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Sample records for budd chiari syndrome

  1. Imaging of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, O.; O' Brien, J.; Snow, A.; Stunell, H.; Torreggiani, W.C.; Lyburn, I.; Munk, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome occurs when venous outflow from the liver is obstructed. The obstruction may occur at any point from the hepatic venules to the left atrium. The syndrome most often occurs in patients with underlying thrombotic disorders such as polycythemia rubra vera, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and pregnancy. It may also occur secondary to a variety of tumours, chronic inflammatory diseases and infections. Imaging plays an important role both in establishing the diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome as well as evaluating for underlying causes and complications such as portal hypertension. In this review article, we discuss the role of modern imaging in the evaluation of Budd-Chiari syndrome. (orig.)

  2. Imaging of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, O.; O' Brien, J.; Snow, A.; Stunell, H.; Torreggiani, W.C. [Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital (AMNCH), Department of Radiology, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Lyburn, I. [Cheltenham Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cheltenham (United Kingdom); Munk, P.L. [Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver (Canada)

    2007-08-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome occurs when venous outflow from the liver is obstructed. The obstruction may occur at any point from the hepatic venules to the left atrium. The syndrome most often occurs in patients with underlying thrombotic disorders such as polycythemia rubra vera, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and pregnancy. It may also occur secondary to a variety of tumours, chronic inflammatory diseases and infections. Imaging plays an important role both in establishing the diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome as well as evaluating for underlying causes and complications such as portal hypertension. In this review article, we discuss the role of modern imaging in the evaluation of Budd-Chiari syndrome. (orig.)

  3. Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating hydatid liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robotti, G.C.; Meister, F.; Schroeder, R.; Bern Univ.; Bern Univ.

    1985-01-01

    In two female patients a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome secondary to hepatic echinococcosis was established by CT. One patient developed acute Budd-Chiari syndrome secondary to E. granulosus lesions of the liver. The second patient presented with a picture of chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome secondary to alveolar echinococcosis. CT findings of Budd-Chiari syndrome included ascites, low density areas in the liver parenchyma, hypertrophy of the caudate lobe, non visualisation of the hepatic veins, occlusion of the retrohepatic inferior vena cava and enlarged retroperitoneal veins. (orig.) [de

  4. Budd-Chiari syndrome secondary to toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Janet S W; Poon, W T; Ma, C K; Chen, M L; Pang, K S; Mak, Tony W L; Chan, H B

    2013-12-01

    In this report, we describe a case of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-related Budd-Chiari syndrome in Hong Kong. A 10-month-old boy presented with ascites, right pleural effusion, and hepatomegaly after consumption of herbal drinks for 3 months. His clinical (including imaging) features were compatible with Budd-Chiari syndrome. Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare disease entity in paediatric patients. In our case, extensive workup performed to look for the underlying cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome was unrevealing, except for toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloid exposure in his herbal drinks.

  5. [Association Budd Chiari syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouelhi, Leila; Chaieb, Mouna; Debbeche, Radhouane; Salem, Mohamed; Sfar, Imene; Trabelsi, Sinda; Gorgi, Yosr; Najjar, Taoufik

    2009-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome in 5% of the cases. Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis, foetal loss and positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies, namely lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I. Anticardiolipin antibodies was reported in auto-immune thyroid disorders, particularly in Grave's disease. Antiphospholipid syndrome associated to Grave's disease was reported in only three cases. To describe a case report of association of Grave's disease and antiphospholipid syndrome. We report the first case of Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. Our observation is particular by the fact that it is about a patient presenting a Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. This triple association has never been reported in literature. Although association between antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease was previously described, further studies evaluating the coexistence of these two affections in the same patient would be useful.

  6. Budd-Chiari syndrome and liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Budd-Chiari syndrome involves obstruction of hepatic venous outflow tracts at various levels from small hepatic veins to the inferior vena cava and is the result of thrombosis or its fibrous sequelae. There is a conspicuous difference in its etiology in the West and the East. Myeloproliferative disease predominates in the West and obstruction of the vena cava predominates in the East. The clinical presentation and clinical manifestations are so varied that it should be suspected in any patient with acute or chronic liver dysfunction. It should be treated with step-wise management. First-line therapy should be anticoagulation with medical treatment of the underlying illness, and interventional revascularization and TIPS are indicated in the event of a lack of response to medical therapy. Liver transplantation may be indicated as a rescue treatment or for fulminant cases with promising results. This step-by-step strategy has achieved a 5-year transplant-free survival rate of 70% and a 5-year overall survival rate of 90%. Living donor liver transplantation can also be used for patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome if deceased donor livers are scarce, but it requires a difficult procedure particularly with regard to venous outflow reconstruction. PMID:25674385

  7. Budd-Chiari Syndrome in a Patient with Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Frankl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome can present with cirrhosis and signs and symptoms similar to those of other chronic liver diseases. We present a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome discovered during attempted transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting in a patient with decompensated cirrhosis believed to be secondary to hepatitis C. Although the patient had hepatocellular carcinoma, the Budd-Chiari syndrome was a primary disease due to hepatic venous webs. Angioplasty was performed in this case, which resolved the patient’s symptoms related to portal hypertension. Follow-up venography 5 months after angioplasty demonstrated continued patency of the hepatic veins. A biopsy was obtained in the same setting, which showed centrilobular fibrosis indicating that venous occlusion was indeed the cause of cirrhosis. It is important to consider a second disease when treating a patient with difficult to manage portal hypertension.

  8. Budd-Chiari syndrome: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Kai; Li Lingsun

    2008-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon but often fatal disorder resulting from obstruction of hepatic venous outflow tract at the level of the hepatic veins, the inferior vena cava. The CT and MRI characteristics of Budd-Chiari syndrome are reviewed in this article especially for displaying the exact site and extent of the obstruction. In addition to this direct sign, the indirect findings of venous obstruction such as the presence of intra-and extrahepatic collateral veins, caudate lobe enlargement, inhomogeneous liver enhancement, and regenerative nodules can also be demonstrated. Awareness of these findings is important for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. (authors)

  9. Etiology, management, and outcome of the Budd-Chiari syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Darwish Murad (Sarwa); A. Plessier (Aurelie); M. Hernandez-Guerra (Manuel); F. Fabris (Federica Margherita); C.E. Eapen (Chundamannil Eapen); M.J. Bahr (Matthias); J. Trebicka (Jonel); I. Morard (Isabelle); L. Lasser (Luc); J. Heller (Jörg); A. Hadengue (Antoine); P. Langlet (Philippe); H. Miranda (Helena); M. Primignani (Massimo); E. Elias (Elwyn); F.W.G. Leebeek (Frank); F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); J.C. Garcia-Pagan (Juan Carlos); D.C. Valla (Dominique Charle); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is hepatic venous outflow obstruction. What is known about the syndrome is based on small studies of prevalent cases. Objective: To characterize the causes and treatment of incident BCS. Design: Consecutive case series of patients with incident

  10. Diagnosis and therapy of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, R.; Strunk, H.; Hofer, U.; Schild, H.; Brensing, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Budd-Chiari syndrome is a fairly uncommon disease in Europe. This often leads to its late diagnosis. The syndrome is characterised by portal hypertension and splanchnic congestion due to obstruction of hepatic venous outflow. This paper describes the treatment of three patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome by interventional therapeutic techniques and discusses alternative treatment modalities. Patients and Methods: The first patient presented with veno-occlusive disease and was treated by the placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stentshunt. The second patient showed an occlusion of the major hepatic veins. After percutaneous recanalisation, a stent was placed in the right hepatic vein which remained patent. The third patient had a membranous obstruction of the right hepatic vein which was treated by percutaneous balloon dilatation. Results: In all patients the clinical symptoms resolved completely after treatment and no complications were encountered. Conclusions: The authors conclude that interventional therapeutic techniques offer a wide variety of possibilities for the treatment of patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome and are safe, effective and relatively inexpensive. However, further studies are required to assess the long-term results and survival rates of these patients. (orig.) [de

  11. Acute trauma-induced Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, G.; Houri, R.; Randrianasolo, S.; Gailleton, R.

    1995-01-01

    The diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome is based on clinical signs including liver enlargement and ascites and findings of complementary examinations: echography, echo-Doppler, cat scanning (CT-scan), magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, pressure readings, laparoscopy and biopsy. Trauma is rarely reported as a cause of acute Budd-Chiari syndrome. In some cases, the trauma is so violent the supra-hepatic veins are ruptured and the dramatic outcome leaves no time for the syndrome to develop. In others, the resulting haematomas form a compression block of the supra hepatic vessels. The mechanism of the trauma in our case appears to have been unreported to date. Four days after a violent motorcycle accident, a 33-year-old man developed an acute Budd-Chiari syndrome probably due to partial and temporary thrombosis of the left and middle supra hepatic veins. A side-to-side porto-cava anastomosis with a calibrated venous graft was performed in an emergency procedure. Outcome was quite favourable and after a 4 year follow-up, the patient is in good health. (authors). 13 refs

  12. Budd Chiari Syndrome in a Fifteen-Year Old Girl with Systemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is believed that in this patient, Budd Chiari Syndrome resulted from hepatic veinous thrombosis due to the presence of Lupus anticoagulants. As the young girl was suffering from antiphospholipid syndrome secondary to lupus, this milder form of Budd-Chiari Syndrome was later treated in India with surgical shunts.

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Budd Chiari Syndrome: An Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copelan, Alexander; Remer, Erick M.; Sands, Mark; Nghiem, Hanh; Kapoor, Baljendra

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the early detection and assessment of the extent of disease in Budd Chiari syndrome (BCS). Early diagnosis and intervention to mitigate hepatic congestion is vital to restoring hepatic function and alleviating portal hypertension. Interventional radiology serves a key role in the management of these patients. The interventionist should be knowledgeable of the clinical presentation as well as key imaging findings, which often dictate the approach to treatment. This article concisely reviews the etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of BCS and provides a detailed description of imaging and treatment options, particularly interventional management

  14. Diagnosis and Management of Budd Chiari Syndrome: An Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copelan, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.copelan@beaumont.edu [William Beaumont Hospital, Diagnostic Radiology Department (United States); Remer, Erick M., E-mail: remere1@ccf.org; Sands, Mark, E-mail: sandsm@ccf.org [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute (United States); Nghiem, Hanh, E-mail: HNghiem@beaumont.edu [William Beaumont Hospital, Diagnostic Radiology Department (United States); Kapoor, Baljendra, E-mail: kapoorb@ccf.org [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the early detection and assessment of the extent of disease in Budd Chiari syndrome (BCS). Early diagnosis and intervention to mitigate hepatic congestion is vital to restoring hepatic function and alleviating portal hypertension. Interventional radiology serves a key role in the management of these patients. The interventionist should be knowledgeable of the clinical presentation as well as key imaging findings, which often dictate the approach to treatment. This article concisely reviews the etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of BCS and provides a detailed description of imaging and treatment options, particularly interventional management.

  15. Budd-Chiari Syndrome: Two Cases with Different Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinjiro Inomata

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of Budd-Chiari syndrome. Case 1: A 57-year-old man presented with leg edema and esophageal varices. Cavography showed obstruction of the inferior vena cava with antiphospholipid syndrome. Further, the patient showed positive serology for hepatitis C virus and consumed large quantities of alcohol. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty was performed on this patient and anticoagulants administered; leg edema and esophageal varices were ameliorated although liver biopsy showed cirrhosis without evident congestion. More than 9 months since the diagnosis, restenosis of the inferior vena cava has not occurred. Case 2: A 73-year-old woman presented abdominal pain but no edema or varices. Cavography showed membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava which required no therapy. Manifestation of portal hypertension was not present and liver function was maintained although liver biopsy showed obvious congestion. These cases showed untypical features against histopathology, and careful observation will be required for emergence of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Radiation-induced liver injury showing low intensity on T2-weighted images noted in Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Harushi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Mori, Kensaku [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Ahmadi, T. [Shahid Beheshti Univ. of Medical Sciences, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Okumura, Toshiyuki [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Tomobe (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    Although it is documented that radiation can cause density or intensity changes on computed tomography or MR imaging in the irradiated hepatic parenchyma, few researchers have reported or understood the MR presentation of changes in hepatic parenchyma following radiotherapy in the patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MR appearance of hepatic radiation injury in Budd-Chiari syndrome and to consider the underlying pathophysiology. The MR examinations of two patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome was compared with those of 11 patients without Budd-Chiari syndrome. The two groups, both of which suffered from hepatocellular carcinoma, underwent 50-72 Gy of proton-beam irradiation during a period of 14-43 days. Examinations including T1- and T2-weighted imaging, superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced imaging, and dynamic study were performed 3-10 weeks after the end of irradiation. Radiation-induced hepatic injury was observed as a low-intensity area on T2-weighted images and on delayed phase images of dynamic study in the Budd-Chiari patients, and as iso- or high-intensity areas on both images in the patients without Budd-Chiari syndrome. US-guided needle biopsy from the irradiated area in one patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome revealed mostly necrotic tissue and fibrous tissue. These MR features of hepatic radiation injury in Budd-Chiari syndrome were considered to be due to severe hepatic fibrosis. (author)

  17. Disproportionate rise in serum CA 125 in case of budd chiari syndrome: an unusual presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad D. Game; Madhuri P. Holay; Satyanarayan Durgam; Sandeep Kharkar

    2015-01-01

    Ca 125 is used as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for ovarian cancer. The level of CA 125 is also elevated in benign conditions like Budd Chiari syndrome, liver cirrhosis and heart failure. But very high level of CA 125 is rarely associated with benign conditions and this can mislead the physician. Here we present a case of budd chiari syndrome in postpartum period associated with very high level of CA 125 which is an unusual presentation. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000): 2129-2131

  18. Factor V G1691A (Leiden is a major etiological factor in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawhida Y. Abdel Ghaffar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Budd-Chiari syndrome is a multifactorial disease in which several prothrombotic disorders may predispose patients to the development of thrombosis at this uncommon location (hepatic veins. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of inherited thrombophilia in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients.Materials and Methods: The study included 47 Budd-Chiari syndrome patients (20 children and 27 adults. Genotyping of Factor V G1691A (Leiden, prothrombin G20210A (PT, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T were performed using real-time PCR and fluorescence melting curve detection analysis.Results: Factor V Leiden was observed in 29 patients (61.7%. It is the only factor that caused Budd-Chiari syndrome in 18 of the patients and in 5 of the patients with inferior vena cava involvement. Myeloproliferative disease was noted in 12 (25.5% patients, antiphospholipid syndrome in 5 (10.6%, and Behcet’s disease in 3 (6.4%. Interestingly, 3 of the children with Budd-Chiari syndrome had lipid storage disease.Conclusion: Factor V Leiden was a major etiological factor in Egyptian Budd-Chiari syndrome patients, which may have been related to the high frequency of this mutation in the study region. Factor V Leiden was also a strong thrombophilic factor and the leading cause of inferior vena cava thrombosis in these patients. Lipid storage disease should be included as a risk factor for Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  19. Primary Budd-Chiari syndrome - a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Mieżyńska-Kurtycz, Joanna; Marlicz, Wojciech; Lawniczak, Małgorzata; Wójcicki, Maciej

    2012-09-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is recognized as a clinical manifestation of various prothrombotic conditions which may be lethal within 3 years of the onset of symptoms if untreated. This study is a retrospective analysis of patients with BCS managed between 2004 and 2011. The diagnosis was confirmed with contrast CT-angiography and/or Doppler ultrasound. BCS was diagnosed in 20 patients (11 females and 9 males), median age 38 years (ranging from 18 to 56). Twelve patients were referred as acute BCS for the liver transplant (LTx) assessment. Thrombosis of the hepatic veins was caused by myeloproliferative disorders (n=8), end-stage liver disease (n=4), protein C deficiency (n=3), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) (n=1), antiphospholipid syndrome (n=1) and secondary poliglobulia (n=1). In two patients the origin of BCS could not be established despite appropriate screening. Median follow-up was 29 months. Low molecular heparin with subsequent conversion to vitamin K antagonists was routinely applied in all patients. Two patients underwent TIPS procedure with good long term outcome and 10 subjects received LTx; 1 patient was lost to follow-up and 1 died of chest infection 9 years since the diagnosis of BCS was made; 14 patients, including those who received LTx, were alive and well at least one year after BCS diagnosis. All survivors remain stable and are followed-up on a regular basis. Strict adherence to the diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines plays a crucial role in the management of BCS patients. Our results confirm the efficacy of anticoagulation as well as TIPS and/or OLT in treatment of this rare condition.

  20. Clinical evaluation of interventional treatment for Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Hongshan; Xu Ke; Xiao Liang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the interventional treatment of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) with regard to different types of the disease. Methods: One hundred and fifty-nine consecutive cases with BCS underwent interventional treatments with regard to different types of the diseases, including percutaneous angioplasty (PTA), transcatheter thrombolysis, endovascular stent implantation and modified transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (MTIPS). Among them, 147 cases that underwent complete follow-up were enrolled in this study. Simple obstruction of HV, membranous obstruction of IVC, membranous obstruction of IVC combined with thrombosis in the distal lumen and segmental obstruction of IVC constituted 13.6% (20), 66.0% (97), 6.1% (9)and 14.3% (21/147), respectively. The technical success rate of each type was determined. They were followed up for (67.3±9.0) months (16 h-104 months). Overall primary patency rate was evaluated. The late effect on liver function was analyzed according to the Child-Pugh score. Results: The primary patency rate of PTA was 65.6% (86/131) and the secondary, patency rate was 96.9% (124/128). The primary patency rate of stent implantation was 78.9% (15/19) and the secondary patency rate was 92.3% (24/26). One patient of type IIIa that received recanalization, catheter-directed thrombolysis and PTA in IVC died of hemoptysis 72 h after the procedure. One patients of type I b who received MTIPS died of DIC 16 hrs after the procedure. And one patient of type Ib who received MTIPS died of liver failure 13 months after the procedure. Twelve patients died in 7-79 months after the interventional procedure due to unrelated causes. At the end of follow-up, the liver function of the patients was improved. Conclusions: Optimal application of various vascular interventional techniques has a satisfactory primary and secondary patency rate and improves the long-term liver function. (authors)

  1. Stent Angioplasty of Closed Mesocaval Shunt in a Patient with Budd-Chiari Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancak, Tanzer; Karagulle, Ayse Tuba; Bilgic, Sadik; Sanlidilek, Umman; Yerdel, Mehmet Ali

    2002-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is an uncommon disorder caused by hepatic venous outflow obstruction. It is characterized by ascites, hepatomegaly and abdominal pain. Percutaneous intervention shave recently been used for the treatment of BCS. We present a case of BCS with a closed mesocaval shunt which was reopened with a self-expandable metallic stent

  2. Subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with polycythemia vera and factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simsek, S; Verheesen, RV; Haagsma, EB; Lourens, J

    We describe a 48-year-old caucasian woman with a subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome attributed to the presence of polycythaemia vera, heterozygosity for the factor V Leiden mutation and the use of an oral contraceptive pill. Two diagnostic pitfalls were encountered. First, on CT scanning of the abdomen

  3. Le syndrome de Budd-Chiari: une complication rare de la ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'atteinte hépatique au cours de la sarcoïdose est une localisation fréquente, habituellement asymptomatique. La cholestase anictérique et l'hypertension portale représentent ses principales complications. Le syndrome de Budd-Chiari est une complication peu connue qui demeure exceptionnelle. Nous rapportons un ...

  4. Expert consensus on the classification of subtype in Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Expert committee on Vane Cava Obstruction,Specialized CommitteeofEndovascology,ChineseMedicalDoctorAssociation

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available From 2012 to 2015 the Department of Interventional Radiology of the Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University undertook the clinical special research subject ”Study on the standardization of interventional diagnosis and treatment of Budd- Chiari syndrome”(No. BL2012021), a program supported by the Department of Science and Technology of Jiangsu Province. Based on the clinical results of three years research and the scientific summary of the experience from more than 2150 cases accumulated in more than 20 years, the Department of Interventional Radiology of the Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University presided over a demonstration meeting about “the standardization of interventional diagnosis and treatment of Budd- Chiari syndrome” on January 14, 2016 in Xuzhou City of Jiangsu Province, China. The scholars from the Expert Committee on Vena Cava Obstruction of Specialized Committee of Endovascology, Chinese Medical Doctor Association, as well as the experts from the related medical fields, including interventional radiology, vascular surgery, pathology and diagnostic imaging, who have been engaged in the study of Budd- Chiari syndrome, attended the meeting, and in the meeting the participants made a full and thorough discussion on the classification and subtypes of Budd - Chiari syndrome. The scholars and experts have unanimously reached a consensus on the subtype definition of Budd- Chiari syndrome: the Budd Chiari syndrome is suggested to be classified into the hepatic vein occlusion subtype, the inferior vena cava occlusion subtype and mixed occlusion subtype, including 10 subtype entities in total. The hepatic vein occlusion subtype includes membranous occlusion of hepatic vein/accessory hepatic vein, segmental occlusion of hepatic vein, extensive occlusion of hepatic vein, and hepatic vein occlusion associated with thrombus formation. The inferior vena cava occlusion subtype

  5. Budd-chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia of the liver: a case report

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    Song, Jae Min; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Jae Wook; Chung, Woo Kyoung; Chung, Hee Sun; Kim, Joo Hyung; Choi, Jun Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon disorder, and it is caused by obstruction of the hepatic venous out-flow or inferior vena cava above the hepatic vein. It may result from a large number of conditions, including primary congenital obstructions of the hepatic veins or inferior vena cava by webs or bands. Secondary causes include trauma, polycythemia vera, chronic leukemia, pregnancy, tumors and use of oral contraceptives. No definitive etiologic factors have been identified in two thirds of all cases. We recently experienced a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia in 21-year-old man. Postoperative follow up CT showed normal venous flow after reintroduction of the liver into the abdominal cavity and closure of the diaphragm defect.

  6. Budd-chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia of the liver: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jae Min; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Jae Wook; Chung, Woo Kyoung; Chung, Hee Sun; Kim, Joo Hyung; Choi, Jun Ho; Kim, Seung Ho

    2007-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome is an uncommon disorder, and it is caused by obstruction of the hepatic venous out-flow or inferior vena cava above the hepatic vein. It may result from a large number of conditions, including primary congenital obstructions of the hepatic veins or inferior vena cava by webs or bands. Secondary causes include trauma, polycythemia vera, chronic leukemia, pregnancy, tumors and use of oral contraceptives. No definitive etiologic factors have been identified in two thirds of all cases. We recently experienced a case of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by diaphragmatic hernia in 21-year-old man. Postoperative follow up CT showed normal venous flow after reintroduction of the liver into the abdominal cavity and closure of the diaphragm defect

  7. Retroperitoneal myxoid liposarcoma of the renal capsule causing Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetzner, G.; Fuerst, G.; Kuhn, F.P.; Kliche, K.O.

    1991-01-01

    A retroperitoneal myxoid liposarcoma of the renal capsule must be differentiated from renal cell carcinomas, angiomyolipomas, fibrogenous lipomas, fibrolipomas and mixed tumours containing fat tissue. Myxoid liposarcomas can lead to intracavale tumourthromboses, which is often the case with renal cell carcinomas and revealed clinical with Budd-Chiari syndrome. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging give additional information in the diagnosis of intracaval tumourthromboses and show the exact expansion of the topographic-anatomical structure. (orig.) [de

  8. [The usefullness of percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty in the management of budd-Chiari syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Hwan; Yu, Kyung Sool; Baek, Seung Min; Lee, Seung Yup; Kim, Hyun Su; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Sung Kook; Choi, Yong Hwan; Chung, Joon Mo

    2002-06-01

    Membranous obstruction is the most common cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome in Orientals. Recently, percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTBA) has been successfully applied as a treatment of membranous obstruction. We evaluated etiologies and clinical manifestations in our cases and the usefulness of PTBA. Twelve cases of Budd-Chiari syndrome were analyzed. 50.3 years was the average age of the cases (ranging from 37 to 67 years). Major symptoms or signs were superficial collateral vessels on the chest or the abdomen in 6 cases, ascites in 3, abdominal pain in 4, hepatomegaly in 4, splenomegaly in 3, melena or hematemesis in 2, and leg edema in 2. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed esophageal varices in 6 cases and two of these 6 cases had gastric varices. Of 8 cases with liver cirrhosis, 4 were classified as Child-Pugh class A and 4 as B. Four patients with cirrhosis had concurrent hepatocellular carcinoma including 1 patient who was HBs Ag positive. Etiologies were membranous obstruction in 11 cases and protein C deficiency in 1 case. The main site of obstruction was IVC in 8 and hepatic vein in 4. PTBA was successfully performed in 8 cases of membranous obstruction. During the mean follow-up period of 27.6 months (12-40 months), there were no reobstructions except in 2 cases. The most common cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome in our cases was membranous obstruction of IVC. Percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty is a very useful treatment method.

  9. The budd-Chiari syndrome in a child: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Vatsala; Verma, Kachnar; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Misra, Sri Prakash

    2012-12-01

    The Budd-Chiari Syndrome is associated with hepatic venous outflow obstruction. This syndrome is rare in infants and children. As this syndrome is uncommon, especially in the paediatric age group, misdiagnoses and delays in the diagnosis are frequent. A high index of clinical suspicion along with a radiological aid and a histopathological correlation can lead to an early diagnosis and an appropriate management in such cases.This case report highlights the occurrence of this rare condition in the paediatric age group as well as it redefines the salient features of this syndrome.

  10. Liver transplantation in a patient with primary antiphospholipid syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Tatiana M; Seredavkina, Natalia V; Satybaldyeva, Maria A; Nasonov, Evgeniy L; Reshetnyak, Vasiliy I

    2015-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired thrombophilic disorder in which autoantibodies are produced to a variety of phospholipids determinants of cell membranes or phospholipid binding proteins. There are few reports about association between antiphospholipid antibodies and development of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). We report the case of BCS development in young Russian male with primary APS. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation on August 26, 2012. At present time his state is good, the blood flow in the liver restored and its function is not impaired. We report about the first time the successful use of dabigatran etexilate for prolonged anticoagulation therapy in APS patient with BCS. In addition patient is managed with immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:26380049

  11. Budd-Chiari and inferior caval vein syndromes due to membranous obstruction of the liver veins. Successful treatment with angioplasty and transcaval TIPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland-Fischer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The case is presented of a 25-year-old Caucasian patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome due to membranous obstruction of the liver veins and inferior caval vein syndrome as a result of secondary hyperplasia of the caudate lobe of the liver, obstructing the caval vein. Diagnosis was established...... that angioplasty and TIPS are safe and efficient procedures to reduce liver engorgement and complications of portal hypertension in selected patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome....

  12. Introducing chinese treatment experience of Budd-Chiari syndrome to world wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linsun

    2008-01-01

    During the latest 20 years, the crucial progress has been made in the field of treatment for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS)in China with therapeutic methods transferring from surgical to interventional and achieving successful rate of 96%. Our unique contribution to the BCS interventional therapy should have made ourselves proud for being as a superior world position on account of large number of cases, abundant therapeutic contents and consummate skills. What a pity is that our achievement was not appreciated by international colleagues because of only a few papers published in SCI journals. So that, Chinese scholars ought to have doing more necessarily through diligently learning English, doing long term follow-up and performing more basic researches and actively joining international academic exchanges, let our good experiences of treatment for BCS be introduced to the world-wide. (authors)

  13. Pericardial tamponade complicated by interventional management for Budd-Chiari syndrome: clinical analysis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Luxi; Zu Maoheng; Wu Jinping; Xu Hao; Jiao Xudong; Chen Zhengkan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the cases and treatment of pericardial tamponade (PT) occurred in the interventional management for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Methods: During the period from 1990 to 2006, interventional treatment was performed in 812 patients with BCS. Pericardial tamponade occurred in nine patients during the period of interventional treatment. The clinical data, including angiographic findings, clinical symptoms, management and outcomes, of the nine patients were retrospectively analyzed. The possible causes of pericardial tamponade were discussed. Results: Of the nine patients occurring pericardial tamponade, successful treatment was obtained in eight and death occurred in one. The lesions of BCS in the nine cases included inferior vena cava obstruction type (n=7), hepatic venous obstruction type (n=1) and mixed type (n=1). Pericardial tamponade was caused by mistakenly puncturing into pericardium (n=5), mistakenly puncturing together with laceration of pericardium by balloon (n=3), and breaking of pericardium by displaced stent (n=1). Conventional pericardicentesis was employed in one case, surgery was carried out in three cases, and infra-xiphoid catheterization and drainage using Seldinger technique was performed in two cases. Conservative treatment was adopted in one case and aspiration through the wrongly inserted catheter was tried in one case. In the remaining one case, aspiration through the wrongly inserted catheter together with infra-xiphoid catheterization and drainage by using Seldinger technique was carried out. Conclusion: The pericardial tamponade is an severe complication occurred in the interventional management for Budd-Chiari syndrome, although it is rarely seen. Preoperative prevention, prompt detection and rational treatment are the keys avoid serious consequences. (authors)

  14. Percutaneous Transjugular Direct Porto-caval Shunt in Patients with Budd-Chiari Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quateen, A.; Pech, M.; Berg, T.; Bergk, A.; Podrabsky, P.; Felix, R.; Ricke, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of direct porto-caval shunts in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) in whom there is no access to the hepatic veins during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS). We included six consecutive patients with fulminant/acute Budd-Chiari syndrome (mean age: 35 years) in whom a conventional TIPSS was not possible due to inaccessible hepatic veins. We performed a direct porto-caval shunt via a transhepatic approach. Patients were followed up by means of clinical examination, laboratory investigations, and Doppler ultrasound. TIPSS implantation from the inferior vena cava (IVC) was successful in all six patients (100%). The median transhepatic shunt length was 9 cm (8-10 cm). No procedure-related complications were observed in our patients. Early shunt occlusion occurred in three out of six patients (50%). In all three of these patients, the stent used to stabilize the shunt ended 1-2 cm before reaching the IVC. All occlusions were successfully recanalized. One of these patients developed recurrent early shunt as well as mesenteric and splenic vein occlusions. She died 7 days after TIPSS placement due to an unmanageable coagulation disorder. The remaining five patients were followed up by planned clinical examination and laboratory investigations (mean follow-up time was 15 months; patient 1 was followed up for 13 months, patient 2 for 14 months, patient 3 for 15 months, and patients 4 and 5 for 16 months) and all displayed a complete and durable resolution of liver failure and ascites without reintervention. In patients with acute liver failure originating from BCS and inaccessible hepatic veins, a direct transhepatic porto-caval shunt can be performed safely and effectively under ultrasound guidance. Future studies in larger patient groups should investigate if the patency of transcaval TIPSS with long transhepatic shunt segments is similar compared to conventional TIPSS via

  15. Comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the follow-up of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legmann, P; Levesque, M; De, Broucker F; F,; Hay, J M; Maillard, J N

    1988-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computed tomography and MRI in 8 patients operated for Budd-Chiari syndrome is reported. The results obtained, evaluated separately for each technique and then compared between each other and with the data of superior coelio-mesenteric angiography and inferior cavography, show that the MRI data is very clearly superior to the data obtained by ultrasonography and computed tomography. MRI allows simultaneous assessment of the hepatic parenchyma, evaluation of portal hypertension and the porto-caval anastomosis, which are all essential elements in the follow-up Budd-Chiari syndrome. However, in the light of the literature, the authors stress that ultrasonography associated with pulsed Doppler also ensures satisfactory vascular and parenchymal assessment of this disease in the majority of cases.

  16. Comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the follow-up of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legmann, P.; Levesque, M.; Broucker, F. de; Hay, J.M.; Maillard, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computed tomography and MRI in 8 patients operated for Budd-Chiari syndrome. The results obtained, evaluated separately for each technique and then compared between each other and with the data of superior coelio-mesenteric angiography and inferior cavography, showed that MRI data is very clearly superior to the data obtained by ultrasonography and computed tomography. MRI allows simultaneous assessment of the hepatic parenchyma, and evaluation of portal hypertension and the porto-caval anastomosis, which are all essential elements in the follow-up Budd-Chiari syndrome. However, in the light of the literature, the authors stress that ultrasonography associated with pulsed Doppler also ensures satisfactory vascular and parenchymal assessment of this disease in the majority of cases [fr

  17. Budd-chiari syndrome by membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava: comparison of sonography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Joo Won

    1992-01-01

    Membranous obstruction of the hepatic inferior vena cava (MOVC) is one of the common causes of Budd-Chiari syndrome. The aim of this study is to ascertain and compare the characteristic sonographic and CT findings of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by MOVC. We studied 10 patients of Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by MOVC thorough sonography and CT. MOVC was confirmed by operation and/or inferior vena cavography. The cases included 9 men and one woman. With sonography, IVC obstruction was diagnosed in 9 cases. The cause of IVC obstruction was web in 5 cases and fibrous cord in 3 cases. The cause was unspecified in one case. Obliteration of the hepatic veins and intrahepatic collateral vessels were delineated in 9 cases. With color doppler sonography, the directions of blood flow of the hepatic veins through the intervenous communication were fairly well demonstrated in all 5 cases. With CT, IVC obstruction was diagnosed in 7 cases. The obliteration of the hepatic segment of the IVC were segmental in 6 cases and diffuse in one case. CT demonstrated communicating vessels between the hepatic veins in 3 cases. Furthermore, systemic collateral vessels (azygos and hemiazygos veins, veins along the abdominal wall, and internal mammary veins) were demonstrated in all cases. Liver cirrhosis was combined in all cases and hepatoma developed in 4 cases. Sonography is useful to detect the MOVC and to demonstrate hepatic venous obstruction and intrahepatic collateral vessels. Color doppler sonography is easily performed to show the direction of the blood flow through interconnecting vessels. CT shows the obliterated segment of the IVC clearly and multiple prominent systemic collaterals. In conclusion, Budd-Chiari syndrome caused by MOVC is accurately diagnosed by combined color doppler sonography and CT

  18. Angiographic and hemodynamic evaluation of the mesoatrial shunt in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome and inferior vena caval obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmond, P.L.; Kadir, S.; Cameron, J.L.; Kaufman, S.L.; White, R.I. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is not uncommon in patients with the Budd-Chiari syndrome. The caval obstruction may be due to thrombus or compression by an enlarged caudate lobe. Conventional portosystemic shunts are not possible in the presence of an obstructed IVC; the mesoatrial shunt is indicated in these patients. Between 1973 and 1986, the authors studied 13 patients (ten female, three male) with Budd-Chiari syndrome and IVC obstruction in whom mesoatrial shunts were subsequently constructed. Polycythemia rubra vera was the most common predisposing condition. Preoperative evaluation included US, scintigraphy, CT, and angiography (hepatic arteriography, hepatic venography and pressure measurements, inferior vena cavography, arterial portography). Postoperatively shunts were assessed angiographically and hemodynamically, and several patients underwent CT. The shunts were catheterized via a brachial or femoral venous approach, which allowed pressures along the shunt from the superior mesenteric vein to the right atrium to be measured. The mesoatrial shunt is a relatively new procedure which is indicated in patients with the Budd-Chiari syndrome complicated by IVC obstruction. Shunt patency may be demonstrated arteriographically or with CT, but hemodynamic evaluation with measurement of pressure gradients is required to assess shunt function

  19. Interventional treatment for the occlusive hepatic veins in Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xitong; Xu Ke; Feng Bo; Su Hongying; Li Hong; Zu Maoheng; Cui Jingguo; Yang Xueliang; Zhao Jinxu; Chen Kai

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the interventional methods for occlusive hepatic veins in Budd-Chiari syndrome and its mid and long-term effects. Methods: Forty-two patients (male 17 cases and female 25 cases) aged from 18 to 57 years old (mean 34.5 years) were studied. The liver functions were Child A in 23 cases, Child B in 6 cases, and Child C in 13 cases, respectively. A total of 92 hepatic veins were occluded. Among them, 29 left hepatic veins, 24 middle hepatic veins, 36 right hepatic veins, and 3 accessory hepatic veins were occluded. Thirty-four patients were accompanied with the stenotic or occlusive inferior vena cave (IVC) . The interventional methods included: (1) recanalization of occlusive hepatic veins (by transjugular, transfemoral, and percutaneous transhepatic route, or the combination of above three methods); (2) percutaneous transluminal angioplasty; (3) self-expanding stent implantation. The occlusive IVC in 32 patients also accepted PTA and/or stent implantation. Results: The successful recanalization was carried out in forty hepatic veins in 40 patients. PTA of occlusive veins was followed by stent implantation in 8 patients. The pressure of hepatic veins dropped from 34.5 cm H 2 O (25.0-48.0 cm H 2 O) to 22.0 cm H 2 O (12.0-35.0 cm H 2 O) after intervention (T=11.50, P < 0.01). The symptoms and pathological signs improved obviously in 32 cases and improved partly in 8 cases. During the follow-up period from 1 month to 54 months (mean 27.5 months), one cases died of liver function failure at one month after intervention. The re-intervention of occlusive veins in two cases were performed and the better results were acquired again. Five cases didn't accept re-intervention. Neither recurrence of symptoms nor re-occlusion of hepatic veins was found in the other 32 patients. Conclusion: (1) Multiple and synthetical interventional methods for the occlusive hepatic veins in Budd-Chiari syndrome can be utilized. (2) The intervention of hepatic vein is mini

  20. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for severe jaundice in patients with acute Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fu-Liang; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Fan, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Meng-Fei; Dai, Shan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Fu-Quan

    2015-02-28

    To evaluate the feasibility of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for severe jaundice secondary to acute Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). From February 2009 to March 2013, 37 patients with severe jaundice secondary to acute BCS were treated. Sixteen patients without hepatic venule, hepatic veins (HV) obstruction underwent percutaneous angioplasty of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and/or HVs. Twenty-one patients with HV occlusion underwent TIPS. Serum bilirubin, liver function, demographic data and operative data of the two groups of patients were analyzed. Twenty-one patients underwent TIPS and the technical success rate was 100%, with no technical complications. Sixteen patients underwent recanalization of the IVC and/or HVs and the technical success rate was 100%. The mean procedure time for TIPS was 84.0±12.11 min and angioplasty was 44.11±5.12 min (Pjaundice in either group. Severe jaundice is not a contraindication for TIPS in patients with acute BCS and TIPS is appropriate for severe jaundice due to BCS.

  1. Hepatic Scintigraphic Findings of Budd-Chiari Syndrome due to Inferior Vena Caval Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Soo Kyo; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Sung Yong; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-03-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is a rare clinical entity characterized by post-sinusoidal portal hypertension caused by the obstruction to the hepatic vein outflow. The diagnosis is suggested by hepatic scintigraphy and is usually confirmed by hepatic venography, inferior vena cavography and biopsy. The scintigraphic finding of BCS caused by the obstruction of main hepatic vein has been reported to consist typically of hypertrophy of the caudate lobe with increased radionuclide accumulation. Such a typical finding has been accounted for by the fact that the venous outflow from the caudate lobe is preserved when the main hepatic vein is obstructed. But usually, the hepatic venous outflow from the caudate lobe is also obstructed in BCS due to inferior vena caval obstruction. So hepatic scintigraphic findings of BCS due to inferior vena caval obstruction show different findings as compared with the BCS due to hepatic vein obstruction. We evaluate the hepatic scintigrams of the 13 cases of BCS due to inferior vena caval obstruction and review the literatures. The results are as follows: 1) We cannot observe the caudate lobe hypertrophy with increased uptake, which is known as a classic finding in BCS due to hepatic vein obstruction. 2) The most prominent hepatic scintigraphic findings of BCS are nonhomogenous uptake in the liver with extrahepatic uptake in the all cases. 3) We can see cold areas at the superior aspect of right hepatic lobe in 7 cases (54%). This is a useful finding suggesting BCS due to inferior vena caval obstruction.

  2. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for the treatment of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Guohong; He Chuangye; Yin Zhanxin; Meng Xiangjie; Wang Jianhong; Zhang Hongbo; Zhou Xinming; Wu Kaichun; Ding Jie; Fan Daiming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Methods: 14 patients with clinical findings of progressive liver function abnormality and severe complication of portal hypertension (upper gastrointestinal bleeding and refractory ascites)were diagnosed as BCS. Based on imaging manifestations, these patients were classified as follows: obstruction of inferior vena cava (1 case); obstruction of hepatic veins (5 cases); combined obstruction (obstruction of hepatic veins and inferior vena cava)(8 cases). During the procedure, different puncture points were selected for fulfilling the real condition; including 7 cases from hepatic vein to portal vein; 4 cases from inferior vena cava to hepatic vein, 4 cases from the right hepatic vein to portal vein. After the operation, the follow-up evaluation of blood flow in the shunt was performed. Results: All of these patients were successfully performed with TIPS, with average pressure of portal vein decreasing from (4.9 ± 1.4) KPa to(3.2 ± 1.5) KPa. After 5 to 64 mouths follow-up, the recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in two patients due to stent stenosis and were well controlled through balloon angioplasty. Conclusions: TIPS is an effective treatment for BCS with progressive liver dysfunction or severe portal hypertension with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and refractory ascites. In addition, it also contributes to the treatment of the recurrent or severe portal hypertension after the inferior vena cava or hepatic vein angioplasty. (authors)

  3. Hepatic Scintigraphic Findings of Budd-Chiari Syndrome due to Inferior Vena Caval Obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Soo Kyo; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Sung Yong; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1988-01-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is a rare clinical entity characterized by post-sinusoidal portal hypertension caused by the obstruction to the hepatic vein outflow. The diagnosis is suggested by hepatic scintigraphy and is usually confirmed by hepatic venography, inferior vena cavography and biopsy. The scintigraphic finding of BCS caused by the obstruction of main hepatic vein has been reported to consist typically of hypertrophy of the caudate lobe with increased radionuclide accumulation. Such a typical finding has been accounted for by the fact that the venous outflow from the caudate lobe is preserved when the main hepatic vein is obstructed. But usually, the hepatic venous outflow from the caudate lobe is also obstructed in BCS due to inferior vena caval obstruction. So hepatic scintigraphic findings of BCS due to inferior vena caval obstruction show different findings as compared with the BCS due to hepatic vein obstruction. We evaluate the hepatic scintigrams of the 13 cases of BCS due to inferior vena caval obstruction and review the literatures. The results are as follows: 1) We cannot observe the caudate lobe hypertrophy with increased uptake, which is known as a classic finding in BCS due to hepatic vein obstruction. 2) The most prominent hepatic scintigraphic findings of BCS are nonhomogenous uptake in the liver with extrahepatic uptake in the all cases. 3) We can see cold areas at the superior aspect of right hepatic lobe in 7 cases (54%). This is a useful finding suggesting BCS due to inferior vena caval obstruction.

  4. Functional Budd-Chiari Syndrome Associated With Severe Polycystic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Precil Diego Miranda de Menezes Neves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease secondary to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was referred to a quaternary care center due to significantly increased abdominal girth. Her physical examination revealed tense ascites and abdominal collateral veins. A 10-L paracentesis improved abdominal discomfort and disclosed a transudate, suggestive of portal hypertension. A computed tomographic scan revealed massive hepatomegaly caused by multiple cysts of variable sizes, distributed throughout all hepatic segments. Contrast-enhanced imaging uncovered extrinsic compression of hepatic and portal veins, resulting in functional Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal hypertension. Although image-guided drainage followed by sclerosis of dominant cysts could potentially lead to alleviation of the extrinsic compression, the associated significant risk of cyst hemorrhage and infection precluded this procedure. In this scenario, the decision was to submit the patient to a liver-kidney transplantation. After 1 year of this procedure, the patient maintains normal liver and kidney function and refers significant improvement in quality of life.

  5. Clinical application of Inoue-balloon in percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Jian; Qu Jian; Zhu Yaoqing; Wang Lei; Liu Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and effect of recanalization of inferior vena cava with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty(PTA)by Inoue-balloon. Methods: Eighty-nine patients with Budd-chiari syndrome (BCS )were treated with PTA by Inoue-balloon. Results: After PTA, the median (interquartile range)diameter of hepatic segment inferior vena cava increased from 0.00 (0.20-0.00) cm to 1.90 (2.00 1.47)cm; (P < 0.001), and the mean pressure of inferior vena cava reduced from (20.63 ± 7.22) mmHg to (12.13 ± 5.60) mmHg; (P < 0.001); with only less serious complications as rupture in two cases and without need of prior minor diameter balloon dilation in Inoue-balloon PTA. Conclusion: The advantages of Inoue- balloon PTA for BCS are more reliable and facile than those of polyethylene balloon, and may take the place in the foreseen future. (authors)

  6. PTA and stenting for various types of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinbao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and evaluate PTA and stenting for various types of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Methods: 89 patients with BCS were diagnosed and treated during 7 years. The interventional procedures included: Percutaneous balloon dilatation (PBD) of inferior vena cava (IVC), PBD and stent placement for IVC, hepatic vein angioplasty via trans jugular vein, hepatic vein angioplasty via transhepatic and trans jugular approach, accessory hepatic vein angioplasty, percutaneous dual balloon dilatation for IVC and hepatic vein, and percutanous dual stent placement for IVC and hepatic vein. Results: The achievement ratio of PTA and stent placement was 96% and the mortality was 0%. The serious complication of PTA and stent placement of BCS was penetration into the pericardium, endovascular stent migration into right atrium. Conclusion: 1. PTA is a reliable procedures in treating type I a, II and III BCS, and TIPPS is useful for type I b BCS. But PTA and stenting is necessary for patients with type IV BCS. 2. Thrombolysis is needed for patients with type III, IV BCS. 3. Guiding of Color Doppler Ultrasound can improve the success of percutanous hepatic vein and reduce complications. (authors)

  7. Analysis of the complications in interventional treatment for Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Zhike; Lv Guanghua; Du Fei; Guo Yanxia; Guan Lan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the causes and the prevention measures of the complications occurred after interventional therapy for different type of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Methods: Based on the type of BCS, the corresponding interventional management was adopted in 204 patients with BCS. The interventional procedures included PTA and stent placement of inferior vena cava (IVC), percutaneous transhepatic recanalization and dilation (PTRD) of hepatic vein, percutaneous trans jugular or trans inferior vena cava recanalization, dilation and stent placement of hepatic vein and trans jugular intrahepatic portal-systemic stenting shunt (TIPSS). Results: The successful rate of interventional therapy was 95.5% (21 / 22) for type Ia, 81.8% (9/11) for type Ib, 97.3% (109/112) for type IIa, 92.9% (13/14) for type IIb, 88.9% (8/9) for type IIIa, 100% (2/2) type IIIb, 92% (23/25) for type IVa and 88.9% (8/9) for type IVb BCS. The main complications occurred during or after the operation included acute cardiac insufficiency (n=2), pulmonary arterial embolization (n=4), disseminated intravascular coagulation (n=1), extravasation of contrast medium (n=3), arrhythmia (n=2), and cardiac tamponade (n=1). Conclusion: Interventional therapy is simple, safe and effective for the treatment of BCS, but its indications should be strictly considered and all kinds of effective prevention measures should be taken to avoid or to reduce the possible complications. (authors)

  8. Bilateral pulmonary thromboembolism and Budd-Chiari syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease on oral contraceptives Tromboembolismo de pulmón bilateral y síndrome de Budd-Chiari en paciente con enfermedad de Crohn y toma de anticonceptivos orales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Valdés Mas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Budd-Chiari syndrome can be defined as an interruption or diminution of the normal blood flow out of the liver. Patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome present with varying degrees of symptomatology that can be divided into the following categories: fulminant, acute, subacute and chronic. The subacute form is the most common presentation. A majority of patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome have an underlying hypercoagulability state. We present the case of a young woman with Crohn's disease on oral contraceptives who developed bilateral pulmonary thromboembolism and Budd-Chiari syndrome.El síndrome de Budd-Chiari consiste en la interrupción o disminución de flujo de las venas suprahepáticas. Tiene una gran variabilidad clínica en cuanto a su forma de presentación siendo la más frecuente la forma subaguda. La gran mayoría de los pacientes responden a estados de hipercoagulabilidad. Presentamos el caso de una paciente joven con enfermedad de Crohn que estaba en tratamiento con anticonceptivos orales y desarrolló un cuadro clínico de tromboembolismo de pulmón bilateral y síndrome de Budd-Chiari.

  9. Budd-Chiari syndrome and secondary nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver. Case report with special reference to diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutze, A.; Rueckert, R.; Rudolph, B.; Paris, S.; Podrabski, P.

    1993-01-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia is a benign epithelial proliferation of the liver with unknown etiology. We observed a female patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome and secondary nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver over a period of five years. Patient history, diagnostic imaging (sonography, CT, MR imaging, angiography), and clinical course are demonstrated along with results of macroscopic and microscopic studies of explanted liver prior to liver transplantation. The patient presented with various predisposing factors in combination that favour the development of nodular regenerative hyperplasia. (orig.) [de

  10. A Case of Acute Budd-Chiari Syndrome Complicating Primary Antiphospholipid Syndrome Presenting as Acute Abdomen and Responding to Tight Anticoagulant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Chinen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old woman with primary antiphospholipid syndrome was admitted to the Gastroenterology Department of our hospital with fever, acute abdomen, watery diarrhea, and extremely high levels of inflammatory parameters. She had a history of left lower limb deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and was taking warfarin potassium. Acute gastroenteritis was suspected and an antibiotic was administered, but symptoms progressed. Abdominal ultrasonography showed occlusion of the left hepatic vein and the middle hepatic vein and her D-dimer level was high. Accordingly, Budd-Chiari syndrome was diagnosed and high-dose intravenous infusion of heparin was initiated. Her abdominal symptoms improved and the levels of inflammatory parameters and D-dimer decreased rapidly. It is known that antiphospholipid syndrome can be complicated by Budd-Chiari syndrome that usually occurs as subacute or chronic onset, but acute onset is rare. It is difficult to diagnose acute Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating antiphospholipid syndrome and this complication generally has a poor outcome. However, the present case can get early diagnosis and successful treatment with tight anticoagulant therapy.

  11. Spectral CT imaging in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome: investigation of image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lei; Dong, Junqiang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Jie; Lv, Peijie; Hu, Lili; Yan, Liangliang; Gao, Jianbo

    2014-11-01

    To assess the image quality of monochromatic imaging from spectral CT in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), fifty patients with BCS underwent spectral CT to generate conventional 140 kVp polychromatic images (group A) and monochromatic images, with energy levels from 40 to 80, 40 + 70, and 50 + 70 keV fusion images (group B) during the portal venous phase (PVP) and the hepatic venous phase (HVP). Two-sample t tests compared vessel-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the portal vein (PV), hepatic vein (HV), inferior vena cava. Readers' subjective evaluations of the image quality were recorded. The highest SNR values in group B were distributed at 50 keV; the highest CNR values in group B were distributed at 40 keV. The higher CNR values and SNR values were obtained though PVP of PV (SNR 18.39 ± 6.13 vs. 10.56 ± 3.31, CNR 7.81 ± 3.40 vs. 3.58 ± 1.31) and HVP of HV (3.89 ± 2.08 vs. 1.27 ± 1.55) in the group B; the lower image noise for group B was at 70 keV and 50 + 70 keV (15.54 ± 8.39 vs. 18.40 ± 4.97, P = 0.0004 and 18.97 ± 7.61 vs. 18.40 ± 4.97, P = 0.0691); the results show that the 50 + 70 keV fusion image quality was better than that in group A. Monochromatic energy levels of 40-70, 40 + 70, and 50 + 70 keV fusion image can increase vascular contrast and that will be helpful for the diagnosis of BCS, we select the 50 + 70 keV fusion image to acquire the best BCS images.

  12. Two cases of Budd-Chiari syndrome complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma. Hemodynamic study with computed tomography and venacavography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayasu, Kenichi; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Masao [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital

    1982-12-01

    Two patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma in whom CT and inferior venacavography were carried out are described. The imaging study with CT disclosed: 1) calcified inferior vena cava (IVC) at the level of the diaphragm and lack of enhancement of the IVC and hepatic veins after contrast enhancement, 2) markedly dilated inferior right hepatic vein, 3) marked compensatory enlargement of the caudate lobe, 4) icile-like thrombus extending caudally in the IVC and dilatation of that portion of the IVC, and 5) enlarged and dilated azygos, hemiazygos and anterior longitudinal venous trunk of the internal vertebral venous plexus, and with cavography, 1) the inferior right hepatic vein as a venous outlet to maintain the liver functions, and 2) occlusion of the right and left hepatic vein openings and a communicating vein between the left hepatic and caudate lobe vein.

  13. A case report of secondary Budd-Chiari syndrome due to chronic empyema diagnosed by NMR-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Sayumi; Hattori, Akira; Yamauchi, Masayosi; Kimura, Kazuo; Suzino, Hajime; Sibata, Koji; Watanabe, Reijiro; Kameda, Haruo

    1985-01-01

    A 34-year-old male patient complained of general fatigue, ascites, and edema of the lower extremities. A chest x-ray film showed atelectasis of the right lung and pleural effusion of the right side. Liver ultrasonography revealed stenosis of the middle and right hepatic veins. Venacavography revealed stenosis of the inferior vena cava and collateral circulation. Finally, abdominal NMR-CT clearly visualized lunate stenosis and antero-lateral deviation of the inferior vena cava. He was diagnosed as having secondary Budd-Chiari syndrome resulting from the deviation and stenosis of the inferior vena cava due to distortion of the surrounding tissues by the thickened pleura which was caused by chronic empyema. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Long-Term Follow-Up After Successful Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement in a Pediatric Patient with Budd-Chiari Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Szejnfeld, Denis; Moreira, Airton Mota; Gibelli, Nelson; Gregorio, Miguel Angel De; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2008-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is the standard of care in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has become an important adjunct procedure while the patient is waiting for a liver. No long-term follow up of TIPS in BCS patients has been published in children. We report successful 10-year follow-up of a child with BCS and iatrogenic TIPS dysfunction caused by oral contraceptive use.

  15. Budd-Chiari syndrome due to prothrombotic disorder: mid-term patency and efficacy of endovascular stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelage, Jean-Pierre; Denys, Alban; Sibert, Annie; Menu, Yves [Department of Radiology, Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, 100 Boulevard du General Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France); Valla, Dominique [Department of Hepatology, Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, 100 Boulevard du General Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France); Sauvanet, Alain; Belghiti, Jacques [Department of Surgery, Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, 100 Boulevard du General Leclerc, 92110 Clichy (France)

    2003-02-01

    Our objective was to evaluate efficacy and patency of metallic stent placement for symptomatic Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) due to prothrombotic disorders. Eleven patients with proved BCS due to prothrombotic disorders were referred for endovascular treatment because of refractory ascites (n=9), abdominal pain (n=8), jaundice (n=6), and/or gastrointestinal bleeding (n=4). Stents were inserted for stenosed hepatic vein (n=7), inferior vena cava (n=2), or mesenterico-caval shunt (n=2). Clinical efficacy and stent patency was evaluated by clinical and Doppler follow-up. After a mean follow-up of 21 months, 6 patients had fully patent stents without reintervention (primary stent patency: 55%). Two patients with hepatic vein stenosis had stent thrombosis and died 4 months after procedure. Restenosis occurred in 3 cases (2 hepatic vein and 1 mesenterico-caval shunt stenosis) and were successfully treated by balloon angioplasty (n=2) and addition of new stents (n=1) leading to a 82% secondary stent patency. Of 9 patients with patent stent, 7 were asymptomatic (77%) at the end of the study. Stent placement is a safe and effective procedure to control of symptomatic BCS. Prothrombotic disorder does not seem to jeopardize patency in anticoagulated patients. (orig.)

  16. Budd-Chiari syndrome and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in polycythemia vera: Successful treatment with repeated TIPS and interferon alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akoum Riad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycythemia vera (PV is a common cause of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS and portal vein thrombosis (PVT. The postpartum period is a precipitating cofactor. An additional heparin-induced thrombocytopenia/thrombosis (HIT/T leads to a life-threatening condition in which transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting (TIPS seems to be the only life-saving procedure. We describe the case of a subacute BCS and PVT in the late postpartum period. The diagnosis was established using CT scan, MRI, and Doppler ultrasonography of abdominal vessels and the laboratory findings were compatible with PV. After a successful creation of TIPS, a HIT/T worsened the hemorrhagic and thrombotic picture. TIPS procedure was successfully repeated and heparin was replaced with Fondaparinux and then vitamin K antagonist. The treatment with interferon alpha-2A, started after the normalization of liver functions, resulted in a complete remission within 6 months. The JAK2 V617F mutation clone remained undetectable after 2 years′ follow-up.

  17. Prevalence of Budd-Chiari Syndrome during Pregnancy or Puerperium: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weirong Ren

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Women during pregnancy or puerperium are likely to develop Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS. However, the reported prevalence of pregnancy-related BCS varied considerably among studies. Our study aims to systematically review this issue. Overall, 817 papers were initially identified via the PubMed, EMBASE, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Scientific and Technological Journal databases. Twenty of them were eligible. The prevalence of pregnancy-related BCS varied from 0% to 21.5%. The pooled prevalence was 6.8% (95% CI: 3.9–10.5% in all BCS patients, 6.3% (95% CI: 3.8–9.4% in primary BCS patients, and 13.1% (95% CI: 7.1–20.7% in female BCS patients. Among them, one study was carried out in Africa with a prevalence of 10.6%; 14 studies in Asian countries with a pooled prevalence of 7.1% (95% CI: 3.1–12.6%; and 5 studies in European countries with a pooled prevalence of 5.0% (95% CI: 3.1–7.3%. The pooled prevalence was 6.7% (95% CI: 2.6–12.3% in studies published before 2005 and 7.3% (95% CI: 4.2–12.5% in those published after 2005. In conclusion, pregnancy is a relatively common risk factor for BCS, but there is a huge variation in the prevalence among studies. Physicians should be aware of pregnancy-related BCS.

  18. Regenerative nodules in patients with chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome: A longitudinal study using multiphase contrast-enhanced multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flor, Nicola; Zuin, Massimo; Brovelli, Francesca; Maggioni, Marco; Tentori, Augusta; Sardanelli, Francesco; Cornalba, Gian Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the serial evolution of regenerative nodules in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) treated with portal-systemic shunts, using multiphasic multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Materials and methods: Five patients each underwent three MDCT exams over an extended period ranging from 36 to 42 months. Two radiologists in consensus retrospectively reviewed each exam for each patient. Individual nodules were grouped according to size (size I: nodules with diameter ≤15 mm; size II: >15 mm but <30 mm; size III: ≥30 mm), pattern of enhancement (A: homogeneously hypervascular or B: with central scar), and segmental location. Four nodules classified as size II, which increased in size over time, were needle-biopsied. Results: We detected 61 nodules at the first exam, 66 nodules at the second exam (7 nodules disappeared and 12 new nodules), and 85 nodules at the third exam (8 disappeared and 27 new) for a total of 212 findings. Nodules were mostly found in the right hepatic lobe. Fourteen of the 15 nodules that disappeared over time were size I and enhancement pattern A. At unenhanced MDCT, 204 (96%) of the 212 findings were isodense. Overall, 100 nodules, including the 61 initially detected, were considered newly diagnosed; of these 84 (84%) were size I and pattern A. Of 57 nodules considered size I and pattern A at the first or second exam, 24 (42%) changed to pattern B at the third exam and either size II (n = 18) or III (n = 6). The four biopsied nodules were each confirmed as benign regenerative nodule. No patient developed HCC at 5-year follow-up period. Conclusion: Hepatic nodules in BCS patients not only increase in number over time but may also increase in size and develop a central scar.

  19. Budd-Chiari syndrome: dynamic enhancement findings with multi-slice helical CT and CT angiography analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xiaochun; Shan Hong; Zhu Kangshun; Xu Chuan; Zhang Jiansheng; Liu Lingyun; Ye Binbin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the dynamic enhancement regulations of liver and their mechanism in Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) by using multi-slice CT and evaluate the value of CT angiography in the diagnosis of BCS. Methods: 28 cases with BCS confirmed by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent dynamic enhancement examinations with multi-slice CT within 1 week before DSA. The relevant vessels were reconstructed respectively with MIP, VR and MPR. Compared with the results of DSA, we analyzed the dynamic enhancement regulations of liver in BCS, estimated the value of dynamic enhancement CT exams and CTA techniques in judging the obstruction level and showing collateral vessels. Results: Of all 28 cases, CT correctly showed the obstruction level in 26 cases, and 2 had incorrect results which proved to be membranous obstruction of the inferior vena cava superior to diaphragm. In 22 cases with hepatic vein obstructions, hepatic parenchyma displayed typical patchy enhancement in 19, atypical patchy enhancement in 3.8 cases among these showed benign nodules. Simultaneously, CT showed stenosis and rigidity of portal vein branches in 20, enlargement of hepatic artery in 14, hepatic collateral vessels in 20 out of 22 cases. In 6 cases with simple obstruction of inferior vena cava, hepatic changes were not found. Collateral circulations in or out of liver corresponded to the obstruction level. Conclusion: Dynamic enhancement examinations with multi-slice CT can correctly reflect the hepatic hemodynamic changes. Transverse images, combined with CTA, can explicitly display the obstruction level of vascular lesions and collateral circulations in BCS. (authors)

  20. Scientific publications on portal vein thrombosis and Budd-Chiari syndrome: a global survey of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xingshun; Jia, Jia; Ren, Weirong; Yang, Man; De Stefano, Valerio; Wang, Juan; Fan, Daiming

    2014-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) are two rare vascular disorders of the liver that can lead to life-threatening complications. We conducted a global survey to systematically analyze the scientific publications in the fields of PVT and BCS. All papers regarding PVT and BCS were identified via the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases. The publication year, country, type of paper, study design, and number of citations were summarized. Good quality papers were defined as those in which a high proportion of homogeneous patients with BCS and/or PVT was observed. We identified 6691 and 4325 papers regarding PVT and BCS, respectively. The number of papers gradually increased over time. Researchers from the USA published the greatest number of papers (PVT: n=1418; BCS: n=888). Clinical studies were the most common type of paper (PVT: n=5395; BCS n=3171), but fewer than half of these observed more than 10 patients (PVT: n=2667/5395; BCS: n=1092/3171). Furthermore, fewer than half of the clinical studies with more than 10 patients were of good quality (PVT: 976/2667; BCS: 466/1092). According to the study design, the good quality papers were classified as cohort studies (PVT: n=865; BCS: n=421), case-control studies (PVT: n=98; BCS: n=45), and randomized controlled trials (PVT: n=13; BCS: n=0). The 5 most frequently cited original articles and guidelines/consensuses were also listed. Despite an increase in the number of papers regarding PVT and BCS over time, most of the papers had a small sample size, suggesting the necessity of large cohort studies or randomized controlled trials.

  1. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis: results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H. L.; Meinardi, J. R.; Vleggaar, F. P.; van Uum, S. H.; Haagsma, E. B.; van der Meer, F. J.; van Hattum, J.; Chamuleau, R. A.; Adang, R. P.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.; van Hoek, B.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We compared 43 BCS

  2. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis : results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, HLA; Meinardi, [No Value; Vleggaar, FP; van Uum, SHM; Haagsma, EB; van der Meer, FJM; van Hattum, J; Chamuleau, RAFM; Adang, RP; Vandenbroucke, JP; van Hoek, B; Rosendaal, FR

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT), We compared 43 BCS

  3. Tratamento da síndrome de Budd-Chiari por meio da colocação de tips e de "stent" venoso supra-hepático Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS and suprahepatic venous stenting in the management of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandi A. Bettio

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Descrever o uso do "shunt" intra-hepático portossistêmico (TIPS e do "stent" venoso supra-hepático no manejo da síndrome de Budd-Chiari, enfocando suas indicações, aspectos técnicos e benefícios do procedimento. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: De janeiro de 1999 a março de 2002, nove casos de síndrome de Budd-Chiari foram encaminhados ao Serviço de Hemodinâmica do Hospital São Lucas, Porto Alegre, RS. A obstrução venosa supra-hepática foi constatada em todos os casos por meio de ultra-sonografia com Doppler em cores. A criação de TIPS foi realizada entre o sistema venoso supra-hepático ou a veia cava inferior e a veia porta, posicionando-se a endoprótese entre as duas abordagens. Doppler em cores pós-procedimento foi efetuado em todos os pacientes em períodos seriados. RESULTADOS: Três casos foram tratados inicialmente com inserção de "stent" venoso por apresentarem estenose preponderante em veias supra-hepáticas. Em dois desses casos ocorreu trombose do "stent", sendo necessária colocação de TIPS. Os demais seis casos foram tratados primariamente com TIPS. Dos oito "shunts" criados, trombose da endoprótese foi constatada em três casos, resolvidas com limpeza dos trombos e dilatação com balão em um caso e inserção de novas próteses nos demais. Embolização com molas de colaterais venosas ectasiadas foi efetuada em um paciente. CONCLUSÕES: A colocação de TIPS constitui-se numa estratégia terapêutica segura e efetiva na síndrome de Budd-Chiari, promovendo uma significativa melhora clínica e hemodinâmica dos pacientes, evitando procedimentos mais invasivos e podendo, em casos sem cirrose estabelecida, servir de tratamento definitivo da hipertensão portal.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS and suprahepatic venous stenting in the management of Budd-Chiari syndrome, emphasizing the indications, technical aspects and the advantages of the procedure

  4. Detection and characterization of Budd-Chiari syndrome with inferior vena cava obstruction: Comparison of fixed and flexible delayed scan time of computed tomography venography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng-Li; Wu, Gang; Han, Xin-Wei; Bi, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Wen-Guang; Wu, Zheng-Yang

    2017-06-01

    To compare the results of computed tomography venography (CTV) with a fixed and a flexible delayed scan time for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) with inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction. A total of 209 consecutive BCS patients with IVC obstruction underwent either a CTV with a fixed delayed scan time of 180s (n=87) or a flexible delayed scan time for good image quality according to IVC blood flow in color Doppler ultrasonography (n=122). The IVC blood flow velocity was measured using a color Doppler ultrasound prior to CT scan. Image quality was classified as either good, moderate, or poor. Image quality, surrounding structures and the morphology of the IVC obstruction were compared between the two groups using a χ 2 -test or paired or unpaired t-tests as appropriate. Inter-observer agreement was assessed using Kappa statistics. There was no significant difference in IVC blood flow velocity between the two groups. Overall image quality, surrounding structures and IVC obstruction morphology delineation on the flexible delayed scan time of CTV images were rated better relative to those obtained by fixed delayed scan time of CTV images (ptime of CTV. There were no significant differences in Kappa statistics between Group A and Group B. The flexible delayed scan time of CTV was associated with better detection and more reliable characterization of BCS with IVC obstruction compared to a fixed delayed scan time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiple FNH-Like Lesions in a Patient with Chronic Budd-Chiari Syndrome: Gd-EOB-Enhanced MRI and BR1 CEUS Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Newerla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A-26-year old female patient with chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome due to different underlying blood disorders applied for a two-year followup of the liver with Gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic-acid-(Gd-EOB-DTPA- enhanced MRI. The liver function tests were raised. Besides showing a progressive hepatosplenomegaly and a cirrhotic liver alteration, the MRI revealed multiple new nodular lesions in all liver segments. These lesions showed typical patterns in the precontrast images, while there was an arterial and a persistent portal venous enhancement. In the hepatobiliary liver-specific late phase, a central “washout” and a persistent rim enhancement were observed (target sign. The additionally performed contrast-enhanced ultrasonography showed a strong zentrifugal arterial enhancement of the lesions followed by an isoechoic enhancement in the portal venous and delayed liver phase. Histologically these lesions turned out as focal nodular hyperplasias (FNH or FNH-like lesions, also known as large regenerative nodules (LRNs. Differentiation between regenerative nodules like LRN and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in cirrhotic livers is crucial, and the target sign in the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA as well as the centrifugal arterial enhancement followed by an isoenhancement during a CEUS might be useful for establishing the correct diagnosis of such hypervascular lesions with proliferated and likely aberrant bile ducts.

  6. Thrombophilic Genetic Factors PAI-1, MTHFRC677T, V Leiden 506Q, and Prothrombin 20210A in Noncirrhotic Portal Vein Thrombosis and Budd-Chiari Syndrome in a Caucasian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario D’Amico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombophilic genetic factors PAI-1, MTHFRC677T, V Leiden 506Q, and Prothrombin 20210A were studied as risk factors in 235 Caucasian subjects: 85 patients with abdominal thrombosis (54 with portal vein thrombosis (PVT and 31 with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS without liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma and 150 blood bank donors. Seventy-five patients with PVT/BCS showed associated disease or particular clinical status (46 PVT/29 BCS: 37 myeloproliferative neoplasm (20 PVT/17 BCS, 12 abdominal surgery (10 PVT/2 BCS, 10 contraception or pregnancy (6 PVT/4 BCS, 7 abdominal acute disease (6 PVT/1 BCS, and 9 chronic disease (4 PVT/5 BCS; ten patients did not present any association (8 PVT/2 BCS. PAI-14G-4G, MTHFR677TT, and V Leiden 506Q were significantly frequent (OR 95% CI and χ2 test with P value in abdominal thrombosis; in these patients PAI-14G-4G and MTHFR677TT distributions deviated from that expected from a population in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (PAI-1: χ2=13.8, P<0.001; MTHFR677: χ2=7.1, P<0.01, whereas the equilibrium was respected in healthy controls. V Leiden Q506 and Prothrombin 20210A were in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium both in patients with abdominal thrombosis and healthy controls. Our study shows an important role of PAI-14G-4G and MTHFR677TT in abdominal thrombosis without liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Chiari I malformation associated with turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamble Jayaprakash Harsha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome (TS is a rare genetic disease due to the absence of one X chromosome. Patients with TS have more subtle neurological/neuropsychiatric problems, while headache is an uncommon clinical presentation which needs attention. We report a 12-year-old child presenting with typical cough headache. Her magnetic resonance imaging revealed Chiari I malformation associated with TS. To the best of our knowledge, Chiari I malformation associated with TS is not described in literature. We report the first case of TS associated with Chiari I malformation. Interestingly, Chiari I malformation is also associated with Noonan's syndrome, which is a close morphological mimicker of TS, raising the possibility of sharing similar pathogenesis in both conditions.

  8. Síndrome de Budd-Chiari. Avances en el conocimiento de su fisiopatología y nuevas estrategias terapeuticas

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Guerra de Aguilar, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    El síndrome de Budd-Chiari (SBC) es una enfermedad poco frecuente que no obstante afecta a población joven con una alta morbimortalidad. A pesar del gran esfuerzo investigador realizado, quedan aún por hacer avances en el conocimiento fisiopatológico y en el ámbito terapéutico, ambos estrechamente vinculados, que mejoren el pronóstico de estos enfermos. Sin embargo, la baja incidencia de esta enfermedad ha dificultado la realización de estudios prospectivos y la obtención de resultados de in...

  9. Hepatopulmonary syndrome: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurnink, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Huurnink A, Van den Berg CHSB, Booij J. Hepatopulmonary syndrome: a case report. Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterised by a lowered oxygenation caused by intrapulmonary vascular dilatation in the setting of a liver disease. We present a case of a 42-year old woman with a Budd-Chiari syndrome,

  10. The effects of L-carnitin in Budd-Chiari syndrome in a domestic cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Sağkan Öztürk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a thrombosis in the vena cava caudalis of a 15 year-old cat with ascites. Trauma and eventually feline enteric corona virus infection in the cat were not detected. In the intrahepatic region, a blockage of vena cava caudalis was brought to light by ultrasonographic imaging. An aspirate of abdominal fl uid revealed modified transudate. Liver enzyme levels were increased in the serum sample of the cat. The levels of total oxidant status (TOS and total antioxidant status (TAS were elevated in the peritoneal fluid. Liver protection diet with L-carnitine, diuretic therapy and antimicrobial drugs were administrated for treatment of the cat. During the continuous treatment, the amount of abdominal fluid decreased, but never completely absorbed. L-carnitine was administered to the cat during the time of treatment, and subsequently the levels of liver enzymes decreased. However, the cat died because of recurrent ascites and persistent thrombosis. In conclusion, ultrasonographic examination was very reliable, non-invasive and highly useful diagnostic method for BCS and L-carnitine has crucial effects on the quality of life, energy metabolism and liver enzyme levels. However, the blockage of the vena cava caudalis could not completely respond to medical treatment and thrombosis should be eliminated by surgical intervention.

  11. The effects of L-carnitin in Budd-Chiari syndrome in a domestic cat

    OpenAIRE

    Aliye Sağkan Öztürk; Nuri Altuğ; Serkan İrfan Köse; Oktay Hasan Öztürk

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a thrombosis in the vena cava caudalis of a 15 year-old cat with ascites. Trauma and eventually feline enteric corona virus infection in the cat were not detected. In the intrahepatic region, a blockage of vena cava caudalis was brought to light by ultrasonographic imaging. An aspirate of abdominal fl uid revealed modified transudate. Liver enzyme levels were increased in the serum sample of the cat. The levels of total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (T...

  12. [Arnold-Chiari malformation in Noonan syndrome and other syndromes of the RAS/MAPK pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejarque, Ismael; Millán-Salvador, José M; Oltra, Silvestre; Pesudo-Martínez, José V; Beneyto, Magdalena; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and other syndromes with a similar phenotype, such as LEOPARD, cardiofaciocutaneous, Costello and Legius, are associated to mutations in genes included in the RAS/MAPK pathway (RASopathies), which is an important signalling pathway related to cell proliferation. Tonsillar descent into the upper cervical spinal canal, known as Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM), has been reported in patients with NS and this has led some researchers to suggest that ACM could be part of the phenotypic spectrum of NS. We report two cases of NS and ACM. Case 1: 29-year-old female with Noonan phenotype who underwent surgery at the age of nine years due to pulmonary valve stenosis. At the age of 27, she presented symptomatic ACM that required surgical decompression. She presented the c.922A>G (N308D) mutation in the gene PTPN that belongs to the RAS/MAPK pathway. Case 2: a 10-year-old female with Noonan phenotype and asymptomatic ACM detected in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. She was a carrier of the c.923A>G (N308S) mutation in gene PTPN11. Six patients with this association have been found in the literature, four with the Noonan phenotype and two with LEOPARD. Our two patients provide supplementary evidence that backs up the hypothesis by which ACM would be part of the phenotypic spectrum of NS. The small number of reported cases of patients with this association does not allow us to draw up recommendations about when and how often neuroimaging studies should be performed; a careful neurological examination, however, should be included in the anticipatory health guidelines in syndromes involving the RAS/MAPK pathway.

  13. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marques do Vale

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery.

  14. Comparison of retrievable stents and permanent stents for Budd-Chiari syndrome due to obstructive inferior vena cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yonghua; Chen, Hongmei; Ding, Penxu; Ren, Jianzhuang; Han, Xinwei

    2018-05-30

    To compare long-term outcomes of retrievable stents and permanent stents for BCS due to long-segment obstructive IVC. Between July 2000 and August 2016, 42 patients with BCS due to long-segment obstructive IVC were treated with retrievable stents (RS) and 41 patients were treated with permanent stents (PS). The retrievable stents was removed eventually after thrombus disappeared. Patients were subsequently followed-up by color Doppler sonography or CT scanning. All retrievable stent placements were successfully, and 37 retrievable stents were retrieved 8 to 29 days later. Forty-two stents were implanted in PS Group. One failure retrieval of retrievable stents occurred, and two failures of cannulations were found in PS Group. Two deaths may procedure-related and died from acute pulmonary thromboembolism perioperatively. One patient developed acute cerebral infarction and recovered after treatment. In PS Group, minor complications were found in 3 patients. The length of IVC lesion segment, length and thickness of IVC thrombus decreased significantly, and diameter of retrocaval IVC and diaphragm IVC increased significantly in both groups. During follow up, 3 patients died from liver failure in RS Group and 2 patients died in PS Group. RS Group showed a significantly higher primary patency rate than PS Group. Cumulative 1-, 3-, and 5-year secondary patency rates were 95.2%, 89.6%, 89.6% in RS Group, and 100%, 96.6%, 96.6% in PS Group (p= 0.7109). Retrievable stents is effective for BCS due to long-segment obstructive IVC, with a higher primary patency rate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of HTLV-I with Arnold Chiari syndrome and syringomyelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Maria de Castro Viana

    Full Text Available HTLV-I is associated with a broad spectrum of manifestations, including tropical spastic paraparesis and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Arnold Chiari syndrome is a condition characterized by herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. This condition should be suspected in all patients with headache and impaired motor coordination. Syringomyelia is a developmental anomaly that leads to the formation of an intramedullary cavity. Its clinical presentation is classically characterized by syringomyelic dissociation of sensation, with suspended distribution in the proximal portion of the trunk and upper limbs and preservation in other regions. We report here a case of association of the three diseases, which is rare in clinical practice, illustrating the difficulty in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of these conditions.

  16. Conquer Chiari

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the Web Chiari Facebook Page Pediatric Chiari Facebook Page Upcoming Events Community Fundraising Efforts ABOUT US C&S Patient Education Foundation Mission History & Accomplishments Team Financial Disclosure Forms (990's) Get Involved ...

  17. Chiari Malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the back of the skull, just above the spine. When a child has a Chiari malformation, the space for the ... a portion of the top vertebra in the spine to reduce pressure in that area. If a child with a Chiari malformation also has hydrocephalus, the ...

  18. Budd–Chiari Syndrome in Young Chinese: Clinical Characteristics, Etiology and Outcome of Recanalization from a Single Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wen-Jie, E-mail: 776260859@qq.com; Cui, Yan-Feng, E-mail: cuiyanfeng366@126.com; Zu, Mao-Heng, E-mail: cjr.zumaoheng@vip.163.com; Zhang, Qing-Qiao, E-mail: 1427286069@qq.com; Xu, Hao, E-mail: xuhao585@yeah.net [Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Department of Interventional Radiology (China)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeWe aimed to characterize the clinical profile, etiology, and outcomes of young Chinese patients with Budd–Chiari syndrome treated with recanalization.MethodsA total of 35 consecutive young patients (≤25 years of age) with primary Budd–Chiari syndrome treated with recanalization at our center were enrolled in this study between March 2011 and December 2014. Data on baseline information, etiology tests, therapeutic recanalization strategies, and follow-up were collected.ResultsThe most common clinical feature was ascites, present in 33 cases (94 %). Hepatic vein obstruction was present in 60 % (21/35) of patients, inferior vena cava obstruction in 3 % (1/35), and combined obstruction in 37 % (13/35). The most common risk factor for thrombosis was hyperhomocysteinemia (14/35, 40 %). Recanalization was technically successful in 32 of 35 patients (91 %), and clinically successful in 28 of these 32 patients (88 %). The cumulative 1- and 3-year primary patency rates were 75.2 and 54.3 %, respectively. The cumulative 1- and 3-year secondary patency rates were 89.3 and 89.3 %, respectively. The cumulative 1- and 3-year survival rates were 96.9 and 93.8 %, respectively.ConclusionIn this study, the most common type of lesion was hepatic vein obstruction, the most common thrombotic risk factor was hyperhomocysteinemia, and recanalization resulted in good mid-term outcomes in young Chinese patients with Budd–Chiari syndrome.

  19. False-positive image of portal thrombosis with MRI: portal hypertension as a pitfall. Observation in a Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy-Miallou, C.; Bousquet, J.C.; Bellin, M.F.; Guinet, C.; Grellet, J.

    1990-01-01

    This observation illustrates how difficult it is to interpret the intravascular signal observed with MRI in cases of portal hypertension. A signal occupying the entire lumen of the portal trunk and branches can be seen, which is constantly observed in the axial as well as coronal planes in the 3 series studied. It is hypointense relative to the liver on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images: this appearance therefore perfectly mimicks portal thrombosis. Ultrasound combined with pulsed Doppler demonstrates the stagnant blood within the patent portal system. This kind of artifact, which is produced by a very slow flow or even by the standstill of flow, is much more difficult to recognize than the common flow artifacts; the criteria put forward by various authors to distinguish between artifacts and thrombosis are of no avail in this case. Examinations must able to confirm or rule out portal thrombosis in the case of portal hypertension with deceleration of flow. In practice, ultrasound studies, combined with pulsed Doppler in the best cases, is therefore indicated as a first-intension technique [fr

  20. Analysis of expression of von Willebrand factor, endothelin-1, vascular endothelial growth factor in Budd-Chiari syndrome with membranous obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xinqiang; Zu Maoheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the injured vascular endothelial plays an important role in the membranous formation of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Methods: There were 40 cases of membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava (MOVC) in the experimental group and 40 arrhythmic inpatients in the control group from affiliated hospital. There were 23 males and 17 females in experimental group while 21 males and 19 females in control group, and the age were (41.8±8.1) yrs and (43.2± 7.6) yrs respectively. All of them had no anti-coagulation (clotting) drug history and smoking history, no hypertension, no pulmonary artery hypertension, no coronary heart disease, no valvular disease, no myocardial disease, no blood disease, no diabetes, no connective tissue disease and malignancy, and liver and renal function must be normal. And then the serum concentrations of von Willebrand factor (vWF), endothelin-l (ET-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were defined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results were analyzed with independent sample t-test. Results: In MOVC patients, the serum concentrations of vWF, ET-1 and VEGF [(37.8±6.6) μg/L, (31.9± 6.0) ng/L, (20.84±5.78) μg/L] were higher than those in the control group [(3.3±1.3) μg/L, (5.3±1.8) ng/L, (4.2±1.2) μg/L. t=32.65, 26.70, 17.85, P<0.01, respectively]. Conclusions: The injury of vascular endothelium is related to the formation of membrane in the IVC. (authors)

  1. Klippel-Feil syndrome in association with Chiari zero malformation in the setting of acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M. McDougall, MD FRCS(C

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This is the first report of a Chiari zero malformation associated with KFS. This patient was managed with an initial conservative approach and delayed posterior fossa decompression. There was steady improvement in his neurological function. This appears to represent a viable treatment approach.

  2. International Journal of Health Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2008-06-02

    Jun 2, 2008 ... As the young girl was suffering from antiphospholipid syndrome secondary to lupus, this milder form of Budd-Chiari Syndrome was later treated in India with surgical shunts. Keywords: Systemic lupus erythematosus; Budd-Chiari. Syndrome; lupus anticoagulants; thrombosis; antiphospholipid syndrome.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging features of complex Chiari malformation variant of Chiari 1 malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Hannah E. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Moore, Kevin R. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Complex Chiari malformation is a subgroup of Chiari 1 malformation with distinct imaging features. Children with complex Chiari malformation are reported to have a more severe clinical phenotype and sometimes require more extensive surgical treatment than those with uncomplicated Chiari 1 malformation. We describe reported MR imaging features of complex Chiari malformation and evaluate the utility of craniometric parameters and qualitative anatomical observations for distinguishing complex Chiari malformation from uncomplicated Chiari 1 malformation. We conducted a retrospective search of the institutional imaging database using the keywords ''Chiari'' and ''Chiari 1'' to identify children imaged during the 2006-2011 time period. Children with Chiari 2 malformation were excluded after imaging review. We used the first available diagnostic brain or cervical spine MR study for data measurement. Standard measurements and observations were made of obex level (mm), cerebellar tonsillar descent (mm), perpendicular distance to basion-C2 line (pB-C2, mm), craniocervical angle (degrees), clivus length, and presence or absence of syringohydromyelia, basilar invagination and congenital craniovertebral junction osseous anomalies. After imaging review, we accessed the institutional health care clinical database to determine whether each subject clinically met criteria for Chiari 1 malformation or complex Chiari malformation. Obex level and craniocervical angle measurements showed statistically significant differences between the populations with complex Chiari malformation and uncomplicated Chiari 1 malformation. Cerebellar tonsillar descent and perpendicular distance to basion-C2 line measurements trended toward but did not meet statistical significance. Odontoid retroflexion, craniovertebral junction osseous anomalies, and syringohydromyelia were all observed proportionally more often in children with complex Chiari malformation than in

  4. Symptomatic Chiari malformation in infancy and adolescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Takeo; Matsuda, Toshihiro; Tsugu, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Seisaburou; Tomonaga, Masamichi; Asakawa, Koji; Mitsudome, Akihisa; Hashimoto, Takahisa.

    1994-01-01

    Of the 7 children and adolescents with Chiari malformation reported here 5 had Chiari type 1 and 2 had Chiari type 2 disease. All 5 Chiari type 1 patients had syringomyelia and scoliosis, but the Chiari type 2 patients did not. All the patients except one with localized syringomyelia (case 3) underwent posterior decompression with suboccipital craniectomy, upper cervical laminectomy and duraplasty, and their clinical signs and symptoms improved. Case 3 received a syringo-subarachnoid shunt and improved clinically. Motor function was restored better than sensory function. Cranial nerve signs were cleared up in the Chiari type 2 patients. In the Chiari type 1 patients postoperative neurological improvement correlated well with the collapse of syringomyelia. Cine MR imaging was useful in the evaluation of CSF dynamics at the cranio-vertebral junction and in the syringomyelic cavity before and after surgery. (author)

  5. Headache in children with Chiari I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldo, Irene; Tangari, Marta; Mardari, Rodica; Perissinotto, Egle; Sartori, Stefano; Gatta, Michela; Calderone, Milena; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Headache is the most common symptom of Chiari 1 malformation, a condition characterized by the herniation of cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. However, the headache pattern of cases with Chiari 1 malformations is not well defined in the literature, especially in children. The aim of this retrospective chart review was to evaluate the frequency and the characteristics of headache in children with Chiari 1 malformation at initial evaluation and during follow up. Forty-five cases with tonsillar ectopia were selected among 9947 cases under 18 years of age who underwent neuroimaging between 2002 and 2010. A semistructured clinical interview (mean follow-up: 5.2 years) was conducted. Headache was classified according to the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Possible associations between clinical picture, in particular headache pattern, but also other signs and symptoms attributable to Chiari 1 malformation, and the extent of tonsillar ectopia were found for 3 different groups: those with borderline (headache, and 9/33 (27%) of those patients (5 with mild and 4 with severe tonsillar ectopia) reported headache attributed to Chiari 1 malformation. In our studied pediatric population, the most common symptom for cases diagnosed with Chiari 1 malformation was headache, and headache attributed to Chiari 1 malformation was the most common headache pattern in patients with Chiari 1 malformation. The presence of headache attributed to Chiari 1 malformation along with 3 other signs or symptoms of Chiari 1 malformation were highly predictive of severe tonsillar ectopia. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  6. Clinical and radiological findings in arnold chiari malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Bhatti, S.N.; Ahmed, E.; Aurangzeb, A.; Ali, A.; Khan, A.; Afzal, S.; Khan, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Chiari Malformation I (CMI) is a disorder of uncertain origin that has been traditionally defined as downward herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. The anomaly is a leading cause of syringomyelia and occurs in association with osseous abnormalities at the cranio vertebral junction. In contrast to other Chiari malformations, CMI tends to present in the second or third decade of life and is sometimes referred to as the 'adult-type' Chiari malformation. The objective was to document clinical and radiological findings in Arnold Chiari Malformation-I. Method: This was a descriptive study carried out in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad at Neurosurgery Department during July 2008 - July 2010. We examined a prospective cohort of 60 symptomatic patients. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the head and spine. Results: There were 40 female and 20 male patients. The age of onset was 24.9 +- 15.8 years. Common associated radiological problems included syringomyelia (60%), scoliosis (25%), and basilar invagination (12%), increased cervical lordosis 5 (8.5%), and Klippel Feil syndrome 2 (3.3%). The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging findings were obliteration of the retrocerebellar cerebrospinal fluid spaces (70% patients), tonsillar herniation of at least 5 mm (100% patients), and varying degrees of post fossa anomalies. Linical manifestations were headaches, pseudotumor-like episodes, a Meniere's disease-like syndrome, lower cranial nerve signs, and spinal cord disturbances in the absence of syringomyelia. Conclusion: These data support accumulating evidence that CMI is a disorder of the para-axial mesoderm that is characterised by underdevelopment of the posterior cranial fossa and overcrowding of the normally developed hindbrain. Tonsillar herniation of less than 5 mm does not exclude the diagnosis. Clinical manifestations of CMI seem to be related to cerebrospinal fluid disturbances (which are responsible

  7. Clinical and radiological findings in arnold chiari malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, A A; Bhatti, S N; Ahmed, E; Aurangzeb, A; Ali, A; Khan, A; Afzal, S; Khan, G [Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad (Pakistan). Department of Neurosurgery

    2010-04-15

    Background: The Chiari Malformation I (CMI) is a disorder of uncertain origin that has been traditionally defined as downward herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum. The anomaly is a leading cause of syringomyelia and occurs in association with osseous abnormalities at the cranio vertebral junction. In contrast to other Chiari malformations, CMI tends to present in the second or third decade of life and is sometimes referred to as the 'adult-type' Chiari malformation. The objective was to document clinical and radiological findings in Arnold Chiari Malformation-I. Method: This was a descriptive study carried out in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad at Neurosurgery Department during July 2008 - July 2010. We examined a prospective cohort of 60 symptomatic patients. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the head and spine. Results: There were 40 female and 20 male patients. The age of onset was 24.9 +- 15.8 years. Common associated radiological problems included syringomyelia (60%), scoliosis (25%), and basilar invagination (12%), increased cervical lordosis 5 (8.5%), and Klippel Feil syndrome 2 (3.3%). The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging findings were obliteration of the retrocerebellar cerebrospinal fluid spaces (70% patients), tonsillar herniation of at least 5 mm (100% patients), and varying degrees of post fossa anomalies. Linical manifestations were headaches, pseudotumor-like episodes, a Meniere's disease-like syndrome, lower cranial nerve signs, and spinal cord disturbances in the absence of syringomyelia. Conclusion: These data support accumulating evidence that CMI is a disorder of the para-axial mesoderm that is characterised by underdevelopment of the posterior cranial fossa and overcrowding of the normally developed hindbrain. Tonsillar herniation of less than 5 mm does not exclude the diagnosis. Clinical manifestations of CMI seem to be related to cerebrospinal fluid disturbances (which are responsible

  8. BEHÇET’S SYNDROME AND THROMBOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emire Seyahi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Behçet syndrome (BS is a multisystem vasculitis with unknown etiology and a unique geographic distribution. The disease course is characterized by exacerbations and remissions while abating as the years pass. The usual onset is in the third decade. Recurrent skin mucosa lesions and sight threatening panuveitis are the hallmark of the disease. Males are more severely affected than females. Vascular involvement can occur in up to 40 % of cases.  BS is unique among the vasculitides in that it may involve all sizes and types of vessels. It affects the veins more than the arteries. Lower extremity vein thrombosis is the most frequent manifestation of vascular involvement, followed by vena cava thrombosis, pulmonary artery aneurysms, Budd-Chiari syndrome, peripheral artery aneurysms, dural sinus thrombosis and abdominal aorta aneurysms. Vascular involvement is frequently associated with constitutional symptoms and increased acute phase response and is the major cause of increased mortality.  A predominantly neutrophilic vasculitis around the vaso vasorum is typical of BS. The thrombus is tightly adherent to the vessel wall which probably explains why thromboembolism is so rare despite the high frequency of venous disease. Thrombophilic factors do not seem to explain thrombotic tendency in BS. Immunosuppressive treatment is essential in suppression and preventing the attacks.

  9. Cranial CT signs of the Chiari II malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidich, T.P.; Pudlowski, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Serial CT scans of 32 patients with proved Chiari II malformations and 19 patients with hydrocephalus and meningomyelocele (presumed to have Chiari II malformation) were reviewed and compared with CT scans from 30 patients with non-chiari aqueductal stenosis to develop criteria for identifying the Chiari II malformation and for differentiating it from other forms of hydrocephalus. Correlation with post-mortem specimens of Chiari II brains provided a pathologic basis for the CT signs observed. (orig.) [de

  10. Crippling load test of Budd Pioneer Car 244, test 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    This report summarizes Test 3, a crippling load test on Budd Pioneer Car 244, conducted on June 28, 2011. Before the crippling load test, Transportation Technology Center, Inc., conducted two 800,000-pound (lb) quasi-static tests on Car 244 in accord...

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and/or hydrothorax (in the chest). Budd-Chiari syndrome , a blockage in one or more veins that ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  12. SAMJ 8615.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoimmune hepatitis. Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Neonatal haemochromatosis. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia with giant cell hepatitis. Toxic. Drugs/toxins/herbals. Amanita phalloides. Vascular. BuddChiari syndrome. Venoocclusive disease. Ischaemic hepatitis/shock liver. Post cardiac surgery. Liver trauma.

  13. Terminal hemimyelocystocele associated with Chiari II malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umamaheswara Reddy V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Terminal myelocystocele (TMC results from failure of embryonic CSF to drain outside the neural tube creating CSF reservoir within a dorsal meningocele. Association of Chiari II malformation with diastematomyelia and myelocystocele is extremely rare. Myelocystoceles do not have neural tissue so they have good prognosis after treatment, however when associated with hydromelia and Chiari malformation they present with neurological deficits. We present details of a 2 year old female who presented to us with this rare anomaly.

  14. Chiari malformations: diagnosis, treatments and failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Barr, M M; Strong, C I; Groff, M W

    2014-12-01

    Chiari malformations refer to abnormalities of the hindbrain originally described by the Austrian pathologist Hans Chiari in the early 1890s. These malformations range from herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum to complete agenesis of the cerebellum. In this review, we review the different classification schemes of Chiari malformations. We discuss the different signs and symptoms that the two most common malformations present with and diagnostic criteria. We next discuss current treatment paradigms, including the new measure of possible in utero surgery to help decrease the incidence of Chiari type II malformations. There is also a small discussion of treatment failures and salvage procedures in these difficult cases. Chiari malformations are a difficult clinical entity to treat. As more is learned about the genetic and environmental factors relating to their characteristics, it will be interesting if we are able to predict which treatments are better suited for different patients. Similarly, with the evolution of in utero techniques especially for Chiari II malformations, it will be interesting to see if the incidence and practice of treating these difficult patients will change.

  15. Syringomyelia associated with Chiari malformation in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Kitano, Shouhei; Nishikawa, Misao; Yasui, Toshihiro; Fujitani, Ken; Hakuba, Akira; Nakanishi, Naruhiko

    1997-01-01

    Among 28 patients with myelomeningocele (MMC group), the myelomeningocele in all patients was repaired shortly after birth, and a shunt was implanted for the associated hydrocephalus in 18 patients. MRI of the group of 28 indicated 20 were afflicted with Chiari II malformation, and the remaining 8 by Chiari I malformation. Among 8 patients lacking myelomeningocele (non-MMC group), seven demonstrated a large syrinx at the cervical and cervico-thoracic level; only one had a syrinx extending from the cervical level down to the lumbar level. None of these patients had hydrocephalus. Surgical decompression to improve cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow at the major cistern improved neurological signs in 7 patients. MRI indicated 4 patients were afflicted with Chiari I malformation, and the remaining 4 with Chiari II malformation. In the MMC group, the initial development of the syrinx at the lumbar level may be the result of a combination of occlusion of the caudal end of the central canal brought about by repair of the myelomeningocele and CSF flow into the hydromyelic cavity via the patent proximal portion of the central canal. In the non-MMC group, the syringomyelia may be considered an early onset type of syringomyelia associated with adult type Chiari malformation because the location of the syrinx was quite similar to that found in adult type Chiari malformation, and decompressive surgery was quite effective. In the non-MMC group, turbulence of the CSF now at the major cistern caused by the herniated cerebellum plays an important role in the enlargement of the syringomyelia. To offer greater appropriate management of pediatric Chiari malformation accompanied by syringomyelia, the malformation should be classified not by degree of the herniated brain tissue but by its association with neural tube defect (myelomeningocele). (K.H.)

  16. BEHÇET’S SYNDROME AND THROMBOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emire Seyahi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Behçet syndrome (BS is a multisystem vasculitis with unknown etiology and a unique geographic distribution. The disease course is characterized by exacerbations and remissions while abating as the years pass. The usual onset is in the third decade. Recurrent skin mucosa lesions and sight threatening panuveitis are the hallmark of the disease. Males are more severely affected than females. Vascular involvement can occur in up to 40 % of cases.  BS is unique among the vasculitides in that it may involve all sizes and types of vessels. It affects the veins more than the arteries. Lower extremity vein thrombosis is the most frequent manifestation of vascular involvement, followed by vena cava thrombosis, pulmonary artery aneurysms, Budd-Chiari syndrome, peripheral artery aneurysms, dural sinus thrombosis and abdominal aorta aneurysms. Vascular involvement is frequently associated with constitutional symptoms and increased acute phase response and is the major cause of increased mortality.  A predominantly neutrophilic vasculitis around the vaso vasorum is typical of BS. The thrombus is tightly adherent to the vessel wall which probably explains why thromboembolism is so rare despite the high frequency of venous disease. Thrombophilic factors do not seem to explain thrombotic tendency in BS. Immunosuppressive treatment is essential in suppression and preventing the attacks. 

  17. Hepatic vena cava syndrome: New concept of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Santosh Man; Kage, Masayoshi; Lee, Byung Boong

    2017-06-01

    Hepatic vena cava syndrome, also known as membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava (IVC), was considered a rare congenital disease and classified under Budd-Chiari syndrome. It is now recognized as a bacterial infection-induced disease related to poor hygiene. Localized thrombophlebitis of the IVC at the site close to hepatic vein outlets is the initial lesion which converts on resolution into stenosis or complete obstruction, the circulatory equilibrium being maintained by development of cavo-caval collateral anastomosis. These changes persist for the rest of the patient's life. The patient remains asymptomatic for a variable period until acute exacerbations occur, precipitated by bacterial infection, resulting in deposition of thrombi at the site of the lesion and endophlebitis in intrahepatic veins. Large thrombus close to hepatic vein outlets results in ascites from hepatic venous outflow obstruction, which is followed by development of venocentric cirrhosis. Endophlebitis of intrahepatic veins results in ischemic liver damage and development of segmental stenosis or membrane. Acute exacerbations are recognized clinically as intermittent jaundice and/or elevation of aminotransferase or ascites associated with neutrophil leukocytosis and elevation of C-reactive protein; sonologically, they are recognized as the presence of thrombi of different ages in IVC and thrombosis of intrahepatic veins. Development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma is related to severity or frequency of acute exacerbations and not to duration or type of caval obstruction. Hepatic vena cava syndrome is a common co-morbid condition with other liver diseases in developing countries and it should be considered in differential diagnosis in patient with intermittent elevation serum bilirubin and or aminotransferase or development of ascites and cirrhosis. © 2017 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  18. [Papillary oedema revealing Arnold Chiari malformation type 1: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imane, Mouhoub; Asmae, Maadane; Toufik, Ramdani; Rachid, Sekhsoukh

    2016-01-01

    Arnold Chiari malformation type 1 is defined as a herniation of the cerebellar tonsils into the foramen magnum of more than 5 mm. Symptoms are most commonly dominated by occipital headache, torticollis and sometimes swallowing disorders. Ophthalmologically abnormal convergences, oculomotor palsy and diplopia are the main clinical signs. We report the case of a 9 year old child, who presented with visual loss evolving since 6 months. Ophthalmologic examination showed visual acuity of 4/10 in both eyes, retained ocular motility and rotational nystagmus. The examination of the anterior segment of the eye showed megalocornea with no evidence of goniodysgenesis, iridodonesis associated with atrophy of the dilator muscle and microcoria with lazy photomotor reflex. Normal intraocular pressure was 14 mmHg. Ocular fundus examination, despite difficulties in performing it, objectified bilateral papilledema (stage II). General physical examination showed torticollis, scoliosis and a tetra-pyramidal syndrome. MRI showed Chiari malformation type I associated with hydrocephalus and syringomyelia. Neurosurgical intervention based on internal CSF drainage with occipitocervical osteo-dural decompression was proposed. The evolution was favorable with regression of clinical signs. Ophthalmologically, there was a regression of papilledema but visual acuity remained stationary. The occurrence of papilledema associated with Chiari malformation type 1 is rare, it has been only reported in 2% of symptomatic patients. Its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. The originality of our study consists in the association of cerebellar malformations with ocular malformations including megalocornea and microcoria which make ophthalmologic examination more difficult to perform.

  19. Chiari Type II malformation: Prenatal sonographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhanandham Shrinuvasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chiari malformations (CM are a group of defects associated with the congenital caudal displacement of the cerebellum and brainstem. A thorough understanding of the sonographic findings is necessary for the diagnosis of CM in the developing fetus. Here, we present the classical imaging findings of CM Type II detected in a 25-year-old primigravida at 26 weeks of gestation by routine sonographic screening.

  20. Malformations of the craniocervical junction (chiari type I and syringomyelia: classification, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Ramos Rocío

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chiari disease (or malformation is in general a congenital condition characterized by an anatomic defect of the base of the skull, in which the cerebellum and brain stem herniate through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal. The onset of Chiari syndrome symptoms usually occurs in the second or third decade (age 25 to 45 years. Symptoms may vary between periods of exacerbation and remission. The diagnosis of Chiari type I malformation in patients with or without symptoms is established with neuroimaging techniques. The most effective therapy for patients with Chiari type I malformation/syringomyelia is surgical decompression of the foramen magnum, however there are non-surgical therapy to relieve neurophatic pain: either pharmacological and non-pharmacological. Pharmacological therapy use drugs that act on different components of pain. Non-pharmacological therapies are primarly based on spinal or peripheral electrical stimulation. It is important to determine the needs of the patients in terms of health-care, social, educational, occupational, and relationship issues, in addition to those derived from information aspects, particularly at onset of symptoms. Currently, there is no consensus among the specialists regarding the etiology of the disease or how to approach, monitor, follow-up, and treat the condition. It is necessary that the physicians involved in the care of people with this condition comprehensively approach the management and follow-up of the patients, and that they organize interdisciplinary teams including all the professionals that can help to increase the quality of life of patients.

  1. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging of Arnold-Chiari malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Kimihiro; Suga, Masakazu; Takemoto, Motohisa

    1987-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of the Arnold-Chiari malformation. The patient, a 52-year-old man, complained of dizziness on walking. He initially refused to undergone myelography, but 4 months later, underwent MRI test, which lead to the diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari malformation (I type). Not all patients with symptoms of Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, syringobulbia and cervical spinal tumor, undergone myelography, which is an invasive technique, therefore MRI should be the first examination for the patients with disorders involving the craniocervical junction.

  2. CT findings in Arnold-Chiari malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Y.; Nakamura, S. (Aichi Prefecture Colony, Kasugai (Japan). Central Hospital); Yamada, H.; Kageyama, N.

    1981-12-01

    CT scans of Arnold-Chiari malformations demonstrate many abnormal findings that are considered to be specific for this type of malformation. Fifty patients with Arnold-Chiari malformations were studied, and their CT findings were analyzed. This number included 14 preshunted neonatal cases and 36 post-shunted infantile cases. Craniolacunia was recognized only in the neonatal cases, but other skull changes, including scaphocephaly and petrous scalloping, were found more frequently in the infantile cases. The posterior fossa abnormality was composed of several specific changes, such as a non-visualized fourth ventricle, a lateral or upward growth of the cerebellum, or a beaking deformity of the midbrain. These findings were far more common in the infantile cases. However, in 7 neonatal cases on which CT cisternography was performed, these posterior fossa changes were well recognized in the majority of cases. Hydrocephalus was found in all cases. In half of the post-shunted infantile cases, the lateral ventricles were markedly collapsed. Characteristic features of the lateral ventricles, such as a protruding of the caudate nuclei, a pointing of the frontal and/or occipital horns, an absent septum pellucidum, or dominently dilated occipital horns, were commonly found in both neonatal and infantile cases. The subarachnoid space was remarkably widened at the retrothalamic cistern and/or the interhemispheric fissure in many cases.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diffuse liver diseases. Comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Ebara, Masaaki; Ohto, Masao

    1987-06-01

    MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) was performed in 74 patients with chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, Budd-Chiari syndrome, extrahepatic protal vein occlusion, Wilson disease and hemochromatosis. We measured relaxation time of the liver and the spleen in these patients and compared MRI with CT in the diagnostic capability. MRI was superior to plain CT in the detection of collateral vessels in liver cirrhosis and extrahepatic protal vein occlusion. MRI could also demonstrate the occluded part of the inferior vena cava in Budd-Chiari syndrome. However, MRI was almost the same as CT in the visualization of the hepatic configuration in liver cirrhosis. In liver cirrhosis, T1 values of the liver and the spleen were longer than those in normal controls, and T1 values of the liver were correlated with ICG R-15. Hepatic T1 values in Budd-Chiari syndrome were longer than those in normal controls.

  4. Symptomatic Chiari malformation in infancy and adolescence; Cine-MRI and clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Takeo; Matsuda, Toshihiro; Tsugu, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Seisaburou; Tomonaga, Masamichi; Asakawa, Koji; Mitsudome, Akihisa (Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Hashimoto, Takahisa

    1994-04-01

    Of the 7 children and adolescents with Chiari malformation reported here 5 had Chiari type 1 and 2 had Chiari type 2 disease. All 5 Chiari type 1 patients had syringomyelia and scoliosis, but the Chiari type 2 patients did not. All the patients except one with localized syringomyelia (case 3) underwent posterior decompression with suboccipital craniectomy, upper cervical laminectomy and duraplasty, and their clinical signs and symptoms improved. Case 3 received a syringo-subarachnoid shunt and improved clinically. Motor function was restored better than sensory function. Cranial nerve signs were cleared up in the Chiari type 2 patients. In the Chiari type 1 patients postoperative neurological improvement correlated well with the collapse of syringomyelia. Cine MR imaging was useful in the evaluation of CSF dynamics at the cranio-vertebral junction and in the syringomyelic cavity before and after surgery. (author).

  5. Two Cases of Arnold-Chiari Malformation with Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Iliaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arnold–Chiari malformation is defined as downward displacement of the brainstem and cerebellum through the foramen magnum. It has different clinical presentations and four subtypes. It is known that downward migration of posterior fossa components through the foramen magnum and associated lower cranial nerve palsy and brainstem compression can cause respiratory failure. Acute respiratory failure could mark the onset of the disease. Posterior fossa decompression performed to treat primary disease can improve the central sleep abnormalities. As respiratory failure is rarely seen, this paper presents two cases of Arnold–Chiari malformation with respiratory failure.

  6. Sports participation with Chiari I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, Jennifer; Geh, Ndi; Selzer, Béla J; Bower, Regina; Himedan, Mai; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with Chiari I malformation (CM-I). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with the imaging finding of CM-I. METHODS A prospective survey was administered to 503 CM-I patients at 2 sites over a 46-month period. Data were gathered on imaging characteristics, treatment, sports participation, and any sport-related injuries. Additionally, 81 patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry and were included in a prospective group, with a mean prospective follow-up period of 11 months. RESULTS Of the 503 CM-I patients, 328 participated in sports for a cumulative duration of 4641 seasons; 205 of these patients participated in contact sports. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. One patient had temporary extremity paresthesias that resolved within hours, and this was not definitely considered to be related to the CM-I. In the prospective cohort, there were no permanent neurological injuries. CONCLUSIONS No permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries were observed in CM-I patients participating in athletic activities. The authors believe that the risk of such injuries is low and that, in most cases, sports participation by children with CM-I is safe.

  7. Evolutionary hypothesis for Chiari type I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Yvens Barbosa; Ramina, Ricardo; Campos-Herrera, Cynthia Resende; Borges, Guilherme

    2013-10-01

    Chiari I malformation (CM-I) is classically defined as a cerebellar tonsillar herniation (≥5 mm) through the foramen magnum. A decreased posterior fossa volume, mainly due to basioccipital hypoplasia and sometimes platybasia, leads to posterior fossa overcrowding and consequently cerebellar herniation. Regardless of radiological findings, embryological genetic hypothesis or any other postulations, the real cause behind this malformation is yet not well-elucidated and remains largely unknown. The aim of this paper is to approach CM-I under a broader and new perspective, conjoining anthropology, genetics and neurosurgery, with special focus on the substantial changes that have occurred in the posterior cranial base through human evolution. Important evolutionary allometric changes occurred during brain expansion and genetics studies of human evolution demonstrated an unexpected high rate of gene flow interchange and possibly interbreeding during this process. Based upon this review we hypothesize that CM-I may be the result of an evolutionary anthropological imprint, caused by evolving species populations that eventually met each other and mingled in the last 1.7 million years. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. STUDY ON ETIOLOGY OF ASCITES

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    Konatham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study 100 cases of ascites, evaluated for the etiological causes. And observed as cirrhosis with portal hypertension 82%, heart failure 8%, chronic kidney disease 3%, nephritic syndrome 2%, peritoneal calcinomatosis 2%, chronic pancreatitis 1% por tal vein thrombosis 1%, Budd - chiari syndrome 1%. AIM OF THE STUDY: To study the various etiologies and their incidence of Ascites.

  9. Dexmedetomidine for an awake fiber-optic intubation of a parturient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, Type I Arnold Chiari malformation and status post released tethered spinal cord presenting for repeat cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay H. Shah

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS have congenital fusion of their cervical vertebrae due to a failure in the normal segmentation of the cervical vertebrae during the early weeks of gestation and also have myriad of other associated anomalies. Because of limited neck mobility, airway management in these patients can be a challenge for the anesthesiologist. We describe a unique case in which a dexmedetomidine infusion was used as sedation for an awake fiber-optic intubation in a parturient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome, who presented for elective cesarean delivery. A 36-yearold female, G2P1A0 with KFS (fusion of cervical vertebrae who had prior cesarean section for breech presentation with difficult airway management was scheduled for repeat cesarean delivery. After obtaining an informed consent, patient was taken in the operating room and non-invasive monitors were applied. Dexmedetomidine infusion was started and after adequate sedation, an awake fiberoptic intubation was performed. General anesthetic was administered after intubation and dexmedetomidine infusion was continued on maintenance dose until extubation. Klippel-Feil Syndrome (KFS is a rare congenital disorder for which the true incidence is unknown, which makes it even rare to see a parturient with this disease. Patients with KFS usually have other congenital abnormalities as well, sometimes including the whole thoraco-lumbar spine (Type III precluding the use of neuraxial anesthesia for these patients. Obstetric patients with KFS can present unique challenges in administering anesthesia and analgesia, primarily as it relates to the airway and dexmedetomidine infusion has shown promising result to manage the airway through awake fiberoptic intubation without any adverse effects on mother and fetus.

  10. Audio-vestibular signs and symptoms in Chiari malformation type i. Case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Jiménez, Gloria; Mazón Gutiérrez, Ángel; Marco de Lucas, Enrique; Valle San Román, Natalia; Martín Laez, Rubén; Morales Angulo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Chiari malformation is an alteration of the base of the skull with herniation through the foramen magnum of the brain stem and cerebellum. Although the most common presentation is occipital headache, the association of audio-vestibular symptoms is not rare. The aim of our study was to describe audio-vestibular signs and symptoms in Chiari malformation type i (CM-I). We performed a retrospective observational study of patients referred to our unit during the last 5 years. We also carried out a literature review of audio-vestibular signs and symptoms in this disease. There were 9 patients (2 males and 7 females), with an average age of 42.8 years. Five patients presented a Ménière-like syndrome; 2 cases, a recurrent vertigo with peripheral features; one patient showed a sudden hearing loss; and one case suffered a sensorineural hearing loss with early childhood onset. The most common audio-vestibular symptom indicated in the literature in patients with CM-I is unsteadiness (49%), followed by dizziness (18%), nystagmus (15%) and hearing loss (15%). Nystagmus is frequently horizontal (74%) or down-beating (18%). Other audio-vestibular signs and symptoms are tinnitus (11%), aural fullness (10%) and hyperacusis (1%). Occipital headache that increases with Valsalva manoeuvres and hand paresthesias are very suggestive symptoms. The appearance of audio-vestibular manifestations in CM-I makes it common to refer these patients to neurotologists. Unsteadiness, vertiginous syndromes and sensorineural hearing loss are frequent. Nystagmus, especially horizontal and down-beating, is not rare. It is important for neurotologists to familiarise themselves with CM-I symptoms to be able to consider it in differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  11. The Chiari III malformation: an unusual and asymptomatic variant in an 11-year old child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirikci, Akif; Bayazit, Yildirim A.; Bayram, Metin

    2001-01-01

    Chiari III malformation is an extremely rare condition, and is characterized by the hindbrain herniation into a low occipital or high cervical encephalocele together with the pathologic and imaging features of the Chiari II malformation. In this report, an unusual variant of the Chiari III malformation was diagnosed in an 11-year-old girl. She had an encephalocele operation when she was a newborn, and has been asymptomatic since then. The clinical and imaging findings of this case were presented

  12. The Chiari III malformation: an unusual and asymptomatic variant in an 11-year old child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirikci, Akif E-mail: sirikci@yahoo.com; Bayazit, Yildirim A.; Bayram, Metin

    2001-09-01

    Chiari III malformation is an extremely rare condition, and is characterized by the hindbrain herniation into a low occipital or high cervical encephalocele together with the pathologic and imaging features of the Chiari II malformation. In this report, an unusual variant of the Chiari III malformation was diagnosed in an 11-year-old girl. She had an encephalocele operation when she was a newborn, and has been asymptomatic since then. The clinical and imaging findings of this case were presented.

  13. Imperforated cor triatriatum dexter in a dog with concurrent caudal vena cava wall mineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobak, Tetyda Paulina; Starrak, Gregory; Linn, Kathleen; Snead, Elisabeth Christine Roberston

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cor triatriatum dexter (CTD) is a rare congenital cardiac malformation with various manifestations and has been sporadically described in dogs. Clinically the dogs present with nonspecific signs of right heart failure or Budd-Chiari-like syndrome. Other associated concurrent

  14. Pregnancy and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, J.; Pel, M.; von dem Borne, A.; van der Lelie, H.

    1994-01-01

    A patient is described who developed symptoms of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) in her first pregnancy. This was uneventful except for a spontaneous preterm delivery. The second pregnancy was complicated by severe anemia and a hemolytic crisis with Budd-Chiari syndrome at 31 weeks'

  15. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-06-03

    Jun 3, 2015 ... Key words: Behcet´s disease, Budd-Chiari syndrome, renal arterial microaneurysms, aneurysm rupture. Received: ... Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis of unknown etiology with a chronic relapsing course. Vasculitis in ... Sixteen year-old male presenting with severe abdominal pain and swelling ...

  16. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    17 janv. 2016 ... Budd-Chiari syndrome: a rare complication of hepatic sarcoidosis (about one case). Ismael Ait Sghier1,&, Nabil Moatassim Billah1. 1Service de Radiologie Centrale, Hôpital Avicenne, Rabat, Maroc. &Corresponding author: Ismael Ait Sghier, Service de Radiologie Centrale, Hôpital Avicenne, Rabat, Maroc.

  17. Scoliosis and Syringomyelia With Chiari Malformation After Lumbar Shunting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hung Chen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady gait was noted in a 2-year-old boy with a lumboperitoneal (LP shunt that had been inserted 1 year earlier for increased head circumference caused by communicating hydrocephalus. Scoliosis was also noted during postoperative follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed new hindbrain tonsillar herniation and an extensive syrinx from C3 to L1. The malfunctioning LP shunt was removed and posterior fossa decompression with ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was performed. The unsteady gait recovered completely and scoliosis improved. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated resolution of the syrinx and tonsillar herniation. Acquired Chiari I malformation after LP shunt is well documented; usually, patients have no symptoms. This is the first report to have all the cause and effect mechanisms among syringomyelia, scoliosis and Chiari I malformation in 1 patient. We review the literature and discuss the possible mechanisms.

  18. Surgical treatment of Chiari malformation: review and progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yuan-zheng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The surgical treatment of Chiari malformation (CM began in 1932. With the advance of medical technology, the surgical technique of CM is also in constant improvement. But due to its pathogenesis has not yet clear, there is no accepted optimal method, and different levels of the operation is still controversial. The author reviewed the concept, pathogenesis, diagnosis and surgical treatment of CM. The hot topics and new technological application were also reviewed in this article.

  19. Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia in cavalier King Charles spaniels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusbridge, C.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is the cumulation of over a decade of study into the pathogenesis and treatment Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia (CM/SM) in the cavalier King Charles spaniel (CKCS). Chiari-like malformation is a condition where the brain is too big for the skull and is crushed and pushed out

  20. Shunt malfunction causing acute neurological deterioration in 2 patients with previously asymptomatic Chiari malformation Type I. Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Robert; Kalhorn, Stephen; Pacione, Donato; Weiner, Howard; Wisoff, Jeffrey; Harter, David

    2009-08-01

    Patients with symptomatic Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) typically exhibit a chronic, slowly progressive disease course with evolution of symptoms. However, some authors have reported acute neurological deterioration in the setting of CM-I and acquired Chiari malformations. Although brainstem dysfunction has been documented in patients with CM-II and hydrocephalus or shunt malfunction, to the authors' knowledge only 1 report describing ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunction causing neurological deterioration in a patient with CM-I exists. The authors report on their experience with the treatment of previously asymptomatic CM-I in 2 children who experienced quite different manifestations of acute neurological deterioration secondary to VP shunt malfunction. Presumably, VP shunt malfunction created a positive rostral pressure gradient across a stenotic foramen magnum, resulting in tetraparesis from foramen magnum syndrome in 1 patient and acute ataxia and cranial nerve deficits from syringobulbia in the other. Although urgent shunt revisions yielded partial recovery of neurological function in both patients, marked improvement occurred only after posterior fossa decompression.

  1. Posterior Fossa Decompression with Duraplasty in Chiari-1 Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, L.; Akbar, H.; Bokhari, I.; Babar, A. K.; Hahim, A. S. M.; Arain, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the symptomatic outcome after PFD (Posterior Fossa Decompression) with duraplasty in Chiari-1 malformations. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Neurosurgery, JPMC, Karachi, from July 2008 to September 2012. Methodology: This included 21 patients of Chiari 1 malformations admitted in department through OPD with clinical features of headache, neck pain, numbness, neurological deficit, and syringomyelia. Diagnosis was confirmed by MRI. PFD followed by C1 laminectomy with duraplasty was done in all cases and symptomatic outcome was assessed in follow-up clinic. Results: Among 21 patients, 13 were females and 8 were males. Age ranged from 18 to 40 years. All the patients had neck pain and numbness in hands. Only 3 patients had weakness of all four limbs and 12 with weakness of hands. Symptoms evolved over a mean of 12 months. Syringomyelia was present in all cases. All patients underwent posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty with an additional C1 laminectomy and in 2 cases C2 laminectomy was done. Syringo-subarachnoid shunt was placed in one patient and ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was placed in 2 patients. Pain was relieved in all cases. Weakness was improved in all cases and numbness was improved in 19 cases. Syringomyelia was improved in all cases. Postoperative complications included CSF leak in 2 patients and wound infection in one patient. However, there was no mortality. Conclusion: Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty is the best treatment option for Chiari-1 malformations because of symptomatic improvement and less chances of complications. (author)

  2. Surgical treatment of Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan MA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the therapeutic effect of small craniotomic posterior fossa decompression combined with occipital-cervical bone graft fusion and internal fixation on Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression.Methods The clinical data of 16 cases(7 males and 9 females,aged 17 to 65 years,mean 36.4 of Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively analyzed.The diagnoses for all the patients were confirmed by radiology.Small craniotomic posterior fossa decompression was performed in all patients,cerebellar tonsils were resected,and then one-stage occipital-cervical bone graft fusion using autogenous iliac bone and internal wiring fixation were performed.Neck support was used for 3 months after surgery.Results Symptoms were significantly improved in all cases after surgical operation.No patient died or infected.Cerebrospinal fluid leakage was found at draining site in one case.Transient pain of scapular and chest was found in one case and disappeared spontaneously.A 6-months follow-up showed that 6 patients were cured,9 improved and 1 unchanged according to Symon and Lavender standard.Postoperative MRI showed the reconstructed cisterna magna was clear in all patients,no cerebellar ptosis was found,and the occipital-cervical graft bone was fused.Conclusion In patients with Chiari malformation complicated with basilar impression,small craniotomic posterior fossa decompression combined with one-stage occipital-cervical bone graft fusion and internal wiring fixation has a clear and definite effect,it can increase the volume of posterior fossa and alleviate the ventral brain stem compression simultaneously,and reconstruct the stability of cranio-cervical junction.

  3. [Oropharyngeal dysphagia associated with Chiari I malformation and syringomyelia J].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Medina, Julio César; Cárdenas-Lara, Armando; Guerrero-Rascón, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Bautista, Heber

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia associated with neurological disease is an important clinical manifestation in the diagnosis of injury that justifies the compression of the brainstem and lower cranial nerves. To emphasize the study of dysphagia in a patient with Chiari I malformation associated with syringomyelia in the absence of primary gastroenterological symptoms. We describe the case of a 62 year-old woman with oropharyngeal dysphagia of six years of evolution, cervicobrachialgia, ptosis and facial diplexia. Magnetic resonance imaging is an essential element for establishing the etiologic diagnosis of neurogenic dysphagia.

  4. Siringomielia y malformación de Arnold-Chiari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Muñoz Escobar

    1971-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos en este informe, nuestra experiencia en ocho casos de siringomielia en dos de ellos asociada a malformación de Arnold Chiari, que hemos analizado desde el punto de vista clínico y de los hallazgos de radiología simple y contrastada. Analizamos igualmente las técnicas quirúrgicas empleadas y los resultados obtenidos en siete casos que fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente. Finalmente comparamos nuestros hallazgos y resultados con los mencionados en la literatura y hacemos algunos comentarios sobre fisio-patología.

  5. Arnold-Chiari Type II Malformation: A Case Report and Review of Prenatal Sonographic Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Nik Nejadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arnold-Chiari malformation is a congenital abnormality of CNS, characterized by downwarddisplacement the parts of the cerebellum, fourth ventricle, pons and medulla oblongata into thespinal canal. This malformation is one of causative factor of death in neonates and infants. Athorough understanding of the direct and indirect sonographic findings is necessary for diagnosis ofChiari II malformation in the developing fetus.In this case report, we present a Chiari malformation II detected at 23 weeks of gestation by routinelysonographic screening. The Role of prenatal sonography in recognition of the malformation andprognostic value of these features are discussed.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Postoperative Ketamine in Chiari Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Michael M; Alhourani, Ahmad; Pearce-Smith, Beverly A; Mazurkiewicz, Anna; Friedlander, Robert M

    2018-02-01

    In Chiari I patients, postoperative pain and discomfort frequently slow the transition back to the home setting. We sought to determine the effect of standardized ketamine infusion protocols on hospital length of stay (LOS). This retrospective cohort study reviewed 100 consecutive adult patients undergoing Chiari I decompression. Fifty-nine patients were placed on a 2-3 mg/hr ketamine drip until postoperative day 1. This group was compared with a group who received 2-3 mg/hr of ketamine until postoperative day 2 (19 patients) and patients who did not receive ketamine at all (22 patients). Clinical characteristics, opioid use, LOS, and relative hospitalization costs were assessed. All narcotic amounts were converted into milligram equivalents of morphine. LOS of the short-ketamine group was 46.5 hours when compared with the long-ketamine group (66.8 hours) and no-ketamine group (56.9 hours). There was a statistically significant difference when comparing the short-ketamine group with the long-ketamine group and no-ketamine group together (P ketamine protocol was used (P ketamine group, 196 mg in the long-ketamine group, and 187 mg in the no-ketamine group (P = 0.65). No adverse events from ketamine were noted. Ketamine at subanesthetic levels may be an effective tool to facilitate early return home postoperatively and may significantly reduce medical costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Difficult intubation in a parturient with syringomyelia and Arnold–Chiari malformation: Use of Airtraq™ laryngoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Bensghir; Chkoura, K.; Elhassani, M.; Ahtil, R.; Azendour, H.; Kamili, N. Drissi

    2011-01-01

    Anesthetic technique in parturient with syringomyelia and Arnold–Chiari malformation is variable depending on the teams. Difficult intubation is one of the risks when general anesthesia is opted. Different devices have been used to manage the difficult intubation in pregnant women. We report the use of Airtraq™ laryngoscope after failed standard laryngoscopy in a parturient with syringomyelia and Arnold–Chiari type I malformation. PMID:22144932

  8. Difficult intubation in a parturient with syringomyelia and Arnold-Chiari malformation: Use of Airtraq™ laryngoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bensghir Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic technique in parturient with syringomyelia and Arnold-Chiari malformation is variable depending on the teams. Difficult intubation is one of the risks when general anesthesia is opted. Different devices have been used to manage the difficult intubation in pregnant women. We report the use of Airtraq™ laryngoscope after failed standard laryngoscopy in a parturient with syringomyelia and Arnold-Chiari type I malformation.

  9. Quantitative trait loci (QTL study identifies novel genomic regions associated to Chiari-like malformation in Griffon Bruxellois dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lemay

    Full Text Available Chiari-like malformation (CM is a developmental abnormality of the craniocervical junction that is common in the Griffon Bruxellois (GB breed with an estimated prevalence of 65%. This disease is characterized by overcrowding of the neural parenchyma at the craniocervical junction and disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow. The most common clinical sign is pain either as a direct consequence of CM or neuropathic pain as a consequence of secondary syringomyelia. The etiology of CM remains unknown but genetic factors play an important role. To investigate the genetic complexity of the disease, a quantitative trait locus (QTL approach was adopted. A total of 14 quantitative skull and atlas measurements were taken and were tested for association to CM. Six traits were found to be associated to CM and were subjected to a whole-genome association study using the Illumina canine high density bead chip in 74 GB dogs (50 affected and 24 controls. Linear and mixed regression analyses identified associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on 5 Canis Familiaris Autosomes (CFAs: CFA2, CFA9, CFA12, CFA14 and CFA24. A reconstructed haplotype of 0.53 Mb on CFA2 strongly associated to the height of the cranial fossa (diameter F and an haplotype of 2.5 Mb on CFA14 associated to both the height of the rostral part of the caudal cranial fossa (AE and the height of the brain (FG were significantly associated to CM after 10 000 permutations strengthening their candidacy for this disease (P = 0.0421, P = 0.0094 respectively. The CFA2 QTL harbours the Sall-1 gene which is an excellent candidate since its orthologue in humans is mutated in Townes-Brocks syndrome which has previously been associated to Chiari malformation I. Our study demonstrates the implication of multiple traits in the etiology of CM and has successfully identified two new QTL associated to CM and a potential candidate gene.

  10. Fetal diffusion tensor quantification of brainstem pathology in Chiari II malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woitek, Ramona; Prayer, Daniela; Weber, Michael; Schoepf, Veronika; Furtner, Julia; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Kasprian, Gregor [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Amann, Gabriele [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Clinical Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Seidl, Rainer [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Bettelheim, Dieter [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    This prenatal MRI study evaluated the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics to identify changes in the midbrain of fetuses with Chiari II malformations compared to fetuses with mild ventriculomegaly, hydrocephalus and normal CNS development. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated from a region of interest (ROI) in the midbrain of 46 fetuses with normal CNS, 15 with Chiari II malformations, eight with hydrocephalus and 12 with mild ventriculomegaly. Fetuses with different diagnoses were compared group-wise after age-matching. Axial T2W-FSE sequences and single-shot echo planar DTI sequences (16 non-collinear diffusion gradient-encoding directions, b-values of 0 and 700 s/mm{sup 2}, 1.5 Tesla) were evaluated retrospectively. In Chiari II malformations, FA was significantly higher than in age-matched fetuses with a normal CNS (p =.003), while ADC was not significantly different. No differences in DTI metrics between normal controls and fetuses with hydrocephalus or vetriculomegaly were detected. DTI can detect and quantify parenchymal alterations of the fetal midbrain in Chiari II malformations. Therefore, in cases of enlarged fetal ventricles, FA of the fetal midbrain may contribute to the differentiation between Chiari II malformation and other entities. (orig.)

  11. Fetal diffusion tensor quantification of brainstem pathology in Chiari II malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woitek, Ramona; Prayer, Daniela; Weber, Michael; Schoepf, Veronika; Furtner, Julia; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Kasprian, Gregor; Amann, Gabriele; Seidl, Rainer; Bettelheim, Dieter; Brugger, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    This prenatal MRI study evaluated the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics to identify changes in the midbrain of fetuses with Chiari II malformations compared to fetuses with mild ventriculomegaly, hydrocephalus and normal CNS development. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated from a region of interest (ROI) in the midbrain of 46 fetuses with normal CNS, 15 with Chiari II malformations, eight with hydrocephalus and 12 with mild ventriculomegaly. Fetuses with different diagnoses were compared group-wise after age-matching. Axial T2W-FSE sequences and single-shot echo planar DTI sequences (16 non-collinear diffusion gradient-encoding directions, b-values of 0 and 700 s/mm 2 , 1.5 Tesla) were evaluated retrospectively. In Chiari II malformations, FA was significantly higher than in age-matched fetuses with a normal CNS (p =.003), while ADC was not significantly different. No differences in DTI metrics between normal controls and fetuses with hydrocephalus or vetriculomegaly were detected. DTI can detect and quantify parenchymal alterations of the fetal midbrain in Chiari II malformations. Therefore, in cases of enlarged fetal ventricles, FA of the fetal midbrain may contribute to the differentiation between Chiari II malformation and other entities. (orig.)

  12. 1995 Emerging Leaders in Healthcare. The new leaders: Gita Budd, Colene Daniel, Elizabeth Gallup, Scott Wordelman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, K

    1995-01-01

    Fierce pressures for cost containment. Demands for quality improvements. The drive toward patient-centered care. The push for community involvement. Insistent voices of payers, patients, consumers, physicians. Accumulated tensions amid the chaos of change. Balancing all of these demands while inspiring and encouraging the professionals and other workers within the healthcare organization requires a high level of leadership ability. One that insists on the best from everyone involved in a healthcare system--from physicians to staff, nurses to social workers. And then strives for more. The four young executives who are this year's Emerging Leaders in Healthcare have all pushed their systems beyond traditional boundaries into new territory, helping their patients, their employees, their physicians, and their communities rise to new levels of achievement. At the same time, these leaders emphasize teamwork and consensus-style management, so that their co-workers feel like they're participating in the changes, not being victimized by them. Gita Budd, Colene Daniel, Elizabeth Gallup, and Scott Wordelman are winners of the 1995 award from The Healthcare Forum and Korn/Ferry International that honors ¿dynamic, decisive young leaders (under 40) with the proven ability to nurture the growth of the industry.¿ Korn/Ferry International and The Healthcare Forum are proud to present 1995's Emerging Leaders.

  13. Asymptomatic Chiari Type I malformation: should patients be advised against participation in contact sports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert; Leach, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Chiari type I malformation (CM-I) is characterised by caudal displacement of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum, crowding the craniocervical junction. It is being increasingly diagnosed in asymptomatic patients due to the widespread availability of MRI, and there are case reports of these patients suffering sudden death or neurological injury following head or neck trauma, raising the issue of whether they should be prohibited from contact sport participation, given the likelihood of frequent trauma. General neurosurgical opinion is that patients who are symptomatic and those with an associated spinal cord syrinx should be offered foramen magnum decompression, however asymptomatic patients without syringomyelia are not offered this in the majority of cases. The authors performed a full review of the published literature, including all case reports, case series, studies and literature reviews regarding CM-I and either contact sports or trauma, excluding patients that had undergone surgical intervention and those becoming symptomatic in circumstances other than head or neck trauma. 21 case reports of CM-I patients deteriorating following trauma were identified, including four cases of sudden death following head or neck injury. However, studies of large samples of CM-I patients are yet to capture an incident of sudden death or acute neurological deterioration, suggesting that the risk is very low. CM-I patients may have an increased risk of concussion and post-concussion syndrome compared to the background population however. Overall, the authors feel that there should be no restriction of sports participation for CM-I patients, but a discussion to make them and their families aware of the possible increased risks is important.

  14. Quantitative analysis of Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia in the Griffon Bruxellois dog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan P Knowler

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a system of quantitative analysis of canine Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia on variable quality MRI. We made a series of measurements from magnetic resonance DICOM images from Griffon Bruxellois dogs with and without Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia and identified several significant variables. We found that in the Griffon Bruxellois dog, Chiari-like malformation is characterized by an apparent shortening of the entire cranial base and possibly by increased proximity of the atlas to the occiput. As a compensatory change, there appears to be an increased height of the rostral cranial cavity with lengthening of the dorsal cranial vault and considerable reorganization of the brain parenchyma including ventral deviation of the olfactory bulbs and rostral invagination of the cerebellum under the occipital lobes.

  15. Diagnosis of Chiari III malformation by second trimester fetal MRI with postnatal MRI and CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alice B.; Glenn, Orit A.; Gupta, Nalin; Otto, Carl

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of Chiari III malformation diagnosed by fetal MRI. Ultrasound (US) performed at a gestational age of 18 weeks demonstrated a posterior skull base cyst. Repeat US at 19 weeks demonstrated neural tissue in the cyst, consistent with an encephalocele. MR imaging at 23 weeks confirmed the presence of an occipital encephalocele, demonstrated additional bony defect in the upper cervical spine, and identified abnormal morphology and position of the brainstem consistent with the diagnosis of Chiari III. Postnatal MRI and CT confirmed the fetal MRI findings and demonstrate the utility of fetal MRI in the early evaluation of songraphically detected posterior fossa abnormalities. (orig.)

  16. Diagnosis of Chiari III malformation by second trimester fetal MRI with postnatal MRI and CT correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alice B.; Glenn, Orit A. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gupta, Nalin [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurosurgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Otto, Carl [California Pacific Medical Center, Department of Perinatology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    We report a case of Chiari III malformation diagnosed by fetal MRI. Ultrasound (US) performed at a gestational age of 18 weeks demonstrated a posterior skull base cyst. Repeat US at 19 weeks demonstrated neural tissue in the cyst, consistent with an encephalocele. MR imaging at 23 weeks confirmed the presence of an occipital encephalocele, demonstrated additional bony defect in the upper cervical spine, and identified abnormal morphology and position of the brainstem consistent with the diagnosis of Chiari III. Postnatal MRI and CT confirmed the fetal MRI findings and demonstrate the utility of fetal MRI in the early evaluation of songraphically detected posterior fossa abnormalities. (orig.)

  17. Anesthesia management for pregnant patient with Arnold-Chiari malformation type I: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şaban Yalçın

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Arnold-Chiari I malformation (ACM is a congenitalanomaly characterized by downward herniation of thecerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal. The anomaly maypresent in a variety of ways with vague symptoms suchas head and limb pains, vertigo, hypoesthesia, weaknessin the extremities. Diagnosis is often difficult and thereforedelayed. Measurement of intracranial pressure in thesepatients is an important measure thus precautions shoulbe taken for avoidance of increased intracranial pressure.In this case report, we discussed the anesthetic managementof a pregnant patient with Arnold Chiari I malformationwho underwent an emergency caesarean section.

  18. The incidence of Arnold–Chiari malformation in neurological practice

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    E. A. Kantimirova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM is a group of congenital hindbrain malformations affecting the structural relationships between the cerebellum, brain stem, top cervical spinal cord, and bones of the skull base. In clinical practice, ACM types 0 and 1 are more common and types 2, 3, and 4 belong to rare severe (often fatal congenital malformations.Objective: to study gender differences in the incidence of ACM types 0 and 1 in outpatient neurological practice.Patients and methods. A total 2039 case records of outpatients who had visited a neurologist of the Krasnoyarsk University clinic in 2008–2014 were analyzed. Neurological and neuroradiological (1.5 Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging, phase-contrast spinal cerebral fluid flow imaging diagnostic techniques were used. 3.4% (70/2039 of cases were randomized according to the criteria of inclusion and exception. An entire sample included 70 ACM patients (median age, 25 [17; 34] years (30 (42.8–7.1% men and 40 (57.2–7.1% women.Results. There was an increase in the incidence of ACM type 1 in the women than in the men. Conclusion. It is necessary to develop a new strategy for the prophylactic medical examination of patients with ACM to improve primary and specialized outpatient health care.

  19. The Role of Cine Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Chiari 0 Malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Kerem Mazhar; Oktay, Kadir; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp; Gezercan, Yurdal; Erman, Tahsin

    2018-01-01

    To define the role of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in deciding the therapeutic strategy and underlying pathophysiology resulting in syrinx formation in patients with Chiari type 0 malformation. Seven patients who were admitted to our clinic with the diagnosis of Chiari 0 malformation from January 2005 to July 2016 were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent a detailed preoperative neurological examination. Entire neuroaxis MRI and phase-contrast cine MRI were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively. Seven patients (5 female and 2 male) with Chiari type 0 malformation fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All of the patients had absent cine flow at the craniovertebral junction except two patients. These five patients underwent surgical interventions; suboccipital decompression and duraplasty. All of them showed both clinical and radiological improvement in the postoperative period. Cine flow MRI appears to be a useful tool in the management of patients with Chiari 0 malformation. There was a good correlation between the clinical presentation and cine flow preoperatively, and between clinical improvement and cine flow in the postoperative period.

  20. Chiari Type I Malformations in Young Adults: Implications for the College Health Practitioner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Mary Jane; Vaughn, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe 2 cases of Chiari type I malformation (CM-I) in students presenting to a college health center within a 6-month period. A review of CM-I, including epidemiology, typical presentation, evaluation, and management, is followed by a discussion of the clinical and functional implications of the disorder in an…

  1. Anesthetic management in a child with Arnold-Chiari malformation and bilateral vocal cord paralysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setz, A.C.W.; Boer, H.D. de; Driessen, J.J.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of a child who was scheduled for an emergency ventriculoperitoneal shunt procedure. The patient had a type II Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM) and associated hydrocephalus and presented with near complete respiratory obstruction from bilateral abductor vocal cord palsy. Early

  2. Surgical decompression for symptomatic Chiari II malformation in neonates with myelomeningocele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandertop, W. P.; Asai, A.; Hoffman, H. J.; Drake, J. M.; Humphreys, R. P.; Rutka, J. T.; Becker, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    Between January, 1981, and July, 1991, 17 infants under 1 month of age were admitted to The Hospital for Sick Children with the signs and symptoms of a Chiari II malformation. These patients' presentation included swallowing difficulty (71%), stridor (59%), apneic spells (29%), aspiration (12%),

  3. Sleep apnea and REM sleep behavior disorder in patients with Chiari malformations Apnéia do sono e distúrbio do comportamento da fase do sono com REM em pacientes com malformações de Chiari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio A. Henriques-Filho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chiari malformations (CM may result in the appearance of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD and sleep apnea syndrome (SAS that can be considered markers of brain stem dysfunction. PURPOSE: To evaluate the frequency of RBD and SAS in patients with CM type I and II. METHOD: Were evaluated 103 patients with CM by means of full night polysomnography. Were scoring different sleep stages, frequency of abnormal movements (through video monitoring and abnormal respiratory events. RESULTS: Of the 103 patients, 36 showed CM type I and 67 CM type II. Episodes of RBD were observed in 23 patients. Abnormal apnea-hypopnea index (AHI was observed in 65 patients. CONCLUSION: The high rate of RBD suggests that this parassomnia and the increased frequency of central sleep apnea episodes, may be considered as a marker of progressive brain stem dysfunction.INTRODUÇÃO: Malformações de Chiari (MC podem gerar o aparecimento de distúrbio comportamental da fase do sono com REM (DCR e síndrome da apnéia do sono (SAS, sugerindo a ocorrência de disfunção do tronco cerebral. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a freqüência de DCR e SAS em pacientes com MC I ou II. MÉTODO: Utilizou-se a polissonografia de noite inteira para a avaliação de 103 pacientes. Classificaram-se as diferentes fases do sono e analisou-se a freqüência de movimentos anormais (monitorada por vídeo e de eventos respiratórios anormais. RESULTADOS: Dos 103 pacientes analisados, 36 eram portadores de MC I e 67 de MC II. Episódios de DCR foram observados em 23 pacientes. O índice de apnéia/hipopnéia foi considerado anormal em 65 pacientes. CONCLUSÃO: A alta freqüência de DCR e o aumento da freqüência de episódios de apnéia central do sono podem ser considerados manifestação de disfunção progressiva do tronco cerebral.

  4. Stereological and Morphometric Analysis of MRI Chiari Malformation Type-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkoç, Ozan Alper; Songur, Ahmet; Eser, Olcay; Toktas, Muhsin; Esi, Ertap; Haktanir, Alpay

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to investigate the underlying ethiological factors in chiari malformation (CM) type-I (CMI) via performing volumetric and morphometric length-angle measurements. Methods A total of 66 individuals [33 patients (20-65 years) with CMI and 33 control subjects] were included in this study. In sagittal MR images, tonsillar herniation length and concurrent anomalies were evaluated. Supratentorial, infratentorial, and total intracranial volumes were measured using Cavalieri method. Various cranial distances and angles were used to evaluate the platybasia and posterior cranial fossa (PCF) development. Results Tonsillar herniation length was measured 9.09±3.39 mm below foramen magnum in CM group. Tonsillar herniation/concurrent syringomyelia, concavity/defect of clivus, herniation of bulbus and fourth ventricle, basilar invagination and craniovertebral junction abnormality rates were 30.3, 27, 18, 2, 3, and 3 percent, respectively. Absence of cisterna magna was encountered in 87.9% of the patients. Total, IT and ST volumes and distance between Chamberlain line and tip of dens axis, Klaus index, clivus length, distance between internal occipital protuberance and opisthion were significantly decreased in patient group. Also in patient group, it was found that Welcher basal angle/Boogard angle increased and tentorial slope angle decreased. Conclusion Mean cranial volume and length-angle measurement values significantly decreased and there was a congenital abnormality association in nearly 81.5 percent of the CM cases. As a result, it was concluded that CM ethiology can be attributed to multifactorial causes. Moreover, congenital defects can also give rise to this condition. PMID:26713146

  5. Clinical and neuroradiological features of syringomyelia associated with Chiari malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Sudo, Kazumasa; Miyasaka, Kazuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Saito, Hisatoshi

    1990-01-01

    The clinical presentation and radiological features were analyzed in 30 cases of syringomyelia associated with Chiari malformation. None of the patients had spinal dysraphism. The age on admission ranged from 6 to 59 years with a mean of 27 years. Syringomyelia was diagnosed by CT myelography and or MRI from 1982 to 1988. The initial symptoms were skeletal abnormality (43%) such as scolisis (12 cases) or pescavus (one case), unilateral pain or numbness (40%) and unilateral motor weakness (17%). Frequently seen signs on admission were sensory deficit (100%), scoliosis (57%), muscle weakness (57%), muscle atrophy (37%) and lower cranial nerve palsy (40%). The neurological findings were asymmetrical in all patients. The characteristic neurological findings in the cases presenting under 20 years of age were unilateral sensory and motor deficits (61%) with decreased or absent deep tendon reflex on the same side. The localization of the syrinx in axial section varied according to the level even in the same case. In 15 cases with unilateral sensory disturbance or unilateral sensory and motor deficit, the syrinx was located in the region corresponding to the posterolateral portion on the same side as that of sensory disturbance in the cervical or thoracic level. On the other hand, in 15 cases with bilateral sensory and motor deficit, the syrinx was located in the central portion and extended into the posterolateral portion of the more affected side. The authors think that the syrinx which originates from the unilateral posterolateral portion, extends to involve the gray matter around the central canal and the posterolateral portion of the other side with progression of the syrinx to cause bilateral disturbance. As a result, unilateral neurological symptoms also become bilateral with progression of the syrinx. (author).

  6. Report of a case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) with complex evolution and liver transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Alencar,Railene Célia B.; Guimarães,Andréa M.; Brito Junior,Lacy C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare acquired disease, with thrombotic episodes and frequent pancytopenia. We report the case of a 32 year-old female PNH patient with bone marrow aplasia, which followed a complex course, diagnosed with aplastic anemia associated with PNH, evolving in three years with Budd-Chiari syndrome and liver transplantation. Post-transplant complications, hepatic arterial thrombosis, graft rejection, liver retransplantation and treatment of P...

  7. Cor triatriatum dexter in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brayley, K.A.; Lunney, J.; Ettinger, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    A six-year-old, spayed, female German shepherd dog cross was evaluated for distention of the caudal vena cava. Differential diagnoses included right heart defects and Budd-Chiari type lesions. Radiography, echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and angiography demonstrated cor triatriatum dexter. This rare congenital anomaly of the right atrium has been described previously in veterinary patients with a right heart failure syndrome. This dog was asymptomatic, therefore, surgical correction was not undertaken

  8. Hemiplegia cruzada associada a impressão basilar, malformação de Arnold-Chiari e siringomielia: relato de caso Cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Arnold-Chiari malformation and syringomyelia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Gonçalves da Silva

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam um caso de hemiplegia cruzada associada a impressão basilar, malformação de Arnold-Chiari e siringomielia. Discutem as propostas anatômicas e a fiopatogenia desta síndrome de ocorrência bastante rara.The authors report a case of cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Chiari malformation and syringomyelia. The neuroanatomical controversy, the surgical treatment and the good outcome of the patient are discussed.

  9. Role of Cysternography in the management of Chiari I malformation related syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Pradhan, P.K.; Arora, P.; Bihari, S.; Arya, A.; Jain, V.K.; Banerjee, D.; Chhabra, D.K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: In syringomyelia related to Chiari I malformation there is significant alteration of CSF flow dynamics . However, no systematic study has been reported revealing the changes of flow dynamics and its role in assessing the outcome of treatment. The aim of this prospective study was to characterize the changes of CSF flow dynamics in MRI proven Chiari I malformation and correlate the findings with the outcome of posterior decompression and duraplasty. Material and Method : Fifteen patients with MRI proven Chiari I malformation without associated hydrocephalus or fixed AAD requiring trans oral decompression were included in this study. 185 MBq ( 5 mCi ) Tc99m-DTPA was instilled in lumbar region and the ascent of the tracer was followed at 2 hrs, 4 hrs, 6 hrs and 24 hrs by Gamma Camera imaging. The time and pattern of ascent to Foramen magnum(FM), cranial subarachnoidal spaces, delay or hold up of tracer or filling of syrinx were noted. Results: Out of 15 patients six (40%) showed timely tracer ascent with normal CSF flow to the cerebral convexities(group I) whereas 9 patients (60%) had delayed ascent and abnormal intra cranial CSF flow. In these 9 patients two distinctive groups could be identified. Six patients (group II) had mild delay whereas three patients (group III) showed almost complete block of CSF flow at the FM level. Comparison of clinical status as measured by modified JOAS disability grading system before and six months after surgical intervention showed significant improvement in group III and moderate improvement in group II. Group I patients had a low disability grade before and showed minor improvement after intervention. Conclusions: (i) Cysternography can be helpful in predicting the outcome of surgical intervention in Chiari I malformation related syringomyelia. (ii) Pre and post operative clinical scores correlate with the cysternography findings. (iii) The traditional belief that FM block causes Chiari I malformation related syringomyelia

  10. A Retrospective 2D Morphometric Analysis of Adult Female Chiari Type I Patients with Commonly Reported and Related Conditions

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    Maggie S. Eppelheimer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Researchers have sought to better understand Chiari type I malformation (CMI through morphometric measurements beyond tonsillar position (TP. Soft tissue and bone structures within the brain and craniocervical junction have been shown to be different for CMI patients compared to healthy controls. Yet, several morphological characteristics have not been consistently associated with CMI. CMI is also associated with different prevalent conditions (PCs such as syringomyelia, pseudotumor, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, scoliosis, and craniocervical instability. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1 to identify unique morphological characteristics of PCs, and (2 to better explain inconsistent results from case-control comparisons of CMI.Methods: Image, demographic, and PC information was obtained through the Chiari1000, a self-report web-accessed database. Twenty-eight morphometric measurements (MMs were performed on the cranial MR images of 236 pre-surgery adult female CMI participants and 140 female healthy control participants. Custom software was used to measure 28 structures within the posterior cranial fossa (PCF compartment, craniocervical junction, oral cavity, and intracranial area on midsagittal MR images for each participant.Results: Morphometric analysis of adult females indicated a smaller McRae line length in CMI participants with syringomyelia compared to those without syringomyelia. TP was reduced in CMI participants with EDS than those without EDS. Basion to posterior axial line was significantly longer in CMI participants with scoliosis compared to those without scoliosis. No additional MMs were found to differ between CMI participants with and without a specific PC. Four morphometric differences were found to be consistently different between CMI participants and healthy controls regardless of PC: larger TP and a smaller clivus length, fastigium, and corpus callosum height in CMI participants.Conclusion: Syringomyelia, EDS

  11. Is Chiari malformation a cause of systemic hypertension and sinus bradycardia? A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ghasemi

    2011-01-01

    Type I Chiari malformation is a disease mostly caused by congenital displacement of cerebellar tonsils through the fo-ramen magnum. The most common symptom is headache, rarely reported with hypertension or sinus bradycardia.

  12. Otto Mennicke (1876-) and the first description of skull base anomalies causing cerebellar tonsillar ectopia: one of the first mentions of the Chiari I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Fabian N; Hendrix, Philipp; Brinker, Titus J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-05-01

    Although Hans Chiari made significant and meaningful contributions to our understanding and classification of hindbrain herniations, others have also contributed to this knowledge. One figure who has been lost to history is Otto Mennicke. Herein, we discuss his role in our understanding of tonsillar ectopia and his life and connection to Hans Chiari. Our knowledge of what is now known as the Chiari malformations has been shaped by several clinicians including Otto Mennicke.

  13. Complicated Pseudomeningocele Repair After Chiari Decompression: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tommasi, Claudio; Bond, Aaron E

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomeningocele is a recognised complication after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation. Its management can be challenging and treatment options vary in literature. A difficult-to-treat case of a pseudomeningocele after posterior fossa decompression for a Chiari I malformation is presented. A 34-year-old woman underwent an initial decompression followed by multiple revision surgeries after the development of a symptomatic pseudomeningocele and a low-grade infection. Complications associated with standard treatment modalities, including lumbar drainage and dural repair, are discussed. A review of the existing literature is presented. The reported case ultimately required complete removal of all dural repair materials to eliminate the patient's low-grade infection, a muscular flap, and placement of a ventricular-peritoneal shunt for definitive treatment after a trial of a lumbar drain led to herniation and development of a syrinx. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. La estrategia del acoso. Análisis de la novela "Billy Budd", de Herman Melville, en clave de acoso laboral

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    Julián Antonio Paniagua López

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The target of this article is to try to show that Herman Melville’s novel Billy Budd can beconsidered a forerunner of what years later will be known as harassment in the workplace, mobbing. Inthe work are described the characteristics of the bully, the limits of the laws to prevent those behaviours,and the responsibility of the organizations’ managements in these cases.

  15. Abnormalities in auditory evoked potentials of 75 patients with Arnold-Chiari malformations types I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriques Filho Paulo Sergio A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency and degree of severity of abnormalities in the auditory pathways in patients with Chiari malformations type I and II. METHOD: This is a series-of-case descriptive study in which the possible presence of auditory pathways abnormalities in 75 patients (48 children and 27 adults with Chiari malformation types I and II were analyzed by means of auditory evoked potentials evaluation. The analysis was based on the determination of intervals among potentials peak values, absolute latency and amplitude ratio among potentials V and I. RESULTS: Among the 75 patients studied, 27 (36% disclosed Arnold-Chiari malformations type I and 48 (64% showed Arnold-Chiari malformations type II. Fifty-three (71% of these patients showed some degree of auditory evoked potential abnormalities. Tests were normal in the remaining 22 (29% patients. CONCLUSION: Auditory evoked potentials testing can be considered a valuable instrument for diagnosis and evaluation of brain stem functional abnormalities in patients with Arnold-Chiari malformations type I and II. The determination of the presence and degree of severity of these abnormalities can be contributory to the prevention of further handicaps in these patients either through physical therapy or by means of precocious corrective surgical intervention.

  16. Unique cerebrovascular anomalies in Noonan syndrome with RAF1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, Yuri A; Lichty, Angie W; Champion, Kristen J; Clarkson, L Kate; Holden, Kenton R; Matheus, M Gisele

    2014-08-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder caused by gain-of-function germline mutations affecting components of the Ras-MAPK pathway. The authors present the case of a 6-year-old male with Noonan syndrome, Chiari malformation type I, shunted benign external hydrocephalus in infancy, and unique cerebrovascular changes. A de novo heterozygous change in the RAF1 gene was identified. The patient underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography angiography, and magnetic resonance angiography to further clarify the nature of his abnormal brain vasculature. The authors compared his findings to the few cases of Noonan syndrome reported with cerebrovascular pathology. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Clinical and radiological outcome of craniocervical osteo-dural decompression for Chiari I-associated syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spena, Giannantonio; Bernucci, Claudio; Garbossa, Diego; Valfrè, Walter; Versari, Pietro

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes of craniocervical decompression for patients affected by Chiari I-related syringomyelia. We performed a retrospective analysis of a group of patients affected by Chiari I-associated syringomyelia treated by craniocervical decompression (CCD). Surgical and technical aspects and preoperative factors predicting outcome were discussed. A total of 36 patients were reviewed. There were 17 men and 19 women (female/male ratio 1.11), and the mean age was 40.4 (range 18-68). The most important preoperative symptoms were related to myelopathy (pain, weakness, atrophy, spasticity, sensory loss, and dysesthesias). Most syrinxes were in the cervico-thoracic region (61.1%), and the majority of patients had tonsillar descent between the foramen magnum and C1. All patients underwent a craniectomy less than 3 cm in diameter followed by a duroplasty with dura substitute. No arachnoid manipulation was necessary. Three patients (8.1%) experienced cerebrospinal fluid leaks that resolved without complications. At a mean follow up of 40 months (range 16-72) 80.5% of patients exhibited improvement over their preoperative neurological examination while 11.1% stabilized. The syrinx shrank in 80.5% of patients. Chi-square test showed that preoperative syrinx extension and degree of tonsillar descent did not correlate with clinical and neuroradiological postoperative evolution. Treating syringomyelia associated in Chiari I malformation with CCD leads to a large percentage of patients with satisfying results and no irreversible complications.

  18. Relationship between Cough-Associated Changes in CSF Flow and Disease Severity in Chiari I Malformation: An Exploratory Study Using Real-Time MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, A F; Khatami, D; Heilman, C B; Kasper, E M; Patz, S; Madan, N; Zhao, Y; Bhadelia, R A

    2018-05-10

    Currently no quantitative objective test exists to determine disease severity in a patient with Chiari I malformation. Our aim was to correlate disease severity in symptomatic patients with Chiari I malformation with cough-associated changes in CSF flow as measured with real-time MR imaging. Thirteen symptomatic patients with Chiari I malformation (tonsillar herniation of ≥5 mm) were prospectively studied. A real-time, flow-sensitized pencil-beam MR imaging scan was used to measure CSF stroke volume during rest and immediately following coughing and relaxation periods (total scan time, 90 seconds). Multiple posterior fossa and craniocervical anatomic measurements were also obtained. Patients were classified into 2 groups by neurosurgeons blinded to MR imaging measurements: 1) nonspecific Chiari I malformation (5/13)-Chiari I malformation with nonspecific symptoms like non-cough-related or mild occasional cough-related headache, neck pain, dizziness, paresthesias, and/or trouble swallowing; 2) specific Chiari I malformation (8/13)-patients with Chiari I malformation with specific symptoms and/or objective findings like severe cough-related headache, myelopathy, syringomyelia, and muscle atrophy. The Spearman correlation was used to determine correlations between MR imaging measurements and disease severity, and both groups were also compared using a Mann-Whitney U test. There was a significant negative correlation between the percentage change in CSF stroke volume (resting to postcoughing) and Chiari I malformation disease severity ( R = 0.59; P = .03). Mann-Whitney comparisons showed the percentage change in CSF stroke volume (resting to postcoughing) to be significantly different between patient groups ( P = .04). No other CSF flow measurement or anatomic measure was significantly different between the groups. Our exploratory study suggests that assessment of CSF flow response to a coughing challenge has the potential to become a valuable objective noninvasive

  19. The Association between Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in a Pediatric Cohort with Chiari 1 Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Amin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB reported in the literature for Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1 is uniformly high (24% to 70%. In Canada, there is limited access to pediatric polysomnography (PSG. Therefore, the identification of clinical features would be invaluable for triaging these children.

  20. Results of Chiari pelvic osteotomy for acetabular dysplasia in adults; Association with bone scintigraphic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Nobuo; Ozono, Kenji; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Takaoka, Kunio; Ono, Hiroo (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1993-02-01

    In an attempt to determine indications of Chiari pelvic osteotomy in acetabular dysplasia, postoperative outcome of hip joint (64 joints) was examined on the basis of findings of bone scintigraphy. The subjects were 61 patients with osteoarthrosis of hip joint who underwent preoperative bone scintigraphy. The follow-up period ranged from 2 years to 9 years and 7 months with a mean of 4 years and 9 months. According to X-ray findings, 37 osteoarthrosis joints were staged as early and 27 as progressive. Preoperative bone scintigraphic findings fell into three: (I) normal or slight hot type (33 joints), (II) hot type at the weighting part (16 joints), and (III) double hot type in the weighting part and inside part (15 joints). None of the patients had severe surgical complications such as deep-seated infection, neuroparalysis and pseudojoint. According to the clinical staging for hip joint function, 7 (47%) of 64 joints were judged as poor after osteotomy, belonging to type III. Deterioration of osteoarthrosis was seen in 11 joints (41%) on X-ray films. Of these, 9 had type III. In conclusion, Chiari pelvic osteotomy should not be indicated when type III is shown on bone scintigrams. (N.K.).

  1. Management of uncommon secondary trigeminal neuralgia related to a rare Arnold Chiari type I malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Ali Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Trigeminal neuralgia (TN may sometimes present secondary to an intra-cranial cause. Arnold Chiari Malformation (ACM is downward herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum that may be a cause of TN like pain in very rare cases. Aims The aim of this brief report is to suggest the proper management of uncommon secondary trigeminal neuralgia related to a rare Arnold Chiari type I malformation. Methods A male patient presented electric shock like stabbing pain on the right side of the face for more than ten years. The symptoms were typical of trigeminal neuralgia except that there was loss of corneal reflex on the right side and the patient also complained of gait & sleep disturbances. Complex and multilevel diagnosis was made. Results A multiplanar imaging through brain acquiring T1/T2W1 revealed ACM Type I Malformation with caudal displacement of cerebellar tonsils through foramen magnum. Conclusion Dental surgeons and oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons should exclude intra-cranial causes by Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI in patients of TN presenting with loss of corneal reflex, gait and sleep disturbances due to night time pain episodes.

  2. Anophthalmia-plus syndrome with unusual findings. A clinical report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayir, A; Tasdemir, S; Eroz, R; Yuce, I; Orbak, Z; Tatar, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a male child at 3 years old with Anophthalmia-Plus Syndrome (APS). He has asymmetry of the face and head, left choanal atresia, a sunken facial appearance, microphthalmia in the right eye, severe microphthalmia in the left eye, bilateral low-set ears, scarring from cleft palate surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sections revealed decreased right globe volume, an undeveloped left globe, decreased left optical nerve thickness, Chiari type 2 malformation, left choanal atresia and cleft palate. Echocardiography and abdominal ultrasonography were normal. The patient has a 45 dB conductive hearing loss in the left ear. Repeated thyroid function tests were evaluated as compatible with central hypothyroidism. We report a Fryns Anophthalmia-Plus Syndrome in a child with unusual findings including central hypothyroidism, chiari type 2 malformation, conductive hearing loss and developmental regression. Summary of the features reported in the present case and all 14 previous cases that might be defined as APS.

  3. A unifying hypothesis for hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, anencephaly and spina bifida

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    Williams Helen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work is a modified version of the Casey Holter Memorial prize essay presented to the Society for Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida, June 29th 2007, Heidelberg, Germany. It describes the origin and consequences of the Chiari malformation, and proposes that hydrocephalus is caused by inadequate central nervous system (CNS venous drainage. A new hypothesis regarding the pathogenesis, anencephaly and spina bifida is described. Any volume increase in the central nervous system can increase venous pressure. This occurs because veins are compressible and a CNS volume increase may result in reduced venous blood flow. This has the potential to cause progressive increase in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF volume. Venous insufficiency may be caused by any disease that reduces space for venous volume. The flow of CSF has a beneficial effect on venous drainage. In health it moderates central nervous system pressure by moving between the head and spine. Conversely, obstruction to CSF flow causes localised pressure increases, which have an adverse effect on venous drainage. The Chiari malformation is associated with hindbrain herniation, which may be caused by low spinal pressure relative to cranial pressure. In these instances, there are hindbrain-related symptoms caused by cerebellar and brainstem compression. When spinal injury occurs as a result of a Chiari malformation, the primary pathology is posterior fossa hypoplasia, resulting in raised spinal pressure. The small posterior fossa prevents the flow of CSF from the spine to the head as blood enters the central nervous system during movement. Consequently, intermittent increases in spinal pressure caused by movement, result in injury to the spinal cord. It is proposed that posterior fossa hypoplasia, which has origins in fetal life, causes syringomyelia after birth and leads to damage to the spinal cord in spina bifida. It is proposed that hydrocephalus may occur as a result of

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of Arnold-Chiari type I malformation with hydromyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLaPaz, R.L.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; New, P.F.; Kistler, J.P.; McGinnis, B.D.; Pykett, I.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Saturation recovery nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images and metrizamide computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained in an adult patient with a clinical history suggestive of syringomyelia. Both NMR and CT studies showed low lying cerebellar tonsils. The CT study demonstrated central cavitation of the spinal cord from the midthoracic to midcervical levels but could not exclude an intramedullary soft tissue mass at the cervico-medullary junction. The NMR images in transverse, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated extension of an enlarged central spinal cord cerebrospinal fluid space to the cervico-medullary junction. This was felt to be strong evidence for exclusion of an intramedullary soft tissue mass and in favor of a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari Type I malformation with hydromyelia. The noninvasive nature of spinal cord and cervico-medullary junction evaluation with NMR is emphasized

  5. Spinning, hurting, still, afraid: Living life spaces with Type I Chiari Malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Gavin J

    2018-01-31

    Human geography's varied engagement with the brain has involved considerations of the way people know and respond to their environments, and their place-based experiences with emotions, mental illnesses and disorders, intellectual disabilities and particular neurological conditions. This paper argues however that this scholarship could be augmented by, and existing expertise be directed towards, considering physical brain abnormalities and injuries. As a case in point it considers the spatial experience of living with Type 1 Chiari Malformation. Through interviews with four sufferers, the research articulates three domains that they have had to re-negotiate - home space, social space and medical space - emphasizing supportive and challenging aspects of each, as well as meaningful and affective qualities to encounters. The paper concludes with some pointers towards the future study of physical brain abnormalities and injuries and the kinds of knowledge it might create to increase awareness and inform care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty in Chiari surgery: A technical note

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    Marcelo Ferreira Sabba

    Full Text Available Summary Chiari malformation (CM is the most common and prevalent symptomatic congenital craniocervical malformation. Radiological diagnosis is established when the cerebellar tonsils are located 5 mm or more below the level of the foramen magnum on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical treatment is indicated whenever there is symptomatic tonsillar herniation or syringomyelia/hydrocephalus. The main surgical treatment for CM without craniocervical instability (such as atlantoaxial luxation is posterior fossa decompression, with or without duraplasty. The authors describe in details and in a stepwise fashion the surgical approach of patients with CM as performed at the State University of Campinas, emphasizing technical nuances for minimizing the risks of the procedure and potentially improving patient outcome.

  7. Unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation for neurogenic hypoventilation in Arnold Chiari malformation

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    Nitin Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Long- term ventilator dependence in patients with neurogenic hypoventilation is associated with significant morbidity and restricts mobility. Diaphragmatic pacing by phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS is a viable alternative. This is a case report of patient with Arnold-Chiari malformation with extensive syrinx who had neurogenic hypoventilation during sleep even after foramen magnum decompression and resolution of the syrinx. Unilateral PNS was done using spinal cord stimulator. With intermittent stimulation for 8 h while asleep, patient could be weaned off the ventilator completely. At 2 years follow- up, patient is ambulant and has returned to his routine activities. PNS is a good treatment tool in patients with neurogenic hypoventilation. Spinal cord stimulator can be used with optimal results. This is first such reported case of using spinal cord stimulator for PNS from India.

  8. Anesthesia for a patient of acromesomelic dysplasia with associated hydrocephalus, Arnold Chiari malformation and syringomyelia

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    Rudrashish Haldar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acromesomelic dysplasias are autosomal recessive osteochondrodysplasias. Acromesomelic dysplasia Maroteaux-type (AMDM, also known as St Helena dysplasia, is of two types: The classical and the mild variety. About 50 cases of AMDM have been reported till date, most of them being the classical variety. There is scarcity of literature on anesthesia for such patients. We are reporting a case of general anesthetic management of AMDM, associated with hydrocephalus, Arnold Chiari malformation type-1 and syringomyelia. The patient was a 10-year-old short-statured boy who presented with symptomatic thoracic kyphoscoliosis, gibbus deformity and back pain. On examination, there was no neurological deficit. Radiology revealed thoracic kyphoscoliosis, mild ventriculomegaly and upper cervical syringomyelia. The patient underwent posterior fossa decompression in the prone position under general anesthesia. We will discuss the anesthetic considerations for such patients and review the pertinent literature.

  9. Posterior cranial fossa dimensions in the Chiari I malformation: relation to pathogenesis and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stovner, L.J.; Bergan, U.; Nilsen, G.; Sjaastad, O.

    1993-01-01

    Skull dimensions were measured on lateral skull radiographs in 33 adult patients with MRI-verified Chiari I malformations and in 40 controls. The posterior cranial fossa was significantly smaller and shallower in patients than in controls. In the patients, there was a positive correlation between posterior fossa size and the degree of the cerebellar ectopia, which might indicate that a posterior cranial fossa which was originally too small had been expanded by the herniation of hindbrain structures at an early stage. No special clinical presentation was associated with a very small posterior cranial fossa, which may indicate that a small posterior cranial per se has little or no clinical significance, although it may be the primary developmental anomaly. (orig./GD)

  10. Orofacial clinical features in Arnold Chiari type I malformation: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arruda, José-Alcides; Figueiredo, Eugênia; Monteiro, João-Luiz; Barbosa, Livia-Mirelle; Rodrigues, Cleomar; Vasconcelos, Belmiro

    2018-04-01

    Arnold Chiari malformation (ACM) is characterized by an anatomical defect at the base of the skull where the cerebellum and the spinal cord herniate through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal. Among the subtypes of the condition, ACM type I (ACM-I) is particularly outstanding because of the severity of symptoms. This study aimed to analyze the orofacial clinical manifestations of patients with ACM-I, and discuss their demographic distribution and clinical features in light of the literature. A case series with patients with ACM-I treated between 2012 and 2015 was described. The sample consisted of patients who were referred by the Department of Neurosurgery to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Service of Hospital da Restauração in Brazil for the assessment of facial symptomatology. A questionnaire was applied to evaluate the presence of painful orofacial findings. Data are reported using descriptive statistical methods. Mean patient age was 39.3 years and the sample consisted mostly of male patients. A high prevalence of headache (50%) and pain in the neck (66.7%) and masticatory muscles (50%) was found. Only one patient reported difficulty in performing mandibular movements and two reported jaw clicking sounds. Mean mouth opening was 40.83 mm. ACM-I patients may exhibit orofacial symptoms which may mimic temporomandibular joint disorders. This study brings interesting information that could help clinicians and oral and maxillofacial surgeons to understand this uncommon condition and also help with the diagnosis of patients with similar physical characteristics by referring them to a neurosurgeon. Key words: Arnold-Chiari malformation, facial pain, diagnosis, orofacial.

  11. Sleep Disordered Breathing in Children and Adolescents with Chiari Malformation Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Anna; Dittoni, Serena; Testani, Elisa; Di Blasi, Chiara; Scarano, Emanuele; Mariotti, Paolo; Paternoster, Giovanna; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) has been associated with sleep disordered breathing (SDB). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of SDB in CM-I and its clinical correlates in a population of children and adolescents. Methods: Fifty-three consecutive children and adolescents affected by CM-I were enrolled (27 girls and 26 boys, mean age 10.3 ± 4.3, range: 3-18 years). All patients underwent neurological examination, MRI, and polysomnography (PSG). Otorhinolaryngologic clinical evaluation was performed in patients with polysomnographic evidence of sleep-related upper airway obstruction. Results: Mean size of the herniation was 9.5 ± 5.4 mm. Fourteen patients had syringomyelia, 5 had hydrocephalus, 31 presented neurological signs, 14 had epileptic seizures, and 7 reported poor sleep. PSG revealed SDB in 13 subjects. Patients with SDB, compared to those without SDB, had a higher prevalence hydrocephalus (p = 0.002), syringomyelia (p = 0.001), and neurological symptoms (p = 0.028). No significant difference was observed in age, gender, prevalence of epilepsy, and size of the herniation. Obstructive SDB was associated with syringomyelia (p = 0.004), whereas central SDB was associated with hydrocephalus (p = 0.034). Conclusions: In our population of CM-I patients the prevalence of SDB was 24%, lower than that reported in literature. Moreover, our findings suggest that abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in CM-I, particularly syringomyelia and hydro-cephalus, are associated with SDB. Citation: Losurdo A; Dittoni S; Testani E; Di Blasi C; Scarano E; Mariotti P; Paternoster G; Di Rocco C; Massimi L; Della Marca G. Sleep disordered breathing in children and adolescents with Chiari malformation Type I. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(4):371-377. PMID:23585753

  12. The odontoid process invagination in normal subjects, Chiari malformation and Basilar invagination patients: Pathophysiologic correlations with angular craniometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, J?nio A.; Botelho, Ricardo V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniometric studies have shown that both Chiari malformation (CM) and basilar invagination (BI) belong to a spectrum of malformations. A more precise method to differentiate between these types of CVJM is desirable. The Chamberlain′s line violation (CLV) is the most common method to identify BI. The authors sought to clarify the real importance of CLV in the spectrum of craniovertebral junction malformations (CVJM) and to identify possible pathophysiological relationships. Me...

  13. Comparison of Porcine and Bovine Collagen Dural Substitutes in Posterior Fossa Decompression for Chiari I Malformation in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christine K; Mokhtari, Tara; Connolly, Ian D; Li, Gordon; Shuer, Lawrence M; Chang, Steven D; Steinberg, Gary K; Hayden Gephart, Melanie

    2017-12-01

    Posterior fossa decompression surgeries for Chiari malformations are susceptible to postoperative complications such as pseudomeningocele, external cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, and meningitis. Various dural substitutes have been used to improve surgical outcomes. This study examined whether the collagen matrix dural substitute type correlated with the incidence of postoperative complications after posterior fossa decompression in adult patients with Chiari I malformations. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 81 adult patients who underwent an elective decompressive surgery for treatment of symptomatic Chiari I malformations, with duraplasty involving a dural substitute derived from either bovine or porcine collagen matrix. Demographics and treatment characteristics were correlated with surgical outcomes. A total of 81 patients were included in the study. Compared with bovine dural substitute, porcine dural substitute was associated with a significantly higher risk of pseudomeningocele occurrence (odds ratio, 5.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.65-27.15; P = 0.01) and a higher overall complication rate (odds ratio, 3.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-12.71; P = 0.03) by univariate analysis. There was no significant difference in the rate of meningitis, repeat operations, or overall complication rate between the 2 dural substitutes. In addition, estimated blood loss was a significant risk factor for meningitis (P = 0.03). Multivariate analyses again showed that porcine dural substitute was associated with pseudomeningocele occurrence, although the association with higher overall complication rate did not reach significance. Dural substitutes generated from porcine collagen, compared with those from bovine collagen, were associated with a higher likelihood of pseudomeningocele development in adult patients undergoing Chiari I malformation decompression and duraplasty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chiari Malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes of Health (NIH), the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. The NINDS conducts research and ... Testimony Legislative Updates Impact NINDS Contributions to Approved Therapies ... Director, Division of Intramural Research

  15. Hepatic Veins and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a Child Treated by Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with portal hypertension, due to Budd-Chiari syndrome, and retrohepatic inferior vena cava thrombosis, submitted to a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) by connecting the suprahepatic segment of the inferior vena cava directly to the portal vein. After 3 months, the withdrawal of anticoagulants promoted the thrombosis of the TIPS. At TIPS revision, thrombosis of the TIPS and the main portal vein and clots at the splenic and the superior mesenteric veins were found. Successful angiography treatment was performed by thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty of a severe stenosis at the distal edge of the stent.

  16. Combined Spinal-Epidural Analgesia for Laboring Parturient with Arnold-Chiari Type I Malformation: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

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    Clark K. Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic management of laboring parturients with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation poses a difficult challenge for the anesthesiologist. The increase in intracranial pressure during uterine contractions, coughing, valsalva maneuvers, and expulsion of the fetus can be detrimental to the mother during the process of labor and delivery. No concrete evidence has implicated high cerebral spinal fluid pressure on maternal and fetal complications. The literature on the use of neuraxial techniques for managing parturients with Arnold-Chiari is extremely scarce. While most anesthesiologists advocate epidural analgesia for management of labor pain and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section, we are the first to report the use of combined spinal-epidural analgesia for managing labor pain in a pregnant woman with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation. Also, we have reviewed the literature and presented information from case reports and case series to support the safe usage of neuraxial techniques in these patients.

  17. Un libello di citazioni. I “Frammenti morali, scientifici, eruditi e poetici” e la polemica fra Pietro Verri e l’abate Chiari

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    Valeria Tavazzi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available After recreating the occurrence of the dispute between Pietro Verri and abbot Chiari – due to Verri's favour to Goldoni in theatrical competitions – this article analyses a work entirely composed of quotations: Frammenti morali, scientifici, eruditi e poetici del signor abbate D. Pietro Chiari. This text was assembled by Verri to show that his adversary's epistles in verse were sloppy and full of incongruities. The use of quotations, as an instrument of attack and defence, is investigated by analysing some passages that preceeded the quarrel, the Frammenti, and Chiari's answer in the novel La filosofessa italiana . In addition, there emerge some aspects of the character of young Verri that might be of interest, especially within the context of his relationship with Goldoni, and in relation to Goldoni's dedication to Verri in Festino.

  18. Do the cerebellar tonsils move during flexion and extension of the neck in patients with Chiari I malformation? A radiological study with clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Kirkpatrick, Christina M; Rizk, Elias; Chern, Joshua J; Oskouian, Rod J; Oakes, W Jerry

    2016-03-01

    In the past, diagnosis of the Chiari I malformation has primarily been made on midsagittal MRI. We hypothesized that based on the frequent presentation of opisthotonos in patients with hindbrain hernia (primarily Chiari II malformation but sometimes Chiari I malformation) that the hyperextension might be a compensatory technique used by such patients to bring the cerebellar tonsils up out of the cervical spine. This prospective study reviewed imaging of patients with Chiari I malformation who underwent flexion/extension MRI for evaluation of their hindbrain herniation. Age-matched controls were used for comparison. In general, there was elevation of the cerebellar tonsils with extension and increased descent with flexion of the cervical spine. In 72 % of patients, flexion of the neck resulted in descent of the cerebellar tonsils. In 64 % of patients, extension of the neck resulted in ascent of the cerebellar tonsils. In the 14 patients with an associated syrinx, 71 % were found to have caudal movement of the cerebellar tonsils with neck flexion, and only 43 % were observed to have any movement of the cerebellar tonsils in neck extension compared to patients without a syrinx where ascent of the tonsils was seen in only nine during neck extension. Two patients were observed to have the reverse finding of ascent of the cerebellar tonsils with neck flexion and descent of the cerebellar tonsils with neck extension. Five patients had no movement of the cerebellar tonsils in either flexion or extension of the neck, and one of these had a small syrinx. Although minimal and not in all patients, we observed elevation of the herniated cerebellar tonsils with extension of the cervical spine in patients with Chiari I malformation. This finding provides evidence as to why some patients with hindbrain herniation present with opisthotonos and supports earlier findings that CSF flow is reduced at the craniocervical junction in flexion in patients with Chiari I malformation.

  19. Expansion of Chiari I-associated syringomyelia after posterior-fossa decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Z; Rao, S; Constantini, S

    2000-09-01

    Chiari I malformation (CMI) is an abnormality that involves caudal herniation of the cerebellar tonsils into the foramen magnum. CMI has been shown to be closely associated with the development of syringomyelia (SM). Several theories have emerged to explain the apparent correlation between the existence of CMI with subsequent development of SM. However, the exact mechanism of the evolution of SM is still subject to controversy. We report here the case of a 12-year-old girl admitted to hospital with headache, vomiting, ataxia, and moderate pyramidal signs. Radiological evaluation revealed the presence of CMI, accompanied by a small SM. The patient underwent posterior fossa decompression and improved significantly. She was re-admitted 6 months later with clinical evidence of progressive spinal cord dysfunction. MR revealed gross expansion of the syrinx. This case raises questions regarding the pathophysiology of CMI and its association with SM. The case indicates the need for neurological and radiological follow-up for patients undergoing posterior fossa decompression due to CMI, even for those without an initial syrinx. This is the first report known to us of expansion of a syrinx following decompression of an associated CMI.

  20. Relationship between pharyngitis and peri-odontoid pannus: A new etiology for some Chiari I malformations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Hendrix, Philipp; Oakes, Peter; Loukas, Marios; Chern, Joshua J; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Oakes, W Jerry

    2015-07-01

    The pathophysiology underlying Chiari I malformations (CIMs) provides room for debate with several theories attempting to address this issue. We retrospectively reviewed many of our past patients with pediatric CIMs (specifically, those with peri-odontoid pannus), and present a hypothesis for the development of the malformation in some of said patients. Our experience with the pediatric CIM has shown that almost 1 in 20 patients who present with symptoms is found to have a peri-odontoid pannus. These masses ranged in size from 4 to 11 mm in diameter. Forty percent had a history of clinically significant pharyngitis or pharyngeal abscess. Pannus formation around the dens (odontoid) resulted in ventral compression of the craniocervical junction in each of these patients. Highlighting the hypermobility that causes such lesions, following fusion, the pannus and symptoms in several patients were diminished. Impairment of normal cerebrospinal fluid circulation out of the fourth ventricle and across the craniocervical junction appears to be a plausible endpoint in this discussion and a suitable explanation for some patients with CIM. Still, the mechanisms by which cerebrospinal fluid circulation is compromised may be variable and are not well understood. This is the first study dedicated to the evaluation of pannus formation in the CIM population. We hypothesize that pharyngeal inflammatory conditions contribute to the formation and progression of hindbrain herniation in a small subset of patients with CIMs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. MRI tight posterior fossa sign for prenatal diagnosis of Chiari type II malformation

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    Ando, Kumiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Ogawa, Masayo; Takada, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Hirota, Shozo [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nishinomiya, Hyogo (Japan); Shakudo, Miyuki [Osaka City General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroyuki [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Gynecology, Nishinomiya (Japan); Minagawa, Kyoko [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    Chiari type II malformation (CMII) is one of three hindbrain malformations that display hydrocephalus. We have observed that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signal in the posterior fossa, which is always apparent on normal fetal MR images, is not visible in a fetus with CMII. We use the term 'tight posterior fossa' for this MR imaging finding, and evaluate the diagnostic value of this finding on fetal MR images. Included in the study were 21 fetuses which underwent brain MR imaging at 1.5 T using two-dimensional balanced turbo-field-echo (2-D balanced-TFE) in the axial and sagittal planes. Postnatal diagnoses were CMII (n=5), CNS abnormalities other than CMII (n=8), and no abnormality (n=8). A tight posterior fossa was defined as an absent or slit-like water signal space around the hindbrain in the posterior fossa on both sagittal and axial MR images. All CMII fetuses displayed a tight posterior fossa on MR images. Hydrocephalus was visualized in all CMII fetuses and myelomeningocele in four fetuses, but hindbrain herniation was visualized only in two of five fetuses. The CSF signal surrounding the hindbrain was clearly visible in all the other 16 fetuses, including five with hydrocephalus not associated with CMII, although it was slightly narrower in a fetus with a cloverleaf skull than in the normal fetuses. Tight posterior fossa in the presence of hydrocephalus is a useful and characteristic finding of CMII on fetal MRI. (orig.)

  2. MRI tight posterior fossa sign for prenatal diagnosis of Chiari type II malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Kumiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Ogawa, Masayo; Takada, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Hirota, Shozo; Shakudo, Miyuki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Minagawa, Kyoko

    2007-01-01

    Chiari type II malformation (CMII) is one of three hindbrain malformations that display hydrocephalus. We have observed that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signal in the posterior fossa, which is always apparent on normal fetal MR images, is not visible in a fetus with CMII. We use the term 'tight posterior fossa' for this MR imaging finding, and evaluate the diagnostic value of this finding on fetal MR images. Included in the study were 21 fetuses which underwent brain MR imaging at 1.5 T using two-dimensional balanced turbo-field-echo (2-D balanced-TFE) in the axial and sagittal planes. Postnatal diagnoses were CMII (n=5), CNS abnormalities other than CMII (n=8), and no abnormality (n=8). A tight posterior fossa was defined as an absent or slit-like water signal space around the hindbrain in the posterior fossa on both sagittal and axial MR images. All CMII fetuses displayed a tight posterior fossa on MR images. Hydrocephalus was visualized in all CMII fetuses and myelomeningocele in four fetuses, but hindbrain herniation was visualized only in two of five fetuses. The CSF signal surrounding the hindbrain was clearly visible in all the other 16 fetuses, including five with hydrocephalus not associated with CMII, although it was slightly narrower in a fetus with a cloverleaf skull than in the normal fetuses. Tight posterior fossa in the presence of hydrocephalus is a useful and characteristic finding of CMII on fetal MRI. (orig.)

  3. Surgical treatment of Arnold-Chiari malformation type I in an adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Marko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal canal with obliteration of the cerebellomedullary cistern is the primary feature of Arnold-Chiari type I malformation (ACM I. It is considered to be congenital malformation, although there have been reported cases of an acquired form. Case report. We presented a female patient, 45-year old, with ACM I without syringomyelia as a rare and unusual clinical image, as well as the effect of decompressive surgery in the treatment of this malformation. The patient was admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery with clinical signs of truncal ataxia worsening during the last six years. Moderate quadriparesis with predominant lower extremity involvement and the signs of the cranial nerves damages occured during the last seven months before admission, with progressive clinical course up to the date of admission. Neurosurgical treatment that included suboccipital medial craniectomy with resection of posterior arch C1 vertebrae and C2 laminectomy resulted in a significant clinical improvement and a much better quality of life. Conclusion. Posterior craniovertebral decompression with microsurgical reduction of the cerebellar tonsils and placement of an artificial dural graft is a treatment of choice in severe forms of ACM I without syringomyelia. .

  4. Malformación de Arnold-Chiari: la pérdida de la sonrisa

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    Antonio Martínez-Sabater

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available La Malformación de Arnold-Chiari es una enfermedad rara caracterizada por la presencia de síntomas insidiosos que pueden suponer un retraso en el diagnóstico. Las características sintomatológicas como el dolor, la pérdida de fuerza progresiva, los mareos, etc., junto con los efectos secundarios de los fármacos indicados para el tratamiento sintomático (anticonvulsionantes, antidepresivos, analgésicos, etc. supone una pérdida de la calidad de vida de la persona. Aspectos de la calidad de vida que en un entorno biomédico suelen pasar desapercibidos, y juntamente, con la falta de repercusión exterior de la patología, supone la incomprensión de las personas del entorno. Con el fin de poder conocer las percepciones y experiencias de una persona afecta se ha utilizado la historia de vida, presentando la historia de Javi, que por su doble vertiente de persona afecta y personal sanitario, se convierte en informante clave.

  5. Malformação de Chiari do tipo II sintomática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SALOMÃO J. FRANCISCO

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Os autores analisam uma série de 17 crianças portadoras de mielodisplasias que desenvolveram sinais e sintomas da malformação de Chiari do tipo II. De acordo com a idade, dois grupos ficaram bem definidos: Grupo I, crianças no primeiro ano de vida, em que predominaram sinais e sintomas de comprometimento do tronco encefálico e nervos cranianos bulbares (n=13; Grupo II, composto por crianças com idade superior a um ano, em que as principais manifestações foram dor cervical e sinais cerebelares (n=4. O resultado do tratamento cirúrgico nos dois grupos foi distinto: enquanto a mortalidade no Grupo I atingiu 46,1%, nenhum paciente do Grupo II veio a falecer. O tratamento inicial consistiu na instalação ou revisão de derivação ventricular, sendo a descompressão crânio-vertebral reservada àqueles que não se beneficiaram com esses procedimentos. Os autores enfatizam a necessidade do imediato reconhecimento e tratamento do quadro, de modo a se obter resultados satisfatórios.

  6. Syringomyelia with Chiari I Malformation Presenting as Hip Charcot Arthropathy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Memarpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroarthropathy (neuropathic osteoarthropathy, also known as Charcot joint, is a condition characterized by a progressive articular surface destruction in the setting of impaired nociceptive and proprioceptive innervation of the involved joint. It is seen most commonly in the foot and ankle secondary to peripheral neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus. Cases of hip (Charcot neuroarthropathy are rare and almost exclusively reported in patients with neurosyphilis (tabes dorsalis. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who presented to the emergency department complaining of right hip pain. On physical examination, pain and thermal sensory deficits were noted in the upper torso with a cape-like distribution, as well as signs of an upper motor neuron lesion in the left upper and lower extremities. A magnetic resonance imaging study (MRI of the right hip showed evidence of early articular surface destruction and periarticular edema consistent with hip Charcot arthropathy. An MRI of the spine revealed an Arnold-Chiari type I malformation with extensive syringohydromyelia of the cervical and thoracic spine.

  7. Valoración de la capacidad laboral de la malformación de Arnold Chiari tipo I Valuation of work disability of the Arnold Chiari malformation

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    Raúl Jesús Regal Ramos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La reciente publicación de un documento de consenso por el Instituto de Investigación de Enfermedades Raras, el aumento de la incidencia de malformación de Arnold - Chiari (por la cada vez más frecuente solicitud de RMN cervicales y, paralelamente, el aumento de la presencia de estos pacientes en las consultas de los médicos encargados de valorar su capacidad funcional, nos invita a hacer una reflexión sobre la valoración laboral de estos pacientes. Objetivos: Esta revisión pretende realizar un acercamiento a distintos aspectos relevantes en la valoración de la discapacidad laboral de estos pacientes. Metodología: Se han revisado hasta Mayo de 2010 las siguientes bases de datos bibliográficas: Medline, Embase, Cochrane. Resultados: La intensidad de los síntomas (sobre todo dolor no está en relación directa con la gravedad de las lesiones observadas en las pruebas de imagen. El cuadro clínico puede ser fluctuante, con períodos de agudización y de remisión. Los síntomas que mejor responden a la cirugía son los síntomas debido a compresión del tronco cerebral (especialmente la cervicocefalalgia, desapareciendo en algunos casos. Son factores de mala evolución postoperatoria la presencia en el examen prequirúrgico de atrofia, ataxia, escoliosis y que el tiempo entre el inicio de los síntomas y la cirugía haya sido superior a 2 años. Aquellas manifestaciones clínicas que no desaparecen en el postoperatorio ni en el periodo de seguimiento podrían estar relacionadas con el daño permanente de las vías nerviosas o de sus núcleos. Pese a tratarse de una enfermedad congénita podría tener la consideración de accidente de trabajo, si los síntomas se desencadenan tras un traumatismo. La evidencia de la eficacia del tratamiento para el dolor resulta escasa. Conclusiones: La evaluación de estos pacientes debe ser siempre individualizada, considerando las limitaciones orgánicas y/o funcionales, y relacion

  8. Neuroimaging experience in pediatric Horner syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadom, Nadja; Rosman, N.P.; Jubouri, Shams; Trofimova, Anna; Egloff, Alexia M.; Zein, Wadih M.

    2015-01-01

    Horner syndrome in children is rare. The frequency and spectrum of malignancy as the cause of Horner syndrome in children remains unclear. Also unclear is whether the imaging work-up should include the entire oculo-sympathetic pathway or should be more targeted. In addition, the value of cross-sectional angiographic imaging in Horner syndrome is uncertain. To review imaging pathology in a cohort of children with Horner syndrome at a major academic pediatric medical center. We reviewed a 22-year period of CT and MR imaging studies in children with a clinical diagnosis of Horner syndrome referred for imaging. We found 38 patients who fulfilled study criteria of Horner syndrome and 6/38 had relevant imaging findings: 2/6 etiologies were neoplastic (congenital neuroblastoma and central astrocytoma), 1/6 had a vascular abnormality (hypoplastic carotid artery), 1/6 had maldevelopment (Chiari I malformation), and 2/6 had inflammatory/traumatic etiology (viral cervical lymphadenopathy, post jugular vein cannulation). There was a similar number of congenital and acquired pathologies. The malignancies were found at any level of the oculosympathetic pathway. There are treatable causes, including malignancies, in children presenting with Horner syndrome, which justify imaging work-up of the entire oculosympathetic pathway, unless the lesion level can be determined clinically. (orig.)

  9. Neuroimaging experience in pediatric Horner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadom, Nadja [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Rosman, N.P. [Boston Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jubouri, Shams; Trofimova, Anna; Egloff, Alexia M. [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Washington, DC (United States); Zein, Wadih M. [National Eye Institute (NEI), Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Horner syndrome in children is rare. The frequency and spectrum of malignancy as the cause of Horner syndrome in children remains unclear. Also unclear is whether the imaging work-up should include the entire oculo-sympathetic pathway or should be more targeted. In addition, the value of cross-sectional angiographic imaging in Horner syndrome is uncertain. To review imaging pathology in a cohort of children with Horner syndrome at a major academic pediatric medical center. We reviewed a 22-year period of CT and MR imaging studies in children with a clinical diagnosis of Horner syndrome referred for imaging. We found 38 patients who fulfilled study criteria of Horner syndrome and 6/38 had relevant imaging findings: 2/6 etiologies were neoplastic (congenital neuroblastoma and central astrocytoma), 1/6 had a vascular abnormality (hypoplastic carotid artery), 1/6 had maldevelopment (Chiari I malformation), and 2/6 had inflammatory/traumatic etiology (viral cervical lymphadenopathy, post jugular vein cannulation). There was a similar number of congenital and acquired pathologies. The malignancies were found at any level of the oculosympathetic pathway. There are treatable causes, including malignancies, in children presenting with Horner syndrome, which justify imaging work-up of the entire oculosympathetic pathway, unless the lesion level can be determined clinically. (orig.)

  10. Hemifacial spasm in a patient with neurofibromatosis and Arnold-Chiari malformation: a unique case association Espasmo hemifacial em paciente com neurofibromatose e malformação de Arnold-Chiari: uma associação rara

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    Andre Carvalho Felício

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of hemifacial spasm (HFS, Chiari type I malformation (CIM and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 has not been described yet. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with NF1 who developed a right-sided HFS. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI a CIM was seen without syringomyelia. The patient has been successfully treated with botulinum toxin type A injections for 5 years without major side effects. CONCLUSION:Clinical features of HFS, CMI and NF1 are highlighted together with their possible relationship. Also, therapeutic strategies are also discussed.INTRODUÇÃO: A associação entre espasmo hemifacial (EHF, malformação de Chiari tipo I (MCI e neurofibromatose tipo I (NFI ainda não foi descrita. RELATO DO CASO: Relatamos o caso de mulher com 31 anos com NFI que desenvolveu EHF à direita. Na ressonância magnética (RM foi observada MCI sem seringomielia associada. A paciente foi tratada com sucesso com toxina botulínica tipo A por 5 anos sem efeitos colaterais. CONCLUSÃO: Ressaltamos as características clínicas do EHF, MCI e NFI assim como uma possível relação entre elas. Além disto, discutimos também estratégias terapêuticas.

  11. Co-existence of Chiari malformation type I and Epstein-Barr virus meningoencephalitis in a 3-year-old child: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomou, E.K.; Kotsarini, C.; Badra, F.A.; Krepis, A.; Papanastasiou, D.; Patriarcheas, G.

    2005-01-01

    In the present report we describe an unusual case of a 3-year-old girl who was admitted to our hospital with Epstein-Barr virus meningoencephalitis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse abnormalities in white matter and Chiari I malformation with cervical and thoracic hydro-syringomyelia. (orig.)

  12. Twelve years of chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia scanning in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels in the Netherlands : Towards a more precise phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnrocx, Katrien; Van Bruggen, Leonie W L; Eggelmeijer, Wieteke; Noorman, Erik; Jacques, Arnold; Buys, Nadine; Janssens, Steven; Mandigers, Paul J J

    2017-01-01

    Chiari-like malformation (CM), syringomyelia (SM) and middle ear effusion (also called PSOM) are three conditions that frequently occur in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS). Both CM and SM are currently screened in the Netherlands prior to breeding and are graded according to the British

  13. Acute Presentation of Chiari I Malformation with Hemiparesis in a Pediatric Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Stephen P; Kimmell, Kristopher T; Silberstein, Howard J

    2016-01-01

    Chiari I malformation (CM-I) is defined by cerebellar tonsillar herniation through the foramen magnum. Patients typically present with chronic complaints, including headache, dizziness, and numbness, although there are few reports in the literature of pediatric patients presenting acutely with neurological deficit caused by CM-I. We report a child who presented acutely with hemiparesis and magnetic resonance imaging findings consistent with CM-I and spinal cord edema. A 3-year old boy with normal development presented with difficulty walking and increased drooling. His mother stated he was running into objects and had balance issues for several days. Neurological examination showed ataxia with falling to the right after a few steps and weakness of the right arm and leg. His medical history was remarkable only for mild asthma, although he had recently been treated for an upper respiratory viral infection. Computed tomography of the head demonstrated no brainstem mass. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head and cervical spine showed tonsillar ectopia approximately 2 cm below the craniocervical junction with increased T2 signal in the spinal cord from C1 to C3 consistent with syringomyelia and cord edema. The patient underwent suboccipital craniectomy with removal of the posterior arch of C1 and dural patch graft. His postoperative course was unremarkable, with complete resolution of his symptoms at his 1-month follow-up visit. This case highlights an unusual presentation of CM-I with neurological deficit related to spinal cord edema, possibly precipitated by the "water-hammer" effect of this patient's coughing fits. Providers should be aware of the acute presentations of CM-I. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. International survey on the management of Chiari 1 malformation and syringomyelia: evolving worldwide opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Ash; Cheong, Alexander; Steinbok, Paul

    2018-03-12

    In 2003, pediatric neurosurgeons were surveyed under the auspices of the education committee of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery (ISPN) to determine prevailing opinions regarding the management of Chiari I malformation (C1M) with and without associated syringomyelia. In the ensuing years, there has been further information from multiple C1M studies, with regards to indications, success rates of different surgical interventions, and complications. The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate current opinions and practices in pediatric C1M. Pediatric neurosurgeons worldwide were surveyed, using an e-mail list provided by the ISPN communication committee chairperson. Respondents were given scenarios similar to the 2003 C1M survey in order to determine opinions regarding whether to surgically intervene, and if so, with which operations. Of 300 surveys electronically distributed, 122 responses were received (40.6% response rate)-an improvement over the 30.8% response rate in 2003. Pediatric neurosurgeons from 34 different countries responded. There was broad consensus that non-operative management is appropriate in asymptomatic C1M (> 90%) as well as asymptomatic C1M with a small syrinx (> 65%). With a large syrinx, a majority (almost 80%) recommended surgical intervention. Scoliotic patients with CIM were generally offered surgery only when there was a large syrinx. There has been a shift in the surgical management over the past decade, with a bone-only decompression now being offered more commonly. There remains, however, great variability in the operation offered. This survey, with a relatively strong response rate, and with broad geographic representation, summarizes current worldwide expert opinion regarding management of pediatric C1M. Asymptomatic C1M and C1M with a small syrinx are generally managed non-operatively. When an operation is indicated, there has been a shift towards less invasive surgical approaches.

  15. Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders in Chiari Malformation Type 1: A Prospective Study of 90 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Álex; Poca, Maria A; de la Calzada, Maria D; Moncho, Dulce; Romero, Odile; Sampol, Gabriel; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the prevalence of sleep disorders in a large group of patients with Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-1) and determine the presence of risk factors associated with these abnormalities. Prospective study with consecutive patient selection. We included 90 adult patients with CM-1, defined by the presence of a cerebellar tonsillar descent (TD) ≥3 mm. Clinical, neuroradiological studies, and nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) was carried out. In addition, patients were also subclassified into 2 CM subtypes: CM-1, with the obex above the foramen magnum (FM) and CM-1.5, in which along with a TD ≥3 mm, the obex was located below the FM. We observed a high prevalence (50%) of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) with predominant hypopnea. Only six patients showed a central apnea index of ≥5. Hypoventilation was observed in only three patients. SRBD severity was associated with male sex, older age, excess weight, and the presence of hydrocephalus. No differences in clinical or PSG parameters were found when comparing CM subtypes (CM-1 and CM-1.5). Sleep architecture study showed decreased sleep efficiency with an increase in arousal and waking after sleep onset. The presence of SRBDs was found to be associated with poorer sleep architecture parameters. This study confirms a high prevalence of SRBDs in patients with CM-1 and CM-1.5, with a predominant obstructive component. Nocturnal PSG recordings should be systematically conducted in these patients, especially those who are male, older, or overweight or those who present hydrocephalus. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of a Chiari I-like malformation in an African lion (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCain, Stephanie; Souza, Marcy; Ramsay, Ed; Schumacher, Juergen; Hecht, Silke; Thomas, William

    2008-09-01

    A 13-mo-old intact male African lion (Panthera leo) presented with a 3-mo history of lethargy, ventral flexion of the neck, abnormal vocalization, and ataxia. Hemogram and serum biochemistries were within normal limits except for the presence of hypokalemia (2.7 mEq/L) and hypochloridemia (108 mEq/L). When no improvement was noted with oral potassium gluconate supplementation, a computed tomography scan of the brain and skull was performed, and no abnormalities were noted. However, magnetic resonance imaging detected occipital bone thickening, crowding of the caudal cranial fossa with cerebellar compression and herniation, and cervical syringohydromyelia, which was consistent with a Chiari I-like malformation. Foramen magnum decompression was performed to relieve the compression of the cerebellum. The animal recovered well with subsequent resolution of clinical signs. Hypovitaminosis A has been proposed previously as the underlying etiology for this malformation in lions with similar clinical presentations. This lion's serum and liver vitamin A concentrations were low (100 ng/ml and 25.31 microg/g, respectively) compared to concentrations reported for domestic carnivores and support hypovitaminosis A as the underlying cause of this animal's Chiari I-like malformation.

  17. Subdural Fluid Collection and Hydrocephalus After Foramen Magnum Decompression for Chiari Malformation Type I: Management Algorithm of a Rare Complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Zefferino; Milani, Davide; Costa, Francesco; Castellani, Carlotta; Lasio, Giovanni; Fornari, Maurizio

    2017-10-01

    Chiari malformation type I is a hindbrain abnormality characterized by descent of the cerebellar tonsils beneath the foramen magnum, frequently associated with symptoms or brainstem compression, impaired cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and syringomyelia. Foramen magnum decompression represents the most common way of treatment. Rarely, subdural fluid collection and hydrocephalus represent postoperative adverse events. The treatment of this complication is still debated, and physicians are sometimes uncertain when to perform diversion surgery and when to perform more conservative management. We report an unusual occurrence of subdural fluid collection and hydrocephalus that developed in a 23-year-old patient after foramen magnum decompression for Chiari malformation type I. Following a management protocol, based on a step-by-step approach, from conservative therapy to diversion surgery, the patient was managed with urgent external ventricular drainage, and then with conservative management and wound revision. Because of the rarity of this adverse event, previous case reports differ about the form of treatment. In future cases, finding clinical and radiologic features to identify risk factors that are useful in predicting if the patient will benefit from conservative management or will need to undergo diversion surgery is only possible if a uniform form of treatment is used. Therefore, we believe that a management algorithm based on a step-by-step approach will reduce the use of invasive therapies and help to create a standard of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiological evolution of peri-odontoid pannus in a patient with Chiari I malformation: a case-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Felipe Hada; Wang, Joy M H; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Oakes, W Jerry

    2017-08-01

    The Chiari I malformation (CIM) is commonly encountered by neurosurgeons and can have different etiologies and clinical presentations. We report a CIM patient who presented with symptoms of ventral brain stem compression and was found to have a large peri-odontoid pannus. Posterior fossa decompression was performed with a planned second-stage odontoidectomy. However, at the 6-month follow-up, postoperative images demonstrated a mostly resolved pannus and improvement of the brain stem compression symptoms, and the patient progressed uneventfully without the need for odontoidectomy. This case illustrates the resolution of a significant and symptomatic peri-odontoid pannus in a patient with CIM without craniocervical fusion or odontoidectomy. Such a case indicates that not all peri-odontoid pannus formations in CIM patients are due to hypermobility at the craniocervical junction.

  19. Posterior fossa reconstruction using titanium plate for the treatment of cerebellar ptosis after decompression for Chiari malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Vikram; Holly, Langston T; Chow, Daniel; Batzdorf, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    We describe our use of a perforated titanium plate to perform a partial posterior fossa cranioplasty in the treatment of cerebellar ptosis and dural ectasia after posterior fossa decompression (PFD). Twelve patients who had undergone PFD underwent posterior fossa reconstruction using a titanium plate. Symptoms were related to either descent of the cerebellum into the decompression or to dural ectasia into the craniectomy defect. Twelve patients who had undergone large suboccipital craniectomies and who presented with persistent headaches and some with neurological symptoms related to syringomyelia, underwent reoperation with placement of a small titanium plate. Ten of 12 patients showed symptomatic improvement after reoperation. Placement of a titanium plate appears to be an effective method of treatment of cerebellar ptosis and dural ectasia after PFD for Chiari malformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparision of results between two different techniques of cranio-cervical decompression in patients with Chiari I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Przemysław; Janowski, Mirosław; Zakrzewska, Agnieszka; Marchel, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    A variety of approaches are employed for treatment of Chiari I malformation. They differ in extent of cranio-c ervical decompression. A technique based on arachnoid preservation and duroplasty was introduced in our department in 2001. The aim of the study is to compare between the previous and the present technique. Retrospective analysis of 38 patients with Chiari I malformation treated between 1998 and 2004 was performed. The previous technique including arach- noid incision, coagulation of cerebellar tonsils, and fourth ventricle exploration without duroplasty was used to treat 21 patients (group 1). A further 17 patients were treated with the present technique consisting of arachnoid preservation and duroplasty (group 2). Complication rates as well as early and late results of treatment were evaluated. Karnofsky (KPS), Rankin (RS) and Bidziński (BS) scales were used for evaluation of results. Post-operative complications were detected in 9 patients in group 1 (43%). They included liquorrhoea (5 cases), meningitis (1 case), and symptoms progression (3 cases). There were no surgical complications in group 2 (p = 0.002). Neurological improvement in the early period (until discharge from hospital) occurred in 10 (48%) patients in group 1 and in 13 (76%) in group 2 (p = NS). Further improvement or lack of symptoms progression was found in 58% in group 1 and 82% in group 2 (p = NS). Assessment in KPS, RS and BS showed slightly better results of group 2 but the difference was statistically insignificant. Results of both techniques are comparable. The risk of post-operative complications after extra-arachnoid cranio-cervical decompression with duroplasty is, however, significantly lower.

  1. The efficacy of intraoperative ultrasonography-assisted microinvasive cisterna magna reconstruction for Chiari malformation typeⅠwith syringomyelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Peng-chao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report the method and effect of intraoperative ultrasonography-assisted microinvasive cisterna magna reconstruction for Chiari malformation type Ⅰ with syringomyelia. Methods Ninty-three patients suffered from Chiari malformation typeⅠwith syringomyelia were treated by microinvasive cisterna magna reconstruction. The skin incision was 1.50-3.00 cm. The bone removal of foramen magnum was 1.50 cm × 2.00 cm with C1 reserved. Dura and arachnoid were incised and sutured linearly. All of the patients underwent cerebellar tonsillar resection and exploration of median aperture of fourth ventricle. Intraoperative ultrasonography was performed both before and after cerebellar tonsillar resection to judge the effect of cisterna magna reconstruction. According to Tator method, the curative effect was divided into 3 groups, improved, stable and worsen. MRI were reviewed at the same time, and the result was divided into syrinx disappeared, reduced, no change and expanded. Results The operation was successful in all patients. Postoperative complications included cerebellum hemorrhage (n = 1, cerebral infarction (n = 1, hydrocephalus (n = 1, subcutaneous dropsy (n = 2 and were recovered after specific treatment. All patients were followed up for 6 months to 12 months after operation. Thirty-six cases were improved, 55 cases were stable, and 2 cases got worse. The MRI showed that the syringomyelia shrinked or disappeared in 90 cases, no change in 3 cases and no expansion. Eighty cases were followed up for 30 months to 36 months after operation, 12 stable cases improved, 1 stable case got worse, while the others remained unchanged. The MRI showed no change was compared with previous follow-up imaging. Conclusion Microinvasive cisterna magna reconstruction is a surgical procedure with mininal injury, quick recovery, stable effect, fewer complications, and high security. Intraoperative ultrasonography provides reliable data and is easy to perform.

  2. Achados cirúrgicos em 260 casos de impressão basilar e/ou malformação de Arnold-Chiari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Gonçalves da Silva

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available A impressão basilar é malformação frequentemente observada no Nordeste do Brasil. No período de 1971 a 1992 foram operados, em nosso Serviço, 260 pacientes com malformações occipitocervicais, sendo 29 (11,1% casos de impressão basilar pura, 18 (6,9% com malformação de Arnold-Chiari e 213 (81,9% com impressão basilar associada à malformação de Arnold-Chiari. São relatados os achados cirúrgicos do plano ósseo, da dura-máter, do tecido nervoso e dos vasos da fossa posterior.

  3. Rare association between cystic fibrosis, Chiari I malformation, and hydrocephalus in a baby: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jea Andrew

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cystic fibrosis, an epithelial cell transport disorder caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene, is not generally associated with malformations of the central nervous system. We review eight previously published reports detailing an infrequent association between cystic fibrosis and Chiari I malformation. Case presentation To the best of our knowledge, our report describes only the ninth case of a baby presenting with a new diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and Chiari I malformation, in this case in a 10-month-old, full-term Caucasian baby boy from the United States of America. Neurosurgical consultation was obtained for associated developmental delay, macrocephaly, bulging anterior fontanel, and papilledema. An MRI scan demonstrated an extensive Chiari I malformation with effacement of the fourth ventricle, obliteration of the outlets of the fourth ventricle and triventricular hydrocephalus without aqueductal stenosis. Our patient was taken to the operating room for ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. Conclusions It is possible that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene may play a previously unrecognized role in central nervous system development; alternatively, this central nervous system abnormality may have been acquired due to constant valsalva from recurrent coughing or wheezing or metabolic and electrolyte imbalances that occur characteristically in cystic fibrosis.

  4. Triple A (Allgrove) syndrome: an unusual association with syringomyelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Triple A (Allgrove) syndrome was first described by Allgrove in 1978 in two pairs of siblings. Since then, about 100 cases have been reported, all of them displaying an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Clinical picture is characterized by achalasia, alacrimia and ACTH-resistant adrenal failure. A progressive neurological syndrome including central, peripheral and autonomic nervous system impairment, and mild mental retardation is often associated. The triple A syndrome gene, designated AAAS, is localized on chromosome 12q13. It consists of 16 exons, encoding for a 546 aminoacid protein called ALADIN (Alacrimia-Achalasia-aDrenal Insufficiency Neurologic disorder). We report on a 13 year-old boy presenting with Addison’s disease, dysphagia, muscle weakness, excessive fatigue and recent onset gait ataxia. The analysis of the AAAS gene revealed a homozygous missense mutation in exon 12. It was a T > G transversion at nucleotide position 1224, resulting in a change of leucine at amino acid position 381 into arginine (Leu381Arg or L381R). Brain appearance was found normal at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional spectroscopy analysis showed normal levels of the main metabolites. Spine MRI showed a cystic cavity within the spinal cord (syringomyelia), localized between the sixth cervical vertebra and the first thoracic vertebra. Cerebellar tonsils descended 7 mm caudal to foramen magnum, consistently with a mild type 1 Chiari malformation. Mild posterior inter-vertebral disk protrusions were evident between T9 and T10 and between L4 and L5. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing type 1 Chiari malformation and multiple spinal cord abnormalities in a patient with Allgrove syndrome. PMID:23800107

  5. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  6. Unusual Association Between Spontaneous Lateral Sphenoid Encephalocele and Chiari Malformation Type I: Endoscopic Repair Through a Transpterygoid Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnoni, Daniele; Daniel, Roy Thomas; George, Mercy; Messerer, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous meningoencephaloceles of the lateral sphenoid sinus are rare entities, and their peculiar location represents a surgical challenge due to the importance of a wide exposure and skull base reconstruction. They are thought to arise from the congenital base defect of the lateral sphenoid or in some cases have been postulated to represent a rare manifestation of altered cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. We report the first case in the literature of a Chiari malformation type I (CMI) and a lateral sphenoid encephalocele, revising the theoretic etiology and surgical technique of endoscopic repair. A 50-year-old woman with a surgical history of symptomatic CMI presented with episodes of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea. Radiologic investigations revealed a left mesial temporal encephalocele herniating into the lateral recess of the sphenoid sinus and radiologic features of altered CSF dynamics, which may have played an etiologic role. An endoscopic transpterygoid excision of the encephalocele and multilayer skull base repair were performed. The association of spontaneous lateral sphenoid encephaloceles with CMI is distinctly unusual. Predisposing factors and disruption of CSF dynamics may play a major role in the development of these rare complications in patients with CMI. Because of their distinct location, transethmoid or transpterygoid endoscopic approaches represent an excellent surgical technique to treat these lesions thanks to their wide and direct visualization of the entire skull base defect following the encephalocele excision, allowing an adequate multilayer repair and lateral sphenoid recess occlusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Contemporary occurrence of hydrocephalus and Chiari I malformation in sagittal craniosynostosis. Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgulò, Francesco Giovanni; Spennato, Pietro; Aliberti, Ferdinando; Di Martino, Giuliana; Cascone, Daniele; Cinalli, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) and hydrocephalus are often associated with complex craniosynostosis. On the contrary, their simultaneous occurrence in monosutural synostosis is extremely rare. The pathophysiological hypothesis is that they may alter posterior fossa growth and lead to cerebellar tonsil herniation also without skull base primary involvement. Hydrocephalus is multifactorial and may be secondary to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction. The management of these cases is quite complex and not well defined. Cranial vault remodeling should be the only treatment when CM-I is asymptomatic and not related to syringomyelia. Suboccipital decompression should be reserved only in complicated CM-I, usually as a second surgical step following the correction of the supratentorial deformity. In our opinion, the associated hydrocephalus should be treated first in order to normalize intracranial hypertension before opening the cranial sutures. We report the case of a 26-month-old child that presented with sagittal craniosynostosis, hydrocephalus, and CM-I. He was managed by performing endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) first and cranial vault remodeling thereafter. Clinico-radiological outcome was very satisfying. Concerning literature is reviewed; physiopathology and surgical management are discussed.

  8. Unusual Ventilatory Response to Exercise in Patient with Arnold-Chiari Type 1 Malformation after Posterior Fossa Decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keely Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 17-year-old Hispanic male with Arnold-Chiari Type 1 [AC-Type 1] with syringomyelia, status post decompression, who complains of exercise intolerance, headaches, and fatigue with exertion. The patient was found to have diurnal hypercapnia and nocturnal alveolar hypoventilation. Cardiopulmonary testing revealed blunting of the ventilatory response to the rise in carbon dioxide (CO2 resulting in failure of the parallel correlation between increased CO2 levels and ventilation; the expected vertical relationship between PETCO2 and minute ventilation during exercise was replaced with an almost horizontal relationship. No new pathology of the brainstem was discovered by MRI or neurological evaluation to explain this phenomenon. The patient was placed on continuous noninvasive open ventilation (NIOV during the day and CPAP at night for a period of 6 months. His pCO2 level decreased to normal limits and his symptoms improved; specifically, he experienced less headaches and fatigue during exercise. In this report, we describe the abnormal response to exercise that patients with AC-Type 1 could potentially experience, even after decompression, characterized by the impairment of ventilator response to hypercapnia during exertion, reflecting a complete loss of chemical influence on breathing with no evidence of abnormality in the corticospinal pathway.

  9. Surgical treatment of type I Chiari malformation: the role of Magendie’s foramen opening e tonsils manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Henrique Fernandes Vidal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The treatment for type 1 Chiari malformation (CM 1 is one of the most controversial topics in the neurosurgical field. The present study evaluated two of the most applied surgical techniques to treat CM 1. Method 32 patients were evaluated and divided in two groups: group 1 had 16 patients that were submitted to decompression of occipital bone and dura mater of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ; group 2 also had 16 patients and in addition to the previous procedure, they were submitted to Magendie’s foramen opening e tonsils manipulation. The comparison between the groups included neurological exam and cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging during pre and postoperative periods. Results Both techniques were equivalents in terms of neurological improvement of the patients (p > 0.05, but the group 2 had more surgical complications, with relative risk of 2.45 (CI 1.55-3.86 for adverse events. Whatever the cerebrospinal fluid flow at CVJ, the patients of the group 1 achieved greater amount of flow than the group 2 (p < 0.05 during the postoperative period. Conclusion The cranial and dural decompression of the CVJ without arachnoidal violation was the best surgical intervention for treatment of CM 1, between these two compared techniques.

  10. Espasmo hemifacial e impressão basilar associados a malformação de arnold-chiari relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Baldoino Leal Filho

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de uma paciente com espasmo hemifacial e impressão basilar associados a malformação de Arnold-Chiari. Com a descompressão cirúrgica da fossa posterior, empregada no tratamento da impressão basilar, houve melhora do quadro clínico e o espasmo hemifacial se reduziu quanto à frequência, duração e intensidade. É enfatizada a necessidade do tratamento etiológico do espasmo hemifacial, antes de se recorrer à toxina botulínica.

  11. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  12. The odontoid process invagination in normal subjects, Chiari malformation and Basilar invagination patients: Pathophysiologic correlations with angular craniometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jânio A; Botelho, Ricardo V

    2015-01-01

    Craniometric studies have shown that both Chiari malformation (CM) and basilar invagination (BI) belong to a spectrum of malformations. A more precise method to differentiate between these types of CVJM is desirable. The Chamberlain's line violation (CLV) is the most common method to identify BI. The authors sought to clarify the real importance of CLV in the spectrum of craniovertebral junction malformations (CVJM) and to identify possible pathophysiological relationships. We evaluated the CLV in a sample of CVJM, BI, CM patients and a control group of normal subjects and correlated their data with craniocervical angular craniometry. A total of 97 subjects were studied: 32 normal subjects, 41 CM patients, 9 basilar invagination type 1 (BI1) patients, and 15 basilar invagination type 2 (BI2) patients. The mean CLV violation in the groups were: The control group, 0.16 ± 0.45 cm; the CM group, 0.32 ± 0.48 cm; the BI1 group, 1.35 ± 0.5 cm; and the BI2 group, 1.98 ± 0.18 cm. There was strong correlation between CLV and Boogard's angle (R = 0.82, P = 0.000) and the clivus canal angle (R = 0.7, P = 0.000). CM's CLV is discrete and similar to the normal subjects. BI1 and BI2 presented with at least of 0.95 cm CLV and these violations were strongly correlated with a primary cranial angulation (clivus horizontalization) and an acute clivus canal angle (a secondary craniocervical angle).

  13. Delamination technique together with longitudinal incisions for treatment of Chiari I/syringomyelia complex: a prospective clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Yildiray

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment modalities in Chiari malformation type 1(CMI accompanied by syringomyelia have not yet been standardized. Pathologies such as a small posterior fossa and thickened dura mater have been discussed previously. Various techniques have been explored to enlarge the foramen magnum and to expand the dura. The aim of this clinical study was to explore a new technique of excision of the external dura accompanied by widening the cisterna magna and making longitudinal incisions in the internal dura, without disturbing the arachnoid. Methods Ten patients with CMI and syringomyelia, operated between 2004 and 2006, formed this prospective series. All cases underwent foramen magnum decompression of 3 × 3 cm area with C1–C2 (partial laminectomy, resection of foramen magnum fibrous band, excision of external dura, delamination and widening of internal dura with longitudinal incisions. Results Patients were aged between 25 and 58 years and occipital headache was the most common complaint. The mean duration of preoperative symptoms was 4 years and the follow-up time was 25 months. Clinical progression was halted for all patients; eight patients completely recovered and two reported no change. In one patient, there was a transient cerebrospinal fluid (CSF fistula that was treated with tissue adhesive. While syringomyelia persisted radiologically with radiological stability in five patients; for three patients the syringomyelic cavity decreased in size, and for the remaining two it regressed completely. Conclusion Removal of the fibrous band and the outer dural layer, at level of foramen magnum, together with the incision of inner dural layer appears to be good technique in adult CMI patients. The advantages are short operation time, no need for duraplasty, sufficient posterior fossa decompression, absence of CSF fistulas as a result of extra arachnoidal surgery, and short duration of hospitalization. Hence this surgical technique has

  14. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 1: validation of an ICD-9-CM code search algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Travis R; Greenberg, Jacob K; Guerrero, Nicole; Olsen, Margaret A; Shannon, Chevis N; Yarbrough, Chester K; Piccirillo, Jay F; Anderson, Richard C E; Feldstein, Neil A; Wellons, John C; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Administrative billing data may facilitate large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). Validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-I surgery are critical prerequisites for such studies but are currently only available for adults. The objective of this study was to validate two ICD-9-CM code algorithms using hospital billing data to identify pediatric patients undergoing CM-I decompression surgery. METHODS The authors retrospectively analyzed the validity of two ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying pediatric CM-I decompression surgery performed at 3 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-I), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to the subset of patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. RESULTS Among 625 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-I decompression was 92%. Among the 581 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the PPV was 97%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in one center (84%) compared with the other centers (93%-94%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (96%-98%) across all subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (91%) and 2 (89%) was very good and remained so across subgroups (82%-97%). CONCLUSIONS An ICD-9-CM algorithm requiring a primary diagnosis of CM-I has excellent PPV and very good sensitivity for identifying CM-I decompression surgery in pediatric patients. These results establish a basis for utilizing administrative billing data to assess pediatric CM-I treatment outcomes.

  15. Restoration of the efferent phase of the sneeze reflex after regression of an Arnold-Chiari malformation with compression of the medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songu, Murat; Can, Nazan; Gelal, Fazil

    2013-01-01

    The precise location of the sneeze center in the human brain has not been definitively identified. The aim of this report is to contribute to the effort to detect its location. We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who presented to our outpatient clinic for evaluation of an inability to sneeze. In an attempt to trigger the afferent (nasal) phase of the sneeze reflex, we first applied a cotton swab and later a silver nitrate stick to the patient's nasal mucosa. Once that was accomplished, we observed that the patient could not complete the efferent (expiratory) phase of the sneeze reflex, and thus he did not sneeze. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that his cerebellar tonsils extended approximately 10 mm inferiorly through the foramen magnum, which represented a type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The tonsils were noted to have compressed the posterolateral portion of the medulla oblongata. At follow-up 21 months later, we noted that the patient was able to sneeze spontaneously as well as with nasal stimulation. Repeat MRI revealed that the Arnold-Chiari malformation had undergone a spontaneous partial regression, which resulted in relief of the compression of the medulla oblongata. We believe that the patient's earlier inability to sneeze might have been attributable to the compression of the medulla oblongata by the cerebellar tonsils and that the site of the compression might represent the location of his sneeze center.

  16. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone ...

  17. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple lentigines syndrome; Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines ... Genetics Home Reference -- ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/noonan-syndrome-with-multiple-lentigines National Organization for Rare Disorders -- ...

  18. Valoración de la capacidad laboral de la malformación de Arnold Chiari tipo I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Jesús Regal Ramos

    Full Text Available Introducción: La reciente publicación de un documento de consenso por el Instituto de Investigación de Enfermedades Raras, el aumento de la incidencia de malformación de Arnold - Chiari (por la cada vez más frecuente solicitud de RMN cervicales y, paralelamente, el aumento de la presencia de estos pacientes en las consultas de los médicos encargados de valorar su capacidad funcional, nos invita a hacer una reflexión sobre la valoración laboral de estos pacientes. Objetivos: Esta revisión pretende realizar un acercamiento a distintos aspectos relevantes en la valoración de la discapacidad laboral de estos pacientes. Metodología: Se han revisado hasta Mayo de 2010 las siguientes bases de datos bibliográficas: Medline, Embase, Cochrane. Resultados: La intensidad de los síntomas (sobre todo dolor no está en relación directa con la gravedad de las lesiones observadas en las pruebas de imagen. El cuadro clínico puede ser fluctuante, con períodos de agudización y de remisión. Los síntomas que mejor responden a la cirugía son los síntomas debido a compresión del tronco cerebral (especialmente la cervicocefalalgia, desapareciendo en algunos casos. Son factores de mala evolución postoperatoria la presencia en el examen prequirúrgico de atrofia, ataxia, escoliosis y que el tiempo entre el inicio de los síntomas y la cirugía haya sido superior a 2 años. Aquellas manifestaciones clínicas que no desaparecen en el postoperatorio ni en el periodo de seguimiento podrían estar relacionadas con el daño permanente de las vías nerviosas o de sus núcleos. Pese a tratarse de una enfermedad congénita podría tener la consideración de accidente de trabajo, si los síntomas se desencadenan tras un traumatismo. La evidencia de la eficacia del tratamiento para el dolor resulta escasa. Conclusiones: La evaluación de estos pacientes debe ser siempre individualizada, considerando las limitaciones orgánicas y/o funcionales, y relacion

  19. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  20. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  1. Cirrhosis: CT and MR imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancatelli, Giuseppe; Federle, Michael P.; Ambrosini, Roberta; Lagalla, Roberto; Carriero, Alessandro; Midiri, Massimo; Vilgrain, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we present the CT and MR imaging characteristics of the cirrhotic liver. We describe the altered liver morphology in different forms of viral, alcoholic and autoimmune end-stage liver disease. We present the spectrum of imaging findings in portal hypertension, such as splenomegaly, ascites and varices. We describe the patchy and lacelike patterns of fibrosis, along with the focal confluent form. The process of hepatocarcinogenesis is detailed, from regenerative to dysplastic nodules to overt hepatocellular carcinoma. Different types of non-neoplastic focal liver lesions occurring in the cirrhotic liver are discussed, including arterially enhancing nodules, hemangiomas and peribiliary cysts. We show different conditions causing liver morphology changes that can mimic cirrhosis, such as congenital hepatic fibrosis, 'pseudo-cirrhosis' due to breast metastases treated with chemotherapy, Budd-Chiari syndrome, sarcoidosis and cavernous transformation of the portal vein

  2. The Hot Spot in Superior Vena Caval Obstruction Using 99m Technetium tin Colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Tae; Kwon, Kye Ik; Shin, Young Tae; Cho, Kyung Sam; Lee, Myung Chul; Cho, Bo Yeon; Koh, Chang Soon

    1981-01-01

    The hot spot on liver scan was demonstrated by many authors in various conditions such as SVC obstruction, Budd-Chiari syndrome, liver abscess, hemangioma of liver, hepatic venoocclusive diseases, IVC obstruction, and tricuspid insufficiency. And the appearance of hot spot in SVC obstruction is due to unusual collateral circulation. But there was no report of this hots pot on liver scan in our country. We have recently observed one patient with SVC obstruction who shows well-defined area of increased radioactivity between right and left lobe of liver on liver scan using 99m Tc-tin colloid, and demonstrated collateral circulations with RI venography using 99m Tc-O 4 . The injection site of radiocolloid was left antecubital vein. This hot spot did not appear when the radiocolloid was injected into right leg vein. We report here this hoe spot on liver scan in SVC obstruction with review of some literatures.

  3. The Hot Spot in Superior Vena Caval Obstruction Using {sup 99m} Technetium tin Colloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Tae; Kwon, Kye Ik; Shin, Young Tae; Cho, Kyung Sam; Lee, Myung Chul; Cho, Bo Yeon; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-03-15

    The hot spot on liver scan was demonstrated by many authors in various conditions such as SVC obstruction, Budd-Chiari syndrome, liver abscess, hemangioma of liver, hepatic venoocclusive diseases, IVC obstruction, and tricuspid insufficiency. And the appearance of hot spot in SVC obstruction is due to unusual collateral circulation. But there was no report of this hots pot on liver scan in our country. We have recently observed one patient with SVC obstruction who shows well-defined area of increased radioactivity between right and left lobe of liver on liver scan using {sup 99m}Tc-tin colloid, and demonstrated collateral circulations with RI venography using {sup 99m}Tc-O{sub 4}. The injection site of radiocolloid was left antecubital vein. This hot spot did not appear when the radiocolloid was injected into right leg vein. We report here this hoe spot on liver scan in SVC obstruction with review of some literatures.

  4. Cirrhosis: CT and MR imaging evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brancatelli, Giuseppe [Sezione di Radiologia, Ospedale Specializzato in Gastroenterologia, ' Saverio de Bellis' -IRCCS, 70013 Castellana Grotte (Bari) (Italy) and Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy) and Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]. E-mail: gbranca@yahoo.com; Federle, Michael P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ambrosini, Roberta [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Lagalla, Roberto [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Carriero, Alessandro [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Midiri, Massimo [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Vilgrain, Valerie [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Beaujon, 100 Boulevard du General Leclerc, 92118 Clichy (France)

    2007-01-15

    In this article, we present the CT and MR imaging characteristics of the cirrhotic liver. We describe the altered liver morphology in different forms of viral, alcoholic and autoimmune end-stage liver disease. We present the spectrum of imaging findings in portal hypertension, such as splenomegaly, ascites and varices. We describe the patchy and lacelike patterns of fibrosis, along with the focal confluent form. The process of hepatocarcinogenesis is detailed, from regenerative to dysplastic nodules to overt hepatocellular carcinoma. Different types of non-neoplastic focal liver lesions occurring in the cirrhotic liver are discussed, including arterially enhancing nodules, hemangiomas and peribiliary cysts. We show different conditions causing liver morphology changes that can mimic cirrhosis, such as congenital hepatic fibrosis, 'pseudo-cirrhosis' due to breast metastases treated with chemotherapy, Budd-Chiari syndrome, sarcoidosis and cavernous transformation of the portal vein.

  5. Normal hepatic vein patterns on ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Jin; Chae, Yoo Soon; Park, Hea Yeoung; Park, Bok Hwan; Kim, Yang Sook

    1987-01-01

    Understanding of the anatomy of the hepatic vein is important in manipulation for transplantation of the liver, hepatectomy and the treatment of hepatic trauma with avulsion of the hepatic vein. Demonstrated of the inferior right hepatic vein (IRHV) is also important; in some cases of hepatocellular carcinoma, thrombus can be seen in the IRHV; in primary Budd-Chiari syndrome, the IRHV is main draining vein; during hepatectomy, the postero-inferior segment of the right lobe and draining IRHV can be preserved. For some 10 months ultrasound examination was done in a total of 124 patients with normal liver function with special emphasis on the hepatic vein, their branches, and the IRHV, and analysed in terms of branching pattern and relative size of the hepatic vein and the detection rate of the IRHV.

  6. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  7. Ogilvie′s syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis for scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report Ogilvie′s syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with intraspinal anomalies. Postoperative paralytic ileus can commonly complicate scoliosis surgery. Ogilvie′s syndrome as a cause of abdominal distension and pain has not been reported following spinal deformity correction and can mimic post-surgical ileus. 12 year old female patient with double thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with Arnold-Chiari 1 malformation and syringomyelia. The patient underwent posterior spinal fusion from T 4 to L 3 with segmental pedicle screw instrumentation and autogenous iliac crest grafting. She developed abdominal distension and pain postoperatively and this deteriorated despite conservative management. Repeat ultrasounds and abdominal computer tomography scans ruled out mechanical obstruction. The clinical presentation and blood parameters excluded toxic megacolon and cecal volvulus. As the symptoms persisted, a laparotomy was performed on postoperative day 16, which demonstrated ragged tears of the colon and cecum. A right hemi-colectomy followed by ileocecal anastomosis was required. The pathological examination of surgical specimens excluded inflammatory bowel disease and vascular abnormalities. The patient made a good recovery following bowel surgery and at latest followup 3.2 years later she had no abdominal complaints and an excellent scoliosis correction. Ogilvie′s syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of postoperative ileus in patients developing prolonged unexplained abdominal distension and pain after scoliosis correction. Early diagnosis and instigation of conservative management can prevent major morbidity and mortality due to bowel ischemia and perforation.

  8. Diffuse and vascular hepatic diseases; Diffuse und vaskulaere Lebererkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreimeyer, S.; Grenacher, L. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    In addition to focal liver lesions, diffuse and vascular disorders of the liver represent a wide spectrum of liver diseases which are from the radiological point of view often difficult or nearly impossible to diagnose. Classical diagnostic methods are computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in addition to ultrasound. Diffuse parenchymal damage caused by diseases of various etiologies is therefore difficult to evaluate because it often lacks characteristic morphological features. For hepatic steatosis, hemochromatosis/siderosis as an example of a diffuse storage disease and sarcoidosis and candidiasis as infectious/inflammatory diseases, an image-based diagnosis is appropriate in some cases. For most diffuse liver diseases, however only nonspecific changes are visualized. Vascular pathologies of the liver, such as the Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis, however, can usually be diagnosed very clearly using radiology and there is also a very effective interventional radiological treatment. Chronic diseases very often culminate in liver cirrhosis which is highly associated with an increased risk of liver cancer. (orig.) [German] Neben den fokalen Leberlaesionen stellen diffuse und vaskulaere Lebererkrankungen ein weites Spektrum an Erkrankungen der Leber dar, die radiologisch oft schwer oder gar nicht diagnostizierbar sind. Klassische diagnostische Verfahren sind dabei neben dem Ultraschall die Computertomographie und die Magnetresonanztomographie. Diffuse Parenchymschaeden, bedingt durch Erkrankungen unterschiedlichster Aetiologie, sind deshalb schwierig evaluierbar, weil haeufig charakteristische bildmorphologische Merkmale fehlen. Die Steatosis hepatis, die Haemochromatose/Siderose als Beispiel der Speicherkrankheiten sowie die Sarkoidose und die Candidose als infektioes-entzuendliche Erkrankungen sind einer bildbasierten Diagnosestellung z. T. zugaenglich, bei den meisten diffusen Lebererkrankungen jedoch zeigen sich lediglich unspezifische

  9. Complicações pós-operatórias em 139 casos de impressão basilar e/ou malformação de Arnold-Chiari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Gonçalves da Silva

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho, foram analisadas as complicações pós-operatórias observadas em 139 casos de impressão basilar e/ou malformação de Arnold-Chiari. Os autores chamam a atenção para a menor ocorrência de complicações e de mortalidade verificadas nos pacientes que foram submetidos à plástica da dura-mater da fossa posterior.

  10. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  11. Aarskog syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarskog disease; Aarskog-Scott syndrome; AAS; Faciodigitogenital syndrome; Gaciogenital dysplasia ... Aarskog syndrome is a genetic disorder that is linked to the X chromosome. It affects mainly males, but females ...

  12. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  13. Cushing's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    宗, 友厚; 伊藤, 勇; 諏訪, 哲也; 武田, 純; MUNE, Tomoatsu

    2003-01-01

    Sixteen cases of verified Cushing's syndrome, and twelve cases of probable Cushing's syndrome were reviewed and data on them were compared with various reports on Cushing's syndrome in the literature.

  14. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  15. Chiari Malformation: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... headaches, or neurological signs Doctor’s Judgment An experienced neurosurgeon does not think the symptoms will respond to ... surgery (posterior fossa decompression), is performed by a neurosurgeon to relieve pressure caused by herniated cerebellar tonsils. ...

  16. Chiari Malformation: Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... funded research in this area © 2012 C&S Patient Education Foundation, 10 ® This presentation is for informational purposes, consult a qualified professional for medical advice. Emotional Issues Emotional: associated with mood, temperament, personality, and ...

  17. Chiari Malformation: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... strong odors can be detected, whether someone can smile or frown, and whether there are problems swallowing. ... heels, or walk heel-to-toe along a line. © 2012 C&S Patient Education Foundation, ® This presentation is ...

  18. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 153. Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and other systemic complications of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  19. Clinical evidence for cervical myelopathy due to Chiari malformation and spinal stenosis in a non-randomized group of patients with the diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffez, Dan S; Ross, Ruth E; Shade-Zeldow, Yvonne; Kostas, Konstantinos; Shah, Sagar; Gottschalk, Robert; Elias, Dean A; Shepard, Alan; Leurgans, Sue E; Moore, Charity G

    2004-10-01

    While patients with fibromyalgia report symptoms consistent with cervical myelopathy, a detailed neurological evaluation is not routine. We sought to determine if patients with fibromyalgia manifest objective neurological signs of cervical myelopathy. Two hundred and seventy patients, 18 years and older, who carried the diagnosis of fibromyalgia but who had no previously recognized neurological disease underwent detailed clinical neurological and neuroradiological evaluation for the prevalence of objective evidence of cervical myelopathy and radiological evidence of cerebellar tonsillar herniation (Chiari 1 malformation) or cervical spinal canal stenosis. Patients were primarily women (87%), of mean age 44 years, who had been symptomatic for 8 years (standard deviation, 6.3 years). The predominant complaints were neck/back pain (95%), fatigue (95%), exertional fatigue (96%), cognitive impairment (92%), instability of gait (85%), grip weakness (83%), paresthesiae (80%), dizziness (71%) and numbness (69%). Eighty-eight percent of patients reported worsening symptoms with neck extension. The neurological examination was consistent with cervical myelopathy: upper thoracic spinothalamic sensory level (83%), hyperreflexia (64%), inversion of the radial periosteal reflex (57%), positive Romberg sign (28%), ankle clonus (25%), positive Hoffman sign (26%), impaired tandem walk (23%), dysmetria (15%) and dysdiadochokinesia (13%). MRI and contrast-enhanced CT imaging of the cervical spine revealed stenosis. The mean antero-posterior (AP) spinal canal diameter at C2/3, C3/4, C4/5, C5/6, C6/7 and C7/T1 was 13.5 mm, 11.8 mm, 11.5 mm, 10.4 mm, 11.3 mm and 14.5 mm respectively, (CT images). In 46% of patients, the AP spinal diameter at C5/6 measured 10 mm, or less, with the neck positioned in mild extension, i.e., clinically significant spinal canal stenosis. MRI of the brain revealed tonsillar ectopia >5 mm in 20% of patients (mean=7.1+/-1.8 mm), i.e., Chiari 1 malformation

  20. A points-based algorithm for prognosticating clinical outcome of Chiari malformation Type I with syringomyelia: results from a predictive model analysis of 82 surgically managed adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Sumit; Sivaraju, Laxminadh; Jacob, Kuruthukulangara S; Arun, Aditya Atal; Aryan, Saritha; Mohan, Dilip; Sai Kiran, Narayanam Anantha; Hegde, Alangar S

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although various predictors of postoperative outcome have been previously identified in patients with Chiari malformation Type I (CMI) with syringomyelia, there is no known algorithm for predicting a multifactorial outcome measure in this widely studied disorder. Using one of the largest preoperative variable arrays used so far in CMI research, the authors attempted to generate a formula for predicting postoperative outcome. METHODS Data from the clinical records of 82 symptomatic adult patients with CMI and altered hindbrain CSF flow who were managed with foramen magnum decompression, C-1 laminectomy, and duraplasty over an 8-year period were collected and analyzed. Various preoperative clinical and radiological variables in the 57 patients who formed the study cohort were assessed in a bivariate analysis to determine their ability to predict clinical outcome (as measured on the Chicago Chiari Outcome Scale [CCOS]) and the resolution of syrinx at the last follow-up. The variables that were significant in the bivariate analysis were further analyzed in a multiple linear regression analysis. Different regression models were tested, and the model with the best prediction of CCOS was identified and internally validated in a subcohort of 25 patients. RESULTS There was no correlation between CCOS score and syrinx resolution (p = 0.24) at a mean ± SD follow-up of 40.29 ± 10.36 months. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the presence of gait instability, obex position, and the M-line-fourth ventricle vertex (FVV) distance correlated with CCOS score, while the presence of motor deficits was associated with poor syrinx resolution (p ≤ 0.05). The algorithm generated from the regression model demonstrated good diagnostic accuracy (area under curve 0.81), with a score of more than 128 points demonstrating 100% specificity for clinical improvement (CCOS score of 11 or greater). The model had excellent reliability (κ = 0.85) and was validated with

  1. Congenital Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis of C2 Vertebra Associated With Atlanto-Axial Dislocation, Chiari Type I Malformation, and Anomalous Vertebral Artery: Case Report With Review Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardhara, Jayesh; Pavaman, Sindgikar; Das, Kuntal; Srivastava, Arun; Mehrotra, Anant; Behari, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    Congenital spondylolytic spondylolisthesis of C2 vertebra resulting from deficient posterior element of the axis is rarely described in the literature. We describe a unique case of agenesis of posterior elements of C2 with craniovertebral junction anomalies consisting of osseous, vascular, and soft tissue anomalies. A 26-year-old man presented with symptoms of upper cervical myelopathy of 12 months' duration. A computed tomography scan of the cervical spine including the craniovertebral junction revealed spondylolisthesis of C2 over C3, atlantoaxial dislocation, occipitalization of the atlas, hypoplasia of the odontoid, and cleft posterior C1 arch. Additionally, the axis vertebra was found devoid of its posterior elements except bilaterally rudimentary pedicles. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed tonsilar herniation, suggesting associated Chiari type I malformation. CT angiogram of the vertebral arteries displayed persistent bilateral first intersegmental arteries crossing the posterior aspect of the C1/2 facet joint. This patient underwent foramen magnum decompression, C3 laminectomy with occipito-C3/C4 posterior fusion using screw and rod to maintain the cervical alignment and stability. We report this rare constellation of congenital craniovertebral junction anomaly and review the relevant literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impressão basilar e malformação de Arnold-Chiari: considerações técnico-cirúrgicas a propósito de 13 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Gonçalves da Silva

    1978-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores empregaram detalhes técnicos pessoais para descompressão da fossa posterior em casos de impressão basilar e/ou maliormação de Arnold-Chiari, consistente em intuoação endotraqueal sem retroflexão da cabeça do paciente, sendo o mesmo operado em posição sentada e com a cabeça ereta. Foi realizada plástica da paquimeninge da fossa posterior com dura-mater de cadáver conservada em glicerina.

  3. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that ... your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  4. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  5. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  6. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye syndrome is a rare illness that can affect the blood, liver, and brain of someone who has recently ... a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately. Reye syndrome can lead to a coma and brain death, ...

  7. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  8. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. Rheumatoid pneumoconiosis (RP; also known as Caplan syndrome) is swelling (inflammation) and scarring of the ... avoid exposure to inorganic dust. Alternative Names RP; Caplan syndrome; Pneumoconiosis - rheumatoid; Silicosis - rheumatoid pneumoconiosis; Coal worker's ...

  9. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  10. Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrado Junior, C.W.; Bresser, A.; Cerri, G.G.; Habr-Gama, A.; Pinotti, H.W.; Magalhaes, A.

    1988-01-01

    A case of familiar poliposis of colon related to a right mandibular osteoma is reported (this association is usually called Gardner's syndrome). Radiologic pictures ae shown and some commentaries about this syndrome concerning the treatment are made. (author) [pt

  11. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ... have also been reported. × Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ...

  12. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  13. Bartter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000308.htm Bartter syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bartter syndrome is a group of rare conditions that affect ...

  14. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other possible long-term consequences of the syndrome. Children with Pendred syndrome should start early treatment to gain communication skills, such as learning sign language or cued speech or learning to ...

  15. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and supports a broad program of basic and clinical research on all types of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome. Study of the genetic defects responsible for Dravet syndrome and related ... Publications Definition Dravet ...

  16. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome increases as a woman gets older. Down syndrome cannot be cured. Early treatment programs can help improve skills. They may include ... occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many ... Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of ...

  17. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  18. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) × Definition Aicardi syndrome is a rare genetic ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) View Full Definition Treatment There is no ...

  19. Neural tube defects in Waardenburg syndrome: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joseph; Miriyala, Kalpana

    2017-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment abnormalities, and is caused by variants in the PAX3 homeodomain. PAX3 variants have been associated with severe neural tube defects in mice and humans, but the frequency and clinical manifestations of this symptom remain largely unexplored in humans. Consequently, the role of PAX3 in human neural tube formation remains a study of interest, for clinical as well as research purposes. Though the association between spina bifida and WS1 is now well-documented, no study has attempted to characterize the range of spina bifida phenotypes seen in WS. Spina bifida encompasses several diagnoses with a wide scope of clinical severity, ranging from spina bifida occulta to myelomeningocele. We present a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 caused by a novel missense variant in PAX3, presenting with myelomeningocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation, and hydrocephalus at birth. Additionally, we review 32 total cases of neural tube defects associated with WS. Including this report, there have been 15 published cases of myelomeningocele, 10 cases of unspecified spina bifida, 3 cases of sacral dimples, 0 cases of meningocele, and 4 cases of miscellaneous other neural tube defects. Though the true frequency of each phenotype cannot be determined from this collection of cases, these results demonstrate that Waardenburg syndrome type 1 carries a notable risk of severe neural tube defects, which has implications in prenatal and genetic counseling. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dravets syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Rasmussen, Niels Henrik; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2010-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epileptic syndrome of infancy and early childhood. Most cases of Dravet syndrome seem to be due to a genetic defect causing the sodium channel to malfunction. We describe the main features of the syndrome. This epilepsy is medically intractable, but we call attention...... to the fact that some medications are of benefit and some could exacerbate the condition. Early recognition of the syndrome including by genetic testing could possibly improve outcome and reduce the need for other specialized investigations. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Feb-22...

  1. Tonsillar pulsatility before and after surgical decompression for children with Chiari malformation type 1: an application for true fast imaging with steady state precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radmanesh, Alireza; Greenberg, Jacob K.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Limbrick, David D.; Chatterjee, Arindam; Sharma, Aseem

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesize that surgical decompression for Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-1) is associated with statistically significant decrease in tonsillar pulsatility and that the degree of pulsatility can be reliably assessed regardless of the experience level of the reader. An Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant retrospective study was performed on 22 children with CM-1 (8 males; mean age 11.4 years) who had cardiac-gated true-FISP sequence and phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow imaging as parts of routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before and after surgical decompression. The surgical technique (decompression with or without duraplasty) was recorded for each patient. Three independent radiologists with different experience levels assessed tonsillar pulsatility qualitatively and quantitatively and assessed peritonsillar CSF flow qualitatively. Results were analyzed. To evaluate reliability, Fleiss kappa for multiple raters on categorical variables and intra-class correlation for agreement in pulsatility ratings were calculated. After surgical decompression, the degree of tonsillar pulsatility appreciably decreased, confirmed by t test, both qualitatively (p values <0.001, <0.001, and 0.045 for three readers) and quantitatively (amount of decrease/p value for three readers 0.7 mm/<0.001, 0.7 mm/<0.001, and 0.5 mm/0.022). There was a better agreement among the readers in quantitative assessment of tonsillar pulsatility (kappa 0.753-0.834), compared to qualitative assessment of pulsatility (kappa 0.472-0.496) and qualitative assessment of flow (kappa 0.056 to 0.203). Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty led to a larger decrease in tonsillar pulsatility, compared to posterior fossa decompression alone. Tonsillar pulsatility in CM-1 is significantly reduced after surgical decompression. Quantitative assessment of tonsillar pulsatility was more reliable across readers than

  2. Does the mesodermal derangement in Chiari Type I malformation extend to the cervical spine? Evidence from an analytical morphometric study on cervical paraspinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Sumit; Kurudi Siddappa, Avinash; Aryan, Saritha; Mohan, Dilip; Sai Kiran, Narayanam Anantha; Hegde, Alangar S

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The mesodermal derangement in Chiari Type I malformation (CMI) has been postulated to encompass the cervical spine. The objectives of this study were to assess the cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of cervical paraspinal muscles (PSMs) in patients with CMI without syringomyelia, compare them with those in non-CMI subjects, and evaluate their correlations with various factors. METHODS In this retrospective study, the CSAs of cervical PSMs in 25 patients were calculated on T2-weighted axial MR images and computed as ratios with respect to the corresponding vertebral body areas. These values and the cervical taper ratios were then compared with those of age- and sex-matched non-CMI subjects and analyzed with respect to demographic data and clinicoradiological factors. RESULTS Compared with the non-CMI group, the mean CSA values for the rectus capitis minor and all of the subaxial PSMs were lower in the study group, and those of the deep extensors were significantly lower (p = 0.004). The cervical taper ratio was found to be significantly higher in the study cohort (p = 0.0003). A longer duration of symptoms and a steeper cervical taper ratio were independently associated with lower CSA values for the deep extensors (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, respectively). The presence of neck pain was associated with a lower CSA value for the deep flexors (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Patients with CMI demonstrate alterations in their cervical paraspinal musculature even in the absence of coexistent syringomyelia. Their deep extensor muscles undergo significant atrophic changes that worsen with the duration of their symptoms. This could be related to a significantly steeper cervical taper ratio that their cervical cords are exposed to. Neck pain in these patients is related to atrophy of their deep flexor muscles. A steeper cervical taper ratio and alterations in the PSMs could be additional indicators for surgery in patients with CMI without syringomyelia.

  3. Tonsillar pulsatility before and after surgical decompression for children with Chiari malformation type 1: an application for true fast imaging with steady state precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radmanesh, Alireza [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St Louis, MO (United States); Greenberg, Jacob K.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Limbrick, David D. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, St Louis, MO (United States); Chatterjee, Arindam; Sharma, Aseem [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    We hypothesize that surgical decompression for Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-1) is associated with statistically significant decrease in tonsillar pulsatility and that the degree of pulsatility can be reliably assessed regardless of the experience level of the reader. An Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant retrospective study was performed on 22 children with CM-1 (8 males; mean age 11.4 years) who had cardiac-gated true-FISP sequence and phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow imaging as parts of routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before and after surgical decompression. The surgical technique (decompression with or without duraplasty) was recorded for each patient. Three independent radiologists with different experience levels assessed tonsillar pulsatility qualitatively and quantitatively and assessed peritonsillar CSF flow qualitatively. Results were analyzed. To evaluate reliability, Fleiss kappa for multiple raters on categorical variables and intra-class correlation for agreement in pulsatility ratings were calculated. After surgical decompression, the degree of tonsillar pulsatility appreciably decreased, confirmed by t test, both qualitatively (p values <0.001, <0.001, and 0.045 for three readers) and quantitatively (amount of decrease/p value for three readers 0.7 mm/<0.001, 0.7 mm/<0.001, and 0.5 mm/0.022). There was a better agreement among the readers in quantitative assessment of tonsillar pulsatility (kappa 0.753-0.834), compared to qualitative assessment of pulsatility (kappa 0.472-0.496) and qualitative assessment of flow (kappa 0.056 to 0.203). Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty led to a larger decrease in tonsillar pulsatility, compared to posterior fossa decompression alone. Tonsillar pulsatility in CM-1 is significantly reduced after surgical decompression. Quantitative assessment of tonsillar pulsatility was more reliable across readers than

  4. Use of Morphometric Mapping to Characterise Symptomatic Chiari-Like Malformation, Secondary Syringomyelia and Associated Brachycephaly in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan P Knowler

    Full Text Available To characterise the symptomatic phenotype of Chiari-like malformation (CM, secondary syringomyelia (SM and brachycephaly in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel using morphometric measurements on mid-sagittal Magnetic Resonance images (MRI of the brain and craniocervical junction.This retrospective study, based on a previous quantitative analysis in the Griffon Bruxellois (GB, used 24 measurements taken on 130 T1-weighted MRI of hindbrain and cervical region. Associated brachycephaly was estimated using 26 measurements, including rostral forebrain flattening and olfactory lobe rotation, on 72 T2-weighted MRI of the whole brain. Both study cohorts were divided into three groups; Control, CM pain and SM and their morphometries compared with each other.Fourteen significant traits were identified in the hindbrain study and nine traits in the whole brain study, six of which were similar to the GB and suggest a common aetiology. The Control cohort had the most elliptical brain (p = 0.010, least olfactory bulb rotation (p = 0.003 and a protective angle (p = 0.004 compared to the other groups. The CM pain cohort had the greatest rostral forebrain flattening (p = 0.007, shortest basioccipital (p = 0.019, but a greater distance between the atlas and basioccipital (p = 0.002 which was protective for SM. The SM cohort had two conformation anomalies depending on the severity of craniocervical junction incongruities; i the proximity of the dens (p <0.001 ii increased airorhynchy with a smaller, more ventrally rotated olfactory bulb (p <0.001. Both generated 'concertina' flexures of the brain and craniocervical junction.Morphometric mapping provides a diagnostic tool for quantifying symptomatic CM, secondary SM and their relationship with brachycephaly. It is hypothesized that CM pain is associated with increased brachycephaly and SM can result from different combinations of abnormalities of the forebrain, caudal fossa and craniocervical junction which compromise

  5. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  6. Refeeding syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, Padmini; Dash, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a potentially fatal medical condition that may affect malnourished patients in response to an inappropriately rapid overfeeding. This commonly occurs following the institution of nutritional support, especially parenteral or enteral nutrition. The most characteristic pathophysiology of refeeding syndrome relates to the rapid consumption of phosphate after glucose intake and subsequent hypophosphatemia. Refeeding syndrome can manifest as either metabolic changes (hypokala...

  7. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  8. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contain aspirin. Some hospitals and medical facilities conduct newborn screenings for fatty acid oxidation disorders to determine which children are at greater risk of developing Reye's syndrome. ...

  9. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, the French ... immediately. What's Life Like for Teens With Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome affects people differently, so life is not ...

  10. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most common inherited ... FAQ Top of page Additional Resources For Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome [nlm.nih.gov] From Medline Plus Marfan ...

  11. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  12. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Usher Syndrome What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher syndrome ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  13. Seckel syndrome: an overdiagnosed syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, E; Pembrey, M

    1985-01-01

    Five children in whom a diagnosis of Seckel syndrome had previously been made were re-examined in the genetic unit. One child had classical Seckel syndrome, a sib pair had the features of the syndrome with less severe short stature, and in two children the diagnosis was not confirmed. Seckel syndrome is only one of a group of low birth weight microcephalic dwarfism and careful attention should be paid to fulfillment of the major criteria defined by Seckel before the diagnosis is made. There r...

  14. A genome-wide association study identifies candidate loci associated to syringomyelia secondary to Chiari-like malformation in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancot, Frédéric; Lemay, Philippe; Knowler, Susan P; Kennedy, Karen; Griffiths, Sandra; Cherubini, Giunio Bruto; Sykes, Jane; Mandigers, Paul J J; Rouleau, Guy A; Rusbridge, Clare; Kibar, Zoha

    2018-03-22

    Syringomyelia (SM) is a common condition affecting brachycephalic toy breed dogs and is characterized by the development of fluid-filled cavities within the spinal cord. It is often concurrent with a complex developmental malformation of the skull and craniocervical vertebrae called Chiari-like malformation (CM) characterized by a conformational change and overcrowding of the brain and cervical spinal cord particularly at the craniocervical junction. CM and SM have a polygenic mode of inheritance with variable penetrance. We identified six cranial T1-weighted sagittal MRI measurements that were associated to maximum transverse diameter of the syrinx cavity. Increased syrinx transverse diameter has been correlated previously with increased likelihood of behavioral signs of pain. We next conducted a whole genome association study of these traits in 65 Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS) dogs (33 controls, 32 with extreme phenotypes). Two loci on CFA22 and CFA26 were found to be significantly associated to two traits associated with a reduced volume and altered orientation of the caudal cranial fossa. Their reconstructed haplotypes defined two associated regions that harbor only two genes: PCDH17 on CFA22 and ZWINT on CFA26. PCDH17 codes for a cell adhesion molecule expressed specifically in the brain and spinal cord. ZWINT plays a role in chromosome segregation and its expression is increased with the onset of neuropathic pain. Targeted genomic sequencing of these regions identified respectively 37 and 339 SNPs with significantly associated P values. Genotyping of tagSNPs selected from these 2 candidate loci in an extended cohort of 461 CKCS (187 unaffected, 274 SM affected) identified 2 SNPs on CFA22 that were significantly associated to SM strengthening the candidacy of this locus in SM development. We identified 2 loci on CFA22 and CFA26 that contained only 2 genes, PCDH17 and ZWINT, significantly associated to two traits associated with syrinx transverse

  15. Twelve years of chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia scanning in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels in the Netherlands: Towards a more precise phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrien Wijnrocx

    Full Text Available Chiari-like malformation (CM, syringomyelia (SM and middle ear effusion (also called PSOM are three conditions that frequently occur in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS. Both CM and SM are currently screened in the Netherlands prior to breeding and are graded according to the British Veterinary Association's Kennel Club (BVA/KC scheme. This study evaluated the prevalence and estimated genetic parameter of CM, SM and middle ear effusion from 12 years of screening results. For SM, the classical method using the BVA/KC scheme, was compared with exact measuring of the central canal dilation. For CM, the BVA/KC scheme was compared with a more detailed scheme. Next to this the presence of microchip artifacts was assessed. 1249 screening of 1020 dogs were re-evaluated. Results indicated the presence of CM in all dogs, suggesting it has become a breed-specific characteristic. And although different grades of CM were observed, the condition did not deteriorate over time. SM was present in 39% of the dogs and a clear age effect was demonstrated, with SM increasing with age. This emphasizes the importance of screening at appropriate age, since SM can worsen with increasing age. One alternative is to promote repeated measures. The presence of middle ear effusion in this study was 19%-21% for dogs younger than 3 years, and 32%-38% for dogs older than 3 years. In as much as 60%, microchip artifacts were noticed, leading to the recommendation to place microchips in another location in breeds that are susceptible to developing SM. Finally, this study estimated the heritability of CM in this population, due to the lack of phenotypic variance, to be very low at 0.02-0.03. The heritability for SM central canal dilatation to be 0.30, compared to 0.13 for the classical BVA/KC method, using a model including the age effect and the combined effect of veterinary clinic and year of the evaluation. Genetic correlations were rather small, ranging from 0.16-0.33. As a

  16. Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  17. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  18. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. × Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. View Full Definition Treatment There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, ...

  19. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...

  20. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  1. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  2. Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid ris...

  3. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sagittal balance in scoliosis associated with Marfan syndrome: a stereoradiographic three-dimensional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glard, Yann; Pomero, Vincent; Collignon, Patrick; Skalli, Wafa; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Bollini, Gérard

    2008-03-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a genetic disease often marked by the presence of scoliosis. There is no three-dimensional analysis of the deformity in the literature. Our aim was to determine what kind of sagittal balance defines scoliosis associated with MFS, namely a flexion deformity, as it is in scoliosis associated with Chiari I or an extension deformity, as in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). To address this issue, we compared the presence or absence of a thoracic scoliosis with the presence or absence of a segment in extension in the thoracic spine. In our series, 30 patients diagnosed with Marfan syndrome were prospectively included. In each patient, personalized three-dimensional reconstruction from T1 to L5 of the spine was made using stereoradiography. The patients were first separated based on the presence or absence of thoracic scoliosis, in order to compare this with the presence or absence of a segment in extension in the thoracic spine. They were then classified into two groups based on the presence or absence of the segment in extension (meaning containing negative values of inter-vertebral sagittal rotation) in the thoracic spine. Among scoliotic patients with a thoracic scoliosis (17 cases), there were 13 (76.5% cases) with a segment in extension in the thoracic spine and 4 with no segment in extension. Our results showed that scoliosis associated with MFS is somehow original, demonstrating a sagittal balance in extension (as AIS) in about 80% of thoracic curves, but without this characteristic feature in about 20%.

  5. Goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome is a syndrome of complex structures developing from first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis. The etiology of this rare disease is not fully understood, as it has shown itself variable genetically and of unclear causes. The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that may vary greatly in range and severity from case to case. Here we present a unique case of Goldenhar syndrome with absence of left condyle, hypoplasia of the zygomatic bone, no pneumatization of the mastoid process, underdeveloped mandible, bifid tongue and the skin tags in the preauricular area.

  6. Cowden syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Prakash S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with variable expressions that result mainly from mutation in the PTEN gene on arm 10q. It is characterized by multiple hamartomatous neoplasms of the skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, bones, CNS, eyes, and genitourinary tract. Mucocutaneous features include trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomatosis, acral keratosis, and palmoplantar keratosis. Here we present a case of Cowden syndrome in a 14-year-old female patient with the chief complaint of multiple oral papillomatous lesions.

  7. Costello syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukara J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome is a rare, distinctive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, characterized by soft, loose skin with deep palmar and plantar creases, loose joints, distinctive coarse facial features and skeletal and cardiac abnormalities. The affected patients have a predisposition to develop malignancy, developmental delays and mental retardation. Recently, a 7-year-old male child born to normal nonconsanguineous parents presented to us with abnormal facial features, arrhythmia, mitral valve dysfunction and growth retardation. His cutaneous examination revealed lax and pigmented skin over hands and feet with deep creases, acanthosis nigricans and short curly hairs. Its differentiation from other syndromes with similar clinical features is discussed in this article.

  8. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now What Is Reye’s Syndrome? ...

  9. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Alagille Syndrome Back Alagille ...

  10. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure to begin sexual changes expected during puberty Sexual development that "stalls" during teenage years Early end to menstrual cycles not due to pregnancy For most women with Turner syndrome, inability to ...

  11. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  12. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  13. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  14. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  15. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... crowding, and osteoporosis (brittle bones). Because of their physical conditions, health concerns, and infertility, some girls and women with TS may have low self- esteem, anxiety, or depression. How is Turner syndrome diagnosed? Physical features may ...

  16. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person cured of Cushing’s syndrome might have some memory loss and slight mental decline. But the change is ... Categories: Family Health, Infants and Toddlers, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: acth, adenomas, hormone, sickness September ...

  17. Levator Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse (See ... out other painful rectal conditions (such as thrombosed hemorrhoids , fissures , or abscesses ). The physical examination is often ...

  18. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs and symptoms may differ, based on age, gender and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, ... prevention and treatment of kidney disease. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the ...

  19. Gilbert's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not know you have the condition until it's discovered by accident, such as when a blood test ... chemotherapy drug Some protease inhibitors used to treat HIV If you have Gilbert's syndrome, talk to your ...

  20. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  1. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are unable to move their eyes back and forth. Decreased numbers of muscle fibers have been reported. Deformities of the tongue, jaw, and limbs, such ...

  2. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network of...

  3. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy for seizures is usually necessary. Physical and occupational therapies, communication therapy, and behavioral therapies are important in allowing individuals with Angelman syndrome to reach their maximum developmental potential. × Treatment There ...

  4. Joubert Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CEP290 . View Full Definition Treatment Treatment for Joubert syndrome is symptomatic and supportive. Infant stimulation and physical, occupational, and speech therapy may benefit some children. Infants with abnormal breathing ...

  5. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swallow. Some babies will be born with glaucoma, retinal degeneration, and impaired hearing. Jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding also may occur. Treatment There is no cure for Zellweger syndrome, nor ...

  6. Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood — typically with an artificial kidney machine (dialyzer). Chronic kidney disease. Nephrotic syndrome may cause your ... opportunities Reprint Permissions A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. " ...

  7. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are more often affected than girls. View Full Definition Treatment Antiepileptic drugs are used to control seizures, but are unfortunately ... Other therapies are symptomatic and supportive. × ... Definition Ohtahara syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by ...

  8. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to abnormal development of the vestibular hair cells, sensory cells that detect gravity and head movement. RP ... 3 Ben-Rebeh, I., et al. (2016). Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: ...

  9. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro,Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento,Luiz Augusto; Oliveira,Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  10. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart......, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...

  11. Pendred's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, M.I.; Cheema, I.A.; Qasim, G.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Pendred's syndrome in three siblings of a consanguineous marriage, belonging to Rahimyar Khan. The children presented with deafmutism and goiters. The investigations included scintigram, perchlorate discharge test and audiometery. The perchlorate discharge was positive in index case. Bilateral sensorineural hearing defect was detected on Pure Tone Average (PTA) audiometry. Meticulous clinical and laboratory evaluation is mandatory for the detection of rare disorders like Pendred's syndrome. (author)

  12. [Poland's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, R; Sasiadek, M

    2000-08-01

    Poland's syndrome consists of the variable clinical features, but always includes unilateral aplasia of the chest wall muscles and ipsilateral anomalies of upper extremity. The incidence of Poland's syndrome, reported by different authors ranges from 1:10,000 to 1:100,000 and is observed more frequently in males than in females with the right side of the body affected more often than the left. The etiology of this syndrome is still discussed. However most of described cases were sporadic, rare familial incidence of Poland's syndrome were also presented. Therefore different etiologic factors of the Poland's syndrome are taken into account: genetic, vascular compromise during early stages of embriogenesis but also teratogenic effect of environmental xenobiotics (e.g. cigarette smoking by pregnant women). The authors present also the case of 20-years old man with inherited bilateral syndactyly with the right side aplasia of major pectoralis muscle and face asymmetry. The familial history was negative in respect to the features, associated with Poland's syndrome.

  13. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Also known as What Is Metabolic syndrome ... metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Risk Factors A Large Waistline Having a large ...

  14. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the signs and symptoms of Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Marfan syndrome is different from Loeys-Dietz syndrome in that the gene mutation which causes Marfan syndrome is in fibrillin-1 (FBN-1), a protein ...

  15. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium ...

  16. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the hormone ...

  17. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other FAQs Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs Basic information for topics, such as " ... been diagnosed with Turner syndrome. Now what? Is Turner syndrome inherited? Turner syndrome is usually not inherited, but ...

  18. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  19. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  20. Nutcracker syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to highlight the symptoms of the Nutcracker Syndrome (NCS), the methods of clinical investigations and the importance of differential diagnosis. Introduction: The NCS refers to left renal vein entrapment caused by abnormal branching patterns of the superior mesenteric artery from the aorta. 1,2 Clinical case presentation: A 27 years old female presented to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal discomfort, bloating, loose bowel motions and irregular micro-haematuria. The radiologist's report indicated the findings from computed tomography examination to be consistent with anterior NCS. Discussion: In most of the NCS cases the clinical symptoms are non-specific. 3 The syndrome is caused by a vascular disorder, but its clinical manifestation can relate to a wide range of abdominal, urological, endovascular or gynaecological pathologies. 4 Conclusion: Nutcracker Syndrome is a relatively rare disease and underdiagnosed may lead to left renal vein thrombosis

  1. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  2. Usher Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fakin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease with prevalence of 3–6/100.000 and is the most common syndrome that affects vision and hearing. Three subtypes are distinguished on the basis of different degree of hearing loss. All patients develop retinitis pigmentosa with night vision difficulties and constriction of visual field, and ultimately a decline in visual acuity and color vision. Future holds promise for gene therapy. We present a patient with typical clinical picture of Usher syndrome, who started noticing night vision problems at age 13. At age 25 he was operated on for posterior cortical cataracts. At age 34 he has only 5–10° of visual field remaining with 1.0 visual acuity in both eyes. Fundus autofluorescence imaging revealed a typical hyperautofluorescent ring on the border between normal and affected retina.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  4. Eagle's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares, Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira, Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo, Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT) of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical. PMID:25992033

  5. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  6. Rapunzel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Wadan, Ali H.; Al-Saai, Azan S.; Abdoulgafour, Mohamed; Al-Absi, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  7. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  8. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  9. Eagle syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, Deepika; Gothi, Rajesh; Rajan, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  10. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  11. Fenton's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondi, E.; Albasini, V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report two recent cases of Fenton's syndrome, a very rare carpal fracture-dislocation. After some anatomophysiopathological considerations and a review of the literature, a wider nosographic frame is proposed in which the entity of the dislocation of the head of capitate bone is not essential. According to both the literature and personal findings, the authors remark that this syndrome is always found in the presence of two morphological variants of the distal radioulnar joint. Finally, the authors stress the importance of a corect diagnosis of this lesion to avoid unnecessary attempts of reduction

  12. Reiter's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, S S; Fernandez, J C; Dhurandhar, M W; Fernandez, R J

    1979-01-01

    A case of Reiter's syndrome occurring in a young mate aged 20 years having extensive skin lesions of keratoderina blenoffhagica is presented along with a review of literature. Although urethritis was absent, other clinical and histopathological features of the cutaneous lesions led us to the diagnosis. The-possible relationship of postural psoriasis to Reiter's syndrome is discussed. Failure of the patient to respond satisfactorily to steroids, antibiotics etc, prompted the use of rnethotrexate in the case. The result was dramatic, as the patient completely recovered within ten days of starting treatment.

  13. Larsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahbubul Islam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Larsen syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by congenital dislocation of multiple joints along with other anomalies of heart, face, hands and bones. Larsen syndrome was first described in 1950 by Larsen, Schottstaedt and Bost. In the present report, we describe a 10 year old girl who presented with mid facial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, high arched palate, bilateral talipes equinovarus and high arched feet. On examination, she had short stature (HAZ -3.5 SD with hyperextension of knee joint, fixed flexion of elbow joint. Awareness of this condition and associated complications may help in management and follow up of these patients. 

  14. Joubert syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanua, J.A.; Lopez, J.M.; Recondo, J.A.; Garcia, J.M.; Gaztanaga, R.

    1998-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare malformation of the posterior fossa, mainly affecting the cerebellar vermis, which generally appears as a dysplastic lesion. Other structures of the cervico medullary junction may be involved, with accompanying brainstem hypoplasia according to neuroimaging studies. The diagnosis is usually reached during, childhood, based on a constellation of changes in the child's neurological development that are supported by the results of imaging studied. Respiratory problems are the most common signs in newborns,leading to the suspicion of the presence of this syndrome. (Author) 11 refs

  15. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  16. Meigs' Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.; Khaskheli, M.; Farooq, S.

    2006-01-01

    Meigs' syndrome is a rare clinical condition commonly considered to be associated with malignant ovarian tumour. A case of unmarried female is presented who came with a slowly increasing abdominal mass. Clinical and ultrasonic investigations revealed a mobile, solid right adenexal tumour in the lower abdomen, along with ascites and pleural effusion of the right lung. The level of CA 125 was also raised. Diagnosis of Meigs' syndrome was confirmed after surgical intervention. The tumour was successfully removed and pleural effusion disappeared 15 days after the intervention. Cytomorphologic study of both the tumour and ascitic fluid was negative for malignancy. (author)

  17. [Elsberg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristine Esbjerg; Knudsen, Troels Bygum

    2013-12-16

    A syndrome involving acute urinary retention in combination with sacral radiculitis and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis was first described by the American neurosurgeon Charles Elsberg in 1931. In many instances the aetiology is herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivation from sensory neurons. In this case report we present a 34-year-old pregnant woman with previous undiagnosed sensory lumbosacral symptoms. She was hospitalized with HSV-2 meningitis and lumbosacral radiculitis but no genital rash. A week after the onset of symptoms she developed acute urinary retention, thus indicating Elsberg syndrome.

  18. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  19. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and/or ...... LS in this day and age appears to be low, however the syndrome is difficult to recognize, and still requires the full attention of the clinician.......This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and....../or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium...

  20. Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Baldini, Chiara; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bowman, Simon J.; Jonsson, Roland; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy; Theander, Elke; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SjS) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the exocrine glands (mainly the salivary and lacrimal glands) and results in the severe dryness of mucosal surfaces, principally in the mouth and eyes. This disease predominantly affects middle-aged women, but can also be

  1. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss of interest in normal play Delayed speech development or loss of previously acquired speech abilities Problem behavior or marked mood swings Any clear loss of previously gained milestones in gross motor or fine motor skills Causes Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. ...

  2. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  3. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can usually resume their normal activities. In some cases, exercise regimens may need to be modified in order to reduce the likelihood of recurrence or worsening. Clinical Trials Throughout the U.S. ... Definition Piriformis syndrome is a rare neuromuscular disorder that ...

  4. Hellp syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A 24 years old female presented with hypertension, haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia in an unconscious state after undergoing an emergency caesarian section. A diagnosis of HELLP syndrome was made on the above findings. Patient made an uneventful recovery with conservative management. A brief review of the literature is included along with the case report. (author)

  5. Kartagener's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, D K; Ganguly, K C; Alam, S; Hossain, A; Sarker, U K; Das, B K; Haque, M J

    2009-01-01

    Kartagener's Syndrome or Immotile Cilia Syndrome, a variant of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defect in the tiny hair like structure, the cilia lining the respiratory tract (upper and lower), sinuses, eustachian tubes, middle ear and fallopian tubes. Here electron microscopy shows abnormal arrangement of ciliary tubules and patients with Kartagener's syndrome has an absence of dynein arms at the base of the cilia. The inability of cilia to move results in inadequate clearance of bacteria from the air passages, resulting in an increased risk of infection and causing bronchiectasis. Another result of ciliary immobility is infertility. A 60 years old lady was diagnosed as a case of Kartagener's syndrome. She had history of chronic cough for 20 years, irregular fever for 20 years and occasional shortness of breath for 5 years. Relevant investigations revealed dextrocardia, situs inversus, bilateral maxillary sinusitis with non pneumatised frontal sinus and bronchiectasis. She was treated with low concentration oxygen inhalation, antibiotic, bronchodilator, chest physiotherapy including postural drainage, vitamins and other supportive treatment.

  6. Carraro syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, H.; Schwarz, R.

    1980-07-01

    The report concerns a girl aged 9 1/2 years who was deaf and dumb and had marked shortening of the calves with deformities of the feet and bilateral, congenital hypoplasia of the tibiae. This syndrome was first described by Carraro in 1931, but there have been no further reports since then.

  7. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  8. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3] Kamath BM, Loomes KM, Piccoli DA. Medical management of Alagille syndrome. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2010;50(6): ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  9. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neoplastic agents), exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome com prises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital ...

  10. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  11. Crest syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, B.; Roedl, W.

    1988-01-01

    If a patient has peri- and intra-articular calcinosis, as well as acro-osteolysis and esophageal hypomotility, and rheumatic symptoms, Crest syndrome should be considered as a manifestation of progressive systemic sclerosis. In connection with relevant symptoms on the skin and visceral involvement, radiological studies offer the possibility of classifying progressive systemic sclerosis more accurately. (orig.) [de

  12. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  13. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can treat many of its symptoms. Thanks to new research and treatments, people with Marfan syndrome who are diagnosed early ... This helps doctors stay on top of any new problems. Doctors might also ... or kids with amblyopia or strabismus will probably need to wear glasses. ...

  14. Kartagener's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    presenting with recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections, sinusitis or bronchiectasis. Inability to diagnose this condition may subject the patient to unnecessary and repeated hospital admissions, investigations and treatment failure. KEY WORDS: Kartagener's syndrome, primary cilliary dyskinesia, situs inversus, ...

  15. The Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Treatment of Portal Hypertension: Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Pomier-Layrargues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS represents a major advance in the treatment of complications of portal hypertension. Technical improvements and increased experience over the past 24 years led to improved clinical results and a better definition of the indications for TIPS. Randomized clinical trials indicate that the TIPS procedure is not a first-line therapy for variceal bleeding, but can be used when medical treatment fails, both in the acute situation or to prevent variceal rebleeding. The role of TIPS to treat refractory ascites is probably more justified to improve the quality of life rather than to improve survival, except for patients with preserved liver function. It can be helpful for hepatic hydrothorax and can reverse hepatorenal syndrome in selected cases. It is a good treatment for Budd Chiari syndrome uncontrollable by medical treatment. Careful selection of patients is mandatory before TIPS, and clinical followup is essential to detect and treat complications that may result from TIPS stenosis (which can be prevented by using covered stents and chronic encephalopathy (which may in severe cases justify reduction or occlusion of the shunt. A multidisciplinary approach, including the resources for liver transplantation, is always required to treat these patients.

  16. Transjugular liver biopsy : the efficacy of quick-core biopsy needle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Gyoo Sik; Ahn, Byung Kwon; Lee, Sang Ouk; Chang, Hee Kyong; Oh, Kyung Seung; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin Medical College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the Quick-Core biopsy needle system in performing transjugular liver biopsy. Between December 1995 and June 1997, eight patients underwent transjugular liver biopsy involving use of the Quick-Core biopsy needle system; the conditions involved were coagulopathy (n=4), thrombocytopenia (n=3), and ascites (n=1). Via the right internal jugular vein, the right hepatic vein was selectively catheterized with a 7-F transjugular guiding catheter, and a14-guage stiffening cannula was then inserted through this catheter; to obtain core tissue, a Quick-Core needle was then advanced into the liver parenchyma through the catheter-cannula combination. Eighteen- and 19-guage needles were used in three and five patients, respectively; specimen size, adequacy of the biopsy specimen and histologic diagnosis were determined, and complications were recorded. Biopsy was successful in all patients. The mean length of the specimen was 1.4 cm (1.0 - 1.8 cm), and all were adequate for pathologic examinations ; specific diagnosis was determined in all patients. There were two malignant neoplasms, two cases of veno-occlusive disease, and one case each of cirrhosis, fulminant hepatitis, Banti syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. One patient complained of neck pain after the procedure, but no serious procedural complications were noted. Our preliminary study shows that the Quick-Core biopsy needle system is safe and provides adequate core tissues with high diagnostic yields. (author). 23 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  17. Transjugular liver biopsy : the efficacy of quick-core biopsy needle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gyoo Sik; Ahn, Byung Kwon; Lee, Sang Ouk; Chang, Hee Kyong; Oh, Kyung Seung; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the Quick-Core biopsy needle system in performing transjugular liver biopsy. Between December 1995 and June 1997, eight patients underwent transjugular liver biopsy involving use of the Quick-Core biopsy needle system; the conditions involved were coagulopathy (n=4), thrombocytopenia (n=3), and ascites (n=1). Via the right internal jugular vein, the right hepatic vein was selectively catheterized with a 7-F transjugular guiding catheter, and a14-guage stiffening cannula was then inserted through this catheter; to obtain core tissue, a Quick-Core needle was then advanced into the liver parenchyma through the catheter-cannula combination. Eighteen- and 19-guage needles were used in three and five patients, respectively; specimen size, adequacy of the biopsy specimen and histologic diagnosis were determined, and complications were recorded. Biopsy was successful in all patients. The mean length of the specimen was 1.4 cm (1.0 - 1.8 cm), and all were adequate for pathologic examinations ; specific diagnosis was determined in all patients. There were two malignant neoplasms, two cases of veno-occlusive disease, and one case each of cirrhosis, fulminant hepatitis, Banti syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. One patient complained of neck pain after the procedure, but no serious procedural complications were noted. Our preliminary study shows that the Quick-Core biopsy needle system is safe and provides adequate core tissues with high diagnostic yields. (author). 23 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS): Current Status and Future Possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, Jose Ignacio; Quiroga, Jorge; Herrero, Jose Ignacio; Benito, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Since the insertion of the first TIPS in 1989 much has been learned about this therapeutic procedure. It has an established role for the treatment of some complications of portal hypertension: prevention of recurrent variceal bleeding and rescue of patients with acute uncontrollable variceal bleeding. In addition TIPS is useful for Budd-Chiari syndrome, refractory ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, although its specific role in these indications remains to be definitively established. However, the decrease in sinusoidal blood flow induced by TIPS can lead to the patient developing hepatic encephalopathy and liver failure in some cases. Therefore, TIPS should be used with caution in patients with very poor liver function. From a technical point of view, successful placement of TIPS is achieved in more than 98% of cases by experienced groups. At present, evaluation of TIPS dysfunction based on morphology probably leads to an overdiagnosis of this complication since most of these cases are not associated with clinical manifestations (recurrent bleeding or refractory ascites). The major disadvantage of TIPS remains its poor long-term patency requiring a mandatory surveillance program. The indicator for shunt function/malfunction should be the portosystemic pressure gradient, which is best assessed by intravascular measurements. Shunt obstructions may be prevented or reduced by the use of stent-grafts in the future

  19. Vascular diseases of the liver. Clinical Guidelines from the Catalan Society of Digestology and the Spanish Association for the Study of the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Llahí, Marta; Albillos, Agustín; Bañares, Rafael; Berzigotti, Annalisa; García-Criado, M Ángeles; Genescà, Joan; Hernández-Gea, Virginia; Llop-Herrera, Elba; Masnou-Ridaura, Helena; Mateo, José; Navascués, Carmen A; Puente, Ángela; Romero-Gutiérrez, Marta; Simón-Talero, Macarena; Téllez, Luis; Turon, Fanny; Villanueva, Cándido; Zarrabeitia, Roberto; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Despite their relatively low prevalence, vascular diseases of the liver represent a significant health problem in the field of liver disease. A common characteristic shared by many such diseases is their propensity to cause portal hypertension together with increased morbidity and mortality. These diseases are often diagnosed in young patients and their delayed diagnosis and/or inappropriate treatment can greatly reduce life expectancy. This article reviews the current body of evidence concerning Budd-Chiari syndrome, non-cirrhotic portal vein thrombosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, hepatic vascular malformations in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia, cirrhotic portal vein thrombosis and other rarer vascular diseases including arterioportal fistulas. It also includes a section on the diagnostic imaging of vascular diseases of the liver and their treatment from a haematological standpoint (study of thrombotic diathesis and anticoagulation therapy). All recommendations are based on published studies extracted from PubMed. The quality of evidence and strength of recommendations were rated in accordance with the GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment Development and Evaluation). In the absence of sufficient evidence, recommendations were based on the opinion of the committee that produced the guide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is functional renal failure that occurs with advanced liver failure. HRS is considered the most severe complication of cirrhosis. Type 1 HRS develops due to severe reduction of effective circulating volume results in hemodynamic dysfunction. Type 1 HRS is characterized by acute renal failure and rapid deterioration in the function of other organs. It can ocur spontaneously or in the setting of a precipitating event. Type 2 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, which is characterized by slowly progressive renal failure and refractory ascites. Liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for both type. The most suitable and ldquo;bridge treatments and rdquo; or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 106-113

  1. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  2. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  3. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  4. Paraneoplastiske syndromer

    OpenAIRE

    Røsbekk, Stein Helge

    2007-01-01

    During the last 50 years it has become clear that malignant tumours can induce symptoms unrelated to the mechanical effects of the primary tumour itself or its metastasis. Today, the name Paraneoplastic syndrome is given to those symptom complexes that may affect the blood cells, electrolytes, coagulation system, muscle, skin, nerve and the endocrine system. Endocrine symptoms were first recognised, and different hormones were isolated from the tumour tissue. However, tumour derived hormones ...

  5. Caroli's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numan, F; Cokyueksel, O; Camuscu, S; Demir, K; Dueren, M

    1986-07-01

    In 1958 Caroli described the syndrome of congenital, either segmental or involving the entire bile duct system, saccular extensions of the intrahepatic bile ducts. He differentiated between two types of this disease pattern. The first form concerns pure cystic dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts, whereas the second one is combined with hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension. Both types are characterised by cystic dilatations in the kidneys and in the extrahepatic bile ducts, pancreas and spleen.

  6. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  7. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Manish; Kavadu, Paresh; Chougule, Sachin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome in a female child aged 2yrs. Petrus Johannes Waardenburg(1) , a Dutch Ophthalmologist in 1951 described individuals with retinal pigmentary differences who had varying degrees of hearing loss and dystopia canthorum (i.e., latral displacement of inner canthi of eyes). The disease runs in families with a dominant inheritance pattern with varying degree of clinical presentation. Patient usually present with heterochromic iris, pigmentary abnormalities of ...

  8. [PHACES syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo Azcárate, J; Bernabeu-Wittel, J; Fernández-Pineda, I; Conejo-Mir, M D; Tuduri Limousin, I; Aspiazu Salinas, D A; de Agustín Asensio, J C

    2010-04-01

    PHACES syndrome associates a segmental facial hemangioma with cerebral malformations, aortic branches/cranial arteries anomalies, cardiac defects, eye anomalies or ventral wall defects. The aim of this study is to analyze our experience with this syndrome. Retrospective study of the cases seen at our unit in the last year. We treat 4 cases; 3 girls and 1 child. Besides the segmental hemangioma they presented: 3 vascular cerebral malformations; 2 structural cardiopathies; 2 cerebral malformations, 1 microftalmia. We did not find ventral wall defects. A case received treatment with two cycles of metilprednisolone i.v. and oral prednisone, with favourable course; two cases received initial treatment with oral prednisone continued of oral propanolol in rising pattern up to 2 mg/kg/day, Obtaining both the detention of the tumour growth and regression of the lesion, with very good tolerance. A 7-year-old patient has been treated with colouring pulse laser for her residual lesions. When we see a segmental facial hemangioma we must perform a wide diagnostic study in order to discard a PHACES syndrome. Multidisciplinar approach to the patient by a wide expert's group gets an earlier diagnose and improves the outcome. Propranolol is a promising therapeutic alternative.

  9. Anserine syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Milton; Kuromoto, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Knee pain is a common complaint in clinical practice, and pes anserinus tendino-bursitis syndrome (PATB) has been frequently diagnosed based only on clinical features that may cause equivocal interpretations. Patients complain of characteristic spontaneous medial knee pain with tenderness in the inferomedial aspect of the joint. Studies with different imaging modalities have been undertaken during the last years to identify whether these patients suffer from bursitis, tendinitis, or both. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the structural defect responsible for this disturbance. Due to these problems and some controversies, we suggest the term "anserine syndrome" for this condition. Diabetes Mellitus is a known predisposing factor for this syndrome. Overweight and osteoarthritis seem to represent additional risk factors; however, their role in the pathophysiology of the disease is not yet understood. Treatment includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses, from 10 days to 36 months to achieve recovery. The lack of knowledge about its epidemiological, etiological, and pathophysiological aspects requires future studies for this common and intriguing disorder.

  10. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs ...

  11. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  12. Prune belly syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle-Barrett syndrome; Triad syndrome ... The exact causes of prune belly syndrome are unknown. The condition affects mostly boys. While in the womb, the developing baby's abdomen swells with fluid. Often, the cause is ...

  13. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: Medication ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain controls ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Antiphospholipid syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... area? Other Names for This Condition anti-phospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Hughes syndrome Related Information How are ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other genetic conditions, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC syndrome) and Noonan syndrome . In affected infants, it can be difficult to ... These individuals may actually have CFC syndrome or Noonan syndrome , which are caused by mutations in related genes. ...

  16. Acute nephritic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes in children ...

  17. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  18. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  19. Robinow syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Robinow syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive mesomelic dwarfism with just more than 100 cases reported in the literature so far. The lower extremity is spared with skeletal deformity usually confined to the forearm, hand, and the dorsal spine. Diagnosis is made easily in the early childhood by the typical "fetal facies" appearance, which disappears to a certain extent as the patient grows. The author reports two cases of this entity with vertebral segmentation defects, rib fusion, and typical severe brachymelia and facial features.

  20. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  1. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  2. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  3. Cardiorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  4. Lowe syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loi Mario

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5 bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years.

  5. Cotard Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Cotard's syndrome is often described as the delusional belief that one is dead or non-existent. However, Jules Cotard's initial description (1880) of the "delusion of negations" was much richer and also involved delusions and claims of immortality and enormity, feelings of damnation, and illusions of bodily dissolution and transformation. Alternatively conceived as an extreme case of depression, hypochondria, or psychosis, the condition is considered rare and remains poorly understood. Cotard himself provided a taxonomy and several explanations for the condition, focusing on its distinction from classical persecutory delusions and suggesting that it could be a kind of reversed grandiosity. He proposed a psychosensory basis in the dissolution of mental imagery, which he then extended to a more general psychomotor impairment of volition. Other early authors highlighted a disorder of the bodily self, and more recent theories postulated an impairment of right hemispheric functions, leading to perceptual and somatosensory feelings of unreality, which coupled with reasoning impairments and an internalized attributional style led in turn to beliefs of non-existence. However, despite its striking presentation and its relevance to our understanding of self-awareness, Cotard's syndrome remains an elusive condition, rarely reported and poorly researched. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  7. Elsberg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldi, Filippo; Kaufmann, Timothy J.; Flanagan, Eoin P.; Toledano, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Elsberg syndrome (ES) is an established but often unrecognized cause of acute lumbosacral radiculitis with myelitis related to recent herpes virus infection. We defined ES, determined its frequency in patients with cauda equina syndrome (CES) with myelitis, and evaluated its clinical, radiologic, and microbiologic features and outcomes. Methods: We searched the Mayo Clinic medical records for ES and subsequently for combinations of index terms to identify patients with suspected CES and myelitis. Results: Our search yielded 30 patients, 2 diagnosed with ES and an additional 28 with clinical or radiologic evidence of CES retrospectively suspected of having ES. We classified patients in 5 groups according to diagnostic certainty. MRI and EMG confirmed that 2 had only myelitis, 5 only radiculitis, and 16 both. Two had preceding sacral herpes infection and 1 oral herpes simplex. Spinal cord lesions were commonly multiple, discontinuous, not expansile, and centrally or ventrally positioned. Lesions generally spared the distal conus. Nerve root enhancement was occasionally prominent and was smooth rather than nodular. Lymphocytic CSF pleocytosis was common. Thirteen patients (43%) had viral isolation studies, which were commonly delayed; the delay may have accounted for the low rate of viral detection. Acyclovir was administered to 6 patients. Most patients recovered with sequelae; 1 patient experienced encephalomyelitis and died. Conclusion: ES is a definable condition likely responsible for 10% of patients with combined CES and myelitis. Radiologic findings are not entirely specific but may help in differentiating ES from some competing diagnostic considerations. We propose criteria to facilitate diagnosis. PMID:28534040

  8. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  9. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en español Síndrome de Marfan What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder of the body's ... bones , blood vessels, and organs. What Causes Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome happens because of an abnormality in one ...

  10. Burnout Syndrome of Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Semrádová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis covers burnout syndrome of teachers. Defines burnout syndrome, describes its causes and symptoms. Describes teaching as helping profession and focousing on stressful situations at school. In the last chapter described different prevention strategies burnout syndrome. Key words: burnout syndrome, teaching, teacher, helping professions, beginning teacher, stress

  11. Turner Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Turner Syndrome KidsHealth / For Teens / Turner Syndrome What's in this ... en español El síndrome de Turner What Is Turner Syndrome? Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic condition found ...

  12. Understanding Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremont, Oliver T; Chan, James C M

    2012-02-01

    We aim to review the clinical features of two renal tubular disorders characterized by sodium and potassium wasting: Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome. Selected key references concerning these syndromes were analyzed, together with a PubMed search of the literature from 2000 to 2011. The clinical features common to both conditions and those which are distinct to each syndrome were presented. The new findings on the genetics of the five types of Bartter syndrome and the discrete mutations in Gitelman syndrome were reviewed, together with the diagnostic workup and treatment for each condition. Patients with Bartter syndrome types 1, 2 and 4 present at a younger age than classic Bartter syndrome type 3. They present with symptoms, often quite severe in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome type 3 present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. The severe, steady-state hypokalemia in Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome may abruptly become life-threatening under certain aggravating conditions. Clinicians need to be cognizant of such renal tubular disorders, and promptly treat at-risk patients.

  13. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome or Wilkie Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano Llano, Rodrigo; Chams Anturi, Abraham; Arango Vargas, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We described three cases of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome, also known as Wilkie's syndrome, chronic duodenal ileus, or cast syndrome. This syndrome occurs when the third portion of the duodenum is compressed between the SMA and the aorta. The major risk factors for development of SMA syndrome are rapid weight loss and surgical correction of spinal deformities. The clinical presentation of SMA syndrome is variable and nonspecific, including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and weight loss. The diagnosis is based on endoscopic, radiographic and tomographic findings of duodenal compression by the SMA. The treatment of SMA syndrome is aimed at the precipitating factor, which usually is related to weight loss. Therefore, conservative therapy with nutritional supplementation is the initial approach, and surgery is reserved for those who do not respond to nutritional therapy.

  14. [Syndrome X vs metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Villegas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Himsworth in 1939 postulated that Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) was not only an insulin deficiency state but also a cellular insulin insensitivity disease. Thirty years later, DeFronzo and Reaven demonstrated that insulin resistance (IR) preceded and predisposed for DM2 and atherosclerotic-cardiovascular-disease (ACVD). Reaven was the first to point out the relationship between IR and with hyperglycemia, dyslipidosis, and hypertension as mediators for ACVD, creating the concept of Syndrome X (SX) in 1988. WHO and, thereafter, other medical societies and medical groups, mainly ATP-III, in 2002, based on the difficulty of diagnosing IR in a simple, reliable, and inexpensive way, proposed and published the Metabolic Syndrome (MS) concept, as a group of five variables, i.e., obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL, and hypertension, as an easy clinical approximation to suspect and treat an increased cardiometabolic risk. Nowadays, there are deep and extensive controversies on this issue; however, these controversies do not really exist since all discordant points of view are rather quantitative and not qualitative in nature. This article is aimed at differentiating and harmonizing the complementary concepts of SX and MS, at analyzing why MS is a good "clinical window" to look for IR and its underlying manifestations, and finally to accept that the MS concept complements, but does not substitute or antagonize, traditional scales used to asses cardiovascular risk, such as the Framingham scale.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  16. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Membranous IVC Obstruction Presenting with Antegrade/Retrograde Respiratory Flow in the Intrahepatic Segment in Doppler Imaging and Prostatic and Urethral Congestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, Dinesh; Mistry, Kewal A.; Chadha, Veenal; Sharma, Sarthak; Morey, Parikshit D.; Suthar, Pokhraj P.; Patel, Dhruv G.

    2015-01-01

    Obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC) is infrequent, membranous obstruction of the IVC (MOIVC) being one of its rare causes. Early diagnosis is important, as it can lead to hepatic congestion, cirrhosis and Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and can predispose to development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe cases. We report a case of membranous IVC obstruction at the junction of hepatic and suprahepatic segments in a young male with extensive collateralization and venous aneurysms. Unique findings involved antegrade and retrograde flow during respiration in the upper part of intrahepatic IVC proximal to a large collateral vein as well as prostatic and urethral congestion leading to intermittent urinary hesitancy, which have not yet been described in such cases. MOIVC is a rare cause of IVC obstruction with typical radiological features. Early diagnosis and management is required due to risk of cirrhosis and HCC. Antegrade and retrograde flow may be seen in incomplete MOIVC above the level of a large collateral vein and it may lead to prostatic and urethral congestion

  18. Radiologic investigation of portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, C.; Wegmueller, H.

    1993-01-01

    Radiologic evaluation of patients with portal hypertension in the pre- and postoperative period can be done with several non-invasive or invasive imaging modalities which offer complementary information. Doppler-ultrasonography (-US) is the method of choice for initial non-invasive screening as well as for follow-up tests after shunt surgery. The diagnostic information provided by Doppler-US regarding morphology and blood flow in the upper abdominal organs and vessels is sufficient in many instances. Dynamic computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) and recently, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) are additional non-invasive imaging techniques that may add valuable information if necessary. Conventional angiography is usually performed immediately prior to surgery to demonstrate the vascular morphology. The standard angiographic technique to demonstrate both the arterial and portal venous system is arterioportography (late-phase portography) by means of selective catheterization of the celiac, the splenic, the superior mesenteric or inferior mesenteric arteries. The dose of iodinated contrast material may be reduced by 50% if digital subtraction angiography is used instead of the conventional technique. Inferior venacavography and hepatic venography are indicated in patients with suspected postsinusoidal portal hypertension, e.g. the Budd-Chiari syndrome; hepatic wedge manometry offers valuable information regarding pressure gradients between the portal and systemic venous system prior to shunt surgery. The angiographic access through the inferior vena cava is also used for direct catheterization of surgical porto-caval or spleno-renal shunts for both angiography, manometry and, if necessary, balloon angioplasty. (authors)

  19. Long-term outcome following trans-jugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Jinguo; Zhang Shutian; Feng Zitan; Zhou Guifen; Pan Xinyuan; Liang Zhihui

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the 6-year outcome following trans-jugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS) for variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension. Methods: 65 patients, 51 males, 14 females, aged 35-72 years old with averaged 4.5 years, have been undergone TIPSS because of portal hypertension due to cirrhosis or Budd-Chiari syndrome. The portal pressures were measured before and after TIPSS. Follow-up study was done by color Doppler sonography or Barium esophageal radiography for 3 months to 6 years (averaged 18 months). Repeated interventional treatments were done in cases of restenosis of the shunts. Results: There were 0, 2, 10, 5, 0 cases of recurrent bleeding after 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, 2 year and 3-6 year following TIPSS respectively. Stenosis occurred in shunt paths due to thrombosis or smooth muscle cell proliferation or neo-intimal hyperplasia were relieved after thrombolytic therapy and repeated balloon angioplasty or stent plant among most of them. 2 were failed due to serious stenosis. 7 cases died, 2 of massive bleeding, 1 of the other cause and 4 of hepatic cancer. The other patients are getting well. Conclusions: Although there were very high rates of restenosis (34%), but most of them could be treated again with interventional therapy, and in kept patency effectively. TIPSS is a still practical valuable management for massive gastric bleeding

  20. Evaluation of fluency stent-grafts in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jianbo; Li Yanhao; Chen Yong; He Xiaofeng; Zeng Qingle; Mei Quelin; Lu Wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of Fluency stent-graft (Bard Corp) in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Methods: The clinical data of 21 consecutive patients treated by TIPS using Fluency stent-grafts were retrospectively reviewed. All of them were recurrent variceal bleeding secondary to portal vein hypertension, 1 was bleeding secondary to primary hepatic carcinoma with port vein thrombus, and 1 was Budd-Chiari syndrome. They were followed-up after (10.1±4.6) months (2.0 to 24.0 months). Stent-grafts patancy, portal vein pressure and liver function were recorded and compared. Results: Twenty-five stent-grafts were successfully implanted in 21 patients, 23 stent grafts were 8 mm 2 were 10 mm in diameter. The covered length of the stents varied from 6 to 8 cm. The bleeding was stopped and the portal vein pressure decreased significantly from (25.4±3.5) mm Hg to (15.4±2.8) mm Hg (t= 12.495, P 0.05). Conclusion: The Fluency stent-grafts could increase the patency of the TIPS, but its efficacy on the long-term effect and hepatic encephalopathy need further investigation. (authors)

  1. Radiologic follow-up of the transjugular intrahepatic stent-shunt (TIPSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, H.J.; Noeldge, G.; Leutloff, U.; Radeleff, B.; Richter, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic stent-shunt (TIPSS) is a well accepted minimal invasive therapy for complications of portal hypertension: recurrent variceal bleeding, refractory ascites and liver failure due to the Budd-Chiari syndrome. The high frequency of shunt stenoses and occlusions makes regular follow up examinations essential. Despite modern non invasive imaging methods direct portography still is the gold standard for shunt surveillance in TIPSS. Ultrasound is helpful to detect shunt dysfunction, but nevertheless its failure rate is considerable despite the use of contrast enhancers such as Levovist because of anatomic and physical limitations, particularly when TIPSS-tracts deep in the liver are present. Reintervention rates approach 90-100% after 24 months, with 100% in child's A patients with comparatively good liver function. However, a strict shunt surveillance program with early portography and reintervention when necessary guarantees high clinical success rates associated with very low rebleeding rates below 10%. Overall the secondary success rate is 80%. Secondary failures are mainly caused by lack of patient compliance during follow-up. In a subgroup of patients no shunt maturation is observed, requiring multiple shunt revisions. In cases of recurrent shunt occlusions an association with bile leaks is presumed. In selected cases patients with chronically recurrent shunt stenosis or occlusions may benefit from placement of TIPSS stent grafts. (orig.) [de

  2. Orthotopic Liver Transplantation in Human-Immunodeficiency-Virus-Positive Patients in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Anadol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This summary evaluates the outcomes of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT of HIV-positive patients in Germany. Methods. Retrospective chart analysis of HIV-positive patients, who had been liver-transplanted in Germany between July 1997 and July 2011. Results. 38 transplantations were performed in 32 patients at 9 German transplant centres. The reasons for OLT were end-stage liver disease (ESLD and/or liver failure due to hepatitis C (HCV (=19, hepatitis B (HBV (=10, multiple viral infections of the liver (=2 and Budd-Chiari-Syndrome. In July 2011 19/32 (60% of the transplanted patients were still alive with a median survival of 61 months (IQR (interquartile range: 41–86 months. 6 patients had died in the early post-transplantation period from septicaemia (=4, primary graft dysfunction (=1, and intrathoracal hemorrhage (=1. Later on 7 patients had died from septicaemia (=2, delayed graft failure (=2, recurrent HCC (=2, and renal failure (=1. Recurrent HBV infection was efficiently prevented in 11/12 patients; HCV reinfection occurred in all patients and contributed considerably to the overall mortality. Conclusions. Overall OLT is a feasible approach in HIV-infected patients with acceptable survival rates in Germany. Reinfection with HCV still remains a major clinical challenge in HIV/HCV coinfection after OLT.

  3. Diffuse and vascular hepatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreimeyer, S.; Grenacher, L.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to focal liver lesions, diffuse and vascular disorders of the liver represent a wide spectrum of liver diseases which are from the radiological point of view often difficult or nearly impossible to diagnose. Classical diagnostic methods are computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in addition to ultrasound. Diffuse parenchymal damage caused by diseases of various etiologies is therefore difficult to evaluate because it often lacks characteristic morphological features. For hepatic steatosis, hemochromatosis/siderosis as an example of a diffuse storage disease and sarcoidosis and candidiasis as infectious/inflammatory diseases, an image-based diagnosis is appropriate in some cases. For most diffuse liver diseases, however only nonspecific changes are visualized. Vascular pathologies of the liver, such as the Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis, however, can usually be diagnosed very clearly using radiology and there is also a very effective interventional radiological treatment. Chronic diseases very often culminate in liver cirrhosis which is highly associated with an increased risk of liver cancer. (orig.) [de

  4. Paediatric chronic liver diseases: how to investigate and follow up? Role of imaging in the diagnosis of fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pariente, Daniele; Franchi-Abella, Stephanie [University Paris XI, Pediatric Radiology Department, Bicetre Hospital, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin Bicetre (France)

    2010-06-15

    Chronic liver diseases are rare in children, but encompass a wide spectrum of disorders that may all be complicated by liver fibrosis and therefore by portal hypertension. They may be classified according to the level of portal flow obstruction: prehepatic, intrahepatic or suprahepatic. Most of them, except presinusoidal diseases, may progress to cirrhosis that carries additional risks of impaired liver function and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Imaging plays an important role in guiding the diagnosis and biopsy and for follow-up during treatment. US, with high-frequency transducers and Doppler, is the first modality of choice, directs the rest of the investigations and guides interventional radiology. MDCT has made great progress and has replaced angiography for diagnostic purposes. MRI is indicated for parenchyma and nodule characterization and for biliary tract evaluation. To avoid liver biopsy, several elasticity imaging techniques have been developed and have to be evaluated for accuracy and convenience in children. The role of each modality with main imaging findings is described in extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, hepatoportal sclerosis, congenital hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis and Budd-Chiari syndrome. (orig.)

  5. Usefulness of color and pulsed Doppler's in the evaluation of surgical portosystemic shunts in pediatric patients; Utilidad del Doppler color y pulsado en la valoracion de los shunts portosistemicos quirurgicos en la edad pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrocal, T.; Prieto, C.; Cortes, P.; Rodriguez, R.; Pastor, I. [Hospital Universitario La Paz. Madrid (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Portosystemic shunts are performed to relieve symptomatic portal hypertension symptomatic or removal pressure in hepatic vascularisation in patients with Budd-Chiari's syndrome. Most surgical portosystemic shunts can be suitably studied by means of ultrasound scan complemented by color and pulsed Dopplers, proved one understands the hemodynamics of the surgical procedures involved. This article demonstrates the usefulness and limitations of the ultrasound scan Duplex Doppler in the evaluation of portosystemic shunts performed on pediatric patients. Pulsed Doppler provides information regarding the nature and direction of blood flow. Color doppler is capable of directly revealing the shunt and, in most cases, permits the anastomosis to be located. The types of shunts that appear include proximal and distal spleno-renal, portocaval and mesocaval. Types of vascular connections are illustrated,s well as expected post-surgical blood flow direction in affected vessels. The ultrasound scanning technique is discussed, as well as the criteria for determining vascular permeability. Also highlighted are the advantages, limitations and diagnostic difficulties associated with the different forms of Doppler. (Author) 17 refs.

  6. Clinical application of hepatic vein percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent after stent placement in inferior vena cava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hao; Zu Maoheng; Gu Yuming; Li Guojun; Zhang Qingqiao; Wei Ning; Xu Wei; Liu Hongtao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and effect of recanalization of hepatic vein with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent after stent placement in inferior vena cava (IVC). Methods: Eleven patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS)were once performed metal stent placement in IVC at other hospital, but ascites was not subsided in 9 patients after the stent placement and occurred again in 2 patients in 3 months after the procedure. PTA and metal stent placement were used to treat the occlusion of the hepatic vein (HV) via stent in IVC. Results: Recanalization of occlusive HV was successful in all 11 patients, and symptoms disappeared or were obviously improved. The mean blood pressure in HV dropped from pre-operation (45.12 ± 1.57) cm H 2 O (1 cm H 2 O=0.098 kPa) to post-operation (17.53 ± 0.68) cm H 2 O (P<0.01). In a period of 4-30 months (mean: 13.6 months) following-up, no patient reoccurred symptoms. Conclusion: Recanalization of HV via stent in IVC is a feasible and effective method for occlusive HV, but it is difficult. (authors)

  7. Research advances in non-cirrhotic portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Bojing

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although liver cirrhosis is the most common cause of portal hypertension (PH, about 20% of PH cases are caused by non-cirrhotic reasons, which are referred to as non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH, with a high incidence rate in developing countries. NCPH is a group of heterogeneous hepatic vascular diseases, including idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH and extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO, as well as the rare diseases in clinical practice such as Budd-Chiari syndrome, congenital hepatic fibrosis, and nodular regenerative hyperplasia. The patients with NCPH usually have the symptoms of portal hypertension, such as recurrent variceal bleeding and splenomegaly, but liver function is well preserved in these patients. At present, the diagnosis of NCPH lacks a universally accepted standard and remains a challenge. In clinical practice, the method of exclusion is usually applied for the diagnosis of HCPH, and liver biopsy is performed when necessary to make a confirmed diagnosis. This paper introduces the pathogenesis and pathological manifestations of IPH and EHPVO, as well as the selection of diagnostic methods and therapeutic strategies. If upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be effectively controlled, NCPH is considered to have a relatively good prognosis.

  8. Usefulness of color and pulsed Doppler's in the evaluation of surgical portosystemic shunts in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrocal, T.; Prieto, C.; Cortes, P.; Rodriguez, R.; Pastor, I.

    2003-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are performed to relieve symptomatic portal hypertension symptomatic or removal pressure in hepatic vascularisation in patients with Budd-Chiari's syndrome. Most surgical portosystemic shunts can be suitably studied by means of ultrasound scan complemented by color and pulsed Dopplers, proved one understands the hemodynamics of the surgical procedures involved. This article demonstrates the usefulness and limitations of the ultrasound scan Duplex Doppler in the evaluation of portosystemic shunts performed on pediatric patients. Pulsed Doppler provides information regarding the nature and direction of blood flow. Color doppler is capable of directly revealing the shunt and, in most cases, permits the anastomosis to be located. The types of shunts that appear include proximal and distal spleno-renal, portocaval and mesocaval. Types of vascular connections are illustrated,s well as expected post-surgical blood flow direction in affected vessels. The ultrasound scanning technique is discussed, as well as the criteria for determining vascular permeability. Also highlighted are the advantages, limitations and diagnostic difficulties associated with the different forms of Doppler. (Author) 17 refs

  9. Gorlin's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, R T; Barrett, A

    1975-06-01

    The uncommon familial syndrome of multiple odontogenic keratocysts, basal cell naevi and skeletal anomalies is reviewed, and seven cases are described, including one patient who developed squamous cell carcinoma in a previous odontogenic keratocyst of the maxilla. We wish to thank Consultants from the Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, The Middlesex Hospital and the Eastman Dental Hospital, who allowed us access to their patients; Mr. D. Garfield Davies, Dr. M. F. Spittle, Mr. D. Winstock, Mr. H. P. Cook, Professor H. C. Killey and Mr. L. W. Kay. We are grateful to Professor L. Michaels and Mr. D. J. Connolly for preparation of the illustrations and to Mrs. A. Matthews for the typescript.

  10. HEPATORENAL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Hafner

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is acommon complication of advanced hepatic disease characterizedby marked abnormalities in arterial circulation and byrenal failure. An extreme arteriolar vasodilatation located inthe splanchnic circulation results in a reduction of total systemicvascular resistence and arterial hypotension. Vasoconstrictionoccurs in the renal circulation as in all other extrasplanchnicvascular territories. In the kidney, marked renalvasoconstriction results in a low glomerular filtration rate.Conclusions. The diagnosis of HRS is currently based on exclusionof other causes of renal failure. Prognosis of patientswith HRS is very poor. Liver transplantation is the best therapeuticoption, but it is seldom applicable due to the short survivalexpectancy of most patients with HRS, particularly thosewith the rapidly progressive type of HRS. New therapies developedduring the last few years, such as the use of systemicvasoconstrictors or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemicshunts (TIPS appear promising. Such treatments are of interestnot only as a bridge to liver transplantation but also as atherapy for patients who are not candidates for transplantation.

  11. Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  12. Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Duane Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U D Shrestha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (GHS is also known as Oculo-Auriculo-Vertebral (OAV syndrome or Branchial arch syndrome. Duane retraction syndrome (DRS is a congenital disorder of ocular motility characterized by limited abduction, adduction or both. It is unilateral in 80% of cases. The important and interesting part of this eight months old child is presence of GHS with DRS. She has bilateral invol-vement, which is seen in only 5-8% of GHS, as compared to high incidence of unilateral involve-ment. This child also had refractive error of + 6.00/ - 1.5 * 180. At four year of age her vision with glass was 6/9. Children with GHS and DRS should have early eye examination done to treat the problem of refractive error. Keywords: Duane retraction syndrome; goldenhar syndrome, refractive error.

  13. Gitelman syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levtchenko Elena N

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gitelman syndrome (GS, also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence of heterozygotes is approximately 1% in Caucasian populations, making it one of the most frequent inherited renal tubular disorders. In the majority of cases, symptoms do not appear before the age of six years and the disease is usually diagnosed during adolescence or adulthood. Transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, sometimes accompanied by abdominal pain, vomiting and fever are often seen in GS patients. Paresthesias, especially in the face, frequently occur. Remarkably, some patients are completely asymptomatic except for the appearance at adult age of chondrocalcinosis that causes swelling, local heat, and tenderness over the affected joints. Blood pressure is lower than that in the general population. Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported occasionally. In general, growth is normal but can be delayed in those GS patients with severe hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. GS is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Mutations in the solute carrier family12, member 3 gene, SLC12A3, which encodes the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC, are found in the majority of GS patients. At present, more than 140 different NCC mutations throughout the whole protein have been identified. In a small minority of GS patients, mutations in the CLCNKB gene, encoding the chloride channel ClC-Kb have been identified. Diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms and biochemical abnormalities (hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. Bartter syndrome (especially type III is the most important genetic disorder to consider in the differential diagnosis of GS. Genetic counseling is important. Antenatal diagnosis for GS

  14. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  15. [Characteristics in treatment of the hip in patients with Down syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlein, C-D; Schiel, M; Timmesfeld, N; Schofer, M D; Eberhardt, O; Wirth, T; Fernandez, F F

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of hip instability in patients with Down syndrome is challenging. We have performed different pelvic osteotomies and corrections at the proximal femur for this indication. This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcome of each intervention. All in all, 166 patients with Down syndrome were treated at our orthopaedic department in the observation period. Problems related to the hip joint were diagnosed in 63 of those patients. Only patients who underwent surgery were included in this study. The charts and X-rays of these 31 patients were evaluated with respect to the following parameters: incidence of the hip problem, concomitant diseases, temporal progress, kind of operation method and date, duration of stay in the hospital, after-care, follow-on surgery related to complications, AC angle, CE angle, ACM angle, CCD angle, index of migration according to Reimers, classification of Bauer and Kerschbauer and general morphology of the femoral head. The group was compared with an age-matched group of 21 patients with hip dysplasia. Those patients underwent the same sort of operation in the same year. In the Morbus Down group, we performed surgery for preservation of the hip in 49 cases. This included 13 osteotomies according to Chiari, 11 triple osteotomies according to Tönnis, 10 corrections by femoral varus derotation osteotomy, 8 pelvic osteotomies according to Pemberton, 5 pelvic osteotomies according to Salter and 2 open reductions of the hip. With respect to the moment of surgery, we detected three peaks of age. There was no difference in course of disease and quantity of complications between the groups. Satisfactory results concerning clinical and radiological outcome were achieved predominantly by complete redirectional acetabular osteotomies. Half of the patients who were solely treated by femoral varus derotation osteotomy needed follow-on surgery in the form of pelvic osteotomy. Comparison of

  16. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a common major complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and generally indicates a poor prognosis when combined with liver failure. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is characterised by a combination of disturbances in circulatory and kidney function. Arterial pressure is decreased in the systemic circulation due to reduced total systemic vascular resistance. Kidney dysfunction is caused by reduction in renal blood flow. The diagnosis of HRS is based on exclusion of other disorders that cause acute kidney injury in cirrhosis as there are no specific tests. There are two types of HRS with different characteristics and prognostics. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for all patients without contraindication. The best approach to the pharmacologic management is the administration vasoconstrictor drugs based on the pathogenesis. Many vasoconstrictors including vasopressin analogues (terlipressin, ornipressin and vasopressin, somatostatin analogues (octreotide and alpha-adrenergic analogues (midodrine and norepinephrine have been studied. In most of the studies intravenous albumin therapy was coadministered with vasoconstrictor drugs and suggested that albumin should be considered as the component of pharmacologic intervention in patients with HRS. Renal replacement therapy in the form of hemodialysis or continuous venovenous hemofiltration has been used in the management of HRS patients awaiting transplantation or in those with acute potentially reversible conditions. The artificial hepatic support systems require further investigation. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 37-44

  17. Pseudohypopituitary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, E; Holl, R W

    1992-07-01

    In a child with short stature, the finding of normal or elevated GH levels in the presence of low concentrations of IGF-I raises the following possibilities. (1) A modification of the GH molecule, which is still detected by RIA, but inactive biologically. Therefore, an RRA or bioassay for hGH should result in considerably lower GH measurements compared with RIA determinations in the same sample. As both bioassays as well as RRAs are not widely available and are hampered by several difficulties, few children with this presumptive diagnosis have been described. So far, it has not been possible to define a specific molecular defect in one of these patients. (2) Abnormalities of the GH receptor or postreceptor mechanisms lead to a GH insensitivity syndrome. Laron-type dwarfism is usually due to a deletion in the gene for hepatic GH receptors: the serum binding protein for GH is absent. In three additional populations, the Pygmies of Zaire, the little women of Loja in Ecuador and the Mountain Ok people in Papua New Guinea, alterations of GH receptor function have been described. Finally, some reports describe patients with normal or elevated serum levels of both growth hormone and IGF-I in whom resistance to IGF has been implied in the pathogenesis of small stature.

  18. Hepatorenal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papper, S

    1980-01-01

    Renal failure without apparent cause (the hepatorenal syndrome) may develop in the course of cirrhosis of the liver. While the development of renal failure bears a poor prognosis, spontaneous recovery can occur. The data suggest that for the most part patients die in rather than of renal failure. The latter seems to be only part of a broader more fundamental disturbance. The pathogenesis of HRS is unknown, but the evidence supports an impairment of effective renal perfusion. The two major hypotheses concerning the nature of the impaired perfusion are that it is a physiologic response to alterations in the extrarenal circulation, and that there is an unidentified humoral agent(s) produced by or inadequately inactivated by or bypassing the diseased liver and causing circulatory changes in the kidney as well as in other organs. It is possible that both mechanisms are operative. Treatment is unsatisfactory and emphasis is presently best placed upon searching for more treatable causes of renal functional impairment in individual patients.

  19. Terlipressin for hepatorenal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Christensen, Kurt; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials suggest that terlipressin improves renal function in hepatorenal syndrome, but the evidence concerning mortality is equivocal.......Clinical trials suggest that terlipressin improves renal function in hepatorenal syndrome, but the evidence concerning mortality is equivocal....

  20. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  1. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  2. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preena A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disease, with oculocutneous albinism, pulmonary fibrosis and bleeding diathesis. Here we report a case of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome who presented with dyspnea, oculocutaneous albinism and nystagmus.

  3. Marfan syndrome (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, ...

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  5. Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia (Goldenhar's syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, F K

    1971-03-01

    A case of Goldenhar's Syndrome or Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia in a Ghanaian infant is described. Significant were the additional findings of congenital esophageal atresia and arthrogryposis which have so far not been reported in association with the syndrome.

  6. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system (PNS). The PNS ... your brain. No one knows what causes the syndrome. Sometimes it is triggered by an infection, surgery, ...

  7. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  8. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) happens when a woman's ovaries or adrenal glands produce more male hormones than normal. PCOS causes cysts ( ... PCOS are at higher risk of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, and high blood pressure. PCOS is ...

  9. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001311.htm Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes ...

  10. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other diseases of the nervous system, such as Sjogren’s syndrome or migraine. It is most often seen in ... other diseases of the nervous system, such as Sjogren’s syndrome or migraine. It is most often seen in ...

  11. The obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Grootb, Ph. G.

    The association of persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies and thromboembolic events, (recurrent) pregnancy loss or both is termed antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in women with the syndrome should be regarded as at high-risk for complications. Optimal management

  12. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Nausea and Vomiting Home Diseases and Conditions Tics and Tourette Syndrome Condition Tics and Tourette Syndrome Share Print Table of Contents1. ... little or no control over. These are called tics. Several different tics can happen at the same ...

  13. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Changed What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Print en español El síndrome de Down You have probably seen people who have Down syndrome. They have certain physical features, such as a ...

  14. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Yosemite FAQ: Non-U.S. Visitors to Yosemite History of HPS Related Links Prevent Rodent Infestations Cleaning Up After Rodents Diseases From Rodent Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is ...

  15. Ramsay Hunt syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt syndrome; Herpes zoster oticus; Geniculate ganglion zoster; Geniculate herpes; Herpetic geniculate ganglionitis ... The varicella-zoster virus that causes Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the same virus that causes chickenpox and ...

  16. Moebius Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... craniofacial/neurological disorder. Individuals with Moebius syndrome cannot smile or frown, and do not have lateral eye ... the organization to ensure that they are in line with the mission of the Moebius Syndrome Foundation. ...

  17. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Home Health Info Health Topics Burning Mouth Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a painful, complex condition often described ... or other symptoms. Read More Publications Cover image Burning Mouth Syndrome Publication files Download Language English PDF — Number of ...

  18. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Much of this research focuses on finding ways to prevent and treat the disorder. Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is ...

  19. Skin Peeling Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rajeev

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling of the skin is an uncommonly encountered disorder. Occurrence of vesicles and bullae in peeling skin syndrome is very rare. We report a case of idiopathic peeling skin syndrome with vesicular lesions.

  20. Malformação da transição crânio-vertebral como causa de síndrome do ângulo ponto-cerebelar: relato de dois casos Cerebello-pontine angle syndrome associated with cranio-vertebral malformation: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amauri Batista da Silva

    1972-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam dois casos de síndrome do ângulo ponto-cerebelar nos quais não havia neoplasia nessa região. Ambos os pacientes apresentavam uma associação de impressão basilar com síndrome de Arnold-Chiari. Após cirurgia descompressiva de fossa posterior os casos evoluiram favoravelmente com a diminuição progressiva dos sintomas neurológicos, restando apenas, no segundo paciente, certo grau de paralisia e de espasmo facial, à direita. São feitas considerações em tôrno das causas mais freqüentes da síndrome do ângulo ponto-cerebelar, bem como acêrca dos quadros clínicos mais usualmente encontrados em doentes que apresentam malformações da transição crânio-vertebral. Finalmente, os autores tecem breves considerações a respeito do possível mecanismo lesionai do VIII, do V e do VII nervos cranianos nos dois casos relatados.Two cases of cerebelo-pontine angle syndrome associated with basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation are reported. In both cases neuroradiological studies and surgical exploration failled to demonstrate any space occupying lesion. After surgery the patients progressively recovered disapearing the neurological symptoms except for a slaight hemifacial spasm that remained in case 2. Clinical signs present in cerebello-pontine angle lesions and the occipito-cervical malformations are discussed. A possible mechanism to explain the association of both conditions is discussed.

  1. [The Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikina, M A; Levin, O S

    2013-01-01

    The Capgras syndrome is one of delusional-like misidentification syndrome in which a person holds a delusion that one or several his/her friends or relatives have been replaced by an identical-looking impostor. As any other delusional disorder, the Capgras syndrome is characterized by stability despite the indisputable arguments against fault views. Initially, this syndrome was considered as a presentation of schizophrenia but later it has been described in brain organic disorders, primarily in elderly patients with dementia.

  2. The wellness syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.).......Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.)....

  3. PRES syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, R.; Novakova, M.; Balev, B.; Baleva, D.; Nedelchev, K.

    2010-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances, seizures and posterior transient changes on neuroimaging. PRES has been described in several conditions including hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia, eclampsia, infections, electrolyte imbalance, hypercalcaemia and use of several drugs. It occurs due to elevated blood pressure which exceeds the autoregulatory capacity of brain vasculature. The posterior circulation supplied by vertibro-basilar system has poor sympathetic innervation and, therefore, is frequently involved. The role of neuroimaging is to establish the initial diagnosis and to exclude other causes of neurological symptoms and signs. NCCT is sufficient to make the diagnosis in a proper clinical setting. MRI features are characteristic and has diagnostic and prognostic value. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) can differentiate this condition from ischemia/cytotoxic edema. Differential diagnosis of PRES includes PCA territory infarcts, venous thrombosis, demyelinating disorders, vasculitis and encephalitis. The diagnosis has important implications because the reversibility of the clinico-radiological abnormalities is contingent on the prompt control of blood pressure and/or withdrawing of the offending drug. We describe here a case of PRES in a 12 years old girl with acute lymphoblasts leukaemia, treated with cytostatics-vincristine, pharmorubycin and methotrexate. After 39 days from the beginning of the treatment there are good results in the myelogram and the flowcytometric examination, but the patient made two tonic-clonic seizures. CT and MRI were made and signs of leucoencephalopathy were diagnosed. Several control MRI examinations after cessation of the therapy and disappearance of the neurologic symptoms were made. The normal findings and the clinical course were the reasons for the PRES diagnosis

  4. Postthrombotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Raffaele; Bernardi, Enrico; Concolato, Alessia; Dalla Valle, Fabio; Pagnan, Antonio; Prandoni, Paolo

    2006-10-01

    Despite considerable progress in the diagnosis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities, one of every three patients will develop postthrombotic sequelae within 2 years; these sequelae are severe in approximately 20% of cases and produce considerable socioeconomic consequences. Among factors potentially related to the development of the postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) are older age, obesity, insufficient oral anticoagulant therapy, and recurrent ipsilateral thrombosis. Whether the extent and location of the initial thrombosis are associated with the development of PTS is controversial. Based on recent findings, the lack of vein recanalization within the first 6 months appears to be an important predictor of PTS, whereas the development of transpopliteal venous reflux is not. The diagnosis of PTS can be made on clinical grounds for patients with a history of DVT. The combination of a standardized clinical evaluation with the results of compression ultrasonography and Doppler ultrasound helps diagnose or exclude a previous proximal vein thrombosis. According to the results of recent clinical studies, the prompt administration of adequate compression elastic stockings in patients with symptomatic DVT has the potential to reduce the frequency of late PTS development by half. The management of this condition is demanding and often frustrating. However, when carefully supervised and instructed to wear proper elastic stockings, more than 50% of patients will either remain stable or improve during long-term follow-up. Clinical presentation helps predict the prognosis; the outcome of patients who refer with initially severe manifestations is more favorable than that of patients whose symptoms deteriorate progressively over time.

  5. Cardio-renal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  6. Facts about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... monitor children with Down syndrome for these conditions. Treatments Down syndrome is a lifelong condition. Services early in life ... of these services focus on helping children with Down syndrome develop to their ... therapy, and they are typically offered through early intervention ...

  7. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Salman, M.; Mansoor, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple jaw cysts are a characteristic manifestation of basal cell nevus (Gorlin) syndrome. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is characterized by symptoms primarily involving the skin, central nervous system, and skeletal system. In 90% of the patients, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is associated with recurring odontogenic keratocysts. This patient showed recurrent jaw and maxillary cysts, for which he was followed for 2 years. (author)

  8. Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Or In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome What causes SLS? SLS is caused by mutations ... methods of diagnosing SLS. Other Clinical Names for Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome Other clinical names of Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome include: ...

  9. Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W. J.; Berghout, A.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy are reported, both due to an adrenal adenoma. The association of pregnancy and Cushing's syndrome has up to now been described in 48 patients (including our two cases); Cushing's syndrome was ACTH-independent in 59%, ACTH-dependent in 33%, and of

  10. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) • What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? • What causes PCOS? • What is insulin resistance? • ... with PCOS? •Glossary What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Common PCOS signs and symptoms include the ...

  11. Diagnostik af Dravet syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Rasmussen, Niels Henrik; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2010-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epileptic syndrome of infancy. We describe the features of two cases with genetically verified SCNA1 mutations. The diagnosis was established rather late in one case. The epilepsies were medically intractable and the symptoms characteristic of Dravet syndrome. The children...

  12. The acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami Filho, L.

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.) [pt

  13. DIDMOAD (Wolfram Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Nashibi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome was first described by physician D J Wolfram and Wagener in 1938. This autosomal recessive syndrome is also referred to as DIDMOAD syndrome which stands for Diabetes Insipidus, Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness

  14. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  15. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Pandeshwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions.

  16. Barth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia-associated DNMT3A p.Arg882His mutation in a patient with Tatton-Brown-Rahman overgrowth syndrome as a constitutional mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Rika; Terashima, Hiroshi; Kubota, Masaya; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a critical role in both embryonic development and tumorigenesis and is mediated through various DNA methyltransferases. Constitutional mutations in the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A cause a recently identified Tatton-Brown-Rahman overgrowth syndrome (TBRS). Somatically acquired mutations in DNMT3A are causally associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and p.Arg882His represents the most prevalent hotspot. So far, no patients with TBRS have been reported to have subsequently developed AML. Here, we report a live birth and the survival of a female with the TBRS phenotype who had a heterozygous constitutional DNMT3A mutation at the AML somatic mutation hotspot p.Arg882His in her DNA from peripheral blood and buccal tissue. Her characteristic features at birth included hypotonia, narrow palpebral fissures, ventricular septal defect, umbilical hernia, sacral cyst, Chiari type I anomaly. At the age of 6 years, she exhibited overgrowth (> 3 SD) and round face and intellectual disability. This report represents the first documentation of the same variant (DNMT3A p.Arg882His) as both the constitutional mutation associated with TBRS and the somatic mutation hotspot of AML. The observation neither confirms nor denies the notion that mutations responsible for TBRS and those for AML might share the same mode of action. Larger data sets are required to determine whether TBRS patients with constitutional DNMT3A mutations are at an increased risk for AML. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Phakomatosis pigmentovascularis: Implications for severity with special reference to Mongolian spots associated with Sturge-Weber and Klippel-Trenaunay syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Bryan D; Cadle, Ronald G; Morrill-Cornelius, Shannon M; Bay, Carolyn A

    2007-12-15

    In 1947 the term phakomatosis pigmentovascularis (PPV) was coined to represent the association of widespread, aberrant, and persistent nevus flammeus and pigmentary abnormalities. Four types of PPV have been recognized with type II (nevus flammeus and Mongolian spots) being the most common. Most early cases were of Asian or African descent. Many cases were subsequently associated with Sturge-Weber (S-W) and Klippel-Trenaunay (K-T) syndromes. Almost no literature reports have appeared in the genetic or dysmorphology literature! We present six cases of PPV in which five were either African, Asian or Hispanic, and five of six had an admixture of K-T and S-W. Four had macrocephaly, and one had microcephaly. Four had CNS abnormalities (three with hydrocephalus, one with Arnold-Chiari and one with polymicrogyria), three had mental retardation, and one had seizures. One each had thumb hypoplasia, hydronephrosis, glaucoma, coronal synostosis, and 3-4 finger syndactyly. It is our suspicion and hypothesis that in the presence of persistent, extensive and aberrant Mongolian spots, vascular abnormalities as are seen in K-T and S-W carry a worse prognosis. This may be particularly true either of children of Asian, Hispanic or African heritage or any individuals from darker pigmented skin groups. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Abdominal compartment syndrome with acute reperfusion syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleeva, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome was recognized clinically in the 19th century when Marey and Burt observed its association with declines in respiratory function. Abdominal compartment syndrome is first used as a medical terminology from Fietsman in a case of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A condition caused by abnormally increased pressure within the abdomen. Causes of abdominal compartment syndrome include trauma, surgery, or infection. Common symptoms: abdominal distension, fast heart rate, insufficient urine production, or low blood pressure Medical procedure: nasogastric intubation Surgery: laparotomy Specialists: radiologist, primary care provider (PCP), surgeon, and emergency medicine doctor [6, 10]. Keywords: Stomach. Gastroparesis . Diabetes Mellitus [bg

  20. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sarraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Marfan syndrome Marfan syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Marfan syndrome KidsHealth from Nemours Foundation MalaCards: marfan syndrome Orphanet: Marfan syndrome Your Genes Your Health from Cold Spring ...

  2. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Shobha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT in the jaw, multiple basal cell carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic examination in the first decade of life, as KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the NBCCS syndrome. This article reports the case of a 12-year-old girl with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestation. This study highlights the importance of health professionals in the early diagnosis of this syndrome and a multidisciplinary approach to provide a better diagnosis and prognosis.

  3. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  4. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  5. Orofacial syndromes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Shyam Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A syndrome is a set of signs and symptoms that tend to occur together and reflect the presence of a particular disease or an increased chance of developing to a particular disease. There are numerous orofacial syndromes and a thorough knowledge of their manifestations and implications is pertinent in good oral health care delivery. The aim of this review is to describe collective esoteric knowledge, about various malformations and syndromes associated with orofacial region.

  6. Steele Richardson Olszewski syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayashree S Gokhale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson′s disease and its plus syndromes are an important cause of morbidity in the geriatric age group. Its plus syndromes show a myriad of clinical features characterized by progressive symptoms. Here we present a 65-year-old woman with progressive "Parkinsonian-like features," i.e., mask-like face, slowness of all movements and tendency to fall, and difficulty in eye movements, leading to the diagnosis of Steele Richardson Olszewski Syndrome or progressive supranuclear palsy.

  7. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Jouyandeh, Zahra; Nayebzadeh, Farnaz; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asadi, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3) criteria t...

  8. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery, i...... on the coronary vessels, with cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial exudate. In the lighter cases, PCIS may be treated with NSAID and, in the more severe cases, with systemic glucocorticoid which has a prompt effect....

  9. A seizuring alagille syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jomon Mathew John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder with incidence of one in 100,000 live births. This syndrome with seizure as a presentation has been rarely reported in Indian studies. We present a 3-month-old infant who presented to us with seizures was found to have a dysmorphic face, jaundice, hepatomegaly, and soft systolic murmur. Infant was stabilized and remained seizure free. A detailed clinical evaluation of a common presentation may reveal a rare syndrome.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Waardenburg syndrome Waardenburg syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Waardenburg syndrome is a group of genetic conditions that can ...

  11. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Also known as What Is Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders ...

  12. What Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome Also known as What Is Respiratory ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  14. Guide to Understanding Pfeiffer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome occurs more often in children with older fathers. if I have pfeiffer syndrome what are the odds of passing it to my children? p feiffer syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, meaning it requires only one parent to ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Cockayne syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cockayne syndrome type II is also known as cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, and while some ... link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome Educational Resources (8 links) ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leigh-like syndrome 3-methylglutaconic aciduria with deafness, encephalopathy, and Leigh-like syndrome MEGDHEL syndrome SERAC1 ... Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Usher syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Usher syndrome Usher syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Usher syndrome is a condition characterized by partial or total ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Bartter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Bartter syndrome Bartter syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Bartter syndrome is a group of very similar kidney disorders ...

  19. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Purine Research Society See all related organizations Publications Order NINDS Publications Definition Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare, inherited ...

  20. SNEDDON’S SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Valtchev

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Sneddon’s syndrome is usually characterized by the association of an ischemic cerebrovascular disease and a widespread livedo reticularis. The incidence of Sneddon syndrome is 4/1000 000. We present 42-year-old woman with livedo reticularis, recurrence ischaemic cerebrovascular accidents, two repetitive miscarriages and positive anti-2GPi antibodies. Skin biopsy specimens reveal inflammatory changes of small- to medium-sized arteries and subendothelial proliferation and fibrosis. The diagnosis Sneddon syndrome is confirmed by skin biopsy, and MR evidence. We suggest that anti-2GPi antibodies may be pathophysiologically related to the clinical manifestation observed in some patients with Sneddon syndrome.

  1. Fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems, or intellectual disability may not be present. Symptoms Behavior problems associated with fragile X syndrome include: Autism spectrum disorder Delay in crawling, walking, or twisting Hand flapping ...

  2. [Neurobiology of Tourette Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Dilek; Akdemir, Devrim

    2016-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Although it is a common disorder in childhood, the etiology of Tourette Syndrome has not been fully elucidated yet. Studies, -conducted so far- have revealed differences in neurobiological structures of individuals who suffer from Tourette Syndrome. The objective of this review is to assess etiological and pathophysiological studies in the Tourette Syndrome literature. An electronical search was conducted in PubMed database using the keywords tic disorders, Tourette Syndrome, neurobiology, genetics, neuroimaging and animal models. Research and review studies published between 1985 and 2015, with a selection preference towards recent publications, were reviewed. According to the studies, genetic predisposition hypothesis is considered as a priority. However, a precise genetic disorder associated with Tourette Syndrome has not been found. The evidence from postmortem and neuroimaging studies in heterogenous patient groups and animal studies supports the pathological involvement of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits in Tourette Syndrome. Consequently, the most emphasized hypothesis in the pathophysiology is the dopaminergic dysfunction in these circuits. Furthermore, these findings of the animal, postmortem and neuroimaging studies have confirmed the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of Tourette Syndrome. In conclusion, more studies are needed to understand the etiology of the disorder. The data obtained from neurobiological studies of the disorder will not only shed light on the way of Tourette Syndrome, but also guide studies on its treatment options.

  3. Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Rossella; Ladu, Cristina; Vezzosi, Chiara; Mannelli, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare condition in the general population and is even less common during pregnancy with only a few cases reported in literature. The diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome may be difficult during pregnancy because the typical features of the disorder and pregnancy may overlap. However, Cushing's syndrome results in increased fetal and maternal complications, and diagnosis and treatment are critical. This report describes a case of 26-year-old female at the 19th week of pregnancy with symptoms and signs of hypercortisolism, where ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome was diagnosed and treated by robotic laparoscopic adrenalectomy at the 21th week of gestation.

  4. Central Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as neurontin (gabapentin) can be useful. Lowering stress levels appears to reduce pain. View Full Treatment Information Definition Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition caused ...

  5. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalli, M.A.; Aamir, M.; Mustafa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  6. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhalli, M A; Aamir, M; Mustafa, G [Combined Military Hospital, Abbottabad (Pakistan)

    2011-06-15

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  7. Crippling test of a Budd Pioneer passenger car

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    This research program was sponsored by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development in support of the advancement of improved safety standards for passenger rail vehicles. FRA and the Volpe National Transportation Syst...

  8. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders.

  9. Wolfram syndrome 1 and Wolfram syndrome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoli, Luciana; Di Bella, Chiara

    2012-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 (WS1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness (DI DM OA D syndrome) associated with other variable clinical manifestations. The causative gene for WS1 (WFS1) encoding wolframin maps to chromosome 4p16.1. Wolframin has an important function in maintaining the homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in pancreatic β cells. Recently, another causative gene, CISD2, has been identified in patients with a type of Wolfram syndrome (WS2) resulting in early optic atrophy, diabetes mellitus, deafness, decreased lifespan, but not diabetes insipidus. The CISD2-encoded protein ERIS (endoplasmic reticulum intermembrane small protein) also localizes to ER, but does not interact directly with wolframin. ERIS maps to chromosome 4q22. Numerous studies have shown an interesting similarity between WFS1 and CISD2 genes. Experimental studies demonstrated that the Cisd2 knockout (Cisd2) mouse shows premature aging and typical symptoms of Wolfram syndrome. These researches provide interesting insight into the relation of neurodegenerative diseases, mitochondrial disorders, and autophagy and are useful for the pathophysiological understanding of both Wolfram syndrome and mitochondrial-mediated premature aging. The knowledge of WS1 and WS2 pathogenesis, and of the interactions between WFS1 and CISD2 genes, is useful for accurate diagnostic classification and for diagnosis of presymptomatic individuals.

  10. Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Usher syndrome (USH) are the most prevalent syndromic forms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), together they make up almost a quarter of the patients with RP. BBS is defined by the association of retinopathy, obesity, hypogonadism, renal dysfunction, postaxial polydactyly and mental retardation. This clinically complex syndrome is genetically heterogeneous with linkage to more than 6 loci, and 4 genes have been cloned so far. Recent molecular data present evidence that, in some instances, the clinical manifestation of BBS requires recessive mutations in 1 of the 6 BBS loci plus one or two additional mutations in a second BBS locus (tri- or tetra-allelic inheritance). USH is characterized by the combination of congenital or early-onset sensorineural deafness, RP, and variable degrees of vestibular dysfunction. Each of the three clinical types is genetically heterogeneous: 7 loci have been mapped for type 1, three loci for type 2, and two loci for type 3. Currently, 6 USH genes (MYO7A, USH1C, CDH23, PCDH15, USH2A, USH3) have been identified. Pathogenetically, mutations of the USH1 genes seem to result in defects of auditory and retinal sensory cells, the USH 2 phenotype is caused by defects of extracellular matrix or cell surface receptor proteins, and USH3 may be due to synaptic disturbances. The considerable contribution of syndromic forms of RP requires interdisciplinary approaches to the clinical and diagnostic management of RP patients.

  11. Alport Syndrome Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4 months later, my father walked me down the aisle. We danced to a Beatles song & then to j… Connect on Instagram Email: info@alportsyndrome.org Phone: (480) 800-3510 Mailing Address: Alport syndrome Foundation P.O. Box 4130 ... 5, 2017 Cecil Alport: Naming the Syndrome November 26, 2016 The Renal Diet: Potassium ...

  12. Adult onset Leigh syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandit Lekha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh syndrome is a rare progressive mitochondrial disorder of oxidative metabolism. Though it has been reported in infancy and childhood, it is rarely described in adults. The authors describe a patient who had clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features diagnostic of Leigh syndrome, with supportive biochemical and muscle histochemistry evidence.

  13. Post-Polio Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Post-Polio Syndrome Information Page Post-Polio Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? ... behavior of motor neurons many years after a polio attack. Others are looking at the mechanisms of ...

  14. Klippel-Feil Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... proteins that are involved in bone development and segmentation of the vertebrae. × Definition Klippel-Feil Syndrome is a rare disorder characterized ... proteins that are involved in bone development and segmentation of the vertebrae. View Full Definition ... Treatment Treatment for Klippel-Feil Syndrome is symptomatic ...

  15. Redefining syndromic surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Katz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available With growing concerns about international spread of disease and expanding use of early disease detection surveillance methods, the field of syndromic surveillance has received increased attention over the last decade. The purpose of this article is to clarify the various meanings that have been assigned to the term syndromic surveillance and to propose a refined categorization of the characteristics of these systems. Existing literature and conference proceedings were examined on syndromic surveillance from 1998 to 2010, focusing on low- and middle-income settings. Based on the 36 unique definitions of syndromic surveillance found in the literature, five commonly accepted principles of syndromic surveillance systems were identified, as well as two fundamental categories: specific and non-specific disease detection. Ultimately, the proposed categorization of syndromic surveillance distinguishes between systems that focus on detecting defined syndromes or outcomes of interest and those that aim to uncover non-specific trends that suggest an outbreak may be occurring. By providing an accurate and comprehensive picture of this field’s capabilities, and differentiating among system types, a unified understanding of the syndromic surveillance field can be developed, encouraging the adoption, investment in, and implementation of these systems in settings that need bolstered surveillance capacity, particularly low- and middle-income countries.

  16. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common tumors in children with this syndrome. Causes Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is caused by a defect ... Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine . 10th ed. ... MA. Hypoglycemia. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  17. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  18. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... state Rett Syndrome Handbook Called the “Rett Syndrome Bible”, all the information you need for your journey- available in PDF version. Purchase a hard copy Get 1:1 Support Connect with our Family Empowerment Team , join a special interest network More forms of support Find your Family Empowerment ...

  19. Churg Strauss syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Rengifo, Diana Milena; Contreras Zuniga, Eduardo; Osio, Luis Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The Churg-Strauss syndrome, also called allergic granulomatosis and angiitis, is a multisystem disorder characterized by allergic rhinitis, asthma, and prominent peripheral blood eosinophilia. The most common organ involved is the lung, followed by the skin. The Churg-Strauss syndrome, however, can affect any organ system, including the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, renal, and central nervous systems

  20. Churg-strauss syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brar B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 29-year-old man who presented with cutaneous vasculitis and was subsequently diagnosed as a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome. The patient fulfilled five out of the six criteria of the syndrome developed by American College of Rheumatology.