, glycolysis-related transcripts, oxidative metabolism and ATP levels even in the presence of PYO. In the mutant, inhibition of respiration to levels comparable to the PYO-treated wild type inhibited wrinkled colony development. Several lines of evidence suggest that PYO does not act through Cdk8. Lastly, the ssn3 mutant was a hyperbiofilm former, and maintained higher biofilm formation in the presence of PYO than the wild type. Together these data provide novel insights into the role of the Cdk8 module of Mediator in regulation of C. albicans physiology and the links between respiratory activity and both wrinkled colony and biofilm development.

  12. Development Correlations of the Buds of Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana ROTARU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The development characteristics of different buds of the grapevine are mainly related by stimulation and/or inhibition effects, the action of which is still inexplicable. The present study examines the development dynamics of the buds of a one-year old branch after excision of different buds and the application of ?-naphtyl acetic acid (ANA, as well as the growth capacity of each bud individually. We verified the effects of acrotony cited previously by various researchers. These effects are due to different developmental characteristics of which could to lay the groundwork for the improvement of different productions methods.

  13. Essential Oil of Betula pendula Roth. Buds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Demirci

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Betula pendula Roth. buds was obtained using both hydrodistillation and microdistillation techniques and their chemical compositions were analyzed using both gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Overall, more than 50 compounds were identified representing 80% and 92% for hydrodistillation and microdistillation, respectively. The main components (by hydrodistillation and microdistillation, respectively found were α-copaene (12% and 10%, germacrene D (11% and 18% and δ-cadinene (11% and 15% in the analyzed essential oils. The microdistillation technique proved to be a useful tool and compliant alternative when compared to hydrodistillation.

  14. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer but a standardized method for its assessment has been lacking. The primary aim of the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) was to reach agreement on an international, evidence......-based standardized scoring system for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The ITBCC included nine sessions with presentations, a pre-meeting survey and an e-book covering the key publications on tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation' method was used...... to determine the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence. The following 10 statements achieved consensus: Tumor budding is defined as a single tumor cell or a cell cluster consisting of four tumor cells or less (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of lymph node metastases in pT1...

  15. Complex bud architecture and cell-specific chemical patterns enable supercooling of Picea abies bud primordia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuprian, Edith; Munkler, Caspar; Resnyak, Anna; Zimmermann, Sonja; Tuong, Tan D; Gierlinger, Notburga; Müller, Thomas; Livingston, David P; Neuner, Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Bud primordia of Picea abies, despite a frozen shoot, stay ice free down to -50 °C by a mechanism termed supercooling whose biophysical and biochemical requirements are poorly understood. Bud architecture was assessed by 3D-reconstruction, supercooling and freezing patterns by infrared video thermography, freeze dehydration and extraorgan freezing by water potential measurements, and cell-specific chemical patterns by Raman microscopy and mass spectrometry imaging. A bowl-like ice barrier tissue insulates primordia from entrance by intrinsic ice. Water repellent and densely packed bud scales prevent extrinsic ice penetration. At -18 °C, break-down of supercooling was triggered by intrinsic ice nucleators whereas the ice barrier remained active. Temperature-dependent freeze dehydration (-0.1 MPa K-1 ) caused accumulation of extraorgan ice masses that by rupture of the shoot, pith tissue are accommodated in large voids. The barrier tissue has exceptionally pectin-rich cell walls and intercellular spaces, and the cell lumina were lined or filled with proteins, especially near the primordium. Primordial cells close to the barrier accumulate di, tri and tetrasaccharides. Bud architecture efficiently prevents ice penetration, but ice nucleators become active inside the primordium below a temperature threshold. Biochemical patterns indicate a complex cellular interplay enabling supercooling and the necessity for cell-specific biochemical analysis. © 2017 The Authors Plant, Cell & Environment Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Protein Kinase C Controls Binding of Igo/ENSA Proteins to Protein Phosphatase 2A in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Vu; Dephoure, Noah; Weiss, Amit; Ferguson, Jacqueline; Leitao, Ricardo; Gygi, Steven P; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2017-03-24

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays important roles in controlling mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. The form of PP2A that controls mitosis is associated with a conserved regulatory subunit that is called B55 in vertebrates and Cdc55 in budding yeast. The activity of this form of PP2A can be inhibited by binding of conserved Igo/ENSA proteins. Although the mechanisms that activate Igo/ENSA to bind and inhibit PP2A are well understood, little is known about how Igo/Ensa are inactivated. Here, we have analyzed regulation of Igo/ENSA in the context of a checkpoint pathway that links mitotic entry to membrane growth in budding yeast. Protein kinase C (Pkc1) relays signals in the pathway by activating PP2ACdc55 We discovered that constitutively active Pkc1 can drive cells through a mitotic checkpoint arrest, which suggests that Pkc1-dependent activation of PP2ACdc55 plays a critical role in checkpoint signaling. We therefore used mass spectrometry to determine how Pkc1 modifies the PP2ACdc55 complex. This revealed that Pkc1 induces changes in the phosphorylation of multiple subunits of the complex, as well as dissociation of Igo/ENSA. Pkc1 directly phosphorylates Cdc55 and Igo/ENSA, and phosphorylation site mapping and mutagenesis indicate that phosphorylation of Cdc55 contributes to Igo/ENSA dissociation. Association of Igo2 with PP2ACdc55 is regulated during the cell cycle, yet mutation of Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation sites on Cdc55 and Igo2 did not cause defects in mitotic progression. Together, the data suggest that Pkc1 controls PP2ACdc55 by multiple overlapping mechanisms. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Structure-based in silico identification of ubiquitin-binding domains provides insights into the ALIX-V:ubiquitin complex and retrovirus budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren-Kaplan, Tal; Attali, Ilan; Estrin, Michael; Kuo, Lillian S; Farkash, Efrat; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Blutraich, Noa; Artzi, Shay; Peri, Aviyah; Freed, Eric O; Wolfson, Haim J; Prag, Gali

    2013-02-20

    The ubiquitylation signal promotes trafficking of endogenous and retroviral transmembrane proteins. The signal is decoded by a large set of ubiquitin (Ub) receptors that tether Ub-binding domains (UBDs) to the trafficking machinery. We developed a structure-based procedure to scan the protein data bank for hidden UBDs. The screen retrieved many of the known UBDs. Intriguingly, new potential UBDs were identified, including the ALIX-V domain. Pull-down, cross-linking and E3-independent ubiquitylation assays biochemically corroborated the in silico findings. Guided by the output model, we designed mutations at the postulated ALIX-V:Ub interface. Biophysical affinity measurements using microscale-thermophoresis of wild-type and mutant proteins revealed some of the interacting residues of the complex. ALIX-V binds mono-Ub with a K(d) of 119 μM. We show that ALIX-V oligomerizes with a Hill coefficient of 5.4 and IC(50) of 27.6 μM and that mono-Ub induces ALIX-V oligomerization. Moreover, we show that ALIX-V preferentially binds K63 di-Ub compared with mono-Ub and K48 di-Ub. Finally, an in vivo functionality assay demonstrates the significance of ALIX-V:Ub interaction in equine infectious anaemia virus budding. These results not only validate the new procedure, but also demonstrate that ALIX-V directly interacts with Ub in vivo and that this interaction can influence retroviral budding.

  18. Targeting Allergen to FcγRI Reveals a Novel Th2 Regulatory Pathway Linked to TSLP Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Kathryn E.; Reefer, Amanda J.; Engelhard, Victor H.; Patrie, James T.; Ziegler, Steven F.; Chapman, Martin D.; Woodfolk, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The molecule H22-Fel d 1, which targets cat allergen to FcγRI on dendritic cells, has the potential to treat cat allergy owing to its T-cell modulatory properties. Objective To investigate whether the T-cell response induced by H22-Fel d 1 is altered in the presence of the Th2-promoting cytokine, TSLP. Methods Studies were performed in cat-allergic subjects with and without atopic dermatitis. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells were primed with H22-Fel d 1 in the presence or absence of TSLP and the resulting T-cell cytokine repertoire was analyzed by flow cytometry. The capacity for H22-Fel d 1 to modulate TSLP receptor expression on dendritic cells was examined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of inhibitors of Fc receptor signaling molecules. Results Surprisingly, TSLP alone was a weak inducer of Th2 responses irrespective of atopic status; however, dendritic cells co-primed with TSLP and H22-Fel d 1 selectively and synergistically amplified Th2 responses in highly atopic subjects. This effect was OX40 ligand-independent pointing to an unconventional TSLP-mediated pathway. Expression of TSLP receptor was upregulated on atopic dendritic cells primed with H22-Fel d 1 through a pathway regulated by FcγRI-associated signaling components, including src related tyrosine kinases and Syk, as well as the downstream molecule, PI3-kinase. Inhibition of TSLP receptor upregulation triggered by H22-Fel d 1 blocked TSLP-mediated Th2 responses. Conclusion Discovery of a novel Th2 regulatory pathway linking FcγRI signaling to TSLP receptor upregulation and consequent TSLP-mediated effects questions the validity of receptor-targeted allergen vaccines. Clinical Implications This study establishes a pivotal role for Fc receptor ligation in promoting TSLP-mediated Th2 responses associated with allergic disease. Capsule Summary Atopic dendritic cells are equipped to efficiently upregulate TSLP receptor upon Fc receptor ligation by allergen. These findings suggest

  19. Balancing protein similarity and gene co-expression reveals new links between genetic conservation and developmental diversity in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Céline; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Glémet, Eric; Néri, Christian

    2005-04-15

    To identify genetic conservation relative to precise aspects of developmental diversity, an essential question in computational biology, we developed a new comparative method that allows conserved modules for the best balance between protein sequence similarity and gene co-expression to be constructed, in invertebrates. Our method, referred to as the best-balance constraint procedure (BBCP), yielded 719 functionally conserved modules (FCMs) comprising 2-23 gene pairs. These modules were consistent with the developmental roles of orthologues as inferred from Gene Ontology, RNAi knockouts, InterPro and process-specific microarray data. New relationships were defined between genetic conservation and developmental diversity. Novel gene associations were indeed found in 94% of the FCMs, 150 modules being completely new. A significant proportion of the FCMs (18%, 132 modules) described cell type-specific mechanisms, comprising neuronal, muscle and germ cell signaling, new associations being found in 125 modules. Also found were gene associations for cell fate specification activities previously not highlighted by computational means, e.g. in FCMs containing homeogenes. These data indicate that highly discriminative description of genetic conservation can be deduced using BBCP, and reveal new correlations between cellular and developmental diversity and gene essentiality in invertebrates. christian.neri@broca.inserm.fr For supplementary information, please refer to Bioinformatics online.

  20. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamerdin, J.E.; Stilwagen, S.A.; Ramirez, M.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3{prime} of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. TWIST1 and TWIST2 promoter methylation and protein expression in tumor stroma influence the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like tumor budding phenotype in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, José A; Helbling, Melina; Koelzer, Viktor H; Tschan, Mario P; Berger, Martin D; Hädrich, Marion; Schnüriger, Beat; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Dawson, Heather; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti

    2015-01-20

    Tumor budding in colorectal cancer is likened to an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) characterized predominantly by loss of E-cadherin and up-regulation of E-cadherin repressors like TWIST1 and TWIST2. Here we investigate a possible epigenetic link between TWIST proteins and the tumor budding phenotype. TWIST1 and TWIST2 promoter methylation and protein expression were investigated in six cell lines and further correlated with tumor budding in patient cohort 1 (n = 185). Patient cohort 2 (n = 112) was used to assess prognostic effects. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of tumor epithelium and stroma from low- and high-grade budding cancers was performed. In colorectal cancers, TWIST1 and TWIST2 expression was essentially restricted to stromal cells. LCM results of a high-grade budding case show positive TWIST1 and TWIST2 stroma and no methylation, while the low-grade budding case was characterized by negative stroma and strong hypermethylation. TWIST1 stromal cell staining was associated with adverse features like more advanced pT (p = 0.0044), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0301), lymphatic vessel invasion (p = 0.0373), perineural invasion (p = 0.0109) and worse overall survival time (p = 0.0226). Stromal cells may influence tumor budding in colorectal cancers through expression of TWIST1. Hypermethylation of the tumor stroma may represent an alternative mechanism for regulation of TWIST1.

  2. Linking social and spatial networks to viral community phylogenetics reveals subtype-specific transmission dynamics in African lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain-Jones, Nicholas M; Packer, Craig; Troyer, Jennifer L; VanderWaal, Kimberly; Robinson, Stacie; Jacquot, Maude; Craft, Meggan E

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneity within pathogen species can have important consequences for how pathogens transmit across landscapes; however, discerning different transmission routes is challenging. Here, we apply both phylodynamic and phylogenetic community ecology techniques to examine the consequences of pathogen heterogeneity on transmission by assessing subtype-specific transmission pathways in a social carnivore. We use comprehensive social and spatial network data to examine transmission pathways for three subtypes of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVPle ) in African lions (Panthera leo) at multiple scales in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. We used FIVPle molecular data to examine the role of social organization and lion density in shaping transmission pathways and tested to what extent vertical (i.e., father- and/or mother-offspring relationships) or horizontal (between unrelated individuals) transmission underpinned these patterns for each subtype. Using the same data, we constructed subtype-specific FIVPle co-occurrence networks and assessed what combination of social networks, spatial networks or co-infection best structured the FIVPle network. While social organization (i.e., pride) was an important component of FIVPle transmission pathways at all scales, we find that FIVPle subtypes exhibited different transmission pathways at within- and between-pride scales. A combination of social and spatial networks, coupled with consideration of subtype co-infection, was likely to be important for FIVPle transmission for the two major subtypes, but the relative contribution of each factor was strongly subtype-specific. Our study provides evidence that pathogen heterogeneity is important in understanding pathogen transmission, which could have consequences for how endemic pathogens are managed. Furthermore, we demonstrate that community phylogenetic ecology coupled with phylodynamic techniques can reveal insights into the differential evolutionary pressures acting on virus

  3. Gorgonian disease outbreak in the Gulf of Naples: pathology reveals cyanobacterial infection linked to elevated sea temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carella, F; Aceto, S; Saggiomo, M; Mangoni, O; De Vico, G

    2014-08-21

    In recent years, mass mortality events of benthic invertebrates in the Mediterranean Sea have been documented to coincide with the increased seawater temperatures associated with global climate change. Following a disease outbreak in gorgonians during the summer seasons of 2008 and 2009 in the Gulf of Naples (Tyrrhenian Sea), we conducted gross and microscopic analyses of healthy and diseased specimens of Eunicella cavolinii and E. singularis using both light and electron microscopy (SEM). Macroscopically, diseased colonies exhibited evident tissue thinning, and dead colonies showed a complete loss of polyps and coenenchyme, exposing their skeletons to settlement by fouling organisms. Histopathology revealed chronic inflammatory lesions at the polyp and axial level, characterized by amoebocyte infiltration of tissue accompanied by new apposition of melanin/gorgonin sheets. We interpreted this response as a defense against different kinds of pathogens-identified as mainly a heterogeneous consortium of filamentous cyanobacteria-and which gradually led to enlargement and hardening of the coral axis, which resembled a wood-like structure at the final stage of the disease. These processes elicited the formation of multiple inflammatory nodules and capsules, some of which were macroscopically visible. A parallel 16S rRNA and ITS analysis of the diseased tissue identified Synechococcus, Arthrospira and other uncultured cyanobacteria grouped within the Oscillatoriales. These results suggest that a cyanobacterial consortium is involved in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory disease leading to the mortality of Gorgoniaceae in the area. Finally, there were anomalously high temperatures (up to 25°C) between 10 and 20 m depth during the sampling period, particularly in June 2009. This supports the hypothesis that the coral skeleton may serve as a reservoir for the pathogens in cooler seasons, with warmer conditions leading to pathogen reactivation and recurring mortality

  4. Electrochemical regulation of budding yeast polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Haupt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs, which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization.

  5. Electrochemical Regulation of Budding Yeast Polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Matthieu; Chang, Fred; Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Cells are naturally surrounded by organized electrical signals in the form of local ion fluxes, membrane potential, and electric fields (EFs) at their surface. Although the contribution of electrochemical elements to cell polarity and migration is beginning to be appreciated, underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we show that an exogenous EF can orient cell polarization in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells, directing the growth of mating projections towards sites of hyperpolarized membrane potential, while directing bud emergence in the opposite direction, towards sites of depolarized potential. Using an optogenetic approach, we demonstrate that a local change in membrane potential triggered by light is sufficient to direct cell polarization. Screens for mutants with altered EF responses identify genes involved in transducing electrochemical signals to the polarity machinery. Membrane potential, which is regulated by the potassium transporter Trk1p, is required for polarity orientation during mating and EF response. Membrane potential may regulate membrane charges through negatively charged phosphatidylserines (PSs), which act to position the Cdc42p-based polarity machinery. These studies thus define an electrochemical pathway that directs the orientation of cell polarization. PMID:25548923

  6. Tumor budding in upper gastrointestinal carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Hendrik Koelzer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The basis of personalized medicine in oncology is the prediction of an individual’s risk of relapse and death from disease. The presence of tumor budding (TB at the tumor-host interface of gastrointestinal cancers has been recognized as a hallmark of unfavorable disease biology. TB is defined as the presence of dedifferentiated cells or small clusters of up to five cells at the tumor invasive front and can be observed in aggressive carcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas, ampulla, colon and rectum. Presence of TB reproducibly correlates with advanced tumor stage, frequent lymphovascular invasion, nodal and distant metastasis. The UICC has officially recognized TB as additional independent prognostic factor in cancers of the colon and rectum. Recent studies have also characterized TB as a promising prognostic indicator for clinical management of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction and gastric adenocarcinoma. However, several important issues have to be addressed for application in daily diagnostic practice: 1 Validation of prognostic scoring systems for tumor budding in large, multi-center studies 2 Consensus on the optimal assessment method 3 Inter-observer reproducibility. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of TB in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract including critical appraisal of perspectives for further study.

  7. Ty1-copia elements reveal diverse insertion sites linked to polymorphisms among flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-González, Leonardo; Mhiri, Corinne; Grandbastien, Marie-Angèle; Deyholos, Michael K

    2016-12-07

    Initial characterization of the flax genome showed that Ty1-copia retrotransposons are abundant, with several members being recently inserted, and in close association with genes. Recent insertions indicate a potential for ongoing transpositional activity that can create genomic diversity among accessions, cultivars or varieties. The polymorphisms generated constitute a good source of molecular markers that may be associated with phenotype if the insertions alter gene activity. Flax, where accessions are bred mainly for seed nutritional properties or for fibers, constitutes a good model for studying the relationship of transpositional activity with diversification and breeding. In this study, we estimated copy number and used a type of transposon display known as Sequence-Specific Amplification Polymorphisms (SSAPs), to characterize six families of Ty1-copia elements across 14 flax accessions. Polymorphic insertion sites were sequenced to find insertions that could potentially alter gene expression, and a preliminary test was performed with selected genes bearing transposable element (TE) insertions. Quantification of six families of Ty1-copia elements indicated different abundances among TE families and between flax accessions, which suggested diverse transpositional histories. SSAPs showed a high level of polymorphism in most of the evaluated retrotransposon families, with a trend towards higher levels of polymorphism in low-copy number families. Ty1-copia insertion polymorphisms among cultivars allowed a general distinction between oil and fiber types, and between spring and winter types, demonstrating their utility in diversity studies. Characterization of polymorphic insertions revealed an overwhelming association with genes, with insertions disrupting exons, introns or within 1 kb of coding regions. A preliminary test on the potential transcriptional disruption by TEs of four selected genes evaluated in three different tissues, showed one case of significant

  8. Bud structure, position and fate generate various branching patterns along shoots of closely related Rosaceae species: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Evelyne; Crespel, Laurent; Denoyes, Béatrice; Morel, Philippe; Demene, Marie-Noëlle; Lauri, Pierre-Eric; Wenden, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Branching in temperate plants is closely linked to bud fates, either floral or vegetative. Here, we review how the fate of meristematic tissues contained in buds and their position along a shoot imprint specific branching patterns which differ among species. Through examples chosen in closely related species in different genera of the Rosaceae family, a panorama of patterns is apparent. Patterns depend on whether vegetative and floral buds are borne individually or together in mixed buds, develop as the shoot grows or after a rest period, and are located in axillary or terminal positions along the parent shoot. The resulting branching patterns are conserved among varieties in a given species but progressively change with the parent shoot length during plant ontogeny. They can also be modulated by agronomic and environmental conditions. The existence of various organizations in the topology and fate of meristematic tissues and their appendages in closely related species questions the between-species conservation of physiological and molecular mechanisms leading to bud outgrowth vs. quiescence and to floral induction vs. vegetative development. PMID:25520729

  9. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi; Bosman, Fred; Cathomas, Gieri; Dawson, Heather; El Zimaity, Hala; Fléjou, Jean-François; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hartmann, Arndt; Kakar, Sanjay; Langner, Cord; Nagtegaal, Iris; Puppa, Giacomo; Riddell, Robert; Ristimäki, Ari; Sheahan, Kieran; Smyrk, Thomas; Sugihara, Kenichi; Terris, Benoît; Ueno, Hideki; Vieth, Michael; Zlobec, Inti; Quirke, Phil

    2017-09-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer but a standardized method for its assessment has been lacking. The primary aim of the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) was to reach agreement on an international, evidence-based standardized scoring system for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The ITBCC included nine sessions with presentations, a pre-meeting survey and an e-book covering the key publications on tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The 'Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation' method was used to determine the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence. The following 10 statements achieved consensus: tumor budding is defined as a single tumor cell or a cell cluster consisting of four tumor cells or less (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of lymph node metastases in pT1 colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of survival in stage II colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be taken into account along with other clinicopathological features in a multidisciplinary setting (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is counted on H&E (19/22, 86%). Intratumoral budding exists in colorectal cancer and has been shown to be related to lymph node metastasis (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is assessed in one hotspot (in a field measuring 0.785 mm(2)) at the invasive front (22/22, 100%). A three-tier system should be used along with the budding count in order to facilitate risk stratification in colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding and tumor grade are not the same (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be included in guidelines/protocols for colorectal cancer reporting (23/23, 100%). Members of the ITBCC were able to reach strong consensus on a single international, evidence-based method for tumor budding assessment and reporting. It is proposed that this method be incorporated into colorectal cancer

  10. Bud initiation and optimum harvest date in Brussels sprouts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaarts, A.P.; Sukkel, W.

    1999-01-01

    For six cultivars of Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera) with a decreasing degree of earliness, or optimum harvest date, the time of bud initiation was determined during two seasons. Fifty percent of the plants had initiated buds between 60 and 75 days after planting (DAP) in 1994

  11. Cell to cell signalling during vertebrate limb bud development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, Lia

    2004-01-01

    Communication between cells is essential during embryonic development. The vertebrate limb bud provides us a model to study signalling interactions between cells during patterning of embryonic tissues and organogenesis. In chapter 1 I give an introduction about limb bud development that is focussed

  12. Floral bud distortion in soybean and incidence in Central India ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Floral bud distortion in soybean and incidence in Central India. V Jadhav Pravin, SS Mane, RS Nandanwar, PB Kale, MS Dudhare, MP Moharil, RG Dani. Abstract. We describe a peculiar and often harmful budding disorder in soybean, leading to huge yield loss in India. To determine the prevalence of floral distortion in ...

  13. Photocontrol of bud burst involves gibberellin biosynthesis in Rosa sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubane, Djillali; Rabot, Amélie; Mortreau, Eric; Legourrierec, Jose; Péron, Thomas; Foucher, Fabrice; Ahcène, Youyou; Pelleschi-Travier, Sandrine; Leduc, Nathalie; Hamama, Latifa; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2012-09-01

    Light is a critical determinant of plant shape by controlling branching patterns and bud burst in many species. To gain insight into how light induces bud burst, we investigated whether its inductive effect in rose was related to gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis. In axillary buds of beheaded plants subject to light, the expression of two GA biosynthesis genes (RoGA20ox and RoGA3ox) was promptly and strongly induced, while that of a GA-catabolism genes (RoGA2ox) was reduced. By contrast, lower expression levels of these two GA biosynthesis genes were found in darkness, and correlated with a total inhibition of bud burst. This effect was dependent on both light intensity and quality. In in vitro cultured buds, the inductive effect of light on the growth of preformed leaves and SAM organogenic activity was inhibited by ancymidol and paclobutrazol, two effectors of GA biosynthesis. This effect was concentration-dependent, and negated by GA(3). However, GA(3) alone could not rescue bud burst in the dark. GA biosynthesis was also required for the expression and activity of a vacuolar invertase, and therefore for light-induced sugar metabolism within buds. These findings are evidence that GA biosynthesis contributes to the light effect on bud burst and lay the foundations of a better understanding of its exact role in plant branching. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. An elastic model of partial budding of retroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2008-03-01

    Retroviruses are characterized by their unique infection strategy of reverse transcription, in which the genetic information flows from RNA back to DNA. The most well known representative is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Unlike budding of traditional enveloped viruses, retrovirus budding happens together with the formation of spherical virus capsids at the cell membrane. Led by this unique budding mechanism, we proposed an elastic model of retrovirus budding in this work. We found that if the lipid molecules of the membrane are supplied fast enough from the cell interior, the budding always proceeds to completion. In the opposite limit, there is an optimal size of partially budded virions. The zenith angle of these partially spherical capsids, α, is given by α˜(2̂/κσ)^1/4, where κ is the bending modulus of the membrane, σ is the surface tension of the membrane, and τ characterizes the strength of capsid protein interaction. If τ is large enough such that α˜π, the budding is complete. Our model explained many features of retrovirus partial budding observed in experiments.

  15. Impact of peritumoral and intratumoral budding in esophageal adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Svenja; Guldener, Lars; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Zlobec, Inti; Koelzer, Viktor H; Lugli, Alessandro; Kröll, Dino; Seiler, Christian A; Feith, Marcus; Langer, Rupert

    2016-06-01

    Tumor budding has prognostic significance in many carcinomas and is defined as the presence of detached isolated single cells or small cell clusters up to 5 cells at the invasion front (peritumoral budding [PTB]) or within the tumor (intratumoral budding [ITB]). For esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs), there are currently only few data about the impact of this morphological feature. We investigated tumor budding in a large collective of 200 primarily resected EACs. Pancytokeratin staining was demonstrated to be superior to hematoxylin and eosin staining for the detection of buds with substantial to excellent interobserver agreement and used for subsequent analysis. PTB and ITB were scored across 10 high-power fields (HPFs). The median count of tumor buds was 130/10 HPFs for PTB (range, 2-593) and 80/10 HPFs for ITB (range, 1-656). PTB and ITB correlated significantly with each other (r = 0.9; P tumor categories (P tumors with lymph node metastases (P tumor grading (P budding is associated with aggressive tumor phenotype. Assessment of tumor budding, especially ITB, may provide additional prognostic information about tumor behavior and may be useful in specific cases for risk stratification of EAC patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Constitutive expression of the Poplar FD-like basic leucine zipper transcription factor alters growth and bud development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier-Line, Cécile M; Coleman, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    In poplar, the CO/FT regulatory module mediates seasonal growth cessation. Although FT interacts with the basic leucine zipper transcription factor FD, surprisingly little is known about the possible role of FD in bud development and growth cessation in trees. In this study, we examined the expression and localization of the poplar FD homolog, PtFD1, during short-day (SD)-induced bud development, and the consequences of overexpressing PtFD1 on bud development and shoot growth. PtFD1 was primarily expressed in apical and axillary buds and exhibited a transient increase in expression during the initial stages of SD-induced bud development. This transient increase declined with continued SD treatment. When PtFD1 was overexpressed in poplar, SD-induced growth cessation and bud formation were abolished. PTFD1 overexpression also resulted in precocious flowering of juvenile plants in long-day (LD) photoperiods. Because the phenotypes associated with overexpression of PtFD1 are similar to those observe when poplar FT1 is overexpressed (Science, 312, 2006, 1040), the expression and diurnal patterns of expression of both poplar FT1 and FT2 were characterized in PtFD1 overexpression poplars and found to be altered. DNA microarray analysis revealed few differences in gene expression between PtFD1 overexpressing poplars in LD conditions while extensive levels of differential gene expression occur in SD-treated plants. These results enforce the connection between the regulation of flowering and the regulation of growth cessation and bud development in poplar. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Plantlets from encapsulated shoot buds of Catalpa ovata G. Don

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Wysokińska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoot buds isolated from in vitro shoot cultures of Catalpa ovata G. Don were encapsulated using 3% sodium alginate with sucrose (3% and 50 mM calcium chloride. The morphogenic response of encapsulated buds was affected by such factors, like composition of the media and the presence of growth regulators. The highest frequency of plantlet germination from encapsulated buds (70% within 4 weeks was obtained on Woody Plant medium (WP (Lloyd and McCown 1980 containing indole-3-butyric acid (IBA (1 mg/l. The process was substantially inhibited by cold-storage (4oC of encapsulated buds. In this case, the frequency response ranged from 3% to 22% dependent on storage period (28 or 42 days and the presence of the paraffin coat covering the alginate capsules. The plantlets developed from both unstored and stored encapsulated buds of C. ovata were transplanted to soil and grew in pots to phenotypically normal plants.

  18. Microtubule cross-linking activity of She1 ensures spindle stability for spindle positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yili; An, Xiaojing; Tomaszewski, Alexis; Hepler, Peter K; Lee, Wei-Lih

    2017-08-09

    Dynein mediates spindle positioning in budding yeast by pulling on astral microtubules (MTs) from the cell cortex. The MT-associated protein She1 regulates dynein activity along astral MTs and directs spindle movements toward the bud cell. In addition to localizing to astral MTs, She1 also targets to the spindle, but its role on the spindle remains unknown. Using function-separating alleles, live-cell spindle assays, and in vitro biochemical analyses, we show that She1 is required for the maintenance of metaphase spindle stability. She1 binds and cross-links MTs via a C-terminal MT-binding site. She1 can also self-assemble into ring-shaped oligomers. In cells, She1 stabilizes interpolar MTs, preventing spindle deformations during movement, and we show that this activity is regulated by Ipl1/Aurora B phosphorylation during cell cycle progression. Our data reveal how She1 ensures spindle integrity during spindle movement across the bud neck and suggest a potential link between regulation of spindle integrity and dynein pathway activity. © 2017 Zhu et al.

  19. Cytokinins and polar transport of auxin in axillary pea buds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kalousek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of cytokinin on auxin transport during release of axillary buds from apical dominance was studied. Expression of auxin-carrier coding genes PsAUX1 (AUXIN RESISTANT 1 and PsPIN1 (PIN-FORMED 1 was explored in axillary buds of the 2nd node of 7-day pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Vladan after decapitation or after exogenous application of benzyladenine (6-benzylaminopurine onto axillary buds of intact plants. Localization of the PsPIN1 protein, the key factor for polar transport of auxin in axillary buds, was visualised by immunohistochemistry. After exogenous application of cytokinin the expression of PsAUX1 and PsPIN1 rapidly increased with a simultaneous rapid decrease in PsDRM1 and PsAD1 expression – genes related to bud dormancy. The same changes in expression were observed after decapitation, however they were markedly slower. The PsPIN1 auxin efflux carrier in the inhibited axillary buds of intact plants was localised in a non-polar manner. After exogenous application of cytokinin gradual polarisation of the PsPIN1 protein occurred on the basal pole of polar auxin transport competent cells. Despite the fact that direct auxin application to buds of intact plants led to an increase in PsAUX1 and PsPIN1 expression, the buds remained dormant (non-growing what was accompanied by persistent expression of the dormancy markers PsDRM1 and PsAD1. The results indicate a possible effect of cytokinins on biosynthesis, and/or transport of auxin in axillary buds and they highlight the importance of auxin-cytokinin crosstalk in the regulation of bud outgrowth after breaking of apical dominance.

  20. High tumor budding stratifies breast cancer with metastatic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhia, Bodour; Trippel, Mafalda; Pfaltz, Katrin; Cihoric, Nikola; Grogg, André; Lädrach, Claudia; Zlobec, Inti; Tapia, Coya

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding refers to single or small cluster of tumor cells detached from the main tumor mass. In colon cancer high tumor budding is associated with positive lymph nodes and worse prognosis. Therefore, we investigated the value of tumor budding as a predictive feature of lymph node status in breast cancer (BC). Whole tissue sections from 148 surgical resection specimens (SRS) and 99 matched preoperative core biopsies (CB) with invasive BC of no special type were analyzed on one slide stained with pan-cytokeratin. In SRS, the total number of intratumoral (ITB) and peripheral tumor buds (PTB) in ten high-power fields (HPF) were counted. A bud was defined as a single tumor cell or a cluster of up to five tumor cells. High tumor budding equated to scores averaging >4 tumor buds across 10HPFs. In CB high tumor budding was defined as ≥10 buds/HPF. The results were correlated with pathological parameters. In SRS high PTB stratified BC with lymph node metastases (p ≤ 0.03) and lymphatic invasion (p ≤ 0.015). In CB high tumor budding was significantly (p = 0.0063) associated with venous invasion. Pathologists are able, based on morphology, to categorize BC into a high and low risk groups based in part on lymph node status. This risk assessment can be easily performed during routine diagnostics and it is time and cost effective. These results suggest that high PTB is associated with loco-regional metastasis, highlighting the possibility that this tumor feature may help in therapeutic decision-making.

  1. Budding yeast for budding geneticists: a primer on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duina, Andrea A; Miller, Mary E; Keeney, Jill B

    2014-05-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model organism for studying fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. This Primer article presents a brief historical perspective on the emergence of this organism as a premier experimental system over the course of the past century. An overview of the central features of the S. cerevisiae genome, including the nature of its genetic elements and general organization, is also provided. Some of the most common experimental tools and resources available to yeast geneticists are presented in a way designed to engage and challenge undergraduate and graduate students eager to learn more about the experimental amenability of budding yeast. Finally, a discussion of several major discoveries derived from yeast studies highlights the far-reaching impact that the yeast system has had and will continue to have on our understanding of a variety of cellular processes relevant to all eukaryotes, including humans.

  2. Cell polarization in budding and fission yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sophie G; Arkowitz, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Polarization is a fundamental cellular property, which is essential for the function of numerous cell types. Over the past three to four decades, research using the best-established yeast systems in cell biological research, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (or budding yeast) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (or fission yeast), has brought to light fundamental principles governing the establishment and maintenance of a polarized, asymmetric state. These two organisms, though both ascomycetes, are evolutionarily very distant and exhibit distinct shapes and modes of growth. In this review, we compare and contrast the two systems. We first highlight common cell polarization pathways, detailing the contribution of Rho GTPases, the cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, lipids, and protein scaffolds. We then contrast the major differences between the two organisms, describing their distinct strategies in growth site selection and growth zone dimensions and compartmentalization, which may be the basis for their distinct shapes. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analyzing DNA replication checkpoint in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustedt, Nicole; Shimada, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Checkpoints are conserved mechanisms that prevent progression into the next phase of the cell cycle when cells are unable to accomplish the previous event properly. Cells also possess a surveillance mechanism called the DNA replication checkpoint, which consists of a conserved kinase cascade that is provoked by insults that block or slow down replication fork progression. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the DNA replication checkpoint controls the timing of S-phase events such as origin firing and spindle elongation. This checkpoint also upregulates dNTP pools and maintains the replication fork structure in order to resume DNA replication after replication block. Many replication checkpoint factors have been found to be tumor suppressors, highlighting the importance of this checkpoint pathway in human health. Here we describe a series of protocols to analyze the DNA replication checkpoint in S. cerevisiae.

  4. Decellularized Tooth Bud Scaffolds for Tooth Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Vazquez, B; Oreadi, D; Yelick, P C

    2017-05-01

    Whole tooth regeneration approaches currently are limited by our inability to bioengineer full-sized, living replacement teeth. Recently, decellularized organ scaffolds have shown promise for applications in regenerative medicine by providing a natural extracellular matrix environment that promotes cell attachment and tissue-specific differentiation leading to full-sized organ regeneration. We hypothesize that decellularized tooth buds (dTBs) created from unerupted porcine tooth buds (TBs) can be used to guide reseeded dental cell differentiation to form whole bioengineered teeth, thereby providing a potential off-the-shelf scaffold for whole tooth regeneration. Porcine TBs were harvested from discarded 6-mo-old pig jaws, and decellularized by successive sodium dodecyl sulfate/Triton-X cycles. Four types of replicate implants were used in this study: 1) acellular dTBs; 2) recellularized dTBs seeded with porcine dental epithelial cells, human dental pulp cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (recell-dTBs); 3) dTBs seeded with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 (dTB-BMPs); and 4) freshly isolated nondecellularized natural TBs (nTBs). Replicate samples were implanted into the mandibles of host Yucatan mini-pigs and grown for 3 or 6 mo. Harvested mandibles with implanted TB constructs were fixed in formalin, decalcified, embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and analyzed via histological methods. Micro-computed tomography (CT) analysis was performed on harvested 6-mo samples prior to decalcification. All harvested constructs exhibited a high degree of cellularity. Significant production of organized dentin and enamel-like tissues was observed in dTB-recell and nTB implants, but not in dTB or dTB-BMP implants. Micro-CT analyses of 6-mo implants showed the formation of organized, bioengineered teeth of comparable size to natural teeth. To our knowledge, these results are the first to describe the potential use of dTBs for functional whole tooth regeneration.

  5. Model thrombi formed under flow reveal the role of factor XIII-mediated cross-linking in resistance to fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, N J; Koikkalainen, J S; Fraser, S R; Duthie, K M; Griffin, M; Mitchell, J; Watson, H G; Booth, N A

    2010-09-01

    Activated factor XIII (FXIIIa), a transglutaminase, introduces fibrin-fibrin and fibrin-inhibitor cross-links, resulting in more mechanically stable clots. The impact of cross-linking on resistance to fibrinolysis has proved challenging to evaluate quantitatively. We used a whole blood model thrombus system to characterize the role of cross-linking in resistance to fibrinolytic degradation. Model thrombi, which mimic arterial thrombi formed in vivo, were prepared with incorporated fluorescently labeled fibrinogen, in order to allow quantification of fibrinolysis as released fluorescence units per minute. A site-specific inhibitor of transglutaminases, added to blood from normal donors, yielded model thrombi that lysed more easily, either spontaneously or by plasminogen activators. This was observed both in the cell/platelet-rich head and fibrin-rich tail. Model thrombi from an FXIII-deficient patient lysed more quickly than normal thrombi; replacement therapy with FXIII concentrate normalized lysis. In vitro addition of purified FXIII to the patient's preprophylaxis blood, but not to normal control blood, resulted in more stable thrombi, indicating no further efficacy of supraphysiologic FXIII. However, addition of tissue transglutaminase, which is synthesized by endothelial cells, generated thrombi that were more resistant to fibrinolysis; this may stabilize mural thrombi in vivo. Model thrombi formed under flow, even those prepared as plasma 'thrombi', reveal the effect of FXIII on fibrinolysis. Although very low levels of FXIII are known to produce mechanical clot stability, and to achieve γ-dimerization, they appear to be suboptimal in conferring full resistance to fibrinolysis. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  6. Site-specific cross-linking of TBP in vivo and in vitro reveals a direct functional interaction with the SAGA subunit Spt3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohibullah, Neeman; Hahn, Steven

    2008-11-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) is critical for transcription by all three nuclear RNA polymerases. In order to identify factors that interact with TBP, the nonnatural photoreactive amino acid rho-benzoyl-phenylalanine (BPA) was substituted onto the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae TBP in vivo. Cross-linking of these TBP derivatives in isolated transcription preinitiation complexes or in living cells reveals physical interactions of TBP with transcriptional coregulator subunits and with the general transcription factor TFIIA. Importantly, the results show a direct interaction between TBP and the SAGA coactivator subunits Spt3 and Spt8. Mutations on the Spt3-interacting surface of TBP significantly reduce the interaction of TBP with SAGA, show a corresponding decrease in transcription activation, and fail to recruit TBP to a SAGA-dependent promoter, demonstrating that the direct interaction of these factors is important for activated transcription. These results prove a key prediction of the model for stimulation of transcription at SAGA-dependent genes via Spt3. Our cross-linking data also significantly extend the known surfaces of TBP that directly interact with the transcriptional regulator Mot1 and the general transcription factor TFIIA.

  7. Architecture of a Full-length Retroviral Integrase Monomer and Dimer, Revealed by Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Chemical Cross-linking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojja, Ravi S.; Andrake, Mark D.; Weigand, Steven; Merkel, George; Yarychkivska, Olya; Henderson, Adam; Kummerling, Marissa; Skalka, Anna Marie (Fox Chase); (NWU)

    2012-02-07

    We determined the size and shape of full-length avian sarcoma virus (ASV) integrase (IN) monomers and dimers in solution using small angle x-ray scattering. The low resolution data obtained establish constraints for the relative arrangements of the three component domains in both forms. Domain organization within the small angle x-ray envelopes was determined by combining available atomic resolution data for individual domains with results from cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry. The full-length dimer architecture so revealed is unequivocally different from that proposed from x-ray crystallographic analyses of two-domain fragments, in which interactions between the catalytic core domains play a prominent role. Core-core interactions are detected only in cross-linked IN tetramers and are required for concerted integration. The solution dimer is stabilized by C-terminal domain (CTD-CTD) interactions and by interactions of the N-terminal domain in one subunit with the core and CTD in the second subunit. These results suggest a pathway for formation of functional IN-DNA complexes that has not previously been considered and possible strategies for preventing such assembly.

  8. Bud composition, branching patterns and leaf phenology in cerrado woody species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damascos, M A; Prado, C H B A; Ronquim, C C

    2005-11-01

    Plants have complex mechanisms of aerial biomass exposition, which depend on bud composition, the period of the year in which shoot extension occurs, branching pattern, foliage persistence, herbivory and environmental conditions. The influence of water availability and temperature on shoot growth, the bud composition, the leaf phenology, and the relationship between partial leaf fall and branching were evaluated over 3 years in Cerrado woody species Bauhinia rufa (BR), Leandra lacunosa (LL) and Miconia albicans (MA). Deciduous BR preformed organs in buds and leaves flush synchronously at the transition from the dry to the wet season. The expansion time of leaves is <1 month. Main shoots (first-order axis, A1 shoots) extended over 30 d and they did not branch. BR budding and foliage unfolds were brought about independently of inter-annual rainfall variations. By contrast, in LL and MA evergreen species, the shoot extension rate and the neoformation of aerial organs depended on rainfall. Leaf emergence was continuous for 2-6 months and lamina expansion took place over 1-4 months. The leaf life span was 5-20 months and the main A1 shoot extension happened over 122-177 d. Both evergreen species allocated biomass to shoots, leaves or flowers continuously during the year, branching in the middle of the wet season to form second-order (A2 shoots) and third-order (A3 shoots) axis in LL and A2 shoots in MA. Partial shed of A1 shoot leaves would facilitate a higher branching intensity A2 shoot production in LL than in MA. MA presented a longer leaf life span, produced a lower percentage of A2 shoots but had a higher meristem persistence on A1 and A2 shoots than LL. It was possible to identify different patterns of aerial growth in Cerrado woody species defined by shoot-linked traits such as branching pattern, bud composition, meristem persistence and leaf phenology. These related traits must be considered over and above leaf deciduousness for searching functional guilds in a

  9. Release of Apical Dominance in Potato Tuber Is Accompanied by Programmed Cell Death in the Apical Bud Meristem[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Buskila, Yossi; Lopesco, Yael; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Saad, Inbal; Holdengreber, Vered; Belausov, Eduard; Zemach, Hanita; Ori, Naomi; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2012-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber, a swollen underground stem, is used as a model system for the study of dormancy release and sprouting. Natural dormancy release, at room temperature, is initiated by tuber apical bud meristem (TAB-meristem) sprouting characterized by apical dominance (AD). Dormancy is shortened by treatments such as bromoethane (BE), which mimics the phenotype of dormancy release in cold storage by inducing early sprouting of several buds simultaneously. We studied the mechanisms governing TAB-meristem dominance release. TAB-meristem decapitation resulted in the development of increasing numbers of axillary buds with time in storage, suggesting the need for autonomous dormancy release of each bud prior to control by the apical bud. Hallmarks of programmed cell death (PCD) were identified in the TAB-meristems during normal growth, and these were more extensive when AD was lost following either extended cold storage or BE treatment. Hallmarks included DNA fragmentation, induced gene expression of vacuolar processing enzyme1 (VPE1), and elevated VPE activity. VPE1 protein was semipurified from BE-treated apical buds, and its endogenous activity was fully inhibited by a cysteinyl aspartate-specific protease-1-specific inhibitor N-Acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-CHO (Ac-YVAD-CHO). Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the TAB-meristem of BE-treated tubers: a knob-like body in the vacuole, development of cytoplasmic vesicles, and budding-like nuclear segmentations. Treatment of tubers with BE and then VPE inhibitor induced faster growth and recovered AD in detached and nondetached apical buds, respectively. We hypothesize that PCD occurrence is associated with the weakening of tuber AD, allowing early sprouting of mature lateral buds. PMID:22362870

  10. Structural and Biochemical Studies of ALIX/AlP1 and Its Role in Retrovirus Budding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher,R.; Chung, H.; Zhai, Q.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, W.; Hill, C.

    2007-01-01

    ALIX/AIP1 functions in enveloped virus budding, endosomal protein sorting, and many other cellular processes. Retroviruses, including HIV-1, SIV, and EIAV, bind and recruit ALIX through YPXnL late-domain motifs (X = any residue; n = 1-3). Crystal structures reveal that human ALIX is composed of an N-terminal Bro1 domain and a central domain that is composed of two extended three-helix bundles that form elongated arms that fold back into a 'V.'. The structures also reveal conformational flexibility in the arms that suggests that the V domain may act as a flexible hinge in response to ligand binding. YPXnL late domains bind in a conserved hydrophobic pocket on the second arm near the apex of the V, whereas CHMP4/ESCRT-III proteins bind a conserved hydrophobic patch on the Bro1 domain, and both interactions are required for virus budding. ALIX therefore serves as a flexible, extended scaffold that connects retroviral Gag proteins to ESCRT-III and other cellular-budding machinery.

  11. Freezing behaviours in wintering Cornus florida flower bud tissues revisited using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masaya; Ide, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Hideyuki; Murakawa, Hiroki; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Price, William S; Arata, Yoji

    2016-12-01

    How plant tissues control their water behaviours (phase and movement) under subfreezing temperatures through adaptative strategies (freezing behaviours) is important for their survival. However, the fine details of freezing behaviours in complex organs and their regulation mechanisms are poorly understood, and non-invasive visualization/analysis is required. The localization/density of unfrozen water in wintering Cornus florida flower buds at subfreezing temperatures was visualized with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This allowed tissue-specific freezing behaviours to be determined. MRI images revealed that individual anthers and ovules remained stably supercooled to -14 to -21 °C or lower. The signal from other floral tissues decreased during cooling to -7 °C, which likely indicates their extracellular freezing. Microscopic observation and differential thermal analyses revealed that the abrupt breakdown of supercooled individual ovules and anthers resulted in their all-or-nothing type of injuries. The distribution of ice nucleation activity in flower buds determined using a test tube-based assay corroborated which tissues primarily froze. MRI is a powerful tool for non-invasively visualizing unfrozen tissues. Freezing events and/or dehydration events can be located by digital comparison of MRI images acquired at different temperatures. Only anthers and ovules preferentially remaining unfrozen are a novel freezing behaviour in flower buds. Physicochemical and biological mechanisms/implications are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Taste bud homeostasis in health, disease, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pu; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian taste bud is an onion-shaped epithelial structure with 50-100 tightly packed cells, including taste receptor cells, supporting cells, and basal cells. Taste receptor cells detect nutrients and toxins in the oral cavity and transmit the sensory information to gustatory nerve endings in the buds. Supporting cells may play a role in the clearance of excess neurotransmitters after their release from taste receptor cells. Basal cells are precursor cells that differentiate into mature taste cells. Similar to other epithelial cells, taste cells turn over continuously, with an average life span of about 8-12 days. To maintain structural homeostasis in taste buds, new cells are generated to replace dying cells. Several recent studies using genetic lineage tracing methods have identified populations of progenitor/stem cells for taste buds, although contributions of these progenitor/stem cell populations to taste bud homeostasis have yet to be fully determined. Some regulatory factors of taste cell differentiation and degeneration have been identified, but our understanding of these aspects of taste bud homoeostasis remains limited. Many patients with various diseases develop taste disorders, including taste loss and taste distortion. Decline in taste function also occurs during aging. Recent studies suggest that disruption or alteration of taste bud homeostasis may contribute to taste dysfunction associated with disease and aging.

  13. Molecular and Pathogenetic Aspects of Tumor Budding in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Heather; Lugli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, tumor budding in colorectal cancer has gained much attention as an indicator of lymph node metastasis, distant metastatic disease, local recurrence, worse overall and disease-free survival, and as an independent prognostic factor. Tumor buds, defined as the presence of single tumor cells or small clusters of up to five tumor cells at the peritumoral invasive front (peritumoral buds) or within the main tumor body (intratumoral buds), are thought to represent the morphological correlate of cancer cells having undergone epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), an important mechanism for the progression of epithelial cancers. In contrast to their undisputed prognostic power and potential to influence clinical management, our current understanding of the biological background of tumor buds is less established. Most studies examining tumor buds have attempted to recapitulate findings of mechanistic EMT studies using immunohistochemical markers. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of studies examining protein expression profiles of tumor buds and to illustrate the molecular pathways and crosstalk involved in their formation and maintenance. PMID:25806371

  14. Molecular and pathogenetic aspects of tumor budding in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather eDawson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, tumor budding in colorectal cancer has gained much attention as an indicator of lymph node metastasis, distant metastatic disease, local recurrence, worse overall and disease-free survival and as an independent prognostic factor. Tumor buds, defined as the presence of single tumor cells or small clusters of up to 5 tumor cells at the peritumoral invasive front (peritumoral buds or within the main tumor body (intratumoral buds, are thought to represent the morphological correlate of cancer cells having undergone epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, an important mechanism for the progression of epithelial cancers. In contrast to their undisputed prognostic power and potential to influence clinical management, our current understanding of the biological background of tumor buds is less established. Most studies examining tumor buds have attempted to recapitulate findings of mechanistic EMT studies using immunohistochemical markers. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of studies examining protein expression profiles of tumor buds and to illustrate the molecular pathways and crosstalk involved in their formation and maintenance.

  15. Sex chromosome-linked genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies of plant sex chromosome-linked genes have revealed many interesting characteristics, although there are limited reports about heteromorphic sex chromosomes in flowering plants. Sex chromosome-linked genes in angiosperms have been characterized mainly in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia. Although all such genes were isolated from transcripts of male flower buds of S. latifolia, most seem to be housekeeping genes except for the petal- and stamen-specific MADS box gene on the Y chromosome (SlAP3Y) and the male reproductive organ-specific gene on the X chromosome (MROS3X). Recent evolutionary studies have revealed at least three evolutionary strata on the X chromosome that are related to stepwise loss of recombination between the sex chromosomes. Moreover, genetic maps showed conservation of gene organization on the X chromosome in the genus Silene and substantial pericentric inversion between the X and Y chromosomes of S. latifolia during evolution. A comparison between paralogs on the sex chromosomes revealed that introns of the Y-linked genes are longer than those of X-linked paralogs. Although analyses of sex chromosome-linked genes suggest that degeneration of the Y chromosome has occurred, the Y chromosome in flowering plants remains the largest in the male genome, unlike that of mammals. Accumulation of repetitive sequences and the entire chloroplast genome on the Y chromosome appear to have contributed to this large size. However, more detailed studies will be required to help explain the basis for the fact that heteromorphic sex chromosomes in angiosperms are large.

  16. Alteration of starch hydrolyzing enzyme inhibitory properties, antioxidant activities, and phenolic profile of clove buds (Syzygium aromaticum L.) by cooking duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen A; Oboh, Ganiyu; Oyeleye, Sunday I; Osunmo, Kolawole

    2016-03-01

    This study assessed the effect of cooking duration on starch hydrolyzing enzyme (α-amylase and α-glucosidase) activities, antioxidant (1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl [DPPH*], hydroxyl [OH*] radicals scavenging abilities and reducing power) properties, and phenolic profile of clove buds. Clove buds (raw) were cooked for 10 (SC 10) and 20 min (SC 20) and subsequently, their effects were assessed on enzyme activities, antioxidant properties, and phenolic profile. Inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities and radicals scavenging abilities were altered by cooking in the trend; raw SC 20, with IC 50 values ranging from 0.25 to 0.52 mg/mL and 0.10 to 1.50 mg/mL respectively. HPLC phenolic profile of the clove buds revealed significant (P clove bud by activation and/or deactivation of redox-active metabolites.

  17. Asc1 supports cell-wall integrity near bud sites by a Pkc1 independent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Melamed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The yeast ribosomal protein Asc1 is a WD-protein family member. Its mammalian ortholog, RACK1 was initially discovered as a receptor for activated protein C kinase (PKC that functions to maintain the active conformation of PKC and to support its movement to target sites. In the budding yeast though, a connection between Asc1p and the PKC signaling pathway has never been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we found that asc1-deletion mutant (asc1Delta presents some of the hallmarks of PKC signaling mutants. These include an increased sensitivity to staurosporine, a specific Pkc1p inhibitor, and susceptibility to cell-wall perturbing treatments such as hypotonic- and heat shock conditions and zymolase treatment. Microscopic analysis of asc1Delta cells revealed cell-wall invaginations near bud sites after exposure to hypotonic conditions, and the dynamic of cells' survival after this stress further supports the involvement of Asc1p in maintaining the cell-wall integrity during the mid-to late stages of bud formation. Genetic interactions between asc1 and pkc1 reveal synergistic sensitivities of a double-knock out mutant (asc1Delta/pkc1Delta to cell-wall stress conditions, and high basal level of PKC signaling in asc1Delta. Furthermore, Asc1p has no effect on the cellular distribution or redistribution of Pkc1p at optimal or at cell-wall stress conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data support the idea that unlike its mammalian orthologs, Asc1p acts remotely from Pkc1p, to regulate the integrity of the cell-wall. We speculate that its role is exerted through translation regulation of bud-site related mRNAs during cells' growth.

  18. Budding & Grafting Citrus & Avocados in the Home Garden

    OpenAIRE

    Elam, Pam

    1997-01-01

    It is often tempting, after eating a particularly good orange or avocado, to plant the seed and grow your own tree full of these delicious fruit. The best way to produce good-quality fruit is to grow seedlings from them and then attach, by budding or grafting, material from trees that are known to be good producers. Budding and grafting can also be used to change or add varieties to mature citrus or avocado trees, a process known as top working. This publication is a brief introduction to bud...

  19. Factors Intrinsic to the Axillary Bud Determine Topophysic Effects on Bud and Shoot Growth and Flower Development in Rosa hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredmose; Hansen; Nielsen

    1999-09-01

    Topophysis (the influence of the position of axillary buds along the shoot on bud and shoot growth, fresh biomass accumulation, and flower development) were studied in Rosa hybrida L. Single-node cuttings with five-leaflet leaves were excised from nine stem positions and grown as single-stemmed rose plants. Plants were grown at 20-h photoperiods, 22 degrees C average air temperature, and an average photosynthetic photon flux density of 228 µmol m-2 s-1. Generally, onset of axillary bud growth and initial shoot growth were promoted, and flower height and bloom quality were reduced in plants from apical bud positions. Stem diameter, stem growth rate, and biomass buildup were greatest from medial bud positions; the plastochron was greater, and stems and internodes were longer, from basal bud positions. Flower diameter and cut flower vase life were not significantly influenced by topophysis. The results demonstrate that topophysis can determine the potential for plant development and flowering in R. hybrida and that this knowledge may be used to regulate plant growth. Results also indicate intrinsic mechanisms determining axillary bud growth, but the physiology of topophysis is presently unclear. A probable role of cytokinins in the topophysic prevention of growth observed is discussed.

  20. Crystal Structures of Wild-type and Mutant Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase Reveal an Alternative Conformation of NADPH that may be Linked to Trimethoprim Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Liu, J; Lombardo, M; Bolstad, D; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Both hospital- and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infections have become major health concerns in terms of morbidity, suffering and cost. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is an alternative treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. However, TMP-resistant strains have arisen with point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the target for TMP. A single point mutation, F98Y, has been shown biochemically to confer the majority of this resistance to TMP. Using a structure-based approach, we have designed a series of novel propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors that are active against several trimethoprim-resistant enzymes. We screened this series against wild-type and mutant (F98Y) S. aureus DHFR and found that several are active against both enzymes and specifically that the meta-biphenyl class of these inhibitors is the most potent. In order to understand the structural basis of this potency, we determined eight high-resolution crystal structures: four each of the wild-type and mutant DHFR enzymes bound to various propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors. In addition to explaining the structure-activity relationships, several of the structures reveal a novel conformation for the cofactor, NADPH. In this new conformation that is predominantly associated with the mutant enzyme, the nicotinamide ring is displaced from its conserved location and three water molecules complete a network of hydrogen bonds between the nicotinamide ring and the protein. In this new position, NADPH has reduced interactions with the inhibitor. An equilibrium between the two conformations of NADPH, implied by their occupancies in the eight crystal structures, is influenced both by the ligand and the F98Y mutation. The mutation induced equilibrium between two NADPH-binding conformations may contribute to decrease TMP binding and thus may be responsible for TMP resistance.

  1. Whole genome sequencing reveals novel non-synonymous mutation in ectodysplasin A (EDA associated with non-syndromic X-linked dominant congenital tooth agenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Sarkar

    Full Text Available Congenital tooth agenesis in human is characterized by failure of tooth development during tooth organogenesis. 300 genes in mouse and 30 genes in human so far have been known to regulate tooth development. However, candidature of only 5 genes viz. PAX9, MSX1, AXIN2, WNT10A and EDA have been experimentally established for congenitally missing teeth like hypodontia and oligodontia. In this study an Indian family with multiple congenital tooth agenesis was identified. Pattern of inheritance was apparently autosomal dominant type with a rare possibility to be X-linked. Whole genome sequencing of two affected individuals was carried out which revealed 119 novel non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (SNVs distributed among 117 genes. Out of these only one variation (c.956G>T located at exon 9 of X-linked EDA gene was considered as pathogenic and validated among all the affected and unaffected family members and unrelated controls. This variation leads to p.Ser319Ile change in the TNF homology domain of EDA (transcript variant 1 protein. In silico analysis predicts that this Ser319 is well conserved across different vertebrate species and a part of putative receptor binding site. Structure based homology modeling predicts that this amino acid residue along with four other amino acid residues nearby, those when mutated known to cause selective tooth agenesis, form a cluster that may have functional significance. Taken together these results suggest that c.956G>T (p.Ser319Ile mutation plausibly reduces the receptor binding activity of EDA leading to distinct tooth agenesis in this family.

  2. Accounting for eXentricities: analysis of the X chromosome in GWAS reveals X-linked genes implicated in autoimmune diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Chang

    Full Text Available Many complex human diseases are highly sexually dimorphic, suggesting a potential contribution of the X chromosome to disease risk. However, the X chromosome has been neglected or incorrectly analyzed in most genome-wide association studies (GWAS. We present tailored analytical methods and software that facilitate X-wide association studies (XWAS, which we further applied to reanalyze data from 16 GWAS of different autoimmune and related diseases (AID. We associated several X-linked genes with disease risk, among which (1 ARHGEF6 is associated with Crohn's disease and replicated in a study of ulcerative colitis, another inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Indeed, ARHGEF6 interacts with a gastric bacterium that has been implicated in IBD. (2 CENPI is associated with three different AID, which is compelling in light of known associations with AID of autosomal genes encoding centromere proteins, as well as established autosomal evidence of pleiotropy between autoimmune diseases. (3 We replicated a previous association of FOXP3, a transcription factor that regulates T-cell development and function, with vitiligo; and (4 we discovered that C1GALT1C1 exhibits sex-specific effect on disease risk in both IBDs. These and other X-linked genes that we associated with AID tend to be highly expressed in tissues related to immune response, participate in major immune pathways, and display differential gene expression between males and females. Combined, the results demonstrate the importance of the X chromosome in autoimmunity, reveal the potential of extensive XWAS, even based on existing data, and provide the tools and incentive to properly include the X chromosome in future studies.

  3. A novel role for the GTPase-activating protein Bud2 in the spindle position checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Nelson

    Full Text Available The spindle position checkpoint (SPC ensures correct mitotic spindle position before allowing mitotic exit in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In a candidate screen for checkpoint genes, we identified bud2Δ as deficient for the SPC. Bud2 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP, and the only known substrate of Bud2 was Rsr1/Bud1, a Ras-like GTPase and a central component of the bud-site-selection pathway. Mutants lacking Rsr1/Bud1 had no checkpoint defect, as did strains lacking and overexpressing Bud5, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF for Rsr1/Bud1. Thus, the checkpoint function of Bud2 is distinct from its role in bud site selection. The catalytic activity of the Bud2 GAP domain was required for the checkpoint, based on the failure of the known catalytic point mutant Bud2(R682A to function in the checkpoint. Based on assays of heterozygous diploids, bud2(R682A, was dominant for loss of checkpoint but recessive for bud-site-selection failure, further indicating a separation of function. Tem1 is a Ras-like protein and is the critical regulator of mitotic exit, sitting atop the mitotic exit network (MEN. Tem1 is a likely target for Bud2, supported by genetic analyses that exclude other Ras-like proteins.

  4. Apoptosis at inflection point in liquid culture of budding yeasts.

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    Toshiyuki Hagiwara

    Full Text Available Budding yeasts are highly suitable for aging studies, because the number of bud scars (stage proportionally correlates with age. Its maximum stages are known to reach at 20-30 stages on an isolated agar medium. However, their stage dynamics in a liquid culture is virtually unknown. We investigate the population dynamics by counting scars in each cell. Here one cell division produces one new cell and one bud scar. This simple rule leads to a conservation law: "The total number of bud scars is equal to the total number of cells." We find a large discrepancy: extremely fewer cells with over 5 scars than expected. Almost all cells with 6 or more scars disappear within a short period of time in the late log phase (corresponds to the inflection point. This discrepancy is confirmed directly by the microscopic observations of broken cells. This finding implies apoptosis in older cells (6 scars or more.

  5. Tolerance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ultra high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, M.; Torigoe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takizawa, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Ono, F.

    2014-05-01

    Our studies on the tolerance of plants and animals against very high pressure of several GPa have been extended to a smaller sized fungus, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several pieces of budding yeast (dry yeast) were sealed in a small teflon capsule with a liquid pressure medium fluorinate, and exposed to 7.5 GPa by using a cubic anvil press. The pressure was kept constant for various duration of time from 2 to 24 h. After the pressure was released, the specimens were brought out from the teflon capsule, and they were cultivated on a potato dextrose agar. It was found that the budding yeast exposed to 7.5 GPa for up to 6 h showed multiplication. However, those exposed to 7.5 GPa for longer than 12 h were found dead. The high pressure tolerance of budding yeast is a little weaker than that of tardigrades.

  6. Tumor Budding in Upper Gastrointestinal Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelzer, Viktor H.; Langer, Rupert; Zlobec, Inti; Lugli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The basis of personalized medicine in oncology is the prediction of an individual’s risk of relapse and death from disease. The presence of tumor budding (TB) at the tumor–host interface of gastrointestinal cancers has been recognized as a hallmark of unfavorable disease biology. TB is defined as the presence of dedifferentiated cells or small clusters of up to five cells at the tumor invasive front and can be observed in aggressive carcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas, ampulla, colon, and rectum. Presence of TB reproducibly correlates with advanced tumor stage, frequent lymphovascular invasion, nodal, and distant metastasis. The UICC has officially recognized TB as additional independent prognostic factor in cancers of the colon and rectum. Recent studies have also characterized TB as a promising prognostic indicator for clinical management of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction, and gastric adenocarcinoma. However, several important issues have to be addressed for application in daily diagnostic practice: (1) validation of prognostic scoring systems for TB in large, multi-center studies, (2) consensus on the optimal assessment method, and (3) inter-observer reproducibility. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of TB in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract including critical appraisal of perspectives for further study. PMID:25177546

  7. The Genetic Requirements for Pentose Fermentation in Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Mittelman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cells grow on a wide range of carbon sources by regulating substrate flow through the metabolic network. Incoming sugar, for example, can be fermented or respired, depending on the carbon identity, cell type, or growth conditions. Despite this genetically-encoded flexibility of carbon metabolism, attempts to exogenously manipulate central carbon flux by rational design have proven difficult, suggesting a robust network structure. To examine this robustness, we characterized the ethanol yield of 411 regulatory and metabolic mutants in budding yeast. The mutants showed little variation in ethanol productivity when grown on glucose or galactose, yet diversity was revealed during growth on xylulose, a rare pentose not widely available in nature. While producing ethanol at high yield, cells grown on xylulose produced ethanol at high yields, yet induced expression of respiratory genes, and were dependent on them. Analysis of mutants that affected ethanol productivity suggested that xylulose fermentation results from metabolic overflow, whereby the flux through glycolysis is higher than the maximal flux that can enter respiration. We suggest that this overflow results from a suboptimal regulatory adjustment of the cells to this unfamiliar carbon source.

  8. Taste Bud Homeostasis in Health, Disease, and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Pu; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian taste bud is an onion-shaped epithelial structure with 50–100 tightly packed cells, including taste receptor cells, supporting cells, and basal cells. Taste receptor cells detect nutrients and toxins in the oral cavity and transmit the sensory information to gustatory nerve endings in the buds. Supporting cells may play a role in the clearance of excess neurotransmitters after their release from taste receptor cells. Basal cells are precursor cells that differentiate into mature...

  9. Longleaf pine bud development: influence of seedling nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. P. Barnett; D. P. Jackson; R. K. Dumroese

    2010-01-01

    A subset of seedlings from a larger study (Jackson and others 2006, 2007) were selected and evaluated for two growing seasons to relate bud development, and root-collar diameter (RCD), and height growth with three nursery fertilization rates. We chose seedlings in the 0.5 (lowest), 2.0 (mid-range), and 4.0 (highest) mg of nitrogen per seedling treatments. Buds moved...

  10. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  11. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone.

  12. Isolation and characterization of the Jatropha curcas APETALA1 (JcAP1) promoter conferring preferential expression in inflorescence buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yan-Bin; He, Liang-Liang; Niu, Longjian; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2016-08-01

    The 1.5 kb JcAP1 promoter from the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas is predominantly active in the inflorescence buds of transgenic plants, in which the -1313/-1057 region is essential for maintaining the activity. Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA1 (AP1) is a MADS-domain transcription factor gene that functions primarily in flower development. We isolated a homolog of AP1 from Jatropha curcas (designated JcAP1), which was shown to exhibit flower-specific expression in Jatropha. JcAP1 is first expressed in inflorescence buds and continues to be primarily expressed in the sepals. We isolated a 1.5 kb JcAP1 promoter and evaluated its activity in transgenic Arabidopsis and Jatropha using the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. In transgenic Arabidopsis and Jatropha, the inflorescence buds exhibited notable GUS activity, whereas the sepals did not. Against expectations, the JcAP1 promoter was active in the anthers of Arabidopsis and Jatropha and was highly expressed in Jatropha seeds. An analysis of promoter deletions in transgenic Arabidopsis revealed that deletion of the -1313/-1057 region resulted in loss of JcAP1 promoter activity in the inflorescence buds and increased activity in the anthers. These results suggested that some regulatory sequences in the -1313/-1057 region are essential for maintaining promoter activity in inflorescence buds and can partly suppress activity in the anthers. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that other elements located upstream of the 1.5 kb JcAP1 promoter may be required for flower-specific activation. The JcAP1 promoter characterized in this study can be used to drive transgene expression in both the inflorescence buds and seeds of Jatropha.

  13. Tumor Budding: The Name is EMT. Partial EMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Alexandru Dan; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Jia, Dongya; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Levine, Herbert

    2016-04-29

    Tumor budding is a histological phenomenon encountered in various cancers, whereby individual malignant cells and/or small clusters of malignant cells are seen in the tumor stroma. Postulated to be mirror epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor budding has been associated with poor cancer outcomes. However, the vast heterogeneity in its exact definition, methodology of assessment, and patient stratification need to be resolved before it can be routinely used as a standardized prognostic feature. Here, we discuss the heterogeneity in defining and assessing tumor budding, its clinical significance across multiple cancer types, and its prospective implementation in clinical practice. Next, we review the emerging evidence about partial, rather than complete, epithelial-mesenchymal phenotype at the tumor bud level, and its connection with tumor proliferation, quiescence, and stemness. Finally, based on recent literature, indicating a co-expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in many tumor buds, we posit tumor budding to be a manifestation of this hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype displaying collective cell migration.

  14. Tumor Budding: The Name is EMT. Partial EMT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Dan Grigore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor budding is a histological phenomenon encountered in various cancers, whereby individual malignant cells and/or small clusters of malignant cells are seen in the tumor stroma. Postulated to be mirror epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor budding has been associated with poor cancer outcomes. However, the vast heterogeneity in its exact definition, methodology of assessment, and patient stratification need to be resolved before it can be routinely used as a standardized prognostic feature. Here, we discuss the heterogeneity in defining and assessing tumor budding, its clinical significance across multiple cancer types, and its prospective implementation in clinical practice. Next, we review the emerging evidence about partial, rather than complete, epithelial-mesenchymal phenotype at the tumor bud level, and its connection with tumor proliferation, quiescence, and stemness. Finally, based on recent literature, indicating a co-expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in many tumor buds, we posit tumor budding to be a manifestation of this hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype displaying collective cell migration.

  15. Tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma: time to take notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Bojana; Schaeffer, David F; Riddell, Robert H; Kirsch, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Tumor 'budding', loosely defined by the presence of individual cells and small clusters of tumor cells at the invasive front of carcinomas, has received much recent attention, particularly in the setting of colorectal carcinoma. It has been postulated to represent an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Tumor budding is a well-established independent adverse prognostic factor in colorectal carcinoma that may allow for stratification of patients into risk categories more meaningful than those defined by TNM staging, and also potentially guide treatment decisions, especially in T1 and T3 N0 (Stage II, Dukes' B) colorectal carcinoma. Unfortunately, its universal acceptance as a reportable factor has been held back by a lack of definitional uniformity with respect to both qualitative and quantitative aspects of tumor budding. The purpose of this review is fourfold: (1) to describe the morphology of tumor budding and its relationship to other potentially important features of the invasive front; (2) to summarize current knowledge regarding the prognostic significance and potential clinical implications of this histomorphological feature; (3) to highlight the challenges posed by a lack of data to allow standardization with respect to the qualitative and quantitative criteria used to define budding; and (4) to present a practical approach to the assessment of tumor budding in everyday practice.

  16. Analysis of differential gene expression during floral bud abortion in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Sun, X L; Zhang, L G; Hui, M X; Zhang, M K

    2013-07-24

    Radish floral bud abortion (FBA) is an adverse biological phenomenon that occurs during reproduction. Although FBA occurs frequently, its mechanism remains unknown. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying FBA, we detected gene expression differences between aborted and normal buds of radish using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). A total of 221 differentially expressed transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were detected by 256 cDNA-AFLP primer combinations, of which 114 were upregulated and 107 were downregulated in the aborted buds. A total of 54 TDFs were cloned and sequenced. A BLAST search revealed that all TDFs have homologous sequences and 29 of these corresponded to known genes, whose functions were mainly related to metabolism, stimulus response, transcriptional regulation, and transportation. Expressions of 6 TDFs with different functions were further analyzed by real-time PCR yielding expression profiling results consistent with the cDNA-AFLP analysis. Our results indicated that radish FBA is related to abnormalities in various physiological and biochemical plant processes.

  17. Volatile constituents and key odorants in leaves, buds, flowers, and fruits of Laurus nobilis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ayben; Hafizoglu, Harzemsah; Kollmannsberger, Hubert; Nitz, Siegfried

    2004-03-24

    The volatiles of fresh leaves, buds, flowers, and fruits from bay (Laurus nolilis L.) were isolated by solvent extraction and analyzed by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Their odor quality was characterized by gas chomatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry (HRGC-O-MS) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). In fresh bay leaves 1,8-cineole was the major component, together with alpha-terpinyl acetate, sabinene, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, beta-elemene, alpha-terpineol, linalool, and eugenol. Besides 1,8-cineole and the pinenes, the main components in flowers were alpha-eudesmol, beta-elemene, and beta-caryophyllene, in fruits (E)-beta-ocimene and biclyclogermacrene, and in buds (E)-beta-ocimene and germacrene D. The aliphatic ocimenes and farnesenes were absent in leaves. By using HRGC-O-MS 21 odor compounds were identified in fresh leaves. Application of AEDA revealed (Z)-3-hexenal (fresh green), 1,8-cineole (eucalyptus), linalool (flowery), eugenol (clove), (E)-isoeugenol (flowery), and an unidentified compound (black pepper) with the highest flavor dilution factors. Differences between buds, flowers, fruits, and leaves with regard to the identified odor compounds are presented.

  18. Early Growth Improvement Of Sugarcane Bud Ps-881 Through Cattle Breeding Liquid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Gunawan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The advantage of cattle breeding in addition to giving a positive impact providing main products such as meat and milk also have the another advance. As matter of fact the livestock business must produce waste. Within use appropriate technology by utilizing cattle liquid waste into fertilizer material after going through the processing or fermentation process to become an organic fertilizer that is beneficial to the plant. This study proposed to carry out the effect of POC concentration of cattle urine on the germination rate of sugarcane bud that is more effective and efficient. The experiment was conducted at Experimental Garden of Agricultural Faculty at the University of Merdeka Surabaya with an elevation of 5 meters above sea level. This research used Randomized Block Design RAK with 1 treatment factor. The POC concentration of cattle urine P consisted of 8 treatment levels ie 0 ml 10 ml 20 ml 30 ml 40 ml 50 ml 60 ml and 70 ml POC per liter of water. This research revealed two results first the significant influence of POC concentration of cow urine on increasing growth of sugarcane bud plant on the variables studied including bud length root number and dry weight per plant during germination period of sugarcane plant. Second The highest value achieved by treatment P7 is the concentration of 70 ml of POC of cow urine per liter of water at all observation parameters.

  19. Chilling-responsive DEMETER-LIKE DNA demethylase mediates in poplar bud break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Daniel; Le Gac, Anne-Laure; Perales, Mariano; Dervinis, Christopher; Kirst, Matias; Maury, Stéphane; González-Melendi, Pablo; Allona, Isabel

    2017-10-01

    Annual dormancy-growth cycle is a developmental and physiological process essential for the survival of deciduous trees in temperate and boreal forests. Seasonal control of shoot growth in woody perennials requires specific genetic programmes responding to environmental signals. The environmental-controlled mechanisms that regulate the shift between winter dormancy and the growth-promoting genetic programmes are still unknown. Here, we show that dynamics in genomic DNA methylation levels are involved in the regulation of dormancy-growth cycle in poplar. The reactivation of growth in the apical shoot during bud break process in spring is preceded by a progressive reduction of genomic DNA methylation in apex tissue. The induction in apex tissue of a chilling-dependent poplar DEMETER-LIKE 10 (PtaDML10) DNA demethylase precedes shoot growth reactivation. Transgenic poplars showing downregulation of PtaDML8/10 caused delayed bud break. Genome-wide transcriptome and methylome analysis and data mining revealed that the gene targets of DEMETER-LIKE-dependent DNA demethylation are genetically associated with bud break. These data point to a chilling-dependent DEMETER-like DNA demethylase mechanisms being involved in the shift from winter dormancy to a condition that precedes shoot apical vegetative growth in poplar. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A nutrient dependant switch explains mutually exclusive existence of meiosis and mitosis initiation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannige, C T; Kulasiri, D; Samarasinghe, S

    2014-01-21

    Nutrients from living environment are vital for the survival and growth of any organism. Budding yeast diploid cells decide to grow by mitosis type cell division or decide to create unique, stress resistant spores by meiosis type cell division depending on the available nutrient conditions. To gain a molecular systems level understanding of the nutrient dependant switching between meiosis and mitosis initiation in diploid cells of budding yeast, we develop a theoretical model based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) including the mitosis initiator and its relations to budding yeast meiosis initiation network. Our model accurately and qualitatively predicts the experimentally revealed temporal variations of related proteins under different nutrient conditions as well as the diverse mutant studies related to meiosis and mitosis initiation. Using this model, we show how the meiosis and mitosis initiators form an all-or-none type bistable switch in response to available nutrient level (mainly nitrogen). The transitions to and from meiosis or mitosis initiation states occur via saddle node bifurcation. This bidirectional switch helps the optimal usage of available nutrients and explains the mutually exclusive existence of meiosis and mitosis pathways. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Evidence for Catechin Synthesis and Accumulation in Tea Buds (Camellia sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinzhen; Guo, Lina; Gao, Liping; Shi, Xingxing; Zhao, Xuecheng; Ma, Xiubing; Xia, Tao; Wang, Yunsheng

    2018-01-10

    Early spring buds of the Camellia sinensis variety Shuchazao were separated into two parts, including the shoot tip (ST) and non-expanded young leaves (YL), in which the synthesis and accumulation of catechins in the two parts were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) staining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and in situ hybridization. HPLC showed that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) amounts in YL were increased significantly by 74.0 and 71.8%, respectively. The results of DMACA staining indicated that catechins in buds accumulated mainly in mesophyll cells and the bud shaft of YL. Meanwhile, qRT-PCR demonstrated that the relative expression levels of genes related to flavonoid metabolism, including CsPAL1, CsC4H1, CsC4H2, CsCHS2, CsF3'5'H1, CsDFR1, CsDFR2, and CsANR1, were significantly higher in YL than in the ST. In situ hybridization revealed that CsDFR1, CsDFR2, CsLAR, and CsANR1 were expressed in leaf primordia and YL but not in the apical meristem. These findings highlight the synthesis and accumulation patterns of catechins in different parts of the ST in C. sinensis, providing a theoretical basis for the assessment of synthesis, accumulation, and transfer patterns of catechins in tea plants.

  2. Malformation of gynoecia impedes fertilisation in bud-flowering Calluna vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, A; Borchert, T; Müller, A; Tänzer, J; Hohe, A

    2013-01-01

    In Calluna vulgaris, a common bedding plant during autumn in the northern hemisphere, the bud-blooming mutation of flower morphology is of high economic importance. Breeding of new bud-blooming cultivars suffers from poor seed set in some of the desirable bud-flowering crossing partners. In the current study, fertilisation and seed development in genotypes with good or poor seed set were monitored in detail in order to examine pre- and post-zygotic cross breeding incompatibilities. Whereas no distinct differences were detected in seed development, pollen tube growth was impeded in the pistils of genotypes characterised by poor seed set. Detailed microscopic analysis revealed malformations of the gynoecia due to imperfect fusion of carpels. Hence, a pre-zygotic mechanism hindering pollen tube growth due to malformation of gynoecia was deduced. An interaction of putative candidate genes involved in malformation of gynoecia with floral organ identity genes controlling the flower architecture is discussed. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Global Analysis of DNA Methylation Variation in Adipose Tissue from Twins Reveals Links to Disease-Associated Variants in Distal Regulatory Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundberg, Elin; Meduri, Eshwar; Sandling, Johanna K.; Hedman, Åsa K.; Keildson, Sarah; Buil, Alfonso; Busche, Stephan; Yuan, Wei; Nisbet, James; Sekowska, Magdalena; Wilk, Alicja; Barrett, Amy; Small, Kerrin S.; Ge, Bing; Caron, Maxime; Shin, So-Youn; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Ainali, Chrysanthi; Barrett, Amy; Bataille, Veronique; Bell, Jordana T.; Buil, Alfonso; Deloukas, Panos; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dimas, Antigone S.; Durbin, Richard; Glass, Daniel; Grundberg, Elin; Hassanali, Neelam; Hedman, Åsa K.; Ingle, Catherine; Knowles, David; Krestyaninova, Maria; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lowe, Christopher E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meduri, Eshwar; di Meglio, Paola; Min, Josine L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Nestle, Frank O.; Nica, Alexandra C.; Nisbet, James; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Parts, Leopold; Potter, Simon; Sandling, Johanna; Sekowska, Magdalena; Shin, So-Youn; Small, Kerrin S.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D.; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Travers, Mary E.; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Tsoka, Sophia; Wilk, Alicja; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zondervan, Krina T.; Lathrop, Mark; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Spector, Timothy D.; Bell, Jordana T.; Deloukas, Panos

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation play a key role in gene regulation and disease susceptibility. However, little is known about the genome-wide frequency, localization, and function of methylation variation and how it is regulated by genetic and environmental factors. We utilized the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource (MuTHER) and generated Illumina 450K adipose methylome data from 648 twins. We found that individual CpGs had low variance and that variability was suppressed in promoters. We noted that DNA methylation variation was highly heritable (h2median = 0.34) and that shared environmental effects correlated with metabolic phenotype-associated CpGs. Analysis of methylation quantitative-trait loci (metQTL) revealed that 28% of CpGs were associated with nearby SNPs, and when overlapping them with adipose expression quantitative-trait loci (eQTL) from the same individuals, we found that 6% of the loci played a role in regulating both gene expression and DNA methylation. These associations were bidirectional, but there were pronounced negative associations for promoter CpGs. Integration of metQTL with adipose reference epigenomes and disease associations revealed significant enrichment of metQTL overlapping metabolic-trait or disease loci in enhancers (the strongest effects were for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and body mass index [BMI]). We followed up with the BMI SNP rs713586, a cg01884057 metQTL that overlaps an enhancer upstream of ADCY3, and used bisulphite sequencing to refine this region. Our results showed widespread population invariability yet sequence dependence on adipose DNA methylation but that incorporating maps of regulatory elements aid in linking CpG variation to gene regulation and disease risk in a tissue-dependent manner. PMID:24183450

  4. Generation of micronuclei during interphase by coupling between cytoplasmic membrane blebbing and nuclear budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh-ichi Utani

    Full Text Available Micronucleation, mediated by interphase nuclear budding, has been repeatedly suggested, but the process is still enigmatic. In the present study, we confirmed the previous observation that there are lamin B1-negative micronuclei in addition to the positive ones. A large cytoplasmic bleb was found to frequently entrap lamin B1-negative micronuclei, which were connected to the nucleus by a thin chromatin stalk. At the bottom of the stalk, the nuclear lamin B1 structure appeared broken. Chromatin extrusion through lamina breaks has been referred to as herniation or a blister of the nucleus, and has been observed after the expression of viral proteins. A cell line in which extrachromosomal double minutes and lamin B1 protein were simultaneously visualized in different colors in live cells was established. By using these cells, time-lapse microscopy revealed that cytoplasmic membrane blebbing occurred simultaneously with the extrusion of nuclear content, which generated lamin B1-negative micronuclei during interphase. Furthermore, activation of cytoplasmic membrane blebbing by the addition of fresh serum or camptothecin induced nuclear budding within 1 to 10 minutes, which suggested that blebbing might be the cause of the budding. After the induction of blebbing, the frequency of lamin-negative micronuclei increased. The budding was most frequent during S phase and more efficiently entrapped small extrachromosomal chromatin than the large chromosome arm. Based on these results, we suggest a novel mechanism in which cytoplasmic membrane dynamics pulls the chromatin out of the nucleus through the lamina break. Evidence for such a mechanism was obtained in certain cancer cell lines including human COLO 320 and HeLa. The mechanism could significantly perturb the genome and influence cancer cell phenotypes.

  5. Folding of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked protein TDP-43 reveals an intermediate state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackness, Brian C; Tran, Meme T; McClain, Shannan P; Matthews, C Robert; Zitzewitz, Jill A

    2014-03-21

    Pathological alteration of TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein-43), a protein involved in various RNA-mediated processes, is a hallmark feature of the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Fragments of TDP-43, composed of the second RNA recognition motif (RRM2) and the disordered C terminus, have been observed in cytoplasmic inclusions in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases, suggesting that conformational changes involving RRM2 together with the disordered C terminus play a role in aggregation and toxicity. The biophysical data collected by CD and fluorescence spectroscopies reveal a three-state equilibrium unfolding model for RRM2, with a partially folded intermediate state that is not observed in RRM1. Strikingly, a portion of RRM2 beginning at position 208, which mimics a cleavage site observed in patient tissues, increases the population of this intermediate state. Mutually stabilizing interactions between the domains in the tethered RRM1 and RRM2 construct reduce the population of the intermediate state and enhance DNA/RNA binding. Despite the high sequence homology of the two domains, a network of large hydrophobic residues in RRM2 provides a possible explanation for the increased stability of RRM2 compared with RRM1. The cluster analysis suggests that the intermediate state may play a functional role by enhancing access to the nuclear export signal contained within its sequence. The intermediate state may also serve as a molecular hazard linking productive folding and function with pathological misfolding and aggregation that may contribute to disease.

  6. Small angle X-ray scattering studies of mitochondrial glutaminase C reveal extended flexible regions, and link oligomeric state with enzyme activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Møller

    Full Text Available Glutaminase C is a key metabolic enzyme, which is unregulated in many cancer systems and believed to play a central role in the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells undergo changes to an altered metabolic profile. A long-standing hypothesis links enzymatic activity to the protein oligomeric state, hence the study of the solution behavior in general and the oligomer state in particular of glutaminase C is important for the understanding of the mechanism of protein activation and inhibition. In this report, this is extensively investigated in correlation to enzyme concentration or phosphate level, using a high-throughput microfluidic-mixing chip for the SAXS data collection, and we confirm that the oligomeric state correlates with activity. The in-depth solution behavior analysis further reveals the structural behavior of flexible regions of the protein in the dimeric, tetrameric and octameric state and investigates the C-terminal influence on the enzyme solution behavior. Our data enable SAXS-based rigid body modeling of the full-length tetramer states, thereby presenting the first ever experimentally derived structural model of mitochondrial glutaminase C including the N- and C-termini of the enzyme.

  7. The cellular robustness by genetic redundancy in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Li

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The frequent dispensability of duplicated genes in budding yeast is heralded as a hallmark of genetic robustness contributed by genetic redundancy. However, theoretical predictions suggest such backup by redundancy is evolutionarily unstable, and the extent of genetic robustness contributed from redundancy remains controversial. It is anticipated that, to achieve mutual buffering, the duplicated paralogs must at least share some functional overlap. However, counter-intuitively, several recent studies reported little functional redundancy between these buffering duplicates. The large yeast genetic interactions released recently allowed us to address these issues on a genome-wide scale. We herein characterized the synthetic genetic interactions for ∼500 pairs of yeast duplicated genes originated from either whole-genome duplication (WGD or small-scale duplication (SSD events. We established that functional redundancy between duplicates is a pre-requisite and thus is highly predictive of their backup capacity. This observation was particularly pronounced with the use of a newly introduced metric in scoring functional overlap between paralogs on the basis of gene ontology annotations. Even though mutual buffering was observed to be prevalent among duplicated genes, we showed that the observed backup capacity is largely an evolutionarily transient state. The loss of backup capacity generally follows a neutral mode, with the buffering strength decreasing in proportion to divergence time, and the vast majority of the paralogs have already lost their backup capacity. These observations validated previous theoretic predictions about instability of genetic redundancy. However, departing from the general neutral mode, intriguingly, our analysis revealed the presence of natural selection in stabilizing functional overlap between SSD pairs. These selected pairs, both WGD and SSD, tend to have decelerated functional evolution, have higher propensities of co

  8. Affective decision-making deficits, linked to a dysfunctional ventromedial prefrontal cortex, revealed in 10th grade Chinese adolescent binge drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C Anderson; Xiao, Lin; Palmer, Paula; Sun, Ping; Wang, Qiong; Wei, Yonglan; Jia, Yong; Grenard, Jerry L; Stacy, Alan W; Bechara, Antoine

    2008-01-31

    The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that adolescent binge drinkers, but not lighter drinkers, would show signs of impairment on tasks of affective decision-making as measured by the Iowa Gambling Test (IGT), when compared to adolescents who never drank. We tested 207 10th grade adolescents in Chengdu City, China, using two versions of the IGT, the original and a variant, in which the reward/punishment contingencies were reversed. This enables one to distinguish among different possibilities of impaired decision-making, such as insensitivity to long-term consequences, or hypersensitivity to reward. Furthermore, we tested working memory capacity using the Self-ordered Pointing Test (SOPT). Paper and pencil questionnaires were used to assess drinking behaviors and school academic performance. Results indicated that relative to never-drinkers, adolescent binge drinkers, but not other (ever, past 30-day) drinkers, showed significantly lower net scores on the original version of the IGT especially in the latter trials. Furthermore, the profiles of behavioral performance from the original and variant versions of the IGT were consistent with a decision-making impairment attributed to hypersensitivity to reward. In addition, working memory and school academic performance revealed no differences between drinkers (at all levels) and never-drinkers. Logistic regression analysis showed that after controlling for demographic variables, working memory, and school academic performance, the IGT significantly predicted binge-drinking. These findings suggest that a "myopia" for future consequences linked to hypersensitivity to reward is a key characteristic of adolescents with binge-drinking behavior, and that underlying neural mechanisms for this "myopia" for future consequences may serve as a predisposing factor that renders some adolescents more susceptible to future addictive behaviors.

  9. Host-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis interactome reveals a novel iron assimilation mechanism linked to nitric oxide stress during early infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Elise A; Xu, Wayne W; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2013-10-10

    The initial interaction between host cell and pathogen sets the stage for the ensuing infection and ultimately determine the course of disease. However, there is limited knowledge of the transcripts utilized by host and pathogen and how they may impact one another during this critical step. The purpose of this study was to create a host-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) interactome for early infection in an epithelium-macrophage co-culture system using RNA-seq. Establishment of the host-MAP interactome revealed a novel iron assimilation system for carboxymycobactin. Iron assimilation is linked to nitric oxide synthase-2 production by the host and subsequent nitric oxide buildup. Iron limitation as well as nitric oxide is a prompt for MAP to enter into an iron sequestration program. This new iron sequestration program provides an explanation for mycobactin independence in some MAP strains grown in vitro as well as during infection within the host cell. Utilization of such a pathway is likely to aid MAP establishment and long-term survival within the host. The host-MAP interactome identified a number of metabolic, DNA repair and virulence genes worthy for consideration as novel drug targets as well as future pathogenesis studies. Reported interactome data may also be utilized to conduct focused, hypothesis-driven research. Co-culture of uninfected bovine epithelial cells (MAC-T) and primary bovine macrophages creates a tolerant genotype as demonstrated by downregulation of inflammatory pathways. This co-culture system may serve as a model to investigate other bovine enteric pathogens.

  10. Functional genomics of pH homeostasis in Corynebacterium glutamicum revealed novel links between pH response, oxidative stress, iron homeostasis and methionine synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persicke Marcus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maintenance of internal pH in bacterial cells is challenged by natural stress conditions, during host infection or in biotechnological production processes. Comprehensive transcriptomic and proteomic analyses has been conducted in several bacterial model systems, yet questions remain as to the mechanisms of pH homeostasis. Results Here we present the comprehensive analysis of pH homeostasis in C. glutamicum, a bacterium of industrial importance. At pH values between 6 and 9 effective maintenance of the internal pH at 7.5 ± 0.5 pH units was found. By DNA microarray analyses differential mRNA patterns were identified. The expression profiles were validated and extended by 1D-LC-ESI-MS/MS based quantification of soluble and membrane proteins. Regulators involved were identified and thereby participation of numerous signaling modules in pH response was found. The functional analysis revealed for the first time the occurrence of oxidative stress in C. glutamicum cells at neutral and low pH conditions accompanied by activation of the iron starvation response. Intracellular metabolite pool analysis unraveled inhibition of the TCA and other pathways at low pH. Methionine and cysteine synthesis were found to be activated via the McbR regulator, cysteine accumulation was observed and addition of cysteine was shown to be toxic under acidic conditions. Conclusions Novel limitations for C. glutamicum at non-optimal pH values were identified by a comprehensive analysis on the level of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome indicating a functional link between pH acclimatization, oxidative stress, iron homeostasis, and metabolic alterations. The results offer new insights into bacterial stress physiology and new starting points for bacterial strain design or pathogen defense.

  11. Structure and dynamics of dark-state bovine rhodopsin revealed by chemical cross-linking and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Richard B; Sale, Kenneth L; Ayson, Marites J; Novak, Petr; Hong, Joohee; Lane, Pamela; Wood, Nichole L; Kruppa, Gary H; Young, Malin M; Schoeniger, Joseph S

    2006-06-01

    Recent work using chemical cross-linking to define interresidue distance constraints in proteins has shown that these constraints are useful for testing tertiary structural models. We applied this approach to the G-protein-coupled receptor bovine rhodopsin in its native membrane using lysine- and cysteine-targeted bifunctional cross-linking reagents. Cross-linked proteolytic peptides of rhodopsin were identified by combined liquid chromatography and FT-ICR mass spectrometry with automated data-reduction and assignment software. Tandem mass spectrometry was used to verify cross-link assignments and locate the exact sites of cross-link attachment. Cross-links were observed to form between 10 pairs of residues in dark-state rhodopsin. For each pair, cross-linkers with a range of linker lengths were tested to determine an experimental distance-of-closest-approach (DCA) between reactive side-chain atoms. In all, 28 cross-links were identified using seven different cross-linking reagents. Molecular mechanics procedures were applied to published crystal structure data to calculate energetically achievable theoretical DCAs between reactive atoms without altering the position of the protein backbone. Experimentally measured DCAs are generally in good agreement with the theoretical DCAs. However, a cross-link between C316 and K325 in the C-terminal region cannot be rationalized by DCA simulations and suggests that backbone reorientation relative to the crystal coordinates occurs on the timescale of cross-linking reactions. Biochemical and spectroscopic data from other studies have found that the C-terminal region is highly mobile in solution and not fully represented by X-ray crystallography data. Our results show that chemical cross-linking can provide reliable three-dimensional structural information and insight into local conformational dynamics in a membrane protein.

  12. Budżet zadaniowy w oświacie

    OpenAIRE

    Kopańska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Budżet to podstawowe narzędzie zarządzania finansami publicznymi. Jego forma – a więc to jak poszczególne wydatki i dochody są w nim zapisywane stanowi jeden z najważniejszych czynników wpływających na efektywność publicznych podmiotów. W ostatnich dziesięcioleciach, coraz częściej postuluje się odejście od klasycznej formy budżetu i poszukuje się takich które tę efektywność będą wyraźnie poprawiać. W niniejszym opracowaniu analizie poddane są możliwości i ograniczenia zastosowania budże...

  13. EARLY BUD-BREAK1 (EBB1) defines a conserved mechanism for control of bud-break in woody perennials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busov, Victor; Carneros, Elena; Yakovlev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Bud-break is an environmentally and economically important trait in trees, shrubs and vines from temperate latitudes. Poor synchronization of bud-break timing with local climates can lead to frost injuries, susceptibility to pests and pathogens and poor crop yields in fruit trees and vines. The rapid climate changes outpace the adaptive capacities of plants to respond through natural selection. This is particularly true for trees which have long generation cycle and thus the adaptive changes are significantly delayed. Therefore, to devise appropriate breeding and conservation strategies, it is imperative to understand the molecular underpinnings that govern dormancy mechanisms. We have recently identified and characterized the poplar EARLY BUD-BREAK 1 (EBB1) gene. EBB1 is a positive regulator of bud-break and encodes a transcription factor from the AP2/ERF family. Here, using comparative and functional genomics approaches we show that EBB1 function in regulation of bud-break is likely conserved across wide range of woody perennial species with importance to forestry and agriculture.

  14. Dormancy in Peach (Prunus persica L.) Flower Buds 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Virginia; Lorenzo, Eugenia; Reinoso, Herminda; Tordable, Maria C.; Abdala, Guillermina; Pharis, Richard P.; Bottini, Ruben

    1990-01-01

    Flower buds of peach (Prunus persica L.) trees, cv Novedad de Cordoba (Argentina), were collected near the end of the dormant period and immediately before anthesis. After removal of scale leaves, morphological observations of representative buds, made on transverse and longitudinal microtome sections, showed that all verticils making up the flower are present in an undifferentiated form during the dormant period (June). Flower buds collected at the end of dormant period (August) showed additional growth and differentiation, at which time formation of two ovules was beginning in the unicarpelar gynoecium. Dehiscence of anthers had not yet occurred 10 days before full bloom, and the ovules were still developing. Free endogenous gibberellin (GA)-like substances were quantified by bioassay (Tan-ginbozu dwarf rice microdrop) after SiO2 partition column chromatography, reversed phase C18-high performance liquid chromatography, and finally Nucleosil [N(CH3)2]high performance liquid chromatography. Bioactive fractions were then subjected to capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM). Gibberellins A1, A3, and A8 were tentatively identified in peach flower buds using GC-SIM and Kovat's retention indices, and relative amounts approximated by GC-SIM (2:8:6 for GA1, GA3, and GA8, respectively). The highest concentration (330 nanograms per gram dry weight) of free GA1/GA3 was found in dormant buds (June) and diminished thereafter. The concentration free of GA1/GA3 did not increase immediately prior to bud break. However, high GA1/GA3 concentrations occurred during stages where rate of growth and cellular differentiation of (mainly fertile) verticils can be influenced. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667435

  15. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Koch, Bailey A; Abblett, Rebecca L; Han, Xuemei; Yates, John R; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2017-06-01

    Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc) inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery.

  16. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Bailey A.; Han, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc) inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery. PMID:28609436

  17. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery.

  18. Tumor Budding Detection by Immunohistochemical Staining is Not Superior to Hematoxylin and Eosin Staining for Predicting Lymph Node Metastasis in pT1 Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Takuma; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Nogami, Hitoshi; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2016-05-01

    Tumor budding is recognized as an important risk factor for lymph node metastasis in pT1 colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin has the potential to improve the objective diagnosis of tumor budding over detection based on hematoxylin and eosin staining. However, it remains unclear whether tumor budding detected by immunohistochemical staining is a significant predictor of lymph node metastasis in pT1 colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to clarify the clinical significance of tumor budding detected by immunohistochemical staining in comparison with that detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. This was a retrospective study. The study was conducted at Niigata University Medical & Dental Hospital. We enrolled 265 patients with pT1 colorectal cancer who underwent surgery with lymph node dissection. Tumor budding was evaluated by both hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining with the use of CAM5.2 antibody. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were conducted to determine the optimal cutoff values for tumor budding detected by hematoxylin and eosin and CAM5.2 staining. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the significant factors for predicting lymph node metastasis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed that the cutoff values for tumor budding detected by hematoxylin and eosin and CAM5.2 staining for predicting lymph node metastases were 5 and 8. On multivariate analysis, histopathological differentiation (OR, 6.21; 95% CI, 1.16-33.33; p = 0.03) and tumor budding detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining (OR, 4.91; 95% CI, 1.64-14.66; p = 0.004) were significant predictors for lymph node metastasis; however, tumor budding detected by CAM5.2 staining was not a significant predictor. This study was limited by potential selection bias because surgically resected specimens were collected instead of endoscopically resected specimens. Tumor budding detected by

  19. Tumor budding as a risk factor of lymph node metastasis in submucosal invasive T1 colorectal carcinoma: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kye Bong-Hyeon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to identify risk factors for lymph node metastasis of early stage colorectal cancer, which was confirmed to a carcinoma that invaded the submucosa after radical resection. Methods In total, 55 patients revealing submucosal invasive colorectal carcinoma on pathology who underwent curative radical resection at the Department of Surgery, St. Vincent’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea from January 2007 to September 2010 were evaluated retrospectively. Tumor size, depth of submucosal invasion, histologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, tumor budding, and microacinar structure were reviewed by a single pathologist. Student t-test for continuous variables and Chi-square test for categorical variables were used for comparing the clinicopathological features between two groups (whether lymph node involvement existed or not. Continuous variables are expressed as the mean ± standard error while statistical significance is accepted at P  Results The mean age of 55 patients (34 males and 21 females was 61.2 ± 9.6 years (range, 43–83. Histologically, eight (14.5% patients had metastatic lymph node. In the univariate analysis, tumor budding (P = 0.047 was the only factor that was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis. Also, the tumor budding had a sensitivity of 83.3%, a specificity of 60.5%, and a negative predictive value of 0.958 for lymph node metastasis in submucosal invasive T1 colorectal cancer. Conclusions The tumor budding seems to have a high sensitivity (83.3%, acceptable specificity (60.5%, and a high negative predictive value (0.958. A close examination of pathologic finding including tumor budding should be performed in order to manage early CRC properly.

  20. Differential expression of a BMP4 reporter allele in anterior fungiform versus posterior circumvallate taste buds of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlow Linda A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4 is a diffusible factor which regulates embryonic taste organ development. However, the role of BMP4 in taste buds of adult mice is unknown. We utilized transgenic mice with LacZ under the control of the BMP4 promoter to reveal the expression of BMP4 in the tongues of adult mice. Further we evaluate the pattern of BMP4 expression with that of markers of specific taste bud cell types and cell proliferation to define and compare the cell populations expressing BMP4 in anterior (fungiform papillae and posterior (circumvallate papilla tongue. Results BMP4 is expressed in adult fungiform and circumvallate papillae, i.e., lingual structures composed of non-taste epithelium and taste buds. Unexpectedly, we find both differences and similarities with respect to expression of BMP4-driven ß-galactosidase. In circumvallate papillae, many fusiform cells within taste buds are BMP4-ß-gal positive. Further, a low percentage of BMP4-expressing cells within circumvallate taste buds is immunopositive for markers of each of the three differentiated taste cell types (I, II and III. BMP4-positive intragemmal cells also expressed a putative marker of immature taste cells, Sox2, and consistent with this finding, intragemmal cells expressed BMP4-ß-gal within 24 hours after their final mitosis, as determined by BrdU birthdating. By contrast, in fungiform papillae, BMP4-ß-gal positive cells are never encountered within taste buds. However, in both circumvallate and fungiform papillae, BMP4-ß-gal expressing cells are located in the perigemmal region, comprising basal and edge epithelial cells adjacent to taste buds proper. This region houses the proliferative cell population that gives rise to adult taste cells. However, perigemmal BMP4-ß-gal cells appear mitotically silent in both fungiform and circumvallate taste papillae, as we do not find evidence of their active proliferation using cell cycle immunomarkers

  1. A Map of Human Mitochondrial Protein Interactions Linked to Neurodegeneration Reveals New Mechanisms of Redox Homeostasis and NF-κB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malty, Ramy H; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Kumar, Ashwani; Phanse, Sadhna; Amin, Shahreen; Zhang, Qingzhou; Minic, Zoran; Goebels, Florian; Musso, Gabriel; Wu, Zhuoran; Abou-Tok, Hosam; Meyer, Michael; Deineko, Viktor; Kassir, Sandy; Sidhu, Vishaldeep; Jessulat, Matthew; Scott, Nichollas E; Xiong, Xuejian; Vlasblom, James; Prasad, Bhanu; Foster, Leonard J; Alberio, Tiziana; Garavaglia, Barbara; Yu, Haiyuan; Bader, Gary D; Nakamura, Ken; Parkinson, John; Babu, Mohan

    2017-12-27

    Mitochondrial protein (MP) dysfunction has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs); however, the discovery of the molecular mechanisms underlying NDs has been impeded by the limited characterization of interactions governing MP function. Here, using mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis of 210 affinity-purified mitochondrial (mt) fractions isolated from 27 epitope-tagged human ND-linked MPs in HEK293 cells, we report a high-confidence MP network including 1,964 interactions among 772 proteins (>90% previously unreported). Nearly three-fourths of these interactions were confirmed in mouse brain and multiple human differentiated neuronal cell lines by primary antibody immunoprecipitation and MS, with many linked to NDs and autism. We show that the SOD1-PRDX5 interaction, critical for mt redox homeostasis, can be perturbed by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked SOD1 allelic variants and establish a functional role for ND-linked factors coupled with IκBɛ in NF-κB activation. Our results identify mechanisms for ND-linked MPs and expand the human mt interaction landscape. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of alternating day and night temperature on short day-induced bud set and subsequent bud burst in long days in Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorunn Elisabeth Olsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Young seedlings of the conifer Norway spruce exhibit short day (SD-induced cessation of apical growth and bud set. Although different, constant temperatures under SD are known to modulate timing of bud set and depth of dormancy with development of deeper dormancy under higher compared to lower temperature, systematic studies of effects of alternating day (DT and night temperatures (NT are limited. To shed light on this, seedlings of different provenances of Norway spruce were exposed to a wide range of DT-NT combinations during bud development, followed by transfer to forcing conditions of long days (LD and 18°C, directly or after different periods of chilling. Although no specific effect of alternating DT/NT was found, the results demonstrate that the effects of DT under SD on bud set and subsequent bud break are significantly modified by NT in a complex way. The effects on bud break persisted after chilling. Since time to bud set correlated with the daily mean temperature under SD at DTs of 18 and 21°C, but not a DT of 15°C, time to bud set apparently also depend on the specific DT, implying that the effect of NT depends on the actual DT. Although higher temperature under SD generally results in later bud break after transfer to forcing conditions, the fastest bud flush was observed at intermediate NTs. This might be due to a bud break-hastening chilling effect of intermediate compared to higher temperatures, and delayed bud development to a stage where bud burst can occur, under lower temperatures. Also, time to bud burst in un-chilled seedlings decreased with increasing SD-duration, suggesting that bud development must reach a certain stage before the processes leading to bud burst are initiated. The present results also indicate that low temperature during bud development had a larger effect on the most southern compared to the most northern provenance studied. Decreasing time to bud burst was observed with increasing northern latitude

  3. The influence of gravity on bud development in apple trees and in poplars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Borkowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The lower shoots in horizontally placed apple trees exhibited much weaker development as well in light as darkness. Removing a narrow strip of bark along both sides of a horizontally placed apple tree improved markedly the growth of the lower buds. In poplars the same effect was received by surrounding the lower buds with semicircular incisions. The inhibition of the lower buds was also released by removing the apical bud and the upper ones. The presented results and those published earlier show that the mechanism responsible for inhibition of the lower buds acts in two steps: 1 gravity influences directly the system composed of a bud and the adjacent tissue of the stem. 2 the lower buds partly inhibited in the step "1" are further inhibited by a correlative mechanism which supresses all weaker buds. The second "step" reaction takes place also after a tree have been reverted back to the normal vertical position.

  4. Extensive transcriptome changes during natural onset and release of vegetative bud dormancy in Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    To survive winter conditions, axillary buds of poplar transition from paradormancy to endodormancy. Following sufficient chilling, endodormant axillary buds will transition from endodormancy to ecodormancy. We utilized the near whole genome NimbleGen poplar microarrays to follow transcriptome diff...

  5. β-Catenin signaling regulates temporally discrete phases of anterior taste bud development

    OpenAIRE

    Thirumangalathu, Shoba; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    The sense of taste is mediated by multicellular taste buds located within taste papillae on the tongue. In mice, individual taste buds reside in fungiform papillae, which develop at mid-gestation as epithelial placodes in the anterior tongue. Taste placodes comprise taste bud precursor cells, which express the secreted factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) and give rise to taste bud cells that differentiate around birth. We showed previously that epithelial activation of β-catenin is the primary induct...

  6. The influence of gravity on bud development in apple trees and in poplars

    OpenAIRE

    B. Borkowska; L. S. Jankiewicz

    2015-01-01

    The lower shoots in horizontally placed apple trees exhibited much weaker development as well in light as darkness. Removing a narrow strip of bark along both sides of a horizontally placed apple tree improved markedly the growth of the lower buds. In poplars the same effect was received by surrounding the lower buds with semicircular incisions. The inhibition of the lower buds was also released by removing the apical bud and the upper ones. The presented results and those published earlier s...

  7. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A; Fraser, Mark E; Scott, Jordan L; Soni, Smita P; Jones, Keaton R; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R; Stahelin, Robert V

    2015-09-01

    Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. Copyright © 2015, American

  8. In vitro PROLIFERATION ABILITY OF AXILLARY BUDS IN Musa spp

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    E-mail : youmbi_emmanuel@yahoo.fr. 2University of Yaounde I, Faculty of Sciences, Laboratory of Biotechnology and Environment, Unit of Physiology and Plant Breeding. B.P. 812 Yaounde Cameroon. ABSTRACT. Tissue culture method has always considered the apical bud as the initial explant for micropropagation of.

  9. presence of axillary bud and application of plant growth hormones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    D. alata)- were grown in pots in the greenhouse. Half the cuttings bore axillary buds and half had none. The cuttings were sprayed with a factorial combination of indole acetic acid (IAA), benzyladenine (BA) and giberellic acid (GA3). Cuttings ...

  10. thidiazuron improves adventitious bud and shoot regeneration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    Induction of adventitious buds and shoots from intact leaves and stem internode segments of two recalcitrant. Ugandan sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas L.) cultivars was investigated in vitro on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, supplemented with 3 different levels (0.5, 2.0 and 4.0 µM) of Thidiazuron (TDZ). Shoots were.

  11. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms...... that contribute to regulating mitotic homologous recombination at telomeres and the role of these mechanisms in signalling short telomeres in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae....

  12. Dynamic assessment of Capparis spinosa buds on survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dynamic assessment of Capparis spinosa buds on survival of periodontal ligament cells using a real‑time cell analysis method. ... Results: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (control) and C. spinosa groups had significantly higher cell index values compared with the HBSS and light milk (P < 0.05). Although, C. spinosa ...

  13. In vitro multiple shoot bud induction and regeneration from plumule ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The response of eleven Indian cultivars of pigeon pea for in vitro multiple shoot bud induction and regeneration from plumule junction explants under variable concentration of 6-benzyl amino purine (BAP), kinetin and thiadiazuron (TDZ) was assessed in the present study. The cultivar IPA-3088 showed best response with a ...

  14. Effects of population source and node position on rhizome bud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of population source (agro-ecozone) and node position on bud distribution in mature (determinate) rhizome of first- (from natural vegetati on) and second- (from screenhouse-grown plants) generation speargrass (Imperata cylindrica (L.) Raeuschel) from the derived savanna (DS), southern Guinea savanna (SGS) ...

  15. Extending the dormant bud cryopreservation method to new tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    In cryopreservation of germplasm, using dormant winter buds (DB) as source plant material is economically favorable over tissue culture options. Although the DB cryopreservation method has been known for many years, the approach is feasible only for cryopreserving a select number of temperate tree s...

  16. Vertical and interhemispheric links in the stratosphere-mesosphere as revealed by the day-to-day variability of Aura-MLS temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The coupling processes in the middle atmosphere have been a subject of intense research activity because of their effects on atmospheric circulation, structure, variability, and the distribution of chemical constituents. In this study, the day-to-day variability of Aura-MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder temperature data are used to reveal the vertical and interhemispheric coupling processes in the stratosphere-mesosphere during four Northern Hemisphere winters (2004/2005–2007/2008. The UKMO (United Kingdom Meteorological Office assimilated data and mesospheric winds from MF (medium frequency radars are also applied to help highlight the coupling processes.

    In this study, a clear vertical link can be seen between the stratosphere and mesosphere during winter months. The coolings and reversals of northward meridional winds in the polar winter mesosphere are often observed in relation to warming events (Sudden Stratospheric Warming, SSW for short and the associated changes in zonal winds in the polar winter stratosphere. An upper-mesospheric cooling usually precedes the beginning of the warming in the stratosphere by 1–2 days.

    Inter-hemispheric coupling has been identified initially by a correlation analysis using the year-to-year monthly zonal mean temperature. Then the correlation analyses are performed based upon the daily zonal mean temperature. From the original time sequences, significant positive (negative correlations are generally found between zonal mean temperatures at the Antarctic summer mesopause and in the Arctic winter stratosphere (mesosphere during northern mid-winters, although these correlations are dominated by the low frequency variability (i.e. the seasonal trend. Using the short-term oscillations (less than 15 days, the statistical result, by looking for the largest magnitude of correlation within a range of time-lags (0 to 10 days; positive lags mean that the Antarctic summer mesopause is lagging, indicates

  17. Vertical and interhemispheric links in the stratosphere-mesosphere as revealed by the day-to-day variability of Aura-MLS temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The coupling processes in the middle atmosphere have been a subject of intense research activity because of their effects on atmospheric circulation, structure, variability, and the distribution of chemical constituents. In this study, the day-to-day variability of Aura-MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder temperature data are used to reveal the vertical and interhemispheric coupling processes in the stratosphere-mesosphere during four Northern Hemisphere winters (2004/2005–2007/2008. The UKMO (United Kingdom Meteorological Office assimilated data and mesospheric winds from MF (medium frequency radars are also applied to help highlight the coupling processes. In this study, a clear vertical link can be seen between the stratosphere and mesosphere during winter months. The coolings and reversals of northward meridional winds in the polar winter mesosphere are often observed in relation to warming events (Sudden Stratospheric Warming, SSW for short and the associated changes in zonal winds in the polar winter stratosphere. An upper-mesospheric cooling usually precedes the beginning of the warming in the stratosphere by 1–2 days. Inter-hemispheric coupling has been identified initially by a correlation analysis using the year-to-year monthly zonal mean temperature. Then the correlation analyses are performed based upon the daily zonal mean temperature. From the original time sequences, significant positive (negative correlations are generally found between zonal mean temperatures at the Antarctic summer mesopause and in the Arctic winter stratosphere (mesosphere during northern mid-winters, although these correlations are dominated by the low frequency variability (i.e. the seasonal trend. Using the short-term oscillations (less than 15 days, the statistical result, by looking for the largest magnitude of correlation within a range of time-lags (0 to 10 days; positive lags mean that the Antarctic summer mesopause is lagging, indicates that the temporal

  18. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen

    2016-01-01

    -spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues...... previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass...

  19. Characterisation of flower bud opening in roses; a comparison of Madelon and Sonia roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, D.; Reenen, van H.S.; Ribôt, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Cut cv. Madelon rose buds do not open satisfactorily when kept under low light (LL) conditions, in contrast to cv. Sonia buds. Adding sucrose to the keeping solution or storage in high light (HL) helped Madelon buds to open, but probably two different mechanisms were involved. Satisfactory

  20. The occurrence of taste buds in adults of the terrestrial ceacilian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two generations of gustatory organs occur during amphibian ontogeny in frogs and salamanders (Anura and Caudata), and are classified as taste buds or taste discs. Taste buds are present in larval forms, whereas taste discs are typical for adults. The little research done on Gymnophiona suggests that only taste buds are ...

  1. Visible dormant buds as related to tree diameter and log position

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith

    1967-01-01

    Red oaks and yellow-poplars in a stand of second-growth cove hardwoods in West Virginia were studied to determine whether visible dormant buds are related to tree size or log position. No correlation was found between dormant buds and tree size, for either species; but yellow-poplars had a significantly greater number of buds on the upper log.

  2. Effects of bud loading levels and nitrogen doses on yield, physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of several bud loading levels in winter pruning and nitrogen doses on yield and physical and chemical properties of fresh vine-leaves of grape cultivar “Narince”. Vines trained with bilateral cordon system was pruned to yield 35000 to 53000 buds/ha (16 or 24 buds/vine) ...

  3. Effect of Cleopatra mandarin rootstock age on bud 'take' of Late ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cleopatra mandarin rootstocks of ages 9 months, 10 months, 11 months and 12 months were budded with Late Valencia sweet orange variety using the chip budding technique in a randomised complete block design. There were 25 budded seedlings for each age group and replicated four times. Results obtained indicated ...

  4. Greater bud outgrowth of Bromus inermis than Pascopyrum smithii under multiple environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqueline P. Ott; Jack L. Butler; Yuping Rong; Lan. Xu

    2017-01-01

    Tiller recruitment of perennial grasses in mixed-grass prairie primarily occurs from belowground buds. Environmental conditions, such as temperature, soil moisture and grazing can affect bud outgrowth of both invasive and native perennial grasses. Differential bud outgrowth responses of native and invasive species to climate change and grazing could alter...

  5. Morphology and prognostic value of tumor budding in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changzheng; Xue, Weicheng; Li, Jiyou; Cai, Yong; Gu, Jin

    2012-07-01

    Tumor budding is an acknowledged prognostic marker in colorectal cancer. This study was conducted to investigate the morphology and prognostic significance of budding in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Surgical specimens from 96 consecutive patients who underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy and curative resection were retrieved to assess budding and other clinicopathologic factors. The morphology and prognostic significance of postirradiation tumor budding were closely associated with tumor regression grade. In the tumor regression grade 1 group, tumor budding presented as "false budding" and did not have a significant association with prognosis. In the tumor regression grade 2 and 3 groups, budding was observed surrounded by radiation-induced fibrosis and large populations of infiltrating inflammatory cells, and budding intensity was significantly associated with histologic differentiation, ypN stage, and lymphovascular invasion (P budding subgroup showed a significantly higher rate of 5-year disease-free survival than the high-grade budding subgroup (87.5% versus 55.6%, P tumor regression grade, and tumor budding were the major independent factors affecting long-term disease-free survival. In conclusion, postirradiation budding has distinct morphology and prognostic significance in rectal cancer after neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of twig pre-harvest temperature for effective cryopreservation of Vaccinium dormant buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryopreservation of plant material by dormant buds is less expensive than using shoot tips; however currently, dormant buds are used only for preservation of selected temperate tree and shrub species. Using dormant buds could be an efficient strategy for long-term preservation of blueberry (Vacciniu...

  7. File list: NoD.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: ALL.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. File list: NoD.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: NoD.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: NoD.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: ALL.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud hg19 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic bud ERX629395...,ERX629396,ERX629399 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_bud.bed ...

  15. Bud detachment in hydra requires activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor and a Rho–ROCK–myosin II signaling pathway to ensure formation of a basal constriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Oliver; Apel, David; Steinmetz, Patrick; Lange, Ellen; Hopfenmüller, Simon; Ohler, Kerstin; Sudhop, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hydra propagates asexually by exporting tissue into a bud, which detaches 4 days later as a fully differentiated young polyp. Prerequisite for detachment is activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling. The mechanism which enables constriction and tissue separation within the monolayered ecto‐ and endodermal epithelia is unknown. Results: Histological sections and staining of F‐actin by phalloidin revealed conspicuous cell shape changes at the bud detachment site indicating a localized generation of mechanical forces and the potential enhancement of secretory functions in ectodermal cells. By gene expression analysis and pharmacological inhibition, we identified a candidate signaling pathway through Rho, ROCK, and myosin II, which controls bud base constriction and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Specific regional myosin phosphorylation suggests a crucial role of ectodermal cells at the detachment site. Inhibition of FGFR, Rho, ROCK, or myosin II kinase activity is permissive for budding, but represses myosin phosphorylation, rearrangement of F‐actin and constriction. The young polyp remains permanently connected to the parent by a broad tissue bridge. Conclusions: Our data suggest an essential role of FGFR and a Rho‐ROCK‐myosin II pathway in the control of cell shape changes required for bud detachment. Developmental Dynamics 246:502–516, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:28411398

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of Floral Buds Deciphered an Irregular Course of Meiosis in Polyploid Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braynen, Janeen; Yang, Yan; Wei, Fang; Cao, Gangqiang; Shi, Gongyao; Tian, Baoming; Zhang, Xiaowei; Jia, Hao; Wei, Xiaochun; Wei, Zhenzhen

    2017-01-01

    Polyploidy is a fundamental process in plant evolution. Understanding the polyploidy-associated effects on plant reproduction is essential for polyploid breeding program. In the present study, our cytological analysis firstly demonstrated that an overall course of meiosis was apparently distorted in the synthetic polyploid Brassica rapa in comparison with its diploid progenitor. To elucidate genetic basis of this irregular meiosis at a molecular level, the comparative RNA-seq analysis was further used to investigate differential genetic regulation of developing floral buds identified at meiosis between autotetraploid and diploid B. rapa. In total, compared to its diploid counterparts, among all 40,927 expressed genes revealed, 4,601 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the floral buds of autotetraploid B. rapa, among which 288 DEGs annotated were involved in meiosis. Notably, DMC1 identified as one previously known meiosis-specific gene involved in inter-homologous chromosome dependent repair of DNA double stranded breaks (DSBs), was significantly down-regulated in autotetraploid B. rapa, which presumably contributed to abnormal progression during meiosis I. Although certain DEGs associated with RNA helicase, cell cycling, and somatic DNA repair were up-regulated after genome duplication, genes associated with meiotic DSB repair were significantly down-regulated. Furthermore, the expression of randomly selected DEGs by RNA-seq analysis was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis in both B. rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results firstly account for adverse effects of polyploidy on an entire course of meiosis at both cytological and transcriptomic levels, and allow for a comprehensive understanding of the uniformity and differences in the transcriptome of floral buds at meiosis between diploid and polyploid B. rapa as well.

  17. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Studies of Mitochondrial Glutaminase C Reveal Extended Flexible Regions, and Link Oligomeric State with Enzyme Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.; Nielsen, Søren Skou; Ramachandran, Siddharth

    2013-01-01

    Glutaminase C is a key metabolic enzyme, which is unregulated in many cancer systems and believed to play a central role in the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells undergo changes to an altered metabolic profile. A long-standing hypothesis links enzymatic activity to the protein oligomeric state...

  18. Influence of temperature on bud break, shoot growth, flower bud atrophy and winter production of glasshouse roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of temperature in the range 15-22 °C on growth, production, quality and flower bud atrophy ('blindness') of the rose cultivars Sweet Promise and Varlon was studied. The roses were grown in Dutch glasshouse soil under natural light conditions and studied from October until May

  19. Analysis of nidogen-1/laminin γ1 interaction by cross-linking, mass spectrometry, and computational modeling reveals multiple binding modes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Lössl

    Full Text Available We describe the detailed structural investigation of nidogen-1/laminin γ1 complexes using full-length nidogen-1 and a number of laminin γ1 variants. The interactions of nidogen-1 with laminin variants γ1 LEb2-4, γ1 LEb2-4 N836D, γ1 short arm, and γ1 short arm N836D were investigated by applying a combination of (photo-chemical cross-linking, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and computational modeling. In addition, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA studies were used to determine kinetic constants of the nidogen-1/laminin γ1 interaction. Two complementary cross-linking strategies were pursued to analyze solution structures of laminin γ1 variants and nidogen-1. The majority of distance information was obtained with the homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linker bis(sulfosuccinimidylglutarate. In a second approach, UV-induced cross-linking was performed after incorporation of the diazirine-containing unnatural amino acids photo-leucine and photo-methionine into laminin γ1 LEb2-4, laminin γ1 short arm, and nidogen-1. Our results indicate that Asn-836 within laminin γ1 LEb3 domain is not essential for complex formation. Cross-links between laminin γ1 short arm and nidogen-1 were found in all protein regions, evidencing several additional contact regions apart from the known interaction site. Computational modeling based on the cross-linking constraints indicates the existence of a conformational ensemble of both the individual proteins and the nidogen-1/laminin γ1 complex. This finding implies different modes of interaction resulting in several distinct protein-protein interfaces.

  20. Tumor Budding Cells, Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition-type Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKaramitopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is one of the most lethal cancers with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Moreover, PDAC escapes early detection and resists treatment. Multiple combinations of genetic alterations are known to occur in PDAC including mutational activation of KRAS, inactivation of p16/CDKN2A and SMAD4 (DPC4 and dysregulation of PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling. Through their interaction with WNT pathway, the downstream molecules of these pathways have been implicated in the promotion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Emerging evidence has demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs, small populations of which have been identified in PDAC, and EMT-type cells play critical roles in drug resistance, invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. EMT may be histologically represented by the presence of tumor budding which is described as the occurrence of single tumor cells or small clusters (<5 of dedifferentiated cells at the invasive front of gastrointestinal (including colorectal, oesophageal, gastric and ampullary carcinomas and is linked to poor prognosis. Tumor budding has recently been shown to occur frequently in PDAC and to be associated with adverse clinicopathological features and decreased disease-free and overall survival. The aim of this review is to present a short overview on the morphological and molecular aspects that underline the relationship between tumor budding cells, CSCs and EMT-type cells in PDAC.

  1. Ligand-induced movements of inner transmembrane helices of Glut1 revealed by chemical cross-linking of di-cysteine mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Mueckler

    Full Text Available The relative orientation and proximity of the pseudo-symmetrical inner transmembrane helical pairs 5/8 and 2/11 of Glut1 were analyzed by chemical cross-linking of di-cysteine mutants. Thirteen functional di-cysteine mutants were created from a C-less Glut1 reporter construct containing cysteine substitutions in helices 5 and 8 or helices 2 and 11. The mutants were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the sensitivity of each mutant to intramolecular cross-linking by two homobifunctional thiol-specific reagents was ascertained by protease cleavage followed by immunoblot analysis. Five of 9 mutants with cysteine residues predicted to lie in close proximity to each other were susceptible to cross-linking by one or both reagents. None of 4 mutants with cysteine substitutions predicted to lie on opposite faces of their respective helices was susceptible to cross-linking. Additionally, the cross-linking of a di-cysteine pair (A70C/M420C, helices 2/11 predicted to lie near the exoplasmic face of the membrane was stimulated by ethylidene glucose, a non-transported glucose analog that preferentially binds to the exofacial substrate-binding site, suggesting that the binding of this ligand stimulates the closure of helices at the exoplasmic face of the membrane. In contrast, the cross-linking of a second di-cysteine pair (T158C/L325, helices 5/8, predicted to lie near the cytoplasmic face of the membrane, was stimulated by cytochalasin B, a glucose transport inhibitor that competitively inhibits substrate efflux, suggesting that this compound recruits the transporter to a conformational state in which closure of inner helices occurs at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. This observation provides a structural explanation for the competitive inhibition of substrate efflux by cytochalasin B. These data indicate that the binding of competitive inhibitors of glucose efflux or influx induce occluded states in the transporter in which substrate is excluded from

  2. Hybridisation-based resequencing of 17 X-linked intellectual disability genes in 135 patients reveals novel mutations in ATRX, SLC6A8 and PQBP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lars R; Chen, Wei; Moser, Bettina; Lipkowitz, Bettina; Schroeder, Christopher; Musante, Luciana; Tzschach, Andreas; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Meloni, Ilaria; Raynaud, Martine; van Esch, Hilde; Chelly, Jamel; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Hackett, Anna; van der Haar, Sigrun; Henn, Wolfram; Gecz, Jozef; Riess, Olaf; Bonin, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Kuss, Andreas W

    2011-06-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID), also known as X-linked mental retardation, is a highly genetically heterogeneous condition for which mutations in >90 different genes have been identified. In this study, we used a custom-made sequencing array based on the Affymetrix 50k platform for mutation screening in 17 known XLID genes in patients from 135 families and found eight single-nucleotide changes that were absent in controls. For four mutations affecting ATRX (p.1761M>T), PQBP1 (p.155R>X) and SLC6A8 (p.390P>L and p.477S>L), we provide evidence for a functional involvement of these changes in the aetiology of intellectual disability.

  3. Mutational analyses on X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy reveal a novel cryptic splicing and three missense mutations in the ABCD1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kun-Long; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Keng, Wee Teik; Chen, Hui-Ju; Liang, Jao-Shwann; Ngu, Lock Hock; Lu, Jyh-Feng

    2013-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by a defective peroxisomal membrane transporter, ABCD1, responsible for transporting very-long-chain fatty acid substrate into peroxisomes for degradation. The main biochemical defect, which is also one of the major diagnostic hallmarks, of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is the accumulation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids in all tissues and body fluids. Direct and reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reactions followed by DNA sequencing-based mutational analyses were performed on one Taiwanese and three Malaysian X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy families. A novel splicing donor site mutation (c.1272+1g>a) was identified in a Taiwanese X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patient, resulting in a deletion of 121 bp and a premature stop codon (p.Val425fs*92) in messenger-RNA transcript. This deletion is caused by the activation of a cryptic splicing donor site in exon 4 of the ABCD1 gene, which is consistent with the prediction by several online algorithms. In addition, three previously described missense mutations (c.965T>C, c.1978C>T, and c.2006A>G), leading to aberrant ABCD1 of p.Leu322Pro, p.Arg660Trp, and p.His669Arg, were also identified in Malaysian probands. This is the first report to unveil unequivocally that cryptic splicing-induced aberrant messenger-RNA carrying an internal frameshift deletion results from an intronic mutation in the ABCD1 gene. Furthermore, a polymorphism in intron 9 (c.1992-32c/t; refSNP: rs4898368) of the ABCD1 gene was commonly observed in both Taiwanese and Malaysian populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Regulation of GA Metabolism during Vernalization, Floral Bud Initiation and Development in Pak Choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis Makino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengya Shang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pak choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis Makino is a representative seed vernalization vegetable and premature bolting in spring can cause significant economic loss. Thus, it is critical to elucidate the mechanism of molecular regulation of vernalization and floral bud initiation to prevent premature bolting. Gibberellin (GA is the key plant hormone involved in regulating plant development. To gain a better understanding of GA metabolism in pak choi, the content of GA in pak choi was measured at different stages of plant development using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that the GA content increased significantly after low-temperature treatment (4°C and then decreased rapidly with vegetative growth. During floral bud initiation, the GA content increased rapidly until it peaked upon floral bud differentiation. To elucidate these changes in GA content, the expression of homologous genes encoding enzymes directly involved in GA metabolism were analyzed. The results showed that the changes in the expression of four genes involved in GA synthesis (Bra035120 encoding ent-kaurene synthase, Bra009868 encoding ent-kaurene oxidase, Bra015394 encoding ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase, and Bra013890 encoding GA20-oxidase were correlated with the changes in GA content. In addition, by comparing the expression of genes involved in GA metabolism at different growth stages, seven differentially expressed genes (Bra005596, Bra009285, Bra022565, Bra008362, Bra033324, Bra010802, and Bra030500 were identified. The differential expression of these genes were directly correlated with changes in GA content, suggesting that these genes were directly related to vernalization, floral bud initiation and development. These results contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanism of changes in GA content during different developmental phases in pak choi.

  5. Membrane-elasticity model of Coatless vesicle budding induced by ESCRT complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Różycki

    Full Text Available The formation of vesicles is essential for many biological processes, in particular for the trafficking of membrane proteins within cells. The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT directs membrane budding away from the cytosol. Unlike other vesicle formation pathways, the ESCRT-mediated budding occurs without a protein coat. Here, we propose a minimal model of ESCRT-induced vesicle budding. Our model is based on recent experimental observations from direct fluorescence microscopy imaging that show ESCRT proteins colocalized only in the neck region of membrane buds. The model, cast in the framework of membrane elasticity theory, reproduces the experimentally observed vesicle morphologies with physically meaningful parameters. In this parameter range, the minimum energy configurations of the membrane are coatless buds with ESCRTs localized in the bud neck, consistent with experiment. The minimum energy configurations agree with those seen in the fluorescence images, with respect to both bud shapes and ESCRT protein localization. On the basis of our model, we identify distinct mechanistic pathways for the ESCRT-mediated budding process. The bud size is determined by membrane material parameters, explaining the narrow yet different bud size distributions in vitro and in vivo. Our membrane elasticity model thus sheds light on the energetics and possible mechanisms of ESCRT-induced membrane budding.

  6. Tumor budding is an independent adverse prognostic factor in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kate; Li-Chang, Hector H; Kalloger, Steven E; Peixoto, Renata D; Webber, Douglas L; Owen, David A; Driman, David K; Kirsch, Richard; Serra, Stefano; Scudamore, Charles H; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established adverse prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. However, the significance and diagnostic reproducibility of budding in pancreatic carcinoma requires further study. We aimed to assess the prognostic significance of tumor budding in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, determine its relationship with other clinicopathologic features, and assess interobserver variability in its diagnosis. Tumor budding was assessed in 192 archival cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) sections; tumor buds were defined as single cells or nonglandular clusters composed of budding was determined through assessment of all tumor-containing slides, and associations with clinicopathologic features and outcomes were analyzed. Six gastrointestinal pathologists participated in an interobserver variability study of 120 images of consecutive tumor slides stained with H&E and cytokeratin. Budding was present in 168 of 192 cases and was associated with decreased overall survival (P=0.001). On multivariable analysis, tumor budding was prognostically significantly independent of stage, grade, tumor size, nodal status, lymphovascular invasion, and perineural invasion. There was substantial agreement among pathologists in assessing the presence of tumor budding using both H&E (K=0.63) and cytokeratin (K=0.63) stains. The presence of tumor budding is an independent adverse prognostic factor in pancreatic ductal carcinoma. The assessment of budding with H&E is reliable and could be used to better risk stratify patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

  7. Safety assessment of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds: Subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liju Vijayasteltar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the various reports on the toxicity of clove oil and its major component eugenol, systematic evaluations on the safety of polyphenolic extracts of clove buds have not been reported. Considering the health beneficial pharmacological effects and recent use of clove polyphenols as dietary supplements, the present study investigated the safety of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds (Clovinol, as assessed by oral acute (5 g/kg b.wt. for 14 days and subchronic (0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg b.wt. for 90 days toxicity studies on Wistar rats and mutagenicity studies employing Salmonella typhimurium strains. Administration of Clovinol did not result in any toxicologically significant changes in clinical/behavioural observations, ophthalmic examinations, body weights, organ weights, feed consumption, urinalysis, hematology and clinical biochemistry parameters when compared to the untreated control group of animals, indicating the no observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL as 1000 mg/kg b.wt./day; the highest dose tested. Terminal necropsy did not reveal any treatment-related histopathology changes. Clovinol did not show genotoxicity when tested on TA-98, TA-100 and TA-102 with or without metabolic activation; rather exhibited significant antimutagenic potential against the known mutagens, sodium azide, NPD and tobacco as well as against 2-acetamidoflourene, which needed metabolic activation for mutagenicity.

  8. Somatic embryogenesis from bud and leaf explants of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cv. Najda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazri, Mouaad Amine; Belkoura, Ilham; Meziani, Reda; Mokhless, Boutaïna; Nour, Souad

    2017-05-01

    An efficient regeneration system through somatic embryogenesis was developed for date palm cv. Najda. Adventitious bud and proximal leaf segments cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with various combinations of auxins and cytokinins induced embryogenesis after at least 6 months of culture. Somatic embryogenesis induction seemed correlated with the type of the explant, the induction period and the auxin used. The highest rate of somatic embryogenesis (86.0%) was obtained on bud explants cultured on MS medium supplemented with 45.0 µM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and 4.5 µM kinetin or 4.5 µM 6-(dimethylallylamino) purine (2iP). Whereas, low levels of embryogenesis were obtained on media supplemented with 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) or 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (NOA). Proximal leaf segments showed somatic embryogenesis only when cultured on media supplemented with 2,4-D or picloram. Statistical analysis revealed significant effects of explant type and plant growth regulators (PGRs) combination on somatic embryogenesis. Somatic embryos were germinated successfully on PGR-free MS medium with or without activated charcoal (50.0-60.0 and 26.6-36.6%, respectively), and 80.0% of plantlets survived after transferring to a glasshouse for 6 months. Our results will be useful for large-scale propagation of date palm cv. Najda, characterized by high fruit quality and bayoud disease resistance.

  9. Safety assessment of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds: Subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasteltar, Liju; Nair, Gopakumar Gopinathan; Maliakel, Balu; Kuttan, Ramadasan; I M, Krishnakumar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the various reports on the toxicity of clove oil and its major component eugenol, systematic evaluations on the safety of polyphenolic extracts of clove buds have not been reported. Considering the health beneficial pharmacological effects and recent use of clove polyphenols as dietary supplements, the present study investigated the safety of a standardized polyphenolic extract of clove buds (Clovinol), as assessed by oral acute (5 g/kg b.wt. for 14 days) and subchronic (0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg b.wt. for 90 days) toxicity studies on Wistar rats and mutagenicity studies employing Salmonella typhimurium strains. Administration of Clovinol did not result in any toxicologically significant changes in clinical/behavioural observations, ophthalmic examinations, body weights, organ weights, feed consumption, urinalysis, hematology and clinical biochemistry parameters when compared to the untreated control group of animals, indicating the no observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) as 1000 mg/kg b.wt./day; the highest dose tested. Terminal necropsy did not reveal any treatment-related histopathology changes. Clovinol did not show genotoxicity when tested on TA-98, TA-100 and TA-102 with or without metabolic activation; rather exhibited significant antimutagenic potential against the known mutagens, sodium azide, NPD and tobacco as well as against 2-acetamidoflourene, which needed metabolic activation for mutagenicity.

  10. Bone marrow combined with dental bud cells promotes tooth regeneration in miniature pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Lin, Hsin-Chi; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, Min-Huey; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chang, Hao-Hueng

    2011-02-01

    Growth factors and morphogens secreted by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) of bone marrow fluid may promote tooth regeneration. Accordingly, a tissue engineering approach was utilized to develop an economical strategy for obtaining the growth factors and morphogens from BMSCs. Unerupted second molar tooth buds harvested from miniature pigs were cultured in vitro to obtain dental bud cells (DBCs). Bone marrow fluid, which contains BMSCs, was collected from the porcine mandible before operation. DBCs suspended in bone marrow fluid were seeded into a gelatin/chondoitin-6-sulfate/hyaluronan tri-copolymer scaffold (GCHT scaffold). The DBCs/bone marrow fluid/GCHT scaffold was autografted into the original alveolar sockets of the pigs. Radiographic and histological examinations were applied to identify the structure of regenerated tooth at 40 weeks postimplantation. The present results showed that one pig developed a complete tooth with crown, root, pulp, enamel, dentin, odontoblast, cementum, blood vessel, and periodontal ligament in indiscriminate shape. Three animals had an unerupted tooth that expressed dentin matrix protein-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and osteopontin; and two other pigs also had dental-like structure with dentin tubules. This study reveals that DBCs adding bone marrow fluid and a suitable scaffold can promote the tooth regeneration in autogenic cell transplantation. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cryopreservation of dried axillary buds from plantlets of Asparagus officinalis L. grown in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uragami, A; Sakai, A; Nagai, M

    1990-10-01

    Dried axillary buds from plantlets of Asparagus lofficinalis L. grown in vitro were successfully cryopreserved. Single node segments (5mm in length) with axillary bud were taken from mature in vitro plantlets. The segments were precultured on solidfied Murashige-Skoog medium (1962) containing 0.7M sucrose at 25 °C in light for 2 days. Thereafter, these precultured segments were subjected to dehydration with silica gel at room temperature for 0 to 24 h. The axillary buds of precultured segments tolerated dehydration to about 14% water content(FW) with 50% lethality (LD50) and the threshold water content at which the dried buds remained alive after exposure to liquid nitrogen was 16.9%(LD50). The maximum rate of survival of cryopreserved buds was about 71% of untreated control. Surviving buds produced shoots and regenerated into plantlets. These results demonstrate the feasibility of cryopreserving dried axillary buds from in vitro plantlets.

  12. Accelerated turnover of taste bud cells in mice deficient for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perna Marla K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian taste buds contain several specialized cell types that coordinately respond to tastants and communicate with sensory nerves. While it has long been appreciated that these cells undergo continual turnover, little is known concerning how adequate numbers of cells are generated and maintained. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 has been shown to influence cell number in several developing tissues, by coordinating cell cycle exit during cell differentiation. Here, we investigated its involvement in the control of taste cell replacement by examining adult mice with targeted ablation of the p27Kip1 gene. Results Histological and morphometric analyses of fungiform and circumvallate taste buds reveal no structural differences between wild-type and p27Kip1-null mice. However, when examined in functional assays, mutants show substantial proliferative changes. In BrdU incorporation experiments, more S-phase-labeled precursors appear within circumvallate taste buds at 1 day post-injection, the earliest time point examined. After 1 week, twice as many labeled intragemmal cells are present, but numbers return to wild-type levels by 2 weeks. Mutant taste buds also contain more TUNEL-labeled cells and 50% more apoptotic bodies than wild-type controls. In normal mice, p27 Kip1 is evident in a subset of receptor and presynaptic taste cells beginning about 3 days post-injection, correlating with the onset of taste cell maturation. Loss of gene function, however, does not alter the proportions of distinct immunohistochemically-identified cell types. Conclusions p27Kip1 participates in taste cell replacement by regulating the number of precursor cells available for entry into taste buds. This is consistent with a role for the protein in timing cell cycle withdrawal in progenitor cells. The equivalence of mutant and wild-type taste buds with regard to cell number, cell types and general structure contrasts with the hyperplasia

  13. Accelerated turnover of taste bud cells in mice deficient for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Theresa A; Smith Adams, Lorraine B; Moore, Preston D; Perna, Marla K; Sword, Jarrod D; Defoe, Dennis M

    2011-04-20

    Mammalian taste buds contain several specialized cell types that coordinately respond to tastants and communicate with sensory nerves. While it has long been appreciated that these cells undergo continual turnover, little is known concerning how adequate numbers of cells are generated and maintained. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 has been shown to influence cell number in several developing tissues, by coordinating cell cycle exit during cell differentiation. Here, we investigated its involvement in the control of taste cell replacement by examining adult mice with targeted ablation of the p27Kip1 gene. Histological and morphometric analyses of fungiform and circumvallate taste buds reveal no structural differences between wild-type and p27Kip1-null mice. However, when examined in functional assays, mutants show substantial proliferative changes. In BrdU incorporation experiments, more S-phase-labeled precursors appear within circumvallate taste buds at 1 day post-injection, the earliest time point examined. After 1 week, twice as many labeled intragemmal cells are present, but numbers return to wild-type levels by 2 weeks. Mutant taste buds also contain more TUNEL-labeled cells and 50% more apoptotic bodies than wild-type controls. In normal mice, p27 Kip1 is evident in a subset of receptor and presynaptic taste cells beginning about 3 days post-injection, correlating with the onset of taste cell maturation. Loss of gene function, however, does not alter the proportions of distinct immunohistochemically-identified cell types. p27Kip1 participates in taste cell replacement by regulating the number of precursor cells available for entry into taste buds. This is consistent with a role for the protein in timing cell cycle withdrawal in progenitor cells. The equivalence of mutant and wild-type taste buds with regard to cell number, cell types and general structure contrasts with the hyperplasia and tissue disruption seen in certain developing p27Kip1

  14. A Conserved Carbon Starvation Response Underlies Bud Dormancy in Woody and Herbaceous Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tarancón

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant shoot systems give rise to characteristic above-ground plant architectures. Shoots are formed from axillary meristems and buds, whose growth and development is modulated by systemic and local signals. These cues convey information about nutrient and water availability, light quality, sink/source organ activity and other variables that determine the timeliness and competence to maintain development of new shoots. This information is translated into a local response, in meristems and buds, of growth or quiescence. Although some key genes involved in the onset of bud latency have been identified, the gene regulatory networks (GRNs controlled by these genes are not well defined. Moreover, it has not been determined whether bud dormancy induced by environmental cues, such as a low red-to-far-red light ratio, shares genetic mechanisms with bud latency induced by other causes, such as apical dominance or a short-day photoperiod. Furthermore, the evolution and conservation of these GRNs throughout angiosperms is not well established. We have reanalyzed public transcriptomic datasets that compare quiescent and active axillary buds of Arabidopsis, with datasets of axillary buds of the woody species Vitis vinifera (grapevine and apical buds of Populus tremula x Populus alba (poplar during the bud growth-to-dormancy transition. Our aim was to identify potentially common GRNs induced during the process that leads to bud para-, eco- and endodormancy. In Arabidopsis buds that are entering eco- or paradormancy, we have identified four induced interrelated GRNs that correspond to a carbon (C starvation syndrome, typical of tissues undergoing low C supply. This response is also detectable in poplar and grapevine buds before and during the transition to dormancy. In all eukaryotes, C-limiting conditions are coupled to growth arrest and latency like that observed in dormant axillary buds. Bud dormancy might thus be partly a consequence of the underlying C

  15. Tumor budding is a strong and reproducible prognostic marker in T3N0 colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Lai Mun

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor budding along the advancing front of colorectal adenocarcinoma is an early event in the metastatic process. A reproducible, prognostic budding scoring system based on outcomes in early stage colorectal cancer has not been established. DESIGN: One hundred twenty-eight T3N0M0 colorectal carcinoma patients with known outcome were identified. Tumor budding was defined as isolated tumor cells or clusters of <5 cells at the invasive tumor front. Tumor bud counts were generated in 5 regions at 200x by 2 pathologists (conventional bud count method). The median bud count per case was used to divide cases into low (median=0) and high budding (median > or =1) groups. Forty cases were reevaluated to assess reproducibility using the conventional and a novel rapid bud count method. RESULTS: Fifty-seven (45%) carcinomas had high and 71 (55%) had low budding scores. High budding was associated with an infiltrative growth pattern (P<0.0001) and lymphovascular invasion (P=0.005). Five-year cancer-specific survival was significantly poorer in high compared with low budding groups: 63% versus 91%, respectively, P<0.0001. Multivariate analysis demonstrated tumor budding to be independently prognostic (hazard ratio=4.76, P<0.001). Interobserver agreement was at least equivalent comparing the conventional to the rapid bud count methods: 87.5% agreement (kappa=0.75) versus 92.5% agreement (kappa=0.85), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Tumor budding is a strong, reproducible, and independent prognostic marker of outcome that is easily assessed on hematoxylin and eosin slides. This may be useful for identifying the subset of T3N0M0 patients at high risk of recurrence who may benefit from adjuvant therapy.

  16. Proteomic profiling of TGFBI-null mouse corneas reveals only minor changes in matrix composition supportive of TGFBI knockdown as therapy against TGFBI-linked corneal dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Runager, Kasper; Nielsen, Nadia Sukusu

    2017-01-01

    role in maintaining structural integrity and possibly corneal transparency as well. Significantly, more than 60 point mutations within the TGFBI gene have been reported to result in aberrant TGFBIp folding and aggregation in the cornea, resulting in severe visual impairment and blindness. Several...... studies have focused on targeting TGFBIp in the cornea as a therapeutic approach to treat TGFBI-linked corneal dystrophies, but the effect of this approach on corneal homeostasis and matrix integrity remained unknown. In the current study, we evaluated the histological and proteomic profiles of corneas...

  17. Newly identified prions in budding yeast, and their possible functions

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, Emily T.; Li, Liming

    2011-01-01

    Yeast prions are atypical genetic elements that are transmitted as heritable protein conformations. [PSI+], [URE3], and [PIN+] are three well-studied prions in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the last three years, several additional prions have been reported in yeast, including [SWI+], [OCT+], [MCA], [GAR+], [MOT3+], [ISP+], and [NSI+]. The growing number of yeast prions suggests that protein-based inheritance might be a widespread biological phenomenon. In this review, we sum...

  18. The cell surface mucin podocalyxin regulates collective breast tumor budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Marcia L; Cipollone, Jane A; Austin, Pamela; Bell, Erin M; Nielsen, Julie S; Gilks, C Blake; McNagny, Kelly M; Roskelley, Calvin D

    2016-01-22

    Overexpression of the transmembrane sialomucin podocalyxin, which is known to play a role in lumen formation during polarized epithelial morphogenesis, is an independent indicator of poor prognosis in a number of epithelial cancers, including those that arise in the breast. Therefore, we set out to determine if podocalyxin plays a functional role in breast tumor progression. MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which express little endogenous podocalyxin, were stably transfected with wild type podocalyxin for forced overexpression. 4T1 mammary tumor cells, which express considerable endogenous podocalyxin, were retrovirally transduced with a short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) targeting podocalyxin for stable knockdown. In vitro, the effects of podocalyxin on collective cellular migration and invasion were assessed in two-dimensional monolayer and three-dimensional basement membrane/collagen gel culture, respectively. In vivo, local invasion was assessed after orthotopic transplantation in immunocompromised mice. Forced overexpression of podocalyxin caused cohesive clusters of epithelial MCF-7 breast tumor cells to bud off from the primary tumor and collectively invade the stroma of the mouse mammary gland in vivo. This budding was not associated with any obvious changes in histoarchitecture, matrix deposition or proliferation in the primary tumour. In vitro, podocalyxin overexpression induced a collective migration of MCF-7 tumor cells in two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer culture that was dependent on the activity of the actin scaffolding protein ezrin, a cytoplasmic binding partner of podocalyxin. In three-dimensional (3-D) culture, podocalyxin overexpression induced a collective budding and invasion that was dependent on actomyosin contractility. Interestingly, the collectively invasive cell aggregates often contained expanded microlumens that were also observed in vivo. Conversely, when endogenous podocalyxin was removed from highly metastatic, but cohesive, 4T1 mammary

  19. Saponins from the flower buds of Buddleja officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongzhu; Koike, Kazuo; Li, Wei; Satou, Tadaaki; Guo, Dean; Nikaido, Tamotsu

    2004-01-01

    Five new saponins, mimengosides C-G (1-5), were isolated from the flower buds of Buddleja officinalis along with five known compounds, namely, songaroside A, acteoside, phenylethyl 2-glucoside, echinacoside, and phenylethyl alcohol 8-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside. The structures of 1-5 were elucidated using spectroscopic and chemical methods, and these compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory effects against HL-60 leukemia cells.

  20. Ecological conditions favoring budding in colonial organisms under environmental disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Nakamaru

    Full Text Available Dispersal is a topic of great interest in ecology. Many organisms adopt one of two distinct dispersal tactics at reproduction: the production of small offspring that can disperse over long distances (such as seeds and spawned eggs, or budding. The latter is observed in some colonial organisms, such as clonal plants, corals and ants, in which (superorganisms split their body into components of relatively large size that disperse to a short distance. Contrary to the common dispersal viewpoint, short-dispersal colonial organisms often flourish even in environments with frequent disturbances. In this paper, we investigate the conditions that favor budding over long-distance dispersal of small offspring, focusing on the life history of the colony growth and the colony division ratio. These conditions are the relatively high mortality of very small colonies, logistic growth, the ability of dispersers to peacefully seek and settle unoccupied spaces, and small spatial scale of environmental disturbance. If these conditions hold, budding is advantageous even when environmental disturbance is frequent. These results suggest that the demography or life history of the colony underlies the behaviors of the colonial organisms.

  1. Bud dormancy in apple trees after thermal fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Anzanello

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of heat waves on the evolution of bud dormancy, in apple trees with contrasting chilling requirements. Twigs of 'Castel Gala' and 'Royal Gala' were collected in orchards in Papanduva, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, and were exposed to constant (3°C or alternating (3 and 15°C for 12/12 hours temperature, combined with zero, one or two days a week at 25°C. Two additional treatments were evaluated: constant temperature (3°C, with a heat wave of seven days at 25°C, in the beginning or in the middle of the experimental period. Periodically, part of the twigs was transferred to 25°C for daily budburst evaluation of apical and lateral buds. Endodormancy (dormancy induced by cold was overcome with less than 330 chilling hours (CH of constant cold in 'Castel Gala' and less than 618 CH in 'Royal Gala'. A daily 15°C-temperature cycle did not affect the endodormancy process. Heat waves during endodormancy resulted in an increased CH to achieve bud requirements. The negative effect of high temperature depended on the lasting of this condition. Chilling was partly cancelled during dormancy when the heat wave lasted 36 continuous hours or more. Therefore, budburst prediction models need adjustments, mainly for regions with mild and irregular winters, such as those of Southern Brazil.

  2. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT. These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs. Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups.

  3. Targeted taste cell-specific overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adult taste buds elevates phosphorylated TrkB protein levels in taste cells, increases taste bud size, and promotes gustatory innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Irina V; Margolskee, Robert F; Nosrat, Christopher A

    2012-05-11

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most potent neurotrophic factor in the peripheral taste system during embryonic development. It is also expressed in adult taste buds. There is a lack of understanding of the role of BDNF in the adult taste system. To address this, we generated novel transgenic mice in which transgene expression was driven by an α-gustducin promoter coupling BDNF expression to the postnatal expression of gustducin in taste cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly stronger BDNF labeling in taste cells of high BDNF-expressing mouse lines compared with controls. We show that taste buds in these mice are significantly larger and have a larger number of taste cells compared with controls. To examine whether innervation was affected in Gust-BDNF mice, we used antibodies to neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and ATP receptor P2X3. The total density of general innervation and specifically the gustatory innervation was markedly increased in high BDNF-expressing mice compared with controls. TrkB and NCAM gene expression in laser capture microdissected taste epithelia were significantly up-regulated in these mice. Up-regulation of TrkB transcripts in taste buds and elevated taste cell-specific TrkB phosphorylation in response to increased BDNF levels indicate that BDNF controls the expression and activation of its high affinity receptor in taste cells. This demonstrates a direct taste cell function for BDNF. BDNF also orchestrates and maintains taste bud innervation. We propose that the Gust-BDNF transgenic mouse models can be employed to further dissect the specific roles of BDNF in the adult taste system.

  4. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  5. A Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Buds and the Young Expanding Leaves of the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tea (Camellia sinensis L. is a perennial woody plant that is widely cultivated to produce a popular non-alcoholic beverage; this beverage has received much attention due to its pleasant flavor and bioactive ingredients, particularly several important secondary metabolites. Due to the significant changes in the metabolite contents of the buds and the young expanding leaves of tea plants, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ analysis were performed. A total of 233 differentially expressed proteins were identified. Among these, 116 proteins were up-regulated and 117 proteins were down-regulated in the young expanding leaves compared with the buds. A large array of diverse functions was revealed, including roles in energy and carbohydrate metabolism, secondary metabolite metabolism, nucleic acid and protein metabolism, and photosynthesis- and defense-related processes. These results suggest that polyphenol biosynthesis- and photosynthesis-related proteins regulate the secondary metabolite content of tea plants. The energy and antioxidant metabolism-related proteins may promote tea leaf development. However, reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR showed that the protein expression levels were not well correlated with the gene expression levels. These findings improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the changes in the metabolite content of the buds and the young expanding leaves of tea plants.

  6. A Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Buds and the Young Expanding Leaves of the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Li, Juan; Liu, Shuoqian; Huang, Jianan; Lin, Haiyan; Wang, Kunbo; Cheng, Xiaomei; Liu, Zhonghua

    2015-06-18

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) is a perennial woody plant that is widely cultivated to produce a popular non-alcoholic beverage; this beverage has received much attention due to its pleasant flavor and bioactive ingredients, particularly several important secondary metabolites. Due to the significant changes in the metabolite contents of the buds and the young expanding leaves of tea plants, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis were performed. A total of 233 differentially expressed proteins were identified. Among these, 116 proteins were up-regulated and 117 proteins were down-regulated in the young expanding leaves compared with the buds. A large array of diverse functions was revealed, including roles in energy and carbohydrate metabolism, secondary metabolite metabolism, nucleic acid and protein metabolism, and photosynthesis- and defense-related processes. These results suggest that polyphenol biosynthesis- and photosynthesis-related proteins regulate the secondary metabolite content of tea plants. The energy and antioxidant metabolism-related proteins may promote tea leaf development. However, reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the protein expression levels were not well correlated with the gene expression levels. These findings improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the changes in the metabolite content of the buds and the young expanding leaves of tea plants.

  7. Global gene expression profiling of brown to white adipose tissue transformation in sheep reveals novel transcriptional components linked to adipose remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, Astrid L.; Dixen, Karen; Yadav, Rachita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Large mammals are capable of thermoregulation shortly after birth due to the presence of brown adipose tissue (BAT). The majority of BAT disappears after birth and is replaced by white adipose tissue (WAT). Results: We analyzed the postnatal transformation of adipose in sheep...... with a time course study of the perirenal adipose depot. We observed changes in tissue morphology, gene expression and metabolism within the first two weeks of postnatal life consistent with the expected transition from BAT to WAT. The transformation was characterized by massively decreased mitochondrial...... NR1H3, MYC, KLF4, ESR1, RELA and BCL6, which were linked to the overall changes in gene expression during the adipose tissue remodeling. Finally, the perirenal adipose tissue expressed both brown and brite/beige adipocyte marker genes at birth, the expression of which changed substantially over time...

  8. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition correlates with tumor budding and predicts prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Yukiko; Yamada, Suguru; Koike, Masahiko; Kanda, Mitsuro; Fujii, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Goro; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nomoto, Shuji; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is considered to play an important role in cancer invasion. Tumor budding is a prognostic factor in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The aim of this study was to explore the correlation between EMT and tumor budding. Surgical specimens from 78 cases of ESCC resected without preoperative treatment between 2001 and 2013 were enrolled in the study. The mRNA expressions of E-cadherin and vimentin were measured in cancerous tissues using real-time PCR, and each tumor was classified into either epithelial or mesenchymal group. Tumor budding was evaluated in H&E-stained slides and divided into two groups; low-grade budding (budding (≥3). The 5-year survival rate in the epithelial group was significantly higher than that in the mesenchymal group (62.0% vs. 31.5%, P = 0.021). Survival rate of patients in the low-grade budding group was significantly higher than that of patients in the high-grade budding group (75.1% vs. 25.9%, P tumor budding was significantly associated with the mesenchymal group (P = 0.009). EMT was found to occur in ESCC and was significantly associated with tumor budding. Tumor budding was identified as a significant independent prognostic factor among the current population of ESCC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ice nucleation activity in various tissues of Rhododendron flower buds: their relevance to extraorgan freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya eIshikawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wintering flower buds of cold hardy Rhododendron japonicum cooled slowly to subfreezing temperatures are known to undergo extraorgan freezing, whose mechanisms remain obscure. We revisited this material to demonstrate why bud scales freeze first in spite of their lower water content, why florets remain deeply supercooled and how seasonal adaptive responses occur in regard to extraorgan freezing in flower buds. We determined ice nucleation activity (INA of various flower bud tissues of using a test tube-based assay. Irrespective of collection sites, outer and inner bud scales that function as ice sinks in extraorgan freezing had high INA levels whilst florets that remain supercooled and act as a water source lacked INA. The INA level of bud scales was not high in late August when flower bud formation was ending, but increased to reach the highest level in late October just before the first autumnal freeze. The results support the following hypothesis: the high INA in bud scales functions as the subfreezing sensor, ensuring the primary freezing in bud scales at warmer subzero temperatures, which likely allows the migration of floret water to the bud scales and accumulation of icicles within the bud scales. The low INA in the florets helps them remain unfrozen by deep supercooling. The INA in the bud scales was resistant to grinding and autoclaving at 121°C for 15 min, implying the intrinsic nature of the INA rather than of microbial origin, whilst the INA in stem bark was autoclaving labile. Anti-nucleation activity (ANA was implicated in the leachate of autoclaved bud scales, which suppresses the INA at millimolar levels of concentration and likely differs from the colligative effects of the solutes. The tissue INA levels likely contribute to the establishment of freezing behaviors by ensuring the order of freezing in the tissues: from the primary freeze to the last tissue remaining unfrozen.

  10. Ice nucleation activity in various tissues of Rhododendron flower buds: their relevance to extraorgan freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masaya; Ishikawa, Mikiko; Toyomasu, Takayuki; Aoki, Takayuki; Price, William S

    2015-01-01

    Wintering flower buds of cold hardy Rhododendron japonicum cooled slowly to subfreezing temperatures are known to undergo extraorgan freezing, whose mechanisms remain obscure. We revisited this material to demonstrate why bud scales freeze first in spite of their lower water content, why florets remain deeply supercooled and how seasonal adaptive responses occur in regard to extraorgan freezing in flower buds. We determined ice nucleation activity (INA) of various flower bud tissues using a test tube-based assay. Irrespective of collection sites, outer and inner bud scales that function as ice sinks in extraorgan freezing had high INA levels whilst florets that remain supercooled and act as a water source lacked INA. The INA level of bud scales was not high in late August when flower bud formation was ending, but increased to reach the highest level in late October just before the first autumnal freeze. The results support the following hypothesis: the high INA in bud scales functions as the subfreezing sensor, ensuring the primary freezing in bud scales at warmer subzero temperatures, which likely allows the migration of floret water to the bud scales and accumulation of icicles within the bud scales. The low INA in the florets helps them remain unfrozen by deep supercooling. The INA in the bud scales was resistant to grinding and autoclaving at 121(∘)C for 15 min, implying the intrinsic nature of the INA rather than of microbial origin, whilst the INA in stem bark was autoclaving-labile. Anti-nucleation activity (ANA) was implicated in the leachate of autoclaved bud scales, which suppresses the INA at millimolar levels of concentration and likely differs from the colligative effects of the solutes. The tissue INA levels likely contribute to the establishment of freezing behaviors by ensuring the order of freezing in the tissues: from the primary freeze to the last tissue remaining unfrozen.

  11. Tumor Budding as a Strong Prognostic Indicator in Invasive Ampullary Adenocarcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohike, Nobuyuki; Coban, Ipek; Kim, Grace E.; Basturk, Olca; Tajiri, Takuma; Krasinskas, Alyssa; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Morohoshi, Toshio; Shimada, Yuki; Kooby, David A.; Staley, Charles A.; Goodman, Michael; Adsay, Nazmi Volkan

    2011-01-01

    Prognostication of invasive ampullary adenocarcinomas (AACs) and their stratification into appropriate management categories have been highly challenging owing to a lack of well-established predictive parameters. In colorectal cancers, recent studies have shown that tumor budding confers a worse prognosis and correlates significantly with nodal metastasis and recurrence; however, this has not been evaluated in AAC. To investigate the prevalence, significance, and clinical correlations of tumor budding in AAC, 244 surgically resected, stringently defined, invasive AAC were analyzed for tumor budding—defined as the presence of more than or equal to 5 isolated single cancer cells or clusters composed of fewer than 5 cancer cells per field measuring 0.785 mm2 using a 20 × objective lens in the stroma of the invasive front. The extent of the budding was then further classified as “high” if there were greater than or equal to 3 budding foci and as “low” if there were budding foci or no budding focus. One hundred ninety-four AACs (80%) were found to be high-budding and 50 (20%) were low-budding. When the clinicopathologic features and survival of the 2 groups were compared, the AACs with high-budding had larger invasion size (19 mm vs. 13 mm; Ptumor budding was found to be an independent predictor of survival (P = 0.01), which impacts prognosis (hazard ratio: 2.6) even more than T-stage and lymph node metastasis (hazard ratio: 1.9 and 1.8, respectively). In conclusion, tumor budding is frequently encountered in AAC. High-budding is a strong independent predictor of overall survival, with a prognostic correlation stronger than the 2 established parameters: T-stage and lymph node metastasis. Therefore, budding should be incorporated into surgical pathology reports for AAC. PMID:20871215

  12. All-trans-retinoid acid (ATRA) suppresses chondrogenesis of rat primary hind limb bud mesenchymal cells by downregulating p63 and cartilage-specific molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Guo; Xie, Peng; Wang, Yun-Gong; Li, Xue-Dong; Zhang, Tao-Gen; Liu, Zhao-Yong; Hong, Quan; Du, Shi-Xin

    2014-09-01

    P63 null mice have no or truncated limbs and mutations in human p63 cause several skeletal syndromes that also show limb and digit abnormalities, suggesting its essential role in bone development. In the current study, we investigated the effect of ATRA on chondrogenesis using mesenchymal cells from rat hind limb bud and further examined the mRNA and protein expression of Sox9 and Col2a1 and p63 in rat hind limb bud cells. Limb buds were isolated from embryos from euthanized female rats. Growth of hind limb bud mesenchymal cells was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assays. Formation of cartilage nodules was examined by Alcian blue-nuclear fast red staining. The expression of Sox9, Col2al and p63 was determined by Real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting assays, respectively. Our MTT assays revealed that ATRA at 1 and 10μM significantly suppressed the growth of mesenchymal cells from rat hind limb bud at 24 and 48h (PATRA caused a significant dose-dependent reduction in the area of cartilage nodules (PATRA, the area of cartilage nodules from hind limb bud cells was reduced to 0.05±0.03mm from 0.15±0.01mm in controls. Real-time RT-PCR assays further indicated that 1 and 10μM ATRA markedly reduced the mRNA expression of Sox9, Col2al and p63 in hind limb bud cells (PATRA time-dependently inhibits the mRNA expression of p63, Sox9 and Col2al. Western blotting assays additionally showed that ATRA dose-dependently reduced the expression of Sox9, Col2al and p63 (PATRA suppresses chondrogenesis by modulating the expression of Sox9, Col2al and p63 in primary hind limb bud mesenchymal cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Phosphorylation-Dependent Activation of the ESCRT Function of ALIX in Cytokinetic Abscission and Retroviral Budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sheng; Sun, Le; Zhou, Xi; Wu, Chuanfen; Wang, Ruoning; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2016-02-08

    The modular adaptor protein ALIX is a key player in multiple ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling processes. ALIX is normally present in a closed conformation due to an intramolecular interaction that renders ALIX unable to perform its ESCRT functions. Here we demonstrate that M phase-specific phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site within the proline-rich domain (PRD) of ALIX transforms cytosolic ALIX from closed to open conformation. Defining the role of this mechanism of ALIX regulation in three classical ESCRT-mediated processes revealed that phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site in the PRD is required for ALIX to function in cytokinetic abscission and retroviral budding, but not in multivesicular body sorting of activated epidermal growth factor receptor. Thus, phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site in the PRD is one of the major mechanisms that activates the ESCRT function of ALIX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Small bud of probable gastrointestinal stromal tumor within a laparoscopically-resected gastric schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Takafumi; Aoyama, Toru; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Yamada, Takanobu; Ogata, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Tsuburaya, Akira; Sekiguchi, Hironobu; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Sakuma, Yuji; Kameda, Yoichi; Miyagi, Yohei

    2012-06-01

    Submucosal tumors (SMTs) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can be potentially difficulty to diagnose pathologically. We report a case of a gastric SMT that was resected by laparoscopic partial gastrectomy. Although the initial histological and immunohistochemical examinations considered the tumor as a schwannoma, mRNA-based KIT genotyping indicated that the tumor included cells with KIT gene expression, and that a small number of cells carried a deletion mutation in exon 11. Additional histopathological investigations revealed small aggregates of enlarged spindle to epithelioid cells, which were positive for KIT, CD34 and DOG1, and negative for S-100, scattered among the S-100-positive schwannoma cells. We consider that the cells carrying the KIT gene mutation are microscopic buds of a gastrointestinal stroma tumor (GIST), and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of probable GIST tissues identified in a schwannoma. Our observations raised the significance of genotyping for diagnosis of GI tract SMTs.

  15. Active immunosurveillance in the tumor microenvironment of colorectal cancer is associated with low frequency tumor budding and improved outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelzer, Viktor H; Dawson, Heather; Andersson, Emilia; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Masucci, Giuseppe V; Lugli, Alessandro; Zlobec, Inti

    2015-08-01

    Tumor budding (single tumor cells or small tumor cell clusters) at the invasion front of colorectal cancer (CRC) is an adverse prognostic indicator linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. This study characterized the immunogenicity of tumor buds by analyzing the expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in the invasive tumor cell compartment. We hypothesized that maintenance of a functional MHC-I antigen presentation pathway, activation of CD8+ T-cells, and release of antitumoral effector molecules such as cytotoxic granule-associated RNA binding protein (TIA1) in the tumor microenvironment can counter tumor budding and favor prolonged patient outcome. Therefore, a well-characterized multipunch tissue microarray of 220 CRCs was profiled for MHC-I, CD8, and TIA1 by immunohistochemistry. Topographic expression analysis of MHC-I was performed using whole tissue sections (n = 100). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) mutations, mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression, and CpG-island methylator phenotype (CIMP) were investigated. Our results demonstrated that membranous MHC-I expression is frequently down-regulated in the process of invasion. Maintained MHC-I at the invasion front strongly predicted low-grade tumor budding (P = 0.0004). Triple-positive MHC-I/CD8/TIA1 in the tumor microenvironment predicted early T-stage (P = 0.0031), absence of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.0348), lymphatic (P = 0.0119) and venous invasion (P = 0.006), and highly favorable 5-year survival (90.9% vs 39.3% in triple-negative patients; P = 0.0032). MHC-I loss was frequent in KRAS-mutated, CD8+ CRC (P = 0.0228). No relationship was observed with CIMP, MMR, or BRAF mutation. In conclusion, tumor buds may evade immune recognition through downregulation of membranous MHC-I. A combined profile of MHC-I/CD8/TIA1 improves the prognostic value of antitumoral effector cells and should be preferred to

  16. Cell Budding from Normal Appearing Epithelia: A Predictor of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Mason, Jeffrey; Jewett, Anahid; Qian, Jun; Ding, Yijiang; Cho, William CS; Zhang, Xichen; Man, Yan-gao

    2013-01-01

    . Our most recent studies of human CRC have detected nearly identical focal capsule disruptions, lymphocyte infiltration, budding cells, and the formation of TLCs. Our studies have further shown that age- and type-matched node-positive and -negative CRC have a significantly different morphological and immunohistochemical profile and that the majority of lymphatic ducts with disseminated cells are located within the mucosa adjacent to morphologically normal appearing epithelial structures that express a stem cell-related marker. New hypothesis: Based on these findings and the growth patterns of budding cells revealed by double immunohistochemistry, we further hypothesize that metastatic spread is an early event of carcinogenesis and that budding cells overlying focal capsule disruptions represent invasion- and metastasis-initiating cells that follow one of four pathways to progress: (1) to undergo extensive in situ proliferation leading to the formation of tumor nests that subsequently invade the submucosa, (2) to migrate with associated lymphocytes functioning as “seeds” to grow in new sites, (3) to migrate and intravasate into pre-existing vascular structures by forming TLCs, or (4) to intravasate into vascular structures that are generated by the budding cells themselves. We also propose that only node-positive cases harbor stem cells with the potential for multi-lineage differentiation and unique surface markers that permit intravasation. PMID:23355797

  17. Purification of viral genome-linked protein VPg from potato virus A-infected plants reveals several post-translationally modified forms of the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafrén, Anders; Mäkinen, Kristiina

    2008-06-01

    In order to be able to analyse post-translational modifications and protein interactions of viral genome-linked protein VPg taking place during potato virus A (PVA) infection, an affinity tag-based purification system was developed by inserting a sequence encoding a six-histidine and haemagglutinin (HisHA) tag to the 3' end of the VPg coding sequence within the infectious cDNA clone of PVA. The engineered virus was fully functional and the HisHA tag-encoding sequence remained stable in the PVA genome throughout the infection process. Purification under denaturing conditions resulted in a protein sample that contained multiple VPg and NIa forms carrying post-translational modifications that altered their isoelectric points. Non-modified tagged VPg (pI 8) was a minor product in the protein sample derived from total leaf proteins, but when the replication-associated membranes were used as starting material, its relative amount increased. Further characterization demonstrated that some of the PVA VPg isoforms were modified by multiple phosphorylation events. Purity of the proteins derived from the native purifications with either of the tags was evaluated. A clearly purer VPg sample was obtained by performing tandem affinity purification utilizing both tags sequentially. NIb, CI and HC-Pro co-purified in an affinity-tagged VPg-dependent manner, indicating that the system was able to isolate protein complexes operating during PVA infection.

  18. Pupil Dilation and EEG Alpha Frequency Band Power Reveal Load on Executive Functions for Link-Selection Processes during Text Reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Scharinger

    Full Text Available Executive working memory functions play a central role in reading comprehension. In the present research we were interested in additional load imposed on executive functions by link-selection processes during computer-based reading. For obtaining process measures, we used a methodology of concurrent electroencephalographic (EEG and eye-tracking data recording that allowed us to compare epochs of pure text reading with epochs of hyperlink-like selection processes in an online reading situation. Furthermore, this methodology allowed us to directly compare the two physiological load-measures EEG alpha frequency band power and pupil dilation. We observed increased load on executive functions during hyperlink-like selection processes on both measures in terms of decreased alpha frequency band power and increased pupil dilation. Surprisingly however, the two measures did not correlate. Two additional experiments were conducted that excluded potential perceptual, motor, or structural confounds. In sum, EEG alpha frequency band power and pupil dilation both turned out to be sensitive measures for increased load during hyperlink-like selection processes in online text reading.

  19. Interorganelle interactions and inheritance patterns of nuclei and vacuoles in budding yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, I-Ting; Lin, Jyun-Liang; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Chuang, Yu-Chien; Liang, Shu-Shan; Chuang, Chi-Ning; Huang, Tzyy-Nan; Wang, Ting-Fang

    2014-02-01

    Many of the mechanisms by which organelles are inherited by spores during meiosis are not well understood. Dramatic chromosome motion and bouquet formation are evolutionarily conserved characteristics of meiotic chromosomes. The budding yeast bouquet genes (NDJ1, MPS3, CSM4) mediate these movements via telomere attachment to the nuclear envelope (NE). Here, we report that during meiosis the NE is in direct contact with vacuoles via nucleus-vacuole junctions (NVJs). We show that in meiosis NVJs are assembled through the interaction of the outer NE-protein Nvj1 and the vacuolar membrane protein Vac8. Notably, NVJs function as diffusion barriers that exclude the nuclear pore complexes, the bouquet protein Mps3 and NE-tethered telomeres from the outer nuclear membrane and nuclear ER, resulting in distorted NEs during early meiosis. An increase in NVJ area resulting from Nvj1-GFP overexpression produced a moderate bouquet mutant-like phenotype in wild-type cells. NVJs, as the vacuolar contact sites of the nucleus, were found to undergo scission alongside the NE during meiotic nuclear division. The zygotic NE and NVJs were partly segregated into 4 spores. Lastly, new NVJs were also revealed to be synthesized de novo to rejoin the zygotic NE with the newly synthesized vacuoles in the mature spores. In conclusion, our results revealed that budding yeast nuclei and vacuoles exhibit dynamic interorganelle interactions and different inheritance patterns in meiosis, and also suggested that nvj1Δ mutant cells may be useful to resolve the technical challenges pertaining to the isolation of intact nuclei for the biochemical study of meiotic nuclear proteins.

  20. Left-right lineage analysis of the embryonic Xenopus heart reveals a novel framework linking congenital cardiac defects and laterality disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsdell, Ann F; Bernanke, Jayne M; Trusk, Thomas C

    2006-04-01

    causatively linked with CHDs that are present in heterotaxic individuals, as well as some 'isolated' CHDs that are found in individuals lacking overt features of laterality disease.

  1. Targeting allergen to FcgammaRI reveals a novel T(H)2 regulatory pathway linked to thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Kathryn E; Reefer, Amanda J; Engelhard, Victor H; Patrie, James T; Ziegler, Steven F; Chapman, Martin D; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2010-01-01

    The molecule H22-Fel d 1, which targets cat allergen to FcgammaRI on dendritic cells (DCs), has the potential to treat cat allergy because of its T-cell modulatory properties. We sought to investigate whether the T-cell response induced by H22-Fel d 1 is altered in the presence of the T(H)2-promoting cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Studies were performed in subjects with cat allergy with and without atopic dermatitis. Monocyte-derived DCs were primed with H22-Fel d 1 in the presence or absence of TSLP, and the resulting T-cell cytokine repertoire was analyzed by flow cytometry. The capacity for H22-Fel d 1 to modulate TSLP receptor expression on DCs was examined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of inhibitors of Fc receptor signaling molecules. Surprisingly, TSLP alone was a weak inducer of T(H)2 responses irrespective of atopic status; however, DCs coprimed with TSLP and H22-Fel d 1 selectively and synergistically amplified T(H)2 responses in highly atopic subjects. This effect was OX40 ligand independent, pointing to an unconventional TSLP-mediated pathway. Expression of TSLP receptor was upregulated on atopic DCs primed with H22-Fel d 1 through a pathway regulated by FcgammaRI-associated signaling components, including src-related tyrosine kinases and Syk, as well as the downstream molecule phosphoinositide 3-kinase. Inhibition of TSLP receptor upregulation triggered by H22-Fel d 1 blocked TSLP-mediated T(H)2 responses. Discovery of a novel T(H)2 regulatory pathway linking FcgammaRI signaling to TSLP receptor upregulation and consequent TSLP-mediated effects questions the validity of receptor-targeted allergen vaccines. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transcriptome profiling reveals links between ParS/ParR, MexEF-OprN, and quorum sensing in the regulation of adaptation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongping; Seeve, Candace; Pierson, Leland S; Pierson, Elizabeth A

    2013-09-13

    The ParS/ParR two component regulatory system plays critical roles for multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was demonstrated that in the presence of antimicrobials, ParR enhances bacterial survival by distinct mechanisms including activation of the mexXY efflux genes, enhancement of lipopolysaccharide modification through the arn operon, and reduction of the expression of oprD porin. In this study, we report on transcriptomic analyses of P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild type and parS and parR mutants growing in a defined minimal medium. Our transcriptomic analysis provides the first estimates of transcript abundance for the 5570 coding genes in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Comparative transcriptomics of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and par mutants identified a total of 464 genes regulated by ParS and ParR. Results also showed that mutations in the parS/parR system abolished expression of the mexEF-oprN operon by down-regulating the regulatory gene mexS. In addition to the known effects on drug resistance genes, transcript abundances of the quorum sensing genes (rhlIR and pqsABCDE-phnAB) were higher in both parS and parR mutants. In accordance with these results, a significant portion of the ParS/ParR regulated genes belonged to the MexEF-OprN and quorum sensing regulons. Deletion of the par genes also led to increased phenazine production and swarming motility, consistent with the up-regulation of the phenazine and rhamnolipid biosynthetic genes, respectively. Our results link the ParS/ParR two component signal transduction system to MexEF-OprN and quorum sensing systems in P. aeruginosa. These results expand our understanding of the roles of the ParS/ParR system in the regulation of gene expression in P. aeruginosa, especially in the absence of antimicrobials.

  3. Identification of O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc)-modified Osteoblast Proteins by Electron Transfer Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry Reveals Proteins Critical for Bone Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Alexis K.; Schilling, Michael; Comte-Walters, Susana; Berkaw, Mary N.; Ball, Lauren E.

    2013-01-01

    The nutrient-responsive β-O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification of critical effector proteins modulates signaling and transcriptional pathways contributing to cellular development and survival. An elevation in global protein O-GlcNAc modification occurs during the early stages of osteoblast differentiation and correlates with enhanced transcriptional activity of RUNX2, a key regulator of osteogenesis. To identify other substrates of O-GlcNAc transferase in differentiating MC3T3E1 osteoblasts, O-GlcNAc-modified peptides were enriched by wheat germ agglutinin lectin weak affinity chromatography and identified by tandem mass spectrometry using electron transfer dissociation. This peptide fragmentation approach leaves the labile O-linkage intact permitting direct identification of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides. O-GlcNAc modification was observed on enzymes involved in post-translational regulation, including MAST4 and WNK1 kinases, a ubiquitin-associated protein (UBAP2l), and the histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein. CREB-binding protein, a transcriptional co-activator that associates with CREB and RUNX2, is O-GlcNAcylated at Ser-147 and Ser-2360, the latter of which is a known site of phosphorylation. Additionally, O-GlcNAcylation of components of the TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signaling complex, TAB1 and TAB2, occurred in close proximity to known sites of Ser/Thr phosphorylation and a putative nuclear localization sequence within TAB2. These findings demonstrate the presence of O-GlcNAc modification on proteins critical to bone formation, remodeling, and fracture healing and will enable evaluation of this modification on protein function and regulation. PMID:23443134

  4. Identification of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc)-modified osteoblast proteins by electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry reveals proteins critical for bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Alexis K; Schilling, Michael; Comte-Walters, Susana; Berkaw, Mary N; Ball, Lauren E

    2013-04-01

    The nutrient-responsive β-O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification of critical effector proteins modulates signaling and transcriptional pathways contributing to cellular development and survival. An elevation in global protein O-GlcNAc modification occurs during the early stages of osteoblast differentiation and correlates with enhanced transcriptional activity of RUNX2, a key regulator of osteogenesis. To identify other substrates of O-GlcNAc transferase in differentiating MC3T3E1 osteoblasts, O-GlcNAc-modified peptides were enriched by wheat germ agglutinin lectin weak affinity chromatography and identified by tandem mass spectrometry using electron transfer dissociation. This peptide fragmentation approach leaves the labile O-linkage intact permitting direct identification of O-GlcNAc-modified peptides. O-GlcNAc modification was observed on enzymes involved in post-translational regulation, including MAST4 and WNK1 kinases, a ubiquitin-associated protein (UBAP2l), and the histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein. CREB-binding protein, a transcriptional co-activator that associates with CREB and RUNX2, is O-GlcNAcylated at Ser-147 and Ser-2360, the latter of which is a known site of phosphorylation. Additionally, O-GlcNAcylation of components of the TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signaling complex, TAB1 and TAB2, occurred in close proximity to known sites of Ser/Thr phosphorylation and a putative nuclear localization sequence within TAB2. These findings demonstrate the presence of O-GlcNAc modification on proteins critical to bone formation, remodeling, and fracture healing and will enable evaluation of this modification on protein function and regulation.

  5. Sucrose promotes axillary bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida and plays a signal role during this process

    OpenAIRE

    Barbier, François; Bertheloot, Jessica; Peron, Thomas; Perez-Garcia, Maria Dolores; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2013-01-01

    Shoot branching is a developmental process by which axillary buds are released from dormancy and develop into new axes. Bud outgrowth is largely affected by a number of environmental factors such as temperature, air and soil humidity, gravitropism and light, confering thus plasticity to the plant development. Control of bud outgrowth is thereby a key mechanism in the establishment of plant architecture in response to environment. Sugars, whose levels in plant are also highly dependent on the ...

  6. The bud rot of oil palm in San Lorenzo, Esmeraldas province, Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Rivas Figueroa; Lidcay Herrera Isla

    2015-01-01

    Oil palms (Elaeis guineensis Jacq) in the area of San Lorenzo were directly observed, and some plants were dissected to assess the internal symptoms, with the purpose of characterizing the symptomatology of bud rot. The plants showed chlorosis and yellowing of young leaves around the bud, necrosis of leaflets in young leaves, necrosis and rot of spears (outer leaf in the process of opening), bending of spears leaves due to the breaking in the lower third, necrosis and internal bud decay which...

  7. Sucrose is an early modulator of the key hormonal mechanisms controlling bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Lecerf, Marion; Perez-Garcia, Maria-Dolores; Barrière, Quentin; Rolčík, Jakub; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Lemoine, Remi; Porcheron, Benoît; Roman, Hanaé; Leduc, Nathalie; Le Gourrierec, José; Bertheloot, Jessica; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-05-01

    Sugar has only recently been identified as a key player in triggering bud outgrowth, while hormonal control of bud outgrowth is already well established. To get a better understanding of sugar control, the present study investigated how sugar availability modulates the hormonal network during bud outgrowth in Rosa hybrida. Other plant models, for which mutants are available, were used when necessary. Buds were grown in vitro to manipulate available sugars. The temporal patterns of the hormonal regulatory network were assessed in parallel with bud outgrowth dynamics. Sucrose determined bud entrance into sustained growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Sustained growth was accompanied by sustained auxin production in buds, and sustained auxin export in a DR5::GUS-expressing pea line. Several events occurred ahead of sucrose-stimulated bud outgrowth. Sucrose upregulated early auxin synthesis genes (RhTAR1, RhYUC1) and the auxin efflux carrier gene RhPIN1, and promoted PIN1 abundance at the plasma membrane in a pPIN1::PIN1-GFP-expressing tomato line. Sucrose downregulated both RwMAX2, involved in the strigolactone-transduction pathway, and RhBRC1, a repressor of branching, at an early stage. The presence of sucrose also increased stem cytokinin content, but sucrose-promoted bud outgrowth was not related to that pathway. In these processes, several non-metabolizable sucrose analogues induced sustained bud outgrowth in R. hybrida, Pisum sativum, and Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that sucrose was involved in a signalling pathway. In conclusion, we identified potential hormonal candidates for bud outgrowth control by sugar. They are central to future investigations aimed at disentangling the processes that underlie regulation of bud outgrowth by sugar. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Relationship between formation of gametophore buds in the protonema of mosses and increase in ribonuclease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Spychała

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in RNase activity similar to those accompanying cytokinin-induced formation of gametophore buds in mosses (a decrease in the early phase of bud formation and later an increase in enzyme activity have also been found during spontaneous formation of gametophores in moss ontogenesis. Using various factors affecting the cytokinin-induced process of bud formation a correlation has been found between this process and the increase in RNase activity.

  9. Metabolite changes in conifer buds and needles during forced bud break in Norway spruce (Picea abies and European silver fir (Abies alba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eDhuli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental changes such as early spring and warm spells induce bud burst and photosynthetic processes in cold-acclimated coniferous trees and consequently, cellular metabolism in overwintering needles and buds. The purpose of the study was to examine metabolism in conifers under forced deacclimation (artificially induced spring by exposing shoots of Picea abies (boreal species and Abies alba (temperate species to a greenhouse environment (22°C, 16/8 h D/N cycle over a nine week period. Each week, we scored bud opening and collected samples for GC/MS–based metabolite profiling. We detected a total of 169 assigned metabolites and 80 identified metabolites, comprising compounds such as mono- and disaccharides, Krebs cycle acids, amino acids, polyols, phenolics and phosphorylated structures. Untargeted multivariate statistical analysis based on PCA and cluster analysis segregated samples by species, tissue type, and stage of tissue deacclimations. Similar patterns of metabolic regulation in both species were observed in buds (amino acids, Krebs cycle acids and needles (hexoses, pentoses, and Krebs cycle acids. Based on correlation of bud opening score with compound levels, distinct metabolites could be associated with bud and shoot development, including amino acids, sugars and acids with known osmolyte function, and secondary metabolites. This study has shed light on how elevated temperature affects metabolism in buds and needles of conifer species during the deacclimation phase, and contributes to the discussion about how phenological characters in conifers may respond to future global warming.

  10. A systems biology approach reveals a link between systemic cytokines and skeletal muscle energy metabolism in a rodent smoking model and human COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Peter K; Herbert, John M; Antczak, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Ferrer, Elisabet; Peinado, Victor I; Gonzalez, Constancio; Roca, Josep; Egginton, Stuart; Barberá, Joan A; Falciani, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    CXCL10 and CXCL9 are promising candidate inflammatory signals linked to the regulation of central metabolism genes in skeletal muscles. On a methodological level, our work also shows that a system level analysis of animal models of diseases can be very effective to generate clinically relevant hypothesis.

  11. Untargeted metabolomics reveals links between Tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L.) and its geographical origin by metabolome changes associated with membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, Josep; Hurkova, Kamila; Stranska, Milena; Hajslova, Jana

    2017-11-21

    Tiger nuts and tiger nut milk are well-known Valencian products, and step-by-step these tubers and the tuber-based beverage are becoming more and more relevant products in international markets. However, the increasing demand and success of Valencian tiger nuts did not allow protected designation of origin (PDO) tuber to supply the domestic and international markets. Therefore, the verification of the geographical origin is highly required. In this research, the main objective was to combine an advance analytical method and chemometrics tools in order to decipher the geographical origin of 45 tiger nut samples from (i) 'Xufa de València' PDO and (ii) African samples. The analytical method, based on solid-liquid extraction followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) metabolomics approach, highlighted sensitivity and wide linear dynamic range in order to simultaneously analyse polar and non-polar metabolites. After data processing, a pronounced sample clustering according to the geographical origin was clearly observed using unsupervised models, and supervised models revealed that tiger nuts lipidome was associated with the geographical origin. As a result, African samples highlighted an overexpression of phospholipids, such as phosphatidylethanolamine 34:1, and triacylgricerols crosslinked to environmental stress and alteration of membrane lipid compositions.

  12. β-Catenin signaling regulates temporally discrete phases of anterior taste bud development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumangalathu, Shoba; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    The sense of taste is mediated by multicellular taste buds located within taste papillae on the tongue. In mice, individual taste buds reside in fungiform papillae, which develop at mid-gestation as epithelial placodes in the anterior tongue. Taste placodes comprise taste bud precursor cells, which express the secreted factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) and give rise to taste bud cells that differentiate around birth. We showed previously that epithelial activation of β-catenin is the primary inductive signal for taste placode formation, followed by taste papilla morphogenesis and taste bud differentiation, but the degree to which these later elements were direct or indirect consequences of β-catenin signaling was not explored. Here, we define discrete spatiotemporal functions of β-catenin in fungiform taste bud development. Specifically, we show that early epithelial activation of β-catenin, before taste placodes form, diverts lingual epithelial cells from a taste bud fate. By contrast, β-catenin activation a day later within Shh+ placodes, expands taste bud precursors directly, but enlarges papillae indirectly. Further, placodal activation of β-catenin drives precocious differentiation of Type I glial-like taste cells, but not other taste cell types. Later activation of β-catenin within Shh+ precursors during papilla morphogenesis also expands taste bud precursors and accelerates Type I cell differentiation, but papilla size is no longer enhanced. Finally, although Shh regulates taste placode patterning, we find that it is dispensable for the accelerated Type I cell differentiation induced by β-catenin. PMID:26525674

  13. Chemical composition of volatile oil from Cinnamomum zeylanicum buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Rao, Lingamallu Jaganmohan; Sakariah, Kunnumpurath K

    2002-01-01

    The hydro-distilled volatile oil of the Cinnamomum zeylanicum (C. zeylanicum) buds was analyzed using GC and GC-MS for the first time. Thirty-four compounds representing approximately 98% of the oil was characterized. It consists of terpene hydrocarbons (78%) and oxygenated terpenoids (9%). alpha-Bergamotene (27.38%) and alpha-copaene (23.05%) are found to be the major compounds. A comparison of the chemical composition of the oil was made with that of flowers and fruits.

  14. UXO Detection and Characterization using new Berkeley UXO Discriminator (BUD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperikova, E.; Morrison, H. F.; Smith, J. T.; Becker, A.

    2006-05-01

    An optimally designed active electromagnetic system (AEM), Berkeley UXO Discriminator, BUD, has been developed for detection and characterization of UXO in the 20 mm to 150 mm size range. The system incorporates three orthogonal transmitters, and eight pairs of differenced receivers. The transmitter-receiver assembly together with the acquisition box, as well as the battery power and GPS receiver, is mounted on a small cart to assure system mobility. BUD not only detects the object itself but also quantitatively determines its size, shape, orientation, and metal content (ferrous or non-ferrous, mixed metals). Moreover, the principal polarizabilities and size of a metallic target can be determined from a single position of the BUD platform. The search for UXO is a two-step process. The object must first be detected and its location determined then the parameters of the object must be defined. A satisfactory classification scheme is one that determines the principal dipole polarizabilities of a target. While UXO objects have a single major polarizability (principal moment) coincident with the long axis of the object and two equal transverse polarizabilities, the scrap metal has all three principal moments entirely different. This description of the inherent polarizabilities of a target is a major advance in discriminating UXO from irregular scrap metal. Our results clearly show that BUD can resolve the intrinsic polarizabilities of a target and that there are very clear distinctions between symmetric intact UXO and irregular scrap metal. Target properties are determined by an inversion algorithm, which at any given time inverts the response to yield the location (x, y, z) of the target, its attitude and its principal polarizabilities (yielding an apparent aspect ratio). Signal-to-noise estimates (or measurements) are interpreted in this inversion to yield error estimates on the location, attitude and polarizabilities. This inversion at a succession of times provides

  15. Evolutionary biology through the lens of budding yeast comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsit, Souhir; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Durand, Éléonore; Marchant, Axelle; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2017-10-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a highly advanced model system for studying genetics, cell biology and systems biology. Over the past decade, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies to this species has contributed to this yeast also becoming an important model for evolutionary genomics. Indeed, comparative genomic analyses of laboratory, wild and domesticated yeast populations are providing unprecedented detail about many of the processes that govern evolution, including long-term processes, such as reproductive isolation and speciation, and short-term processes, such as adaptation to natural and domestication-related environments.

  16. Functionally homologous DNA replication genes in fission and budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Mar; Calzada, Arturo; Bueno, Avelino

    1999-01-01

    The cdc18+ gene of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in the initiation of DNA replication as well as in coupling the S phase to mitosis. In this work, we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC6 gene complements cdc18-K46 ts and cdc18 deletion mutant S. pombe strains. The budding yeast gene suppresses both the initiation and the checkpoint defects associated with the lack of cdc18+. The Cdc6 protein interacts in vivo with Cdc2 kinase complexes. Interestingly, Cdc6 is ...

  17. Antihyperglycemic, hypolipidemic, hepatoprotective and antioxidative effects of dietary clove (Szyzgium aromaticum) bud powder in a high-fat diet/streptozotocin-induced diabetes rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen A; Oboh, Ganiyu; Adefegha, Omowunmi M; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L

    2014-10-01

    Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry (clove) bud is an important spice used in the preparation of several delicacies and in folklore for diabetes management. The present study was convened to assess the effects of dietary clove bud powder (CBP) on biochemical parameters in a type 2 diabetes rat model, induced by a combination of high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin (35 mg kg⁻¹) for 30 days. Diabetic rats were placed on dietary regimen containing 20-40 g kg⁻¹ clove bud powder. The results revealed that there was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the average feed intake and weight changes between the rat groups. Furthermore, supplementation with CBP gradually reduced blood glucose level in diabetic rat compared to control diabetic rats without CBP supplementation (DBC). Moreover, reduced activity of α-glucosidase was observed in CBP and metformin-treated rat groups when compared to that of the DBC rat group. In addition, the DBC group had significantly (P clove bud diet may attenuate hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in the type 2 diabetic condition. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Allele-specific analysis of cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprograming reveals distinct and predictive susceptibilities of human X-linked genes to reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Irene; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Chan, Yi-Wah; Kohler, Anne-Celine; Lenhard, Boris; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G

    2017-01-25

    Inactivation of one X chromosome is established early in female mammalian development and can be reversed in vivo and in vitro when pluripotency factors are re-expressed. The extent of reactivation along the inactive X chromosome (Xi) and the determinants of locus susceptibility are, however, poorly understood. Here we use cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprograming to study human Xi reactivation and allele-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify reactivated loci. We show that a subset of human Xi genes is rapidly reactivated upon re-expression of the pluripotency network. These genes lie within the most evolutionary recent segments of the human X chromosome that are depleted of LINE1 and enriched for SINE elements, predicted to impair XIST spreading. Interestingly, this cadre of genes displays stochastic Xi expression in human fibroblasts ahead of reprograming. This stochastic variability is evident between clones, by RNA-sequencing, and at the single-cell level, by RNA-FISH, and is not attributable to differences in repressive histone H3K9me3 or H3K27me3 levels. Treatment with the DNA demethylating agent 5-deoxy-azacytidine does not increase Xi expression ahead of reprograming, but instead reveals a second cadre of genes that only become susceptible to reactivation upon induction of pluripotency. Collectively, these data not only underscore the multiple pathways that contribute to maintaining silencing along the human Xi chromosome but also suggest that transcriptional stochasticity among human cells could be useful for predicting and engineering epigenetic strategies to achieve locus-specific or domain-specific human Xi gene reactivation.

  19. Large-scale analysis of variation in the insulin-like growth factor family in humans reveals rare disease links and common polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotwein, Peter

    2017-06-02

    The insulin-like growth factors IGF1 and IGF2 are closely related proteins that are essential for normal growth and development in humans and other species and play critical roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. IGF actions are mediated by transmembrane receptors and modulated by IGF-binding proteins. The importance of IGF actions in human physiology is strengthened by the rarity of inactivating mutations in their genes and by the devastating impact caused by such mutations on normal development and somatic growth. Large-scale genome sequencing has the potential to provide new insights into human variation and disease susceptibility. Toward this end, the availability of DNA sequence data from 60,706 people through the Exome Aggregation Consortium has prompted the analyses presented here. Results reveal a broad range of potential missense and other alterations in the coding regions of every IGF family gene, but the vast majority of predicted changes were uncommon. The total number of different alleles detected per gene in the population varied over an ∼15-fold range, from 57 for IGF1 to 872 for IGF2R, although when corrected for protein length the rate ranged from 0.22 to 0.59 changes/codon among the 11 genes evaluated. Previously characterized disease-causing mutations in IGF2, IGF1R, IGF2R, or IGFALS all were found in the general population but with allele frequencies of <1:30,000. A few new highly prevalent amino acid polymorphisms were also identified. Collectively, these data provide a wealth of opportunities to understand the intricacies of IGF signaling and action in both physiological and pathological contexts. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Functional MRI examination of empathy for pain in people with schizophrenia reveals abnormal activation related to cognitive perspective-taking but typical activation linked to affective sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistoli, Damien; Lavoie, Marie-Audrey; Sutliff, Stephanie; Jackson, Philip L.; Achim, Amélie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is associated with important disturbances in empathy that are related to everyday functioning. Empathy is classically defined as including affective (sharing others’ emotions) and cognitive (taking others’ cognitive perspectives) processes. In healthy individuals, studies on empathy for pain revealed specific brain systems associated with these sets of processes, notably the anterior middle cingulate (aMCC) and anterior insula (AI) for affective sharing and the bilateral temporoparietal junction (TPJ) for the cognitive processes, but the integrity of these systems in patients with schizophrenia remains uncertain. Methods Patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls performed a pain empathy task while undergoing fMRI scanning. Participants observed pictures of hands in either painful or nonpainful situations and rated the level of pain while imagining either themselves (self) or an unknown person (other) in these situations. Results We included 27 patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy controls in our analyses. For the pain versus no pain contrast, patients showed overall typical activation patterns in the aMCC and AI, with only a small part of the aMCC showing reduced activation compared with controls. For the other versus self contrast, patients showed an abnormal modulation of activation in the TPJ bilaterally (extending to the posterior superior temporal sulcus, referred to as the TPJ/pSTS). Limitations The design included an unnecessary manipulation of the visual perspective that reduced the number of trials for analysis. The sample size may not account for the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. Conclusion People with schizophrenia showed relatively intact brain activation when observing others’ pain, but showed abnormalities when asked to take the cognitive perspectives of others. PMID:28556774

  1. Zircon petrochronology reveals the temporal link between porphyry systems and the magmatic evolution of their hidden plutonic roots (the Eocene Coroccohuayco deposit, Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelle-Michou, Cyril; Chiaradia, Massimo; Ovtcharova, Maria; Ulianov, Alexey; Wotzlaw, Jörn-Frederik

    2014-06-01

    We present zircon geochronologic (LA-ICPMS and ID-TIMS), trace element and Hf isotopic evidence for a complex evolution of the plutonic roots of the Eocene Coroccohuayco porphyry system, southern Peru. LA-ICPMS U-Pb dating has initially been carried out to optimize grain selection for subsequent high-precision ID-TIMS dating and to characterize crustal assimilation (xenocrystic cores). This combined in-situ and whole-grain U-Pb dating of the same grains has been further exploited to derive a robust temporal interpretation of the complex magmatic system associated with the Coroccohuayco porphyry-skarn deposit. Our data reveal that a heterogeneous gabbrodioritic complex was emplaced at ca. 40.4 Ma and was followed by a nearly 5 Ma-long magmatic lull until the emplacement of dacitic porphyry stocks and dykes associated with the mineralizing event at ca. 35.6 Ma. However, at the sample scale, zircons from the porphyries provide insight into a 2 Ma-long lived “hidden” magmatism (probably at 4-9 km paleodepth) prior to porphyry intrusion and mineralization for which no other evidence can be found on the surface today. These dates together with zircon trace element analysis and Hf isotopes argue for the development of a long-lived magmatic system dominated by amphibole fractionation with an increasing amount of crustal assimilation and the development of a large and sustained thermal anomaly. The system was probably rejuvenated at an increasing rate from 37.5 to 35.6 Ma with injection of fresh and oxidized magma from the lower crust, which caused cannibalism and remelting of proto-plutons. The porphyry intrusions at Coroccohuayco were emplaced at the peak thermal conditions of this upper crustal magma chamber, which subsequently cooled and expelled ore fluids. Zircon xenocrysts and Hf isotopes in the porphyritic rocks suggest that this large upper crustal system evolved at stratigraphic levels corresponding to Triassic sediments similar to the Mitu group that may be

  2. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes in fecal samples reveals high diversity of hindgut microflora in horses and potential links to chronic laminitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steelman Samantha M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nutrition and health of horses is closely tied to their gastrointestinal microflora. Gut bacteria break down plant structural carbohydrates and produce volatile fatty acids, which are a major source of energy for horses. Bacterial communities are also essential for maintaining gut homeostasis and have been hypothesized to contribute to various diseases including laminitis. We performed pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA bacterial genes isolated from fecal material to characterize hindgut bacterial communities in healthy horses and those with chronic laminitis. Results Fecal samples were collected from 10 normal horses and 8 horses with chronic laminitis. Genomic DNA was extracted and the V4-V5 segment of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced on the 454 platform generating a mean of 2,425 reads per sample after quality trimming. The bacterial communities were dominated by Firmicutes (69.21% control, 56.72% laminitis and Verrucomicrobia (18.13% control, 27.63% laminitis, followed by Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes. We observed more OTUs per individual in the laminitis group than the control group (419.6 and 355.2, respectively, P = 0.019 along with a difference in the abundance of two unassigned Clostridiales genera (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01. The most abundant bacteria were Streptococcus spp., Clostridium spp., and Treponema spp.; along with unassigned genera from Subdivision 5 of Verrucomicrobia, Ruminococcaceae, and Clostridiaceae, which together constituted ~ 80% of all OTUs. There was a high level of individual variation across all taxonomic ranks. Conclusions Our exploration of the equine fecal microflora revealed higher bacterial diversity in horses with chronic laminitis and identification of two Clostridiales genera that differed in abundance from control horses. There was large individual variation in bacterial communities that was not explained in our study. The core hindgut microflora was

  3. Cooperative protein structural dynamics of homodimeric hemoglobin linked to water cluster at subunit interface revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Goo Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI consisting of two subunits is a good model system for investigating the allosteric structural transition as it exhibits cooperativity in ligand binding. In this work, as an effort to extend our previous study on wild-type and F97Y mutant HbI, we investigate structural dynamics of a mutant HbI in solution to examine the role of well-organized interfacial water cluster, which has been known to mediate intersubunit communication in HbI. In the T72V mutant of HbI, the interfacial water cluster in the T state is perturbed due to the lack of Thr72, resulting in two less interfacial water molecules than in wild-type HbI. By performing picosecond time-resolved X-ray solution scattering experiment and kinetic analysis on the T72V mutant, we identify three structurally distinct intermediates (I1, I2, and I3 and show that the kinetics of the T72V mutant are well described by the same kinetic model used for wild-type and F97Y HbI, which involves biphasic kinetics, geminate recombination, and bimolecular CO recombination. The optimized kinetic model shows that the R-T transition and bimolecular CO recombination are faster in the T72V mutant than in the wild type. From structural analysis using species-associated difference scattering curves for the intermediates, we find that the T-like deoxy I3 intermediate in solution has a different structure from deoxy HbI in crystal. In addition, we extract detailed structural parameters of the intermediates such as E-F distance, intersubunit rotation angle, and heme-heme distance. By comparing the structures of protein intermediates in wild-type HbI and the T72V mutant, we reveal how the perturbation in the interfacial water cluster affects the kinetics and structures of reaction intermediates of HbI.

  4. A simple model to predict the probability of a peach (Prunus persicae tree bud to develop as a long or short shoot as a consequence of winter pruning intensity and previous year growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Bevacqua

    Full Text Available In many woody plants, shoots emerging from buds can develop as short or long shoots. The probability of a bud to develop as a long or short shoot relies upon genetic, environmental and management factors and controlling it is an important issue in commercial orchard. We use peach (Prunus persicae trees, subjected to different winter pruning levels and monitored for two years, to develop and calibrate a model linking the probability of a bud to develop as a long shoot to winter pruning intensity and previous year vegetative growth. Eventually we show how our model can be used to adjust pruning intensity to obtain a desired proportion of long and short shoots.

  5. Naumovozyma castellii: an alternative model for budding yeast molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir Andersson, Ahu; Cohn, Marita

    2017-03-01

    Naumovozyma castellii (Saccharomyces castellii) is a member of the budding yeast family Saccharomycetaceae. It has been extensively used as a model organism for telomere biology research and has gained increasing interest as a budding yeast model for functional analyses owing to its amenability to genetic modifications. Owing to the suitable phylogenetic distance to S. cerevisiae, the whole genome sequence of N. castellii has provided unique data for comparative genomic studies, and it played a key role in the establishment of the timing of the whole genome duplication and the evolutionary events that took place in the subsequent genomic evolution of the Saccharomyces lineage. Here we summarize the historical background of its establishment as a laboratory yeast species, and the development of genetic and molecular tools and strains. We review the research performed on N. castellii, focusing on areas where it has significantly contributed to the discovery of new features of molecular biology and to the advancement of our understanding of molecular evolution. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Inhibition of budding/release of porcine endogenous retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Masumi; Fukuma, Aiko; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Yasuda, Jiro

    2014-08-01

    PERV is integrated into the genome of all pigs. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic and can productively infect human cell lines, whereas PERV-C is ecotropic. Recombinant PERV-A/C can infect human cells and exhibits high titer replication. Therefore, use of pigs for human xenotransplantation raises concerns about the risks of transfer of this infectious agent from donors to xenotransplantation recipients. To establish strategies to inhibit PERV production from cells, in the present study, we investigated the mechanism of PERV budding and anti-PERV activity of Tetherin/BST-2. The results showed that DN mutants of WWP-2, Tsg101, and Vps4A/B markedly reduced PERV production in human and porcine cell lines, suggesting that PERV budding uses these cellular factors and the cellular MVB sorting pathway as well as many other retroviruses. Moreover, PERV production was also reduced by human and porcine Tetherin/BST-2. These data are useful for developing strategies to inhibit PERV production and may reduce the risk of PERV infection in xenotransplantation. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. A computational clonal analysis of the developing mouse limb bud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Marcon

    Full Text Available A comprehensive spatio-temporal description of the tissue movements underlying organogenesis would be an extremely useful resource to developmental biology. Clonal analysis and fate mappings are popular experiments to study tissue movement during morphogenesis. Such experiments allow cell populations to be labeled at an early stage of development and to follow their spatial evolution over time. However, disentangling the cumulative effects of the multiple events responsible for the expansion of the labeled cell population is not always straightforward. To overcome this problem, we develop a novel computational method that combines accurate quantification of 2D limb bud morphologies and growth modeling to analyze mouse clonal data of early limb development. Firstly, we explore various tissue movements that match experimental limb bud shape changes. Secondly, by comparing computational clones with newly generated mouse clonal data we are able to choose and characterize the tissue movement map that better matches experimental data. Our computational analysis produces for the first time a two dimensional model of limb growth based on experimental data that can be used to better characterize limb tissue movement in space and time. The model shows that the distribution and shapes of clones can be described as a combination of anisotropic growth with isotropic cell mixing, without the need for lineage compartmentalization along the AP and PD axis. Lastly, we show that this comprehensive description can be used to reassess spatio-temporal gene regulations taking tissue movement into account and to investigate PD patterning hypothesis.

  8. Iniciation in vitro of buds of Ipomoea batatas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando S. González Paneque

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Different buds of sweet potatowere studied. Roots of the clones Cemsa 78-354, Inivit 90-1, Inivit 93-1, Yabú-8 and Jewel were selected and put in glass with water in the laboratories for inducing the shoots. Afterwards the top shoot and the axiles shoots one to five (from top shoot were selected and sown in the Murashige and Skoog medium with the sales MS, Thiamine (1 mg.l-1, myoinositol (100 mg.l-1, sucrose (3%, gelrite (2 g.l-1 and different growth regulator combinations of giberelic acid (AG3 and 3-indol acetic acid (AIA, for example: AG3 (5 mg.l-1 + AIA (0.05 mg.l-1, AG3 (10 mg.l-1 + AIA (0.05 mg.l-1, AG3 (5 mg.l-1 + AIA (0.1 mg.l-1 and AG3 (10 mg.l-1 + AIA (0.1 mg.l-1. The pH was adjusted to 5.8. After five weeks, the morphologic behaviuor of the shoots was evaluated. The better results were obtained in the micropropagation with the use of the axiles shoots two, three and four in the culture medium whit growth regulator AG3 (10 mg.l-1 + AIA (0.05 mg.l-1. Key words: clones, axiles buds, top shoot, brotation

  9. Origin plasticity during budding yeast DNA replication in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Julien; Devbhandari, Sujan; Remus, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The separation of DNA replication origin licensing and activation in the cell cycle is essential for genome stability across generations in eukaryotic cells. Pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs) license origins by loading Mcm2-7 complexes in inactive form around DNA. During origin firing in S phase, replisomes assemble around the activated Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. Budding yeast pre-RCs have previously been reconstituted in vitro with purified proteins. Here, we show that reconstituted pre-RCs support replication of plasmid DNA in yeast cell extracts in a reaction that exhibits hallmarks of cellular replication initiation. Plasmid replication in vitro results in the generation of covalently closed circular daughter molecules, indicating that the system recapitulates the initiation, elongation, and termination stages of DNA replication. Unexpectedly, yeast origin DNA is not strictly required for DNA replication in vitro, as heterologous DNA sequences could support replication of plasmid molecules. Our findings support the notion that epigenetic mechanisms are important for determining replication origin sites in budding yeast, highlighting mechanistic principles of replication origin specification that are common among eukaryotes. PMID:24566988

  10. Signal transduction and information processing in mammalian taste buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The molecular machinery for chemosensory transduction in taste buds has received considerable attention within the last decade. Consequently, we now know a great deal about sweet, bitter, and umami taste mechanisms and are gaining ground rapidly on salty and sour transduction. Sweet, bitter, and umami tastes are transduced by G-protein-coupled receptors. Salty taste may be transduced by epithelial Na channels similar to those found in renal tissues. Sour transduction appears to be initiated by intracellular acidification acting on acid-sensitive membrane proteins. Once a taste signal is generated in a taste cell, the subsequent steps involve secretion of neurotransmitters, including ATP and serotonin. It is now recognized that the cells responding to sweet, bitter, and umami taste stimuli do not possess synapses and instead secrete the neurotransmitter ATP via a novel mechanism not involving conventional vesicular exocytosis. ATP is believed to excite primary sensory afferent fibers that convey gustatory signals to the brain. In contrast, taste cells that do have synapses release serotonin in response to gustatory stimulation. The postsynaptic targets of serotonin have not yet been identified. Finally, ATP secreted from receptor cells also acts on neighboring taste cells to stimulate their release of serotonin. This suggests that there is important information processing and signal coding taking place in the mammalian taste bud after gustatory stimulation. PMID:17468883

  11. GATA6 Is a Crucial Regulator of Shh in the Limb Bud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Ionescu, Andreia; Lassar, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    In the limb bud, patterning along the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis is controlled by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a signaling molecule secreted by the “Zone of Polarizing Activity”, an organizer tissue located in the posterior margin of the limb bud. We have found that the transcription factors GATA4 and GATA6, which are key regulators of cell identity, are expressed in an anterior to posterior gradient in the early limb bud, raising the possibility that GATA transcription factors may play an additional role in patterning this tissue. While both GATA4 and GATA6 are expressed in an A-P gradient in the forelimb buds, the hindlimb buds principally express GATA6 in an A-P gradient. Thus, to specifically examine the role of GATA6 in limb patterning we generated Prx1-Cre; GATA6fl/fl mice, which conditionally delete GATA6 from their developing limb buds. We found that these animals display ectopic expression of both Shh and its transcriptional targets specifically in the anterior mesenchyme of the hindlimb buds. Loss of GATA6 in the developing limbs results in the formation of preaxial polydactyly in the hindlimbs. Conversely, forced expression of GATA6 throughout the limb bud represses expression of Shh and results in hypomorphic limbs. We have found that GATA6 can bind to chromatin (isolated from limb buds) encoding either Shh or Gli1 regulatory elements that drive expression of these genes in this tissue, and demonstrated that GATA6 works synergistically with FOG co-factors to repress expression of luciferase reporters driven by these sequences. Most significantly, we have found that conditional loss of Shh in limb buds lacking GATA6 prevents development of hindlimb polydactyly in these compound mutant embryos, indicating that GATA6 expression in the anterior region of the limb bud blocks hindlimb polydactyly by repressing ectopic expression of Shh. PMID:24415953

  12. GATA6 is a crucial regulator of Shh in the limb bud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kozhemyakina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the limb bud, patterning along the anterior-posterior (A-P axis is controlled by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh, a signaling molecule secreted by the "Zone of Polarizing Activity", an organizer tissue located in the posterior margin of the limb bud. We have found that the transcription factors GATA4 and GATA6, which are key regulators of cell identity, are expressed in an anterior to posterior gradient in the early limb bud, raising the possibility that GATA transcription factors may play an additional role in patterning this tissue. While both GATA4 and GATA6 are expressed in an A-P gradient in the forelimb buds, the hindlimb buds principally express GATA6 in an A-P gradient. Thus, to specifically examine the role of GATA6 in limb patterning we generated Prx1-Cre; GATA6(fl/fl mice, which conditionally delete GATA6 from their developing limb buds. We found that these animals display ectopic expression of both Shh and its transcriptional targets specifically in the anterior mesenchyme of the hindlimb buds. Loss of GATA6 in the developing limbs results in the formation of preaxial polydactyly in the hindlimbs. Conversely, forced expression of GATA6 throughout the limb bud represses expression of Shh and results in hypomorphic limbs. We have found that GATA6 can bind to chromatin (isolated from limb buds encoding either Shh or Gli1 regulatory elements that drive expression of these genes in this tissue, and demonstrated that GATA6 works synergistically with FOG co-factors to repress expression of luciferase reporters driven by these sequences. Most significantly, we have found that conditional loss of Shh in limb buds lacking GATA6 prevents development of hindlimb polydactyly in these compound mutant embryos, indicating that GATA6 expression in the anterior region of the limb bud blocks hindlimb polydactyly by repressing ectopic expression of Shh.

  13. BudBurst Buddies: Introducing Young Citizen Scientists to Plants and Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D.; Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.

    2011-12-01

    As part of Project BudBurst, the BudBurst Buddies recently moved to the National Ecological Network (NEON) as part of its Education and Public Engagement efforts. The BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) were created to engage elementary school age children in the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Hundreds of young students have participated in the inaugural year of BudBurst Buddies. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. The program was recently highlighted by education staff at the New York Hall of Science and numerous classrooms have been implementing this resource as part of their curriculum. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies resources including a new implementation guide and will also share feedback from the first year of implementation.

  14. BuD, a helix–loop–helix DNA-binding domain for genome modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stella, Stefano [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Calle de Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Molina, Rafael; López-Méndez, Blanca [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Calle de Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Juillerat, Alexandre; Bertonati, Claudia; Daboussi, Fayza [Cellectis, 8 Rue de la Croix Jarry, 75013 Paris (France); Campos-Olivas, Ramon [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Calle de Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Duchateau, Phillippe [Cellectis, 8 Rue de la Croix Jarry, 75013 Paris (France); Montoya, Guillermo, E-mail: guillermo.montoya@cpr.ku.dk [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Calle de Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-07-01

    Crystal structures of BurrH and the BurrH–DNA complex are reported. DNA editing offers new possibilities in synthetic biology and biomedicine for modulation or modification of cellular functions to organisms. However, inaccuracy in this process may lead to genome damage. To address this important problem, a strategy allowing specific gene modification has been achieved through the addition, removal or exchange of DNA sequences using customized proteins and the endogenous DNA-repair machinery. Therefore, the engineering of specific protein–DNA interactions in protein scaffolds is key to providing ‘toolkits’ for precise genome modification or regulation of gene expression. In a search for putative DNA-binding domains, BurrH, a protein that recognizes a 19 bp DNA target, was identified. Here, its apo and DNA-bound crystal structures are reported, revealing a central region containing 19 repeats of a helix–loop–helix modular domain (BurrH domain; BuD), which identifies the DNA target by a single residue-to-nucleotide code, thus facilitating its redesign for gene targeting. New DNA-binding specificities have been engineered in this template, showing that BuD-derived nucleases (BuDNs) induce high levels of gene targeting in a locus of the human haemoglobin β (HBB) gene close to mutations responsible for sickle-cell anaemia. Hence, the unique combination of high efficiency and specificity of the BuD arrays can push forward diverse genome-modification approaches for cell or organism redesign, opening new avenues for gene editing.

  15. Antineoplastic effects of clove buds (Syzygium aromaticum L.) in the model of breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubatka, Peter; Uramova, Sona; Kello, Martin; Kajo, Karol; Kruzliak, Peter; Mojzis, Jan; Vybohova, Desanka; Adamkov, Marian; Jasek, Karina; Lasabova, Zora; Zubor, Pavol; Fialova, Silvia; Dokupilova, Svetlana; Solar, Peter; Pec, Martin; Adamicova, Katarina; Danko, Jan; Adamek, Mariusz; Busselberg, Dietrich

    2017-11-01

    It is supposed that plant functional foods, rich in phytochemicals, may potentially have preventive effects in carcinogenesis. In this study, the anticancer effects of cloves in the in vivo and in vitro mammary carcinoma model were assessed. Dried flower buds of cloves (CLOs) were used at two concentrations of 0.1% and 1% through diet during 13 weeks after the application of chemocarcinogen. After autopsy, histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of rat mammary carcinomas were performed. Moreover, in vitro evaluation using MCF-7 cells was carried out. Dietary administered CLO caused the dose-dependent decrease in tumour frequency by 47.5% and 58.5% when compared to control. Analysis of carcinoma cells in animals showed bcl-2, Ki67, VEGFA, CD24 and CD44 expression decrease and Bax, caspase-3 and ALDH1 expression increase after high-dose CLO administration. MDA levels were substantially decreased in rat carcinomas in both CLO groups. The evaluation of histone modifications revealed increase in lysine trimethylations and acetylations (H4K20me3, H4K16ac) in carcinomas after CLO administration. TIMP3 promoter methylation levels of CpG3, CpG4, CpG5 islands were altered in treated cancer cells. An increase in total RASSF1A promoter methylation (three CpG sites) in CLO 1 group was found. In vitro studies showed antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of CLO extract in MCF-7 cells (analyses of cytotoxicity, Brdu, cell cycle, annexin V/PI, caspase-7, Bcl-2 and mitochondrial membrane potential). This study showed a significant anticancer effect of clove buds in the mammary carcinoma model in vivo and in vitro. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  16. De novo transcriptome assembly and comparative analysis between male and benzyladenine-induced female inflorescence buds of Plukenetia volubilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiantang; Niu, Longjian; Chen, Mao-Sheng; Tao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Xiulan; He, Huiying; Pan, Bang-Zhen; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2018-02-01

    Plukenetia volubilis is a promising oilseed crop due to its seeds being rich in unsaturated fatty acids, especially alpha-linolenic acid. P. volubilis is monoecious, with separate male and female flowers on the same inflorescence. We previously reported that male flowers were converted to female flowers by exogenous cytokinin (6-benzyladenine, 6-BA) treatment in P. volubilis. To identify candidate genes associated with floral sex differentiation of P. volubilis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and comparative analysis on control male inflorescence buds (MIB) and female inflorescence buds (FIB) induced by 6-BA using Illumina sequencing technology. A total of 57,664 unigenes with an average length of 979 bp were assembled from 104.1 million clean reads, and 45,235 (78.45%) unigenes were successfully annotated in the public databases. Notably, Gene Ontology analyses revealed that 4193 and 3880 unigenes were enriched in the categories of reproduction and reproductive processes, respectively. Differential expression analysis identified 1385 differentially expressed unigenes between MIB and FIB, of which six unigenes related to cytokinin and auxin signaling pathways and 16 important transcription factor (TF) genes including MADS-box family members were identified. In particular, several unigenes encoding important TFs, such as homologs of CRABS CLAW, RADIALIS-like 1, RADIALIS-like 2, HECATE 2, WUSCHEL-related homeobox 9, and SUPERMAN, were expressed at higher levels in FIB than in MIB. The expression patterns of the 36 selected unigenes revealed by transcriptome analysis were successfully validated by quantitative real-time PCR. This study not only provides comprehensive gene expression profiles of P. volubilis inflorescence buds, but also lays the foundation for research on the molecular mechanism of floral sex determination in P. volubilis and other monoecious plants. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  17. Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates grape bud dormancy, and dormancy release stimuli may act through modification of ABA metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chuanlin; Halaly, Tamar; Acheampong, Atiako Kwame; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Or, Etti

    2015-01-01

    In warm-winter regions, induction of dormancy release by hydrogen cyanamide (HC) is mandatory for commercial table grape production. Induction of respiratory stress by HC leads to dormancy release via an uncharacterized biochemical cascade that could reveal the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Previous studies proposed a central role for abscisic acid (ABA) in the repression of bud meristem activity, and suggested its removal as a critical step in the HC-induced cascade. In the current study, support for these assumptions was sought. The data show that ABA indeed inhibits dormancy release in grape (Vitis vinifera) buds and attenuates the advancing effect of HC. However, HC-dependent recovery was detected, and was affected by dormancy status. HC reduced VvXERICO and VvNCED transcript levels and induced levels of VvABA8’OH homologues. Regulation of these central players in ABA metabolism correlated with decreased ABA and increased ABA catabolite levels in HC-treated buds. Interestingly, an inhibitor of ethylene signalling attenuated these effects of HC on ABA metabolism. HC also modulated the expression of ABA signalling regulators, in a manner that supports a decreased ABA level and response. Taken together, the data support HC-induced removal of ABA-mediated repression via regulation of ABA metabolism and signalling. Expression profiling during the natural dormancy cycle revealed that at maximal dormancy, the HC-regulated VvNCED1 transcript level starts to drop. In parallel, levels of VvA8H-CYP707A4 transcript and ABA catabolites increase sharply. This may provide initial support for the involvement of ABA metabolism also in the execution of natural dormancy. PMID:25560179

  18. The link in Linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "linking" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block. PMID:23840106

  19. All-trans-retinoid acid (ATRA) may have inhibited chondrogenesis of primary hind limb bud mesenchymal cells by downregulating Pitx1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-guo; Li, Xue-dong; Liu, Zhao-yong; Zhang, Tao-gen; Chen, Bin; Hou, Guo-qing; Hong, Quan; Xie, Peng; Du, Shi-xin

    2014-01-13

    Despite frequently well-established role of all-trans-retinoid acid (ATRA) in congenital limb deformities, its mechanism of action, thus far, is still ambiguous. Pitx1, which is expressed in the hindlimb bud mesenchyme, or its pathways may be etiologically responsible for the increased incidence of clubfoot. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms whereby Pitx1 regulated chondrogenesis of hindlimb bud mesenchymal cells in vitro. E12.5 embryonic rat hind limb bud mesenchymal cells were treated with ATRA at appropriate concentrations. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was performed to evaluate cell proliferation. Hematoxylin-safranin-O-fast-green staining assays were used to observe cartilage nodules, and Pitx1 expression was examined by immunofluorescent microscopy. Real-time quantitative PCR and immunoblotting assays were applied to determine the mRNA expressions of Pitx1, Sox9 and type II collagen (Col2al), respectively. The results showed that ATRA inhibited the proliferation of hind limb bud cells dose-dependently. ATRA also induced a dose-dependent reduction in the number of cartilage nodules and the area of cartilage nodules compared with controls. Our real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays revealed that the mRNA expression of Pitx1, Sox9 and Col2al were significantly downregulated by ATRA. Furthermore, our immunofluorescent microscopy and Western blotting assays indicated that Pitx1 was mainly expressed in the cartilage nodules and the levels of Pitx1, Sox9 and Col2al were also downregulated by ATRA dose-dependently. The results indicated that ATRA may decrease chondrogenesis of hind limb bud mesenchymal cells by inhibiting cartilage-specific molecules, such as Sox9 and Col2al, via downregulating Pitx1 expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Effects of basic orange II on proliferation and differentiation of limb bud cells in rat embryos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lixin; Feng, Jiawang; Tian, Shimin

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effects of basic orange II on proliferation and differentiation of limb bud cells. Limb bud cell were separated from SD rat embryo at 13-day gestational age, limb bud cell were exposed to basic orange II at concentrations of 0.0, 12.5, 25.0, 50.0, 100.0, 200, 0 and 400.0 mg/L in the culture medium. The effect of basic orange II on limb bud cell proliferation was detected by Cell Counting Kit-8, the effect of basic orange II on limb bud cell differentiation was assessed by Alcian Blue 8GX. With the increasing of basic orange II concentration, the proliferation and differentiation of embryo limb bud cells were poorer and poorer in vitro, and there was the dose-effect relationship. The pID50 and dLD50 of basic orange II on limb bud cells were 240.6 mg/L and 69.3 mg/L respectively. The inhibition of basic orange II on cell differentiation might exceed that on cell proliferation. Basic orange II could inhibit proliferation and differentiation of embryo limb bud cells. It might be a potential developmental toxic substance in rat embryo.

  1. Morphological and physiological aspects of the early phases of flower bud formation of apple

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, F.A.

    1996-01-01


    For consistent yields in apple fruit production, knowledge of the factors affecting flower bud formation is required. The aim of this study was to gain more insight in the role of endogenous factors in flower bud formation of apple. The effects of temperature, applied gibberellin (GA

  2. effects of bud loading levels and different nitrogen doses on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of several bud loading levels in winter pruning and nitrogen doses on yield and physical and chemical properties of fresh vine-leaves of grape cultivar. “Narince”. Vines trained with bilateral cordon system was pruned to yield 35000 to 53000 buds/ha (16 or.

  3. Light controls shoot meristem organogenic activity and leaf primordia growth during bud burst in Rosa sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Tiffanie; Bergougnoux, Veronique; Combes, Didier; Viemont, Jean-Daniel; Leduc, Nathalie

    2008-11-01

    Light controls bud burst in many plants, which subsequently affects their architecture. Nevertheless, very little is known about this photomorphogenic process. This study ascertains the effects of light on bud burst and on two of its components, i.e. growth of preformed leaves and meristem organogenesis in six cultivars from three Rosa species (R. hybrida L., R. chinensis L., R. wichurana L.). Defoliated plants were severed above the third basal bud and exposed, either to darkness or to different intensities of white light, to blue, red or to FR, at constant temperature. Bud bursting was inhibited in darkness in the six cultivars of Rosa, but not in Arabidopsis, tomato and poplar plants under the same condition. In all Rosa cultivars, bud burst, growth of preformed leaves and meristem organogenesis were triggered by blue and red lights, and extended by increasing light intensities. FR was inhibitory of bud burst. Partial shading experiments demonstrated that bud and not stem was the active site for light perception in bud burst.

  4. Loss of membranous Ep-CAM in budding colorectal carcinoma cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, M.J.E.M.; Kempen, L.C. van; Velde, C.J. van de; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Nagtegaal, I.D.

    2007-01-01

    Tumor budding is a histological feature that reflects loss of adhesion of tumor cells and is associated with locoregional metastasis of colorectal carcinoma. Although nuclear localization of beta-catenin is associated with tumor budding, the molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. In this

  5. Prognostic significance of tumor budding in rectal cancer biopsies before neoadjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ailín C; Gibbons, David; Hanly, Ann M; Hyland, John M P; O'Connell, P Ronan; Winter, Desmond C; Sheahan, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Tumor budding is an increasingly important prognostic feature for pathologists to recognize. The aim of this study was to correlate intra-tumoral budding in pre-treatment rectal cancer biopsies with pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and with long-term outcome. Data from a prospectively maintained database were acquired from patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Pre-treatment rectal biopsies were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of intra-tumoral budding. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors contributing to cancer-specific death, expressed as hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Of the 185 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, 89 patients met the eligibility criteria, of whom 18 (20%) exhibited budding in a pre-treatment tumor biopsy. Intra-tumoral budding predicted a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (higher ypT stage, P=0.032; lymph node involvement, P=0.018; lymphovascular invasion, P=0.004; and residual poorly differentiated tumors, P=0.005). No patient with intra-tumoral budding exhibited a tumor regression grade 1 or complete pathological response, providing a 100% specificity and positive predictive value for non-response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Intra-tumoral budding was associated with a lower disease-free 5-year survival rate (33 vs 78%, Ptumoral budding at diagnosis of rectal cancer identifies those who will poorly respond to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and those with a poor prognosis.

  6. Effect of pretreatment methods of dormant pear buds on viability after cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aimed to develop alternatives for dormant bud cryopreservation by using several cryoprotectants on four pear cultivars with a view to improve the viability of the dormant buds. We used different cryoprotectants such as Honey, PVS2, PVS3, PVS4, Towill, IPBB-1 for cultivars: Talgarskaya Kra...

  7. New technique for more rapid cryopreservation of dormant vegetative tree buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryopreservation of dormant buds of temperate trees in liquid nitrogen can provide a safe backup of field germplasm collections. However the process requires several months of preparation before buds can be cryopreserved. Cryopreservation at the natural moisture content (MC) would greatly accelerate...

  8. Apical bud toughness tests and tree sway movements to examine crown abrasion: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler Brannon; Wayne Clatterbuck

    2012-01-01

    Apical bud toughness differences were examined for several species to determine if crown abrasion affects shoot growth of determinate and indeterminate species during stand development. Determinate buds will set and harden after initial shoot elongation in the spring, while the indeterminate shoots form leaves from the apical meristem continuously based on the...

  9. Terminal bud failure of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) exposed to salt-laden winter storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Thorbergur H

    2006-07-01

    At coastal sites, trees are exposed to marine aerosols that may cause foliar necrosis and shoot dieback, which can result in deformed crowns and contorted stems. A six-year study of leaf primordia in terminal buds of black cottonwood trees (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) on Heimaey Island off the south coast of Iceland was undertaken to elucidate the physiological events associated with salt-deposition-related bud failure. Leaf and bud lengths, dry mass, water content and chloride concentrations were monitored and related to four phenological stages: (1) bud set; (2) dormancy induction; (3) dormancy release; and (4) bud break. The trees set buds in July and shed their leaves by late September. Leaf primordia generally stopped growing by September 10 +/- 22 days and attained midwinter water content in late September. Leaf growth commenced in the terminal buds by March 2 +/- 16 days, but mean dates of bud swelling and bud break were April 29 +/- 19 and May 10 +/- 12 days. In summer and until November, chloride concentrations in leaf primordia were low, but increasing. Chloride concentrations remained stable from December to February, even though the dormant trees were exposed to large amounts of marine aerosols. In February and March, three events occurred more or less simultaneously: (1) leaf extension growth commenced; (2) chloride concentration surged in the leaf primordia; and (3) the leaf primordia began to hydrate. Following dormancy release, growth and hydration of leaf primordia were negatively related to chloride concentration in the leaf primordia, with inhibition of leaf growth, tissue hydration and chloride acquisition occurring at a chloride concentration threshold estimated at 7.3 mg Cl- g(-1) tissue water. Necrosis of leaf primordia was observed above 14 mg Cl- g(-1) tissue water. Growth and hydration of leaves at bud break in mid-May was explained by a three-parameter logistic model of chloride concentration in leaf primordia at the end of March

  10. Glucosinolate composition of young shoots and flower buds of capers (Capparis species) growing wild in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Musa

    2002-12-04

    The content and glucosinolate composition of young shoots and raw flower buds of Capparis spinosa var. spinosa and Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens at three different sizes (x 13 mm) were investigated by HPLC with UV detection. Samples were harvested in August 2001 in Turkey. Twelve different glucosinolates were identified in the young shoots and buds of both species. Total content of glucosinolates ranged from 6.55 micromol/g (large buds of C. spinosa) to 45.56 micromol/g (young shoots of C. ovata). The main glucosinolate was glucocapperin, which amounted to approximately 90% of the total glucosinolates. In both species the total glucosinolate content varied in dependence on the bud size, whereas a greater variability was given for buds from C. spinosa.

  11. Cell kinetic study on the relation between irradiation hypogeusia and taste buds in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Hideharu; Furumoto, Keiichi [Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate the mechanism of hypogeusia caused by irradiation. X-ray treatment at 10 Gy or 20 Gy was given to the maxillofacial region including the tongue in rats, and the involvement of taste bud for hypogeusia was investigated. In addition, cytological kinetics were immunohistologically studied using bromodeoxyuridine in the taste bud and in the lingual mucosal epithelium. The following results were obtained: In the 10 Gy group, the number of taste bud become less after the exposure, but no hypogeusia was observed during the experimental period. In the 20 Gy group, any labeled taste bud was not observed on the 7th day, and all taste buds disappeared by the 10th day. In the lingual mucosal epithelium, the number of basal cells decreased to the minimum, and the body weight and total water intake decreased coincidently in the 20 Gy group, which were few in the 10 Gy group. (author)

  12. The ureteric bud epithelium: Morphogenesis and roles in metanephric kidney patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is composed of two epithelial components –the collecting duct system and the nephron epithelium– that differentiate from two different tissues –the ureteric bud epithelium and the nephron progenitors, respectively– of intermediate mesoderm origin. The collecting duct system is generated through reiterative ureteric bud branching morphogenesis whereas the nephron epithelium is formed in a process termed nephrogenesis, which is initiated with the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of the nephron progenitors. Ureteric bud branching morphogenesis is regulated by nephron progenitors, and in return the ureteric bud epithelium regulates nephrogenesis. The metanephric kidney is also physiologically divided along the cortico-medullary axis into subcompartments that are enriched with specific segments of these two epithelial structures. Here we provide an overview of the major molecular and cellular processes underlying the morphogenesis and patterning of the ureteric bud epithelium and its roles in the cortical-medullary patterning of the metanephric kidney. PMID:25783232

  13. Origin of nuclear buds and micronuclei in normal and folate-deprived human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, Hanna K. [New Technologies and Risks, Work Environment Development, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41aA, FI-00250 Helsinki (Finland); Wang Xu [Genome Health and Nutrigenomics Project, CSIRO Human Nutrition, Adelaide BC, SA 5000 (Australia); School of Life Sciences, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, Yunnan 650092 (China); Jaerventaus, Hilkka [New Technologies and Risks, Work Environment Development, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41aA, FI-00250 Helsinki (Finland); Falck, Ghita C.-M. [New Technologies and Risks, Work Environment Development, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41aA, FI-00250 Helsinki (Finland); Norppa, Hannu [New Technologies and Risks, Work Environment Development, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41aA, FI-00250 Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: hannu.norppa@ttl.fi; Fenech, Michael [Genome Health and Nutrigenomics Project, CSIRO Human Nutrition, Adelaide BC, SA 5000 (Australia)

    2007-04-01

    Micronuclei are formed from chromosomes and chromosomal fragments that lag behind in anaphase and are left outside daughter nuclei in telophase. They may also be derived from broken anaphase bridges. Nuclear buds, micronucleus-like bodies attached to the nucleus by a thin nucleoplasmic connection, have been proposed to be generated similarly to micronuclei during nuclear division or in S-phase as a stage in the extrusion of extra DNA, possibly giving rise to micronuclei. To better understand these phenomena, we have characterized the contents of 894 nuclear buds and 1392 micronuclei in normal and folate-deprived 9-day cultures of human lymphocytes using fluorescence in situ hybridization with pancentromeric and pantelomeric DNA probes. Such information has not earlier been available for human primary cells. Surprisingly, there appears to be no previous data on the occurrence of telomeres in micronuclei (or buds) of normal human cells in general. Our results suggest that nuclear buds and micronuclei have partly different mechanistic origin. Interstitial DNA without centromere or telomere label was clearly more prevalent in nuclear buds (43%) than in micronuclei (13%). DNA with only telomere label or with both centromere and telomere label was more frequent in micronuclei (62% and 22%, respectively) than in nuclear buds (44% and 10%, respectively). Folate deprivation especially increased the frequency of nuclear buds and micronuclei harboring telomeric DNA and nuclear buds harboring interstitial DNA but also buds and micronuclei with both centromeric and telomeric DNA. According to the model we propose, that micronuclei in binucleate lymphocytes primarily derive from lagging chromosomes and terminal acentric fragments during mitosis. Most nuclear buds, however, are suggested to originate from interstitial or terminal acentric fragments, possibly representing nuclear membrane entrapment of DNA that has been left in cytoplasm after nuclear division or excess DNA that

  14. Tumor budding predicts response to anti-EGFR therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobec, Inti; Molinari, Francesca; Martin, Vittoria; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Saletti, Piercarlo; Trezzi, Rosangela; De Dosso, Sara; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Frattini, Milo; Lugli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the evaluation of tumor budding can complement K-RAS analysis to improve the individualized prediction of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor based therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. METHODS: Forty-three patients with mCRC treated with cetuximab or panitumumab were entered into this study. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, 30 patients had stable or progressive disease (non-responsive), while 13 patients had a partial response. Tumor buds were evaluated from whole tissue sections stained for pan-cytokeratin, evaluated in the densest region using a 40 × objective and “high-grade” tumor budding was defined as 15 buds/high-power field. RESULTS: Tumor buds and K-RAS mutation both correctly classified 68% of patients. All patients with K-RAS mutation (n = 7) or high-grade tumor budding (n = 11) were non-responsive, of which 4 patients had both features. All 13 partial responders were K-RAS wild-type with low-grade tumor budding. Combined, the predictive value of K-RAS and tumor budding was 80%. Additionally, high-grade tumor budding was significantly related to worse progression-free survival [HR (95% CI): 2.8 (1.3-6.0, P = 0.008)]. CONCLUSION: If confirmed in larger cohorts, the addition of tumor budding to K-RAS analysis may represent an effective approach for individualized patient management in the metastatic setting. PMID:20939111

  15. Prognostic Value of Tumor Budding in Early-Stage Cervical Adenocarcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satabongkoch, Nopporn; Khunamornpong, Surapan; Pongsuvareeyakul, Tip; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Sukpan, Kornkanok; Soongkhaw, Aungsumalee; intaraphet, Suthida; Suprasert, Prapaporn; Siriaunkgul, Sumalee

    2017-06-25

    Background: Tumor budding has recently been reported as an independent adverse prognostic factor for colorectal adenocarcinomas and other types of carcinoma in the digestive tract. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of tumor budding in patients with early-stage cervical adenocarcinomas and any associations with other clinical and pathological features. Methods: Histological slides of patients with early-stage (IB-IIA) usual-type endocervical adenocarcinoma who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection, without preoperative chemotherapy, between January 2006 and December 2012 were reviewed. Tumor budding was evaluated in routinely-stained sections and defined as detached single cells or clusters of fewer than 5 cells in a tumor invasive front and was stratified based on the number of bud counts in 10-high-power fields as low (buds) and high (≥15 buds). Correlations between tumor bud count and other clinical and pathological variables including follow-up outcomes were assessed. Results: Of 129 patients, a high tumor bud count was observed in 15 (11.6%), positively associated with histologic grade 3 (ptumor size >2 cm (p=0.036). Kaplan-Meyer analysis showed a significant decrease in both disease-free survival and cancer-specific survival for patients with a high tumor bud count (p=0.027 and 0.031, respectively). On multivariate analysis, histologic grade 3 was the only independent predictor for decreased disease-free survival (p=0.004) and cancer-specific survival (p=0.003). Conclusions: A high tumor budding count based on assessment of routinely-stained sections was found to be associated with decreased disease-free and cancer-specific survival in patients with early-stage cervical adenocarcinomas. However, it was not found to be an independent prognostic predictor in this study. Creative Commons Attribution License

  16. Tumor budding is an independent predictor of outcome in AJCC/UICC stage II colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betge, Johannes; Kornprat, Peter; Pollheimer, Marion J; Lindtner, Richard A; Schlemmer, Andrea; Rehak, Peter; Vieth, Michael; Langner, Cord

    2012-11-01

    In colorectal cancer, the morphology of the invasive tumor margin may reflect aggressiveness of tumor growth, thus providing important prognostic information. The tumor growth pattern according to Jass and the extent of tumor budding were analyzed in patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union for International Cancer Control (AJCC/UICC) stage II disease. Tumors of 120 randomly selected patients with AJCC/UICC stage II disease were retrospectively reviewed for tumor growth pattern (expanding vs. infiltrating) and the extent of tumor budding, with high-grade budding reflecting presence of 10 or more budding foci scattered at the invasive tumor margin. Progression-free and cancer-specific survivals were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. For multivariable analysis, Cox's proportional hazards regression models were performed. The infiltrating growth pattern was significantly associated with histological subtype and lymphovascular invasion, while high-grade budding was significantly associated with tumor grade and lymphovascular invasion. High-grade budding, but not the infiltrating growth pattern, was significantly associated with outcome in univariable analysis. Cox's proportional hazards regression models proved tumor budding to be an independent predictor of disease progression (hazard ratio 3.91, 95 % confidence interval 1.3-11.77; P = 0.02) and cancer-related death (hazard ratio 5.90, 95 % confidence interval 1.62-21.51; P = 0.007). The combination of infiltrating growth pattern and high-grade budding did not have a stronger prognostic significance than tumor budding alone. Tumor budding independently predicted patient outcome in patients with AJCC/UICC stage II colorectal cancer and may therefore be used for accurate prognostication, patient counseling, and design of clinical trials by using integrated multimodal therapy.

  17. BudBurst Buddies: A New Tool for Engaging the Youngest Citizen Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.; Ward, D.

    2010-12-01

    BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) introduces elementary school age children to the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a new part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies newly developed resources. BudBurst Buddies is a part of Project BudBurst, a national citizen science program coordinated by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Chicago Botanic Garden. Funding for this resource was provided by NEON, NSF, NASA, and the National Geographic Education Foundation.

  18. Correlation between tumor budding and post-resection prognosis in patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Yoshitsugu; Ohara, Masanori; Doumen, Hiromitsu; Kimura, Noriko; Ishidate, Takuzo; Kondo, Satoshi

    2011-02-01

    Tumor budding is defined as an isolated single cancer cell or a cluster of cancer cells composed of fewer than five cells at the invasive front of a tumor. The aim of the present study was to identify correlations between tumor budding and clinicopathological factors and their impact on postoperative prognosis in invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus. The subjects were 82 patients who underwent curative resection. The number of tumors showing budding was counted immunohistochemically based on positivity for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3) to distinguish cancer cells from inflammatory cells, and the patients were divided into low-grade and high-grade budding groups. High-grade budding was defined as ≥5 budding foci per field under a 20× objective lens. One group of 36 patients (43.9%) and a second group of 46 patients (56.1%) were classified into the low-grade and high-grade budding groups, respectively. Patients in the high-grade budding group had significantly larger tumor size, deeper depth of invasion, more frequent lymphatic invasion and venous invasion, as well as more lymph node metastases, than those in the low-grade budding group. Disease-free and overall survivals were worse in the high-grade budding group than in the low-grade budding group (Ptumor recurrence more than 5 years postoperatively belonged to the low-grade budding group. Tumor budding appears to be an indicator of tumor growth and invasiveness. Patients with low-grade budding are likely to have a better prognosis than those with high-grade budding, but the tumor may recur in the late phase postoperatively in patients with low-grade budding.

  19. Guillaume Budé, l’humaniste et le prince

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Le Clech-Charton

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Grande figure de la Renaissance des lettres et des arts en France, tout à la fois écrivain, traducteur, ambassadeur, créateur du dépôt légal et fondateur du Collège de France, maître de la librairie du roi à Fontainebleau, Guillaume Budé (1468-1540 est essentiellement connu pour le rôle de conseiller politique et culturel qu’il joua auprès de François Ier, dont il fut le secrétaire. Il a été surtout étudié du point de vue de sa production littéraire savante, mais non sous l’angle de son mili...

  20. Identification of SUMO conjugation sites in the budding yeast proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Esteras

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO is an important mechanism regulating protein function. Identification of SUMO conjugation sites on substrates is a challenging task. Here we employed a proteomic method to map SUMO acceptor lysines in budding yeast proteins. We report the identification of 257 lysine residues where SUMO is potentially attached. Amongst the hits, we identified already known SUMO substrates and sites, confirming the success of the approach. In addition, we tested several of the novel substrates using SUMO immunoprecipitation analysis and confirmed that the SUMO acceptor lysines identified in these proteins are indeed bona fide SUMOylation sites. We believe that the collection of SUMO sites presented here is an important resource for future functional studies of SUMOylation in yeast.

  1. Genetic bypass of essential RNA repair enzymes in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Patrick D; White, Laura K; York, Kerri; Hesselberth, Jay R

    2017-12-06

    RNA repair enzymes catalyze rejoining of an RNA molecule after cleavage of phosphodiester linkages. RNA repair in budding yeast is catalyzed by two separate enzymes that process tRNA exons during their splicing and HAC1 mRNA exons during activation of the unfolded protein response. The RNA ligase Trl1 joins 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl RNA fragments, creating a new phosphodiester linkage with a 2'-phosphate at the junction. The 2'-phosphate is subsequently removed by the 2'-phosphotransferase Tpt1, which catalyzes phosphate transfer to NAD+, producing nicotinamide and a unique ADP ribose metabolite. We bypassed the essential functions of TRL1 and TPT1 in budding yeast by expressing "pre-spliced," intronless versions of the ten normally intron-containing tRNAs, indicating this repair pathway does not have additional essential functions. Consistent with previous studies, expression of intronless tRNAs failed to rescue the growth of cells with deletions in components of the SEN complex, implying an additional essential role for the splicing endonuclease. The trl1∆ and tpt1∆ mutants accumulate tRNA and HAC1 splicing intermediates indicative of specific RNA repair defects and are hypersensitive to drugs that inhibit translation. As expected, failure to induce the unfolded protein response in trl1∆ cells grown with tunicamycin is lethal owing to their inability to ligate HAC1 after its cleavage by Ire1. In contrast, tpt1∆ mutants grow in the presence of tunicamycin despite reduced accumulation of spliced HAC1, suggesting that ligated but 2'-phosphorylated mRNA is decoded by the ribosome. Finally, we optimized a PCR-based method to detect RNA 2'-phosphate modifications and show that they are present on ligated HAC1 mRNA. These RNA repair mutants enable new studies of the role of RNA repair in cellular physiology. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Linked Partitions and Linked Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, William Y. C.; Wu, Susan Y. J.; Yan, Catherine H.

    2006-01-01

    The notion of noncrossing linked partition arose from the study of certain transforms in free probability theory. It is known that the number of noncrossing linked partitions of [n+1] is equal to the n-th large Schroder number $r_n$, which counts the number of Schroder paths. In this paper we give a bijective proof of this result. Then we introduce the structures of linked partitions and linked cycles. We present various combinatorial properties of noncrossing linked partitions, linked partit...

  3. Electron cryotomography studies of maturing HIV-1 particles reveal the assembly pathway of the viral core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Cora L; Cheng, Sarah N; Jensen, Grant J

    2015-01-15

    To better characterize the assembly of the HIV-1 core, we have used electron cryotomography (ECT) to image infected cells and the viral particles cryopreserved next to them. We observed progressive stages of virus assembly and egress, including flower-like flat Gag lattice assemblies, hemispherical budding profiles, and virus buds linked to the plasma membrane via a thin membrane neck. The population of budded viral particles contains immature, maturation-intermediate, and mature core morphologies. Structural characteristics of the maturation intermediates suggest that the core assembly pathway involves the formation of a CA sheet that associates with the condensed ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. Our analysis also reveals a correlation between RNP localization within the viral particle and the formation of conical cores, suggesting that the RNP helps drive conical core assembly. Our findings support an assembly pathway for the HIV-1 core that begins with a small CA sheet that associates with the RNP to form the core base, followed by polymerization of the CA sheet along one side of the conical core toward the tip, and then closure around the body of the cone. During HIV-1 assembly and release, the Gag polyprotein is organized into a signature hexagonal lattice, termed the immature lattice. To become infectious, the newly budded virus must disassemble the immature lattice by proteolyzing Gag and then reassemble the key proteolytic product, the structural protein p24 (CA), into a distinct, mature hexagonal lattice during a process termed maturation. The mature HIV-1 virus contains a conical capsid that encloses the condensed viral genome at its wide base. Mutations or small molecules that interfere with viral maturation also disrupt viral infectivity. Little is known about the assembly pathway that results in the conical core and genome encapsidation. Here, we have used electron cryotomography to structurally characterize HIV-1 particles that are actively maturing

  4. Ndc10 is a platform for inner kinetochore assembly in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med)

    2012-01-10

    Kinetochores link centromeric DNA to spindle microtubules and ensure faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In point-centromere yeasts, the CBF3 complex Skp1-Ctf13-(Cep3){sub 2}-(Ndc10){sub 2} recognizes a conserved centromeric DNA element through contacts made by Cep3 and Ndc10. We describe here the five-domain organization of Kluyveromyces lactis Ndc10 and the structure at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution of domains I-II (residues 1-402) bound to DNA. The structure resembles tyrosine DNA recombinases, although it lacks both endonuclease and ligase activities. Structural and biochemical data demonstrate that each subunit of the Ndc10 dimer binds a separate fragment of DNA, suggesting that Ndc10 stabilizes a DNA loop at the centromere. We describe in vitro association experiments showing that specific domains of Ndc10 interact with each of the known inner-kinetochore proteins or protein complexes in budding yeast. We propose that Ndc10 provides a central platform for inner-kinetochore assembly.

  5. Sonic hedgehog from both nerves and epithelium is a key trophic factor for taste bud maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Azofeifa, David; Losacco, Justin T; Salcedo, Ernesto; Golden, Erin J; Finger, Thomas E; Barlow, Linda A

    2017-09-01

    The integrity of taste buds is intimately dependent on an intact gustatory innervation, yet the molecular nature of this dependency is unknown. Here, we show that differentiation of new taste bud cells, but not progenitor proliferation, is interrupted in mice treated with a hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibitor (HPI), and that gustatory nerves are a source of sonic hedgehog (Shh) for taste bud renewal. Additionally, epithelial taste precursor cells express Shh transiently, and provide a local supply of Hh ligand that supports taste cell renewal. Taste buds are minimally affected when Shh is lost from either tissue source. However, when both the epithelial and neural supply of Shh are removed, taste buds largely disappear. We conclude Shh supplied by taste nerves and local taste epithelium act in concert to support continued taste bud differentiation. However, although neurally derived Shh is in part responsible for the dependence of taste cell renewal on gustatory innervation, neurotrophic support of taste buds likely involves a complex set of factors. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Evolutionary origins of taste buds: phylogenetic analysis of purinergic neurotransmission in epithelial chemosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirino, Masato; Parnes, Jason; Hansen, Anne; Kiyohara, Sadao; Finger, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Taste buds are gustatory endorgans which use an uncommon purinergic signalling system to transmit information to afferent gustatory nerve fibres. In mammals, ATP is a crucial neurotransmitter released by the taste cells to activate the afferent nerve fibres. Taste buds in mammals display a characteristic, highly specific ecto-ATPase (NTPDase2) activity, suggesting a role in inactivation of the neurotransmitter. The purpose of this study was to test whether the presence of markers of purinergic signalling characterize taste buds in anamniote vertebrates and to test whether similar purinergic systems are employed by other exteroceptive chemosensory systems. The species examined include several teleosts, elasmobranchs, lampreys and hagfish, the last of which lacks vertebrate-type taste buds. For comparison, Schreiner organs of hagfish and solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) of teleosts, both of which are epidermal chemosensory end organs, were also examined because they might be evolutionarily related to taste buds. Ecto-ATPase activity was evident in elongate cells in all fish taste buds, including teleosts, elasmobranchs and lampreys. Neither SCCs nor Schreiner organs show specific ecto-ATPase activity, suggesting that purinergic signalling is not crucial in those systems as it is for taste buds. These findings suggest that the taste system did not originate from SCCs but arose independently in early vertebrates. PMID:23466675

  7. Automated quantification of budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel image cytometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Daniel J; Kury, Alexandria L; Kuksin, Dmitry; Pirani, Alnoor; Flanagan, Kevin; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2013-06-01

    The measurements of concentration, viability, and budding percentages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are performed on a routine basis in the brewing and biofuel industries. Generation of these parameters is of great importance in a manufacturing setting, where they can aid in the estimation of product quality, quantity, and fermentation time of the manufacturing process. Specifically, budding percentages can be used to estimate the reproduction rate of yeast populations, which directly correlates with metabolism of polysaccharides and bioethanol production, and can be monitored to maximize production of bioethanol during fermentation. The traditional method involves manual counting using a hemacytometer, but this is time-consuming and prone to human error. In this study, we developed a novel automated method for the quantification of yeast budding percentages using Cellometer image cytometry. The automated method utilizes a dual-fluorescent nucleic acid dye to specifically stain live cells for imaging analysis of unique morphological characteristics of budding yeast. In addition, cell cycle analysis is performed as an alternative method for budding analysis. We were able to show comparable yeast budding percentages between manual and automated counting, as well as cell cycle analysis. The automated image cytometry method is used to analyze and characterize corn mash samples directly from fermenters during standard fermentation. Since concentration, viability, and budding percentages can be obtained simultaneously, the automated method can be integrated into the fermentation quality assurance protocol, which may improve the quality and efficiency of beer and bioethanol production processes.

  8. Cell cycle genes are activated earlier than respiratory genes during release of grapevine buds from endodormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, Ximena; Pérez, Francisco J

    2017-10-03

    Single-bud cuttings of Vitis vinifera L exposed to forced growing conditions were used to investigate the involvement of phytohormones, abscisic acid (ABA), auxin (Aux) and cytokinin (CK) in the release of buds from the ED and in bud-sprouting. This artificial system imitates and hastens the natural sprouting that occurs in spring. Temporal expression analysis of genes related to phytohormones synthesis, showed an early drop in the expression of ABA biosynthesis gene that preceded an increase in Aux and CK biosynthesis genes. Bud-break is headed by the activation of all structures of the latent bud, especially the differentiation of the inflorescence and the development of the early stages of floral organs. Therefore, resumption of cell division and increases in respiration are essential for the activation of the bud. Temporal expression analysis of the cell cycle and respiration genes indicate that an increase in cell division go before the increase in respiration. These results, together with results indicating that the cell cycle genes are upregulated by Aux and CK, suggest that the events before the bud-break, start with a reduction in ABA content, followed by an increase in the content of Aux and CK, which activates the machinery of the cell cycle, which eventually would cause an increase in respiration.

  9. Sugars are under light control during bud burst in Rosa sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Tiffanie; Abidi, Farouk; Sigogne, Monique; Pelleschi-Travier, Sandrine; Boumaza, Rachid; Sakr, Soulaiman; Leduc, Nathalie

    2010-08-01

    Bud burst in certain species is conditioned by the luminous environment. With roses, the requirement for light is absolute, and darkness totally inhibits bud burst. Few studies have looked into understanding the action of light on the physiological bud burst processes. Here, we show the impact of light on certain components of glucidic metabolism during bud burst. Measurements were taken on decapitated plants of Rosa hybrida L. 'Radrazz' exposed either to darkness, white, blue or R light. Results show that a mobilization of bud and the carrying stem sucrose reserves only takes place in light and accompanies the bud burst. Furthermore, the activity of the RhVI vacuolar acid invertase which contributes to the breakdown of sucrose in the buds, as well as the transcription of the RhVI gene, is reduced in darkness, although it is strongly stimulated by light. The same analysis concerning the RhNAD-SDH gene, coding an NAD-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase, shows, on the contrary, a strong induction of its transcription in darkness that could reflect the use of survival mechanisms in this condition.

  10. Prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Keying; Zhao, Yang; Qu, Xiao; Pang, Zhaofei; Ni, Yang; Zhang, Tiehong; Du, Jiajun; Shen, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is a highly aggressive cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Histopathological evaluation pertaining to invasiveness is likely to provide additional information in relation to patient outcome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides generated from 296 gastric adenocarcinoma patients with full clinical and pathological and follow-up information were systematically reviewed. The patients were grouped on the basis of tumor budding, single cell invasion, large cell invasion, mitotic count, and fibrosis. The association between histopathological parameters, different classification systems, and overall survival (OS) was statistically analyzed. Among the 296 cases that were analyzed, high-grade tumor budding was observed in 49.0% (145) of them. Single cell invasion and large cell invasion were observed in 62.8% (186) and 16.9% (50) of the cases, respectively. Following univariate analysis, patients with high-grade tumor budding had shorter OS than those with low-grade tumor budding (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.260, Ptumor budding and single cell invasion were observed to be independent risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma (PTumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma are associated with an unfavorable prognosis.

  11. Histogen Layers Contributing to Adventitious Bud Formation Are Determined by their Cell Division Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Tomoyuki; Yang, Soo-Jung; Ohno, Sho; Honda, Keita; Deguchi, Ayumi; Doi, Motoaki; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Saintpaulia ionantha is propagated by adventitious buds in horticulture, and periclinal chimeral cultivars are usually difficult to propagate. However, some periclinal chimeral cultivars can be propagated with adventitious buds, and the mechanism of which has been unknown. Striped flower cultivars "Kaname," "Concord," and "Monique" were used to investigate what causes flower color separation in adventitious shoot-derived plants by tissue culture. These cultivars were revealed to have mutated flavonoid 3', 5' hydroxylase (SiF3'5'H), WDR1 (SiWDR1), or flavonoid 3 hydroxylase (SiF3H), respectively, in their L1 layer. From our previous study using "Kaname," all flowers from adventitious shoots were colored pink, which was the epidermal color of mother plants' flowers. We used "Concrd" and "Monique" from which we obtained not only monochromatic-colored plants the same as the epidermal color of mother plants, but also plants with a monochromatic colored plants, same as the subepidermal color, and a striped flower color the same as mother plants. Histological observations revealed that epidermal cells divided actively at 14 d after culture and they were involved in the formation of adventitious shoots in the cultured leaf segments of "Kaname." On the other hand, in "Concord" and "Monique," the number of divided cells in the subepidermis was rather higher than that of epidermal cells, and subepidermal cells were sometimes involved in shoot formation. In addition, the plant and leaf size of L1-derived plants from "Concord" and "Monique" were non-vigorous and smaller than those derived from the subepidermal layer. In conclusion, periclinal chimeral cultivars of Saintpaulia can be divided into two types. One type has a high cell division activity in the L1 layer, from which only single flower-colored plants derived from L1 can be obtained as adventitious shoots. Another type has a low cell division activity in the L1 layer, from which striped flower-colored plants the same as

  12. Histogen Layers Contributing to Adventitious Bud Formation Are Determined by their Cell Division Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Nabeshima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Saintpaulia ionantha is propagated by adventitious buds in horticulture, and periclinal chimeral cultivars are usually difficult to propagate. However, some periclinal chimeral cultivars can be propagated with adventitious buds, and the mechanism of which has been unknown. Striped flower cultivars “Kaname,” “Concord,” and “Monique” were used to investigate what causes flower color separation in adventitious shoot-derived plants by tissue culture. These cultivars were revealed to have mutated flavonoid 3′, 5′ hydroxylase (SiF3′5′H, WDR1 (SiWDR1, or flavonoid 3 hydroxylase (SiF3H, respectively, in their L1 layer. From our previous study using “Kaname,” all flowers from adventitious shoots were colored pink, which was the epidermal color of mother plants' flowers. We used “Concrd” and “Monique” from which we obtained not only monochromatic-colored plants the same as the epidermal color of mother plants, but also plants with a monochromatic colored plants, same as the subepidermal color, and a striped flower color the same as mother plants. Histological observations revealed that epidermal cells divided actively at 14 d after culture and they were involved in the formation of adventitious shoots in the cultured leaf segments of “Kaname.” On the other hand, in “Concord” and “Monique,” the number of divided cells in the subepidermis was rather higher than that of epidermal cells, and subepidermal cells were sometimes involved in shoot formation. In addition, the plant and leaf size of L1-derived plants from “Concord” and “Monique” were non-vigorous and smaller than those derived from the subepidermal layer. In conclusion, periclinal chimeral cultivars of Saintpaulia can be divided into two types. One type has a high cell division activity in the L1 layer, from which only single flower-colored plants derived from L1 can be obtained as adventitious shoots. Another type has a low cell division activity

  13. Thyroid bud morphogenesis requires CDC42- and SHROOM3-dependent apical constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebel, David A F; Plageman, Timothy F; Tang, Theresa L; Jones, Vanessa J; Muccioli, Maria; Tam, Patrick P L

    2016-01-15

    Early development of the gut endoderm and its subsequent remodeling for the formation of organ buds are accompanied by changes to epithelial cell shape and polarity. Members of the Rho-related family of small GTPases and their interacting proteins play multiple roles in regulating epithelial morphogenesis. In this study we examined the role of Cdc42 in foregut development and organ bud formation. Ablation of Cdc42 in post-gastrulation mouse embryos resulted in a loss of apical-basal cell polarity and columnar epithelial morphology in the ventral pharyngeal endoderm, in conjunction with a loss of apical localization of the known CDC42 effector protein PARD6B. Cell viability but not proliferation in the foregut endoderm was impaired. Outgrowth of the liver, lung and thyroid buds was severely curtailed in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In particular, the thyroid bud epithelium did not display the apical constriction that normally occurs concurrently with the outgrowth of the bud into the underlying mesenchyme. SHROOM3, a protein that interacts with Rho GTPases and promotes apical constriction, was strongly expressed in the thyroid bud and its sub-cellular localization was disrupted in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In Shroom3 gene trap mutant embryos, the thyroid bud epithelium showed no apical constriction, while the bud continued to grow and protruded into the foregut lumen. Our findings indicate that Cdc42 is required for epithelial polarity and organization in the endoderm and for apical constriction in the thyroid bud. It is possible that the function of CDC42 is partly mediated by SHROOM3. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Thyroid bud morphogenesis requires CDC42- and SHROOM3-dependent apical constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. F. Loebel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Early development of the gut endoderm and its subsequent remodeling for the formation of organ buds are accompanied by changes to epithelial cell shape and polarity. Members of the Rho-related family of small GTPases and their interacting proteins play multiple roles in regulating epithelial morphogenesis. In this study we examined the role of Cdc42 in foregut development and organ bud formation. Ablation of Cdc42 in post-gastrulation mouse embryos resulted in a loss of apical-basal cell polarity and columnar epithelial morphology in the ventral pharyngeal endoderm, in conjunction with a loss of apical localization of the known CDC42 effector protein PARD6B. Cell viability but not proliferation in the foregut endoderm was impaired. Outgrowth of the liver, lung and thyroid buds was severely curtailed in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In particular, the thyroid bud epithelium did not display the apical constriction that normally occurs concurrently with the outgrowth of the bud into the underlying mesenchyme. SHROOM3, a protein that interacts with Rho GTPases and promotes apical constriction, was strongly expressed in the thyroid bud and its sub-cellular localization was disrupted in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In Shroom3 gene trap mutant embryos, the thyroid bud epithelium showed no apical constriction, while the bud continued to grow and protruded into the foregut lumen. Our findings indicate that Cdc42 is required for epithelial polarity and organization in the endoderm and for apical constriction in the thyroid bud. It is possible that the function of CDC42 is partly mediated by SHROOM3.

  15. [Clinical significance of tumor budding detection in stage II colon cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-jie; Yang, Xiao-hong; Ren, Jing-qing; Zhu, Xuan-jin

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the association of tumor budding with recurrence and survival of patients with stage II colon cancer, in order to identify patients with high-risk recurrence who may benefit from adjuvant therapy. Clinical data of 112 stage II colon cancer patients in Guangzhou Red Cross Hospital between 1998 and 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. The degree of tumor budding was assessed by two observers and classified according to the number of tumor buds in the area with the greatest budding intensity on HE stain slides, as high-grade budding (≥10, n=30) and low-grade budding (≤9, n=82). Progression-free and cancer-specific survival were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression. All the patients were followed up and the median follow-up was 78 months. The 5-year progression-free survival rates for patients with high-grade and low-grade budding were 65.3% and 90.7% respectively (P=0.008). The 5-year cancer-specific survival rates were 72.1% and 93.8% respectively (P=0.001). Cox regression analysis demonstrated tumor budding was an independent predictor of disease progression (RR=4.572, 95%CI:2.218-11.746, P=0.002) and cancer-related death (RR=4.116, 95%CI:1.657-10.384, P=0.012). Tumor budding is a strong prognostic index for adverse outcome in stage II colon cancer patients,which may serve as a prognostic marker to identify patients with high risk of recurrence who may benefit from adjuvant therapy.

  16. Morphogenetic and developmental functions of the Aspergillus nidulans homologues of the yeast bud site selection proteins Bud4 and Axl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Haoyu; Rittenour, William R; Xu, Kaimei; Nicksarlian, Mark; Calvo, Ana M; Harris, Steven D

    2012-07-01

    The yeast bud site selection system represents a paradigm for understanding how fungal cells regulate the formation of a polarity axis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Bud4 and Axl2 are components of the axial bud site marker. To address the possibility that these proteins regulate cellular morphogenesis in filamentous fungi, we have characterized homologues of Bud4 and Axl2 in Aspergillus nidulans. Our results show that Bud4 is involved in septum formation in both hyphae and developing conidiophores. Whereas Axl2 appears to have no obvious role in hyphal growth, it is required for the regulation of phialide morphogenesis during conidiation. In particular, Axl2 localizes to the phialide-spore junction, where it appears to promote the recruitment of septins. Furthermore, the developmental regulators BrlA and AbaA control the expression of Axl2. Additional studies indicate that Axl2 is also involved in the regulation of sexual development, not only in A. nidulans, but also in the phylogenetically unrelated fungus Fusarium graminearum. Our results suggest that Axl2 plays a key role in phialide morphogenesis and/or function during conidiation in the aspergilli. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Phenotypic plasticity, QTL mapping and genomic characterization of bud set in black poplar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabbrini Francesco

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic control of important adaptive traits, such as bud set, is still poorly understood in most forest trees species. Poplar is an ideal model tree to study bud set because of its indeterminate shoot growth. Thus, a full-sib family derived from an intraspecific cross of P. nigra with 162 clonally replicated progeny was used to assess the phenotypic plasticity and genetic variation of bud set in two sites of contrasting environmental conditions. Results Six crucial phenological stages of bud set were scored. Night length appeared to be the most important signal triggering the onset of growth cessation. Nevertheless, the effect of other environmental factors, such as temperature, increased during the process. Moreover, a considerable role of genotype × environment (G × E interaction was found in all phenological stages with the lowest temperature appearing to influence the sensitivity of the most plastic genotypes. Descriptors of growth cessation and bud onset explained the largest part of phenotypic variation of the entire process. Quantitative trait loci (QTL for these traits were detected. For the four selected traits (the onset of growth cessation (date2.5, the transition from shoot to bud (date1.5, the duration of bud formation (subproc1 and bud maturation (subproc2 eight and sixteen QTL were mapped on the maternal and paternal map, respectively. The identified QTL, each one characterized by small or modest effect, highlighted the complex nature of traits involved in bud set process. Comparison between map location of QTL and P. trichocarpa genome sequence allowed the identification of 13 gene models, 67 bud set-related expressional and six functional candidate genes (CGs. These CGs are functionally related to relevant biological processes, environmental sensing, signaling, and cell growth and development. Some strong QTL had no obvious CGs, and hold great promise to identify unknown genes that affect bud set

  18. Nerve-independent and ectopically additional induction of taste buds in organ culture of fetal tongues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Kotaro; Tomooka, Yasuhiro

    2016-10-01

    An improved organ culture system allowed to observe morphogenesis of mouse lingual papillae and taste buds relatively for longer period, in which fetal tongues were analyzed for 6 d. Taste cells were defined as eosinophobic epithelial cells expressing CK8 and Sox2 within lingual epithelium. Addition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta inhibitor CHIR99021 induced many taste cells and buds in non-gustatory and gustatory stratified lingual epithelium. The present study clearly demonstrated induction of taste cells and buds ectopically and without innervation.

  19. Tumor budding is an independent prognostic factor for prediction of lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Punnya V; Patil, Prakash V; Hallikeri, Kaveri; Mallapur, M D; Hallikerimath, Seema; Kale, Alka D

    2015-04-01

    Despite the enormous advances in diagnostic and management modalities of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the mortality rates have remained stagnant with a 5-year survival rate of tumor budding has been associated with aggressive behavior and is correlated with lymph node metastasis, recurrence, distant metastasis, and decreased survival in several cancers. However, the prognostic significance of this apparently simple to evaluate parameter is sparse in OSCC. A total of 75 cases of surgically excised OSCC were analyzed for tumor budding along with other clinicopathologic parameters. Tumor budding was graded as high and low intensity based on presence and absence of ≥10 or budding foci in hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. An association between the clinicopathological parameters, lymph node metastases with the budding index was examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Tumor budding was evident in 89% of cases with around 45.3% of the cases demonstrated high-intensity budding. High-intensity tumor budding was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and depth of invasion. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor budding and depth of invasion were significant independent predictors for lymph node metastasis. Tumor budding is frequently encountered histologic marker in OSCC. High-intensity tumor budding is a strong independent prognostic factor for prediction of lymph node metastasis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. [Analysis of cyclic fluctuations in larch bud moth populations by means of discrete-time dynamic models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedorezov, L V

    2011-01-01

    Analysed are the data of larch bud moth (Zeiraphera diniana Gn.) fluctuations in Swiss Alps. The analysis applies simplest mathematical models of isolated population dynamics (in particular, Kostitzin model, Skellam model, the discrete logistic model, and some other ones), which include the minimal number of unknown parameters. The parameters have been estimated, for all the models in hand, by the least-squares method, to fit certain data from the Global Population Dynamics Database (N 1407 and N 6195), the sequences of the data deviations from the model trajectories being treated as well. The best approximations are shown to be achieved with Moran-Ricker model and the discrete logistic model. Statistical criteria (Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Shapiro-Wilk tests) reveal that the hypotheses of normal distribution of residuals must be rejected for one of the time series (N 1407); some models demonstrate serial correlations in the sequence of residuals (according to Durbin-Watson test). This leads to the conclusion that periodic fluctuations in the larch bud moth population (N 1407) can hardly be explained by self-regulation mechanisms alone. For another time series (N 6195), the modified discrete logistic model has appeared to be acceptable as a mode of fluctuations.

  1. The histone deacetylases sir2 and rpd3 act on ribosomal DNA to control the replication program in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazumasa; Bacal, Julien; Desmarais, Damien; Padioleau, Ismaël; Tsaponina, Olga; Chabes, Andrei; Pantesco, Véronique; Dubois, Emeric; Parrinello, Hugues; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Lengronne, Armelle; Pasero, Philippe

    2014-05-22

    In S. cerevisiae, replication timing is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms restricting the accessibility of origins to limiting initiation factors. About 30% of these origins are located within repetitive DNA sequences such as the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, but their regulation is poorly understood. Here, we have investigated how histone deacetylases (HDACs) control the replication program in budding yeast. This analysis revealed that two HDACs, Rpd3 and Sir2, control replication timing in an opposite manner. Whereas Rpd3 delays initiation at late origins, Sir2 is required for the timely activation of early origins. Moreover, Sir2 represses initiation at rDNA origins, whereas Rpd3 counteracts this effect. Remarkably, deletion of SIR2 restored normal replication in rpd3Δ cells by reactivating rDNA origins. Together, these data indicate that HDACs control the replication timing program in budding yeast by modulating the ability of repeated origins to compete with single-copy origins for limiting initiation factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Voltage-gated sodium channels in taste bud cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Mark E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste bud cells transmit information regarding the contents of food from taste receptors embedded in apical microvilli to gustatory nerve fibers innervating basolateral membranes. In particular, taste cells depolarize, activate voltage-gated sodium channels, and fire action potentials in response to tastants. Initial cell depolarization is attributable to sodium influx through TRPM5 in sweet, bitter, and umami cells and an undetermined cation influx through an ion channel in sour cells expressing PKD2L1, a candidate sour taste receptor. The molecular identity of the voltage-gated sodium channels that sense depolarizing signals and subsequently initiate action potentials coding taste information to gustatory nerve fibers is unknown. Results We describe the molecular and histological expression profiles of cation channels involved in electrical signal transmission from apical to basolateral membrane domains. TRPM5 was positioned immediately beneath tight junctions to receive calcium signals originating from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation, while PKD2L1 was positioned at the taste pore. Using mouse taste bud and lingual epithelial cells collected by laser capture microdissection, SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel transcripts were expressed in taste tissue. SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A were expressed beneath tight junctions in subsets of taste cells. SCN3A and SCN9A were expressed in TRPM5 cells, while SCN2A was expressed in TRPM5 and PKD2L1 cells. HCN4, a gene previously implicated in sour taste, was expressed in PKD2L1 cells and localized to cell processes beneath the taste pore. Conclusion SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channels are positioned to sense initial depolarizing signals stemming from taste receptor activation and initiate taste cell action potentials. SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A gene products likely account for the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents in taste receptor cells.

  3. Scandinavian links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Knowles, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The European Round Table of Industrialists identified in the 1980ies 14 missing links in the transportation network of the continent. Three of them were found around the Danish island of Zealand. One link is within the nation, the other two are between nations. One link connects heavy economic....... They concentrate traffic flows and create strong transport corridors. They are the basis of new regional development regimes. “Ferries connect systems, fixed links unite systems”....

  4. Comprehensive transcriptome analyses reveal differential gene expression profiles of Camellia sinensis axillary buds at para-, endo-, ecodormancy, and bud flush stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter dormancy is an important biological feature for tea plant to survive cold winters, and it also affects the economic output of tea plant, one of the few woody plants in the world whose leaves are harvested and one of the few non-conifer evergreen species with characterized dormancies. To disco...

  5. Tumor Budding in Colorectal Carcinoma: Confirmation of Prognostic Significance and Histologic Cutoff in a Population-based Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rondell P; Vierkant, Robert A; Tillmans, Lori S; Wang, Alice H; Laird, Peter W; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Lynch, Charles F; French, Amy J; Slager, Susan L; Raissian, Yassaman; Garcia, Joaquin J; Kerr, Sarah E; Lee, Hee Eun; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Cerhan, James R; Limburg, Paul J; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2015-10-01

    Tumor budding in colorectal carcinoma has been associated with poor outcome in multiple studies, but the absence of an established histologic cutoff for "high" tumor budding, heterogeneity in study populations, and varying methods for assessing tumor budding have hindered widespread incorporation of this parameter in clinical reports. We used an established scoring system in a population-based cohort to determine a histologic cutoff for "high" tumor budding and confirm its prognostic significance. We retrieved hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections from 553 incident colorectal carcinoma cases. Each case was previously characterized for select molecular alterations and survival data. Interobserver agreement was assessed between 2 gastrointestinal pathologists and a group of 4 general surgical pathologists. High budding (≥ 10 tumor buds in a ×20 objective field) was present in 32% of cases, low budding in 46%, and no budding in 22%. High tumor budding was associated with advanced pathologic stage (P 2 times risk of cancer-specific death (hazard ratio = 2.57 [1.27, 5.19]). After multivariate adjustment, by penalized smoothing splines, we found increasing tumor bud counts from 5 upward to be associated with an increasingly shortened cancer-specific survival. By this method, a tumor bud count of 10 corresponded to approximately 2.5 times risk of cancer-specific death. The interobserver agreement was good with weighted κ of 0.70 for 2 gastrointestinal pathologists over 121 random cases and 0.72 between all 6 pathologists for 20 random cases. Using an established method to assess budding on routine histologic stains, we have shown that a cutoff of 10 for high tumor budding is independently associated with a significantly worse prognosis. The reproducibility data provide support for the routine widespread implementation of tumor budding in clinical reports.

  6. Arf3p GTPase is a key regulator of Bud2p activation for invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Lee, Fang-Jen S

    2013-08-01

    The regulation and signaling pathways involved in the invasive growth of yeast have been studied extensively because of their general applicability to fungal pathogenesis. Bud2p, which functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Bud1p/Rsr1p, is required for appropriate budding patterns and filamentous growth. The regulatory mechanisms leading to Bud2p activation, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we report that ADP-ribosylation factor 3p (Arf3p) acts as a regulator of Bud2p activation during invasive growth. Arf3p binds directly to the N-terminal region of Bud2p and promotes its GAP activity both in vitro and in vivo. Genetic analysis shows that deletion of BUD1 suppresses the defect of invasive growth in arf3Δ or bud2Δ cells. Lack of Arf3p, like that of Bud2p, causes the intracellular accumulation of Bud1p-GTP. The Arf3p-Bud2p interaction is important for invasive growth and facilitates the Bud2p-Bud1p association in vivo. Finally, we show that under glucose depletion-induced invasion conditions in yeast, more Arf3p is activated to the GTP-bound state, and the activation is independent of Arf3p guanine nucleotide-exchange factor Yel1p. Thus we demonstrate that a novel spatial activation of Arf3p plays a role in regulating Bud2p activation during glucose depletion-induced invasive growth.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of female and male flower buds of Idesia polycarpa Maxim. var. vestita Diels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanju Mei

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This work provides the first detailed transcriptome analysis of female and male flower of I. polycarpa and lays foundations for future studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying flower bud development of I. polycarpa.

  8. Ustawa budżetowa na 2016 rok – problematyka prawna

    OpenAIRE

    Borodo, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Ustawa budżetowa na 2016 r. ustala roczne dochody, wydatki, przychody, rozchody, koszty, wynagrodzenia, stawki należności, odpisy na fundusze. Ustalenia te dotyczą gospodarki finansowej rządu i innych części gospodarki finansowej państwa. Ustawa budżetowa zawiera postanowienia wynikające z wielu ustaw. Jest rozwinięciem lub wykonaniem uregulowań ujętych w całym ustawodawstwie. Ustawa budżetowa na 2016 r. zawiera trzy wymagane przez ustawę o finansach publicznych części: budżet, załączniki, in...

  9. Retained Cotton Bud-induced Severe Otitis Externa That Mimics Malignant Otitis Externa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Chae Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential complications of cotton bud use are not well known in the elderly population. Here, we presented a case of cotton bud misuse. An elderly man who had long-standing diabetes mellitus, chronic otorrhea, and right-sided otalgia was poorly responsive to empirical treatment at a primary hospital. He was misdiagnosed with malignant otitis externa and referred to a tertiary hospital. On treatment Day 7 at the tertiary hospital, when the swollen ear canal was somewhat resolved, a retained cotton swab was found in his ear canal. His symptoms rapidly resolved after removing the retained foreign body. A cotton bud can be retained as a foreign body in the ear canal. The guidance of health professionals is needed to clean the ear canal using cotton buds, especially for elderly patients with other chronic diseases.

  10. Breast bud detection: a validation study in the Chilean growth obesity cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana; Garmendia, María Luisa; González, Daniela; Kain, Juliana; Mericq, Verónica; Uauy, Ricardo; Corvalán, Camila

    2014-08-13

    Early puberty onset has been related to future chronic disease; however breast bud assessment in large scale population studies is difficult because it requires trained personnel. Thus our aim is to assess the validity of self and maternal breast bud detection, considering girl's body mass index (BMI) and maternal education. In 2010, 481 girls (mean age = 7.8) from the Growth and Obesity Chilean Cohort Study were evaluated by a nutritionist trained in breast bud detection. In addition, the girl(n = 481) and her mother(n = 341) classified the girl's breast development after viewing photographs of Tanner stages. Concordance between diagnostics was estimated (kappa, Spearman correlation) considering girls' BMI and mother's educational level. 14% of the girls presented breast buds and 43% had excess weight (BMI z-score > 1, World Health Organization 2007). Self-assessment showed low concordance with the evaluator (K puberty onset in epidemiological studies, particularly developing countries.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Sesquiterpenoids from Cassia Buds and Their Antimicrobial Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guoruoluo, Yindengzhi; Zhou, Haofeng; Zhou, Junfei; Zhao, Haiqing; Aisa, Haji Akber; Yao, Guangmin

    2017-07-19

    Cassia buds, the immature fruits of Cinnamomum cassia (Lauraceae), are widely consumed as a food spice, dietary supplements, flavoring agents, and preservatives. In this study, cassia buds were phytochemically investigated for the first time, leading to the isolation of 2 new sesquiterpenoids (1 and 2) and 10 known sesquiterpenoids (3-12). Their structures were determined by spectrometric and spectroscopic analyses, including nuclear magnetic resonance, high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism. Cinnamosim A (1) represents the ninth example of the rare cyperane-type sesquiterpenoids. All of the compounds (1-12) isolated from cassia buds were evaluated for antimicrobial activities, with compounds 1-3, 5-8, 11, and 12 exhibiting strong antimicrobial activities against Candida albicans and compounds 6, 7, and 11 showing moderate antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The present investigation indicated that sesquiterpenoids from cassia buds might be used as potential antimicrobial agents to preserve food.

  12. Identification of New Genes that Regulate Telomerase and Telomere Length in Budding Yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Otero, Joel

    2003-01-01

    In budding yeast, Cdc13 has both an essential function in chromosome end protection as well as a non-essential role in telomere replication, by mediating recruitment of telomerase to the chromosome end...

  13. Karyotypic Determinants of Chromosome Instability in Aneuploid Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, William D.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer cells and budding yeast demonstrated that aneuploidy, the state of having abnormal chromosome numbers, correlates with elevated chromosome instability (CIN), i.e. the propensity of gaining and losing chromosomes at a high frequency. Here we have investigated ploidy- and chromosome-specific determinants underlying aneuploidy-induced CIN by observing karyotype dynamics in fully isogenic aneuploid yeast strains with ploidies between 1N and 2N obtained through a random meiotic process. The aneuploid strains exhibited various levels of whole-chromosome instability (i.e. chromosome gains and losses). CIN correlates with cellular ploidy in an unexpected way: cells with a chromosomal content close to the haploid state are significantly more stable than cells displaying an apparent ploidy between 1.5 and 2N. We propose that the capacity for accurate chromosome segregation by the mitotic system does not scale continuously with an increasing number of chromosomes, but may occur via discrete steps each time a full set of chromosomes is added to the genome. On top of such general ploidy-related effect, CIN is also associated with the presence of specific aneuploid chromosomes as well as dosage imbalance between specific chromosome pairs. Our findings potentially help reconcile the divide between gene-centric versus genome-centric theories in cancer evolution. PMID:22615582

  14. A taste for ATP: neurotransmission in taste buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Not only is ATP a ubiquitous source of energy but it is also used widely as an intercellular signal. For example, keratinocytes release ATP in response to numerous external stimuli including pressure, heat, and chemical insult. The released ATP activates purinergic receptors on nerve fibers to generate nociceptive signals. The importance of an ATP signal in epithelial-to-neuronal signaling is nowhere more evident than in the taste system. The receptor cells of taste buds release ATP in response to appropriate stimulation by tastants and the released ATP then activates P2X2 and P2X3 receptors on the taste nerves. Genetic ablation of the relevant P2X receptors leaves an animal without the ability to taste any primary taste quality. Of interest is that release of ATP by taste receptor cells occurs in a non-vesicular fashion, apparently via gated membrane channels. Further, in keeping with the crucial role of ATP as a neurotransmitter in this system, a subset of taste cells expresses a specific ectoATPase, NTPDase2, necessary to clear extracellular ATP which otherwise will desensitize the P2X receptors on the taste nerves. The unique utilization of ATP as a key neurotransmitter in the taste system may reflect the epithelial rather than neuronal origins of the receptor cells. PMID:24385952

  15. A comprehensive model to predict mitotic division in budding yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Yadav, Vikas; Sridhar, Shreyas; Sreekumar, Lakshmi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Paul, Raja; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2015-11-05

    High-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division depends on a series of concerted interdependent interactions. Using a systems biology approach, we built a robust minimal computational model to comprehend mitotic events in dividing budding yeasts of two major phyla: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This model accurately reproduces experimental observations related to spindle alignment, nuclear migration, and microtubule (MT) dynamics during cell division in these yeasts. The model converges to the conclusion that biased nucleation of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) is essential for directional nuclear migration. Two distinct pathways, based on the population of cMTs and cortical dyneins, differentiate nuclear migration and spindle orientation in these two phyla. In addition, the model accurately predicts the contribution of specific classes of MTs in chromosome segregation. Thus we present a model that offers a wider applicability to simulate the effects of perturbation of an event on the concerted process of the mitotic cell division. © 2015 Sutradhar, Yadav, Sridhar, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Timing robustness in the budding and fission yeast cell cycles.

    KAUST Repository

    Mangla, Karan

    2010-02-01

    Robustness of biological models has emerged as an important principle in systems biology. Many past analyses of Boolean models update all pending changes in signals simultaneously (i.e., synchronously), making it impossible to consider robustness to variations in timing that result from noise and different environmental conditions. We checked previously published mathematical models of the cell cycles of budding and fission yeast for robustness to timing variations by constructing Boolean models and analyzing them using model-checking software for the property of speed independence. Surprisingly, the models are nearly, but not totally, speed-independent. In some cases, examination of timing problems discovered in the analysis exposes apparent inaccuracies in the model. Biologically justified revisions to the model eliminate the timing problems. Furthermore, in silico random mutations in the regulatory interactions of a speed-independent Boolean model are shown to be unlikely to preserve speed independence, even in models that are otherwise functional, providing evidence for selection pressure to maintain timing robustness. Multiple cell cycle models exhibit strong robustness to timing variation, apparently due to evolutionary pressure. Thus, timing robustness can be a basis for generating testable hypotheses and can focus attention on aspects of a model that may need refinement.

  17. Initiation of Begonia erythrophylla L. vitroculture from axillary buds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta - Emilia ROMOCEA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In our aim was to establish a short-term in vitro culture of Begonia erythrophylla L., different culture media compositions were tested: complex variants added with growth regulators and simplified modified media with Heller microelements and MS macroelements. Adventitious shoots elongating over 13 mm in length were efficiently obtained from axillary bud segments of the strain of begonia Begonia erythrophylla L. on MS basic mineral medium culture containing different concentration of growth regulators, in order to identify optimal culture conditions, which would facilitate the achievement of a vitroculture, allowing the in vitro culture of this studied species. On complex regeneration variant V1 – mineral basic medium culture MB - MS supplemented with 1 mg/l BA, the rooting process was absent, but according to this carried out research, plantlets were obtained by rooting the elongated shoots on Murashige-Skoog (1962 basic mineral media containing 1 mg/l IBA, respectively a basic mineral medium culture without growth regulators, producing a much better organogenesis, where the phenomenon was greater in rooting process.

  18. Characterization of Natural, Decellularized and Reseeded Porcine Tooth Bud Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traphagen, Samantha B.; Fourligas, Nikos; Xylas, Joanna; Sengupta, Sejuti; Kaplan, David; Georgakoudi, Irene; Yelick, Pamela C.

    2012-01-01

    Dental tissue engineering efforts have yet to identify scaffolds that instruct the formation of bioengineered teeth of predetermined size and shape. Here we investigated whether extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules present in natural tooth scaffolds can provide insight on how to achieve this goal. We describe methods to effectively decellularize and demineralize porcine molar tooth buds, while preserving natural ECM protein gradients. Natural tooth ECM composition was assessed using histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of fibrillar and basement membrane proteins. Our results showed that Collagen I, Fibronectin, Collagen IV, and Laminin gradients were detected in natural tooth tissues, and retained in decellularized samples. Second harmonic generation (SHG) image analysis and 3D reconstructions were used to show that natural tooth tissue exhibited higher collagen fiber density, and less oriented and less organized collagen fibers, as compared to decellularized tooth tissue. We also found that reseeded decellularized tooth scaffolds exhibited distinctive collagen content and organization as compared to decelluarized scaffolds. Our results show that SHG allows for quantitative assessment of ECM features that are not easily characterized using traditional histological analyses. In summary, our results demonstrate the potential for natural decellularized molar tooth ECM to instruct dental cell matrix synthesis, and lay the foundation for future use of biomimetic scaffolds for dental tissue engineering applications. PMID:22551485

  19. A physiologic role for serotonergic transmission in adult rat taste buds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Jaber

    Full Text Available Of the multiple neurotransmitters and neuropeptides expressed in the mammalian taste bud, serotonin remains both the most studied and least understood. Serotonin is expressed in a subset of taste receptor cells that form synapses with afferent nerve fibers (type III cells and was once thought to be essential to neurotransmission (now understood as purinergic. However, the discovery of the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor in a subset of taste receptor cells paracrine to type III cell suggested a role in cell-to-cell communication during the processing of taste information. Functional data describing this role are lacking. Using anatomical and neurophysiological techniques, this study proposes a modulatory role for serotonin during the processing of taste information. Double labeling immunocytochemical and single cell RT-PCR technique experiments documented that 5-HT1A-expressing cells co-expressed markers for type II cells, cells which express T1R or T2R receptors and release ATP. These cells did not co-express type III cells markers. Neurophysiological recordings from the chorda tympani nerve, which innervates anterior taste buds, were performed prior to and during intravenous injection of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. These experiments revealed that serotonin facilitates processing of taste information for tastants representing sweet, sour, salty, and bitter taste qualities. On the other hand, injection of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, was without effect. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that serotonin is a crucial element in a finely-tuned feedback loop involving the 5-HT1A receptor, ATP, and purinoceptors. It is hypothesized that serotonin facilitates gustatory signals by regulating the release of ATP through ATP-release channels possibly through phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate resynthesis. By doing so, 5-HT1A activation prevents desensitization of post-synaptic purinergic receptors expressed on afferent nerve fibers

  20. CG Methylation Covaries with Differential Gene Expression between Leaf and Floral Bud Tissues of Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyria Roessler

    Full Text Available DNA methylation has the potential to influence plant growth and development through its influence on gene expression. To date, however, the evidence from plant systems is mixed as to whether patterns of DNA methylation vary significantly among tissues and, if so, whether these differences affect tissue-specific gene expression. To address these questions, we analyzed both bisulfite sequence (BSseq and transcriptomic sequence data from three biological replicates of two tissues (leaf and floral bud from the model grass species Brachypodium distachyon. Our first goal was to determine whether tissues were more differentiated in DNA methylation than explained by variation among biological replicates. Tissues were more differentiated than biological replicates, but the analysis of replicated data revealed high (>50% false positive rates for the inference of differentially methylated sites (DMSs and differentially methylated regions (DMRs. Comparing methylation to gene expression, we found that differential CG methylation consistently covaried negatively with gene expression, regardless as to whether methylation was within genes, within their promoters or even within their closest transposable element. The relationship between gene expression and either CHG or CHH methylation was less consistent. In total, CG methylation in promoters explained 9% of the variation in tissue-specific expression across genes, suggesting that CG methylation is a minor but appreciable factor in tissue differentiation.

  1. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Beyer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step. The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away.

  2. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Ted

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step). The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away. PMID:27716774

  3. Partial repair of salinity-induced damage to sprouting sugarcane buds by proline and glycinebetaine pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Rizwan; Wahid, Abdul; Hussain, Iqbal; Mahmood, Saqib; Parveen, Abida

    2016-05-01

    Sugarcane shows reduced crop stand under relatively suboptimal conditions; the main reason for this is its sensitivity to ionic stress in the soil solution. This research was performed to explore some physiological and developmental changes in the immature sugarcane buds submitted to salt stress and possible role of glycinebetaine (GB) and proline (Pro) in mitigating the ion toxicity in a time course manner. Salinity stress reduced fresh and dry weight, induced the generation of hydrogen peroxide, increased tissue levels of Na(+) sand Cl(-), reduced K(+) and Ca(2+), and K(+):Na(+) and Ca(2+):Na(+) ratios, while increasing the osmolyte synthesis in expanding sugarcane buds. Salinity stress reduced and delayed the formation of new bud leaves and their expansion, which was mainly because of reduction in the number and area of mesophyll cells and poor development of vascular bundles. The pretreatment of bud chips with 20 mM each of GB and Pro decreased tissue levels of Na(+) and Cl(-), reduced the generation of H2O2, improved K(+) and Ca(2+), K(+):Na(+) and Ca(2+):Na(+) ratios, and further increased the levels of GB, free proline (FP), and soluble sugars in the buds. The pretreatment increased mesophyll cell number and expansion of bud leaves and formation of elaborated vascular tissues, which apparently enabled the sprouting buds to adapt to salinity stress. Of the two osmolytes, GB was a relatively better inducer of salinity tolerance than Pro. In short, salinity-induced oxidative stress was the main cause for altered tissue development, the production of which was offset by pretreatment of bud tissues with Pro and GB.

  4. Glutamate may be an efferent transmitter that elicits inhibition in mouse taste buds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijen A Huang

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that l-glutamate may be an efferent transmitter released from axons innervating taste buds. In this report, we determined the types of ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors present on taste cells and that underlie this postulated efferent transmission. We also studied what effect glutamate exerts on taste bud function. We isolated mouse taste buds and taste cells, conducted functional imaging using Fura 2, and used cellular biosensors to monitor taste-evoked transmitter release. The findings show that a large fraction of Presynaptic (Type III taste bud cells (∼50% respond to 100 µM glutamate, NMDA, or kainic acid (KA with an increase in intracellular Ca(2+. In contrast, Receptor (Type II taste cells rarely (4% responded to 100 µM glutamate. At this concentration and with these compounds, these agonists activate glutamatergic synaptic receptors, not glutamate taste (umami receptors. Moreover, applying glutamate, NMDA, or KA caused taste buds to secrete 5-HT, a Presynaptic taste cell transmitter, but not ATP, a Receptor cell transmitter. Indeed, glutamate-evoked 5-HT release inhibited taste-evoked ATP secretion. The findings are consistent with a role for glutamate in taste buds as an inhibitory efferent transmitter that acts via ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors.

  5. In vivo and ex vivo methods of growing a liver bud through tissue connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Yusuke; Nakayama, Koichi; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Enosawa, Shin; Tamura, Tadashi; Yoshimaru, Koichiro; Matsuura, Toshiharu; Hayashida, Makoto; Kohashi, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2017-10-26

    Cell-based therapy has been proposed as an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. The novel transplantation of an in vitro-generated liver bud might have therapeutic potential. In vivo and ex vivo methods for growing a liver bud are essential for paving the way for the clinical translation of liver bud transplantation. We herein report a novel transplantation method for liver buds that are grown in vivo involving orthotopic transplantation on the transected parenchyma of the liver, which showed long engraftment and marked growth in comparison to heterotopic transplantation. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a method for rapidly fabricating scalable liver-like tissue by fusing hundreds of liver bud-like spheroids using a 3D bioprinter. Its system to fix the shape of the 3D tissue with the needle-array system enabled the fabrication of elaborate geometry and the immediate execution of culture circulation after 3D printing-thereby avoiding an ischemic environment ex vivo. The ex vivo-fabricated human liver-like tissue exhibited self-tissue organization ex vivo and engraftment on the liver of nude rats. These achievements conclusively show both in vivo and ex vivo methods for growing in vitro-generated liver buds. These methods provide a new approach for in vitro-generated liver organoids transplantation.

  6. Circulating cytokeratin-positive cells and tumor budding in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märkl, Bruno; Wilhelms, Narjes; Anthuber, Matthias; Schenkirsch, Gerhard; Schlimok, Günter; Oruzio, Daniel

    2016-12-10

    To investigate whether circulating cytokeratin-positive (CK(+)) cells in the mesenteric blood of resected colorectal specimens are prognostic and correlate with tumor budding. Fifty-six colorectal specimens were collected between 9/2007 and 7/2008. Blood from the mesenteric vein was drawn immediately after receiving the fresh and unfixed specimens in the pathology department. After separation of the mononuclear cells by Ficoll-Hypaque density-gradient centrifugation, cytological smears were immunocytochemically stained for CK18. Tumor budding was evaluated on slides stained for pan-cytokeratin. The identification of ≥ 30 buds/1.3 mm(2) was defined as high grade budding. CK(+) cells and clusters were identified in 29 (48%) and 14 (25%) of the samples, respectively. Two cells were identified in one of three non-malignant cases. Clusters were found exclusively in malignant cases. The occurrence of CK(+) cells or clusters was not associated with any of the evaluated clinicopathological factors, including surgical technique and tumor budding. Moreover, the occurrence of CK(+) cells or clusters had no influence on the cancer-specific survival [75 mo (CI: 61; 88) vs 83 mo (CI: 72; 95) and 80 mo (CI: 63; 98) vs 79 mo (CI: 69; 89), respectively]. CK(+) cells and showed neither prognostic significance nor an association with tumor budding. It is very likely that CK18-staining is not specific enough to identify the relevant cells.

  7. Tumor Budding in Intestinal Type Gastric Adenocarcinoma is Associated with Nodal Metastasis and Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Stephen; Linda, Jin; Fields, Ryan C; Yan, Yan; Nalbantoglu, ILKe

    2017-04-17

    Gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) is a common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. GAC can be classified as intestinal or diffuse. Intestinal type cancers are common and reported to have a better prognosis compared to diffuse cancers. Studies have shown the presence and amount of tumor budding in intestinal carcinomas of the colon and esophagus to predict nodal metastasis and recurrence. Our aim is to determine if tumor budding in intestinal type GAC correlates with prognostic features. One hundred four patients treated with primary surgical excision between 1999-2013 were identified. Histologic type (intestinal, diffuse, or mixed), tumor grade, T-stage, and lymph node status were evaluated. Tumor bud scores were assigned to all intestinal type cancers using methods previously described for colorectal adenocarcinoma. Scores of Tumor characteristics were as follows: 52 intestinal (50%), 36 diffuse (35%) and 16 mixed (15%). Of the 52 cases with intestinal histology, 4 were well (8%), 28 were moderately (54%), and 20 were poorly differentiated (38%). Thirty-three (63%) of the intestinal tumors had high tumor bud scores. Cases with high scores were associated with higher T-stage, N-stage, and grade (Ptumor bud scores in intestinal type GAC have higher T-stage, N-stage, grade, and likelihood of recurrence. Assessment of tumor budding may guide clinical management in a subset of patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. High-Grade Tumor Budding Stratifies Early-Stage Cervical Cancer with Recurrence Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bangxing; Cai, Jing; Xu, Xia; Guo, Shuang; Wang, Zehua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated prognostic significance of tumor budding in early-stage cervical cancer (ESCC) following radical surgery and its contribution to improve the stratification of patients with recurrence risk. The archival medical records and H&E-stained slides of 643 patients with IA2-IIA stage cervical cancer who underwent radical surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Clinicopathological parameters were noted, and tumor buds were counted using immunohistochemistry for each case. The prognostic significance of tumor budding was analyzed. Prediction models that comprised tumor budding were established, and the performance was compared between the novel models and classic criteria via log-rank test and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Tumors with high-grade tumor budding (HTB) exhibited a substantially increased risk of recurrence (hazard ratio = 4.287, P tumor size ≥ 4 cm, deep stromal invasion of outer 1/3, and lymphovascular space invasion to stratify patients with an intermediate risk was most predictive of recurrence compared with the classic criteria. Tumor budding is an independent, unfavorable, prognostic factor for ESCC patients following radical surgery and holds promise for improved recurrence risk stratification.

  9. Tumor Budding Is Independently Predictive for Lymph Node Involvement in Early Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulluoglu, Mine; Yegen, Gulcin; Ozluk, Yasemin; Keskin, Metin; Dogan, Serap; Gundogdu, Gökçen; Onder, Semen; Balik, Emre

    2015-08-01

    The most important prognostic factor for early gastric cancer (EGC) is the lymph node status. It is important to predict early lesions without lymph node metastasis (LNM) before proceeding to radical surgery in locally excised lesions. Tumor budding is a feature known to be related to aggressive tumor behavior in several solid tumors. We aimed to assess the predictive value of tumor budding for LNM in pT1a and pT1b gastric cancer. We retrospectively investigated radical gastrectomy specimens for of 126 EGC patients and assess the possible relation between the clinicopathologic features, including age, gender, tumor location, tumor size, macroscopic tumor type, histologic differentiation, depth and width of submucosal invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and tumor budding with lymph node involvement. Among the 126 EGCs, 38 were stages as pT1a and 88 as pT1b. LNM rate in pT1a tumors was 13% whereas it was 33% in pT1b tumors. Tumor budding was the only factor significantly and independently related to LNM in pT1a patients. Female gender and tumor budding were found to be independent risk factors in pT1b group. Other clinicopathologic features were not related to LNM. Based on these results, we suggest that budding is a promising parameter to assess for prediction of LNM in EGC removed by endoscopic surgery, and to decide on the appropriate surgical approach. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Identification of genes associated with bud dormancy release in Prunus persica by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leida, Carmen; Terol, Javier; Martí, Gracia; Agustí, Manuel; Llácer, Gerardo; Badenes, María Luisa; Ríos, Gabino

    2010-05-01

    To better understand the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying maintenance and release of seasonal bud dormancy in perennial trees, we identified differentially expressed genes during dormancy progression in reproductive buds from peach (Prunus persica [L.] Batsch) by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and microarray hybridization. Four SSH libraries were constructed, which were respectively enriched in cDNA highly expressed in dormant buds (named DR), in dormancy-released buds (RD) and in the cultivars with different chilling requirement, 'Zincal 5' (ZS) and 'Springlady' (SZ), sampled after dormancy release. About 2500 clones picked from the four libraries were loaded on a glass microarray. Hybridization of microarrays with the final products of SSH procedure was performed in order to validate the selected clones that were effectively enriched in their respective sample. Nearly 400 positive clones were sequenced, which corresponded to 101 different unigenes with diverse functional annotation. We obtained DAM4, 5 and 6 genes coding for MADS-box transcription factors previously related to growth cessation and terminal bud formation in the evergrowing mutant of peach. Several other cDNAs are similar to dormancy factors described in other species, and others have been related to bud dormancy for the first time in this study. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed differential expression of cDNAs coding for a Zn-finger transcription factor, a GRAS-like regulator, a DNA-binding protein and proteins similar to forisome subunits involved in the reversible occlusion of sieve elements in Fabaceae, among others.

  11. [Research of the amounts of flavonoids accumulated in the buds of single-styled hawthorn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakstas, Valdas; Janulis, Valdimaras; Labokas, Juozas

    2004-01-01

    To determine the amounts of flavonoids accumulated in the buds of single-styled hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.); and to establish the possibility of usage of hawthorn buds in pharmacy practice. Different examples of hawthorn buds collected in 2001, 2002 and 2003 from some Lithuanian regions: Akmene (V1, V2, V3), Kedainiai (S1, S2, S3), Klaipeda (M1), Lazdijai (D1, D2, D3) and Vilnius (VL1, VL2) from branches of lower storey. Examples were extracted with ethanol and flavonoids were measured by spectroscopic method and by high performance liquid chromatography. From 0.72 to 1.89% of flavonoids are found in the hawthorn buds. The dominating flavonoid is vitexin-2-O-rhamnosid (6.72-10.91 milligrams in one gram of dried crude drug). Other flavonoids are: vitexin: 0.88-6.53 milligrams/gram, hyperosid: 0.85-2.70 milligrams/gram, rutin: 0.72-2.10 milligrams/gram and quercitrin: 0.82-1.01 milligrams/gram. The marks of phytochemical compounds of Lithuanian single-styled hawthorn buds corroborated the theory of possibility to use hawthorn buds as pharmaceutical crude drug and form sufficient ground for planning phytochemical and pharmacological researches of new hawthorn crude drug.

  12. Cell morphology, budding propensity and cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at high hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Lewis, Jeffrey; Kumar, Pradeep

    A large biomass on earth thrives in extremes of physical and chemical conditions including high pressure and temperature. Budding yeast, S. cerevisiae, is a eukaryotic model organism due to its amenability to molecular biology tools. To understand the effects of hydrostatic pressure on a eukaryotic cell, we have performed quantitative experiments of the growth, the propensity of budding, and cell death of S. cerevisiae in a wide range of pressures. An automated image analysis method for the quantification of the budding index was developed and applied along with a continuum model of budding to investigate the effects of pressure on cell division and cell morphology. We find that the growth, the budding propensity, the average cell size, and the ellipticity of the cells decrease with increasing pressure. Furthermore, large hydrostatic pressure led to the small but finite probability of cell death. Our experiments suggest that the decrease of budding propensity arises from cellular arrest at the cell cycle checkpoints during different stages of cell division.

  13. Effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Shigeki; Naruse, Yujiro; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2010-12-01

    The effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of single yeast cells was investigated using a magnetic circuit that was capable of generating a strong magnetic field (2.93 T) and gradient (6100 T²  m⁻¹). Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells were grown in an aqueous YPD agar in a silica capillary under either a homogeneous or inhomogeneous static magnetic field. Although the size of budding yeast cells was only slightly affected by the magnetic fields after 4 h, the budding angle was clearly affected by the direction of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the homogeneous magnetic field, the budding direction of daughter yeast cells was mainly oriented in the direction of magnetic field B. However, when subjected to the inhomogeneous magnetic field, the daughter yeast cells tended to bud along the axis of capillary flow in regions where the magnetic gradient, estimated by B(dB/dx), were high. Based on the present experimental results, the possible mechanism for the magnetic effect on the budding direction of daughter yeast cells is theoretically discussed. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Influence of the bud neck on nuclear envelope fission in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloy, Patricia G; Rose, Mark D

    2017-09-15

    Studies have shown that nuclear envelope fission (karyokinesis) in budding yeast depends on cytokinesis, but not distinguished whether this was a direct requirement, indirect, because of cell cycle arrest, or due to bud neck-localized proteins impacting both processes. To determine the requirements for karyokinesis, we examined mutants conditionally defective for bud emergence and/or nuclear migration. The common mutant phenotype was completion of the nuclear division cycle within the mother cell, but karyokinesis did not occur. In the cdc24 swe1 mutant, at the non-permissive temperature, multiple nuclei accumulated within the unbudded cell, with connected nuclear envelopes. Upon return to the permissive temperature, the cdc24 swe1 mutant initiated bud emergence, but only the nucleus spanning the neck underwent fission suggesting that the bud neck region is important for fission initiation. The neck may be critical for either mechanical reasons, as the contractile ring might facilitate fission, or for regulatory reasons, as the site of a protein network regulating nuclear envelope fission, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis. We also found that 77-85% of pairs of septin mutant nuclei completed nuclear envelope fission. In addition, 27% of myo1Δ mutant nuclei completed karyokinesis. These data suggested that fission is not dependent on mechanical contraction at the bud neck, but was instead controlled by regulatory proteins there. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. First report on an X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia family with X chromosome inversion: Breakpoint mapping reveals the pathogenic mechanism and preimplantation genetics diagnosis achieves an unaffected birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tonghua; Yin, Biao; Zhu, Yuanchang; Li, Guangui; Ye, Lijun; Liang, Desheng; Zeng, Yong

    2017-10-14

    To investigate the etiology of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) in a family with an inversion of the X chromosome [inv(X)(p21q13)] and to achieve a healthy birth following preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Next generation sequencing (NGS) and Sanger sequencing analysis were carried out to define the inversion breakpoint. Multiple displacement amplification, amplification of breakpoint junction fragments, Sanger sequencing of exon 1 of ED1, haplotyping of informative short tandem repeat markers and gender determination were performed for PGD. NGS data of the proband sample revealed that the size of the possible inverted fragment was over 42Mb, spanning from position 26, 814, 206 to position 69, 231, 915 on the X chromosome. The breakpoints were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. A total of 5 blastocyst embryos underwent trophectoderm biopsy. Two embryos were diagnosed as carriers and three were unaffected. Two unaffected blastocysts were transferred and a singleton pregnancy was achieved. Following confirmation by prenatal diagnosis, a healthy baby was delivered. This is the first report of an XLHED family with inv(X). ED1 is disrupted by the X chromosome inversion in this XLHED family and embryos with the X chromosomal abnormality can be accurately identified by means of PGD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. EVALUATION OF THE LEAVE AND BUD DECOCTIONS PINUS HALEPENSIS MILL EFFECTS ON THE INDUCED-PHENOL RENAL TOXICITY IN WISTAR RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berroukche

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pinus halepensis M. (Pinaceae has done object many indications in traditional medicine. Several studies have demonstrated a protective activity of essential oils extracted from various plant species against renal toxicity induced by chemicals in the animal model. The objective of this study is to assess the anti toxic effects of decocted leaves and buds of Pinus halepensis M. on Wistar rats initially exposed to phenol C6H5OH (180 mg / kg body weight. The results of laboratory analyzes of biochemical parameters revealed that decocted leaves and buds (250 mg / kg body weight have shown a highly significant antitoxic activity (p < 0,001. The protective effect of decocted leaves and buds were respectively expressed by a decrease in serum concentrations of biochemical markers urea ( 0,32 and 0,28 g/l and creatinine ( 121 & 13,8 g / l and electrolyte Calcium ( 89,8 & 109,5 g / l , Potassium ( 7 & 6,6 g / l and Sodium ( 130,5 & 129,6 g / l .

  17. Identification of duplicated and stress-inducible Aox2b gene co-expressed with Aox1 in species of the Medicago genus reveals a regulation linked to gene rearrangement in leguminous genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, João Henrique Frota; Oliveira, Georgia Mesquita; Saraiva, Kátia Daniella da Cruz; Torquato, José Pedro Pires; Maia, Ivan G; de Melo, Dirce Fernandes; Costa, José Hélio

    2013-12-15

    In flowering plants, alternative oxidase (Aox) is encoded by 3-5 genes distributed in 2 subfamilies (Aox1 and Aox2). In several species only Aox1 is reported as a stress-responsive gene, but in the leguminous Vigna unguiculata Aox2b is also induced by stress. In this work we investigated the Aox genes from two leguminous species of the Medicago genus (Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula) which present one Aox1, one Aox2a and an Aox2b duplication (named here Aox2b1 and Aox2b2). Expression analyses by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in M. sativa revealed that Aox1, Aox2b1 and Aox2b2 transcripts increased during seed germination. Similar analyses in leaves and roots under different treatments (SA, PEG, H2O2 and cysteine) revealed that these genes are also induced by stress, but with peculiar spatio-temporal differences. Aox1 and Aox2b1 showed basal levels of expression under control conditions and were induced by stress in leaves and roots. Aox2b2 presented a dual behavior, i.e., it was expressed only under stress conditions in leaves, and showed basal expression levels in roots that were induced by stress. Moreover, Aox2a was expressed at higher levels in leaves and during seed germination than in roots and appeared to be not responsive to stress. The Aox expression profiles obtained from a M. truncatula microarray dataset also revealed a stress-induced co-expression of Aox1, Aox2b1 and Aox2b2 in leaves and roots. These results reinforce the stress-inducible co-expression of Aox1/Aox2b in some leguminous plants. Comparative genomic analysis indicates that this regulation is linked to Aox1/Aox2b proximity in the genome as a result of the gene rearrangement that occurred in some leguminous plants during evolution. The differential expression of Aox2b1/2b2 suggests that a second gene has been originated by recent gene duplication with neofunctionalization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure of the Bro1 domain protein BROX and functional analyses of the ALIX Bro1 domain in HIV-1 budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Qianting; Landesman, Michael B; Robinson, Howard; Sundquist, Wesley I; Hill, Christopher P

    2011-01-01

    Bro1 domains are elongated, banana-shaped domains that were first identified in the yeast ESCRT pathway protein, Bro1p. Humans express three Bro1 domain-containing proteins: ALIX, BROX, and HD-PTP, which function in association with the ESCRT pathway to help mediate intraluminal vesicle formation at multivesicular bodies, the abscission stage of cytokinesis, and/or enveloped virus budding. Human Bro1 domains share the ability to bind the CHMP4 subset of ESCRT-III proteins, associate with the HIV-1 NC(Gag) protein, and stimulate the budding of viral Gag proteins. The curved Bro1 domain structure has also been proposed to mediate membrane bending. To date, crystal structures have only been available for the related Bro1 domains from the Bro1p and ALIX proteins, and structures of additional family members should therefore aid in the identification of key structural and functional elements. We report the crystal structure of the human BROX protein, which comprises a single Bro1 domain. The Bro1 domains from BROX, Bro1p and ALIX adopt similar overall structures and share two common exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Surface 1 is located on the concave face and forms the CHMP4 binding site, whereas Surface 2 is located at the narrow end of the domain. The structures differ in that only ALIX has an extended loop that projects away from the convex face to expose the hydrophobic Phe105 side chain at its tip. Functional studies demonstrated that mutations in Surface 1, Surface 2, or Phe105 all impair the ability of ALIX to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Our studies reveal similarities in the overall folds and hydrophobic protein interaction sites of different Bro1 domains, and show that a unique extended loop contributes to the ability of ALIX to function in HIV-1 budding.

  19. Structure of the Bro1 domain protein BROX and functional analyses of the ALIX Bro1 domain in HIV-1 budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianting Zhai

    Full Text Available Bro1 domains are elongated, banana-shaped domains that were first identified in the yeast ESCRT pathway protein, Bro1p. Humans express three Bro1 domain-containing proteins: ALIX, BROX, and HD-PTP, which function in association with the ESCRT pathway to help mediate intraluminal vesicle formation at multivesicular bodies, the abscission stage of cytokinesis, and/or enveloped virus budding. Human Bro1 domains share the ability to bind the CHMP4 subset of ESCRT-III proteins, associate with the HIV-1 NC(Gag protein, and stimulate the budding of viral Gag proteins. The curved Bro1 domain structure has also been proposed to mediate membrane bending. To date, crystal structures have only been available for the related Bro1 domains from the Bro1p and ALIX proteins, and structures of additional family members should therefore aid in the identification of key structural and functional elements.We report the crystal structure of the human BROX protein, which comprises a single Bro1 domain. The Bro1 domains from BROX, Bro1p and ALIX adopt similar overall structures and share two common exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Surface 1 is located on the concave face and forms the CHMP4 binding site, whereas Surface 2 is located at the narrow end of the domain. The structures differ in that only ALIX has an extended loop that projects away from the convex face to expose the hydrophobic Phe105 side chain at its tip. Functional studies demonstrated that mutations in Surface 1, Surface 2, or Phe105 all impair the ability of ALIX to stimulate HIV-1 budding.Our studies reveal similarities in the overall folds and hydrophobic protein interaction sites of different Bro1 domains, and show that a unique extended loop contributes to the ability of ALIX to function in HIV-1 budding.

  20. Structure of the Bro1 Domain Protein BROX and Functional Analyses of the ALIX Bro1 Domain in HIV-1 Budding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai Q.; Robinson H.; Landesman M. B.; Sundquist W. I.; Hill C. P.

    2011-12-01

    Bro1 domains are elongated, banana-shaped domains that were first identified in the yeast ESCRT pathway protein, Bro1p. Humans express three Bro1 domain-containing proteins: ALIX, BROX, and HD-PTP, which function in association with the ESCRT pathway to help mediate intraluminal vesicle formation at multivesicular bodies, the abscission stage of cytokinesis, and/or enveloped virus budding. Human Bro1 domains share the ability to bind the CHMP4 subset of ESCRT-III proteins, associate with the HIV-1 NC{sup Gag} protein, and stimulate the budding of viral Gag proteins. The curved Bro1 domain structure has also been proposed to mediate membrane bending. To date, crystal structures have only been available for the related Bro1 domains from the Bro1p and ALIX proteins, and structures of additional family members should therefore aid in the identification of key structural and functional elements. We report the crystal structure of the human BROX protein, which comprises a single Bro1 domain. The Bro1 domains from BROX, Bro1p and ALIX adopt similar overall structures and share two common exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Surface 1 is located on the concave face and forms the CHMP4 binding site, whereas Surface 2 is located at the narrow end of the domain. The structures differ in that only ALIX has an extended loop that projects away from the convex face to expose the hydrophobic Phe105 side chain at its tip. Functional studies demonstrated that mutations in Surface 1, Surface 2, or Phe105 all impair the ability of ALIX to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Our studies reveal similarities in the overall folds and hydrophobic protein interaction sites of different Bro1 domains, and show that a unique extended loop contributes to the ability of ALIX to function in HIV-1 budding.

  1. Operative Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Højlund, Holger

    2012-01-01

    educational goals, learning content, or value clarification. Health pedagogy is often a matter of retrospective rationalization rather than the starting point of planning. Health and risk behaviour approaches override health educational approaches. Conclusions: Operational links between health education......, health professionalism, and management strategies pose the foremost challenge. Operational links indicates cooperative levels that facilitate a creative and innovative effort across traditional professional boundaries. It is proposed that such links are supported by network structures, shared semantics...

  2. Triterpenoid saponins from the buds of Lonicera similis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Zou, Li-Hua; He, Yu-Lin; Peng, Cheng; Guo, Li; Xiong, Liang

    2017-11-30

    Four new lupane triterpenoid saponins, along with one known lupane and eight hederagenin saponins, were isolated from the EtOH extract of the buds of Lonicera similis Hemsl. The structures of the new compounds were established as 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl 23-hydroxybetulinic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (lonisimilioside A, 1), 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl 23-hydroxybetulinic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (lonisimilioside B, 2), 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl betulinic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (lonisimilioside C, 3) and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl betulinic acid 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (lonisimilioside D, 4), respectively. The cytotoxic activities of the isolates against human cancer cell lines HepG2, MCF-7 and A-549 were evaluated. Only the monodesmosidic saponin with a free carboxyl group at C-28 (12) exhibited significant cytotoxicities against HepG2, MCF-7 and A-549 cell lines with the IC 50 values of 8.98 ± 0.19, 12.48 ± 0.45 and 11.62 ± 0.54 μM, respectively. Furthermore, Hoechst fluorescence 33342 staining was used to demonstrate that 12 could induce HepG2 and A-549 cells apoptosis significantly.

  3. Origin of irreversibility of cell cycle start in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Charvin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Budding yeast cells irreversibly commit to a new division cycle at a regulatory transition called Start. This essential decision-making step involves the activation of the SBF/MBF transcription factors. SBF/MBF promote expression of the G1 cyclins encoded by CLN1 and CLN2. Cln1,2 can activate their own expression by inactivating the Whi5 repressor of SBF/MBF. The resulting transcriptional positive feedback provides an appealing, but as yet unproven, candidate for generating irreversibility of Start. Here, we investigate the logic of the Start regulatory module by quantitative single-cell time-lapse microscopy, using strains in which expression of key regulators is efficiently controlled by changes of inducers in a microfluidic chamber. We show that Start activation is ultrasensitive to G1 cyclin. In the absence of CLN1,2-dependent positive feedback, we observe that Start transit is reversible, due to reactivation of the Whi5 transcriptional repressor. Introduction of the positive feedback loop makes Whi5 inactivation and Start activation irreversible, which therefore guarantees unidirectional entry into S phase. A simple mathematical model to describe G1 cyclin turn on at Start, entirely constrained by empirically measured parameters, shows that the experimentally measured ultrasensitivity and transcriptional positive feedback are necessary and sufficient dynamical characteristics to make the Start transition a bistable and irreversible switch. Our study thus demonstrates that Start irreversibility is a property that arises from the architecture of the system (Whi5/SBF/Cln2 loop, rather than the consequence of the regulation of a single component (e.g., irreversible protein degradation.

  4. Systems Level Modeling of the Cell Cycle Using Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Kim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in the regulation of the cell cycle are highly conserved across all eukaryotes, and so a relatively simple eukaryote such as yeast can provide insight into a variety of cell cycle perturbations including those that occur in human cancer. To date, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has provided the largest amount of experimental and modeling data on the progression of the cell cycle, making it a logical choice for in-depth studies of this process. Moreover, the advent of methods for collection of high-throughput genome, transcriptome, and proteome data has provided a means to collect and precisely quantify simultaneous cell cycle gene transcript and protein levels, permitting modeling of the cell cycle on the systems level. With the appropriate mathematical framework and suffi cient and accurate data on cell cycle components, it should be possible to create a model of the cell cycle that not only effectively describes its operation, but can also predict responses to perturbations such as variation in protein levels and responses to external stimuli including targeted inhibition by drugs. In this review, we summarize existing data on the yeast cell cycle, proteomics technologies for quantifying cell cycle proteins, and the mathematical frameworks that can integrate this data into representative and effective models. Systems level modeling of the cell cycle will require the integration of high-quality data with the appropriate mathematical framework, which can currently be attained through the combination of dynamic modeling based on proteomics data and using yeast as a model organism.

  5. Local adaptations and climate change: converging sensitivity of bud break in black spruce provenances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    Species with transcontinental distribution or spread over wide geographical regions develop populations with growth traits genetically adapted to the local climate. The aim of this study was to investigate the ecotypic sensitivity of bud break, a strong adaptive trait, to a changing environment. Six phenological phases of bud break were monitored daily on black spruce [ Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP] seedlings submitted to different temperatures (12, 16 and 20 °C) and photoperiods (14, 18 and 22 h). Six provenances were tested in growth chambers, produced from seeds collected along the whole latitudinal range of the closed boreal forest in Quebec, Canada. Bud break lasted 13.3 days on average and occurred earlier in seedlings from colder sites. The annual temperature of the sites suitably tracked the clinal variation among ecotypes, providing a clear biological explanation for the environmental signal driving the adaptive divergence of populations to the local climate. Increasing temperature induced an earlier bud break according to a non-linear pattern with greater advancements observed between 12 and 16 °C. Photoperiod was significant, but sensitivity analysis indicated that its effect on bud break was marginal with respect to temperature. No interaction of provenance × treatment was observed, demonstrating an ecotypic convergence of the responses to both factors. Changes in the growing conditions could substantially modify the synchronization between bud phenology and climate, thus exposing the developing meristems of black spruce to frost damage. However, similar advancements of bud break could be expected in the different ecotypes subjected to warmer temperatures or longer day lengths.

  6. Bud development in corydalis (Corydalis bracteata) requires low temperature: a study of developmental and carbohydrate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodorova, Nadejda V.; Miroslavov, Evgeniy A.; Shavarda, Alexey L.; Laberche, Jean-Claude; Boitel-Conti, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Spring geophytes require a period of low temperature for proper flower development but the mechanism that underlies the relationship between cold treatment and flowering remains unknown. The present study aims to compare the developmental anatomy and carbohydrate content of the tuberous geophyte Corydalis bracteata growing under natural winter conditions from 10 to −10 °C (field-grown) and under a mild temperature regime of 18 °C (indoor-grown plants). Methods Samples were studied under light and electron microscopy. A histochemical test (periodic acid – Schiff's) was employed to identify starch in sectioned material. Sugars were analysed by capillary gas chromatography. Apoplastic wash fluid was prepared. Key Results Under natural conditions, shoots were elongated, and buds gained in dry mass and developed normally. For indoor-grown plants, these parameters were lower in value and, from December, a progressive necrosis of flower buds was observed. The tuber consisted of the new developing one, which was connected to the bud, and the old tuber with its starch reserve. Due to the absence of plasmodesmata between new and old tuber cells, sugar transport cannot be through the symplast. Thus, a potential apoplastic route is proposed from old tuber phloem parenchyma cells to the adjacent new tuber cells. Sugar content in buds during the autumn months (September–November) was lower for indoor-grown plants than control plants, whereas the sugar content in tubers during the same period was similar for plants from both temperature treatments. However, the amount of apoplastic sugars in tubers of field-grown plants was almost 15-fold higher than in indoor-grown tubers. Conclusions The results suggest that low temperature activates the apoplastic route of sugar transport in C. bracteata tubers and a consequent carbohydrate delivery to the bud. In the absence of cold treatment, the carbohydrate reserve is locked in old tuber cells so the nutrient

  7. Functional interchangeability of late domains, late domain cofactors and ubiquitin in viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zhadina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The membrane scission event that separates nascent enveloped virions from host cell membranes often requires the ESCRT pathway, which can be engaged through the action of peptide motifs, termed late (L- domains, in viral proteins. Viral PTAP and YPDL-like L-domains bind directly to the ESCRT-I and ALIX components of the ESCRT pathway, while PPxY motifs bind Nedd4-like, HECT-domain containing, ubiquitin ligases (e.g. WWP1. It has been unclear precisely how ubiquitin ligase recruitment ultimately leads to particle release. Here, using a lysine-free viral Gag protein derived from the prototypic foamy virus (PFV, where attachment of ubiquitin to Gag can be controlled, we show that several different HECT domains can replace the WWP1 HECT domain in chimeric ubiquitin ligases and drive budding. Moreover, artificial recruitment of isolated HECT domains to Gag is sufficient to stimulate budding. Conversely, the HECT domain becomes dispensable if the other domains of WWP1 are directly fused to an ESCRT-1 protein. In each case where budding is driven by a HECT domain, its catalytic activity is essential, but Gag ubiquitination is dispensable, suggesting that ubiquitin ligation to trans-acting proteins drives budding. Paradoxically, however, we also demonstrate that direct fusion of a ubiquitin moiety to the C-terminus of PFV Gag can also promote budding, suggesting that ubiquitination of Gag can substitute for ubiquitination of trans-acting proteins. Depletion of Tsg101 and ALIX inhibits budding that is dependent on ubiquitin that is fused to Gag, or ligated to trans-acting proteins through the action of a PPxY motif. These studies underscore the flexibility in the ways that the ESCRT pathway can be engaged, and suggest a model in which the identity of the protein to which ubiquitin is attached is not critical for subsequent recruitment of ubiquitin-binding components of the ESCRT pathway and viral budding to proceed.

  8. Modeling of bud break of Scots pine in northern Finland in 1908–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Hannu; Jalkanen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Bud break and height-growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the northern boreal zone in Lapland, Finland, was followed through the entire growing seasons in the periods 2001–2003 and 2008–2010 in sapling stands in two different locations in northern Finland set some 250 km apart along a latitudinal transect. Field measurements continued at the southern site also in 2011–2013. Air temperature was recorded hourly at the sites. A simple optimization algorithm (GA) was used to adjust parameters of the models predicting the timing of bud break of Scots pine in order to minimize the difference between observed and predicted dates. The models giving the best performance and century-long daily temperatures were used to reconstruct bud-break time series. The temperature observations were recorded for the period 1908–2014 in Sodankylä, which is located in-between the sapling stands in the north–south direction and for the period 1877–2014 in Karasjok, which is in Norway about 145 km north–west from the northernmost stand of this study. On average buds began to extend in the beginning of May in the southernmost stand and in mid-May in the northernmost stands, and the variation between years was in the range of 3 weeks. A simple day-length-triggered (fixed date) model predicted most accurately the date of bud break; root mean square error (RMSE) was 2 and 4 days in the northern and southern site, respectively. The reconstructed bud-break series indicated that based on temperature observations from Sodankylä, growth onset of Scots pine has clearly advanced since the 1960s, though it currently matches that of the early 1920s and early 1950s. The temperature record from Karasjok indicated a similar variation, though there was a weak linear trend advancing bud break by about 3–4 days over a 100-year period. PMID:25798141

  9. Modeling of bud break of Scots pine in northern Finland in 1908-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Hannu; Jalkanen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Bud break and height-growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the northern boreal zone in Lapland, Finland, was followed through the entire growing seasons in the periods 2001-2003 and 2008-2010 in sapling stands in two different locations in northern Finland set some 250 km apart along a latitudinal transect. Field measurements continued at the southern site also in 2011-2013. Air temperature was recorded hourly at the sites. A simple optimization algorithm (GA) was used to adjust parameters of the models predicting the timing of bud break of Scots pine in order to minimize the difference between observed and predicted dates. The models giving the best performance and century-long daily temperatures were used to reconstruct bud-break time series. The temperature observations were recorded for the period 1908-2014 in Sodankylä, which is located in-between the sapling stands in the north-south direction and for the period 1877-2014 in Karasjok, which is in Norway about 145 km north-west from the northernmost stand of this study. On average buds began to extend in the beginning of May in the southernmost stand and in mid-May in the northernmost stands, and the variation between years was in the range of 3 weeks. A simple day-length-triggered (fixed date) model predicted most accurately the date of bud break; root mean square error (RMSE) was 2 and 4 days in the northern and southern site, respectively. The reconstructed bud-break series indicated that based on temperature observations from Sodankylä, growth onset of Scots pine has clearly advanced since the 1960s, though it currently matches that of the early 1920s and early 1950s. The temperature record from Karasjok indicated a similar variation, though there was a weak linear trend advancing bud break by about 3-4 days over a 100-year period.

  10. Local adaptations and climate change: converging sensitivity of bud break in black spruce provenances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    Species with transcontinental distribution or spread over wide geographical regions develop populations with growth traits genetically adapted to the local climate. The aim of this study was to investigate the ecotypic sensitivity of bud break, a strong adaptive trait, to a changing environment. Six phenological phases of bud break were monitored daily on black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP] seedlings submitted to different temperatures (12, 16 and 20 °C) and photoperiods (14, 18 and 22 h). Six provenances were tested in growth chambers, produced from seeds collected along the whole latitudinal range of the closed boreal forest in Quebec, Canada. Bud break lasted 13.3 days on average and occurred earlier in seedlings from colder sites. The annual temperature of the sites suitably tracked the clinal variation among ecotypes, providing a clear biological explanation for the environmental signal driving the adaptive divergence of populations to the local climate. Increasing temperature induced an earlier bud break according to a non-linear pattern with greater advancements observed between 12 and 16 °C. Photoperiod was significant, but sensitivity analysis indicated that its effect on bud break was marginal with respect to temperature. No interaction of provenance × treatment was observed, demonstrating an ecotypic convergence of the responses to both factors. Changes in the growing conditions could substantially modify the synchronization between bud phenology and climate, thus exposing the developing meristems of black spruce to frost damage. However, similar advancements of bud break could be expected in the different ecotypes subjected to warmer temperatures or longer day lengths.

  11. Bud sprouting and floral induction and expression of FT in loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, Carmina; Gil-Muñoz, Francisco; Vera-Sirera, Francisco; García-Lorca, Ana; Martínez-Fuentes, Amparo; Mesejo, Carlos; Pérez-Amador, Miguel A; Agustí, Manuel

    2017-07-14

    EjFT1 and EjFT2 genes were isolated and sequenced from leaves of loquat. EjFT1 is involved in bud sprouting and leaf development, and EjFT2 in floral bud induction. Loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl.] is an evergreen species belonging to the family Rosaceae, such as apple and pear, whose reproductive development, in contrast with these species, is a continuous process that is not interrupted by winter dormancy. Thus, the study of the mechanism of flowering in loquat has the potential to uncover the environmental and genetic networks that trigger flowering more accurately, contributing for a better understanding of the Rosaceae floral process. As a first step toward understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling flowering, extensive defoliation and defruiting assays, together with molecular studies of the key FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene, were carried out. FT exhibited two peaks of expression in leaves, the first one in early to mid-May, the second one in mid-June. Two FT genes, EjFT1 and EjFT2, were isolated and sequenced and studied their expression. Expression of EjFT1 and EjFT2 peaks in mid-May, at bud sprouting. EjFT2 expression peaks again in mid-June, coinciding with the floral bud inductive period. Thus, when all leaves of the tree were continuously removed from early to late May vegetative apex differentiated into panicle, but when defoliation was performed from early to late June apex did not differentiate. On the other hand, fruit removal advanced EjFT1 expression in old leaves and the sooner the fruit detached, the sooner the bud sprouted. Accordingly, results strongly suggest that EjFT1 might be related to bud sprouting and leaf development, while EjFT2 might be involved in floral bud induction. An integrative model for FT functions in loquat is discussed.

  12. LMNA Sequences of 60,706 Unrelated Individuals Reveal 132 Novel Missense Variants in A-Type Lamins and Suggest a Link between Variant p.G602S and Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Florwick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LMNA, encoding nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A and C, cause multiple diseases (‘laminopathies’ including muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy, familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD2, insulin resistance syndrome and progeria. To assess the prevalence of LMNA missense mutations (‘variants’ in a broad, ethnically diverse population, we compared missense alleles found among 60,706 unrelated individuals in the ExAC cohort to those identified in 1,404 individuals in the laminopathy database (UMD-LMNA. We identified 169 variants in the ExAC cohort, of which 37 (∼22% are disease-associated including p.I299V (allele frequency 0.0402%, p.G602S (allele frequency 0.0262% and p.R644C (allele frequency 0.124%, suggesting certain LMNA mutations are more common than previously recognized. Independent analysis of LMNA variants via the type 2 diabetes (T2D Knowledge Portal showed that variant p.G602S associated significantly with type 2 diabetes (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 4.58, and was more frequent in African Americans (allele frequency 0.297%. The FPLD2-associated variant I299V was most prevalent in Latinos (allele frequency 0.347%. The ExAC cohort also revealed 132 novel LMNA missense variants including p.K108E (limited to individuals with psychiatric disease; predicted to perturb coil-1B, p.R397C and p.R427C (predicted to perturb filament biogenesis, p.G638R and p.N660D (predicted to perturb prelamin A processing, and numerous Ig-fold variants predicted to perturb phenotypically characteristic protein–protein interactions. Overall, this two-pronged strategy— mining a large database for missense variants in a single gene (LMNA, coupled to knowledge about the structure, biogenesis and functions of A-type lamins— revealed an unexpected number of LMNA variants, including novel variants predicted to perturb lamin assembly or function. Interestingly, this study also correlated novel variant p.K108E with psychiatric

  13. BUD31 and Lipid Metabolism: A New Potential Therapeutic Entry Point for Myc-Driven Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0039 TITLE: BUD31 and Lipid Metabolism: A New Potential Therapeutic Entry Point for Myc-Driven Breast Cancer...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER BUD31 and Lipid Metabolism: A New Potential Therapeutic Entry Point for Myc-Driven Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT...manuscript in Nature detailing a role for BUD31 in splicing and shown more broadly that splicing is a viable therapeutic intervention point for myc

  14. Spatio-temporal relief from hypoxia and production of reactive oxygen species during