WorldWideScience

Sample records for bubble model due

  1. A model to estimate volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion in solution reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souto, F.J.; Heger, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effects of radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion on the steady-state operation of solution reactors at the power level required for the production of medical isotopes, a calculational model has been developed. To validate this model, including its principal hypotheses, specific experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory SHEBA uranyl fluoride solution reactor were conducted. The following sections describe radiolytic gas generation in solution reactors, the equations to estimate the fuel solution volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion, the experiments conducted at SHEBA, and the comparison of experimental results and model calculations. (author)

  2. A model to estimate volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion in solution reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souto, F.J. [NIS-6: Advanced Nuclear Technology, Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Heger, A.S. [ESA-EA: Engineering Sciences and Application, Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the effects of radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion on the steady-state operation of solution reactors at the power level required for the production of medical isotopes, a calculational model has been developed. To validate this model, including its principal hypotheses, specific experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory SHEBA uranyl fluoride solution reactor were conducted. The following sections describe radiolytic gas generation in solution reactors, the equations to estimate the fuel solution volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion, the experiments conducted at SHEBA, and the comparison of experimental results and model calculations. (author)

  3. Discrete Bubble Modeling for Cavitation Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2007-03-01

    Dynaflow, Inc. has conducted extensive studies on non-spherical bubble dynamics and interactions with solid and free boundaries, vortical flow structures, and other bubbles. From these studies, emerged a simplified Surface Averaged Pressure (SAP) spherical bubble dynamics model and a Lagrangian bubble tracking scheme. In this SAP scheme, the pressure and velocity of the surrounding flow field are averaged on the bubble surface, and then used for the bubble motion and volume dynamics calculations. This model is implemented using the Fluent User Defined Function (UDF) as Discrete Bubble Model (DBM). The Bubble dynamics portion can be solved using an incompressible liquid modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation or a compressible liquid modified Gilmore equation. The Discrete Bubble Model is a very suitable tool for the studies on cavitation inception of foils and turbo machinery, bubble nuclei effects, noise from the bubbles, and can be used in many practical problems in industrial and naval applications associated with flows in pipes, jets, pumps, propellers, ships, and the ocean. Applications to propeller cavitation, wake signatures of waterjet propelled ships, bubble-wake interactions, modeling of cavitating jets, and bubble entrainments around a ship will be presented.

  4. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskii, Yurii A; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A; Hay, Todd A; Hamilton, Mark F

    2012-09-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23-26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion.

  5. Bubbles in Non-Newtonian Fluids: A Multiscale Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank X.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the concept of a multiscale modeling approach is highlighted with which physical phenomena at different scales can be studied. The work reports a multiscale approach to describe the dynamics of a chain of bubbles rising in non-Newtonian fluids. By means of the Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV and the Lattice Boltzmann (LB simulation, a deep understanding of the complex flow pattern around a single bubble is gained at microscale. The interactions and coalescences between bubbles rising in non-Newtonian fluids are experimentally investigated by the PIV measurements, birefringence and rheological characterization for both an isolated bubble and a chain of bubbles formed from a submerged orifice. Two aspects are identified as central to interactions and coalescence: the stress creation by the passage of bubbles and their relaxation due to the fluid’s memory. This competition between the creation and relaxation of stresses displays non-linear complex dynamics. Along with the detailed knowledge around a single bubble, these fundamental mechanisms governing bubbles’ collective behavior in a train of bubbles at mesoscale lead to a cognitive modeling based on behavioral rules. By simulating bubbles as adaptive agents with the surround fluid via residual stresses, model predictions for consecutive coalescence between a great number of bubbles compare very satisfactorily with the experimental investigation at macroscale. Obviously this new approach captures important quantitative and qualitative features of the collective behaviors of bubbles at macroscale level which are predicted by the mesoscopic cognitive modeling approach of the interactions rules which are deduced from the understanding of the microscopic mechanism of the flow around a single bubble.

  6. Active acoustic leak detection for LMFBR steam generator. Sound attenuation due to bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Sakuma, Toshio

    1995-01-01

    In the steam generators (SG) of LMFBR, it is necessary to detect the leakage of water from tubes of heat exchangers as soon as it occurs. The active acoustic detection method has drawn general interest owing to its short response time and reduction of the influence of background noise. In this paper, the application of the active acoustic detection method for SG is proposed, and sound attenuation by bubbles is investigated experimentally. Furthermore, using the SG sector model, sound field characteristics and sound attenuation characteristics due to injection of bubbles are studied. It is clarified that the sound attenuation depends upon bubble size as well as void fraction, that the distance attenuation of sound in the SG model containing heat transfer tubes is 6dB for each two-fold increase of distance, and that emitted sound attenuates immediately upon injection of bubbles. (author)

  7. Constraining hadronic models of the Fermi bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, Soebur

    2018-01-01

    The origin of sub-TeV gamma rays detected by Fermi-LAT from the Fermi bubbles at the Galactic center is unknown. In a hadronic model, acceleration of protons and/or nuclei and their subsequent interactions with gas in the bubble volume can produce observed gamma ray. Such interactions naturally produce high-energy neutrinos, and detection of those can discriminate between a hadronic and a leptonic origin of gamma rays. Additional constraints on the Fermi bubbles gamma-ray flux in the PeV range from recent HAWC observations restrict hadronic model parameters, which in turn disfavor Fermi bubbles as the origin of a large fraction of neutrino events detected by IceCube along the bubble directions. We revisit our hadronic model and discuss future constraints on parameters from observations in very high-energy gamma rays by CTA and in neutrinos.

  8. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Christian; Su, Yanqing; Parmigiani, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the complex non-linear physics that governs volcanic eruptions is contingent on our ability to characterize the dynamics of bubbles and its effect on the ascending magma. The exsolution and migration of bubbles has also a great impact on the heat and mass transport in and out of magma bodies stored at shallow depths in the crust. Multiphase systems like magmas are by definition heterogeneous at small scales. Although mixture theory or homogenization methods are convenient to represent multiphase systems as a homogeneous equivalent media, these approaches do not inform us on possible feedbacks at the pore-scale and can be significantly misleading. In this presentation, we discuss the development and application of bubble-scale multiphase flow modeling to address the following questions : How do bubbles impact heat and mass transport in magma chambers ? How efficient are chemical exchanges between the melt and bubbles during magma decompression? What is the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the deformation of bubbles while the magma is sheared? Addressing these questions requires powerful numerical methods that accurately model the balance between viscous, capillary and pressure stresses. We discuss how these bubble-scale models can provide important constraints on the dynamics of magmas stored at shallow depth or ascending to the surface during an eruption.

  9. Experimental investigation and mechanistic modelling of dilute bubbly bulk boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutnjak, Josip

    2013-01-01

    -heating. The liquid super-heating is only possible if the heat and mass transfer between the phases is slower than the saturation temperature reduction by hydrostatic pressure decreases along the height of the boiling container or due to bubble growth. By activation of the so far inactive micro-bubbles in the liquid bulk volume the bubble number density quickly increases. This effect is modelled by an algebraic function that uses a constant bubble number density in the vicinity of the saturation temperature and applies an exponentially increased bubble number density depending on the liquid super-heating. Based on modelling a local and variable bubble number density numerical flow simulations were performed. The simulations showed that this approach is a suitable model to describe the mechanisms found in the experiments. Model parameters were determined and verified by correlation with the experimental data.

  10. Nonlinear behavior of micro bubbles under ultrasound due to heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chan Soo; Kwak, Ho Young [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Eun; Lee, Jae Young [Han Dong University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    We investigated the nonlinear behavior of a microbubble under ultrasound, taking into account the heat transfer inside the bubble and through the bubble wall. The polytropic relation, which has been used for the process of pressure change depending on the volume variation of ideal gases, cannot properly treat heat transfer involving the oscillating bubble under ultrasound. In this study, a set of solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for the gas inside the bubble along with an analytical treatment of the Navier-Stokes equations for the liquid adjacent to the bubble wall was used to treat properly the heat transfer process for the oscillating bubble under ultrasound. Entropy generation due to finite heat transfer, which induces the lost work during bubble evolution, reduces the collapsing process and considerably affects the nonlinear behavior of the bubble

  11. Modelling of large-scale dense gas-solid bubbling fluidised beds using a novel discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokkers, G.A.; Laverman, J.A.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In order to model the complex hydrodynamic phenomena prevailing in industrial scale gas–solid bubbling fluidised bed reactors and especially the macro-scale emulsion phase circulation patterns induced by bubble–bubble interactions and bubble coalescence, a discrete bubble model (DBM) has been

  12. Application of coalescence and breakup models in a discrete bubble model for bubble columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hengel, E.I.V.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a discrete bubble model (DBM) is used to investigate the hydrodynamics, coalescence, and breakup occurring in a bubble column. The DBM, originally developed by Delnoij et al. (Chem. Eng. Sci. 1997, 52, 1429-1458; Chem. Eng. Sci. 1999, 54, 2217-2226),1,2 was extended to incorporate

  13. Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dholakia, Nikhilesh; Turcan, Romeo V.

    2013-01-01

    A goal of our ongoing research stream is to develop a multidisciplinary metatheory of bubbles. In this viewpoint paper we put forward a typology of bubbles by comparing four types of assets – entertainment, commodities, financial securities (stocks), and housing properties – where bubbles could a...

  14. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-11

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development” and “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at beam power levels between 6 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was recorded. The previous report2 described the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis performed on the as-built solution vessel geometry. The CFD simulations in the current analysis were performed using Ansys Fluent, Ver. 17.2. The same power profiles determined from MCNP calculations in earlier work were used for the 12 and 15 kW simulations. The primary goal of the current work is to calculate the temperature profiles for the 12 and 15 kW cases using reasonable estimates for the gas generation rate, based on images of the bubbles recorded during the irradiations. Temperature profiles resulting from the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  15. Stochastic modelling for financial bubbles and policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fry

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we draw upon the close relationship between statistical physics and mathematical finance to develop a suite of models for financial bubbles and crashes. By modifying previous approaches, we are able to derive novel analytical formulae for evaluation problems and for the expected timing of future change points. In particular, we help to explain why previous approaches have systematically overstated the timing of changes in market regime. The list of potential empirical applications is deep and wide ranging, and includes contemporary housing bubbles, the Eurozone crisis and the Crash of 2008.

  16. Modeling quiescent phase transport of air bubbles induced by breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.; Ma, Gangfeng

    Simultaneous modeling of both the acoustic phase and quiescent phase of breaking wave-induced air bubbles involves a large range of length scales from microns to meters and time scales from milliseconds to seconds, and thus is computational unaffordable in a surfzone-scale computational domain. In this study, we use an air bubble entrainment formula in a two-fluid model to predict air bubble evolution in the quiescent phase in a breaking wave event. The breaking wave-induced air bubble entrainment is formulated by connecting the shear production at the air-water interface and the bubble number intensity with a certain bubble size spectra observed in laboratory experiments. A two-fluid model is developed based on the partial differential equations of the gas-liquid mixture phase and the continuum bubble phase, which has multiple size bubble groups representing a polydisperse bubble population. An enhanced 2-DV VOF (Volume of Fluid) model with a k - ɛ turbulence closure is used to model the mixture phase. The bubble phase is governed by the advection-diffusion equations of the gas molar concentration and bubble intensity for groups of bubbles with different sizes. The model is used to simulate air bubble plumes measured in laboratory experiments. Numerical results indicate that, with an appropriate parameter in the air entrainment formula, the model is able to predict the main features of bubbly flows as evidenced by reasonable agreement with measured void fraction. Bubbles larger than an intermediate radius of O(1 mm) make a major contribution to void fraction in the near-crest region. Smaller bubbles tend to penetrate deeper and stay longer in the water column, resulting in significant contribution to the cross-sectional area of the bubble cloud. An underprediction of void fraction is found at the beginning of wave breaking when large air pockets take place. The core region of high void fraction predicted by the model is dislocated due to use of the shear

  17. Pressure distribution due to steam bubble collapse in a BWR suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giencke, E.

    1979-01-01

    For the pressure time history at the walls of a suppression chamber due to a steam bubble collaps at the condenser pipes interests, expecially the influence of the wall elasticity and the position of the condenser pipes. Two problems are to solve: the pressure time history in the steam bubble and at the walls during the collaps and the pressure distribution at the walls. Both problems are coupled with each other, but the influence of the wall elasticity on the pressure time history in the steam bubble is usually small. Thus the two problems may be solved one after each other. For simplifying the analysis the steam bubble surface may be idealized as a sphere during the whole collaps time. Then the resulting pressure time history is be put on the fluid-structure-system. To show the influence of the containment-elasticity it is favourable to investigate both the rigid and the elastic containment. Because the condenser pipes are arranged in a regular scheme, two limit loading cases are to distinguish. Collapses occur simultaneously with the same intensity at all condenser pipes and a strong collaps occurs only at one condenser pipe or a small group of pipes. When including wall elasticity first the modes of the fluid-structure-system are to analyse and then the dynamical responses of the modes. The coupling effects between the pressure time history in the bubble and at the walls are discussed and then how the membrane and bending stiffness of the walls and the buttomstructure influence the pressure distribution, both for steel and concrete structure. Finally simple models for the analysis are derived and the analytical results are compared with experiments. (orig.)

  18. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  19. A grid-independent EMMS/bubbling drag model for bubbling and turbulent fluidization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hao; Lu, Bona; Zhang, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    The EMMS/bubbling drag model takes the effects of meso-scale structures (i.e. bubbles) into modeling of drag coefficient and thus improves coarse-grid simulation of bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds. However, its dependence on grid size has not been fully investigated. In this article, we adopt...... a periodic domain show the new drag model is less sensitive to grid size because of the additional dependence on local slip velocity. When applying the new drag model to simulations of realistic bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds, we find grid-independent results are easier to obtain for high......-velocity turbulent fluidized bed cases. The simulation results indicate that the extended EMMS/bubbling drag model is a potential method for coarse-grid simulations of large-scale fluidized beds....

  20. Modeling of mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column reactor using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas-liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  1. Stochastic modelling for financial bubbles and policy

    OpenAIRE

    Fry, John

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we draw upon the close relationship between statistical physics and mathematical finance to develop a suite of models for financial bubbles and crashes. By modifying previous approaches, we are able to derive novel analytical formulae for evaluation problems and for the expected timing of future change points. In particular, we help to explain why previous approaches have systematically overstated the timing of changes in market regime. The list of potential empirical applicati...

  2. Empirical concentration bounds for compressive holographic bubble imaging based on a Mie scattering model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wensheng; Tian, Lei; Rehman, Shakil; Zhang, Zhengyun; Lee, Heow Pueh; Barbastathis, George

    2015-02-23

    We use compressive in-line holography to image air bubbles in water and investigate the effect of bubble concentration on reconstruction performance by simulation. Our forward model treats bubbles as finite spheres and uses Mie scattering to compute the scattered field in a physically rigorous manner. Although no simple analytical bounds on maximum concentration can be derived within the classical compressed sensing framework due to the complexity of the forward model, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves in our simulation provide an empirical concentration bound for accurate bubble detection by compressive holography at different noise levels, resulting in a maximum tolerable concentration much higher than the traditional back-propagation method.

  3. The impact of bubble dynamics on the flow in plumes of ladle water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Y. Y.; Irons, G. A.

    1995-05-01

    Bubbly plumes are widely encountered in metallurgical processes when gas is injected into liquid metals for refining purposes. Based on the experimental findings from a water model ladle, this phenomenon was simulated with a mathematical model, paying special attention to the dynamics of the bubbles in the plume. In the model, the liquid flow field is first calculated in an Eulerian frame with an estimated distribution of the void fraction. The trajectories of bubbles are then computed in a Lagrangian manner using the estimated flow field, experimentally measured information on bubble drag coefficients, lateral migration due to lateral lift forces, and variation in bubble size due to breakup. Turbulence in the two-phase zone is modeled with a modified k-ɛ model with extra source terms to account for the second phase. The computed void fraction and turbulent liquid flow field distributions are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  4. AM05-24-002 THE MICRO-BUBBLE GENERATION DUE TO THE VORTEX BREAKDOWN

    OpenAIRE

    山田, 麗徳; 坂入, 信之; 金子, 公久; 京藤, 敏達; 筑波大学システム情報工学研究科; 筑波大学システム情報工学研究科; 筑波大学システム情報工学研究科; 筑波大学システム情報工学研究科

    2005-01-01

    Micro-bubble generation due to a vortex breakdown of high-speed gas-liquid two-phase swirling flow was investigated in the present study. The control of the position and type of the vortex breakdown is crucial for the generation of the micro-bubbles. It greatly depends on the nozzle shape and the air discharge supplied to the nozzle. The air discharge under which micro-bubbles are efficiently generated depends on the pressure in the air vortex core. Numerical analysis was performed to study t...

  5. A model established of a 'Embryo' bubble growing-up some visible bubble in bubble chamber and its primary theory calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zipiao; Sheng Xiangdong

    2006-01-01

    A model of a 'embryo' bubble growing up a visible bubble in the bubble chamber is established. Through primary theory calculation it is shown that the 'embryo' bubble is not only absorbing quantity of heat, but also some molecules get into the 'embryo' bubble from its environment. It is explained reasonably that the radius of bubbles in bubble camber is different for the same energies of neutrons and proton. The track of neutron in bubble camber is long and thin, and the track of proton in bubble camber is wide and short. It is explained reasonably that the bubble radius of the incident particles with more charges which there are the same energies will be wider than that of the incident particles with less charges in the track. It is also explained reasonably that there are a little different radius of the bubbles of a track at the some region. It can be predicted theoretically that there should be big bubbles to burst when incident particles enter the bubble chamber at first. The sensitivity and the detective efficiency of bubble camber can be enhanced by choosing appropriate work matter. (authors)

  6. Modelling of grain face bubbles coalescence in irradiated UO{sub 2} fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veshchunov, M.S. [Nuclear Safety Institute (IBRAE), Russian Academy of Sciences, 52, B. Tulskaya, Moscow 115191 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vms@ibrae.ac.ru

    2008-02-29

    Two different mechanisms of grain face bubbles coalescence in irradiated UO{sub 2} fuel are critically analysed and further developed. Coalescence of face bubbles due to their random migration is reconsidered on the base of the general theory for evolution of two-dimensional array of bubbles and shown to be effective for steady irradiation conditions and apparently insufficient for description of high-temperature annealing regimes. On the contrary, the improved mechanism of coalescence by growth and impingement of randomly distributed bubbles predicts rather weak decrease of face bubbles concentration under steady state irradiation conditions, however, becomes effective for simulation of high-temperature annealing tests with noticeable gas release. On this base, the general coalescence model which includes superposition of the two complementary mechanisms is formulated and proposed for implementation in the MFPR code.

  7. Mechanistic model for dispersion coefficients in bubble column

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skosana, PJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic model describing the mass and momentum exchange in bubble columns is proposed that is based on the observations that the gas distribution in a bubble column is not uniform across the column and that as a consequence large liquid...

  8. Inhomogeneous MUSIG Model - a population balance approach for polydispersed bubbly flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.; Zwart, P.J.; Shi, J.; Krepper, E.; Lucas, D.; Rohde, U.

    2005-01-01

    Many flow regimes in Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) Research are characterized by multiphase flows, with one phase being a continuous liquid and the other phase consisting of gas or vapour of the liquid phase. In the range of low to intermediate volume fraction of the gaseous phase the multiphase flow under consideration is a bubbly or slug flow, where the disperse phase is characterized by an evolving bubble size distribution due to bubble breakup and coalescence processes. The paper presents a generalized inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) Model. Within this model the disperse gaseous phase is divided into N inhomogeneous velocity groups (phases) and each of these groups is subdivided into M bubble size classes. Bubble breakup and coalescence processes between all bubble size classes are taken into account by appropriate models. The derived inhomogeneous MUSIG model has been validated against experimental data from the TOPFLOW test facility at the Research Center Rossendorf (FZR). Comparisons of gas volume fraction and velocity profiles with TOPFLOW-074 test case data are provided, showing the applicability and accuracy of the model for polydispersed bubbly flow in large diameter vertical pipe flow. (author)

  9. Development of the bubble rise model in RELAP-UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    Several improvements have been made to the 'bubble rise calculation' in the code RELAP-UK, which models the separation of the steam and water phases within specified volumes of the coolant circuit. The bubble rise velocity and the bubble density gradient parameter are no longer necessarily user-defined constants, as the code can calculate their values at each time step according to the local fluid conditions. In particular, the calculation of the bubble rise velocity is consistent with the RELAP-UK drift flux correlation. It is now possible to represent a vertical column by a stack of vertically-adjacent bubble-rise volumes. Any mixture level existing within the column can freely pass between the volumes in the stack. The facilities are demonstrated in this paper by a simple computational example. (author)

  10. Classification images and bubbles images in the generalized linear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Richard F

    2012-07-09

    Classification images and bubbles images are psychophysical tools that use stimulus noise to investigate what features people use to make perceptual decisions. Previous work has shown that classification images can be estimated using the generalized linear model (GLM), and here I show that this is true for bubbles images as well. Expressing the two approaches in terms of a single statistical model clarifies their relationship to one another, makes it possible to measure classification images and bubbles images simultaneously, and allows improvements developed for one method to be used with the other.

  11. Explosive Bubble Modelling by Noncausal Process

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Gouriéroux; Jean-Michel Zakoian

    2013-01-01

    The linear mixed causal and noncausal autoregressive processes provide often a better fit to economic and financial time series than the standard causal linear autoregressive processes. By considering the example of the noncausal Cauchy autoregressive process, we show that it might be explained by the special associated nonlinear causal dynamics. Indeed, this causal dynamics can include unit root, bubble phenomena, or asymmetric cycles often observed on financial markets. The noncausal Cauchy...

  12. Models and observations of foam coverage and bubble content in the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, J. T.; Shi, F.; Holman, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Optical and acoustical observations and communications are hampered in the nearshore by the presence of bubbles and foam generated by breaking waves. Bubble clouds in the water column provide a highly variable (both spatially and temporally) obstacle to direct acoustic and optical paths. Persistent foam riding on the water surface creates a primary occlusion of optical penetration into the water column. In an effort to better understand and predict the level of bubble and foam content in the surfzone, we have been pursuing the development of a detailed phase resolved model of fluid and gaseous components of the water column, using a Navier-Stokes/VOF formulation extended to include a multiphase description of polydisperse bubble populations. This sort of modeling provides a detailed description of large scale turbulent structures and associated bubble transport mechanisms under breaking wave crests. The modeling technique is too computationally intensive, however, to provide a wider-scale description of large surfzone regions. In order to approach the larger scale problem, we are developing a model for spatial and temporal distribution of foam and bubbles within the framework of a Boussinesq model. The basic numerical framework for the code is described by Shi et al (2010, this conference). Bubble effects are incorporated both in the mass and momentum balances for weakly dispersive, fully nonlinear waves, with spatial and temporal bubble distributions parameterized based on the VOF modeling and measurements and tied to the computed rate of dissipation of energy during breaking. A model of a foam layer on the water surface is specified using a shallow water formulation. Foam mass conservation includes source and sink terms representing outgassing of the water column, direct foam generation due to surface agitation, and erosion due to bubble bursting. The foam layer motion in the plane of the water surface arises due to a balance of drag forces due to wind and water

  13. Corner-transport-upwind lattice Boltzmann model for bubble cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofonea, V.; Biciuşcǎ, T.; Busuioc, S.; Ambruş, Victor E.; Gonnella, G.; Lamura, A.

    2018-02-01

    Aiming to study the bubble cavitation problem in quiescent and sheared liquids, a third-order isothermal lattice Boltzmann model that describes a two-dimensional (2D) fluid obeying the van der Waals equation of state, is introduced. The evolution equations for the distribution functions in this off-lattice model with 16 velocities are solved using the corner-transport-upwind (CTU) numerical scheme on large square lattices (up to 6144 ×6144 nodes). The numerical viscosity and the regularization of the model are discussed for first- and second-order CTU schemes finding that the latter choice allows to obtain a very accurate phase diagram of a nonideal fluid. In a quiescent liquid, the present model allows us to recover the solution of the 2D Rayleigh-Plesset equation for a growing vapor bubble. In a sheared liquid, we investigated the evolution of the total bubble area, the bubble deformation, and the bubble tilt angle, for various values of the shear rate. A linear relation between the dimensionless deformation coefficient D and the capillary number Ca is found at small Ca but with a different factor than in equilibrium liquids. A nonlinear regime is observed for Ca≳0.2 .

  14. CFD Modeling of Gas-Liquid Bubbly Flow in Horizontal Pipes: Influence of Bubble Coalescence and Breakup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ekambara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of gas-liquid bubbly flows is achieved by coupling a population balance equation with the three-dimensional, two-fluid, hydrodynamic model. For gas-liquid bubbly flows, an average bubble number density transport equation has been incorporated in the CFD code CFX 5.7 to describe the temporal and spatial evolution of the gas bubbles population. The coalescence and breakage effects of the gas bubbles are modeled. The coalescence by the random collision driven by turbulence and wake entrainment is considered, while for bubble breakage, the impact of turbulent eddies is considered. Local spatial variations of the gas volume fraction, interfacial area concentration, Sauter mean bubble diameter, and liquid velocity are compared against experimental data in a horizontal pipe, covering a range of gas (0.25 to 1.34 m/s and liquid (3.74 to 5.1 m/s superficial velocities and average volume fractions (4% to 21%. The predicted local variations are in good agreement with the experimental measurements reported in the literature. Furthermore, the development of the flow pattern was examined at three different axial locations of L/D = 25, 148, and 253. The first location is close to the entrance region where the flow is still developing, while the second and the third represent nearly fully developed bubbly flow patterns.

  15. Volatility Clustering and Scaling for Financial Time Series due to Attractor Bubbling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiecki, A.; Hołyst, J. A.; Helbing, D.

    2002-09-01

    A microscopic model of financial markets is considered, consisting of many interacting agents (spins) with global coupling and discrete-time heat bath dynamics, similar to random Ising systems. The interactions between agents change randomly in time. In the thermodynamic limit, the obtained time series of price returns show chaotic bursts resulting from the emergence of attractor bubbling or on-off intermittency, resembling the empirical financial time series with volatility clustering. For a proper choice of the model parameters, the probability distributions of returns exhibit power-law tails with scaling exponents close to the empirical ones.

  16. Hydrodynamics of Bubble Columns: Turbulence and Population Balance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Braga Vieira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an in-depth numerical analysis on the hydrodynamics of a bubble column. As in previous works on the subject, the focus here is on three important parameters characterizing the flow: interfacial forces, turbulence and inlet superficial Gas Velocity (UG. The bubble size distribution is taken into account by the use of the Quadrature Method of Moments (QMOM model in a two-phase Euler-Euler approach using the open-source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code OpenFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation. The interfacial forces accounted for in all the simulations presented here are drag, lift and virtual mass. For the turbulence analysis in the water phase, three versions of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS k-ε turbulence model are examined: namely, the standard, modified and mixture variants. The lift force proves to be of major importance for a trustworthy prediction of the gas volume fraction profiles for all the (superficial gas velocities tested. Concerning the turbulence, the mixture k-ε model is seen to provide higher values of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in comparison to the other models, and this clearly affects the prediction of the gas volume fraction in the bulk region, and the bubble-size distribution. In general, the modified k-ε model proves to be a good compromise between modeling simplicity and accuracy in the study of bubble columns of the kind undertaken here.

  17. Subsurface deuterium bubble formation in W due to low-energy high flux deuterium plasma exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Qu, S. L.; Shi, L. Q.; Morgan, T. W.

    2017-01-01

    The deuterium (D) bubbles formed in W exposed to high flux D plasma were researched by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. After D plasma exposure at 500 K and 1000 K, a layer of nano-sized bubbles were homogenously distributed in W subsurface region. The D bubbles

  18. Bubble Coalescence and Breakup Modeling for Computing Mass Transfer Coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Mawson, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    There exist several different numerical models for predicting bubble coalescence and breakup using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Various combinations of these models will be employed to model a bioreactor process in a stirred reactor tank. A mass transfer coefficient, Kla, has been calculated and compared to those found experimentally by Thermo-Fisher Scientific, to validate the accuracy of currently available mathematical models for population balance equations. These include various c...

  19. Turbulence-induced bubble collision force modeling and validation in adiabatic two-phase flow using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Subash L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States); Brooks, Caleb S. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Schlegel, Joshua P. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Liu, Yang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Buchanan, John R. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Bettis Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Void distribution in narrow rectangular channel with various non-uniform inlet conditions. • Modeling of void diffusion due to bubble collision force. • Validation of new modeling in adiabatic air–water two-phase flow in a narrow channel. - Abstract: The prediction capability of the two-fluid model for gas–liquid dispersed two-phase flow depends on the accuracy of the closure relations for the interfacial forces. In previous studies of two-phase flow Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), interfacial force models for a single isolated bubble has been extended to disperse two-phase flow assuming the effect in a swarm of bubbles is similar. Limited studies have been performed investigating the effect of the bubble concentration on the lateral phase distribution. Bubbles, while moving through the liquid phase, may undergo turbulence-driven random collision with neighboring bubbles without significant coalescence. The rate of these collisions depends upon the bubble approach velocity and bubble spacing. The bubble collision frequency is expected to be higher in locations with higher bubble concentrations, i.e., volume fraction. This turbulence-driven random collision causes the diffusion of the bubbles from high concentration to low concentration. Based on experimental observations, a phenomenological model has been developed for a “turbulence-induced bubble collision force” for use in the two-fluid model. For testing the validity of the model, two-phase flow data measured at Purdue University are utilized. The geometry is a 10 mm × 200 mm cross section channel. Experimentally, non-uniform inlet boundary conditions are applied with different sparger combinations to vary the volume fraction distribution across the wider dimension. Examining uniform and non-uniform inlet data allows for the influence of the volume fraction to be studied as a separate effect. The turbulence-induced bubble collision force has been implemented in ANSYS CFX. The

  20. Development and validation of models for bubble coalescence and breakup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Yiaxiang

    2013-01-01

    A generalized model for bubble coalescence and breakup has been developed, which is based on a comprehensive survey of existing theories and models. One important feature of the model is that all important mechanisms leading to bubble coalescence and breakup in a turbulent gas-liquid flow are considered. The new model is tested extensively in a 1D Test Solver and a 3D CFD code ANSYS CFX for the case of vertical gas-liquid pipe flow under adiabatic conditions, respectively. Two kinds of extensions of the standard multi-fluid model, i.e. the discrete population model and the inhomogeneous MUSIG (multiple-size group) model, are available in the two solvers, respectively. These extensions with suitable closure models such as those for coalescence and breakup are able to predict the evolution of bubble size distribution in dispersed flows and to overcome the mono-dispersed flow limitation of the standard multi-fluid model. For the validation of the model the high quality database of the TOPFLOW L12 experiments for air-water flow in a vertical pipe was employed. A wide range of test points, which cover the bubbly flow, turbulent-churn flow as well as the transition regime, is involved in the simulations. The comparison between the simulated results such as bubble size distribution, gas velocity and volume fraction and the measured ones indicates a generally good agreement for all selected test points. As the superficial gas velocity increases, bubble size distribution evolves via coalescence dominant regimes first, then breakup-dominant regimes and finally turns into a bimodal distribution. The tendency of the evolution is well reproduced by the model. However, the tendency is almost always overestimated, i.e. too much coalescence in the coalescence dominant case while too much breakup in breakup dominant ones. The reason of this problem is discussed by studying the contribution of each coalescence and breakup mechanism at different test points. The redistribution of the

  1. Cluster Dynamics Modeling with Bubble Nucleation, Growth and Coalescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blondel, Sophie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bernholdt, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The topic of this communication pertains to defect formation in irradiated solids such as plasma-facing tungsten submitted to helium implantation in fusion reactor com- ponents, and nuclear fuel (metal and oxides) submitted to volatile ssion product generation in nuclear reactors. The purpose of this progress report is to describe ef- forts towards addressing the prediction of long-time evolution of defects via continuum cluster dynamics simulation. The di culties are twofold. First, realistic, long-time dynamics in reactor conditions leads to a non-dilute di usion regime which is not accommodated by the prevailing dilute, stressless cluster dynamics theory. Second, long-time dynamics calls for a large set of species (ideally an in nite set) to capture all possible emerging defects, and this represents a computational bottleneck. Extensions beyond the dilute limit is a signi cant undertaking since no model has been advanced to extend cluster dynamics to non-dilute, deformable conditions. Here our proposed approach to model the non-dilute limit is to monitor the appearance of a spatially localized void volume fraction in the solid matrix with a bell shape pro le and insert an explicit geometrical bubble onto the support of the bell function. The newly cre- ated internal moving boundary provides the means to account for the interfacial ux of mobile species into the bubble, and the growth of bubbles allows for coalescence phenomena which captures highly non-dilute interactions. We present a preliminary interfacial kinematic model with associated interfacial di usion transport to follow the evolution of the bubble in any number of spatial dimensions and any number of bubbles, which can be further extended to include a deformation theory. Finally we comment on a computational front-tracking method to be used in conjunction with conventional cluster dynamics simulations in the non-dilute model proposed.

  2. Some Econometric Results for the Blanchard-Watson Bubble Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Soren; Lange, Theis

    The purpose of the present paper is to analyse a simple bubble model suggested by Blanchard and Watson. The model is defined by y(t) =s(t)¿y(t-1)+e(t), t=1,…,n, where s(t) is an i.i.d. binary variable with p=P(s(t)=1), independent of e(t) i.i.d. with mean zero and finite variance. We take ¿>1 so ...

  3. Studies on modelling of bubble driven flows in chemical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevskott, Sverre

    1997-12-31

    Multiphase reactors are widely used in the process industry, especially in the petrochemical industry. They very often are characterized by very good thermal control and high heat transfer coefficients against heating and cooling surfaces. This thesis first reviews recent advances in bubble column modelling, focusing on the fundamental flow equations, drag forces, transversal forces and added mass forces. The mathematical equations for the bubble column reactor are developed, using an Eulerian description for the continuous and dispersed phase in tensor notation. Conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy and chemical species are given, and the k-{epsilon} and Rice-Geary models for turbulence are described. The different algebraic solvers used in the model are described, as are relaxation procedures. Simulation results are presented and compared with experimental values. Attention is focused on the modelling of void fractions and gas velocities in the column. The energy conservation equation has been included in the bubble column model in order to model temperature distributions in a heated reactor. The conservation equation of chemical species has been included to simulate absorption of CO{sub 2}. Simulated axial and radial mass fraction profiles for CO{sub 2} in the gas phase are compared with measured values. Simulations of the dynamic behaviour of the column are also presented. 189 refs., 124 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Metabolic modeling of synthesis gas fermentation in bubble column reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Gomez, Jose A; Höffner, Kai; Barton, Paul I; Henson, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    A promising route to renewable liquid fuels and chemicals is the fermentation of synthesis gas (syngas) streams to synthesize desired products such as ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. While commercial development of syngas fermentation technology is underway, an unmet need is the development of integrated metabolic and transport models for industrially relevant syngas bubble column reactors. We developed and evaluated a spatiotemporal metabolic model for bubble column reactors with the syngas fermenting bacterium Clostridium ljungdahlii as the microbial catalyst. Our modeling approach involved combining a genome-scale reconstruction of C. ljungdahlii metabolism with multiphase transport equations that govern convective and dispersive processes within the spatially varying column. The reactor model was spatially discretized to yield a large set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in time with embedded linear programs (LPs) and solved using the MATLAB based code DFBAlab. Simulations were performed to analyze the effects of important process and cellular parameters on key measures of reactor performance including ethanol titer, ethanol-to-acetate ratio, and CO and H2 conversions. Our computational study demonstrated that mathematical modeling provides a complementary tool to experimentation for understanding, predicting, and optimizing syngas fermentation reactors. These model predictions could guide future cellular and process engineering efforts aimed at alleviating bottlenecks to biochemical production in syngas bubble column reactors.

  5. Diving decompression models and bubble metrics: modern computer syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienke, B R

    2009-04-01

    A quantitative summary of computer models in diving applications is presented, underscoring dual phase dynamics and quantifying metrics in tissue and blood. Algorithms covered include the multitissue, diffusion, split phase gradient, linear-exponential, asymmetric tissue, thermodynamic, varying permeability, reduced gradient bubble, tissue bubble diffusion, and linear-exponential phase models. Defining relationships are listed, and diver staging regimens are underscored. Implementations, diving sectors, and correlations are indicated for models with a history of widespread acceptance, utilization, and safe application across recreational, scientific, military, research, and technical communities. Presently, all models are incomplete, but many (included above) are useful, having resulted in diving tables, underwater meters, and dive planning software. Those herein employ varying degrees of calibration and data tuning. We discuss bubble metrics in tissue and blood as a backdrop against computer models. The past 15 years, or so, have witnessed changes and additions to diving protocols and table procedures, such as shorter nonstop time limits, slower ascent rates, shallow safety stops, ascending repetitive profiles, deep decompression stops, helium based breathing mixtures, permissible reverse profiles, multilevel techniques, both faster and slower controlling repetitive tissue halftimes, smaller critical tensions, longer flying-after-diving surface intervals, and others. Stimulated by Doppler and imaging technology, table and decompression meter development, theory, statistics, chamber and animal testing, or safer diving consensus, these modifications affect a gamut of activity, spanning bounce to decompression, single to multiday, and air to mixed gas diving. As it turns out, there is growing support for many protocols on operational, experimental, and theoretical grounds, with bubble models addressing many concerns on plausible bases, but with further testing or

  6. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-03

    This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiation. It is based on the model used to calculate temperatures and volume fractions in an annular vessel containing an aqueous solution of uranium . The experiment was repeated at several electron beam power levels, but the CFD analysis was performed only for the 12 kW irradiation, because this experiment came the closest to reaching a steady-state condition. The aim of the study is to compare results of the calculation with experimental measurements to determine the validity of the CFD model.

  7. Photoionization Modelling of HII Region with Stellar Wind Bubble Inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, R. V., Melekh, B. Ya.

    2009-12-01

    The last results obtained from optimized photoionization modelling of HII region show a lack of Lyman continuum (Lyc) quanta in wavelength range 912 - 504 Å. It could be explained by the ionizing radiation penetrating the very thin and dense envelope of nebular plasma with high density. Presence of such envelope in HII region surrounding a starburst could be explained by a superwind bubble formation. For detailed analysis the multicomponent grid of photoionization models was culculated with ISM grains included. In this paper the comparative analysis of emission line spectra obtained from multicomponent modelling is presented.

  8. Modeling high-energy gamma-rays from the Fermi Bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Megan

    2015-09-17

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 55° in galactic latitude and 20°-30° in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields- both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to second order Fermi acceleration. I compare the analytical solutions of the proton spectrum to a numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution to the transport equation converges to the analytical solution in all cases. The gamma-ray spectrum due to proton-proton interaction is compared to Fermi Bubble data (from Ackermann et al. 2014), and I find that second order Fermi acceleration is a good fit for the gamma-ray spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles at low energies with an injection source term of S = 1.5 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹. I find that a non-steady-state solution to the gamma-ray spectrum with an injection source term of S = 2 x 10⁻¹⁰ GeV⁻¹cm⁻³yr⁻¹ matches the bubble data at high energies.

  9. Numerical modelling of isothermal gas-liquid two-phase bubbly flow in vertical pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamoah, S.

    2014-07-01

    lubrication and turbulent dispersion force models. Overall, the comparison has shown that the MUSIG model yielded satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The transition from wall peak to core peak gas volume fraction profiles has been successfully captured and encouraging results clearly exemplified the capability of the model in capturing the dynamical changes of bubble size due to coalescence and breakup processes. The observed agreement with the gas volume fraction profiles indicates a level of confidence in the interfacial force models (especially the lift coefficient model) used, while on the other hand, the agreement seen on the interfacial area concentration indicates that the birth and death processes modelled are reasonably adequate to describe the bubble dynamics. Nevertheless, noticeable discrepancies in simulating bimodal bubble size distributions were found revealing the plausible imperfection of existing coalescence and breakup kernels. Thirdly, the performance of the interfacial area transport equation has been assessed by implementing some typical constitutive models for bubble coalescence and breakup taken from literature. The interfacial area transport equation has been successfully implemented into the CFD code and the constitutive model formulations from Hibiki and Ishii (2000a), Wu et al. (1998) with coefficients from Ishii and Kim (2001) and Wang (2010) have been implemented and validated. The combined effects of lift and wall lubrication force have been investigated. Both models of the lATE source and sink terms were able to reasonably capture the experimental data especially the gas volume fraction profiles. More experimental and theoretical work needs to be done in this field to increase the prediction capability of the simulation tools regarding the distribution of the phases along the pipe radius. (au)

  10. PROGRESS TOWARDS MODELING OF FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gandrik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-11-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The

  11. 3D unified CFD to modeling of bubbles phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir V Chudanov; Anna E Aksenova; Valerii A Pervichko

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: During of the last ten years the developed numerical methods and algorithms for solving of heat and mass transfer problems in compressible/incompressible fluids were successfully tested at simulation of interaction of two immiscible liquids. Now these computing tools are extended on a case of two-phase flows, such as a liquids-gas system as follows: outside of bubbles the non-stationary incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the primitive variables coupled with the heat transfer equation are used; inside of bubble a compressible medium model with low Mach limit is applied. To observe of an interface of liquid-gas system we use the modified level set method and three-dimensional advective schemes of TVD-type with small scheme diffusion with use of sub-grid simulation. These schemes with small diffusion were already applied by us under using of sub-grid simulation for interface transfer in case of two non-mixing liquids. For bubble phenomena a numerical technique based on the developed algorithms with a small scheme diffusion, for which the discrete approximations are constructed using the finite-volume methods and fully staggered grids is adapted. Testing of the developed approach is carried out on the set of test problems and a good agreement is obtained between numerical predictions and experimental data. The numerical technique was successfully utilized for numerical support of 3D experiment financed by Nuclear Energy Agency at the Organization economic cooperation and development within the framework of MASKA Project, where computational fluid dynamics of two non-mixing fluids such as corium and steel was investigated. In this paper there is application of developed approach for simulation of bubble flows, in particular, for study of coalescence of two drops. The developed technique has a high degree of efficiency and allows on a personal computer (3 GHz and 2 Gbytes RAM) to carry out CFD calculations on a grid with 10 7

  12. A generation-dispersion model of ambient and transient bubbles in the close vicinity of breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldy, Serge

    1993-10-01

    Bubble models are necessary to ascertain bubble contribution to ocean-atmosphere fluxes of gas, aerosols, humidity, and latent heat. Previous theories flatten the wave breaking layer to a theoretical boundary from which bubbles are dispersed by turbulence working against buoyancy lift. As a consequence, bubble population characteristics next to the surface are not derived from these models but depend on empirical or semiempirical assumptions made at this boundary. By considering bubble injection with puffs of intense turbulence, specifying how bubbles are first created by a small-scale similarity reasoning, and using a wavy interface, the present bubble theory expands this layer to a more physical breaking layer. Bubble concentration density as a function of bubble diameter, depth, and sea state parameters is obtained through explicit integrals. The model is found to be consistent with the previous bubble theories: the back flattening of the model breaking layer indeed results in equations compatible with these theories. The model variations in bubble concentration density with different parameters is coherent with experimental laws: the dominant bubble concentration is found to vary as about d-4 with bubble diameter and u*3 with wind friction velocity, but because of breaking patches, a d-2 bubble distribution is obtained very close to the surface. The concordance of the model with experimental data in the recent and classic bubble literature is quite good.

  13. Modelling of Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies and ionized bubbles at the epoch of reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Sugimura, Kazuyuki; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    Understanding {Ly{α }} emitting galaxies (LAEs) can be a key to reveal cosmic reionization and galaxy formation in the early Universe. Based on halo merger trees and {Ly{α }} radiation transfer calculations, we model redshift evolution of LAEs and their observational properties at z ≥ 6. We consider ionized bubbles associated with individual LAEs and IGM transmission of {Ly{α }} photons. We find that {Ly{α }} luminosity tightly correlates with halo mass and stellar mass, while the relation with star formation rate has a large dispersion. Comparing our models with the observed luminosity function by Konno et al., we suggest that LAEs at z ˜ 7 have galactic wind of V_out ≳ 100 km s^{-1} and HI column density of N_HI ≳ 10^{20} cm^{-2}. Number density of bright LAEs rapidly decreases as redshift increases, due to both lower star formation rate and smaller HII bubbles. Our model predicts future wide deep surveys with next generation telescopes, such as JWST, E-ELT and TMT, can detect LAEs at z ˜ 10 with a number density of n_LAE ˜ a few × 10^{-6} Mpc^{-3} for the flux sensitivity of 10^{-18} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. When giant HII bubbles are formed by clustering LAEs, the number density of observable LAEs can increase by a factor of few. By combining these surveys with future 21-cm observations, it could be possible to detect both LAEs with L_{Lyα }≳ 10^{42} erg s^{-1} and their associated giant HII bubbles with the size ≳ 250 kpc at z ˜ 10.

  14. The effect of channel height on bubble nucleation in superhydrophobic microchannels due to subcritical heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Adam; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie; Iverson, Brian

    2017-11-01

    This work experimentally investigates the effects of heating on laminar flow in high aspect ratio superhydrophobic (SH) microchannels. When water that is saturated with dissolved air is used, the unwetted cavities of the SH surfaces act as nucleation sites and air effervesces out of solution onto the surfaces. The microchannels consist of a rib/cavity structured SH surface, that is heated, and a glass surface that is utilized for flow visualization. Two channel heights of nominally 183 and 366 μm are considered. The friction factor-Reynolds product (fRe) is obtained via pressure drop and volumetric flow rate measurements and the temperature profile along the channel is obtained via thermocouples embedded in an aluminum block below the SH surface. Five surface types/configurations are investigated: smooth hydrophilic, smooth hydrophobic, SH with ribs perpendicular to the flow, SH with ribs parallel to the flow, and SH with both ribs parallel to the flow and sparse ribs perpendicular to the flow. Depending on the surface type/configuration, large bubbles can form and adversely affect fRe and lead to higher temperatures along the channel. Once bubbles grow large enough, they are expelled from the channel. The channel size greatly effects the residence time of the bubbles and consequently fRe and the channel temperature. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Grant No. CBET-1235881) and the Utah NASA Space Grant Consortium (NASA Grant NNX15A124H).

  15. Dynamic simulation of dispersed gas-liquid two-phase flow using a discrete bubble model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delnoij, E.; Lammers, F.A.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a detailed hydrodynamic model for gas-liquid two-phase flow will be presented. The model is based on a mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian approach and describes the time-dependent two-dimensional motion of small, spherical gas bubbles in a bubble column operating in the homogeneous regime. The

  16. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul C.K. Lam; Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed and is appended in this report. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The details are presented in the attached paper titled ''CFD Simulation of Flow and Turbulence in a Slurry Bubble Column''. This phase of the work is in press in a referred journal (AIChE Journal, 2002) and was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001) in New Orleans, May 27-June 1, 2001 (Paper No. 909). The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. To better understand turbulence we studied fluidization in a liquid-solid bed. This work was also presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001, Paper No. 910). To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV

  17. Modelling and critical analysis of bubbly flows of dilute nanofluids in a vertical tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiangdong; Yuan, Yang [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, VIC 3083 (Australia); Tu, Jiyuan, E-mail: jiyuan.tu@rmit.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, VIC 3083 (Australia); Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, PO Box 1021, Beijing 100086 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The classic two-fluid model needs improvement for nanofluid bubbly flows. • The nanoparticle self-assembly changes the interfacial behaviours of bubbles. • Key job is to reformulate the interfacial transfer terms. - Abstract: The bubbly flows of air–nanofluid and air–water in a vertical tube were numerically simulated using the two-fluid model. Comparison of the numerical results against the experimental data of Park and Chang (2011) demonstrated that the classic two-fluid model, although agreed well with the air–water data, was not applicable to the air–nanofluid bubbly flow. It was suggested that in a bubbly flow system, the existence of interfaces allows the spontaneous formation of a thin layer of nanoparticle assembly at the interfaces, which significantly changes the interfacial behaviours of the air bubbles and the roles of the interfacial forces. As the conservation equations of the classic two-fluid model are still applicable to nanofluids, the mechanisms underlying the modified interfacial behaviours need to be carefully taken into account when modelling air–nanofluid bubbly flows. Thus, one of the key tasks when modelling bubbly flows of air–nanofluid using the two-fluid model is to reformulate the interfacial transfer terms according to the interfacial behaviour modifications induced by nanoparticles.

  18. Well-posed Euler model of shock-induced two-phase flow in bubbly liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukhvatullina, R. R.; Frolov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    A well-posed mathematical model of non-isothermal two-phase two-velocity flow of bubbly liquid is proposed. The model is based on the two-phase Euler equations with the introduction of an additional pressure at the gas bubble surface, which ensures the well-posedness of the Cauchy problem for a system of governing equations with homogeneous initial conditions, and the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for radial pulsations of gas bubbles. The applicability conditions of the model are formulated. The model is validated by comparing one-dimensional calculations of shock wave propagation in liquids with gas bubbles with a gas volume fraction of 0.005-0.3 with experimental data. The model is shown to provide satisfactory results for the shock propagation velocity, pressure profiles, and the shock-induced motion of the bubbly liquid column.

  19. Revised numerical model for F{sub 2} bubble breakdown in molten flibe and its economics in the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, K., E-mail: kelvin.seto@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model of the breakdown for a fluorine bubble due to break-up and chemical reactions with dissolved UF{sub 4} and PuF{sub 4} in the molten salt reactor (MSR) volatilization process was revised. The updated model utilized a more realistic, 1.0 cm F{sub 2} bubble to study the breakdown process in the idealized MSR fuel purification vessel. Although more accurate reaction interface and F{sub 2} reactivity values were used, chemical reactions were still found to be the primary cause of bubble breakdown. The importance of efficiency in F{sub 2} usage in the purification process on the economic and safety point of view was discussed. (author)

  20. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Lam; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2000-09-01

    The objective if this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with PIV measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. This phase of the work was presented at the Chemical Reaction Engineering VIII: Computational Fluid Dynamics, August 6-11, 2000 in Quebec City, Canada. To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV technique. The results together with simulations will be presented at the annual meeting of AIChE in November 2000.

  1. Modeling High-Energy Gamma-Rays from the Fermi Bubbles - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Megan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 50 degrees in galactic latitude and 20-30 degrees in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration is responsible for the high-energy emission of the bubbles. Second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields—both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. I use the assumption of second order Fermi acceleration in the transport equation, which describes the diffusion of particles. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to Fermi second order acceleration and compare this analytical solution to a numerical solution provided by Dr. P. Mertsch. Analytical solutions to the transport equation are taken from Becker, Le, & Dermer and are used to further test the numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution converges to the analytical solution in all cases. Thus, we know the numerical solution accurately calculates the proton spectrum. The gamma-ray spectrum follows the proton spectrum, and will be computed in the future.

  2. THE SEMIEMPIRICAL MODEL OF THE MULTICOMPONENT BUBBLE BEHAVIOUR IN GLASS MELTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUBOMÍR NĚMEC

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical model of the bubble growth and dissolution in glasses with a fining agent has been derived. This model applies the experimental data from bubble observation at melting and fining temperatures. The experimental data needed for the model involved the temperature dependences of the average growth rate of the bubble radius and the average concentration of the fining gas in the bubbles. Both sets of values were measured in the laboratory in the glass of the float type and applied in the model. The measurements of the solubilities and diffusion coefficients of the gases present in the glass – needed for the analytical model of multicomponent bubbles – were thus avoided. The course of the partial bubble absorption with the temperature decreasing was simulated by means of two factors modifying the experimental values of the bubble growth rates at constant temperature. The temperature dependence of the resulting bubble growth rate qualitatively corresponded to the experimental observations in the soda-lime-silica glass, but a more detailed experimental and comparative study has yet to be performed. Such a study is being prepared.

  3. An integrated wave-effects model for an underwater explosion bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Thomas L; Hunter, Kendall S

    2002-04-01

    A model for a moderately deep underwater explosion bubble is developed that integrates the shock wave and oscillation phases of the motion. A hyperacoustic relationship is formulated that relates bubble volume acceleration to far-field pressure profile during the shock-wave phase, thereby providing initial conditions for the subsequent oscillation phase. For the latter, equations for bubble-surface response are derived that include wave effects in both the external liquid and the internal gas. The equations are then specialized to the case of a spherical bubble, and bubble-surface displacement histories are calculated for dilational and translational motion. Agreement between these histories and experimental data is found to be substantially better than that produced by previous models.

  4. Integral bubble and jet models with pressure forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfson, A. N.; Nikolaev, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    Modifications of integral bubble and jet models including the pressure force are proposed. Exact solutions are found for the modified model of a stationary convective jet from a point source of buoyancy and momentum. The exact solutions are compared against analytical solutions of the integral models for a stationary jet that are based on the approximation of the vertical boundary layer. It is found that the modified integral models of convective jets retain the power-law dependences on the altitude for the vertical velocity and buoyancy obtained in classical models. For a buoyant jet in a neutrally stratified atmosphere, the inclusion of the pressure force increases the amplitude of buoyancy and decreases the amplitude of vertical velocity. The total amplitude change is about 10%. It is shown that in this model there is a dynamic invariant expressing the law of a uniform distribution of the potential and kinetic energy along the jet axis. For a spontaneous jet rising in an unstably stratified atmosphere, the inclusion of the pressure force retains the amplitude of buoyancy and increases the amplitude of vertical velocity by about 15%. It is shown that in the model of a spontaneous jet there is a dynamic invariant expressing the law of a uniform distribution of the available potential and kinetic energy along the jet axis. The results are of interest for the problems of anthropogenic pollution diffusion in the air and water environments and the formulation of models for statistical and stochastic ensembles of thermals in a mass-flux parameterization of turbulent moments.

  5. Temperature effects on He bubbles production due to cascades in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Zu, X.T.; Xiao, H.Y.; Gao, F.; Liu, K.Z.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Yang, S.Z.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of irradiation temperature on the formation of He-vacancy clusters by displacement cascades in α-Fe are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) methods. The irradiation temperatures of 100 and 600 K are considered for primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy, E p , from 500 eV to 20 keV. The concentration of He in Fe varies from 1 to 5 at.%. We find that the number of Frenkel pairs (N F ) at 600 K is slightly lower than that at 100 K for the same He concentration and E p , but the number of He-vacancy clusters increases with increasing temperature for the same He concentration and energy recoils. However, the mean size of He-vacancy clusters is independent on temperature. The mechanisms of He bubble nucleation in displacement cascades at different temperatures are discussed in detail

  6. Pseudopotential multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for cavitation bubble collapse with high density ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Ming-Lei; Zhu Chang-Ping; Yao Cheng; Yin Cheng; Jiang Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the cavitation bubble collapse is a fundamental issue for the bubble collapse application and prevention. In the present work, the modified forcing scheme for the pseudopotential multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model developed by Li Q et al. [Li Q, Luo K H and Li X J 2013 Phys. Rev. E 87 053301] is adopted to develop a cavitation bubble collapse model. In the respects of coexistence curves and Laplace law verification, the improved pseudopotential multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model is investigated. It is found that the thermodynamic consistency and surface tension are independent of kinematic viscosity. By homogeneous and heterogeneous cavitation simulation, the ability of the present model to describe the cavitation bubble development as well as the cavitation inception is verified. The bubble collapse between two parallel walls is simulated. The dynamic process of a collapsing bubble is consistent with the results from experiments and simulations by other numerical methods. It is demonstrated that the present pseudopotential multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model is applicable and efficient, and the lattice Boltzmann method is an alternative tool for collapsing bubble modeling. (paper)

  7. Meniscus Dynamics in Bubble Formation. Part II: Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Marek; Bunganič, Radovan; Drahoš, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 10 (2009), s. 1357-1365 ISSN 0263-8762 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200720801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble formation * periodic bubbling * meniscus oscillations Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.223, year: 2009

  8. A siphon well model for hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Hui; Ji, Ping; Xia, Qingfu; Guo, Xinlei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new method was proposed to improve the hydraulic performance and bubble elimination. • The diversion pier and diversion grid were used to stabilize the flow pattern. • Double multi-hole orifices were arranged after the weir. • The new method has a simpler construction and greater bubble elimination. - Abstract: In coastal nuclear power plants, bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump in the siphon well causes foam pollution and salt fog erosion near the outfall of the siphon well. Thus, bubble elimination in siphon wells has been a topic of considerable interest. This study presents a new hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination method based on model experiments. Compared to previous methods, the new method has a simple structure, is effective in eliminating bubbles and is well adapted to different tide levels. The method mainly uses a diversion pier, diversion grid and multi-hole orifices to improve the hydraulic performance, thus reducing bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump and shortening the bubble movement length in the siphon well. This study provides a valuable reference for the future siphon well design of coastal power plants.

  9. A siphon well model for hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Hui, E-mail: fuhui_iwhr@126.com; Ji, Ping; Xia, Qingfu; Guo, Xinlei

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A new method was proposed to improve the hydraulic performance and bubble elimination. • The diversion pier and diversion grid were used to stabilize the flow pattern. • Double multi-hole orifices were arranged after the weir. • The new method has a simpler construction and greater bubble elimination. - Abstract: In coastal nuclear power plants, bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump in the siphon well causes foam pollution and salt fog erosion near the outfall of the siphon well. Thus, bubble elimination in siphon wells has been a topic of considerable interest. This study presents a new hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination method based on model experiments. Compared to previous methods, the new method has a simple structure, is effective in eliminating bubbles and is well adapted to different tide levels. The method mainly uses a diversion pier, diversion grid and multi-hole orifices to improve the hydraulic performance, thus reducing bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump and shortening the bubble movement length in the siphon well. This study provides a valuable reference for the future siphon well design of coastal power plants.

  10. Model and experimental vizualisation of a bubble interacting with an inclined wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podvin, Berengere; Khoja, Suleman; Attinger, Daniel; Moraga, Francisco

    2006-11-01

    We describe the motion of an air bubble rising through water as it interacts with a wall of variable inclination. The bubble diameter varies about O(1) mm. We use lubrication theory to determine the modification of the bubble interface and compute the hydrodynamic force exerted by the wall. The present work is an extension of Moraga et al's model [Computers and Fluids 2006], which was devised for a horizontal wall. The predictions of the model are checked against experimental visualizations. The influence of the Weber number, Reynolds number and wall inclination is examined

  11. A heat transfer model for evaporating micro-channel coalescing bubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consolini, L.; Thome, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The current study presents a one-dimensional model of confined coalescing bubble flow for the prediction of micro-channel convective boiling heat transfer. Coalescing bubble flow has recently been identified as one of the characteristic flow patterns to be found in micro-scale systems, occurring at intermediate vapor qualities between the isolated bubble and the fully annular regimes. As two or more bubbles bond under the action of inertia and surface tension, the passage frequency of the bubble liquid slug pair declines, with a redistribution of liquid among the remaining flow structures. Assuming heat transfer to occur only by conduction through the thin evaporating liquid film surrounding individual bubbles, the present model includes a simplified description of the dynamics of the thin film evaporation process that takes into account the added mass transfer by breakup of the bridging liquid slugs. The new model has been confronted against experimental data taken within the coalescing bubble flow mode that have been identified by a diabatic micro-scale flow pattern map. The comparisons for three different fluids (R-134a, R-236fa and R-245fa) gave encouraging results with 83% of the database predicted within a ± 30% error band. (author)

  12. An equation of motion for bubble growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesage, F.J.; Cotton, J.S.; Robinson, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed which describes asymmetric bubble growth, either during boiling or bubble injection from submerged orifices. The model is developed using the integral form of the continuity and momentum equations, resulting in a general expression for the acceleration of the bubble's centre of gravity. The proposed model highlights the need to include acceleration due to an asymmetric gain or loss of mass in order to accurately predict bubble motion. Some scenarios are posed by which the growth of bubbles, particularly idealized bubbles that remain a section of a sphere, must include the fact that bubble growth can be asymmetric. In particular, for approximately hemispherical bubble growth the sum of the forces acting on the bubble is negligible compared with the asymmetric term. Further, for bubble injection from a submerged needle this component in the equation of motion is very significant during the initial rapid growth phase as the bubble issues from the nozzle changing from a near hemisphere to truncated sphere geometry. (author)

  13. Modeling shear-sensitive dinoflagellate microalgae growth in bubble column photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rosales, Lorenzo; García-Camacho, Francisco; Sánchez-Mirón, Asterio; Contreras-Gómez, Antonio; Molina-Grima, Emilio

    2017-12-01

    The shear-sensitive dinoflagellate microalga Karlodinium veneficum was grown in a sparged bubble column photobioreactor. The influence of mass transfer and shear stress on cell growth and physiology (concentration of reactive oxygen species, membrane fluidity and photosynthetic efficiency) was studied, and a model describing cell growth in term of mass transfer and culture parameters (nozzle sparger diameter, air flow rate, and culture height) was developed. The results show that mass transfer limits cell growth at low air-flow rates, whereas the shear stress produced by the presence of bubbles is critically detrimental for air flow rates above 0.1vvm. The model developed in this paper adequately represents the growth of K. veneficum. Moreover, the parameters of the model indicate that bubble rupture is much more harmful for cells than bubble formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of Turbulence Models for Isothermal Vertical-upward Bubbly Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, V. T.; Yun, B. J.; Song, C. H. [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, B. U.; Euh, D. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    EAGLE (Elaborated Analysis of Gas-Liquid Evolution) code was developed by KAERI for a multi-dimensional analysis of two-phase flow with the implementations of non-drag force, turbulence models, and the interfacial area transport equation. The code structure was based on the two-fluid model and the Simplified Marker And Cell (SMAC) algorithm was modified to be available for an isothermal bubbly two-phase flow simulation. In the Euler/Eulerian approach simulating bubbly flow, the influence of the bubbles on the turbulence of the liquid has to be modeled correctly since the liquid turbulence strongly influences the models describing bubble coalescence and bubble breakup in any interfacial area transport equation. In the present paper, two common concepts for modeling the influence of bubbles on liquid turbulence quantities implemented in k-{epsilon} turbulence model are described and analyzed. Simulation were done using EAGLE code and compared with gas volume fraction distributions and turbulence parameters obtained from experimental data of Hibiki et al (2001)

  15. Assessment of Turbulence Models for Isothermal Vertical-upward Bubbly Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V. T.; Yun, B. J.; Song, C. H.; Bae, B. U.; Euh, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    EAGLE (Elaborated Analysis of Gas-Liquid Evolution) code was developed by KAERI for a multi-dimensional analysis of two-phase flow with the implementations of non-drag force, turbulence models, and the interfacial area transport equation. The code structure was based on the two-fluid model and the Simplified Marker And Cell (SMAC) algorithm was modified to be available for an isothermal bubbly two-phase flow simulation. In the Euler/Eulerian approach simulating bubbly flow, the influence of the bubbles on the turbulence of the liquid has to be modeled correctly since the liquid turbulence strongly influences the models describing bubble coalescence and bubble breakup in any interfacial area transport equation. In the present paper, two common concepts for modeling the influence of bubbles on liquid turbulence quantities implemented in k-ε turbulence model are described and analyzed. Simulation were done using EAGLE code and compared with gas volume fraction distributions and turbulence parameters obtained from experimental data of Hibiki et al (2001)

  16. Modeling ionospheric pre-reversal enhancement and plasma bubble growth rate using data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P. K.; Lin, C. C. H.; Chen, C. H.; Matsuo, T.

    2017-12-01

    We report that assimilating total electron content (TEC) into a coupled thermosphere-ionosphere model by using the ensemble Kalman filter results in improved specification and forecast of eastward pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) electric field (E-field). Through data assimilation, the ionospheric plasma density, thermospheric winds, temperature and compositions are adjusted simultaneously. The improvement of dusk-side PRE E-field over the prior state is achieved primarily by intensification of eastward neutral wind. The improved E-field promotes a stronger plasma fountain and deepens the equatorial trough. As a result, the horizontal gradients of Pedersen conductivity and eastward wind are increased due to greater zonal electron density gradient and smaller ion drag at dusk, respectively. Such modifications provide preferable conditions and obtain a strengthened PRE magnitude closer to the observation. The adjustment of PRE E-field is enabled through self-consistent thermosphere and ionosphere coupling processes captured in the model. The assimilative outputs are further utilized to calculate the flux tube integrated Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate during March 2015 for investigation of global plasma bubble occurrence. Significant improvements in the calculated growth rates could be achieved because of the improved update of zonal electric field in the data assimilation forecast. The results suggest that realistic estimate or prediction of plasma bubble occurrence could be feasible by taking advantage of the data assimilation approach adopted in this work.

  17. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Seventh technical progress report, January--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this investigation is to convert our ``learning gas solid-liquid`` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phase. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. A hydrodynamic model for multiphase flows, based on the principles of mass, momentum and energy conservation for each phase, was developed and applied to model gas-liquid, gas-liquid-solid fluidization and gas-solid-solid separation. To simulate the industrial slurry bubble column reactors, a computer program based on the hydrodynamic model was written with modules for chemical reactions (e.g. the synthesis of methanol), phase changes and heat exchangers. In the simulations of gas-liquid two phases flow system, the gas hold-ups, computed with a variety of operating conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas and liquid velocities, agree well with the measurements obtained at Air Products` pilot plant. The hydrodynamic model has more flexible features than the previous empirical correlations in predicting the gas hold-up of gas-liquid two-phase flow systems. In the simulations of gas-liquid-solid bubble column reactors with and without slurry circulation, the code computes volume fractions, temperatures and velocity distributions for the gas, the liquid and the solid phases, as well as concentration distributions for the species (CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}0H, ... ), after startup from a certain initial state. A kinetic theory approach is used to compute a solid viscosity due to particle collisions. Solid motion and gas-liquid-solid mixing are observed on a color PCSHOW movie made from computed time series data. The steady state and time average catalyst concentration profiles, the slurry height and the rates of methanol production agree well with the measurements obtained at an Air Products` pilot plant.

  18. Multiple Size Group Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in the Mold: An Analysis of Turbulence and Interfacial Force Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2015-04-01

    An inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) model based on the Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been developed to describe the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold. A laboratory scale mold has been simulated using four different turbulence closure models (modified k - ɛ, RNG k - ɛ, k - ω, and SST) with the purpose of critically comparing their predictions of bubble Sauter mean diameter distribution with previous experimental data. Furthermore, the influences of all the interfacial momentum transfer terms including drag force, lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force are investigated. The breakup and coalescence effects of the bubbles are modeled according to the bubble breakup by the impact of turbulent eddies while for bubble coalescence by the random collisions driven by turbulence and wake entrainment. It has been found that the modified k - ɛ model shows better agreement than other models in predicting the bubble Sauter mean diameter profiles. Further, simulations have also been performed to understand the sensitivity of different interfacial forces. The appropriate drag force coefficient, lift force coefficient, virtual mass force coefficient, and turbulent dispersion force coefficient are chosen in accordance with measurements of water model experiments. However, the wall lubrication force does not have much effect on the current polydispersed bubbly flow system. Finally, the MUSIG model is then used to estimate the argon bubble diameter in the molten steel of the mold. The argon bubble Sauter mean diameter generated in molten steel is predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the similar conditions.

  19. Layered storage of biogenic methane-enriched gas bubbles in peat: A lumped capacitance model controlled by soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Comas, X.; Binley, A. M.; Slater, L. D.

    2017-12-01

    Methane can accumulate in the gaseous phase in peats, and enter the atmosphere as gas bubbles with a mass flux higher than that via diffusion and plant-mediated pathways. A complete understanding of the mechanisms regulating bubble storage in peats remains incomplete. We developed a layered model to quantify the storage of gas bubbles over a peat column based on a general lumped capacitance model. This conceptual model was applied to explain the effects of peat structure on bubble storage at different depths observed in a laboratory experiment. A peat monolith was collected from the Everglades, a subtropical wetland located in Florida (USA), and kept submerged in a cuboid chamber over 102 days until gas bubble saturation was achieved. Time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) was used to estimate changes in gas content of each layer and the corresponding average dimensions of stored gas bubbles. The results highlight a hotspot layer of bubble accumulation at depths between 5 and 10 cm below the monolith surface. Bubbles in this shallow hotspot layer were larger relative to those in deeper layers, whilst the degree of decomposition of the upper layers was generally smaller than that of the lower layers based on von Post humification tests. X-ray Computer tomography (CT) was applied to resin-impregnated peat sections from different depths and the results showed that a higher porosity promotes bubbles storage. The stored gas bubbles were released by changing water levels and the air CH4 concentrations above the peat monolith were measured using a flow-through chamber system to confirm the high CH4 concentration in the stored bubbles. Our findings suggest that bubble capacitance is related to the difference in size between gas bubbles and peat pores. This work has implications for better understanding how changes in water table elevation associated with climate change and sea level rise (particularly for freshwater wetlands near coastal areas like the Everglades) may

  20. Modeling, analysis and prediction of neutron emission spectra from acoustic cavitation bubble fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)], E-mail: rusi@purdue.edu; Lapinskas, J.; Xu, Y. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Cho, J.S. [FNC Tech. Locn., Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Block, R.C.; Lahey, R.T. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Nigmatulin, R.I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-10-15

    Self-nucleated and external neutron nucleated acoustic (bubble fusion) cavitation experiments have been modeled and analyzed for neutron spectral characteristics at the detector locations for all separate successful published bubble fusion studies. Our predictive approach was first calibrated and validated against the measured neutron spectrum emitted from a spontaneous fission source ({sup 252}Cf), from a Pu-Be source and from an accelerator-based monoenergetic 14.1 MeV neutrons, respectively. Three-dimensional Monte-Carlo neutron transport calculations of 2.45 MeV neutrons from imploding bubbles were conducted, using the well-known MCNP5 transport code, for the published original experimental studies of Taleyarkhan et al. [Taleyarkhan, et al., 2002. Science 295, 1868; Taleyarkhan, et al., 2004. Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109; Taleyarkhan, et al., 2006a. PRL 96, 034301; Taleyarkhan, et al., 2006b. PRL 97, 149404] as also the successful confirmation studies of Xu et al. [Xu, Y., et al., 2005. Nuclear Eng. Des. 235, 1317-1324], Forringer et al. [Forringer, E., et al., 2006a. Transaction on American Nuclear Society Conference, vol. 95, Albuquerque, NM, USA, November 15, 2006, p. 736; Forringer, E., et al., 2006b. Proceedings of the International Conference on Fusion Energy, Albuquerque, NM, USA, November 14, 2006] and Bugg [Bugg, W., 2006. Report on Activities on June 2006 Visit, Report to Purdue University, June 9, 2006]. NE-213 liquid scintillation (LS) detector response was calculated using the SCINFUL code. These were cross-checked using a separate independent approach involving weighting and convoluting MCNP5 predictions with published experimentally measured NE-213 detector neutron response curves for monoenergetic neutrons at various energies. The impact of neutron pulse-pileup during bubble fusion was verified and estimated with pulsed neutron generator based experiments and first-principle calculations. Results of modeling-cum-experimentation were found to be

  1. Development of bubble-induced turbulence model for advanced two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Hideaki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A two-fluid model can simulate two-phase flow by computational cost less than detailed two-phase flow simulation method such as interface tracking method. The two-fluid model is therefore useful for thermal hydraulic analysis in the large-scale domain such as rod bundles. However, since the two-fluid model includes a lot of constitutive equations verified by use of experimental results, it has problems that the result of analyses depends on accuracy of the constitutive equations. To solve these problems, an advanced two-fluid model has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this model, interface tracking method is combined with two-fluid model to accurately predict large interface structure behavior. Liquid clusters and bubbles larger than a computational cell are calculated using the interface tracking method, and those smaller than the cell are simulated by the two-fluid model. The constitutive equations to evaluate the effects of small bubbles or droplets on two-phase flow are also required in the advanced two-fluid model, just as with the conventional two-fluid model. However, the dependency of small bubbles and droplets on two-phase flow characteristics is relatively small, and fewer experimental results are required to verify the characteristics of large interface structures. Turbulent dispersion force model is one of the most important constitutive equations for the advanced two-fluid model. The turbulent dispersion force model has been developed by many researchers for the conventional two-fluid model. However, existing models implicitly include the effects of large bubbles and the deformation of bubbles, and are unfortunately not applicable to the advanced two-fluid model. In the previous study, the authors suggested the turbulent dispersion force model based on the analogy of Brownian motion. And the authors improved the turbulent dispersion force model in consideration of bubble-induced turbulence to improve the analysis results for small

  2. Numerical Modeling of the Photothermal Processing for Bubble Forming around Nanowire in a Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Chaari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate computation of the temperature is an important factor in determining the shape of a bubble around a nanowire immersed in a liquid. The study of the physical phenomenon consists in solving a photothermic coupled problem between light and nanowire. The numerical multiphysic model is used to study the variations of the temperature and the shape of the created bubble by illumination of the nanowire. The optimization process, including an adaptive remeshing scheme, is used to solve the problem through a finite element method. The study of the shape evolution of the bubble is made taking into account the physical and geometrical parameters of the nanowire. The relation between the sizes and shapes of the bubble and nanowire is deduced.

  3. Experiments performed with bubbly flow in vertical pipes at different flow conditions covering the transition region: simulation by coupling Eulerian, Lagrangian and 3D random walks models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Cobo, José; Chiva, Sergio; El Aziz Essa, Mohamed; Mendes, Santos

    2012-08-01

    carrier fluid that are seen by the bubbles due to turbulence fluctuations. Also we have included in the model the deformation that suffers the bubble when it touches the wall and it is compressed by the forces that pushes it toward the wall, provoking that the bubble rebound like a ball.

  4. Vertical Rise Velocity of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles Estimated from Equatorial Atmosphere Radar Observations and High-Resolution Bubble Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, T.; Ajith, K. K.; Yamamoto, M.; Niranjan, K.

    2017-12-01

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) is a well-known phenomenon in the equatorial ionospheric F region. As it causes severe scintillation in the amplitude and phase of radio signals, it is important to understand and forecast the occurrence of EPBs from a space weather point of view. The development of EPBs is presently believed as an evolution of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We have already developed a 3D high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model with a grid spacing of as small as 1 km and presented nonlinear growth of EPBs which shows very turbulent internal structures such as bifurcation and pinching. As EPBs have field-aligned structures, the latitude range that is affected by EPBs depends on the apex altitude of EPBs over the dip equator. However, it was not easy to observe the apex altitude and vertical rise velocity of EPBs. Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in Indonesia is capable of steering radar beams quickly so that the growth phase of EPBs can be captured clearly. The vertical rise velocities of the EPBs observed around the midnight hours are significantly smaller compared to those observed in postsunset hours. Further, the vertical growth of the EPBs around midnight hours ceases at relatively lower altitudes, whereas the majority of EPBs at postsunset hours found to have grown beyond the maximum detectable altitude of the EAR. The HIRB model with varying background conditions are employed to investigate the possible factors that control the vertical rise velocity and maximum attainable altitudes of EPBs. The estimated rise velocities from EAR observations at both postsunset and midnight hours are, in general, consistent with the nonlinear evolution of EPBs from the HIRB model.

  5. An Euler-Lagrange method considering bubble radial dynamics for modeling sonochemical reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Rashid; Brenner, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Unsteady numerical computations are performed to investigate the flow field, wave propagation and the structure of bubbles in sonochemical reactors. The turbulent flow field is simulated using a two-equation Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model. The distribution of the acoustic pressure is solved based on the Helmholtz equation using a finite volume method (FVM). The radial dynamics of a single bubble are considered by applying the Keller-Miksis equation to consider the compressibility of the liquid to the first order of acoustical Mach number. To investigate the structure of bubbles, a one-way coupling Euler-Lagrange approach is used to simulate the bulk medium and the bubbles as the dispersed phase. Drag, gravity, buoyancy, added mass, volume change and first Bjerknes forces are considered and their orders of magnitude are compared. To verify the implemented numerical algorithms, results for one- and two-dimensional simplified test cases are compared with analytical solutions. The results show good agreement with experimental results for the relationship between the acoustic pressure amplitude and the volume fraction of the bubbles. The two-dimensional axi-symmetric results are in good agreement with experimentally observed structure of bubbles close to sonotrode. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. On the One-Dimensional Modeling of Vertical Upward Bubbly Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Peña-Monferrer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The one-dimensional two-fluid model approach has been traditionally used in thermal-hydraulics codes for the analysis of transients and accidents in water–cooled nuclear power plants. This paper investigates the performance of RELAP5/MOD3 predicting vertical upward bubbly flow at low velocity conditions. For bubbly flow and vertical pipes, this code applies the drift-velocity approach, showing important discrepancies with the experiments compared. Then, we use a classical formulation of the drag coefficient approach to evaluate the performance of both approaches. This is based on the critical Weber criteria and includes several assumptions for the calculation of the interfacial area and bubble size that are evaluated in this work. A more accurate drag coefficient approach is proposed and implemented in RELAP5/MOD3. Instead of using the Weber criteria, the bubble size distribution is directly considered. This allows the calculation of the interfacial area directly from the definition of Sauter mean diameter of a distribution. The results show that only the proposed approach was able to predict all the flow characteristics, in particular the bubble size and interfacial area concentration. Finally, the computational results are analyzed and validated with cross-section area average measurements of void fraction, dispersed phase velocity, bubble size, and interfacial area concentration.

  7. Shape and size of methane bubbles in muddy aquatic sediments and their dependence on sediment fracture toughness: a modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsman, Regina

    2014-05-01

    Shallow gassy marine sediments abundantly found on continental margins of Israel and worldwide, are a source of a major concern for their contribution to the destabilization of coastal and marine infrastructure, air pollution, and global warming. Bubbles are different in the different sediment types. Size of the bubbles residing in the fine-grained muddy sediment exceeds significantly the grain size of sediment, and its shape can be approximated by a large oblate spheroid surrounded by sediment saturated with water. Experimental results indicate that bubble growth is accompanied by fracturing of the fine-grained muddy sediment. Modeling reveals that fracture toughness of the muddy sediments significantly affects bubble shape and size evolution prior its ascent. Small fracture toughness is responsible for generation of the small bubbles with highly asymmetric configuration and with fracturing concentrated mostly on the bubble head. In contrast, bigger fracture toughness is responsible for generation of the large, more symmetric bubbles. Moreover, growing bubble demonstrates a positive allometry resulting in a bigger rate of growth of its surface area that is responsible for the effectiveness of the solute supply from pore water to the bubble interior. This scaling demonstrates a strong correlation with sediment fracture toughness as well. Cross-section of the buoyant bubbles evolves from the elliptic profile to the one resembling an 'inverted tear drop'. Calculated bubbles characteristics in different sediments types demonstrate a good agreement with values reported in the literature.

  8. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in neutron irradiated boron doped RAFM steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dethloff, Christian; Gaganidze, Ermile; Svetukhin, Vyacheslav V.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2012-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are promising candidates for structural materials in future fusion technology. In addition to other irradiation defects, the transmuted helium is believed to strongly influence material hardening and embrittlement behavior. A phenomenological model based on kinetic rate equations is developed to describe homogeneous nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated RAFM steels. The model is adapted to different 10 B doped EUROFER97 based heats, which already had been studied in past irradiation experiments. Simulations yield bubble size distributions, whereby effects of helium generation rate, surface energy, helium sinks and helium density are investigated. Peak bubble diameters under different conditions are compared to preliminary microstructural results on irradiated specimens. Helium induced hardening was calculated by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening model to simulated cluster size distributions. Quantitative microstructural investigations of unirradiated and irradiated specimens will be used to support and verify the model.

  9. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in neutron irradiated boron doped RAFM steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dethloff, Christian, E-mail: christian.dethloff@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gaganidze, Ermile [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Svetukhin, Vyacheslav V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy Str. 42, 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Aktaa, Jarir [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are promising candidates for structural materials in future fusion technology. In addition to other irradiation defects, the transmuted helium is believed to strongly influence material hardening and embrittlement behavior. A phenomenological model based on kinetic rate equations is developed to describe homogeneous nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated RAFM steels. The model is adapted to different {sup 10}B doped EUROFER97 based heats, which already had been studied in past irradiation experiments. Simulations yield bubble size distributions, whereby effects of helium generation rate, surface energy, helium sinks and helium density are investigated. Peak bubble diameters under different conditions are compared to preliminary microstructural results on irradiated specimens. Helium induced hardening was calculated by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening model to simulated cluster size distributions. Quantitative microstructural investigations of unirradiated and irradiated specimens will be used to support and verify the model.

  10. Clarifications to questions and criticisms on the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette financial bubble model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, Didier; Woodard, Ryan; Yan, Wanfeng; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2013-10-01

    The Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles with finite-time singular crash hazard rates has been developed to describe the dynamics of financial bubbles and crashes. It has been applied successfully to a large variety of financial bubbles in many different markets. Having been developed over a decade ago, the JLS model has been studied, analyzed, used and criticized by several researchers. Much of this discussion is helpful for advancing the research. However, several serious misconceptions seem to be present within this literature both on theoretical and empirical aspects. Several of these problems stem from the fast evolution of the literature on the JLS model and related works. In the hope of removing possible misunderstanding and of catalyzing useful future developments, we summarize these common questions and criticisms concerning the JLS model and synthesize the current state of the art and existing best practice.

  11. Volume Oscillations Delivered to a Lung Model Using 4 Different Bubble CPAP Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Jonathan A; Richardson, C Peter; DiBlasi, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    High-frequency pressure oscillations created by gas bubbling through an underwater seal during bubble CPAP may enhance ventilation and aid in lung recruitment in premature infants. We hypothesized that there are no differences in the magnitude of oscillations in lung volume (ΔV) in a preterm neonatal lung model when different bubble CPAP systems are used. An anatomically realistic replica of an infant nasal airway model was attached to a Silastic test lung sealed within a calibrated plethysmograph. Nasal prongs were affixed to the simulated neonate and supported using bubble CPAP systems set at 6 cm H2O. ΔV was calculated using pressure measurements obtained from the plethysmograph. The Fisher & Paykel Healthcare bubble CPAP system provided greater ΔV than any of the other devices at all of the respective bias flows (P CPAP systems. The magnitude of ΔV increased at bias flows of > 4 L/min in the Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Airways Development, and homemade systems, but appeared to decrease as bias flow increased with the Babi.Plus system. The major finding of this study is that bubble CPAP can provide measureable ventilation effects in an infant lung model. We speculate that the differences noted in ΔV between the different devices are a combination of the circuit/nasal prong configuration, bubbler configuration, and frequency of oscillations. Additional testing is needed in spontaneously breathing infants to determine whether a physiologic benefit exists when using the different bubble CPAP systems. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  12. Detailed modelling of hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model: Chemisorption of CO2 into NaOH solution, numerical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Henket, R.L.B.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes simulations that were performed with an Euler–Lagrange model that takes into account mass transfer and chemical reaction reported by Darmana et al. (2005. Detailed modelling of hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLOW MODEL FOR FISCHER TROPSCH SYNTHESIS IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Tami Grimmett; Anastasia M. Gribik; Steven P. Antal

    2010-09-01

    The Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. A central component of the HYTEST is the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) in which the gas-to-liquid reactions will be performed to synthesize transportation fuels using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. SBCRs are cylindrical vessels in which gaseous reactants (for example, synthesis gas or syngas) is sparged into a slurry of liquid reaction products and finely dispersed catalyst particles. The catalyst particles are suspended in the slurry by the rising gas bubbles and serve to promote the chemical reaction that converts syngas to a spectrum of longer chain hydrocarbon products, which can be upgraded to gasoline, diesel or jet fuel. These SBCRs operate in the churn-turbulent flow regime which is characterized by complex hydrodynamics, coupled with reacting flow chemistry and heat transfer, that effect reactor performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) model to aid in understanding the physico-chemical processes occurring in the SBCR. Our team is developing a robust methodology to couple reaction kinetics and mass transfer into a four-field model (consisting of the bulk liquid, small bubbles, large bubbles and solid catalyst particles) that includes twelve species: (1) CO reactant, (2) H2 reactant, (3) hydrocarbon product, and (4) H2O product in small bubbles, large bubbles, and the bulk fluid. Properties of the hydrocarbon product were specified by vapor liquid equilibrium calculations. The absorption and kinetic models, specifically changes in species concentrations, have been incorporated into the mass continuity equation. The reaction rate is determined based on the macrokinetic model for a cobalt catalyst developed by Yates and Satterfield [1]. The

  14. Active acoustic leak detection for LMFBR steam generator. Pt. 5. Experiment for detection of bubbles using the SG full sector model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi

    1997-01-01

    In order to prevent the expansion of tube damages and to maintain structural safety in steam generators (SG) of fast breeder reactors (FBR), it is necessary to detect precisely and immediately the leakage of water from tubes of heat exchangers. Therefore, an active acoustic method, which detects the sound attenuation due to bubbles generated in the sodium-water reactions, it being developed. In this paper, the attenuation characteristics of sound attenuated by bubbles and influence of background noise are investigated experimentally by using an SG full sector model (diameter ratio about 1/1, height ratio about 1/7) simulating the actual SG. As an experimental result, the received sound attenuation for ten seconds was more than 10 dB from air bubble injection when injected bubble of 10 l/s (equivalence water leak rate about 10 g/s). The attenuation of sound are least affected by bubble injection position of heat exchanger tube bunch department. And the time was about 25 seconds till the sound attenuation became 10 dB in case of quantity of air bubble 1 l/s (equivalent water leak rate about 1 g/s). It is clarified that the background noise hardly influenced water leak detection performance as a result of having examined influence of background noise. (author)

  15. Modeling of turbulent bubbly flows; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents a bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellakhal, Ghazi

    2005-03-15

    The two-phase flows involve interfacial interactions which modify significantly the structure of the mean and fluctuating flow fields. The design of the two-fluid models adapted to industrial flows requires the taking into account of the effect of these interactions in the closure relations adopted. The work developed in this thesis concerns the development of first order two-fluid models deduced by reduction of second order closures. The adopted reasoning, based on the principle of decomposition of the Reynolds stress tensor into two statistically independent contributions turbulent and pseudo-turbulent parts, allows to preserve the physical contents of the second order relations closure. Analysis of the turbulence structure in two basic flows: homogeneous bubbly flows uniform and with a constant shear allows to deduce a formulation of the two-phase turbulent viscosity involving the characteristic scales of bubbly turbulence, as well as an analytical description of modification of the homogeneous turbulence structure induced by the bubbles presence. The Eulerian two-fluid model was then generalized with the case of the inhomogeneous flows with low void fractions. The numerical results obtained by the application of this model integrated in the computer code MELODIF in the case of free sheared turbulent bubbly flow of wake showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and made it possible to analyze the modification of the characteristic scales of such flow by the interfacial interactions. The two-fluid first order model is generalized finally with the case of high void fractions bubbly flows where the hydrodynamic interactions between the bubbles are not negligible any more. (author)

  16. Development of Bubble Driven Flow CFD Model Applied for Aluminium Smelting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Q. Feng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD model for the study of bubble driven bath flow in aluminium reduction cells. For validation purposes, the model development was conducted using a full scale air -water model of part of an aluminium reduction cell as a test-bed. The bubble induced turbulence has been modelled by either modifying bubble induced turbulence viscosity directly or by modifying bubble induced turbulence kinetic energy in a standard k- ε turbulence model. The relative performance of the two modelling approaches has been examined through comparison with experimental data taken under similar conditions using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV. Detailed comparison has been conducted by point-wise comparison of liquid velocities to quantify the level of agreement between CFD simulation and PIV measurement. Both models can capture the key flow patterns determined by PIV measurement, while the modified turbulence kinetic energy model gives better agreement with flow patterns in the gap between anode and cathode.

  17. Bubbles, Banks, and Financial Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuke Aoki; Kalin Nikolov

    2011-01-01

    This paper asks two main questions: (1) What makes some asset price bubbles more costly for the real economy than others? and (2) When do costly bubbles occur? We construct a model of rational bubbles under credit frictions and show that when bubbles held by banks burst this is followed by a costly financial crisis. In contrast, bubbles held by ordinary savers have relatively muted effects. Banks tend to invest in bubbles when financial liberalisation decreases their profitability.

  18. GISAXS modelling of helium-induced nano-bubble formation in tungsten and comparison with TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Matt; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Bernard, Elodie; Kirby, Nigel; Kluth, Patrick; Riley, Daniel; Corr, Cormac

    2016-01-01

    Grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is a powerful non-destructive technique for the measurement of nano-bubble formation in tungsten under helium plasma exposure. Here, we present a comparative study between transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and GISAXS measurements of nano-bubble formation in tungsten exposed to helium plasma in the Large Helical Device (LHD) fusion experiment. Both techniques are in excellent agreement, suggesting that nano-bubbles range from spheroidal to ellipsoidal, displaying exponential diameter distributions with mean diameters μ=0.68 ± 0.04 nm and μ=0.6 ± 0.1 nm measured by TEM and GISAXS respectively. Depth distributions were also computed, with calculated exponential depth distributions with mean depths of 8.4 ± 0.5 nm and 9.1 ± 0.4 nm for TEM and GISAXS. In GISAXS modelling, spheroidal particles were fitted with an aspect ratio ε=0.7 ± 0.1. The GISAXS model used is described in detail. - Highlights: • GISAXS and TEM were used to measure nano-bubble formation in W exposed to He plasma in the large helical device. • Nano-bubbles had an exponential diameter distributions with averages 0.6 ± 0.1 nm and 0.68 ± 0.04 nm measured by GISAXS and TEM. • Nano-bubbles had an exponential depth distributions with average depths of 9.1 ± 0.4 nm and 8.4 ± 0.5 nm for GISAXS and TEM. • The GISAXS model used to analyse diffraction patterns is explained in detail.

  19. Optimal Portfolio Selection in Ex Ante Stock Price Bubble and Furthermore Bubble Burst Scenario from Dhaka Stock Exchange with Relevance to Sharpe’s Single Index Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Bin Kamal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at constructing an optimal portfolio by applying Sharpe’s single index model of capital asset pricing in different scenarios, one is ex ante stock price bubble scenario and stock price bubble and bubble burst is second scenario. Here we considered beginning of year 2010 as rise of stock price bubble in Dhaka Stock Exchange. Hence period from 2005 -2009 is considered as ex ante stock price bubble period. Using DSI (All share price index in Dhaka Stock Exchange as market index and considering daily indices for the March 2005 to December 2009 period, the proposed method formulates a unique cut off point (cut off rate of return and selects stocks having excess of their expected return over risk-free rate of return surpassing this cut-off point. Here, risk free rate considered to be 8.5% per annum (Treasury bill rate in 2009. Percentage of an investment in each of the selected stocks is then decided on the basis of respective weights assigned to each stock depending on respective ‘β’ value, stock movement variance representing unsystematic risk, return on stock and risk free return vis-à-vis the cut off rate of return. Interestingly, most of the stocks selected turned out to be bank stocks. Again we went for single index model applied to same stocks those made to the optimum portfolio in ex ante stock price bubble scenario considering data for the period of January 2010 to June 2012. We found that all stocks failed to make the pass Single Index Model criteria i.e. excess return over beta must be higher than the risk free rate. Here for the period of 2010 to 2012, the risk free rate considered to be 11.5 % per annum (Treasury bill rate during 2012.

  20. A discrete trinomial model for the birth and death of stock financial bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Persio, Luca; Guida, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    The present work proposes a novel way to model the dynamic of financial bubbles. In particular we exploit the so called trinomial tree technique, which is mainly inspired by the typical market order book (MOB) structure. According to the typical MOB rules, we exploit a bottom-up approach to derive the relevant generator process for the financial quantities characterizing the market we are considering. Our proposal pays attention in considering the real world changes in probability levels characterizing the bid-ask preferences, focusing the attention on the market movements. In particular, we show that financial bubbles are originated by these movements which also act amplify their growth.

  1. Analysis of flashing and swelling phenomena in tanks of nuclear power plants; the importance of bubble growth dynamics and bubble transport models with size tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerezo A, E. [University of Caribe, Department of Basics Sciences and Engineering, Lote 1, Manzana 1, Region 78, esq. Fracc. Tabachines, 77500 Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico)]. E-mail: ecerezo@unicaribe.edu.mx; Munoz C, J.L. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a non-equilibrium model to describe flashing phenomena in tanks and cooling pools. The present model is based on Watanabe's work that we have extended by developing a realistic model for the growth of bubbles. We have made the corresponding venting model, continuity equation, gas and liquid phase energy conservation equations for the model. This model takes into account both drag and virtual mass force. The dynamics of bubble growth plays an important role in two-phase phenomena such as flashing. In our model the growth rate is assumed to be limited by the heat conduction in the liquid. The results of the analytic model were compared with the experimental data of Watanabe [1]. The results have shown that the present model evaluates fairly accurately the pressure evolution, the void fraction and the swelling level of a tank.

  2. Analysis of flashing and swelling phenomena in tanks of nuclear power plants; the importance of bubble growth dynamics and bubble transport models with size tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezo A, E.; Munoz C, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a non-equilibrium model to describe flashing phenomena in tanks and cooling pools. The present model is based on Watanabe's work that we have extended by developing a realistic model for the growth of bubbles. We have made the corresponding venting model, continuity equation, gas and liquid phase energy conservation equations for the model. This model takes into account both drag and virtual mass force. The dynamics of bubble growth plays an important role in two-phase phenomena such as flashing. In our model the growth rate is assumed to be limited by the heat conduction in the liquid. The results of the analytic model were compared with the experimental data of Watanabe [1]. The results have shown that the present model evaluates fairly accurately the pressure evolution, the void fraction and the swelling level of a tank

  3. Real-Time Measurements and Modelling on Dynamic Behaviour of SonoVue Bubbles Based on Light Scattering Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Juan; Guan F., J.; Matula J., T.; Crum A., L.; Wei, Rongjue

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour of SonoVue microbubbles, a new generation ultrasound contrast agent, is investigated in real time with light scattering method. Highly diluted SonoVue microbubbles are injected into a diluted gel made of xanthan gum and water. The responses of individual SonoVue bubbles to driven ultrasound pulses are measured. Both linear and nonlinear bubble oscillations are observed and the results suggest that SonoVue microbubbles can generate strong nonlinear responses. By fitting the experimental data of individual bubble responses with Sarkar's model, the shell coating parameter of the bubbles and dilatational viscosity is estimated to be 7.0 nm.s.Pa.

  4. A new model for coal gasification on pressurized bubbling fluidized bed gasifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, Cristian; Arenas, Erika; Chejne, Farid; Londoño, Carlos A.; Cisneros, Sebastian; Quintana, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new model was proposed for the simulation of fluidized bed reactors. • The model was validated against experimental data found in the literature. • The model was compared and found to be superior to other models reported in the literature. • Effects of pressure, temperature, steam/coal and air/coal ratios over gas composition were studied. - Abstract: Many industries have taken interest in the use of coal gasification for the production of chemicals and fuels. This gasification can be carried out inside a fluidized bed reactor. This non-ideal reactor is difficult to predict due to the complex physical phenomena and the different chemical changes that the feedstock undergoes. The lack of a good model to simulate the reactor’s behavior produces less efficient processes and plant designs. Various approaches to the proper simulation of such reactor have been proposed. In this paper, a new model is developed for the simulation of a pressurized bubbling fluidized bed (PBFB) gasifier that rigorously models the physical phenomena and the chemical changes of the feedstock inside the reactor. In the model, the reactor is divided into three sections; devolatilization, volatile reactions and combustion-gasification. The simulation is validated against experimental data reported in the literature and compared with other models proposed by different authors; once the model is validated, the dependence of the syngas composition on operational pressure, temperature, steam/coal and air/coal ratios are studied. The results of this article show how this model satisfactorily predicts the performance of PBFB gasifiers.

  5. Bubble generation in a twisted and bent DNA-like model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Ulrik Vingaard; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Bang, Ole

    2004-01-01

    The DNA molecule is modeled by a parabola embedded chain with long-range interactions between twisted base pair dipoles. A mechanism for bubble generation is presented and investigated in two different configurations. Using random normally distributed initial conditions to simulate thermal...

  6. New JLS-Factor Model versus the Standard JLS Model: A Case Study on Chinese Stock Bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyi Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we extend the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS model by introducing fundamental economic factors in China (including the interest rate and deposit reserve rate and the historical volatilities of targeted and US equity indices into the original model, which is a flexible tool to detect bubbles and predict regime changes in financial markets. We then derive a general method to incorporate these selected factors in addition to the log-periodic power law signature of herding and compare the prediction accuracy of the critical time between the original and the new JLS models (termed the JLS-factor model by applying these two models to fit two well-known Chinese stock indices in three bubble periods. The results show that the JLS-factor model with Chinese characteristics successfully depicts the evolutions of bubbles and “antibubbles” and constructs efficient end-of-bubble signals for all bubbles in Chinese stock markets. In addition, the results of standard statistical tests demonstrate the excellent explanatory power of these additive factors and confirm that the new JLS model provides useful improvements over the standard JLS model.

  7. Leverage bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wanfeng; Woodard, Ryan; Sornette, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Leverage is strongly related to liquidity in a market and lack of liquidity is considered a cause and/or consequence of the recent financial crisis. A repurchase agreement is a financial instrument where a security is sold simultaneously with an agreement to buy it back at a later date. Repurchase agreement (repo) market size is a very important element in calculating the overall leverage in a financial market. Therefore, studying the behavior of repo market size can help to understand a process that can contribute to the birth of a financial crisis. We hypothesize that herding behavior among large investors led to massive over-leveraging through the use of repos, resulting in a bubble (built up over the previous years) and subsequent crash in this market in early 2008. We use the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles and behavioral finance to study the dynamics of the repo market that led to the crash. The JLS model qualifies a bubble by the presence of characteristic patterns in the price dynamics, called log-periodic power law (LPPL) behavior. We show that there was significant LPPL behavior in the market before that crash and that the predicted range of times predicted by the model for the end of the bubble is consistent with the observations.

  8. Stochastic resonance as a model for financial market crashes and bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiecki, A.; Hołyst, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    A bistable model of a financial market is considered, aimed at modelling financial crashes and bubbles, based on the Ising model with thermal-bath dynamics and long-range interactions, subject to a weak external information-carrying signal and noise. In the ordered phase, opposite stable orientations of magnetization correspond to the growing and declining market before and after the crash or bubble, and jumps of magnetization direction correspond to crashes and bubbles. It is shown that the influence of an information-carrying signal, assumed to be too weak to induce magnetization jumps, can be enhanced by the external noise via the effect of stochastic resonance. It is argued that in real stock markets the arrival of a piece of information, considered a posteriori to be the cause for a crash or bubble, can be enhanced in a similar way, thus leading to price return whose value is unexpectedly large in comparison with relatively weak importance of this piece of information.

  9. On the modeling of bubble evolution and transport using coupled level-set/CFD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlomiej Wierzbicki; Steven P Antal; Michael Z Podowski

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The ability to predict the shape of the gas/liquid/solid interfaces is important for various multiphase flow and heat transfer applications. Specific issues of interest to nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics, include the evolution of the shape of bubbles attached to solid surfaces during nucleation, bubble surface interactions in complex geometries, etc. Additional problems, making the overall task even more complicated, are associated with the effect of material properties that may be significantly altered by the addition of minute amounts of impurities, such as surfactants or nano-particles. The present paper is concerned with the development of an innovative approach to model time-dependent shape of gas/liquid interfaces in the presence of solid walls. The proposed approach combines a modified level-set method with an advanced CFD code, NPHASE. The coupled numerical solver can be used to simulate the evolution of gas/liquid interfaces in two-phase flows for a variety of geometries and flow conditions, from individual bubbles to free surfaces (stratified flows). The issues discussed in the full paper will include: a description of the novel aspects of the proposed level-set concept based method, an overview of the NPHASE code modeling framework and a description of the coupling method between these two elements of the overall model. A particular attention will be give to the consistency and completeness of model formulation for the interfacial phenomena near the liquid/gas/solid triple line, and to the impact of the proposed numerical approach on the accuracy and consistency of predictions. The accuracy will be measured in terms of both the calculated shape of the interfaces and the gas and liquid velocity fields around the interfaces and in the entire computational domain. The results of model testing and validation will also be shown in the full paper. The situations analyzed will include: bubbles of different sizes and varying

  10. Speculative bubbles and crashes in stock markets: an interacting-agent model of speculative activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizoji, Taisei

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we present an interacting-agent model of speculative activity explaining bubbles and crashes in stock markets. We describe stock markets through an infinite-range Ising model to formulate the tendency of traders getting influenced by the investment attitude of other traders. Bubbles and crashes are understood and described qualitatively and quantitatively in terms of the classical phase transitions. When the interactions among traders become stronger and reach some critical values, a second-order phase transition and critical behavior can be observed, and a bull market phase and a bear market phase appear. When the system stays at the bull market phase, speculative bubbles occur in the stock market. For a certain range of the investment environment (the external field), multistability and hysteresis phenomena are observed. When the investment environment reaches some critical values, the rapid changes (the first-order phase transitions) in the distribution of investment attitude are caused. The phase transition from a bull market phase to a bear market phase is considered as a stock market crash. Furthermore, we estimate the parameters of the model using the actual financial data. As an example of large crashes we analyze Japan crisis (the bubble and the subsequent crash in the Japanese stock market in 1987-1992), and show that the good quality of the fits, as well as the consistency of the parameter values are obtained from Japan crisis. The results of the empirical study demonstrate that Japan crisis can be explained quite naturally by the model that bubbles and crashes have their origin in the collective crowd behavior of many interacting agents.

  11. Mixed Causal-Noncausal AR Processes and the Modelling of Explosive Bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, Sébastien; Zakoian, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    Noncausal autoregressive models with heavy-tailed errors generate locally explosive processes and therefore provide a natural framework for modelling bubbles in economic and financial time series. We investigate the probability properties of mixed causal-noncausal autoregressive processes, assuming the errors follow a stable non-Gaussian distribution. We show that the tails of the conditional distribution are lighter than those of the errors, and we emphasize the presence of ARCH effects and ...

  12. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in Continuous-Casting Using Multiple-Size-Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2015-02-01

    A population balance model based on the multiple-size-group (MUSIG) approach has been developed to investigate the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the slab continuous-casting mold and bubble behavior including volume fraction, breakup, coalescence, and size distribution. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach is used to describe the equations of motion of the two-phase flow. All the non-drag forces (lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force) and drag force are incorporated in this model. Sato and Sekiguchi model is used to account for the bubble-induced turbulence. Luo and Svendsen model and Prince and Blanch model are used to describe the bubbles breakup and coalescence behavior, respectively. A 1/4th water model of the slab continuous-casting mold was applied to investigate the distribution and size of bubbles by injecting air through a circumferential inlet chamber which was made of the specially-coated samples of mullite porous brick, which is used for the actual upper nozzle. Against experimental data, numerical results showed good agreement for the gas volume fraction and local bubble Sauter mean diameter. The bubble Sauter mean diameter in the upper recirculation zone decreases with increasing water flow rate and increases with increasing gas flow rate. The distribution of bubble Sauter mean diameter along the width direction of the upper mold increases first, and then gradually decreases from the SEN to the narrow wall. Close agreements between the predictions and measurements demonstrate the capability of the MUSIG model in modeling bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold.

  13. Modeling of Multisize Bubbly Flow and Application to the Simulation of Boiling Flows with the Neptune_CFD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Morel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the modeling of boiling multisize bubbly flows and its application to the simulation of the DEBORA experiment. We follow the method proposed originally by Kamp, assuming a given mathematical expression for the bubble diameter pdf. The original model is completed by the addition of some new terms for vapor compressibility and phase change. The liquid-to-interface heat transfer term, which essentially determines the bubbles condensation rate in the DEBORA experiment, is also modeled with care. First numerical results realized with the Neptune_CFD code are presented and discussed.

  14. Dynamic morphology of gas hydrate on a methane bubble in water: Observations and new insights for hydrate film models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzinski, Robert P.; Lynn, Ronald; Haljasmaa, Igor; Leifer, Ira; Shaffer, Frank; Anderson, Brian J.; Levine, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-01

    Predicting the fate of subsea hydrocarbon gases escaping into seawater is complicated by potential formation of hydrate on rising bubbles that can enhance their survival in the water column, allowing gas to reach shallower depths and the atmosphere. The precise nature and influence of hydrate coatings on bubble hydrodynamics and dissolution is largely unknown. Here we present high-definition, experimental observations of complex surficial mechanisms governing methane bubble hydrate formation and dissociation during transit of a simulated oceanic water column that reveal a temporal progression of deep-sea controlling mechanisms. Synergistic feedbacks between bubble hydrodynamics, hydrate morphology, and coverage characteristics were discovered. Morphological changes on the bubble surface appear analogous to macroscale, sea ice processes, presenting new mechanistic insights. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate coverage and bubble dissolution rate is indicated. Understanding and incorporating these phenomena into bubble and bubble plume models will be necessary to accurately predict global greenhouse gas budgets for warming ocean scenarios and hydrocarbon transport from anthropogenic or natural deep-sea eruptions.

  15. Modelling studies for influence factors of gas bubble in compressed air energy storage in aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Chaobin; Zhang, Keni; Li, Cai; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    CAES (Compressed air energy storage) is credited with its potential ability for large-scale energy storage. Generally, it is more convenient using deep aquifers than employing underground caverns for energy storage, because of extensive presence of aquifers. During the first stage in a typical process of CAESA (compressed air energy storage in aquifers), a large amount of compressed air is injected into the target aquifer to develop an initial space (a gas bubble) for energy storage. In this study, numerical simulations were conducted to investigate the influence of aquifer's permeability, geological structure and operation parameters on the formation of gas bubble and the sustainability for the later cycling operation. The SCT (system cycle times) was designed as a parameter to evaluate the reservoir performance and the effect of operation parameters. Simulation results for pressure and gas saturation results of basic model confirm the feasibility of compressed air energy storage in aquifers. The results of different permeability cases show that, for a certain scale of CAESA system, there is an optimum permeability range for a candidate aquifer. An aquifer within this permeability range will not only satisfy the injectivity requirement but also have the best energy efficiency. Structural impact analysis indicates that the anticline structure has the best performance to hold the bubble under the same daily cycling schedule with the same initial injected air mass. In addition, our results indicate that the SCT shows a logarithmic growth as the injected air mass increase. During the formation of gas bubble, compressed air should be injected into aquifers with moderate rate and the injection can be done in several stages with different injection rate to avoid onset pressure. - Highlights: • Impact of permeability, geological structure, operation parameters was investigated. • With certain air production rate, an optimum permeability exists for performance.

  16. A vapour bubble collapse model to describe the fragmentation of low-melting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, R.; Schober, P.

    1977-11-01

    By means of a model, the fragmentation of a hot melt of metal in consequence of collapsing vapour-bubbles is investigated. In particular the paper deals with the development of the physical model-ideas for calculation of the temperature of contact that adjusts between the temperature of the melt and the coolant, of the waiting-time until bubble-nucleation occurs and of the maximal obtainable vapour-bubble-radius in dependence of the coolant-temperature. After that follows the description of the computing-program belonging to this model and of the results of an extensive parameter-study. The study examined the influence of the temperature of melt and coolant, the melted mass, the nucleation-site-density, the average maximum bubble-radius, the duration of film-breakdown and the coefficient of heat-transition. The calculation of the process of fragmentation turns out to be according to expectation, whereas the duration of this process seems to be somewhat too long. The dependence of the surface-enlargement on the subcooling of the water-bath and the initial temperature of the melt is not yet reproduced satisfactorily by the model. The reasons for this are the temperature-increase of the water-bath as well as the fact that the coupling of heat-flux-density and nucleation-site-density are not taken into consideration. Further improvement of the model is necessary and may improve the results in the sense of the experimental observations. (orig.) [de

  17. A Generalized turbulent dispersion model for bubbly flow numerical simulation in NEPTUNE-CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviéville, Jérôme, E-mail: Jerome-marcel.lavieville@edf.fr; Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Guingo, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.guingo@edf.fr; Baudry, Cyril, E-mail: Cyril.baudry@edf.fr; Mimouni, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr

    2017-02-15

    The NEPTUNE-CFD code, based upon an Eulerian multi-fluid model, is developed within the framework of the NEPTUNE project, financially supported by EDF (Electricité de France), CEA (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives), IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire) and AREVA-NP. NEPTUNE-CFD is mainly focused on Nuclear Safety applications involving two-phase water-steam flows, like two-phase Pressurized Shock (PTS) and Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB). Many of these applications involve bubbly flows, particularly, for application to flows in PWR fuel assemblies, including studies related to DNB. Considering a very usual model for interfacial forces acting on bubbles, including drag, virtual mass and lift forces, the turbulent dispersion force is often added to moderate the lift effect in orthogonal directions to the main flow and get the right dispersion shape. This paper presents a formal derivation of this force, considering on the one hand, the fluctuating part of drag and virtual mass, and on the other hand, Turbulent Pressure derivation obtained by comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian description of bubbles motion. An extension of the Tchen’s theory is used to express the turbulent kinetic energy of bubbles and the two-fluid turbulent covariance tensor in terms of liquid turbulent velocities and time scale. The model obtained by this way, called Generalized Turbulent Dispersion Model (GTD), does not require any user parameter. The model is validated against Liu & Bankoff air-water experiment, Arizona State University (ASU) experiment, DEBORA experiment and Texas A&M University (TAMU) boiling flow experiments.

  18. Modelling of impaired cerebral blood flow due to gaseous emboli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hague, J P; Banahan, C; Chung, E M L

    2013-01-01

    Bubbles introduced to the arterial circulation during invasive medical procedures can have devastating consequences for brain function but their effects are currently difficult to quantify. Here we present a Monte Carlo simulation investigating the impact of gas bubbles on cerebral blood flow. For the first time, this model includes realistic adhesion forces, bubble deformation, fluid dynamical considerations, and bubble dissolution. This allows investigation of the effects of buoyancy, solubility, and blood pressure on embolus clearance. Our results illustrate that blockages depend on several factors, including the number and size distribution of incident emboli, dissolution time and blood pressure. We found it essential to model the deformation of bubbles to avoid overestimation of arterial obstruction. Incorporation of buoyancy effects within our model slightly reduced the overall level of obstruction but did not decrease embolus clearance times. We found that higher blood pressures generate lower levels of obstruction and improve embolus clearance. Finally, we demonstrate the effects of gas solubility and discuss potential clinical applications of the model. (paper)

  19. A Nonlinear Super-Exponential Rational Model of Speculative Financial Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Andersen, J. V.

    Keeping a basic tenet of economic theory, rational expectations, we model the nonlinear positive feedback between agents in the stock market as an interplay between nonlinearity and multiplicative noise. The derived hyperbolic stochastic finite-time singularity formula transforms a Gaussian white noise into a rich time series possessing all the stylized facts of empirical prices, as well as accelerated speculative bubbles preceding crashes. We use the formula to invert the two years of price history prior to the recent crash on the Nasdaq (April 2000) and prior to the crash in the Hong Kong market associated with the Asian crisis in early 1994. These complex price dynamics are captured using only one exponent controlling the explosion, the variance and mean of the underlying random walk. This offers a new and powerful detection tool of speculative bubbles and herding behavior.

  20. Gravitational waves from first-order phase transitions: towards model separation by bubble nucleation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Lee, Sangjun; Seong, Hyeonseok; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    We study gravitational-wave production from bubble collisions in a cosmic first-order phase transition, focusing on the possibility of model separation by the bubble nucleation rate dependence of the resulting gravitational-wave spectrum. By using the method of relating the spectrum with the two-point correlator of the energy-momentum tensor , we first write down analytic expressions for the spectrum with a Gaussian correction to the commonly used nucleation rate, Γ propto eβ tarrow eβ t-γ2t2, under the thin-wall and envelope approximations. Then we quantitatively investigate how the spectrum changes with the size of the Gaussian correction. It is found that the spectral shape shows Script O(10)% deviation from Γ propto eβ t case for some physically motivated scenarios. We also briefly discuss detector sensitivities required to distinguish different spectral shapes.

  1. A numerical simulation of the water vapor bubble rising in ferrofluid by volume of fluid model in the presence of a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei Dizaji, A.; Mohammadpourfard, M.; Aminfar, H.

    2018-03-01

    Multiphase flow is one of the most complicated problems, considering the multiplicity of the related parameters, especially the external factors influences. Thus, despite the recent developments more investigations are still required. The effect of a uniform magnetic field on the hydrodynamics behavior of a two-phase flow with different magnetic permeability is presented in this article. A single water vapor bubble which is rising inside a channel filled with ferrofluid has been simulated numerically. To capture the phases interface, the Volume of Fluid (VOF) model, and to solve the governing equations, the finite volume method has been employed. Contrary to the prior anticipations, while the consisting fluids of the flow are dielectric, uniform magnetic field causes a force acting normal to the interface toward to the inside of the bubble. With respect to the applied magnetic field direction, the bubble deformation due to the magnetic force increases the bubble rising velocity. Moreover, the higher values of applied magnetic field strength and magnetic permeability ratio resulted in the further increase of the bubble rising velocity. Also it is indicated that the flow mixing and the heat transfer rate is increased by a bubble injection and applying a magnetic field. The obtained results have been concluded that the presented phenomenon with applying a magnetic field can be used to control the related characteristics of the multiphase flows. Compared to the previous studies, implementing the applicable cases using the common and actual materials and a significant reduction of the CPU time are the most remarkable advantages of the current study.

  2. Model for the growth and the oscillation of a cavitation bubble in a spherical liquid-filled cavity enclosed in an elastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doinikov, Alexander A.; Dollet, Benjamin; Marmottant, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Equations are derived that describe the growth and subsequent damped oscillation of a cavitation bubble in a liquid-filled cavity surrounded by an elastic solid. It is assumed that the nucleation and the growth of the bubble are caused by an initial negative pressure in the cavity. The liquid is treated as viscous and compressible. The obtained equations allow one to model, by numerical computation, the growth and the oscillation of the bubble in the cavity and the oscillation of the cavity surface. It is shown that the equilibrium radius reached by the growing bubble decreases when the absolute magnitude of the initial negative pressure decreases. It is also found that the natural frequency of the bubble oscillation increases with increasing bubble radius. This result is of special interest because in an unbounded liquid, the natural frequency of a bubble is known to behave oppositely, namely it decreases with increasing bubble radius.

  3. Acoustic modeling of shell-encapsulated gas bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.A. Frinking (Peter); N. de Jong (Nico)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractExisting theoretical models do not adequately describe the scatter and attenuation properties of the ultrasound contrast agents Quantison(TM) and Myomap(TM). An adapted version of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, in which the shell is described by a viscoelastic solid, is proposed and

  4. A Free Streamline Model for a Rising Bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    AD-R167 535 A FREE STREAMLINE MODEL FOR A RISING IIUUE(U) 1 I WISCONSIN UNIV- AOIS N MATHENATICS RESEARCH CENTER I J YANDEN-BROECK MAR 86 NRC-TSR... computations on nonlinear free surface flow problems (Vanden-Broeck3𔃾 𔃿) have uncovered an unexpected effect of surface tension. It has been found...the end of Section 2. - 4. Solutions Without Surface Tension We used the scheme presented in Section 3 to compute solutions with a - (i.e. T = 0). The

  5. Modeling of bubble growth in complex fluids. Application to radiolytic swelling of nuclear bituminized waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this PhD thesis is to predict the swelling of bitumen barrels in which radioactive salts are mixed. The bitumen exposed to radioactivity undergoes a chemical reaction: the radiolysis. This implies a generation of dihydrogen. The created is solubilized until the concentration reaches a limit value which is called saturation. Over this limit nucleation of bubbles is observed. Then they will grow thank to the contribution of the gas generated by radiolysis and they will be submitted to Archimede's principle so that they will rise in the fluid. The swelling is the result of the competition between generation and evacuation of gas. A model has been built to describe the evolution of a bubble population. Because of it is not possible to solve it analytically, a numerical program was developed. The results show that an increase of the fluid viscosity, the gas generation or the container height lead to an increase of the swelling and that an increase of the diffusion coefficient contributes to a decrease of the swelling. In the particular case of a yield stress fluid, the behavior of the bubble population is modified and the evacuation of gas is done with several shots, at the opposite of the case of a Newtonian fluid for which a stationary evacuation is reached. (author)

  6. A study of the surfacing bubbles speed in a physical model representing a layer of liquid coal pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begunov, A.I.; Yakovleva, A.A. [Irkutsk State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    The authors investigated the motion characteristics of the gas bubbles originating in the baked part of Soderberg anodes and barbotating through the liquid layer of the anodic paste. This study was conducted sing a physical model with paraffin representing the column of anodic paste. The column height of the model liquid was changed from 0.2 to 0.5 m, which corresponds to the liquid layer heights in a real anode. The dependence of the vertical gas bubble speed on the liquid layer height above the level on which the bubble was formed was studied and an empirical equation was found to describe this dependence in terms of mathematical powers. The numerical values of the hydrodynamic resistance coefficients for surfacing bubbles were determined, which vary from 1 {center_dot} 10{sup {minus}5} to 6 {center_dot} 10{sup {minus}5}.

  7. Droplet and bubble nucleation modeled by density gradient theory – cubic equation of state versus saft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrubý Jan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study presents some preliminary results of the density gradient theory (GT combined with two different equations of state (EoS: the classical cubic equation by van der Waals and a recent approach based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT, namely its perturbed-chain (PC modification. The results showed that the cubic EoS predicted for a given surface tension the density profile with a noticeable defect. Bulk densities predicted by the cubic EoS differed as much as by 100 % from the reference data. On the other hand, the PC-SAFT EoS provided accurate results for density profile and both bulk densities in the large range of temperatures. It has been shown that PC-SAFT is a promising tool for accurate modeling of nucleation using the GT. Besides the basic case of a planar phase interface, the spherical interface was analyzed to model a critical cluster occurring either for nucleation of droplets (condensation or bubbles (boiling, cavitation. However, the general solution for the spherical interface will require some more attention due to its numerical difficulty.

  8. Fluid dynamics of bubbly flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegenhein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bubbly flows can be found in many applications in chemical, biological and power engineering. Reliable simulation tools of such flows that allow the design of new processes and optimization of existing one are therefore highly desirable. CFD-simulations applying the multi-fluid approach are very promising to provide such a design tool for complete facilities. In the multi-fluid approach, however, closure models have to be formulated to model the interaction between the continuous and dispersed phase. Due to the complex nature of bubbly flows, different phenomena have to be taken into account and for every phenomenon different closure models exist. Therefore, reliable predictions of unknown bubbly flows are not yet possible with the multi-fluid approach. A strategy to overcome this problem is to define a baseline model in which the closure models including the model constants are fixed so that the limitations of the modeling can be evaluated by validating it on different experiments. Afterwards, the shortcomings are identified so that the baseline model can be stepwise improved without losing the validity for the already validated cases. This development of a baseline model is done in the present work by validating the baseline model developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf mainly basing on experimental data for bubbly pipe flows to bubble columns, bubble plumes and air-lift reactors that are relevant in chemical and biological engineering applications. In the present work, a large variety of such setups is used for validation. The buoyancy driven bubbly flows showed thereby a transient behavior on the scale of the facility. Since such large scales are characterized by the geometry of the facility, turbulence models cannot describe them. Therefore, the transient simulation of bubbly flows with two equation models based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is investigated. In combination with the before mentioned baseline model these

  9. Science Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Pedersen, David Budtz

    2013-01-01

    Much like the trade and trait sof bubbles in financial markets,similar bubbles appear on the science market. When economic bubbles burst, the drop in prices causes the crash of unsustainable investments leading to an investor confidence crisis possibly followed by a financial panic. But when bubb...... bubbles appear in science, truth and reliability are the first victims. This paper explores how fashions in research funding and research management may turn science into something like a bubble economy.......Much like the trade and trait sof bubbles in financial markets,similar bubbles appear on the science market. When economic bubbles burst, the drop in prices causes the crash of unsustainable investments leading to an investor confidence crisis possibly followed by a financial panic. But when...

  10. Flow visualization using bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, J.P.

    1974-01-01

    Soap bubbles were used for visualizing flows. The tests effected allowed some characteristics of flows around models in blow tunnels to be precised at mean velocities V 0 5 . The velocity of a bubble is measured by chronophotography, the bulk envelope of the trajectories is also registered [fr

  11. Genetic optimization of neural network and fuzzy logic for oil bubble point pressure modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar, Mohammad [Islamic Azad University, Kharg (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholami, Amin [Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asoodeh, Mojtaba [Islamic Azad University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Bubble point pressure is a critical pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) property of reservoir fluid, which plays an important role in almost all tasks involved in reservoir and production engineering. We developed two sophisticated models to estimate bubble point pressure from gas specific gravity, oil gravity, solution gas oil ratio, and reservoir temperature. Neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system are powerful tools for extracting the underlying dependency of a set of input/output data. However, the mentioned tools are in danger of sticking in local minima. The present study went further by optimizing fuzzy logic and neural network models using the genetic algorithm in charge of eliminating the risk of being exposed to local minima. This strategy is capable of significantly improving the accuracy of both neural network and fuzzy logic models. The proposed methodology was successfully applied to a dataset of 153 PVT data points. Results showed that the genetic algorithm can serve the neural network and neuro-fuzzy models from local minima trapping, which might occur through back-propagation algorithm.

  12. New mechanism for bubble nucleation: Classical transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T. Jr; Hui Lam; Lim, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    Given a scalar field with metastable minima, bubbles nucleate quantum mechanically. When bubbles collide, energy stored in the bubble walls is converted into kinetic energy of the field. This kinetic energy can facilitate the classical nucleation of new bubbles in minima that lie below those of the 'parent' bubbles. This process is efficient and classical, and changes the dynamics and statistics of bubble formation in models with multiple vacua, relative to that derived from quantum tunneling.

  13. Doppler method leak detection for LMFBR steam generators. Pt. 1. Experimental results of bubble detection using small models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi

    1999-01-01

    To prevent the expansion of the tube damage and to maintain structural integrity in the steam generators (SGs) of fast breeder reactors (FBRs), it is necessary to detect precisely and immediately the leakage of water from heat transfer tubes. Therefore, an active acoustic method was developed. Previous studies have revealed that in practical steam generators the active acoustic method can detect bubbles of 10 l/s within 10 seconds. To prevent the expansion of damage to neighboring tubes, it is necessary to detect smaller leakages of water from the heat transfer tubes. The Doppler method is designed to detect small leakages and to find the source of the leak before damage spreads to neighboring tubes. To evaluate the relationship between the detection sensitivity of the Doppler method and the bubble volume and bubble size, the structural shapes and bubble flow conditions were investigated experimentally, using a small structural model. The results show that the Doppler method can detect the bubbles under bubble flow conditions, and it is sensitive enough to detect small leakages within a short time. The doppler method thus has strong potential for the detection of water leakage in SGs. (author)

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bubbling in a Viscous Fluid for Validation of Waste Glass Melter Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander William [Idaho National Laboratory; Guillen, Donna Post [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    At the Hanford site, radioactive waste stored in underground tanks is slated for vitrification for final disposal. A comprehensive knowledge of the glass batch melting process will be useful in optimizing the process, which could potentially reduce the cost and duration of this multi-billion dollar cleanup effort. We are developing a high-fidelity heat transfer model of a Joule-heated ceramic lined melter to improve the understanding of the complex, inter-related processes occurring with the melter. The glass conversion rates in the cold cap layer are dependent on promoting efficient heat transfer. In practice, heat transfer is augmented by inserting air bubblers into the molten glass. However, the computational simulations must be validated to provide confidence in the solutions. As part of a larger validation procedure, it is beneficial to split the physics of the melter into smaller systems to validate individually. The substitution of molten glass for a simulant liquid with similar density and viscosity at room temperature provides a way to study mixing through bubbling as an isolated effect without considering the heat transfer dynamics. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained by the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America using bubblers placed within a large acrylic tank that is similar in scale to a pilot glass waste melter. Comparisons are made for surface area of the rising air bubbles between experiments and CFD simulations for a variety of air flow rates and bubble injection depths. Also, computed bubble rise velocity is compared to a well-accepted expression for bubble terminal velocity.

  15. Development and validation of bubble breakup and coalescence constitutive models for the one-group interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellacani, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    A local mechanistic model for bubble coalescence and breakup for the one-group interfacial area transport equation has been developed, in agreement and within the limits of the current understanding, based on an exhaustive survey of the theory and of the state of the art models for bubble dynamics simulation. The new model has been tested using the commercial 3D CFD code ANSYS CFX. Upward adiabatic turbulent air-water bubbly flow has been simulated and the results have been compared with the data obtained in the experimental facility PUMA. The range of the experimental data available spans between 0.5 to 2 m/s liquid velocity and 5 to 15 % volume fraction. For the implementation of the models, both the monodispersed and the interfacial area transport equation approaches have been used. The first one to perform a detailed analysis of the forces and models to reproduce the dynamic of the dispersed phase adequately and to be used in the next phases of the work. Also two different bubble induced turbulence models have been tested to consider the effect of the presence of the gas phase on the turbulence of the liquid phase. The interfacial area transport equation has been successfully implemented into the CFD code and the state of the art breakup and coalescence models have been used for simulation. The limitations of the actual theory have been shown and a new bubble interactions model has been developed. The simulations showed that a considerable improvement is achieved if compared to the state of the art closure models. Limits in the implementation derive from the actual understanding and formulation of the bubbly dynamics. A strong dependency on the interfacial non-drag force models and coefficients have been shown. More experimental and theory work needs to be done in this field to increase the prediction capability of the simulation tools regarding the distribution of the phases along the pipe radius.

  16. Mechanics of Bubbles in Sludges and Slurries Modeling Studies of Particulate Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Terrones, Guillermo; Muller, Susan J.; Denn, Morton M.; Rossen, William R.

    2002-01-01

    The Hanford Site has 177 underground waste storage tanks that are known to retain and release bubbles composed of flammable gases. Characterizing and understanding the behavior of these bubbles is important for the safety issues associated with the flammable gases for both ongoing waste storage and future waste-retrieval operations. The retained bubbles are known to respond to small barometric pressure changes, though in a complex manner with unusual hysteresis occurring in some tanks in the relationship between bubble volume and pressure, or V-P hysteresis. With careful analysis, information on the volume of retained gas and the interactions of the waste and the bubbles can be determined

  17. Simulation of hydrogen bubble growth in tungsten by a hybrid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Jizhong; Bonnin, Xavier; Wang, L.; Wang, Dezhen

    2015-01-01

    A two dimensional hybrid code (HIIPC-MC) joining rate-theory and Monte Carlo (MC) methods is developed in this work. We evaluate the cascade-coalescence mechanism contribution to the bubble growth by MC. First, effects of the starting radius and solute deuterium concentration on the bubble growth are studied; then the impacts of the wall temperature and implantation ion flux on the bubble growth are assessed. The simulation indicates that the migration-coalescence of the bubbles and the high pressure inside the bubbles are the main driving forces for the bubble growth, and that neglect of the migration and coalescence would lead to an underestimation of the bubble growth or blistering

  18. A dry-spot model for the prediction of critical heat flux in water boiling in bubbly flow regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Sang Jun; No, Hee Cheon

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) in bubbly flow regime using dry-spot model proposed recently by authors for pool and flow boiling CHF and existing correlations for forced convective heat transfer coefficient, active site density and bubble departure diameter in nucleate boiling region. Without any empirical constants always present in earlier models, comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data for upward flow of water in vertical, uniformly-heated round tubes are performed and show a good agreement. The parametric trends of CHF have been explored with respect to variation in pressure, tube diameter and length, mass flux and inlet subcooling

  19. Numerical Study on Mass Transfer of a Vapor Bubble Rising in Very High Viscous Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kunugi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on a bubble rising behavior in a molten glass because it is important to improve the efficiency of removal of bubbles from the molten glass. On the other hand, it is expected that some gas species which exists in a bubble are transferred into the molten glass through the bubble interface, i.e., the mass transfer, subsequently, it may cause a bubble contraction in the molten glass. In this paper, in order to understand the bubble rising behavior with its contraction caused by the mass transfer through the bubble interface in the very high viscous fluid such as the molten glass, a bubble contraction model has been developed. The direct numerical simulations based on the MARS (Multi-interface Advection and Reconstruction Solver coupled with the mass transfer equation and the bubble contraction model regarding the mass transfer from the rising bubble in very high viscous fluid have been performed. Here, the working fluids were water vapor as the gas species and the molten glass as the very high viscous fluid. Also, the jump conditions at the bubble interface for the mass transfer were examined. Furthermore, the influence of the bubble contraction for the bubble rising compared to that in the water as a normal viscous fluid was investigated. From the result of the numerical simulations, it was found that the bubble rising behavior was strongly affected not only by the viscosity of the working fluid but also by the bubble contraction due to the mass transfer through the bubble interface.

  20. HCDA bubble experiment, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Kaoru; Mashiko, Hiroyuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; An, Shigehiro; Isozaki, Tadashi.

    1981-06-01

    An experiment simulating the behavior of the very large steam bubbles generated at the time of an accident of core collapse was carried out with a warm water tank, and the applicability of the theory of very small bubble disappearance known at present was examined. The bubbles generated in HCDA (hypothetical core disruptive accident) are expected to be very large, containing sodium, fuel, FP gas and so on, and play important role in the mechanism of emitting radioactive substances in the safety analysis of LMFBRs. In this experiment, the degree of subcool of the warm water pool, the initial radii of steam bubbles and the blowoff pressure of steam were taken as the parameters. The radius of the steam bubbles generated in the experiment was about 6.5 cm, and the state of disappearance was different above and below the degree of unsaturation of 10 deg C. Comparing the disappearance curve obtained by the experiment with the theory of disappearance of small bubbles, the experimental values were between inertia-controlled disappearance and heat transfer-controlled disappearance, and this result was able to be explained generally with the model taking the pressure change within steam bubbles into account. The rise of bubbles was also observed. (Kako, I.)

  1. Bubble-Bed Structural Models for Hybrid Flow Simulation: An Outlook Based on a CFD-Generated Flow Image

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staykov, P.; Fialová, Marie; Vlaev, S. D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 5 (2009), s. 669-676 ISSN 0263-8762 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble column * hybrid modeling * phenomenological mixing models Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.223, year: 2009

  2. Bubble systems

    CERN Document Server

    Avdeev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic analysis of bubble system mathematics, using the mechanics of two-phase systems in non-equilibrium as the scope of analysis. The author introduces the thermodynamic foundations of bubble systems, ranging from the fundamental starting points to current research challenges. This book addresses a range of topics, including description methods of multi-phase systems, boundary and initial conditions as well as coupling requirements at the phase boundary. Moreover, it presents a detailed study of the basic problems of bubble dynamics in a liquid mass: growth (dynamically and thermally controlled), collapse, bubble pulsations, bubble rise and breakup. Special emphasis is placed on bubble dynamics in turbulent flows. The analysis results are used to write integral equations governing the rate of vapor generation (condensation) in non-equilibrium flows, thus creating a basis for solving a number of practical problems. This book is the first to present a comprehensive theory of boil...

  3. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tsvetkov, Pavel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  4. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  5. Geomagnetic control of equatorial plasma bubble activity modeled by the TIEGCM with Kp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Yizengaw, E.; Groves, K.; Caton, R.; McNamara, L.; Bridgwood, C.; Francis, M.; Terkildsen, M.; Norman, R.; Zhang, K.

    2014-08-01

    Describing the day-to-day variability of Equatorial Plasma Bubble (EPB) occurrence remains a significant challenge. In this study we use the Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM), driven by solar (F10.7) and geomagnetic (Kp) activity indices, to study daily variations of the linear Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability growth rate in relation to the measured scintillation strength at five longitudinally distributed stations. For locations characterized by generally favorable conditions for EPB growth (i.e., within the scintillation season for that location), we find that the TIEGCM is capable of identifying days when EPB development, determined from the calculated R-T growth rate, is suppressed as a result of geomagnetic activity. Both observed and modeled upward plasma drifts indicate that the prereversal enhancement scales linearly with Kp from several hours prior, from which it is concluded that even small Kp changes cause significant variations in daily EPB growth.

  6. Modeling of reaction kinetics in bubbling fluidized bed biomass gasification reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapa, R.K.; Halvorsen, B.M. [Telemark University College, Kjolnes ring 56, P.O. Box 203, 3901 Porsgrunn (Norway); Pfeifer, C. [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Bubbling fluidized beds are widely used as biomass gasification reactors as at the biomass gasification plant in Gussing, Austria. The reactor in the plant is a dual circulating bubbling fluidized bed gasification reactor. The plant produces 2MW electricity and 4.5MW heat from the gasification of biomass. Wood chips as biomass and olivine particles as hot bed materials are fluidized with high temperature steam in the reactor. As a result, biomass undergoes endothermic chemical reaction to produce a mixture of combustible gases in addition to some carbon-dioxide (CO2). The combustible gases are mainly hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4). The gas is used to produce electricity and heat via utilization in a gas engine. Alternatively, the gas is further processed for gaseous or liquid fuels, but still on the process of development level. Composition and quality of the gas determine the efficiency of the reactor. A computational model has been developed for the study of reaction kinetics in the gasification rector. The simulation is performed using commercial software Barracuda virtual reactor, VR15. Eulerian-Lagrangian approach in coupling of gas-solid flow has been implemented. Fluid phase is treated with an Eulerian formulation. Discrete phase is treated with a Lagrangian formulation. Particle-particle and particle-wall interactions and inter-phase heat and mass transfer have been taken into account. Series of simulations have been performed to study model prediction of the gas composition. The composition is compared with data from the gasifier at the CHP plant in Güssing, Austria. The model prediction of the composition of gases has good agreements with the result of the operating plant.

  7. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  8. Mathematical modeling of cold cap: Effect of bubbling on melting rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorny, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-12-31

    The rate of melting is a primary concern in the vitrification of radioactive wastes because it directly influences the life cycle of nuclear waste cleanup efforts. To increase glass melting performance, experimental and industrial all-electric waste glass melters employ various melt-rate enhancement techniques, the most prominent being the application of bubblers submerged into molten glass. This study investigates various ways in which bubbling affects melting rate in a waste glass melter. Using the recently developed cold cap model, we suggest that forced convection of molten glass, which increases the cold cap bottom temperature, is the main factor. Other effects, such as stirring the feed into molten glass or reducing the insulating effect of foaming, also play a role.

  9. Structural Model of RNA Polymerase II Elongation Complex with Complete Transcription Bubble Reveals NTP Entry Routes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The RNA polymerase II (Pol II is a eukaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the messenger RNA using a DNA template. Despite numerous biochemical and biophysical studies, it remains elusive whether the "secondary channel" is the only route for NTP to reach the active site of the enzyme or if the "main channel" could be an alternative. On this regard, crystallographic structures of Pol II have been extremely useful to understand the structural basis of transcription, however, the conformation of the unpaired non-template DNA part of the full transcription bubble (TB is still unknown. Since diffusion routes of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP substrate through the main channel might overlap with the TB region, gaining structural information of the full TB is critical for a complete understanding of Pol II transcription process. In this study, we have built a structural model of Pol II with a complete transcription bubble based on multiple sources of existing structural data and used Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations together with structural analysis to shed light on NTP entry pathways. Interestingly, we found that although both channels have enough space to allow NTP loading, the percentage of MD conformations containing enough space for NTP loading through the secondary channel is twice higher than that of the main channel. Further energetic study based on MD simulations with NTP loaded in the channels has revealed that the diffusion of the NTP through the main channel is greatly disfavored by electrostatic repulsion between the NTP and the highly negatively charged backbones of nucleotides in the non-template DNA strand. Taken together, our results suggest that the secondary channel is the major route for NTP entry during Pol II transcription.

  10. Surface renewal model for heat transfer calculation between a porous solid wall and an internally heated bubbling pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourniaire, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This work has been performed in the frame of the study of severe accident of LWR involving core meltdown and failure of the reactor vessel with molten corium relocation in the reactor pit. One of the main issue in nuclear safety is the estimation of the time when the reactor cavity may fail due to the erosion of the basemat since it would lead to the contamination of the groundwater. The calculation of the basemat erosion velocity requires the knowledge of the heat transfer between the corium pool and the concrete. Due to the gas release (mainly CO 2 and H 2 O) resulting from the concrete erosion, two-phase flow heat transfers occur during molten core concrete interaction (MCCI). Two-phase flow heat transfer between a porous horizontal wall and an internally heated bubbling pool has been already extensively investigated on the experimental side by several authors (Kutateladze and Malenkov, Duignan et al, Bonnet et al, Bilbao y Leon et al). The effect of various parameters such as the physical properties of the fluid or the pool aspect ratio has been studied so that many experimental data are available. From dimensional analysis (Kutateladze-Malenkov, Bonnet et al) or theoretical approach (Konsetov) and from these experimental data, heat transfer correlations have been proposed based on usual non-dimensional groups as Nu, Pr, Ra, etc. Today, the most widely used correlation in MCCI study are those proposed by Konsetov and by Kutateladze and Malenkov. Comparisons of the results of these correlations with available experimental data show that not all tendencies are well reproduced. The main purpose of this paper is to present an alternative heat transfer correlation that can be used in MCCI study. This correlation has been proposed by Deckwer in the frame of the study of heat transfer in bubble column reactors dedicated to chemical engineering. This correlation has been deduced from a theoretical analysis based on a surface renewal

  11. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  12. Modeling and Predicting the Daily Equatorial Plasma Bubble Activity Using the Tiegcm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Yizengaw, E.; Wiens, K. C.; Wing, S.; Groves, K. M.; Caton, R. G.; Bridgwood, C.; Francis, M. J.; Terkildsen, M. B.; Norman, R.; Zhang, K.

    2014-12-01

    Describing and understanding the daily variability of Equatorial Plasma Bubble (EPB) occurrence has remained a significant challenge over recent decades. In this study we use the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM), which is driven by solar (F10.7) and geomagnetic (Kp) activity indices, to study daily variations of the linear Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability growth rate in relation to the measured scintillation strength at five longitudinally distributed stations. For locations characterized by generally favorable conditions for EPB growth (i.e., within the scintillation season for that location) we find that the TIEGCM is capable of identifying days when EPB development, determined from the calculated R-T growth rate, is suppressed as a result of geomagnetic activity. Both observed and modeled upward plasma drift indicate that the pre-reversal enhancement scales linearly with Kp from several hours prior, from which it is concluded that even small Kp changes cause significant variations in daily EPB growth. This control of Kp variations on EPB growth prompted an investigation into the use of predicted Kp values from the Wing Kp model over a 2-month equinoctial campaign in 2014. It is found that both the 1-hr and 4-hr predicted Kp values can be reliably used as inputs into the TIEGCM to forecast the EPB growth conditions during scintillation season, when daily EPB variability is governed by the suppression of EPBs on days with increased, but not necessarily high, geomagnetic activity.

  13. Bubble transport in bifurcations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph; Qamar, Adnan

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment, we examine the transport of bubbles entrained in liquid. In gas embolotherapy, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that originate from acoustic vaporization of vascular droplets. In the case of non-functionalized droplets with the objective of vessel occlusion, the bubbles are transported by flow through vessel bifurcations, where they may split prior to eventually reach vessels small enough that they become lodged. This splitting behavior affects the distribution of bubbles and the efficacy of flow occlusion and the treatment. In these studies, we investigated bubble transport in bifurcations using computational and theoretical modeling. The model reproduces the variety of experimentally observed splitting behaviors. Splitting homogeneity and maximum shear stress along the vessel walls is predicted over a variety of physical parameters. Maximum shear stresses were found to decrease with increasing Reynolds number. The initial bubble length was found to affect the splitting behavior in the presence of gravitational asymmetry. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  14. Cognitive Bubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Ciril Bosch-Rosa; Thomas Meissner; Antoni Bosch-Domènech

    2015-01-01

    Smith et al. (1988) reported large bubbles and crashes in experimental asset markets, a result that has been replicated by a large literature. Here we test whether the occurrence of bubbles depends on the experimental subjects' cognitive sophistication. In a two-part experiment, we first run a battery of tests to assess the subjects' cognitive sophistication and classify them into low or high levels of cognitive sophistication. We then invite them separately to two asset market experimen...

  15. Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Log Periodic Power Laws for Bubble Modelling but Were Afraid to Ask

    OpenAIRE

    Fantazzini, Dean; Geraskin, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Sornette et al. (1996), Sornette and Johansen (1997), Johansen et al. (2000) and Sornette (2003a) proposed that, prior to crashes, the mean function of a stock index price time series is characterized by a power law decorated with log-periodic oscillations, leading to a critical point that describes the beginning of the market crash. This paper reviews the original Log-Periodic Power Law (LPPL) model for financial bubble modelling, and discusses early criticism and recent generalizations prop...

  16. Spherical Solutions of an Underwater Explosion Bubble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B. Wardlaw

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the 1D explosion bubble flow field out to the first bubble minimum is examined in detail using four different models. The most detailed is based on the Euler equations and accounts for the internal bubble fluid motion, while the simplest links a potential water solution to a stationary, Isentropic bubble model. Comparison of the different models with experimental data provides insight into the influence of compressibility and internal bubble dynamics on the behavior of the explosion bubble.

  17. Bubbling away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Bubble chambers may have almost vanished from the front line of physics research, but the vivid memory of their intricate and sometimes beautiful patterns of particle tracks lives on, and has greatly influenced the computer graphics of track reconstruction in today's big experiments. 'Seeing' an interaction makes it more understandable. Bubble chambers, with their big collaborations of physicists from many widely scattered research institutes, started another ball rolling. The groups formed are even now only surpassed in size by the big collaborations working on today's major detectors at colliding beam machines. From 14-16 July, about 130 physicists gathered at CERN to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the invention of the bubble chamber by Donald Glaser. The meeting, organized by Derek C. Colley from Birmingham, gave a comprehensive overview of bubble chamber contributions to physics, their challenging technology, and the usefulness of bubble chamber photographs in education, both for physics and the public at large. After opening remarks by CERN Director Carlo Rubbia, Donald Glaser began with a brief review of the work which led to his invention - there was much more to it than idly watching beer bubbles rise up the wall of the glass - before turning to his present line of research, biophysics, also very visually oriented

  18. Observations and modeling of magnetized plasma jets and bubbles launched into a transverse B-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward B., IV; van der Holst, Bart; Rogers, Barrett N.; Hsu, Scott C.

    2017-10-01

    Hot, dense, plasma structures launched from a coaxial plasma gun on the HelCat dual-source plasma device at the University of New Mexico drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the chamber's background magnetic field providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, shocks, as well as CME-like dynamics possibly relevant to the solar corona. Vector magnetic field data from an eleven-tipped B-dot rake probe and images from an ultra-fast camera will be presented in comparison with ongoing MHD modeling using the 3-D MHD BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid (AMR) that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets and is uniquely suited for flux-rope expansion modeling. Recent experiments show a possible magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability that appears asymmetrically at the interface between launched spheromaks (bubbles) and their entraining background magnetic field. Efforts to understand this instability using in situ measurements, new chamber boundary conditions, and ultra-fast camera data will be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  19. Modeling and simulation of the bubble-induced flow in wine fermentation vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed flow pattern analyses regarding wine fermentations conducted without mechanical agitation are limited to lab-scale investigations, as industrial size measurements are expensive and difficult to realize. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD methods can offer an alternative and more flexible approach to gain insight into such bubble induced fluid flows. Therefore, the aim of this study was to transfer the findings of existing research onto a CFD model capable of capturing the three- dimensional flow pattern in industrial scale wine fermentation vessels. First results were obtained by using an extended version of the OpenFOAM® (v.2.2.x solver multiphaseEulerFoam for modeling the gas-liquid two phase system. With parameters from the most vigorous phase of wine fermentation a fully developed, unsteady flow regime could be established after approx. 120 s of real time. Thereby the groundwork for further evaluations of e.g. mixing efficiency or cooling equipment optimizations with CFD methods is laid.

  20. A dry-spot model for the prediction of critical heat flux in water boiling in bubbly flow regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Sang Jun; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) in bubbly flow regime using dry-spot model proposed recently by authors for pool and flow boiling CHF and existing correlations for forced convective heat transfer coefficient, active site density and bubble departure diameter in nucleate boiling region. Without any empirical constants always present in earlier models, comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data for upward flow of water in vertical, uniformly-heated round tubes are performed and show a good agreement. The parametric trends of CHF have been explored with respect to variations in pressure, tube diameter and length, mass flux and inlet subcooling. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  1. Integral analysis of cavity pressurization in a fuel rod during an ULOF driven TOP with inclusion of surface tension effects on froth gas bubbles and variable cavity conditions due to fuel melting and ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.

    1984-02-01

    The transient cavity pressurization in an ULOF driven TOP excursion has been analyzed for the SPX-1 reactor with an equation of state that allows to simulate the contribution of small froth gas bubbles to the pressure build-up in a fuel pin with inclusion of restraints from surface tension. Calculations were performed for various bubble parameters. Estimates are made for effective gas availabilities at fuel melting which can be used in a cavity model with an ideal gas equation to arrive at similar pressure transients

  2. Magnetic-bubble devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairholme, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic bubbles were first described only ten years ago when research workers were discussing orthoferrites containing μm diameter bubbles. However, problems of material fabrication limit crystals to a few mm across which severely curtailed device development. Since then materials have changed and rare-earth-iron garnet films can be grown up 3 inches in diameter with bubble diameters down to sizes below 1 μm. The first commercial products have device capacities in the range 64 000 to 100 000 bits with bubble diameters between 4 and 6 μm. Chip capacities of 1 Mbit are presently under development in the laboratory, as are new techniques to use submicrometre bubbles. The operation and fabrication of a bubble device is described using the serial loop devices currently being manufactured at Plessey as models. Chip organization is one important variable which directly affects the access time. A range of access times and capacities is available which offers a wide range of market opportunities, ranging from consumer products to fixed head disc replacements. some of the application areas are described. (author)

  3. A derivation of the stable cavitation threshold accounting for bubble-bubble interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guédra, Matthieu; Cornu, Corentin; Inserra, Claude

    2017-09-01

    The subharmonic emission of sound coming from the nonlinear response of a bubble population is the most used indicator for stable cavitation. When driven at twice their resonance frequency, bubbles can exhibit subharmonic spherical oscillations if the acoustic pressure amplitude exceeds a threshold value. Although various theoretical derivations exist for the subharmonic emission by free or coated bubbles, they all rest on the single bubble model. In this paper, we propose an analytical expression of the subharmonic threshold for interacting bubbles in a homogeneous, monodisperse cloud. This theory predicts a shift of the subharmonic resonance frequency and a decrease of the corresponding pressure threshold due to the interactions. For a given sonication frequency, these results show that an optimal value of the interaction strength (i.e. the number density of bubbles) can be found for which the subharmonic threshold is minimum, which is consistent with recently published experiments conducted on ultrasound contrast agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Super-exponential bubbles in lab experiments: evidence for anchoring over-optimistic expectations on price

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hüsler, A.; Sornette, D.; Hommes, C.H.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze a controlled price formation experiment in the laboratory that shows evidence for bubbles. We calibrate two models that demonstrate with high statistical significance that these laboratory bubbles have a tendency to grow faster than exponential due to positive feedback. We show that the

  5. On the Inception of Financial Representative Bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ferrara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we aim to formalize the inception of representative bubbles giving the condition under which they may arise. We will find that representative bubbles may start at any time, depending on the definition of a behavioral component. This result is at odds with the theory of classic rational bubbles, which are those models that rely on the fulfillment of the transversality condition by which a bubble in a financial asset can arise just at its first trade. This means that a classic rational bubble (differently from our model cannot follow a cycle since if a bubble exists, it will burst by definition and never arise again.

  6. Convective mass transfer around a dissolving bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat, Jerome; Grandemange, Mathieu; Poulain, Cedric

    2017-11-01

    Heat or mass transfer around an evaporating drop or condensing vapor bubble is a complex issue due to the interplay between the substrate properties, diffusion- and convection-driven mass transfer, and Marangoni effects, to mention but a few. In order to disentangle these mechanisms, we focus here mainly on the convective mass transfer contribution in an isothermal mass transfer problem. For this, we study the case of a millimetric carbon dioxide bubble which is suspended under a substrate and dissolved into pure liquid water. The high solubility of CO2 in water makes the liquid denser and promotes a buoyant-driven flow at a high (solutal) Rayleigh number (Ra˜104 ). The alteration of p H allows the concentration field in the liquid to be imaged by laser fluorescence enabling us to measure both the global mass flux (bubble volume, contact angle) and local mass flux around the bubble along time. After a short period of mass diffusion, where the boundary layer thickens like the square root of time, convection starts and the CO2 is carried by a plume falling at constant velocity. The boundary layer thickness then reaches a plateau which depends on the bubble cross section. Meanwhile the plume velocity scales like (dV /d t )1 /2 with V being the volume of the bubble. As for the rate of volume loss, we recover a constant mass flux in the diffusion-driven regime followed by a decrease in the volume V like V2 /3 after convection has started. We present a model which agrees well with the bubble dynamics and discuss our results in the context of droplet evaporation, as well as high Rayleigh convection.

  7. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF THREE-PHASE SLURRY-BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    1999-09-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding three-phase reactors from the point of view of kinetic theory. In a paper in press for publication in Chemical Engineering Science (Wu and Gidaspow, 1999) we have obtained a complete numerical solution of bubble column reactors. In view of the complexity of the simulation a better understanding of the processes using simplified analytical solutions is required. Such analytical solutions are presented in the attached paper, Large Scale Oscillations or Gravity Waves in Risers and Bubbling Beds. This paper presents analytical solutions for bubbling frequencies and standing wave flow patterns. The flow patterns in operating slurry bubble column reactors are not optimum. They involve upflow in the center and downflow at the walls. It may be possible to control flow patterns by proper redistribution of heat exchangers in slurry bubble column reactors. We also believe that the catalyst size in operating slurry bubble column reactors is not optimum. To obtain an optimum size we are following up on the observation of George Cody of Exxon who reported a maximum granular temperature (random particle kinetic energy) for a particle size of 90 microns. The attached paper, Turbulence of Particles in a CFB and Slurry Bubble Columns Using Kinetic Theory, supports George Cody's observations. However, our explanation for the existence of the maximum in granular temperature differs from that proposed by George Cody. Further computer simulations and experiments involving measurements of granular temperature are needed to obtain a sound theoretical explanation for the possible existence of an optimum catalyst size.

  8. Issues for Achieving an Experimental Model Concerning Bubble Deck Concrete Slab with Spherical Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Călin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available After realizing numerous constructions in the world, which use Bubble Deck concrete slabs with spherical gaps, valuable information were gathered, allowing a rigorous processing and systematization, with the purpose of realizing an experimental and documentary study. The paper presents some experimental programs which refer to concrete slabs with spherical gaps, existing in similar execution and loading conditions as those from a real construction; this implies the realization of a monolithic slab element at a scale of 1:1, which will be subjected to static gravitational loadings in order to determine the deformation (deflection, cracking and failing characteristics. The resultant conclusions will be used in defining the failing mechanisms, very useful in the formulation of an adequate mathematical model. The research proposed in the project offers an answer to the major objectives of the development of calculus methods and existent prescriptions of the concrete slabs with spherical gaps. The realization of the proposed objectives involves documentation activities, theoretical study, collaboration with different other partners, gathering and processing of the results obtained in laboratory and even in situ.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of bubble dynamics in subcooled and near-saturated convective nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Sreeyuth; Sato, Yohei; Niceno, Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We simulate convective nucleate pool boiling with a novel phase-change model. • We simulate four cases at different sub-cooling and wall superheat levels. • We investigate the flow structures around the growing bubble and analyze the accompanying physics. • We accurately simulate bubble shape elongation and enhanced wall cooling due to the sliding and slanting motions of bubbles. • Bubble cycle durations show good agreement with experimental observations. - Abstract: With the long-term objective of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) prediction, bubble dynamics in convective nucleate boiling flows has been studied using a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). A sharp-interface phase change model which was originally developed for pool boiling flows is extended to convective boiling flows. For physical scales smaller than the smallest flow scales (smaller than the grid size), a micro-scale model was used. After a grid dependency study and a parametric study for the contact angle, four cases of simulation were carried out with different wall superheat and degree of subcooling. The flow structures around the growing bubble were investigated together with the accompanying physics. The relation between the heat flux evolution and the bubble growth was studied, along with investigations of bubble diameter and bubble base diameter evolutions across the four cases. As a validation, the evolutions of bubble diameter and bubble base diameter were compared to experimental observations. The bubble departure period and the bubble shapes show good agreement between the experiment and the simulation, although the Reynolds number of the simulation cases is relatively low

  10. Modeling the capture rate by a radially oscillating spherical bubble. A bio-mimetic model for studying the mechanically-mediated uptake by cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudino, Antonio; Raciti, Domenica; Grassi, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The surface of living cells constitutes a dynamic environment submitted to complex oscillatory motions. Oscillations may modify the uptake of incoming molecules. In this study we explored a bio-mimetic system formed by oscillating bubbles suspended in a sea of randomly distributed diffusants. We investigated by a time-dependent Fokker-Planck equation the effect of the periodic motions on the adsorption of a diffusant onto the moving bubble surface. We introduced both direct interactions between the diffusant and the fluctuating surface and indirect interactions due to the hydrodynamic motions around a vibrating surface. Results are expressed in terms of oscillation frequencies and amplitudes. An overall reduction of the bound diffusant at the bubble surface was observed.

  11. Multivariate bubbles and antibubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, John

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we develop models for multivariate financial bubbles and antibubbles based on statistical physics. In particular, we extend a rich set of univariate models to higher dimensions. Changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. Moreover, our multivariate models are able to capture some of the contagious effects that occur during such episodes. We are able to show that declining lending quality helped fuel a bubble in the US stock market prior to 2008. Further, our approach offers interesting insights into the spatial development of UK house prices.

  12. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  13. Mechanics of gas-vapor bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Yuhang; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Most bubbles contain a mixture of vapor and incondensible gases. While the limit cases of pure vapor and pure gas bubbles are well studied, much less is known about the more realistic case of a mixture. The bubble contents continuously change due to the combined effects of evaporation and

  14. Modelling chemical reactions in dc plasma inside oxygen bubbles in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, N; Ishii, Y; Yasuoka, K

    2012-01-01

    Plasmas generated inside oxygen bubbles in water have been developed for water purification. Zero-dimensional numerical simulations were used to investigate the chemical reactions in plasmas driven by dc voltage. The numerical and experimental results of the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ozone in the solution were compared with a discharge current between 1 and 7 mA. Upon increasing the water vapour concentration inside bubbles, we saw from the numerical results that the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased with discharge current, whereas the concentration of ozone decreased. This finding agreed with the experimental results. With an increase in the discharge current, the heat flux from the plasma to the solution increased, and a large amount of water was probably vaporized into the bubbles.

  15. Modelling chemical reactions in dc plasma inside oxygen bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.; Ishii, Y.; Yasuoka, K.

    2012-02-01

    Plasmas generated inside oxygen bubbles in water have been developed for water purification. Zero-dimensional numerical simulations were used to investigate the chemical reactions in plasmas driven by dc voltage. The numerical and experimental results of the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ozone in the solution were compared with a discharge current between 1 and 7 mA. Upon increasing the water vapour concentration inside bubbles, we saw from the numerical results that the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased with discharge current, whereas the concentration of ozone decreased. This finding agreed with the experimental results. With an increase in the discharge current, the heat flux from the plasma to the solution increased, and a large amount of water was probably vaporized into the bubbles.

  16. Simulation of shock-induced bubble collapse using a four-equation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, E.; Hoarau, Y.; Zeidan, D.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the interaction between a planar incident shock wave with a cylindrical gas bubble. Simulations are performed using an inviscid compressible one-fluid solver based upon three conservation laws for the mixture variables, namely mass, momentum, and total energy along with a supplementary transport equation for the volume fraction of the gas phase. The study focuses on the maximum pressure generated by the bubble collapse. The influence of the strength of the incident shock is investigated. A law for the maximum pressure function of the Mach number of the incident shock is proposed.

  17. Bubble Proliferation or Dissolution of Cavitation Nuclei in the Beam Path of a Shock-Wave Lithotripter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Spencer; Lautz, Jaclyn; Sankin, Georgy N.; Szeri, Andrew J.; Zhong, Pei

    2015-03-01

    It is hypothesized that the decreased treatment efficiency in contemporary shock-wave lithotripters is related to tensile wave attenuation due to cavitation in the prefocal beam path. Utilizing high-speed imaging of the beam path and focal pressure waveform measurements, tensile attenuation is associated with bubble proliferation. By systematically testing different combinations of pulse-repetition frequency and gas concentration, we modulate the bubble-dissolution time to identify which conditions lead to bubble proliferation and show that reducing bubble proliferation in the beam path significantly improves acoustic transmission and stone comminution efficiency in vitro. In addition to experiments, a bubble-proliferation model is developed that takes gas diffusion across the bubble wall and bubble fragmentation into account. By aligning the model with experimental observations, the number of daughter bubbles produced after a single lithotripter bubble collapse is estimated to be in the range of 253 ˜510 . This finding is on the same order of magnitude with previous measurements of an isolated bubble collapse in a lithotripter field by Pishchalnikov, McAteer, and Williams [BJU Int. 102, 1681 (2008), 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2008.07896.x], and this estimate improves the general understanding of lithotripsy bubble dynamics in the beam path.

  18. Interface tracking computations of bubble dynamics in nucleate flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giustini, G.

    2015-01-01

    The boiling process is of utter importance for the design and operation of water-cooled nuclear reactors. Despite continuous effort over the past decades, a fully mechanistic model of boiling in the presence of a solid surface has not yet been achieved. Uncertainties exist at fundamental level, since the microscopic phenomena governing nucleate boiling are still not understood, and as regards 'component scale' modelling, which relies heavily on empirical representations of wall boiling. Accurate models of these phenomena at sub-milli-metric scale are capable of elucidating the various processes and to produce quantitative data needed for up-scaling. Within this context, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) represents a powerful tool for CFD analysis of boiling flows. In this contribution, DNS coupled with an Interface Tracking method (Y. Sato, B. Niceno, Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 249, 15 September 2013, Pages 127-161) are used to analyse the hydrodynamics and heat transfer associated with heat diffusion controlled bubble growth at a solid substrate during nucleate flow boiling. The growth of successive bubbles from a single nucleation site is simulated with a computational model that includes heat conduction in the solid substrate and evaporation from the liquid film (micro-layer) present beneath the bubble. Bubble evolution is investigated and the additional (with respect to single phase convection) heat transfer mechanisms due to the ebullition cycle are quantified. The simulations show that latent heat exchange due to evaporation in the micro-layer and sensible heat exchange during the waiting time after bubble departure are the main heat transfer mechanisms. It is found that the presence of an imposed flow normal to the bubble rising path determines a complex velocity and temperature distribution near the nucleation site. This conditions can result in bubble sliding, and influence bubble shape, departure diameter and departure frequency

  19. Moduli vacuum bubbles produced by evaporating black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    We consider a model with a toroidally compactified extra dimension giving rise to a temperature-dependent 4D effective potential with one-loop contributions due to the Casimir effect, along with a 5D cosmological constant. The forms of the effective potential at low and high temperatures indicate a possibility for the formation of a domain wall bubble, formed by the modulus scalar field, surrounding an evaporating black hole. This is viewed as an example of a recently proposed black hole vacuum bubble arising from matter-sourced moduli fields in the vicinity of an evaporating black hole [D. Green, E. Silverstein, and D. Starr, Phys. Rev. D 74, 024004 (2006)]. The black hole bubble can be highly opaque to lower-energy particles and photons, and thereby entrap them within. For high-temperature black holes, there may also be a symmetry-breaking black hole bubble of false vacuum of the type previously conjectured by Moss [I. G. Moss, Phys. Rev. D 32, 1333 (1985)], tending to reflect low-energy particles from its wall. A double bubble composed of these two different types of bubble may form around the black hole, altering the hole's emission spectrum that reaches outside observers. Smaller mass black holes that have already evaporated away could have left vacuum bubbles behind that contribute to the dark matter

  20. Neutron-induced nucleation inside bubble chambers using Freon 115 as the active medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-08-01

    Neutron imaging is used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments to measure the core symmetry of imploded targets. Liquid bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. Due to the fact that nucleation models used in gel detectors research cannot always give correct estimates for the neutron-induced bubble density inside a liquid bubble chamber, an improved theoretical model to describe the mechanism of bubble formation for Freon 115 as the active medium has been developed. It shows that the size of the critical radius for the nucleation process determines the mechanism of bubble formation and the sensitivity of the active medium to the 14.1-MeV incident neutrons resulting from ICF implosions. The bubble-growth mechanism is driven by the excitation of the medium electronic levels and not by electrons ejected from the medium's atoms as happens for the bubble chambers used to detect charged particles. The model accurately predicts the neutron-induced bubble density measured on OMEGA with both liquid bubble chambers and gel detectors.

  1. Neutron-induced nucleation inside bubble chambers using Freon 115 as the active medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghilea, M.C., E-mail: mghi@lle.rochester.edu [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, NY 14623-1299 (United States); Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, NY 14623-1299 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    Neutron imaging is used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments to measure the core symmetry of imploded targets. Liquid bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. Due to the fact that nucleation models used in gel detectors research cannot always give correct estimates for the neutron-induced bubble density inside a liquid bubble chamber, an improved theoretical model to describe the mechanism of bubble formation for Freon 115 as the active medium has been developed. It shows that the size of the critical radius for the nucleation process determines the mechanism of bubble formation and the sensitivity of the active medium to the 14.1-MeV incident neutrons resulting from ICF implosions. The bubble-growth mechanism is driven by the excitation of the medium electronic levels and not by electrons ejected from the medium's atoms as happens for the bubble chambers used to detect charged particles. The model accurately predicts the neutron-induced bubble density measured on OMEGA with both liquid bubble chambers and gel detectors.

  2. CFD Model for Pneumatic Mixing with Bubble Chains: Application to Glass Melts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 127, MAY 4 (2015), s. 344-361 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble chain * viscous liquid * flow simulation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.750, year: 2015

  3. The relation between pre-eruptive bubble size distribution, ash particle morphology, and their internal density: Implications to volcanic ash transport and dispersion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models strongly depends on particle morphology and their internal properties. Shape of ash particles affects terminal fall velocities (TFV) and, mostly, dispersion. Internal density combined with particle size has a very strong impact on TFV and ultimately on the rate of ash cloud thinning and particle sedimentation on the ground. Unlike other parameters, internal particle density cannot be measured directly because of the micron scale sizes of fine ash particles, but we demonstrate that it varies greatly depending on the particle size. Small simple type ash particles (fragments of bubble walls, 5-20 micron size) do not contain whole large magmatic bubbles inside and their internal density is almost the same as that of volcanic glass matrix. On the other side, the larger compound type ash particles (>40 microns for silicic fine ashes) always contain some bubbles or the whole spectra of bubble size distribution (BSD), i.e. bubbles of all sizes, bringing their internal density down as compared to simple ash. So, density of the larger ash particles is a function of the void fraction inside them (magmatic bubbles) which, in turn, is controlled by BSD. Volcanic ash is a product of the fragmentation of magmatic foam formed by pre-eruptive bubble population and characterized by BSD. The latter can now be measured from bubble imprints on ash particle surfaces using stereo-scanning electron microscopy (SSEM) and BubbleMaker software developed at UNH, or using traditional high-resolution X-Ray tomography. In this work we present the mathematical and statistical formulation for this problem connecting internal ash density with particle size and BSD, and demonstrate how the TFV of the ash population is affected by variation of particle density.

  4. Incorporation of Reaction Kinetics into a Multiphase, Hydrodynamic Model of a Fischer Tropsch Slurry Bubble Column Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Guillen, PhD; Anastasia Gribik; Daniel Ginosar, PhD; Steven P. Antal, PhD

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process in a Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). The CMFD model is fundamentally based which allows it to be applied to different industrial processes and reactor geometries. The NPHASE CMFD solver [1] is used as the robust computational platform. Results from the CMFD model include gas distribution, species concentration profiles, and local temperatures within the SBCR. This type of model can provide valuable information for process design, operations and troubleshooting of FT plants. An ensemble-averaged, turbulent, multi-fluid solution algorithm for the multiphase, reacting flow with heat transfer was employed. Mechanistic models applicable to churn turbulent flow have been developed to provide a fundamentally based closure set for the equations. In this four-field model formulation, two of the fields are used to track the gas phase (i.e., small spherical and large slug/cap bubbles), and the other two fields are used for the liquid and catalyst particles. Reaction kinetics for a cobalt catalyst is based upon values reported in the published literature. An initial, reaction kinetics model has been developed and exercised to demonstrate viability of the overall solution scheme. The model will continue to be developed with improved physics added in stages.

  5. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B. [Chalk River Laboratories (Canada); Unrau, D. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} {kappa}-{epsilon} transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels.

  6. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B.; Unrau, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the open-quotes standardclose quotes κ-ε transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels

  7. Experimental investigation of bubble plume structure instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco Simiano; Robert Zboray; Francois de Cachard [Thermal-Hydraulics Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Djamel Lakehal; George Yadigaroglu [Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH-Zentrum/CLT, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    cameras at a right angle provided instantaneous projections of the plume shape on two perpendicular planes. Image processing techniques were applied to determine the plume width and position and their fluctuations in time. Triggering the video recording process with the STPF-PIV system allowed to correlate the measured velocity fields with the plume position with respect to the vessel axis. Then, the velocity fields were ensemble - averaged for a given plume position. The results may significantly differ from the time - averaged velocity fields in a fixed plane, which were used in the past for code assessment. The present results should allow to better discriminate between effective plume spreading, due e.g. to turbulent dispersion, and superimposed, apparent spreading due to plume motion. Beyond this aspect, the achievement of local measurements of most flow parameters in fairly large bubble plumes is a unique tool for model validation. (authors)

  8. Blowing bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteel, K.

    1999-04-01

    The article, based on a series of interviews with column flotation equipment suppliers, reviews and comments on the progress of bubble generator design. Developments mentioned include the Air/Water sparger from Cominco, the SparJet and SlamJet from CPT, the CISA sparger from Sevala CISA, Microcel flotation columns from Birtley Engineering, Flotaire column flotation cells from LMC International, and the Variable Gap Sparger from MinnovEX. 1 fig., 2 photo.

  9. Effect of Slotted Anode on Gas Bubble Behaviors in Aluminum Reduction Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meijia; Li, Baokuan; Li, Linmin; Wang, Qiang; Peng, Jianping; Wang, Yaowu; Cheung, Sherman C. P.

    2017-12-01

    In the aluminum reduction cells, gas bubbles are generated at the bottom of the anode which eventually reduces the effective current contact area and the system efficiency. To encourage the removal of gas bubbles, slotted anode has been proposed and increasingly adopted by some industrial aluminum reduction cells. Nonetheless, the exact gas bubble removal mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. A three-dimensional (3D) transient, multiphase flow mathematical model coupled with magnetohydrodynamics has been developed to investigate the effect of slotted anode on the gas bubble movement. The Eulerian volume of fluid approach is applied to track the electrolyte (bath)-molten aluminum (metal) interface. Meanwhile, the Lagrangian discrete particle model is employed to handle the dynamics of gas bubbles with considerations of the buoyancy force, drag force, virtual mass force, and pressure gradient force. The gas bubble coalescence process is also taken into account based on the O'Rourke's algorithm. The two-way coupling between discrete bubbles and fluids is achieved by the inter-phase momentum exchange. Numerical predictions are validated against the anode current variation in an industrial test. Comparing the results using slotted anode with the traditional one, the time-averaged gas bubble removal rate increases from 36 to 63 pct; confirming that the slotted anode provides more escaping ways and shortens the trajectories for gas bubbles. Furthermore, the slotted anode also reduces gas bubble's residence time and the probability of coalescence. Moreover, the bubble layer thickness in aluminum cell with slotted anode is reduced about 3.5 mm (17.4 pct), so the resistance can be cut down for the sake of energy saving and the metal surface fluctuation amplitude is significantly reduced for the stable operation due to the slighter perturbation with smaller bubbles.

  10. Advanced Mathematical Modeling of Sonar-Induced Bubble Growth and Coalescence in Humans and Marine Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    temperature, linear theory for thermal and radiation damping of the bubble oscillations, and gas concentration in the liquid given by its value for a...not on pressure, and according to the kinetic theory of gases it can be taken proportional to the square root of the gas temperature, 3g = Tg o , (25...Underwater acoustic communication systems typically use CW signals while transmitting data, but echolocation sonar systems do not. Gated signals are used

  11. Fracture-driven methane bubble ascent within shallow fine-grained clay-bearing aquatic sediments: dynamics and controlling factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarboush Sirhan, Shahrazad; Katsman, Regina; Ten Brink, Uri

    2017-04-01

    Mature methane gas bubbles in the fine-grained, clay-bearing (cohesive) aquatic sediments, found at many locations throughout the world, are much larger than the characteristic pore size. When gas pressure within the bubble is high enough to overcome compression, friction, and cohesion at grain contacts, gas migrates upward driven by buoyancy, by pushing the grains apart and fracturing the fine-grained sediments. Fracturing of the fine-grained cohesive sediments by the migrating bubbles destabilizes sediment and might result in slope failure. Migrating methane bubbles may bypass processes of oxidation in the upper sediment layers due to their fast rise velocity, release to the water column and eventually to the atmosphere. In this study we use coupled macroscopic single-bubble mechanical/reaction-transport numerical model to explore bubble ascent under various ambient concentration profiles, associated with bio-chemical processes of methane production and consumption below sediment-water interface, as it occurs in nature. Modeling results show that changes in the ambient dissolved-methane concentrations strongly affect bubble ascent velocity. It is demonstrated that bubble migration scenario within fine-grained muddy sediments is controlled dominantly by the internal bubble pressure that manages solute exchange with adjacent porewater. It is significantly affected by the total hydrostatic pressure. For shallow water depths two sequential bubble propagation patterns were observed: (1) Stable (saw-tooth) fracturing, followed by (2) Dynamic (unstable, rising line) fracturing, leading to an ultimate release of the bubble to the water column. However, for a higher water depth, bubble propagation pattern is characterized by stable fracturing only. In this pattern the bubble becomes more sensitive to the ambient field of methane concentrations and may stop below sediment-water interface due solute release caused by the local methanotrophy.

  12. Theoretical and pragmatic modelling of governing equations for a two-phase flow in bubbly and annular flow regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottoni, M.; Sengpiel, W.

    1992-01-01

    Starting from the rigorous formulation of the conservation equations for mass, momentum and enthalpy, derived for a two-phase flow by volume averaging microscopic balance equations over Eulerian control cells, the article discusses the formulation of the terms describing exchanges between the phases. Two flow regimes are taken into consideration, bubbly flow, applicable for small or medium void fractions, and annular flow, for large void fractions. When lack of knowledge of volume-averaged physical quantities make the rigorously formulated terms useless for computational purposes, modelling of these terms is discussed. 3 figs., 15 refs

  13. Improvement of the bubble rise velocity model in the pressurizer using ALMOD 3 computer code to calculate evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madeira, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    It's studied the improvement for the calculation of bubble rise velocity, by adding two different ways to estimate this velocity, one of which more adequate to pressures normally found in the Reactor Cooling System. Additionally, a limitation in bubble rise velocity growth was imposed, to account for the actual behavior of bubble rise in two-phase mixtures. (Author) [pt

  14. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  15. Development and validation of models for bubble coalescence and breakup. Final report; Entwicklung und Validierung von Modellen fuer Blasenkoaleszenz und -zerfall. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y.; Lucas, D.

    2013-02-15

    A new generalized model for bubble coalescence and breakup has been developed. It is based on physical considerations and takes into account various mechanisms that can lead to bubble coalescence and breakup. First, in a detailed literature review, the available models were compiled and analyzed. It turned out that many of them show a contradictory behaviour. None of these models allows the prediction of the evolution of bubble size distributions along a pipe flow for a wide range of combinations of flow rates of the gas and the liquid phase. The new model has been extensively studied in a simplified Test-Solver. Although this does not cover all details of a developing flow along the pipe, it allows - in contrast to a CFD code - to conduct a large number of variational calculations to investigate the influence of individual sizes and models. Coalescence and breakup cannot be considered separately from other phenomena and models that reflect these phenomena. There are close interactions with the turbulence of the liquid phase and the momentum exchange between phases. Since the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy is a direct input parameter for the new model, the turbulence modelling has been studied very carefully. To validate the model, a special experimental series for air-water flows was used, conducted at the TOPFLOW facility in an 8-meter long DN200 pipe. The data are characterized by high quality and were produced within the TOPFLOW-II project. The test series aims to provide a basis for the work presented here. Predicting the evolution of the bubble size distribution along the pipe could be improved significantly in comparison to the previous standard models for bubble coalescence and breakup implemented in CFX. However some quantitative discrepancies remain. The full model equations as well as an implementation as ''User-FORTRAN'' in CFX are available and can be used for further work on the simulation of poly-disperse bubbly

  16. A theoretical study of bubble motion in surfactant solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanping

    1999-08-01

    We examine the effect of surfactants on a spherical gas bubble rising steadily in an infinite fluid at low and order one Reynolds number with order one and larger Peclet numbers. Our mathematical model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a convection- diffusion equation together with appropriate interfacial conditions. The nonlinearity of the equations and boundary conditions, and the coupling between hydrodynamics and surfactant transport make the problem very challenging. When a bubble rises in a fluid containing surface-active agents, surfactant adsorbs onto the bubble surface at the leading edge, convects to the trailing edge by the surface flow and desorbs into the bulk along the interface. This adsorption develops a surface concentration gradient on the interface that makes the surface tension at the back end relatively lower than that at the front end, and thus retards the bubble velocity. Because of surfactant impurities unavoidably present in materials, this retardation can cause a problem in materials processing in space and glass processing when bubbles are created during chemical reactions. Thus the study of how to remobilize (remove the surfactant gradient on the surface) the bubble surface becomes necessary. Many studies have been done on this retarding effects of the surfactant on a moving bubble. However, most were focused on the retarding effect due to a trace amount of surfactant, in which case the bubble velocity monotonically decreases as the bulk concentration increases. The question of how to remobilize the bubble surface remains unanswered. In this work, we will show that the bubble velocity can be controlled by remobilizing the bubble interface using the surfactant concentration. This technique not only can be used to maximize the bubble velocity, but also can be used to maximize mass transfer on purifying materials and extracting materials from mixtures. In the first part of the work, we illustrate numerically that the

  17. Bubble propagation in Hele-Shaw channels with centred constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Gómez, Andrés; Thompson, Alice B.; Hazel, Andrew L.; Juel, Anne

    2018-04-01

    We study the propagation of finite bubbles in a Hele-Shaw channel, where a centred occlusion (termed a rail) is introduced to provide a small axially uniform depth constriction. For bubbles wide enough to span the channel, the system’s behaviour is similar to that of semi-infinite fingers and a symmetric static solution is stable. Here, we focus on smaller bubbles, in which case the symmetric static solution is unstable and the static bubble is displaced towards one of the deeper regions of the channel on either side of the rail. Using a combination of experiments and numerical simulations of a depth-averaged model, we show that a bubble propagating axially due to a small imposed flow rate can be stabilised in a steady symmetric mode centred on the rail through a subtle interaction between stabilising viscous forces and destabilising surface tension forces. However, for sufficiently large capillary numbers Ca, the ratio of viscous to surface tension forces, viscous forces in turn become destabilising thus returning the bubble to an off-centred propagation regime. With decreasing bubble size, the range of Ca for which steady centred propagation is stable decreases, and eventually vanishes through the coalescence of two supercritical pitchfork bifurcations. The depth-averaged model is found to accurately predict all the steady modes of propagation observed experimentally, and provides a comprehensive picture of the underlying steady bifurcation structure. However, for sufficiently large imposed flow rates, we find that initially centred bubbles do not converge onto a steady mode of propagation. Instead they transiently explore weakly unstable steady modes, an evolution which results in their break-up and eventual settling into a steady propagating state of changed topology.

  18. Tropical Bubbles : Asset Prices in Latin America, 1980-2001

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Santiago; Perry, Guillermo

    2001-01-01

    The authors test for the existence of asset price bubbles in Latin America in 1980-2001, focusing mainly on stock prices. Based on unit root and cointegration tests, they find that they cannot reject the hypothesis of bubbles. They arrive at the same conclusion using Froot and Obstfeld's intrinsic bubbles model. To examine empirical regularities of these bubble episodes in the region, the ...

  19. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  20. Hydrodynamics in a swarm of rising bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riboux, G.

    2007-04-01

    In many applications, bubbles are used to agitate a liquid in order to enhance mixing and transfer. This work is devoted to the study of the hydrodynamics in a stable bubble column. Experimentally, we have determined the properties of the velocity fluctuations inside and behind a homogeneous swarm of rising bubbles for different bubble sizes and gas volume fractions α: self-similarity in α 0,4 , spectrum in k -3 and integral length scale controlled by buoyancy. Numerically, we have reproduced these properties by means of large-scale simulations, the bubbles being modeled by volume-forces. This confirms that the dynamics is controlled by wake interactions. (author)

  1. Vortex nucleation limited mobility of free electron bubbles in the Gross-Pitaevskii model of a superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villois, Alberto; Salman, Hayder

    2018-03-01

    We study the motion of an electron bubble in the zero-temperature limit where neither phonons nor rotons provide a significant contribution to the drag exerted on an ion moving within the superfluid. By using the Gross-Clark model, in which a Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the superfluid wave function is coupled to a Schrödinger equation for the electron wave function, we study how vortex nucleation affects the measured drift velocity of the ion. We use parameters that give realistic values of the ratio of the radius of the bubble with respect to the healing length in superfluid 4He at a pressure of one bar. By performing fully three-dimensional spatiotemporal simulations of the superfluid coupled to an electron, that is modeled within an adiabatic approximation and moving under the influence of an applied electric field, we are able to recover the key dynamics of the ion-vortex interactions that arise and the subsequent ion-vortex complexes that can form. Using the numerically computed drift velocity of the ion as a function of the applied electric field, we determine the vortex nucleation limited mobility of the ion to recover values in good agreement with measured data.

  2. Bubbles & Squat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre Larsen, Signe

    Years Eve they arranged a similar event, and on their facebook event they wrote that ‘Your last training in 2016 might as well be a party’. The concept has been popular, and in the spring of 2017 it evolved into similar events such as ‘Cocktails & Kettlebells’. Our paper aims to contribute......In Denmark a new fitness chain has seen the light of day. It is called Repeat and on their facebook page it is presented as “A new breed of fitness. Metropolitan environment. Flexible terms & prices. Join the revolution.” As part of this ‘fitness revolution’ they introduced, in the autumn of 2016......, a new concept called ‘Bubbles & Squat’, where fitness training is combined with Champagne and a live DJ. One of the invitations for this event describes how “we spice up your friday training with live DJ and lots of refreshing bubbles, to make sure that you are ready for the weekend (...).” Before New...

  3. Theoretical modelling and optimization of bubble column dehumidifier for a solar driven humidification-dehumidification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitha, P. Raj; Ratheesh, R.; Jayakumar, J. S.; Balakrishnan, Shankar

    2018-02-01

    Availability and utilization of energy and water are the top most global challenges being faced by the new millennium. At the present state water scarcity has become a global as well as a regional challenge. 40 % of world population faces water shortage. Challenge of water scarcity can be tackled only with increase in water supply beyond what is obtained from hydrological cycle. This can be achieved either by desalinating the sea water or by reusing the waste water. High energy requirement need to be overcome for either of the two processes. Of many desalination technologies, humidification dehumidification (HDH) technology powered by solar energy is widely accepted for small scale production. Detailed optimization studies on system have the potential to effectively utilize the solar energy for brackish water desalination. Dehumidification technology, specifically, require further study because the dehumidifier effectiveness control the energetic performance of the entire HDH system. The reason attributes to the high resistance involved to diffuse dilute vapor through air in a dehumidifier. The present work intends to optimize the design of a bubble column dehumidifier for a solar energy driven desalination process. Optimization is carried out using Matlab simulation. Design process will identify the unique needs of a bubble column dehumidifier in HDH system.

  4. A physically based framework for modeling the organic fractionation of sea spray aerosol from bubble film Langmuir equilibria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely sensed chlorophyll a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC, a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semilabile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecules. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll a and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical

  5. Neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of adrenoleukodystrophy: the roles of the Bubblegum and Double bubble acyl-CoA synthetases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sivachenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Debilitating neurodegenerative conditions with metabolic origins affect millions of individuals worldwide. Still, for most of these neurometabolic disorders there are neither cures nor disease-modifying therapies, and novel animal models are needed for elucidation of disease pathology and identification of potential therapeutic agents. To date, metabolic neurodegenerative disease has been modeled in animals with only limited success, in part because existing models constitute analyses of single mutants and have thus overlooked potential redundancy within metabolic gene pathways associated with disease. Here, we present the first analysis of a very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS double mutant. We show that the Drosophila bubblegum (bgm and double bubble (dbb genes have overlapping functions, and that the consequences of double knockout of both bubblegum and double bubble in the fly brain are profound, affecting behavior and brain morphology, and providing the best paradigm to date for an animal model of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD, a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disease associated with the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids. Using this more fully penetrant model of disease to interrogate brain morphology at the level of electron microscopy, we show that dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism via disruption of ACS function in vivo is causal of neurodegenerative pathologies that are evident in both neuronal cells and their supporting cell populations, and leads ultimately to lytic cell death in affected areas of the brain. Finally, in an extension of our model system to the study of human disease, we describe our identification of an individual with leukodystrophy who harbors a rare mutation in SLC27a6 (encoding a very-long-chain ACS, a human homolog of bgm and dbb.

  6. Neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of adrenoleukodystrophy: the roles of the Bubblegum and Double bubble acyl-CoA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivachenko, Anna; Gordon, Hannah B; Kimball, Suzanne S; Gavin, Erin J; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Letsou, Anthea

    2016-04-01

    Debilitating neurodegenerative conditions with metabolic origins affect millions of individuals worldwide. Still, for most of these neurometabolic disorders there are neither cures nor disease-modifying therapies, and novel animal models are needed for elucidation of disease pathology and identification of potential therapeutic agents. To date, metabolic neurodegenerative disease has been modeled in animals with only limited success, in part because existing models constitute analyses of single mutants and have thus overlooked potential redundancy within metabolic gene pathways associated with disease. Here, we present the first analysis of a very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) double mutant. We show that the Drosophila bubblegum(bgm) and double bubble(dbb) genes have overlapping functions, and that the consequences of double knockout of both bubblegum and double bubble in the fly brain are profound, affecting behavior and brain morphology, and providing the best paradigm to date for an animal model of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disease associated with the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids. Using this more fully penetrant model of disease to interrogate brain morphology at the level of electron microscopy, we show that dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism via disruption of ACS function in vivois causal of neurodegenerative pathologies that are evident in both neuronal cells and their supporting cell populations, and leads ultimately to lytic cell death in affected areas of the brain. Finally, in an extension of our model system to the study of human disease, we describe our identification of an individual with leukodystrophy who harbors a rare mutation in SLC27a6(encoding a very-long-chain ACS), a human homolog of bgm and dbb. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. From rational bubbles to crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent μbubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent μmodel and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  8. Numerical analysis and control of the recirculation bubble strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract. Numerical investigation of the turbulent jet flows, both central and annular type of jets has been carried out with the introduction of swirl at the inlet using the modified ε κ − model. It was observed that the recirculation bubble generated by the central jet without swirl diminishes in size due to increase in swirl number, ...

  9. Numerical analysis and control of the recirculation bubble strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical investigation of the turbulent jet flows, both central and annular type of jets has been carried out with the introduction of swirl at the inlet using the modified κ −ε model. It was observed that the recirculation bubble generated by the central jet without swirl diminishes in size due to increase in swirl number, while in ...

  10. A study on bubble detachment and the impact of heated surface structure in subcooled nucleate boiling flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wen; Chen Peipei; Jones, Barclay G.; Newell, Ty A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the bubble detachment phenomena under subcooled nucleate boiling conditions, in order to obtain a better understanding of the bubble dynamics on horizontal flat heat exchangers. Refrigerant R134a is chosen as a simulant fluid due to its merits of having smaller surface tension, reduced latent heat, and lower boiling temperature than water. Experiments are run with varying experimental parameters, e.g. pressure, inlet subcooled level, flow rate, etc. Digital images are obtained at frame rates up to 4000 frames/s, showing the characteristics of bubble movements. Bubble departure and bubble lift-off, which are described as bubbles detaching from the original nucleation sites and bubbles detaching from the horizontal heated surface respectively, are both considered and measured. Results are compared against the model proposed by Klausner et al. for the prediction of bubble detachment sizes. While good overall agreement is shown, it is suggested that finite rather than zero bubble contact area should be assumed, which improves the model prediction at the pressure range of 300-500 kPa while playing no significant role at a lower pressure of 150 kPa where the model was originally benchmarked. The impact of heated surface structure is studied whose results provide support to the above assumption

  11. High-Frequency Fiber-Optic Ultrasonic Sensor Using Air Micro-Bubble for Imaging of Seismic Physical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Gang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A micro-fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI is proposed and demonstrated experimentally for ultrasonic imaging of seismic physical models. The device consists of a micro-bubble followed by the end of a single-mode fiber (SMF. The micro-structure is formed by the discharging operation on a short segment of hollow-core fiber (HCF that is spliced to the SMF. This micro FPI is sensitive to ultrasonic waves (UWs, especially to the high-frequency (up to 10 MHz UW, thanks to its ultra-thin cavity wall and micro-diameter. A side-band filter technology is employed for the UW interrogation, and then the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR UW signal is achieved. Eventually the sensor is used for lateral imaging of the physical model by scanning UW detection and two-dimensional signal reconstruction.

  12. Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Shripad; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Zheng, Ling; Wang, Ying-Xi

    2002-11-01

    Microgravity experiments on the Constrained Vapor Bubble Heat Exchanger, CVB, are being developed for the International Space Station. In particular, we present results of a precursory experimental and theoretical study of the vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble in the Earth's environment. A novel non-isothermal experimental setup was designed and built to study the transport processes in an ethanol/quartz vertical CVB system. Temperature profiles were measured using an in situ PC (personal computer)-based LabView data acquisition system via thermocouples. Film thickness profiles were measured using interferometry. A theoretical model was developed to predict the curvature profile of the stable film in the evaporator. The concept of the total amount of evaporation, which can be obtained directly by integrating the experimental temperature profile, was introduced. Experimentally measured curvature profiles are in good agreement with modeling results. For microgravity conditions, an analytical expression, which reveals an inherent relation between temperature and curvature profiles, was derived.

  13. V&V Of CFD Modeling Of The Argonne Bubble Experiment: FY15 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, Nathaniel C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Basavarajappa, Manjunath [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-09-30

    In support of the development of accelerator-driven production of the fission product Mo 99, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of an electron-beam irradiated, experimental-scale bubble chamber have been conducted in order to aid in interpretation of existing experimental results, provide additional insights into the physical phenomena, and develop predictive thermal hydraulic capabilities that can be applied to full-scale target solution vessels. Toward that end, a custom hybrid Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian multiphase solver was developed, and simulations have been performed on high-resolution meshes. Good agreement between experiments and simulations has been achieved, especially with respect to the prediction of the maximum temperature of the uranyl sulfate solution in the experimental vessel. These positive results suggest that the simulation methodology that has been developed will prove to be suitable to assist in the development of full-scale production hardware.

  14. Asset Bubbles, Endogenous Growth, and Financial Frictions

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Tomohiro; Yanagawa, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of bubbles in an infinitely-lived agent model of endogenous growth with financial frictions and heterogeneous agents. We provide a complete characterization on the relationship between financial frictions and the existence of bubbles. Our model predicts that if the degree of pledgeability is sufficiently high or sufficiently low, bubbles can not exist. They can only arise at an intermediate degree. This suggests that improving the financial market condition mig...

  15. Brane big bang brought on by a bulk bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gen, Uchida; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    We propose an alternative inflationary universe scenario in the context of Randall-Sundrum braneworld cosmology. In this new scenario the existence of extra dimension(s) plays an essential role. First, the brane universe is initially in the inflationary phase driven by the effective cosmological constant induced by a small mismatch between the vacuum energy in the five-dimensional bulk and the brane tension. This mismatch arises since the bulk is initially in a false vacuum. Then, false vacuum decay occurs, nucleating a true vacuum bubble with negative energy inside the bulk. The nucleated bubble expands in the bulk and consequently hits the brane, causing a hot big-bang brane universe of the Randall-Sundrum type. Here, the termination of the inflationary phase is due to the change of the bulk vacuum energy. The bubble kinetic energy heats up the universe. As a simple realization, we propose a model in which we assume an interaction between the brane and the bubble. We derive the constraints on the model parameters taking into account the following requirements: solving the flatness problem, no force which prohibits the bubble from colliding with the brane, a sufficiently high reheating temperature for the standard nucleosynthesis to work, and the recovery of Newton's law up to 1 mm. We find that a fine-tuning is needed in order to satisfy the first and the second requirements simultaneously, although the other constraints are satisfied in a wide range of the model parameters

  16. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  17. Temperature measurements in cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is usually a nearly isothermal process in the liquid phase, but in some specific flow conditions like hot water or cryogenic fluids, significant temperature variations are detected. In addition, a large temperature increase happens inside the cavitation bubbles at the very end of their collapse, due to the fast compression of the gas at the bubble core, which is almost adiabatic. This process is of primary interest in various biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, where the mechanisms of bubble collapse plays a major role. To investigate the amplitude and the spatial distribution of these temperature variations inside and outside the cavitation bubbles, a system based on cold wires has been developed. They have been tested in a configuration of a single bubble obtained by submitting a small air bubble to a large amplitude pressure wave. Some promising results have been obtained after the initial validation tests. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research Global under Grant N62909-16-1-2116, Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed & Ki-Han Kim program managers.

  18. Soap bubbles in paintings: Art and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozi, F.

    2008-12-01

    Soap bubbles became popular in 17th century paintings and prints primarily as a metaphor for the impermanence and fragility of life. The Dancing Couple (1663) by the Dutch painter Jan Steen is a good example which, among many other symbols, shows a young boy blowing soap bubbles. In the 18th century the French painter Jean-Simeon Chardin used soap bubbles not only as metaphor but also to express a sense of play and wonder. In his most famous painting, Soap Bubbles (1733/1734) a translucent and quavering soap bubble takes center stage. Chardin's contemporary Charles Van Loo painted his Soap Bubbles (1764) after seeing Chardin's work. In both paintings the soap bubbles have a hint of color and show two bright reflection spots. We discuss the physics involved and explain how keenly the painters have observed the interaction of light and soap bubbles. We show that the two reflection spots on the soap bubbles are images of the light source, one real and one virtual, formed by the curved surface of the bubble. The faint colors are due to thin film interference effects.

  19. Armoring confined bubbles in concentrated colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxian; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Encapsulation of a bubble with microparticles is known to significantly improve the stability of the bubble. This phenomenon has recently gained increasing attention due to its application in a variety of technologies such as foam stabilization, drug encapsulation and colloidosomes. Nevertheless, the production of such colloidal armored bubble with controlled size and particle coverage ratio is still a great challenge industrially. We study the coating process of a long air bubble by microparticles in a circular tube filled with a concentrated microparticles colloidal suspension. As the bubble proceeds in the suspension of particles, a monolayer of micro-particles forms on the interface of the bubble, which eventually results in a fully armored bubble. We investigate the phenomenon that triggers and controls the evolution of the particle accumulation on the bubble interface. Moreover, we examine the effects of the mean flow velocity, the size of the colloids and concentration of the suspension on the dynamics of the armored bubble. The results of this study can potentially be applied to production of particle-encapsulated bubbles, surface-cleaning techniques, and gas-assisted injection molding.

  20. Liquid jet formation through the interactions of a laser-induced bubble and a gas bubble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Han

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of the liquid jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair are investigated and compared with the jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair. The strobe photography experimental method and numerical simulations are implemented to obtain the parameter space of the optimum liquid jet, i.e. highest speed and lowest diameter. It is found that due to the enhanced “catapult effect”, which is induced by the protrusion of the first bubble into the second bubble and the flip back of the elongated part of the first bubble, the optimum liquid jet of the second bubble of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair compared to that of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair is 54 %, 65 % and 11 % faster in speed, and 4 %, 44 % and 64 % smaller in diameter, for the 500 μm, 50 μm and 5 μm sized bubbles, respectively. The optimum dimensionless distance for the optimum jet of the laser-induced and the gas bubble is around 0.7, when the maximum bubble radius increases from ∼ 5μm to ∼500 μm, which is different from the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pairs. Besides, the optimum jet of the laser-induced bubble appeared when the bubbles are equal sized, while that of the gas bubble is independent of the relative bubble size, i.e. the liquid jet of the gas bubble has higher robustness in real liquid jet assisted applications when the laser-induced bubble size varies. However, the jet of bubble 2 could maintain a high speed (20 m/s - 35 m/s and a low diameter (∼5 % of the maximum bubble diameter over a big range of the dimensionless distance (0.6 - 0.9 for both of the 50 μm and 500 μm sized laser-induced equal sized anti-phase bubble pairs.

  1. Liquid jet formation through the interactions of a laser-induced bubble and a gas bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Liu, Liu; Zhao, Xiong-Tao; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2017-10-01

    The mechanisms of the liquid jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair are investigated and compared with the jet formation from the interaction of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair. The strobe photography experimental method and numerical simulations are implemented to obtain the parameter space of the optimum liquid jet, i.e. highest speed and lowest diameter. It is found that due to the enhanced "catapult effect", which is induced by the protrusion of the first bubble into the second bubble and the flip back of the elongated part of the first bubble, the optimum liquid jet of the second bubble of the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pair compared to that of the laser-induced and gas bubble pair is 54 %, 65 % and 11 % faster in speed, and 4 %, 44 % and 64 % smaller in diameter, for the 500 μm, 50 μm and 5 μm sized bubbles, respectively. The optimum dimensionless distance for the optimum jet of the laser-induced and the gas bubble is around 0.7, when the maximum bubble radius increases from ˜ 5μm to ˜500 μm, which is different from the laser-induced anti-phase bubble pairs. Besides, the optimum jet of the laser-induced bubble appeared when the bubbles are equal sized, while that of the gas bubble is independent of the relative bubble size, i.e. the liquid jet of the gas bubble has higher robustness in real liquid jet assisted applications when the laser-induced bubble size varies. However, the jet of bubble 2 could maintain a high speed (20 m/s - 35 m/s) and a low diameter (˜5 % of the maximum bubble diameter) over a big range of the dimensionless distance (0.6 - 0.9) for both of the 50 μm and 500 μm sized laser-induced equal sized anti-phase bubble pairs.

  2. Acoustofluidic relay: sequential trapping and transporting of microparticles via acoustically excited oscillating bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuliang; Ahmed, Daniel; Lapsley, Michael Ian; Lu, Mengqian; Li, Sixing; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-04-01

    We report an on-chip acoustofluidic method for sequential trapping and transporting of microparticles via acoustically oscillating bubbles. The size and location of bubbles were precisely controlled by lithography. When the acoustic waves were turned off, particles followed the streamlines dictated by laminar flow. When the acoustic waves were turned on, particles were attracted to and trapped in a vortex near the surface of bubble. Therefore, particles could move across the microfluidic channel with programmed trajectories. Additionally, a theoretical model based on acoustic radiation force and drag force due to acoustic microstreaming was established to help design this particle-trapping and -transporting system.

  3. Super-exponential bubbles in lab experiments: evidence for anchoring over-optimistic expectations on price

    OpenAIRE

    Hüsler, Andreas; Sornette, Didier; Hommes, Cars H.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze a controlled price formation experiment in the laboratory that shows evidence for bubbles. We calibrate two models that demonstrate with high statistical significance that these laboratory bubbles have a tendency to grow faster than exponential due to positive feedback. We show that the positive feedback operates by traders continuously upgrading their over-optimistic expectations of future returns based on past prices rather than on realized returns.

  4. Advanced subgrid-scale modeling for convection-dominated species transport at fluid interfaces with application to mass transfer from rising bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andre; Bothe, Dieter

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel subgrid scale (SGS) model for simulating convection-dominated species transport at deformable fluid interfaces. One possible application is the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of mass transfer from rising bubbles. The transport of a dissolving gas along the bubble-liquid interface is determined by two transport phenomena: convection in streamwise direction and diffusion in interface normal direction. The convective transport for technical bubble sizes is several orders of magnitude higher, leading to a thin concentration boundary layer around the bubble. A true DNS, fully resolving hydrodynamic and mass transfer length scales results in infeasible computational costs. Our approach is therefore a DNS of the flow field combined with a SGS model to compute the mass transfer between bubble and liquid. An appropriate model-function is used to compute the numerical fluxes on all cell faces of an interface cell. This allows to predict the mass transfer correctly even if the concentration boundary layer is fully contained in a single cell layer around the interface. We show that the SGS-model reduces the resolution requirements at the interface by a factor of ten and more. The integral flux correction is also applicable to other thin boundary layer problems. Two flow regimes are investigated to validate the model. A semi-analytical solution for creeping flow is used to assess local and global mass transfer quantities. For higher Reynolds numbers ranging from Re = 100 to Re = 460 and Péclet numbers between Pe =104 and Pe = 4 ṡ106 we compare the global Sherwood number against correlations from literature. In terms of accuracy, the predicted mass transfer never deviates more than 4% from the reference values.

  5. Laminar separation bubbles: Dynamics and control

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    surface of a flat plate by appropriately contouring the top wall of the wind tunnel. First, a basic ... of thin aerofoils, on gas turbine blades and on low Reynolds number micro-aero-vehicle wings. Presence of bubbles ... ied its effect on the loss reduction in a gas turbine blade due to periodic quenching of the separation bubble.

  6. Proton bubble and robustness of neutron skin thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, M.; Saxena, G.; Agrawal, B.K.; Aggarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    The 'Bubble Structure' or the depletion in the central density of the nucleus has renewed a lot of research interest currently. There have been increasing experimental and theoretical efforts to search and understand the phenomena of bubble which mainly arises due to the unoccupancy of the s-state because of which the density at the center becomes significantly lower than the saturation density. The first experimental evidence for depletion of the central density of protons in 34 Si has been recently reported which has opened a testing ground for already developed successful models and of course the new avenues for better and consistent understanding of the nuclear structure throughout the periodic chart. Very recently, nuclear density functional theory and ab initio self consistent Green's function many-body method have been applied to investigate bubble structure in in nuclei over a wide range of masses

  7. Formation of soap bubbles by gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Maolei; Li, Min; Chen, Zhiyuan; Han, Jifeng; Liu, Dong

    2017-12-01

    Soap bubbles can be easily generated by various methods, while their formation process is complicated and still worth studying. A model about the bubble formation process was proposed in the study by Salkin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 077801 (2016)] recently, and it was reported that the bubbles were formed when the gas blowing velocity was above one threshold. However, after a detailed study of these experiments, we found that the bubbles could be generated in two velocity ranges which corresponded to the laminar and turbulent gas jet, respectively, and the predicted threshold was only effective for turbulent gas flow. The study revealed that the bubble formation was greatly influenced by the aerodynamics of the gas jet blowing to the film, and these results will help to further understand the formation mechanism of the soap bubble as well as the interaction between the gas jet and the thin liquid film.

  8. Optical reflection probe for the measurement of local void fraction, bubble velocity, bubble size and for the identification of flow regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berti, M.

    1983-11-01

    Within the scope of two-phase flow measurement technique optical probes have been investigated for measurement of local void fraction, bubble velocity, bubble-size and identification of flow regime. Single and double probes used normal to flow need a calibration factor due to the effects of bubble deformation and bubble deflexion by the probe tips. (Auth.)

  9. Analytical modeling of pipeline failure in multiphase flow due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research focuses on the development of a model that can predict pipeline failure due to corrosion in multiphase flows. The role that velocity, density, water cut and other parameters play in predicting corrosion is critically analyzed with Norsok Model. The result shows that velocity plays a key role in corrosion prediction.

  10. Model studies of bubble size distribution and sound propagation at microleaks in sodium-heated steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlmann, G.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction zone of a small water leak in a sodium-heated steam generator (microleak) has been simulated by jet gassing or argon in water. The bubble diameter distribution in the bubble flow has been measured using a photoelectric method. The bubble size distribution obtained can be approached by an exponential distribution. For this case, phase velocity and sound damping have been calculated in the two-phase mixture. In the case of small ratios of sound frequency to the expected value of bubble resonance frequency, the frequency-independent sound velocity of the homogeneous mixture is obtained as a function of the gas volume fraction. In the case of very high frequencies, the sound velocity of the pure liquid is obtained for any gas volume fractions. In the whole range investigated damping is strongly dependent on the frequency. (author)

  11. Foam Flow Through a 2D Porous Medium: Evolution of the Bubble Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meheust, Y.; Géraud, B.; Cantat, I.; Dollet, B.

    2017-12-01

    Foams have been used for decades as displacing fluids for EOR and aquifer remediation, and more recently as carriers of chemical amendments for remediation of the vadose zone. Bulk foams are shear-thinning fluids; but for foams with bubbles of order at least the typical pore size of the porous medium, the rheology cannot be described at the continuum scale, as viscous dissipation occurs mostly at the contact between soap films and solid walls. We have investigated the flow of an initially monodisperse foam through a transparent 2D porous medium[1]. The resulting complex flow phenomenology has been characterized quantitatively from optical measurements of the bubble dynamics. In addition to preferential flow path and local flow intermittency, we observe an irreversible evolution of the probability density function (PDF) for bubbles size as bubbles travel along the porous medium. This evolution is due to bubble fragmentation by lamella division, which is by far the dominant mechanism of film creation/destruction. We measure and characterize this evolution of the PDF as a function of the experimental parameters, and model it numerically based on a fragmentation equation, with excellent agreement. The model uses two ingredients obtained from the experimental data, namely the statistics of the bubble fragmentation rate and of the fragment size distributions[2]. It predicts a nearly-universal scaling of all PDFs as a function of the bubble area normalized by the initial mean bubble area. All the PDFs measured in various experiments, with different mean flow velocities, initial bubble sizes and foam qualities, collapse on a master distribution which is only dependent on the geometry of the medium.References:[1] B. Géraud, S. A. Jones, I. Cantat, B. Dollet & Y. Méheust (2016), WRR 52(2), 773-790. [2] B. Géraud, Y. Méheust, I. Cantat & B. Dollet (2017), Lamella division in a foam flowing through a two-dimensional porous medium: A model fragmentation process, PRL 118

  12. Evaluating the Effect of Flow and Interface Type on Pressures Delivered With Bubble CPAP in a Simulated Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Stephanie A; Firestone, Kimberly S; Dunn, Diane K; McNinch, Neil L; Brown, Miraides F; Volsko, Teresa A

    2016-03-01

    Bubble CPAP, used for spontaneously breathing infants to avoid intubation or postextubation support, can be delivered with different interface types. This study compared the effect that interfaces had on CPAP delivery. We hypothesized that there would be no difference between set and measured levels between interface types. A validated preterm infant nasal airway model was attached to the ASL 5000 breathing simulator. The simulator was programmed to deliver active breathing of a surfactant-deficient premature infant with breathing frequency at 70 breaths/min inspiratory time of 0.30 s, resistance of 150 cm H2O/L/s, compliance of 0.5 mL/cm H2O, tidal volume of 5 mL, and esophageal pressure of -10 cm H2O. Nasal CPAP prongs, size 4030, newborn and infant RAM cannulas were connected to a nasal airway model and a bubble CPAP system. CPAP levels were set at 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 cm H2O with flows of 6, 8, and 10 L/min each. Measurements were recorded after 1 min of stabilization. The analysis was performed using SAS 9.4. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test assessed normality of the data. The Friedman test was used to compare non-normally distributed repeated measures. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to conduct post hoc analysis. All tests were 2-sided, and P values of CPAP levels, 4-6 cm H2O, measured CPAP dropped precipitously with the nasal prongs with the highest flow setting. At higher CPAP levels, 7-9 cm H2O measured CPAP concomitantly increased as the flow setting increased. Statistically significant differences in set and measured CPAP occurred for all devices across all CPAP levels, with the measured CPAP less than set for all conditions, P CPAP. The concomitant drop in measured pressure with high and low flows could be attributed to increased resistance to spontaneous breathing or insufficient flow to meet inspiratory demand. Clinicians should be aware of the effect that the interface and flow have on CPAP delivery. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. Fama on Bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    2016-01-01

    While Eugene Fama has repeatedly expressed his discontent with the notion of an “irrational bubble,” he has never publicly expressed his opinion on “rational bubbles.” On empirical grounds Fama rejects bubbles by referring to the lack of reliable evidence that price declines are predictable...

  14. Fama on bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    . On empirical grounds Fama rejects bubbles by referring to the lack of reliable evidence that price declines are predictable. However, this argument cannot be used to rule out rational bubbles because such bubbles do not necessarily imply return predictability. On data samples that include the 1990s...

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Population Balance Model Simulation of Effects of Cell Design and Operating Parameters on Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows and Bubble Distribution Characteristics in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuiqing; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Zhentao; Yang, Jianhong

    2018-02-01

    The effects of different cell design and operating parameters on the gas-liquid two-phase flows and bubble distribution characteristics under the anode bottom regions in aluminum electrolysis cells were analyzed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-population balance model. These parameters include inter-anode channel width, anode-cathode distance (ACD), anode width and length, current density, and electrolyte depth. The simulations results show that the inter-anode channel width has no significant effect on the gas volume fraction, electrolyte velocity, and bubble size. With increasing ACD, the above values decrease and more uniform bubbles can be obtained. Different effects of the anode width and length can be concluded in different cell regions. With increasing current density, the gas volume fraction and electrolyte velocity increase, but the bubble size keeps nearly the same. Increasing electrolyte depth decreased the gas volume fraction and bubble size in particular areas and the electrolyte velocity increased.

  16. Conservation of bubble size distribution during gas reactive absorption in bubble column reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L.C. LAGE

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of the bubble size distribution function was applied to the reactive absorption of carbon dioxide in a bubble column reactor. The model developed was solved by the method of characteristics and by a Monte Carlo method. Simulations were carried out using simplified models for the liquid phase and for the gas-liquid mass transfer. Predictions of gas holdup and outlet gas composition showed that the concept of a mean bubble diameter is not applicable when the bubble size distribution is reasonably polydispersed. In these cases, the mass mean velocity and the numerical mean velocity of the bubbles are very different. Therefore, quantification of the polydispersion of bubbles was shown to be essential to gas-phase hydrodynamics modeling.

  17. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Fifth technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this work is to convert our `learning gas-solid-liquid` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and the volume fractions of gas, liquid, and particulate phases. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values.

  18. A Model of the Bubble Break-up in a Turbulent Flow; Modelizacion de la rotura de una Burbuja en un Flujo Turbulento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayod, R.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, J.; Martinez Bazan, C.

    2005-07-01

    In this report, a simplified model of the break-up of an air bubble in a turbulent water flow is proposed and analyzed numerically. According to Hinze's theory, and our experimental observations, the external flow field is assumed asymmetric and irrotational for away from the bubble. furthermore the turbulent flow-field is modelled by an asymmetric hyperbolic flow-field and the evolution of the air-water interface is calculated by the levels-set method for a wide range of Reynolds and Weber numbers. Therefore, the break-up times are obtained for super-critical weber numbers and different Reynolds numbers. Therefore, the break-up times are obtained for super-critical Weber and Reynolds numbers allows the comparison of the numeric with our experimental results. Other possible break-up mechanisms for subcritical Weber number, i. e. the break-up by resonance, are also considered. (Author) 20 refs.

  19. Gas Bubble Dynamics under Mechanical Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Elbing, Brian

    2017-11-01

    The scientific community has a limited understanding of the bubble dynamics under mechanical oscillations due to over simplification of Navier-Stockes equation by neglecting the shear stress tensor and not accounting for body forces when calculating the acoustic radiation force. The current work experimental investigates bubble dynamics under mechanical vibration and resulting acoustic field by measuring the bubble size and velocity using high-speed imaging. The experimental setup consists of a custom-designed shaker table, cast acrylic bubble column, compressed air injection manifold and an optical imaging system. The mechanical vibrations resulted in accelerations between 0.25 to 10 times gravitational acceleration corresponding to frequency and amplitude range of 8 - 22Hz and 1 - 10mm respectively. Throughout testing the void fraction was limited to definition of Bjerknes force in combination with Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Physical behavior of the system was capture and classified. Bubble size, velocity as well as size and spatial distribution will be presented.

  20. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors. Fourth technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this investigation is to convert our ``learning gas-solid-liquid`` fluidization model into a predictive design model. The IIT hydrodynamic model computes the phase velocities and volume fractions of gas, liquid and particulate phases. Model verification involves a comparison of these computed velocities and volume fractions to experimental values. The simulation of Air Product methanol reactors described in this paper are continuing. Granular temperatures and viscosities have been computed. Preliminary measurements of granular temperatures using the Air Product catalysts were obtained using our CCD camera.

  1. Finite element modelling of elastic intraplate stresses due to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finite element modelling of elastic intraplate stresses due to heterogeneities in crustal density and mechanical properties for the Jabalpur earthquake region, central India. A Manglik1,∗. , S Thiagarajan. 1. , A V Mikhailova. 2 and Yu Rebetsky. 2. 1. National Geophysical Research Institute, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, ...

  2. Modelling atmospheric temperature rise due to pollutants and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a mathematical model we show that temperature increases (warming) as the Hartman number due to pollutant increases. Thus, temperature and pollutants contribute to global warming. We also discuss the implications of the result on agriculture and forestry. Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical ...

  3. Inhomogeneous distribution of Chlamydomonas in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Yuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Kage, Azusa; Ueno, Hironori; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Swimming microalgae show various taxes, such as phototaxis and gravitaxis, which sometimes result in the formation of a cell-rich layer or a patch in a suspension. Despite intensive studies on the effects of shear flow and turbulence on the inhomogeneous distribution of microalgae, the effect of a bubble plume has remained unclear. In this study, we used Chlamydomonas as model microalgae, and investigated the spatial distribution of cells in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume. The results illustrate that cells become inhomogeneously distributed in the suspension due to their motility and photo-responses. A vortical ring distribution was observed below the free surface when the bubble flow rate was sufficiently small. We performed a scaling analysis on the length scale of the vortical ring, which captured the main features of the experimental results. These findings are important in understanding transport phenomena in a microalgae suspension with a bubble plume. PMID:26787679

  4. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-02-03

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  5. The life and death of film bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, S.; Villermaux, E.; Bourouiba, L.

    2017-11-01

    Following its burst, the fragmentation of a large bubble (film bubble) at the air-water interface can release hundreds of micrometer-sized film-drops in the air we breathe. This mechanism of droplet formation is one of the most prominent sources of sea spray. Indoor or outdoor, pathogens from contaminated water are transported by these droplets and have also been linked to respiratory infection. The lifetime and thickness of bubbles govern the number and size of the droplets they produce. Despite these important implications, little is known about the factors influencing the life and death of surface film bubbles. In particular, the fundamental physical mechanisms linking bubble aging, thinning, and lifetime remain poorly understood. To address this gap, we present the results of an extensive investigation of the aging of film-drop-producing bubbles in various ambient air, water composition, and temperature conditions. We present and validate a generalized physical picture and model of bubble cap thickness evolution. The model and physical picture are linked to the lifetime of bubbles via a series of cap rupture mechanisms of increasing efficiency.

  6. Dynamics of Bubbly-magma Flow in Conduits: Stress and Expansion Regimes of Magma Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, N. K.; Koyaguchi, T.; Ida, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are characterized by magma fragmentation, that is, the process through which a bubbly magma is changed into a gas-pyroclast dispersion. Two criteria of mechanisms have been proposed for the magma fragmentation so far. First, magma fragments when stress or strain rate of magma around bubbles exceeds a critical value. Second, magma disrupts due to the instability of thin magma-foam. Which criterion is actually applicable is not yet known. In order to clarify the physics of the magma fragmentation, we numerically study one-dimensional steady flows with bubble growth in conduits. The spherical cell model is used to calculate expansion of bubbles in ascending visco-elastic magma. The stress around bubbles generally grows as magma ascends and the pressure difference between bubbles and surrounding magma increases. In some conditions, the stress becomes critically large only when the flow velocity approaches the sound speed meeting the choking condition. In other conditions, the stress becomes large enough as magma pressure drops with bubble pressure kept almost unchanged. These two distinct types may correspond to the above two criteria of fragmentation mechanisms. In the former case, void fraction becomes close to unity before the stress reaches the strength of magma. In such case, the magma does not fragment due to the visco-elastic deformations but fragments by the instability of the thin magma-foam (`expansion' regime). In the latter case, on the other hand, the stress reaches the magma strength at much lower void fractions. In such case, the magma fragments due to the visco-elastic deformation around bubbles (`stress' regime). The `expansion' and `stress' regimes occur when the ratio of the initial wall-friction stress to the magma strength is sufficiently smaller and greater than unity, respectively.

  7. Assessments of Bubble Dynamics Model and Influential Parameters in Microbubble Drag Reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skudarnov, P. V; Lin, C. X

    2006-01-01

    .... The effects of mixture density variation, free stream turbulence intensity, free stream velocity, and surface roughness on the microbubble drag reduction were studied using a single phase model based...

  8. Gaseous bubble oscillations in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids under influence of high-frequency acoustic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golykh, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    Progress of technology and medicine dictates the ever-increasing requirements (heat resistance, corrosion resistance, strength properties, impregnating ability, etc.) for non-Newtonian fluids and materials produced on their basis (epoxy resin, coating materials, liquid crystals, etc.). Materials with improved properties obtaining is possible by modification of their physicochemical structure. One of the most promising approaches to the restructuring of non-Newtonian fluids is cavitation generated by high-frequency acoustic vibrations. The efficiency of cavitation in non-Newtonian fluid is determined by dynamics of gaseous bubble. Today, bubble dynamics in isotropic non-Newtonian fluids, in which cavitation bubble shape remains spherical, is most full investigated, because the problem reduces to ordinary differential equation for spherical bubble radius. However, gaseous bubble in anisotropic fluids which are most wide kind of non-Newtonian fluids (due to orientation of macromolecules) deviates from spherical shape due to viscosity dependence on shear rate direction. Therefore, the paper presents the mathematical model of gaseous bubble dynamics in anisotropic non-Newtonian fluids. The model is based on general equations for anisotropic non-Newtonian fluid flow. The equations are solved by asymptotic decomposition of fluid flow parameters. It allowed evaluating bubble size and shape evolution depending on rheological properties of liquid and acoustic field characteristics.

  9. Modelling direct tangible damages due to natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, H.; Bubeck, P.

    2012-04-01

    Europe has witnessed a significant increase in direct damages from natural hazards. A further damage increase is expected due to the on-going accumulation of people and economic assets in risk-prone areas and the effects of climate change, for instance, on the severity and frequency of drought events in the Mediterranean basin. In order to mitigate the impact of natural hazards an improved risk management based on reliable risk analysis is needed. Particularly, there is still much research effort needed to improve the modelling of damage due to natural hazards. In comparison with hazard modelling, simple approaches still dominate damage assessments, mainly due to limitations in available data and knowledge on damaging processes and influencing factors. Within the EU-project ConHaz, methods as well as data sources and terminology for damage assessments were compiled, systemized and analysed. Similarities and differences between the approaches concerning floods, alpine hazards, coastal hazards and droughts were identified. Approaches for significant improvements of direct tangible damage modelling with a particular focus on cross-hazard-learning will be presented. Examples from different hazards and countries will be given how to improve damage data bases, the understanding of damaging processes, damage models and how to conduct improvements via validations and uncertainty analyses.

  10. The effect of ion irradiation on inert gas bubble mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1991-09-01

    The effect of Al ion irradiation on the mobility of Xe gas bubbles in Al thin films was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy was used to determine bubble diffusivities in films irradiated and/or annealed at 673K, 723K and 773K. Irradiation increased bubble diffusivity by a factor of 2--9 over that due to thermal annealing alone. The Arrhenius behavior and dose rate dependence of bubble diffusivity are consistent with a radiation enhanced diffusion phenomenon affecting a volume diffusion mechanism of bubble transport. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  12. Bubble mobility in mud and magmatic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Aaron; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Manga, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The rheology of particle-laden fluids with a yield stress, such as mud or crystal-rich magmas, controls the mobility of bubbles, both the size needed to overcome the yield stress and their rise speed. We experimentally measured the velocities of bubbles and rigid spheres in mud sampled from the Davis-Schrimpf mud volcanoes adjacent to the Salton Sea, Southern California. Combined with previous measurements in the polymer gel Carbopol, we obtained an empirical model for the drag coefficient and bounded the conditions under which bubbles overcome the yield stress. Yield stresses typical of mud and basaltic magmas with sub-mm particles can immobilize millimeter to centimeter sized bubbles. At Stromboli volcano, Italy, a vertical yield stress gradient in the shallow conduit may immobilize bubbles with diameter ≲ 1 cm and hinder slug coalescence.

  13. Dynamics of micro-bubble sonication inside a phantom vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2013-01-10

    A model for sonicated micro-bubble oscillations inside a phantom vessel is proposed. The model is not a variant of conventional Rayleigh-Plesset equation and is obtained from reduced Navier-Stokes equations. The model relates the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics with geometric and acoustic parameters in a consistent manner. It predicts micro-bubble oscillation dynamics as well as micro-bubble fragmentation when compared to the experimental data. For large micro-bubble radius to vessel diameter ratios, predictions are damped, suggesting breakdown of inherent modeling assumptions for these cases. Micro-bubble response with acoustic parameters is consistent with experiments and provides physical insight to the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics.

  14. Mathematical modelling of bubble removal from a glass melting channel with defined melt flow and the relation between the optimal flow conditions of bubble removal and sand dissolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cincibusová, Petra; Němec, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2015), s. 52-62 ISSN 1753-3546 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt * mathematical modelling * controlled flow * space utilization * temperature gradients Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.362, year: 2015 http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/sgt/gta/2015/00000056/00000002/art00003

  15. Primordial bubbles of colour superconducting quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masperi, L.; Orsaria, M.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the possibility that bubbles of quark matter surviving the confinement phase transition might have become superconducting due to the enormous compression they suffer. Because of the relatively high temperature of the process we compare the initially unpaired quark matter with the colour-flavour locked alternative when the extremely large chemical potential could have increased the critical temperature sufficiently and find that this latter phase would be more stable before the bubble compression stops. If other physical effects had not affected completely their stability, these bubbles might still exist today and perhaps be observed as strangelets

  16. Bubble and drop interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miller

    2011-01-01

    The book aims at describing the most important experimental methods for characterizing liquid interfaces, such as drop profile analysis, bubble pressure and drop volume tensiometry, capillary pressure technique, and oscillating drops and bubbles. Besides the details of experimental set ups, also the underlying theoretical basis is presented in detail. In addition, a number of applications based on drops and bubbles is discussed, such as rising bubbles and the very complex process of flotation. Also wetting, characterized by the dynamics of advancing contact angles is discussed critically. Spec

  17. Dynamic Modeling and Control Studies of a Two-Stage Bubbling Fluidized Bed Adsorber-Reactor for Solid-Sorbent CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modekurti, Srinivasarao; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2013-07-31

    A one-dimensional, non-isothermal, pressure-driven dynamic model has been developed for a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor for solid-sorbent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture using Aspen Custom Modeler® (ACM). The BFB model for the flow of gas through a continuous phase of downward moving solids considers three regions: emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake. Both the upper and lower reactor stages are of overflow-type configuration, i.e., the solids leave from the top of each stage. In addition, dynamic models have been developed for the downcomer that transfers solids between the stages and the exit hopper that removes solids from the bottom of the bed. The models of all auxiliary equipment such as valves and gas distributor have been integrated with the main model of the two-stage adsorber reactor. Using the developed dynamic model, the transient responses of various process variables such as CO{sub 2} capture rate and flue gas outlet temperatures have been studied by simulating typical disturbances such as change in the temperature, flowrate, and composition of the incoming flue gas from pulverized coal-fired power plants. In control studies, the performance of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, feedback-augmented feedforward controller, and linear model predictive controller (LMPC) are evaluated for maintaining the overall CO{sub 2} capture rate at a desired level in the face of typical disturbances.

  18. Prospects for bubble fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I. [Tyumen Institute of Mechanics of Multiphase Systems (TIMMS), Marx (Russian Federation); Lahey, R.T. Jr. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  19. Numerical simulation of superheated vapor bubble rising in stagnant liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkhaniani, N.; Ansari, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    In present study, the rising of superheated vapor bubble in saturated liquid is simulated using volume of fluid method in OpenFOAM cfd package. The surface tension between vapor-liquid phases is considered using continuous surface force method. In order to reduce spurious current near interface, Lafaurie smoothing filter is applied to improve curvature calculation. Phase change is considered using Tanasawa mass transfer model. The variation of saturation temperature in vapor bubble with local pressure is considered with simplified Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The couple velocity-pressure equation is solved using PISO algorithm. The numerical model is validated with: (1) isothermal bubble rising and (2) one-dimensional horizontal film condensation. Then, the shape and life time history of single superheated vapor bubble are investigated. The present numerical study shows vapor bubble in saturated liquid undergoes boiling and condensation. It indicates bubble life time is nearly linear proportional with bubble size and superheat temperature.

  20. Clostridium Difficile Infection Due to Pneumonia Treatment: Mortality Risk Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, M; Zycinska, K; Lenartowicz, B; Hadzik-Błaszczyk, M; Cieplak, M; Kur, Z; Wardyn, K A

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common gastrointestinal infection after the antibiotic treatment of community or nosocomial pneumonia is caused by the anaerobic spore Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess mortality due to C. difficile infection (CDI) in patients treated for pneumonia. We identified 94 cases of post-pneumonia CDI out of the 217 patients with CDI. The mortality issue was addressed by creating a mortality risk models using logistic regression and multivariate fractional polynomial analysis. The patients' demographics, clinical features, and laboratory results were taken into consideration. To estimate the influence of the preceding respiratory infection, a pneumonia severity scale was included in the analysis. The analysis showed two statistically significant and clinically relevant mortality models. The model with the highest prognostic strength entailed age, leukocyte count, serum creatinine and urea concentration, hematocrit, coexisting neoplasia or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In conclusion, we report on two prognostic models, based on clinically relevant factors, which can be of help in predicting mortality risk in C. difficile infection, secondary to the antibiotic treatment of pneumonia. These models could be useful in preventive tailoring of individual therapy.

  1. Numerical simulation of single bubble boiling behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of a single bubble boiling process are studied with numerical modeling. The mass, momentum, energy and level set equations are solved using COMSOL multi-physics software. The bubble boiling dynamics, the transient pressure field, velocity field and temperature field in time are analyzed, and reasonable results are obtained. The numeral model is validated by the empirical equation of Fritz and could be used for various applications.

  2. Viscosity Destabilizes Sonoluminescing Bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tögel, R.; Luther, S.; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    In single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) microbubbles are trapped in a standing sound wave, typically in water or water-glycerol mixtures. However, in viscous liquids such as glycol, methylformamide, or sulphuric acid it is not possible to trap the bubble in a stable position. This is very peculiar

  3. Bubbles in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Power, Stephen; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Strain-induced deformations in graphene are predicted to give rise to large pseudomagnetic fields. We examine theoretically the case of gas-inflated bubbles to determine whether signatures of such fields are present in the local density of states. Sharp-edged bubbles are found to induce Friedel...

  4. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  5. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study

  6. Numerical investigation of bubble nonlinear dynamics characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jie, E-mail: shijie@hrbeu.edu.cn; Yang, Desen; Shi, Shengguo; Hu, Bo [Acoustic Science and Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Underwater Acoustic Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Haoyang; Jiang, Wei [College of Underwater Acoustic Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-28

    The complicated dynamical behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave can provide favorable conditions for many engineering applications. On the basis of Keller-Miksis model, the influences of control parameters, including acoustic frequency, acoustic pressure and radius of gas bubble, are discussed by utilizing various numerical analysis methods, Furthermore, the law of power spectral variation is studied. It is shown that the complicated dynamic behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave, such as bifurcation and chaos, further the stimulated scattering processes are revealed.

  7. Blackbody spectra for sonoluminescing hydrogen bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, George; Camara, C; Putterman, S J; Weninger, K

    2002-05-13

    The dynamical motion of sonoluminescing bubbles formed from a mixture of water and hydrogen gas indicates that these bubbles contain hydrogen. Their spectrum is well matched by an ideal 6000 K blackbody radiating from a surface with a radius less than 1/4 microm. According to this model, the state of matter inside the collapsed bubble is so stressed that the photon mean free path is much smaller than 1 microm. Implications for various theories of the light-emitting mechanism and the role of chemical reactions are discussed.

  8. Evolution of a gas bubble in porous matrix filled by methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiberkin, Kirill; Lyubimov, Dmitry; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Zikanov, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    Behavior of a small isolated hydrate-free inclusion (a bubble) within hydrate-bearing porous matrix is studied analytically and numerically. An infinite porous matrix of uniform properties with pores filled by methane hydrates and either water (excessive water situation) or methane gas (excessive gas situation) is considered. A small spherical hydrate-free bubble of radius R0 exists at initial moment within the matrix due to overheating relative to the surrounding medium. There is no continuing heat supply within the bubble, so new hydrate forms on its boundary, and its radius decreases with time. The process is analysed in the framework of the model that takes into account the phase transition and accompanying heat and mass transport processes and assumes spherical symmetry. It is shown that in the case of small (~ 10-2-10-1 m) bubbles, convective fluxes are negligible and the process is fully described by heat conduction and phase change equations. A spherically symmetric Stefan problem for purely conduction-controlled evolution is solved analytically for the case of equilibrium initial temperature and pressure within the bubble. The self-similar solution is verified, with good results, in numerical simulations based on the full filtration and heat transfer model and using the isotherm migration method. Numerical simulations are also conducted for a wide range of cases not amenable to analytical solution. It is found that, except for initial development of an overheated bubble, its radius evolves with time following the self-similar formula: R(t) ( t)1-2 R0-= 1 - tm- , (1) where tm is the life-time of bubble (time of its complete freezing). The analytical solution shows that tm follows 2 tm ~ (R0-?) , (2) where ? is a constant determined by the temperature difference ΔT between the bubble's interior and far field. We consider implications for natural hydrate deposits. As an example, for a bubble with R0 = 4 cm and ΔT = 0.001 K, we find tm ~ 5.7 ? 106 s (2

  9. Power to Fuels: Dynamic Modeling of a Slurry Bubble Column Reactor in Lab-Scale for Fischer Tropsch Synthesis under Variable Load of Synthesis Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Seyednejadian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research developed a comprehensive computer model for a lab-scale Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR (0.1 m Dt and 2.5 m height for Fischer–Tropsch (FT synthesis under flexible operation of synthesis gas load flow rates. The variable loads of synthesis gas are set at 3.5, 5, 7.5 m3/h based on laboratory adjustments at three different operating temperatures (483, 493 and 503 K. A set of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs in the form of mass transfer and chemical reaction are successfully coupled to predict the behavior of all the FT components in two phases (gas and liquid over the reactor bed. In the gas phase, a single-bubble-class-diameter (SBCD is adopted and the reduction of superficial gas velocity through the reactor length is incorporated into the model by the overall mass balance. Anderson Schulz Flory distribution is employed for reaction kinetics. The modeling results are in good agreement with experimental data. The results of dynamic modeling show that the steady state condition is attained within 10 min from start-up. Furthermore, they show that step-wise syngas flow rate does not have a detrimental influence on FT product selectivity and the dynamic modeling of the slurry reactor responds quite well to the load change conditions.

  10. Experimental and analytical studies of iodine mass transfer from xenon-iodine mixed gas bubble to liquid sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, S.; Sagawa, N.; Shimoyama, K.

    1996-01-01

    In the fuel pin failure accident of a liquid metal fast reactor, volatile fission products play an important role in the assessment of radiological consequences. Especially the radioisotopes of elemental iodine are important because of their high volatility and of the low permissible dose to human thyroid. The released iodines are known to be retained in the coolant sodium as sodium iodide due to the chemical affinity between alkali metals and halogens. However, the xenon and krypton released with iodines into the sodium pool as bubbles may influence the reaction rate of iodine with sodium during the bubble rising. So far, the only few experimental results have been available concerning the decontamination factor (DF: the ratio of the initial iodine mass in the mixed gas bubble to the released mass into the cover gas) of iodine in this phenomenon. Therefore, experimental and analytical studies were carried out to study the mass transfer of iodine from a xenon-iodine mixed gas bubble to the liquid sodium pool. In the experiments, the bubble was generated in the sodium pool by cracking a quartz ball which contains the xenon-iodine mixed gas and then, the mixed gas released into the argon cover gas was collected to determine the transferred iodine mass into the pool. A rising velocity of the bubble was measured by Chen-type void sensors arranged vertically in the pool. From the measured rising velocity and another observation of bubble behavior in simulated water experiments, it is found that the generated bubble breaks up into several smaller bubbles of spherical cap type during the rising period. Transferred iodine mass per unit initial bubble volume from the bubble to the sodium pool shows increases with increasing time and the initial iodine concentration. A mass transfer rate obtained by differentiating the transferred iodine mass with respect to the time indicates a rapid decrease just after the bubble generation and a slow decrease for the successive period

  11. Dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedra, Saúl; Ramos, Eduardo; Herrera, J. Ramón

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional bubbles ascending under the influence of buoyant forces is numerically studied with a one-fluid model coupled with the front-tracking technique. The bubble dynamics are described by recording the position, shape, and orientation of the bubbles as functions of time. The qualitative properties of the bubbles and their terminal velocities are described in terms of the Eötvos (ratio of buoyancy to surface tension) and Archimedes numbers (ratio of buoyancy to viscous forces). The terminal Reynolds number result from the balance of buoyancy and drag forces and, consequently, is not an externally fixed parameter. In the cases that yield small Reynolds numbers, the bubbles follow straight paths and the wake is steady. A more interesting behavior is found at high Reynolds numbers where the bubbles follow an approximately periodic zigzag trajectory and an unstable wake with properties similar to the Von Karman vortex street is formed. The dynamical features of the motion of single bubbles are compared to experimental observations of air bubbles ascending in a water-filled Hele-Shaw cell. Although the comparison is not strictly valid in the sense that the effect of the lateral walls is not incorporated in the model, most of the dynamical properties observed are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical calculations. Hele-Shaw cells with different gaps have been used to determine the degree of approximation of the numerical calculation. It is found that for the relation between the terminal Reynolds number and the Archimedes number, the numerical calculations are closer to the observations of bubble dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells of larger gaps.

  12. The dynamics of a non-equilibrium bubble near bio-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohl, S W; Klaseboer, E; Khoo, B C

    2009-01-01

    In many medical treatments oscillating (non-equilibrium) bubbles appear. They can be the result of high-intensity-focused ultrasound, laser treatments or shock wave lithotripsy for example. The physics of such oscillating bubbles is often not very well understood. This is especially so if the bubbles are oscillating near (soft) bio-materials. It is well known that bubbles oscillating near (hard) materials have a tendency to form a high speed jet directed towards the material during the collapse phase of the bubble. It is equally well studied that bubbles near a free interface (air) tend to collapse with a jet directed away from this interface. If the interface is neither 'free' nor 'hard', such as often occurs in bio-materials, the resulting flow physics can be very complex. Yet, in many bio-applications, it is crucial to know in which direction the jet will go (if there is a jet at all). Some applications require a jet towards the tissue, for example to destroy it. For other applications, damage due to impacting jets is to be prevented at all cost. This paper tries to address some of the physics involved in these treatments by using a numerical method, the boundary element method (BEM), to study the dynamics of such bubbles near several bio-materials. In the present work, the behaviour of a bubble placed in a water-like medium near various bio-materials (modelled as elastic fluids) is investigated. It is found that its behaviour depends on the material properties (Young's modulus, Poisson ratio and density) of the bio-material. For soft bio-materials (fat, skin, brain and muscle), the bubble tends to split into smaller bubbles. In certain cases, the resulting bubbles develop opposing jets. For hard bio-materials (cornea, cartilage and bone), the bubble collapses towards the interface with high speed jets (between 100 and about 250 m s -1 ). A summary graph is provided identifying the combined effects of the dimensionless elasticity (κ) and density ratio (α) of

  13. The dynamics of a non-equilibrium bubble near bio-materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohl, S W; Klaseboer, E [Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusinopolis Way, 16-16 Connexis 138632 (Singapore); Khoo, B C [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent 119260 (Singapore)], E-mail: mpekbc@nus.edu.sg

    2009-10-21

    In many medical treatments oscillating (non-equilibrium) bubbles appear. They can be the result of high-intensity-focused ultrasound, laser treatments or shock wave lithotripsy for example. The physics of such oscillating bubbles is often not very well understood. This is especially so if the bubbles are oscillating near (soft) bio-materials. It is well known that bubbles oscillating near (hard) materials have a tendency to form a high speed jet directed towards the material during the collapse phase of the bubble. It is equally well studied that bubbles near a free interface (air) tend to collapse with a jet directed away from this interface. If the interface is neither 'free' nor 'hard', such as often occurs in bio-materials, the resulting flow physics can be very complex. Yet, in many bio-applications, it is crucial to know in which direction the jet will go (if there is a jet at all). Some applications require a jet towards the tissue, for example to destroy it. For other applications, damage due to impacting jets is to be prevented at all cost. This paper tries to address some of the physics involved in these treatments by using a numerical method, the boundary element method (BEM), to study the dynamics of such bubbles near several bio-materials. In the present work, the behaviour of a bubble placed in a water-like medium near various bio-materials (modelled as elastic fluids) is investigated. It is found that its behaviour depends on the material properties (Young's modulus, Poisson ratio and density) of the bio-material. For soft bio-materials (fat, skin, brain and muscle), the bubble tends to split into smaller bubbles. In certain cases, the resulting bubbles develop opposing jets. For hard bio-materials (cornea, cartilage and bone), the bubble collapses towards the interface with high speed jets (between 100 and about 250 m s{sup -1}). A summary graph is provided identifying the combined effects of the dimensionless elasticity

  14. Why do bubbles in Guinness sink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilov, E. S.; Cummins, C. P.; Lee, W. T.

    2013-02-01

    Stout beers show the counter-intuitive phenomena of sinking bubbles, while the beer is settling. Previous research suggests that this phenomenon is due to the small size of the bubbles in these beers and the presence of a circulatory current, directed downwards near the side of the wall and upwards in the interior of the glass. The mechanism by which such a circulation is established and the conditions under which it will occur has not been clarified. In this paper, we use simulations and experiments to demonstrate that the flow in a glass of stout beer depends on the shape of the glass. If it narrows downwards (as the traditional stout glass, the pint, does), the flow is directed downwards near the wall and upwards in the interior and sinking bubbles will be observed. If the container widens downwards, the flow is opposite to that described above and only rising bubbles will be seen.

  15. Average properties of bidisperse bubbly flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-García, J. C.; Mendez-Díaz, S.; Zenit, R.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments were performed in a vertical channel to study the properties of a bubbly flow composed of two distinct bubble size species. Bubbles were produced using a capillary bank with tubes with two distinct inner diameters; the flow through each capillary size was controlled such that the amount of large or small bubbles could be controlled. Using water and water-glycerin mixtures, a wide range of Reynolds and Weber number ranges were investigated. The gas volume fraction ranged between 0.5% and 6%. The measurements of the mean bubble velocity of each species and the liquid velocity variance were obtained and contrasted with the monodisperse flows with equivalent gas volume fractions. We found that the bidispersity can induce a reduction of the mean bubble velocity of the large species; for the small size species, the bubble velocity can be increased, decreased, or remain unaffected depending of the flow conditions. The liquid velocity variance of the bidisperse flows is, in general, bound by the values of the small and large monodisperse values; interestingly, in some cases, the liquid velocity fluctuations can be larger than either monodisperse case. A simple model for the liquid agitation for bidisperse flows is proposed, with good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  16. Interaction of equal-size bubbles in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jai; Lavrenteva, Olga M; Byk, Leonid; Nir, Avinoam

    2013-04-01

    The inertia-induced forces on two identical spherical bubbles in a simple shear flow at small but finite Reynolds number, for the case when the bubbles are within each other's inner viscous region, are calculated making use of the reciprocal theorem. This interaction force is further employed to model the dynamics of air bubbles injected to a viscous fluid sheared in a Couette device at the first shear flow instability where the bubbles are trapped inside the stable Taylor vortex. It was shown that, during a long time scale, the inertial interaction between the bubbles in the primary shear flow drives them away from each other and, as a result, equal-size bubbles eventually assume an ordered string with equal separation distances between all neighbors. We report on experiments showing the dynamic evolution of various numbers of bubbles. The results of the theory are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  17. Universe out of a breathing bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    We consider the model of a false-vacuum bubble with a thin wall where the surface energy density is composed of two different components, 'domain-wall' type and 'dust' type, with opposite signs. We find stably oscillating solutions, which we call 'breathing bubbles'. By decay to a lower mass state, such a breathing bubble could become either (i) a child universe or ii) a bubble that 'eats up' the original universe, depending on the sign of the surface energy of the domain-wall component. We also discuss the effect of the finite-thickness corrections to the thin-wall approximation and possible origins of the energy contents of our model

  18. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    expanded beam of a Q-switched laser pulse at wavelength of λ=532 nm and with pulse duration of ∼4 ns is focused at the center of a water tank using an aberration minimized lens design. Single cavitation bubbles are initiated via optical breakdown at this location which coincides with the position of which the shock wave is focused. The energy of the shock wave source has been altered in 8 steps. The pressure pulse amplitude of the impinging shock wave measured at the distance of about 1.8 mm above the focus location range from 24.4 MPa to 108.1 MPa. The lithotripter shock wave impact time is varied in three steps which provides the possibility of investigation of the bubble dynamics in both cases of collapsing and expanding cavities at the moment of the shock wave impingement. After the shock wave impact, the bubble spherical symmetry is broken and a liquid jet develops in the original direction of the shock propagation. The speed of the jet is increasing with the shock wave energy. Due to the energy transfer from the shock wave to the bubble, the forced cavity implosion is more violent in comparison to free oscillation. The pressure pulse amplitude released from the forced bubble collapse is amplified and the collapse time is reduced. These effects are discussed in chapter 5. Generally, when the bubble is collapsing at the time of the shock impact, the forced cavity collapse is more violent with a resultant of more pressure enhancement compared to the expanding bubbles at the moment of the shock arrival. The maximum pressure enhancement and reduction of bubble collapse time occur when the time interval between the moments of the shock impact and bubble collapse approaches the pulse duration of the compression part of the shock wave profile (i.e. ∼1 μs). For each specific shock wave arrival time, increasing the shock intensity leads to the fact that the bubble collapse takes place earlier relative to the moment of the shock impact and having more collapse pressure

  19. MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY OF BUBBLES IN QUIESCENT PROMINENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudík, J.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Zapiór, M.; Heinzel, P.

    2012-01-01

    We study a polar-crown prominence with a bubble and its plume observed in several coronal filters by the SDO/AIA and in Hα by the MSDP spectrograph in Białków (Poland) to address the following questions: what is the brightness of prominence bubbles in EUV with respect to the corona outside of the prominence and the prominence coronal cavity? What is the geometry and topology of the magnetic field in the bubble? What is the nature of the vertical threads seen within prominences? We find that the brightness of the bubble and plume is lower than the brightness of the corona outside of the prominence, and is similar to that of the coronal cavity. We constructed linear force-free models of prominences with bubbles, where the flux rope is perturbed by inclusion of parasitic bipoles. The arcade field lines of the bipole create the bubble, which is thus devoid of magnetic dips. Shearing the bipole or adding a second one can lead to cusp-shaped prominences with bubbles similar to the observed ones. The bubbles have complex magnetic topology, with a pair of coronal magnetic null points linked by a separator outlining the boundary between the bubble and the prominence body. We conjecture that plume formation involves magnetic reconnection at the separator. Depending on the viewing angle, the prominence can appear either anvil-shaped with predominantly horizontal structures, or cusp-shaped with predominantly vertical structuring. The latter is an artifact of the alignment of magnetic dips with respect to the prominence axis and the line of sight.

  20. Skeleton-and-bubble model of polyether-polyurethane elastic open-cell foams for finite element analysis at large deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuwala, Tapan; Gioia, Gustavo

    2013-03-01

    We formulate a new micromechanical model of elastic open-cell (EOC) foams. In this model, the usual skeleton of open-cell foams is supplemented by fitting a thin-walled bubble within each cavity of the skeleton, as a substitute for the membranes that occlude the "windows" of the foam cells in polyether-polyurethane EOC foams. The model has nine parameters; each parameter has a clear geometrical or mechanical significance, and its value may be readily estimated for any given foam. To calibrate the model, we carry out fully nonlinear, three-dimensional finite-element simulations of the experiments of Dai et al. (2011a), in which a set of five polyether-polyurethane EOC foams covering a range of commercially available relative densities was tested under compression along the rise direction, compression along a transverse direction, tension along the rise direction, simple shear combined with compression along the rise direction, and hydrostatic pressure combined with compression along the rise direction. We show that, with a suitable choice of the values of the parameters of the model, the model is capable of reproducing the most salient trends evinced in the experimental stress-stretch curves. Yet the model can no longer reproduce all of these trends if the bubbles be excluded from the model, and we conclude that the bubbles play a crucial role at large deformations. We also show that the stretch fields that obtain in our computational simulations are in good accord with the digital-image-correlation (DIC) measurements of Dai et al. For simple shear combined with compression along the rise direction, the DIC measurements of Dai et al. prove insufficient to our purposes, and we carry out DIC measurements of our own. To demonstrate the performance of the model in a typical application of polyether-polyurethane EOC foams, we carry out experiments and simulations of foam specimens loaded through a cylindrical punch and a spherical punch. We conclude the paper with a

  1. Bayesian Analysis of Bubbles in Asset Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Andras Fulop; Jun Yu

    2017-01-01

    We develop a new model where the dynamic structure of the asset price, after the fundamental value is removed, is subject to two different regimes. One regime reflects the normal period where the asset price divided by the dividend is assumed to follow a mean-reverting process around a stochastic long run mean. The second regime reflects the bubble period with explosive behavior. Stochastic switches between two regimes and non-constant probabilities of exit from the bubble regime are both all...

  2. Theory calculation of combination of 'embryo' bubble growing-up visible bubble in bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zipiao; Sheng Xiangdong; Dai Changjiang

    2004-01-01

    By aid of island combination theory of 'embryo' bubble, it is resolved well the question which 'embryo' bubble grows up a visible bubble in the bubble chamber. Through theory calculation it is shown that radius of the big' embryo' bubble combinated not only relates with work matter such as surface tension coefficient, saturation vapour pressure and boiling point of liquid, but also does absorbing quantity of heat and the numbers of 'embryo' bubbles combination. It is explained reasonably that the radius of bubbles in bubble chamber is different for the same energies of neutrons and proton. The track of neutron in bubble chamber is long and thin, and the track of proton in bubble chamber is wide and short. It is also explained reasonably that the bubble radius of the incident particles with more charges which there are the same energies will be wider than that of the incident particles with less charges in the track. (author)

  3. Sensitivity in forward modeled hyperspectral reflectance due to phytoplankton groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana; Pinardi, Monica; Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Phytoplankton is an integral part of the ecosystem, affecting trophic dynamics, nutrient cycling, habitat condition, and fisheries resources. The types of phytoplankton and their concentrations are used to describe the status of water and the processes inside of this. This study investigates bio-optical modeling of phytoplankton functional types (PFT) in terms of pigment composition demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to recognize freshwater phytoplankton. In particular, a sensitivity analysis of simulated hyperspectral water reflectance (with band setting of HICO, APEX, EnMAP, PRISMA and Sentinel-3) of productive eutrophic waters of Mantua lakes (Italy) environment is presented. The bio-optical model adopted for simulating the hyperspectral water reflectance takes into account the reflectance dependency on geometric conditions of light field, on inherent optical properties (backscattering and absorption coefficients) and on concentrations of water quality parameters (WQPs). The model works in the 400-750nm wavelength range, while the model parametrization is based on a comprehensive dataset of WQP concentrations and specific inherent optical properties of the study area, collected in field surveys carried out from May to September of 2011 and 2014. The following phytoplankton groups, with their specific absorption coefficients, a*Φi(λ), were used during the simulation: Chlorophyta, Cyanobacteria with phycocyanin, Cyanobacteria and Cryptophytes with phycoerythrin, Diatoms with carotenoids and mixed phytoplankton. The phytoplankton absorption coefficient aΦ(λ) is modelled by multiplying the weighted sum of the PFTs, Σpia*Φi(λ), with the chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a). To highlight the variability of water reflectance due to variation of phytoplankton pigments, the sensitivity analysis was performed by keeping constant the WQPs (i.e., Chl-a=80mg/l, total suspended matter=12.58g/l and yellow substances=0.27m-1). The sensitivity analysis was

  4. IceCube and HAWC constraints on very-high-energy emission from the Fermi bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ke; Su, Meng; Linden, Tim; Murase, Kohta

    2017-12-01

    The nature of the γ -ray emission from the Fermi bubbles is unknown. Both hadronic and leptonic models have been formulated to explain the peculiar γ -ray signal observed by the Fermi-LAT between 0.1-500 GeV. If this emission continues above ˜30 TeV , hadronic models of the Fermi bubbles would provide a significant contribution to the high-energy neutrino flux detected by the IceCube observatory. Even in models where leptonic γ -rays produce the Fermi bubbles flux at GeV energies, a hadronic component may be observable at very high energies. The combination of IceCube and HAWC measurements have the ability to distinguish these scenarios through a comparison of the neutrino and γ -ray fluxes at a similar energy scale. We examine the most recent four-year data set produced by the IceCube Collaboration and find no evidence for neutrino emission originating from the Fermi bubbles. In particular, we find that previously suggested excesses are consistent with the diffuse astrophysical background with a p-value of 0.22 (0.05 in an extreme scenario that all the IceCube events that overlap with the bubbles come from them). Moreover, we show that existing and upcoming HAWC observations provide independent constraints on any neutrino emission from the Fermi bubbles due to the close correlation between the γ -ray and neutrino fluxes in hadronic interactions. The combination of these results disfavors a significant contribution from the Fermi bubbles to the IceCube neutrino flux.

  5. Fearless versus fearful speculative financial bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J. V.; Sornette, D.

    2004-06-01

    Using a recently introduced rational expectation model of bubbles, based on the interplay between stochasticity and positive feedbacks of prices on returns and volatility, we develop a new methodology to test how this model classifies nine time series that have been previously considered as bubbles ending in crashes. The model predicts the existence of two anomalous behaviors occurring simultaneously: (i) super-exponential price growth and (ii) volatility growth, that we refer to as the “fearful singular bubble” regime. Out of the nine time series, we find that five pass our tests and can be characterized as “fearful singular bubbles”. The four other cases are the information technology Nasdaq bubble and three bubbles of the Hang Seng index ending in crashes in 1987, 1994 and 1997. According to our analysis, these four bubbles have developed with essentially no significant increase of their volatility. This paper thus proposes that speculative bubbles ending in crashes form two groups hitherto unrecognized, namely those accompanied by increasing volatility (reflecting increasing risk perception) and those without change of volatility (reflecting an absence of risk perception).

  6. Numerical and experimental study of dissociation in an air-water single-bubble sonoluminescence system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Gabriela F.; Urteaga, Raúl; Bonetto, Fabián J.

    2005-10-01

    We performed a comprehensive numerical and experimental analysis of dissociation effects in an air bubble in water acoustically levitated in a spherical resonator. Our numerical approach is based on suitable models for the different effects considered. We compared model predictions with experimental results obtained in our laboratory in the whole phase parameter space, for acoustic pressures from the bubble dissolution limit up to bubble extinction. The effects were taken into account simultaneously to consider the transition from nonsonoluminescence to sonoluminescence bubbles. The model includes (1) inside the bubble, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, dissociation of O2 and N2 , and mass diffusion of vapor in the noncondensable gases; (2) at the bubble interface, nonequilibrium evaporation and condensation of water and a temperature jump due to the accommodation coefficient; (3) in the liquid, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, and mass diffusion of the gas in the liquid. The model is completed with a Rayleigh-Plesset equation with liquid compressible terms and vapor mass transfer. We computed the boundary for the shape instability based on the temporal evolution of the computed radius. The model is valid for an arbitrary number of dissociable gases dissolved in the liquid. We also obtained absolute measurements for R(t) using two photodetectors and Mie scattering calculations. The robust technique used allows the estimation of experimental results of absolute R0 and Pa . The technique is based on identifying the bubble dissolution limit coincident with the parametric instability in (Pa,R0) parameter space. We take advantage of the fact that this point can be determined experimentally with high precision and replicability. We computed the equilibrium concentration of the different gaseous species and water vapor during collapse as a function of Pa and R0 . The model

  7. A Study of Heat Transfer and Flow Characteristics of Rising Taylor Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammell, Alexander David

    2016-01-01

    Practical application of flow boiling to ground- and space-based thermal management systems hinges on the ability to predict the systems heat removal capabilities under expected operating conditions. Research in this field has shown that the heat transfer coefficient within two-phase heat exchangers can be largely dependent on the experienced flow regime. This finding has inspired an effort to develop mechanistic heat transfer models for each flow pattern which are likely to outperform traditional empirical correlations. As a contribution to the effort, this work aimed to identify the heat transfer mechanisms for the slug flow regime through analysis of individual Taylor bubbles.An experimental apparatus was developed to inject single vapor Taylor bubbles into co-currently flowing liquid HFE 7100. The heat transfer was measured as the bubble rose through a 6 mm inner diameter heated tube using an infrared thermography technique. High-speed flow visualization was obtained and the bubble film thickness measured in an adiabatic section. Experiments were conducted at various liquid mass fluxes (43-200 kgm2s) and gravity levels (0.01g-1.8g) to characterize the effect of bubble drift velocityon the heat transfer mechanisms. Variable gravity testing was conducted during a NASA parabolic flight campaign.Results from the experiments showed that the drift velocity strongly affects the hydrodynamics and heat transfer of single elongated bubbles. At low gravity levels, bubbles exhibited shapes characteristic of capillary flows and the heat transfer enhancement due to the bubble was dominated by conduction through the thin film. At moderate to high gravity, traditional Taylor bubbles provided small values of enhancement within the film, but large peaks in the wake heat transfer occurred due to turbulent vortices induced by the film plunging into the trailing liquid slug. Characteristics of the wake heat transfer profiles were analyzed and related to the predicted velocity field

  8. The influence of bubbles on the perception carbonation bite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Wise

    Full Text Available Although many people naively assume that the bite of carbonation is due to tactile stimulation of the oral cavity by bubbles, it has become increasingly clear that carbonation bite comes mainly from formation of carbonic acid in the oral mucosa. In Experiment 1, we asked whether bubbles were in fact required to perceive carbonation bite. Subjects rated oral pungency from several concentrations of carbonated water both at normal atmospheric pressure (at which bubbles could form and at 2.0 atmospheres pressure (at which bubbles did not form. Ratings of carbonation bite under the two pressure conditions were essentially identical, indicating that bubbles are not required for pungency. In Experiment 2, we created controlled streams of air bubbles around the tongue in mildly pungent CO2 solutions to determine how tactile stimulation from bubbles affects carbonation bite. Since innocuous sensations like light touch and cooling often suppress pain, we predicted that bubbles might reduce rated bite. Contrary to prediction, air bubbles flowing around the tongue significantly enhanced rated bite, without inducing perceived bite in blank (un-carbonated solutions. Accordingly, though bubbles are clearly not required for carbonation bite, they may well modulate perceived bite. More generally, the results show that innocuous tactile stimulation can enhance chemogenic pain. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed.

  9. bubble chamber lens

    CERN Multimedia

    Before the days of electronic detectors, visual techniques were used to detect particles, using detectors such as spark chambers and bubble chambers. This plexiglass lens was used to focus the image of tracks so they could be photographed.

  10. Modeling gamma radiation dose in dwellings due to building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Peter; van Dijk, Willem

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that calculates the absorbed dose rate in air of gamma radiation emitted by building materials in a rectangular body construction. The basis for these calculations is formed by a fixed set of specific absorbed dose rates (the dose rate per Bq kg(-1) 238U, 232Th, and 40K), as determined for a standard geometry with the dimensions 4 x 5 x 2.8 m3. Using the computer codes Marmer and MicroShield, correction factors are assessed that quantify the influence of several room and material related parameters on the specific absorbed dose rates. The investigated parameters are the position in the construction; the thickness, density, and dimensions of the construction parts; the contribution from the outer leave; the presence of doors and windows; the attenuation by internal partition walls; the contribution from building materials present in adjacent rooms; and the effect of non-equilibrium due to 222Rn exhalation. To verify the precision, the proposed method is applied to three Dutch reference dwellings, i.e., a row house, a coupled house, and a gallery apartment. The averaged difference with MCNP calculations is found to be 4%.

  11. Boussinesq modeling of surface waves due to underwater landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dutykh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Consideration is given to the influence of an underwater landslide on waves at the surface of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion that govern the evolution of the barycenter of the landslide mass include various dissipative effects due to bottom friction, internal energy dissipation, and viscous drag. The surface waves are studied in the Boussinesq scaling, with time-dependent bathymetry. A numerical model for the Boussinesq equations is introduced that is able to handle time-dependent bottom topography, and the equations of motion for the landslide and surface waves are solved simultaneously. The numerical solver for the Boussinesq equations can also be restricted to implement a shallow-water solver, and the shallow-water and Boussinesq configurations are compared. A particular bathymetry is chosen to illustrate the general method, and it is found that the Boussinesq system predicts larger wave run-up than the shallow-water theory in the example treated in this paper. It is also found that the finite fluid domain has a significant impact on the behavior of the wave run-up.

  12. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  13. Prediction of bubble detachment diameter in flow boiling based on force analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Deqi; Pan Liangming; Ren Song

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► All the forces acting on the growing bubbles are taken into account in the model. ► The bubble contact diameter has significant effect on bubble detachment. ► Bubble growth force and surface tension are more significant in narrow channel. ► A good agreement between the predicted and the measured results is achieved. - Abstract: Bubble detachment diameter is one of the key parameters in the study of bubble dynamics and boiling heat transfer, and it is hard to be measured in a boiling system. In order to predict the bubble detachment diameter, a theoretical model is proposed based on forces analysis in this paper. All the forces acting on a bubble are taken into account to establish a model for different flow boiling configurations, including narrow and conventional channels, upward, downward and horizontal flows. A correlation of bubble contact circle diameter is adopted in this study, and it is found that the bubble contact circle diameter has significant effect on bubble detachment. A new correlation taking the bubble contact circle diameter into account for the evaluation of bubble growth force is proposed in this study, and it is found that the bubble growth force and surface tension force are more significant in narrow channel when comparing with that in conventional channel. A visual experiment was carried out in order to verify present model; and the experimental data from published literature are used also. A good agreement between predicted and measured results is achieved.

  14. Beer tapping: dynamics of bubbles after impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantič-Lugo, V.; Cayron, A.; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, F.

    2015-12-01

    Beer tapping is a well known prank where a bottle of beer is impacted from the top by a solid object, usually another bottle, leading to a sudden foam overflow. A description of the shock-driven bubble dynamics leading to foaming is presented based on an experimental and numerical study evoking the following physical picture. First, the solid impact produces a sudden downwards acceleration of the bottle creating a strong depression in the liquid bulk. The existing bubbles undergo a strong expansion and a sudden contraction ending in their collapse and fragmentation into a large amount of small bubbles. Second, the bubble clouds present a large surface area to volume ratio, enhancing the CO2 diffusion from the supersaturated liquid, hence growing rapidly and depleting the CO2. The clouds of bubbles migrate upwards in the form of plumes pulling the surrounding liquid with them and eventually resulting in the foam overflow. The sudden pressure drop that triggers the bubble dynamics with a collapse and oscillations is modelled by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The bubble dynamics from impact to collapse occurs over a time (tb ≃ 800 μs) much larger than the acoustic time scale of the liquid bulk (tac = 2H/c ≃ 80 μs), for the experimental container of height H = 6 cm and a speed of sound around c ≃ 1500 m/s. This scale separation, together with the comparison of numerical and experimental results, suggests that the pressure drop is controlled by two parameters: the acceleration of the container and the distance from the bubble to the free surface.

  15. Electron acceleration in the bubble regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Oliver

    2014-02-03

    The bubble regime of laser-wakefield acceleration has been studied over the recent years as an important alternative to classical accelerators. Several models and theories have been published, in particular a theory which provides scaling laws for acceleration parameters such as energy gain and acceleration length. This thesis deals with numerical simulations within the bubble regime, their comparison to these scaling laws and data obtained from experiments, as well as some specific phenomenona. With a comparison of the scaling laws with numerical results a parameter scan was able to show a large parameter space in which simulation and theory agree. An investigation of the limits of this parameter space revealed boundaries to other regimes, especially at very high (a{sub 0} > 100) and very low laser amplitudes (a{sub 0} < 4). Comparing simulation data with data from experiments concerning laser pulse development and electron energies, it was found that experimental results can be adequately reproduced using the Virtual-Laser-Plasma-Laboratory code. In collaboration with the Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik at the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena synchrotron radiation emitted from the inside of the bubble was investigated. A simulation of the movement of the electrons inside the bubble together with time dependent histograms of the emitted radiation helped to prove that the majority of radiation created during a bubble acceleration originates from the inside of the bubble. This radiation can be used to diagnose the amplitude of oscillation of the trapped electrons. During a further study it was proven that the polarisation of synchrotron radiation from a bubble contains information about the exact oscillation direction. This oscillation was successfully controlled by using either a laser pulse with a tilted pulse front or an asymmetric laser pulse. First results of ongoing studies concerning injecting electrons into an existing bubble and a scheme called

  16. Bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, John

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we provide a unifying framework for a set of seemingly disparate models for bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies in financial markets. Markets operate by balancing intrinsic levels of risk and return. This seemingly simple observation is commonly over-looked by academics and practitioners alike. Our model shares its origins in statistical physics with others. However, under our approach, changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. This structure leads to an improved physical and econometric model. We develop models for bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies. The list of empirical applications is both interesting and topical and includes real-estate bubbles and the on-going Eurozone crisis. We close by comparing the results of our model with purely qualitative findings from the finance literature.

  17. Sonoluminescence and dynamics of cavitation bubble populations in sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Andrea; Holsteyns, Frank; Cairós, Carlos; Mettin, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The detailed link of liquid phase sonochemical reactions and bubble dynamics is still not sufficiently known. To further clarify this issue, we image sonoluminescence and bubble oscillations, translations, and shapes in an acoustic cavitation setup at 23kHz in sulfuric acid with dissolved sodium sulfate and xenon gas saturation. The colour of sonoluminescence varies in a way that emissions from excited non-volatile sodium atoms are prominently observed far from the acoustic horn emitter ("red region"), while such emissions are nearly absent close to the horn tip ("blue region"). High-speed images reveal the dynamics of distinct bubble populations that can partly be linked to the different emission regions. In particular, we see smaller strongly collapsing spherical bubbles within the blue region, while larger bubbles with a liquid jet during collapse dominate the red region. The jetting is induced by the fast bubble translation, which is a consequence of acoustic (Bjerknes) forces in the ultrasonic field. Numerical simulations with a spherical single bubble model reproduce quantitatively the volume oscillations and fast translation of the sodium emitting bubbles. Additionally, their intermittent stopping is explained by multistability in a hysteretic parameter range. The findings confirm the assumption that bubble deformations are responsible for pronounced sodium sonoluminescence. Notably the observed translation induced jetting appears to serve as efficient mixing mechanism of liquid into the heated gas phase of collapsing bubbles, thus potentially promoting liquid phase sonochemistry in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Testing for Multiple Bubbles: Limit Theory of Real Time Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Peter C.B. Phillips; Shu-Ping Shi; Jun Yu

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides the limit theory of real time dating algorithms for bubble detection that were suggested in Phillips, Wu and Yu (2011, PWY) and Phillips, Shi and Yu (2013b, PSY). Bubbles are modeled using mildly explosive bubble episodes that are embedded within longer periods where the data evolves as a stochastic trend, thereby capturing normal market behavior as well as exuberance and collapse. Both the PWY and PSY estimates rely on recursive right tailed unit root tests (each with a d...

  19. Heat transfer between immiscible liquids enhanced by gas bubbling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Schwarz, C.E.; Klages, J.; Klein, J.

    1982-08-01

    The phenomena of core-concrete interactions impact upon containment integrity of light water reactors (LWR) following postulated complete meltdown of the core by containment pressurization, production of combustible gases, and basemat penetration. Experiments have been performed with non-reactor materials to investigate one aspect of this problem, heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquids whose interface is disturbed by a transverse non-condensable gas flux emanating from below. Hydrodynamic studies have been performed to test a criterion for onset of entrainment due to bubbling through the interface and subsequent heat transfer studies were performed to assess the effect of bubbling on interfacial heat transfer rates, both with and without bubble induced entrainment. Non-entraining interfacial heat transfer data with mercury-water/oil fluid pairs were observed to be bounded from below within a factor of two to three by the Szekeley surface renewal heat transfer model. However heat transfer data for fluid pairs which are found to entrain (water-oil), believed to be characteristic of molten reactor core-concrete conditions, were measured to be up to two orders of magnitude greater than surface renewal predictions and are calculated by a simple entrainment heat transfer model

  20. The Spatially Uniform Spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles: The Leptonic Active Galactic Nucleus Jet Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.-Y. K.; Ruszkowski, M.

    2017-11-01

    The Fermi bubbles are among the most important findings of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope; however, their origin is still elusive. One of the unique features of the bubbles is that their gamma-ray spectrum, including a high-energy cutoff at ˜110 GeV and the overall shape of the spectrum, is nearly spatially uniform. The high-energy spectral cutoff is suggestive of a leptonic origin due to synchrotron and inverse-Compton cooling of cosmic-ray (CR) electrons; however, even for a leptonic model, it is not obvious why the spectrum should be spatially uniform. In this work, we investigate the bubble formation in the leptonic active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet scenario using a new CRSPEC module in FLASH that allows us to track the evolution of a CR spectrum during the simulations. We show that the high-energy cutoff is caused by fast electron cooling near the Galactic center (GC) when the jets were launched. Afterwards, the dynamical timescale becomes the shortest among all relevant timescales, and therefore the spectrum is essentially advected with only mild cooling losses. This could explain why the bubble spectrum is nearly spatially uniform: the CRs from different parts of the bubbles as seen today all share the same origin near the GC at an early stage of the bubble expansion. We find that the predicted CR spatial and spectral distribution can simultaneously match the normalization, spectral shape, and high-energy cutoff of the observed gamma-ray spectrum and their spatial uniformity, suggesting that past AGN jet activity is a likely mechanism for the formation of the Fermi bubbles.

  1. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  2. Theoretical aspects of appearing of bubbles in economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pronoza Pavlo V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers theoretical aspects of appearing of bubbles in economy. It analyses vies of scientists regarding the essence of this phenomenon and, with the help of content analysis, specifies the essence of the bubble notion in economy. It considers main stages of appearance of such bubbles. It offers classification of their types. It analyses pre-requisites of appearance of bubbles in economy and their features. It considers main existing approaches to detection and modelling appearance of bubbles. It proves that bubbles negatively influence economy of the countries, that is why, the problem of their detection and prevention is one of the central problems in the process of development of policy of state regulation of economy.

  3. Dynamics of Magnetized Plasma Jets and Bubbles Launched into a Background Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, B.; Zhang, Y.; Fisher, D. M.; Gilmore, M.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation of dense magnetized plasma, either collimated with mainly azimuthal B-field (jet) or toroidal with closed B-field (bubble), in a background plasma occurs in a number of solar and astrophysical cases. Such cases include coronal mass ejections moving in the background solar wind and extragalactic radio lobes expanding into the extragalactic medium. Understanding the detailed MHD behavior is crucial for correctly modeling these events. In order to further the understanding of such systems, we are investigating the injection of dense magnetized jets and bubbles into a lower density background magnetized plasma using a coaxial plasma gun and a background helicon or cathode plasma. In both jet and bubble cases, the MHD dynamics are found to be very different when launched into background plasma or magnetic field, as compared to vacuum. In the jet case, it is found that the inherent kink instability is stabilized by velocity shear developed due to added magnetic tension from the background field. In the bubble case, rather than directly relaxing to a minimum energy Taylor state (spheromak) as in vacuum, there is an expansion asymmetry and the bubble becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable on one side. Recent results will be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  4. Experimental investigation of the motion of bubble clusters and the flow structures with the clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Masanobu; Maeda, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2012-11-01

    In upward bubbly flows, mono-dispersed 1 mm spherical bubbles which do not coalesce in the presence of small amount of surfactants in a liquid phase migrate toward the walls due to the shear-induced lift force. Those bubbles form the bubble clusters near the walls [Takagi, S. and Matsumoto, Y., Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. (2011)]. In this study flow structures of the bubbly flow with the bubble clusters and the motion of the bubble clusters are investigated using scanning stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV), respectively. In order to focus on bubble clusters, 1 mm bubbles are injected near the one of the walls and bubble clusters are formed under some conditions of gas flow rate. From the measurement of the bubbly flows by stereoscopic PIV, it is shown that the bubbles near the wall accelerate surrounding liquids due to their buoyancy and reduce Reynolds stress with increasing a void fraction. Three-dimensional velocity fields are also measured by scanning stereoscopic PIV, and the effect of the bubble cluster on the instantaneous flow fields are analyzed. The results are discussed in the presentation.

  5. The Fermi Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Bubbles are a pair of giant lobes at the heart of the Milky Way, extending roughly 50 degrees north and south of the Galactic Center, and emitting photons with energies up to 100 GeV. This previously unknown structure could be evidence for past activity of the central supermassive black hole, or enhanced star formation towards the inner Galaxy. We will describe the path to discovery of the Bubbles in multiwavelength data, from the first hints in microwave radiation measured by WMAP and X-rays from ROSAT, to the unveiling of their shape and spectrum using public gamma-ray data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, to more recent measurements by Planck and XMM-Newton. We will outline the current state of knowledge of the Bubbles' spectrum, morphology and internal structure, and discuss theoretical proposals and numerical simulations for their nature and origin.

  6. Global tropospheric ozone modeling: Quantifying errors due to grid resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wild, Oliver; Prather, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Ozone production in global chemical models is dependent on model resolution because ozone chemistry is inherently nonlinear, the timescales for chemical production are short, and precursors are artificially distributed over the spatial scale of the model grid. In this study we examine the sensitivity of ozone, its precursors, and its production to resolution by running a global chemical transport model at four different resolutions between T21 (5.6° × 5.6°) and T106 (1.1° × 1.1°) and by quant...

  7. Rational speculative bubbles: A critical view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radonjić Ognjen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of rational bubbles, the bubble is present whenever asset prices progressively diverge from their fundamental value, which occurs because agents expect that asset prices will continue to grow exponentially (self-fulfilling prophecies far in the future and consistently, which promises the realization of ever larger capital gains. In our opinion, the basic shortcoming of this theory refers to the assumption that all market agents are perfectly informed and rational and, accordingly, form homogeneous expectations. The model does not explain decision-making processes or expectation formation, nor does it detect potential psychological and institutional factors that might significantly influence decision making processes and market participants’ reactions to news. Since assumptions of the model critically determine its validity, we conclude that comprehensiveness of the rational bubble model is, to put it mildly, limited.

  8. Numerical simulation of bubble behavior in subcooled flow boiling under velocity and temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreini, Mohammad; Ramiar, Abas; Ranjbar, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Condensing bubble is numerically investigated using VOF model in OpenFOAM package. • Bubble mass reduces as it goes through condensation and achieves higher velocities. • At a certain time the slope of changing bubble diameter with time, varies suddenly. • Larger bubbles experience more lateral migration to higher velocity regions. • Bubbles migrate back to a lower velocity region for higher liquid subcooling rates. - Abstract: In this paper, numerical simulation of the bubble condensation in the subcooled boiling flow is performed. The interface between two-phase is tracked via the volume of fluid (VOF) method with continuous surface force (CSF) model, implemented in the open source OpenFOAM CFD package. In order to simulate the condensing bubble with the OpenFOAM code, the original energy equation and mass transfer model for phase change have been modified and a new solver is developed. The Newtonian flow is solved using the finite volume scheme based on the pressure implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) algorithm. Comparison of the simulation results with previous experimental data revealed that the model predicted well the behavior of the actual condensing bubble. The bubble lifetime is almost proportional to bubble initial size and is prolonged by increasing the system pressure. In addition, the initial bubble size, subcooling of liquid and velocity gradient play an important role in the bubble deformation behavior. Velocity gradient makes the bubble move to the higher velocity region and the subcooling rate makes it to move back to the lower velocity region.

  9. The stability of large oscillating bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, John; Pearson, Antony

    2002-11-01

    In a most remarkable paper, in October 1942, Penney & Price developed a theory for the stability of large oscillating bubbles; in their case they were interested in underwater explosions. Much of our current understanding on the stability of oscillating bubbles can be traced to the theoretical and experimental insight shown in this paper. While interest in this particular area continues with regard ship survivability to underwater explosions, other newer areas include the oscillatory behaviour of of seismic airgun generated bubbles. Apart from large volume oscillations with a characteristic period, the other dominant parameter is associated with buoyancy. An appropriate parameter is chosen that provides a measure of the distance of migration of a bubble over one period. An analytical and computational analysis of this class of problem reveals that this pressure gradient driven instability, normally observed in the form of a high speed liquid jet threading the bubble, is the most dominant surface instability, a characteristic feature borne out in most experimental and practical applications due to the presence of an incipient pressure gradient associated with hydrostatics, dynamics or boundaries

  10. Local inflammation, dissemination and coalescence of lesions are key for the progression towards active tuberculosis: the bubble model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara ePrats

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of a tuberculosis (TB infection towards active disease is driven by a combination of factors mostly related to the host response. The equilibrium between control of the bacillary load and the pathology generated is crucial as regards preventing the growth and proliferation of TB lesions. In addition, some experimental evidence suggests an important role of both local endogenous reinfection and the coalescence of neighboring lesions.Herein we propose a mathematical model that captures the essence of these factors by defining three hypotheses: (i lesions grow logistically due to the inflammatory reaction; (ii new lesions can appear as a result of extracellular bacilli or infected macrophages that escape from older lesions; and (iii lesions can merge when they are close enough. This model was implemented in Matlab to simulate the dynamics of several lesions in a 3D space. It was also fitted to available microscopy data from infected C3HeB/FeJ mice, an animal model of active TB that reacts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with an exaggerated inflammatory response.The results of the simulations show the dynamics observed experimentally, namely an initial increase in the number of lesions followed by oscillations, and an exponential increase in the mean area of the lesions. In addition, further analysis of experimental and simulation results show a strong coincidence of the area distributions of lesions at day 21, thereby highlighting the consistency of the model. Three simulation series removing each one of the hypothesis corroborate their essential role in the dynamics observed.These results demonstrate that three local factors, namely an exaggerated inflammatory response, an endogenous reinfection and a coalescence of lesions, are needed in order to progress towards active TB. The failure of one of these factors stops induction of the disease. This mathematical model may be used as a basis for developing strategies to stop the

  11. Bubble separation at the interface between a liquid metal and a liquid slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Vincent F.

    Due to more specific consumer demand, most steel manufacturers are developing techniques to produce quality steels by limiting the number of defects in the final product. There are several aspects to be considered when producing "clean steels", and this research project will focus on one of them: inclusion and bubble separation. Large inclusions (solid or liquid) and gas bubbles have to be removed from the liquid metal before casting, and separation occurs mostly at the slag-metal interface. The objective of this study to develop a fundamental understanding of bubble separation at the slag-metal interface by looking at the chemical engineering literature on separation and coalescence, and by studying experimentally bubble separation at a liquid-liquid interface, first using a water-oil system and then with a metal-slag system. The literature review and the water modeling experiments have shown that four separate steps need to be considered when studying the removal of a buoyant phase particle at a liquid-liquid interface: the transport to the interface, the separation at the interface (film drainage), the film rupture and the removal from the interface. The major factors influencing the rest-time of an argon bubble at an oil-water interface are determined experimentally. The high temperature apparatus permits direct visualization of bubble behavior in metal and slag. The separation of argon bubbles at the slag-metal interface exhibits a behavior similar to what is observed in water modeling: the bubbles impact the interface and rest there for some time before coalescing. A methodology of studying the separation of solid and liquid inclusions is also established using two complementary techniques: x-ray fluoroscopy and confocal scanning electron microscopy. This experimental study showed that inclusions and bubbles do not separate immediately upon reaching the slag-metal interface but can rest in the metal phase for long periods of time before separating. Enhancing

  12. Atomistic simulations of thermodynamic properties of Xe gas bubbles in U10Mo fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shenyang; Setyawan, Wahyu; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2017-07-01

    Xe gas bubble superlattice formation is observed in irradiated uranium-10 wt% molybdenum (U10Mo) fuels. However, the thermodynamic properties of the bubbles (the relationship among bubble size, equilibrium Xe concentration, and bubble pressure) and the mechanisms of bubble superlattice formation are not well known. In this work, the molecular dynamics (MD) method is used to study these properties and mechanisms. The results provide important inputs for quantitative mesoscale models of gas bubble evolution and fuel performance. In the MD simulations, the embedded-atom method (EAM) potential of U10Mo-Xe [1] is employed. Initial gas bubbles with a low Xe concentration (underpressured) are generated in a body-centered cubic (bcc) U10Mo single crystal. Then Xe atoms are sequentially added into the bubbles one by one, and the evolution of pressure and dislocation emission around the bubbles is analyzed. The relationship between pressure, equilibrium Xe concentration, and radius of the bubbles is established. It was found that an overpressured gas bubble emits partial dislocations with a Burgers vector along the direction and a slip plane of (11-2). Meanwhile, dislocation loop punch out was not observed. The overpressured bubble also induces an anisotropic stress field. A tensile stress was found along directions around the bubble, favoring the nucleation and formation of a face-centered cubic bubble superlattice in bcc U10Mo fuels.

  13. Due Regard Encounter Model Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    Note that no existing model covers encoun- ters between two IFR aircraft in oceanic airspace. The reason for this is that one cannot observe encounters...encounters between instrument flight rules ( IFR ) and non- IFR traffic beyond 12NM. 2 TABLE 1 Encounter model categories. Aircraft of Interest Intruder...Aircraft Location Flight Rule IFR VFR Noncooperative Noncooperative Conventional Unconventional CONUS IFR C C U X VFR C U U X Offshore IFR C C U X VFR C U

  14. Cohesion of Bubbles in Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Sydney

    1978-01-01

    The free-energy change, or binding energy, of an idealized bubble cluster is calculated on the basis of one mole of gas, and on the basis of a single bubble going from sphere to polyhedron. Some new relations of bubble geometry are developed in the course of the calculation. (BB)

  15. Three phase Eulerian-granular model applied on numerical simulation of non-conventional liquid fuels combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemoda Stevan Đ.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a two-dimensional CFD model of liquid fuel combustion in bubbling fluidized bed. The numerical procedure is based on the two-fluid Euler-Euler approach, where the velocity field of the gas and particles are modeled in analogy to the kinetic gas theory. The model is taking into account also the third - liquid phase, as well as its interaction with the solid and gas phase. The proposed numerical model comprise energy equations for all three phases, as well as the transport equations of chemical components with source terms originated from the component conversion. In the frame of the proposed model, user sub-models were developed for heterogenic fluidized bed combustion of liquid fuels, with or without water. The results of the calculation were compared with experiments on a pilot-facility (power up to 100 kW, combusting, among other fuels, oil. The temperature profiles along the combustion chamber were compared for the two basic cases: combustion with or without water. On the basis of numerical experiments, influence of the fluid-dynamic characteristics of the fluidized bed on the combustion efficiency was analyzed, as well as the influence of the fuel characteristics (reactivity, water content on the intensive combustion zone. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33042: Improvement of the industrial fluidized bed facility, in scope of technology for energy efficient and environmentally feasible combustion of various waste materials in fluidized bed

  16. Radiolytic and thermolytic bubble gas hydrogen composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-11

    This report describes the development of a mathematical model for the estimation of the hydrogen composition of gas bubbles trapped in radioactive waste. The model described herein uses a material balance approach to accurately incorporate the rates of hydrogen generation by a number of physical phenomena and scale the aforementioned rates in a manner that allows calculation of the final hydrogen composition.

  17. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  18. MISSING: BUBBLE CHAMBER LENS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Would the person who borrowed the large bubble chamber lens from the Microcosm workshops on the ISR please return it. This is a much used piece from our object archives. If anybody has any information about the whereabouts of this object, please contact Emma.Sanders@cern.ch Thank you

  19. bubble chamber lens

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in a PS experiment. Before the days of electronic detectors, visual techniques were used to detect particles, using detectors such as spark chambers and bubble chambers. This plexiglass lens was used to focus the image of tracks so they could be photographed.

  20. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  1. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  2. Critical scattering by bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler-Ferrari, N.; Nussenzveig, H.M.

    1986-11-01

    We apply the complex angular momentum theory to the problem of the critical scattering of light by spherical cavities in the high frequency limit (permittivity greater than the external media) (e.g, air bubble in water) (M.W.O.) [pt

  3. Soap Bubbles and Crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jean Taylor is Professor. Emerita at Rutgers. University and currently a. Visitor at the Courant. Institute, NYU. She works on problems related to soap bubble froths, crystals, and how they evolve under various physical laws. Much of her recent research has been interdisciplinary, joint work with materials scientists ...

  4. A new source of radiation in single-bubble sonoluminescence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-03-28

    Mar 28, 2017 ... In this article, by considering single-bubble sonoluminescence and based on the hydrochemical model and thermal bremsstrahlung approach, for the first time two different origins of light have numerically been studied to describe the Ar bubble radiation in water at the moment of collapse: (a) radiation.

  5. Finite element modelling of elastic intraplate stresses due to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Elastic stresses; continental crust; intraplate seismicity; rheology; geodynamics; modelling; seismology. Abstract. Deep lower crustal intraplate earthquakes are infrequent and the mechanism of their occurrence is not well understood. The Narmada–Son-lineament region in central India has experienced two such ...

  6. Laser controllable generation and manipulation of micro-bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Bekshaev, A. Ya.; Maksimyak, P. P.; Maksimyak, A. P.; Hanson, S. G.; Kontush, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    Micrometer-sized vapor bubbles are formed due to local heating of the water suspension containing absorptive pigment particles of 100 nm diameter. The heating is performed by the CW near-infrared laser radiation. By changing the laser power, four regimes are realized: (1) bubble generation, (2) stable growth of the existing bubbles; (3) stationary existence of the bubbles and (4) bubbles' shrinkage and collapse. The generation and evolution of single bubbles and ensembles of bubbles with controllable sizes and numbers is demonstrated. The bubbles are grouped within the laserilluminated region. They can be easily moved and transported together with the focal spot. The results can be useful for applications associated with the precise manipulation and the species delivery in nano- and micro-engineering problems.

  7. Performance Evaluation of Underwater Wireless Optical Communications Links in the Presence of Different Air Bubble Populations

    KAUST Repository

    Oubei, Hassan M.

    2017-03-16

    We experimentally evaluate the performance of underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) links in the presence of different air bubbles. Air bubbles of different sizes and densities are generated by using an air pipe in conjunction with a submersible water pump of variable flow rate that help break up large bubbles into smaller bubbles. Received signal intensity measurements show that bubbles significantly degrade the performance of UWOC links. Large bubbles completely obstruct the optical beam and cause a deep fade. However, as the bubble size decreases, the level of deep fade also decreases because the optical beam is less susceptible to complete obstruction and more light reaches the detector. We also show that beam expansion could help mitigate the performance degradation due to the deep fade caused by air bubbles scatters in the channel.

  8. Global tropospheric ozone modeling: Quantifying errors due to grid resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Oliver; Prather, Michael J.

    2006-06-01

    Ozone production in global chemical models is dependent on model resolution because ozone chemistry is inherently nonlinear, the timescales for chemical production are short, and precursors are artificially distributed over the spatial scale of the model grid. In this study we examine the sensitivity of ozone, its precursors, and its production to resolution by running a global chemical transport model at four different resolutions between T21 (5.6° × 5.6°) and T106 (1.1° × 1.1°) and by quantifying the errors in regional and global budgets. The sensitivity to vertical mixing through the parameterization of boundary layer turbulence is also examined. We find less ozone production in the boundary layer at higher resolution, consistent with slower chemical production in polluted emission regions and greater export of precursors. Agreement with ozonesonde and aircraft measurements made during the NASA TRACE-P campaign over the western Pacific in spring 2001 is consistently better at higher resolution. We demonstrate that the numerical errors in transport processes on a given resolution converge geometrically for a tracer at successively higher resolutions. The convergence in ozone production on progressing from T21 to T42, T63, and T106 resolution is likewise monotonic but indicates that there are still large errors at 120 km scales, suggesting that T106 resolution is too coarse to resolve regional ozone production. Diagnosing the ozone production and precursor transport that follow a short pulse of emissions over east Asia in springtime allows us to quantify the impacts of resolution on both regional and global ozone. Production close to continental emission regions is overestimated by 27% at T21 resolution, by 13% at T42 resolution, and by 5% at T106 resolution. However, subsequent ozone production in the free troposphere is not greatly affected. We find that the export of short-lived precursors such as NOx by convection is overestimated at coarse resolution.

  9. Bubble properties of heterogeneous bubbly flow in a square bubble column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Wei; Deen, Niels G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The present work focuses on the measurements of bubble properties in heterogeneous bubbly flows in a square bubble column. A four-point optical fibre probe was used for this purpose. The accuracy and intrusive effect of the optical probe was investigated first. The results show that the optical

  10. Inflation and bubbles in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna-Castillo, Pablo; Matzner, Richard A.

    1986-11-01

    Following Israel's study of singular hypersurfaces and thin shells in general relativity, the complete set of Einstein's field equations in the presence of a bubble boundary SIGMA is reviewed for all spherically symmetric embedding four-geometries M+/-. The mapping that identifies points between the boundaries Σ+ and Σ- is obtained explicitly when the regions M+ and M- are described by a de Sitter and a Minkowski metric, respectively. In addition, the evolution of a bubble with vanishing surface energy density is studied in a spatially flat Robertson-Walker space-time, for region M- radiation dominated with a vanishing cosmological constant, and an energy equation in M+ determined by the matching. It is found that this type of bubble leads to a ``worm-hole'' matching; that is, an infinite extent exterior of a sphere is joined across the wall to another infinite extent exterior of a sphere. Interior-interior matches are also possible. Under this model, solutions for a bubble following a Hubble law are analyzed. Numerical solutions for bubbles with constant tension are also obtained.

  11. Gas fluxing of aluminum: a bubble probe for optimization of bubbles/bubble distribution and minimization of splashing/droplet formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James W. Evans; Auitumn Fjeld

    2006-01-01

    totaling 1.549 million lbs. for only thirteen of the twenty three primary smelters then in operation in the US. The research work described in the body of this report (the doctoral dissertation of Dr. Autumn M. Fjeld) had as its objective the improvement of gas fluxing technology to reduce emissions while still maintaining fluxing unit metal throughput. A second objective was a better understanding of the splashing and droplet emission that occurs during fluxing at high gas throughput rates. In the extreme such droplets can form undesired accretions on the walls and gas exit lines of the fluxing unit. Consequently, the productivity of a fluxing unit is sometimes limited by the need to avoid such spraying of droplets produced as gas bubbles break at the metal surface. The approach used was a combination of experimental work in laboratories at UC Berkeley and at the Alcoa Technical Center. The experimental work was mostly on a bubble probe that could be used to determine the extent of dispersion of gas bubbles in the fluxing unit (a parameter affecting the utilization of the injected chlorine). Additionally a high speed digital movie camera was used to study droplet formation due to gas bubbles bursting at the surface of a low melting point alloy. The experimental work was supported by mathematical modeling. In particular, two FLUENT? base mathematical models were developed to compute the metal flow and distribution of the gas within a fluxing unit. Results from these models were then used in a third model to compute emissions and the progress of impurity removal as a function of parameters such as rotor speed. The project was successful in demonstrating that the bubble probe could detect bubbles in a gas fluxing unit at the Alcoa technical Center outside Pittsburgh, PA. This unit is a commercial sized one and the probe, with its associated electronics, was subjected to the hostile molten aluminum, electrical noise etc. Despite this the probes were, on several occasions

  12. Boiling crisis as inhibition of bubble detachment by the vapor recoil force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolayev, V.S.; Beysens, D.; Garrabos, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Boiling crisis is a transition between nucleate and film boiling. In this communication we present a physical model of the boiling crisis based on the vapor recoil effect. Our numerical simulations of the thermally controlled bubble growth at high heat fluxes show how the bubble begins to spread over the heater thus forming a germ for the vapor film. The vapor recoil force not only causes the vapor spreading, it also creates a strong adhesion to the heater that prevents the bubble departure, thus favoring the further bubble spreading. Near the liquid-gas critical point, the bubble growth is very slow and allows the kinetics of the bubble spreading to be observed. Since the surface tension is very small in this regime, only microgravity conditions can preserve a convex bubble shape. Under such conditions, we observed an increase of the apparent contact angle and spreading of the dry spot under the bubble, thus confirming our model of the boiling crisis. (authors)

  13. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  14. High energy neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20-50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  15. Fermi Bubbles: Formation Scenarios and Substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2013-04-01

    The Milky Way has gamma-ray lobes extending several kpc above and below the Galactic center, known as the "Fermi Bubbles." Although the Galactic center is quiet today, these bubbles are a hint of past AGN activity, a burst of star formation, or some other dramatic energy injection. In the three years since their discovery, they have been modeled analytically and numerically, and additional radio and x-ray data have been obtained, leading to a number of ideas about their origins. I will review the latest data and report on some possible formation scenarios. I will also give an update on our tentative claim last year of a linear jet-like structure within the bubbles (arXiv:1205.5852).

  16. Behavior of gas seep bubbles below the hydrate stability zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Jun, I.; Hutschenreuter, K.; Socolofsky, S. A.; Kessler, J. D.; Lavery, A.; Breier, J. A., Jr.; Seewald, J.

    2016-02-01

    Two research cruises (GISR G07 and G08) have been carried out during 2014-2015 to study the behavior of natural gas seep plumes escaping on the seafloor below the hydrate stability zone at MC 118 and GC 600 in the Gulf of Mexico. Quantitative image measurements suggest both temporal and spatial variation of the bubble size and gas flow rate. Hydrate formation on the natural gas seep bubbles was a very fast process in the deep sea environment (890 and 1200 m depth), where the measured methane concentration in water close to the source was also saturated. The measured rise velocities of the bubbles differed significantly from the predicted terminal velocities using empirical equations in Clift et al. (1978). The measured bubble characteristics (size distribution and flow rate) were provided as input to a bubble dissolution model, which accounts for the effect of hydrate on the mass transfer coefficient. The model shows results consistent with the measurements.

  17. Dynamics of gas bubble growth in oil-refrigerant mixtures under isothermal decompression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Joao Paulo; Barbosa Junior, Jader R.; Prata, Alvaro T. [Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], Emails: jpdias@polo.ufsc.br, jrb@polo.ufsc.br, prata@polo.ufsc.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper proposes a numerical model to predict the growth of gaseous refrigerant bubbles in oil-refrigerant mixtures with high contents of oil subjected to isothermal decompression. The model considers an Elementary Cell (EC) in which a spherical bubble is surrounded by a concentric and spherical liquid layer containing a limited amount of dissolved liquid refrigerant. The pressure reduction in the EC generates a concentration gradient at the bubble interface and the refrigerant is transported to the bubble by molecular diffusion. After a sufficiently long period of time, the concentration gradient in the liquid layer and the bubble internal pressure reach equilibrium and the bubble stops growing, having attained its stable radius. The equations of momentum and chemical species conservation for the liquid layer, and the mass balance at the bubble interface are solved via a coupled finite difference procedure to determine the bubble internal pressure, the refrigerant radial concentration distribution and the bubble growth rate. Numerical results obtained for a mixture of ISO VG10 ester oil and refrigerant HFC-134a showed that bubble growth dynamics depends on model parameters like the initial bubble radius, initial refrigerant concentration in the liquid layer, decompression rate and EC temperature. Despite its simplicity, the model showed to be a potential tool to predict bubble growth and foaming which may result from important phenomena occurring inside refrigeration compressors such as lubrication of sliding parts and refrigerant degassing from the oil stored in oil sump during compressor start-up. (author)

  18. Micro bubble formation and bubble dissolution in domestic wet central heating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Yunting

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 16 % of the carbon dioxide emissions in the UK are known to originate from wet domestic central heating systems. Contemporary systems make use of very efficient boilers known as condensing boilers that could result in efficiencies in the 90-100% range. However, research and development into the phenomenon of micro bubbles in such systems has been practically non-existent. In fact, such systems normally incorporate a passive deaerator that is installed as a ‘default’ feature with no real knowledge as to the micro bubble characteristics and their effect on such systems. High saturation ratios are known to occur due to the widespread use of untreated tap water in such systems and due to the inevitable leakage of air into the closed loop circulation system during the daily thermal cycling. The high temperatures at the boiler wall result in super saturation conditions which consequently lead to micro bubble nucleation and detachment, leading to bubbly two phase flow. Experiments have been done on a test rig incorporating a typical 19 kW domestic gas fired boiler to determine the expected saturation ratios and bubble production and dissolution rates in such systems.

  19. Micro bubble formation and bubble dissolution in domestic wet central heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fsadni, Andrew M.; Ge, Yunting

    2012-04-01

    16 % of the carbon dioxide emissions in the UK are known to originate from wet domestic central heating systems. Contemporary systems make use of very efficient boilers known as condensing boilers that could result in efficiencies in the 90-100% range. However, research and development into the phenomenon of micro bubbles in such systems has been practically non-existent. In fact, such systems normally incorporate a passive deaerator that is installed as a `default' feature with no real knowledge as to the micro bubble characteristics and their effect on such systems. High saturation ratios are known to occur due to the widespread use of untreated tap water in such systems and due to the inevitable leakage of air into the closed loop circulation system during the daily thermal cycling. The high temperatures at the boiler wall result in super saturation conditions which consequently lead to micro bubble nucleation and detachment, leading to bubbly two phase flow. Experiments have been done on a test rig incorporating a typical 19 kW domestic gas fired boiler to determine the expected saturation ratios and bubble production and dissolution rates in such systems.

  20. The bubble distribution in glass refining channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Lubomír; Cincibusová, P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2005), s. 269-277 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : glass fining * bubble distribution s models * horizontal channel Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.463, year: 2005

  1. Bubble dynamics in drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Šafařík, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    This study introduces two physical effects known from beverages: the effect of sinking bubbles and the hot chocolate sound effect. The paper presents two simple "kitchen" experiments. The first and second effects are indicated by means of a flow visualization and microphone measurement, respectively. To quantify the second (acoustic) effect, sound records are analyzed using time-frequency signal processing, and the obtained power spectra and spectrograms are discussed.

  2. Effects of surface orientation on lifetime of near-surface nanoscale He bubble in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jiechao; Fu, Baoqin; Wu, Zhangwen; Hou, Qing, E-mail: qhou@scu.edu.cn

    2017-02-15

    In multiscale modeling of the morphological evolution of plasma facing materials in nuclear fusion reactors, the knowledge of the timescales of the involved physical processes is important. In the present study, a new method based on molecular dynamics simulations was developed to extract the lifetime of helium bubbles near tungsten surfaces. It was found that the lifetime of a helium bubble can be described by the Arrhenius equation. However, the lifetime of a helium bubble depends on the thickness of tungsten film above the helium bubble in the substrate and the bubble size. The influence of surface orientations on the lifetime of helium bubbles was also observed, and the performance of helium bubbles on the (1 1 1) surface is very different from on the (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces. The role of the helium bubble lifetime in other simulation techniques, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory, is discussed.

  3. Partial coalescence from bubbles to drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2015-10-07

    The coalescence of drops is a fundamental process in the coarsening of emulsions. However, counter-intuitively, this coalescence process can produce a satellite, approximately half the size of the original drop, which is detrimental to the overall coarsening. This also occurs during the coalescence of bubbles, while the resulting satellite is much smaller, approximately 10 %. To understand this difference, we have conducted a set of coalescence experiments using xenon bubbles inside a pressure chamber, where we can continuously raise the pressure from 1 up to 85 atm and thereby vary the density ratio between the inner and outer fluid, from 0.005 up to unity. Using high-speed video imaging, we observe a continuous increase in satellite size as the inner density is varied from the bubble to emulsion-droplet conditions, with the most rapid changes occurring as the bubble density grows up to 15 % of that of the surrounding liquid. We propose a model that successfully relates the satellite size to the capillary wave mode responsible for its pinch-off and the overall deformations from the drainage. The wavelength of the primary wave changes during its travel to the apex, with the instantaneous speed adjusting to the local wavelength. By estimating the travel time of this wave mode on the bubble surface, we also show that the model is consistent with the experiments. This wavenumber is determined by both the global drainage as well as the interface shapes during the rapid coalescence in the neck connecting the two drops or bubbles. The rate of drainage is shown to scale with the density of the inner fluid. Empirically, we find that the pinch-off occurs when 60 % of the bubble fluid has drained from it. Numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid method with dynamic adaptive grid refinement can reproduce these dynamics, as well as show the associated vortical structure and stirring of the coalescing fluid masses. Enhanced stirring is observed for cases with second

  4. Universe unveiled the cosmos in my bubble bath

    CERN Document Server

    Vishveshwara, C V

    2015-01-01

    The bubbles were swirling all around me, massaging my body. As I luxuriated in this fantastic bath, I gasped realizing that those bubbles carried with them miniature galaxies bringing the entire Cosmos into my bathtub... Alfie is back. And so are George and other characters from the author’s previous book Einstein’s Enigma or Black Holes in My Bubble Bath. While the present book, Universe Unveiled - The Cosmos in My Bubble Bath, is completely independent, its storyline can be considered a sequel to the previous one. The scientific content spanning ancient world models to the most recent mysteries of cosmology is presented in an entirely nontechnical and descriptive style through the discussions between Alfie, the enlightened learner, and George, professor of astrophysics. Fantasies, based on these discussions that cover the scientific facts, are created by the magical bubble baths taken by Alfie. Universe Unveiled blends accurate science with philosophy, drama, humour, and fantasy to create an exciting co...

  5. The transition from gas bubble to void growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayns, M.R.

    1977-05-01

    A natural feature of the rate theory of void swelling is that it completely describes the growth of a cavity from a gas bubble through a transition growth region to a void in the presence of an evolving microstructure. This transition from a gas bubble to void growth is expressed in terms of a critical radius and it is shown that this is a very useful tool for interpreting the early life kinetics of void growth. As an example the initial helium gas bubble population expected in pre-injected samples of 316 stainless steel used in simulation void swelling experiments has been calculated using a sophisticated bubble nucleation and growth model. Applying the critical radius arguments to these calculated bubble size distributions a consistent and simple interpretation of the observed void concentrations in subsequent irradiations is obtained. The implications following from these arguments for the interpretation of the neutron irradiated steels are discussed. (author)

  6. Fermi bubbles as sources of cosmic rays above 1 PeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshov Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermi bubbles are giant gamma-ray structures extended north and south of the Galactic center with characteristic sizes of the order of 10 kpc discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Good correlation between radio and gamma-ray emission in the region covered by Fermi bubbles implies the presence of high-energy electrons in this area. Due to high energy losses it is rather problematic to transfer relativistic electrons from the Galactic disk toward the Fermi bubbles. Therefore it is natural to assume that these electrons are accelerated in-situ. Additionally this acceleration mechanism should also affect protons. In particular it may re-accelerate Galactic cosmic rays produced by supernova remnants. Unlike electrons, protons have huge life-times and therefore re-acceleration should not be a local effect but affect the whole Galaxy. The effect may even be observed near the Earth. In our model we propose that hadronic cosmic rays (CR below the “knee” of the observed CR spectrum are produced by Galactic supernova remnants distributed in the Galactic disk. Re-acceleration of these particles in Fermi Bubbles produces CRs above the knee. This model provides a natural explanation of the observed CR flux, spectral indices, and matching of spectra at the knee.

  7. Avoiding steam-bubble-collapse-induced water hammers in piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Y.; Griffith, P.

    1989-10-01

    In terms of the frequency of occurrence, steam bubble collapse in subcooled water is the dominant initiating mechanism for water hammer events in nuclear power plants. Water hammer due to steam bubble collapse occurs when water slug forms in stratified horizontal flow, or when steam bubble is trapped at the end of the pipe. These types of water hammer events have been studied experimentally and analytically in order to develop stability maps showing those combinations of filling velocities and liquid subcooling that cause water hammer and those which don't. In developing the stability maps, experiments with different piping orientations were performed in a low pressure laboratory apparatus. Details of these experiments are described, including piping arrangement, test procedures, and test results. Visual tests using a transparent Lexan pipe are also performed to study the flow regimes accompanying the water hammer events. All analytical models were tested by comparison with the corresponding experimental results. Based on these models, and step-by-step approach for each flow geometry is presented for plant designers and engineers to follow in avoiding water hammer induced by steam bubble collapse when admitting cold water into pipes filled with steam. 37 refs., 54 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Laser-induced nucleation of carbon dioxide bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Martin R.; Jamieson, William J.; Leckey, Claire A.; Alexander, Andrew J.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed experimental study of laser-induced nucleation (LIN) of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles is presented. Water and aqueous sucrose solutions supersaturated with CO2 were exposed to single nanosecond pulses (5 ns, 532 nm, 2.4-14.5 MW cm-2) and femtosecond pulses (110 fs, 800 nm, 0.028-11 GW cm-2) of laser light. No bubbles were observed with the femtosecond pulses, even at high peak power densities (11 GW cm-2). For the nanosecond pulses, the number of bubbles produced per pulse showed a quadratic dependence on laser power, with a distinct power threshold below which no bubbles were observed. The number of bubbles observed increases linearly with sucrose concentration. It was found that filtering of solutions reduces the number of bubbles significantly. Although the femtosecond pulses have higher peak power densities than the nanosecond pulses, they have lower energy densities per pulse. A simple model for LIN of CO2 is presented, based on heating of nanoparticles to produce vapor bubbles that must expand to reach a critical bubble radius to continue growth. The results suggest that non-photochemical laser-induced nucleation of crystals could also be caused by heating of nanoparticles.

  9. Bubble and boundary layer behaviour in subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurus, Reinhold; Sattelmayer, Thomas [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Subcooled flow boiling is a commonly applied technique for achieving efficient heat transfer. In the study, an experimental investigation in the nucleate boiling regime was performed for water circulating in a closed loop at atmospheric pressure. The horizontal orientated test-section consists of a rectangular channel with a one side heated copper strip and good optical access. Various optical observation techniques were applied to study the bubble behaviour and the characteristics of the fluid phase. The bubble behaviour was recorded by the high-speed cinematography and by a digital high resolution camera. Automated image processing and analysis algorithms developed by the authors were applied for a wide range of mass flow rates and heat fluxes in order to extract characteristic length and time scales of the bubbly layer during the boiling process. Using this methodology, the bubbles were automatically analysed and the bubble size, bubble lifetime, waiting time between two cycles were evaluated. Due to the huge number of observed bubbles a statistical analysis was performed and distribution functions were derived. Using a two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithm, the averaged axial phase boundary velocity profile could be extracted. In addition, the fluid phase velocity profile was characterised by means of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) for the single phase flow as well as under subcooled flow boiling conditions. The results indicate that the bubbles increase the flow resistance. The impact on the flow exceeds by far the bubbly region and it depends on the magnitude of the boiling activity. Finally, the ratio of the averaged phase boundary velocity and of the averaged fluid velocity was evaluated for the bubbly region. (authors)

  10. Modeling of methane bubbles released from large sea-floor area: Condition required for methane emission to the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, A.; Yamanaka, Y.; Tajika, E.

    2009-01-01

    Massive methane release from sea-floor sediments due to decomposition of methane hydrate, and thermal decomposition of organic matter by volcanic outgassing, is a potential contributor to global warming. However, the degree of global warming has not been estimated due to uncertainty over the proportion of methane flux from the sea-floor to reach the atmosphere. Massive methane release from a large sea-floor area would result in methane-saturated seawater, thus some methane would reach the atm...

  11. Orbital trajectory of an acoustic bubble in a cylindrical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjouy, Cyril; Labelle, Pauline; Gilles, Bruno; Bera, Jean-Christophe; Inserra, Claude

    2013-09-01

    Acoustic cavitation-induced microbubbles in a cylindrical resonator filled with water tend to concentrate into ring patterns due to the cylindrical geometry of the system. The shape of these ring patterns is directly linked to the Bjerknes force distribution in the resonator. Experimental observations showed that cavitation bubbles located in the vicinity of this ring may exhibit a spiraling behavior around the pressure nodal line. This spiraling phenomenon is numerically studied, the conditions for which a single cavitation bubble follows an orbital trajectory are established, and the influences of the acoustic pressure amplitude and the initial bubble radius are investigated.

  12. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...... in activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during...

  13. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years....... The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model...... and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes....

  14. Bubble measuring instrument and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert (Inventor); Magari, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for a non-invasive bubble measuring instrument operable for detecting, distinguishing, and counting gaseous embolisms such as bubbles over a selectable range of bubble sizes of interest. A selected measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected is insonified by two distinct frequencies from a pump transducer and an image transducer, respectively. The image transducer frequency is much higher than the pump transducer frequency. The relatively low-frequency pump signal is used to excite bubbles to resonate at a frequency related to their diameter. The image transducer is operated in a pulse-echo mode at a controllable repetition rate that transmits bursts of high-frequency ultrasonic signal to the measurement volume in which bubbles may be detected and then receives the echo. From the echo or received signal, a beat signal related to the repetition rate may be extracted and used to indicate the presence or absence of a resonant bubble. In a preferred embodiment, software control maintains the beat signal at a preselected frequency while varying the pump transducer frequency to excite bubbles of different diameters to resonate depending on the range of bubble diameters selected for investigation.

  15. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  16. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  17. Neutron detection via bubble chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D.V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)]. E-mail: david.jordan@pnl.gov; Ely, J.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Peurrung, A.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Bond, L.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Collar, J.I. [Department of Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., LASR 214, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Flake, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Knopf, M.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pitts, W.K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Shaver, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Sonnenschein, A. [Department of Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., LASR 214, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Smart, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Todd, L.C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS P8-20, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a {sup 137}Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  18. Galactic Teamwork Makes Distant Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    using deep field Hubble observations, Castellano and collaborators found an additional 6 galaxies in the same region as the first two, also at a redshift of z~7!The authors believe these galaxies provide a simple explanation of the ionized bubble: each of these faint, normal galaxies produced a small ionized bubble. The overlap of these many small bubbles provided the larger ionized region from which the light of the two originally discovered galaxies was able to escape.How normal is this clustering of galaxies found by Castellano and collaborators? The team demonstrates via cosmological modeling that the number density of galaxies in this region is a factor of 34 greater than would be expected at this distance in a random pointing of the same size.These results greatly support the theoretical prediction that the first ionization fronts in the universe were formed in regions with significant galaxy overdensities. The discovery of this deep-field collection of galaxies strongly suggests that reionization was driven by faint, normal star-forming galaxies in a clumpy process.CitationM. Castellano et al 2016 ApJ 818 L3. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/818/1/L3

  19. Establishment of Measurement Techniques for Sliding Bubble on a Horizontal Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu-Na Kim; Park, Goon-Cherl; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    The mechanistic wall boiling model includes many parameters relevant with bubble behaviors, such as the bubble departure diameter, bubble lift-off diameter, bubble waiting time, etc. Although there have been a large number of studies investigating bubble behavior, the subjects of observation are almost bubbles on a plane or vertical tube. Since the bubble motion is highly influenced by the directions of gravitational force and the heating surfaces, it is expected that the bubble behavior on a horizontal tube is largely different from those on the other geometry. The heat exchanger of APR+ has horizontal U-tube configuration installed in a water pool, of which diameter is 50mm. The study aims to establish measurement techniques for sliding bubbles on a horizontal tube. The measurement parameters include the diameter, interface area, volume, and velocity of the bubble. Additionally, in order to analyze the force acting on the bubble, liquid velocity measurement method was proposed. This paper presents the procedure of the measurement; the phase separation technique, 3-D reconstruction technique, and velocity measurement techniques. For visualization of the sliding bubble behavior, bubble and liquid velocity measurement methods were established which use two high speed cameras and a continuous LASER for the PTV and PIV. Three steps for the bubble shape and velocity measurement (the phase separation, 3-D reconstruction, and velocity calculation), were successfully set up and verified. A PIV technique which uses two different time duration for two regions where the velocity difference is huge was proposed and tested. Using these methods, various information regarding a sliding bubble can be obtained such as bubble and liquid velocities, shape, volume, surface area etc

  20. Modelling of bubbly and annular two-phase flow in subchannel geometries with BACCHUS-3D/TP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottoni, M.; Lyczkowski, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The theoretical and computational bases of the BACCHUS-3D/TP computer program are reviewed. The computer program is used for thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear fuel bundles under normal and accident conditions. The present program combines two models and solution procedures previously used separately, namely, the Improved Slip Model (ISM) and the Separated-Phases Model (SPM). The former model uses mixture equations with accounting for slip between the phases, whereas the latter uses separate continuity and momentum equations. At the present stage of development, both assume thermodynamic equilibrium. Techniques used to affect smooth transition between the two models are described. including treatment of frictional pressure drop and solution of the Poisson and momentum equations. A detailed derivation of the computation of mass transfer between the phases is given because it is a central and novel feature of the model

  1. Bubble Coalescence: Effect of Bubble Approach Velocity and Liquid Viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orvalho, Sandra; Růžička, Marek; Olivieri, G.; Marzocchella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 134, SEP 29 (2015), s. 205-216 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble coalescence * bubble approach velocity * liquid viscosity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.750, year: 2015

  2. Magnetic Bubble Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    x-axis intercept in Figure 20 is twice the coercive field, which for this sample is 0.3 oersted . In this experiment, the laser beam diameter was...the ion im- planted region. From the theory of optical waveguides, Namba, et al., have shown that the minimum refractive index change in an...resulting in bubble outputs at both A + B and A • B outputs. Our first devices of this type were found to have 6 to 7 Oersted bias field margins for

  3. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki, E-mail: takahira@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki, E-mail: oga@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Mori, Naoto, E-mail: su101064@edu.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Moe [Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai-shi, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  4. Experimental Analysis of a Bubble Wake Influenced by a Vortex Street

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Rüttinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubble column reactors are ubiquitous in engineering processes. They are used in waste water treatment, as well as in the chemical, pharmaceutical, biological and food industry. Mass transfer and mixing, as well as biochemical or chemical reactions in such reactors are determined by the hydrodynamics of the bubbly flow. The hydrodynamics of bubbly flows is dominated by bubble wake interactions. Despite the fact that bubble wakes have been investigated intensively in the past, there is still a lack of knowledge about how mass transfer from bubbles is influenced by bubble wake interactions in detail. The scientific scope of this work is to answer the question how bubble wakes are influenced by external flow structures like a vortex street behind a cylinder. For this purpose, the flow field in the vicinity of a single bubble is investigated systematically with high spatial and temporal resolution. High-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurements are conducted monitoring the flow structure in the equatorial plane of the single bubble. It is shown that the root mean square (RMS velocity profiles downstream the bubble are influenced significantly by the interaction of vortices. In the presence of a vortex street, the deceleration of the fluid behind the bubble is compensated earlier than in the absence of a vortex street. This happens due to momentum transfer by cross-mixing. Both effects indicate that the interaction of vortices enhances the cross-mixing close to the bubble. Time series of instantaneous velocity fields show the formation of an inner shear layer and coupled vortices. In conclusion, this study shows in detail how the bubble wake is influenced by a vortex street and gives deep insights into possible effects on mixing and mass transfer in bubbly flows.

  5. Bubble point pressures of the selected model system for CatLiq® bio-oil process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib Sohail; Rosendahl, Lasse; Baig, Muhammad Noman

    2010-01-01

    were presented for the temperatures between 40 oC and 75 oC. The results were correlated by the PSRK (Predictive Soave-Redlich-Kwong) model using Huron-Vidal first-order mixing rule of Michelsen coupled with the modified UNIFAC model. The average absolute deviation between the experimental...

  6. Numerical investigation of air film breakup and micro-bubble formation in liquid-liquid impact events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjalili, Seyedshahabaddin; Mani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Experimental evidence shows that micro-bubbles can be generated when a droplet of the size of a few millimeters impacts a layer of the same liquid with a velocity of a few meters per second. This phenomenon, also known as Mesler entrainment is cumbersome to numerically simulate due to the small time and length scales involved. In order to gain a better understanding of the relevant scales, parameters, and regions, 2-D boundary element simulations inspired by M. Mani, Mandre, Brenner (JFM, vol. 647, p. 143, 2010) were performed. By developing treatments for topological changes, these simulations are extended to after impact events and finally depict the formation of micro-bubbles of sizes similar to entrapped bubbles in Mesler entrainment. Compressibility effects on final bubble size are discussed, and the requirements for a resolved CFD calculation are obtained. Thereafter, a 2-D two-phase flow calculation using a diffuse interface model is undertaken and based on grid-converged results, the statistics of the bubbles are examined and compared with available experimental data. Supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  7. Computational analysis of ozonation in bubble columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinones-Bolanos, E.; Zhou, H.; Otten, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new computational ozonation model based on the principle of computational fluid dynamics along with the kinetics of ozone decay and microbial inactivation to predict the performance of ozone disinfection in fine bubble columns. The model can be represented using a mixture two-phase flow model to simulate the hydrodynamics of the water flow and using two transport equations to track the concentration profiles of ozone and microorganisms along the height of the column, respectively. The applicability of this model was then demonstrated by comparing the simulated ozone concentrations with experimental measurements obtained from a pilot scale fine bubble column. One distinct advantage of this approach is that it does not require the prerequisite assumptions such as plug flow condition, perfect mixing, tanks-in-series, uniform radial or longitudinal dispersion in predicting the performance of disinfection contactors without carrying out expensive and tedious tracer studies. (author)

  8. The stability of the dome of a liquid bubble rising in a dense liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanygin, R. I.; Kascheev, A. D.; Kudryavtsev, A. Yu; Meshkov, E. E.; Novikova, I. A.

    2018-02-01

    The results of experiments researching the stability of the dome of a large water bubble rising in a salt solution are presented. The experiments demonstrate the suppression of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the dome of the rising bubble with the Atwood number being A ≪ 1. The intensive development of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the lateral surface of the bubble is observed as it rises. The stability of the dome of the rising bubble is explained by the action of an accelerated shear flow of water over the bubble surface. The results of computational modeling of the problem by the STAR-CCM + program are presented.

  9. Is there a Housing Bubble in Turkey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coskun Yener

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There was a notable housing price inflation in aggregate/local levels in Turkey during the last few years. Although the country’s economic fundamentals remain strong, the probability of a housing bubble is a heated debate among market participants. This timely investigation brings greater clarity to whether the Turkish housing market is in a bubble. The study uses a multi-strand approach to dissect the bubble over the period of Jan. 2010 - Dec. 2014. First, monthly/annual price-to-income and monthly price-to-rent ratios are examined for the national Turkish as well as regional Istanbul, Izmir and Ankara housing markets. Second, an extended CASE and SHILLER (2003 model is applied assessing the interdependence between housing prices and a series of explanatory variables. Lastly, the Right Tail Augmented Dickey-Fuller (Rtadf test is performed to support the overall analysis. This study finds that neither affordability ratios nor regression estimates support the existence of the bubble in Turkey.

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Interaction between Rising Bubbles and Swirling Water Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Uchiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study experimentally investigates the interaction between rising bubbles and swirling water flow imposed around the central (vertical axis of a bubble plume in a cylindrical water tank. Small air bubbles are successively released from the bottom of the tank to generate a bubble plume, and a stirring disc at the bottom of the tank is rotated to impose a swirling water flow around the central axis of the bubble plume. The bubbles disperse further with the increasing rotational speed ω of the stirring disc. Some bubbles shift toward the central axis of the swirling flow when ω is high. The nondimensional swirling velocity of water reduces with increasing bubble flow rate when ω is lower than a certain value. However, it is less affected by the bubbles when ω is higher. The precessional amplitude for the upper end of the vortex core increases due to the presence of the bubbles. With increasing ω, the nondimensional precessional velocity decreases, and the bubble effect also reduces.

  11. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Document Server

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  12. Bubble coalescence in breathing DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novotný, Tomas; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the coalescence of two DNA bubbles initially located at weak segments and separated by a more stable barrier region in a designed construct of double-stranded DNA. The characteristic time for bubble coalescence and the corresponding distribution are derived, as well as the distribu...

  13. Bubble columns : Structures or stability?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harteveld, W.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the hydrodynamics of the gravity driven bubbly flow that can be found in bubble columns. Special attention is paid to the large scale structures that have a strong impact on several key parameters such as the degree of mixing, mass and

  14. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, C.D.; Arora, M.; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the

  15. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.-D. Ohl (Claus-Dieter); M. Arora (Manish); R. Ikink (Roy); N. de Jong (Nico); M. Versluis (Michel); M. Delius (Michael); D. Lohse (Detlef)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads

  16. Sonoluminescing Air Bubbles Rectify Argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohse, Detlef; Brenner, Michael P.; Dupont, Todd F.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Johnston, Blaine

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) strongly depends on the percentage of inert gas within the bubble. We propose a theory for this dependence, based on a combination of principles from sonochemistry and hydrodynamic stability. The nitrogen and oxygen dissociation and subsequent

  17. Proposals of counting method for bubble detectors and their intercomparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, Eduardo; Silva, Ademir X.; Bellido, Luis F.; Facure, Alessandro; Pereira, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The study of neutron's spectrometry and dosimetry has become significantly easier due to relatively new devices called bubble detectors. Insensitive to gamma rays and composed by superheated emulsions, they still are subjects of many researches in Radiation Physics and Nuclear Engineering. In bubble detectors, either exposed to more intense neutron fields or for a long time, when more bubbles are produced, the statistical uncertainty during the dosimetric and spectrometric processes is reduced. A proposal of this nature is set up in this work, which presents ways to perform counting processes for bubble detectors and an updated proceeding to get the irradiated detectors' images in order to make the manual counting easier. Twelve BDS detectors were irradiated by RDS111 cyclotron from IEN's (Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear) and photographed using an assembly specially designed for this experiment. Counting was proceeded manually in a first moment; simultaneously, ImagePro was used in order to perform counting automatically. The bubble counting values, either manual or automatic, were compared and the time to get them and their difficult levels as well. After the bubble counting, the detectors' standardizes responses were calculated in both cases, according to BDS's manual and they were also compared. Among the results, the counting on these devices really becomes very hard at a large number of bubbles, besides higher variations in counting of many bubbles. Because of the good agreement between manual counting and the custom program, the last one revealed a good alternative in practical and economical levels. Despite the good results, the custom program needs of more adjustments in order to achieve more accuracy on higher counting on bubble detectors for neutron measurement applications. (author)

  18. Bubble Formation in Basalt-like Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Keding, Ralf; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the melting temperature on bubble size and bubble formation in an iron bearing calcium aluminosilicate melt is studied by means of in-depth images acquired by optical microscopy. The bubble size distribution and the total bubble volume are determined by counting the number of bubbles...... and their diameter. The variation in melting temperature has little influence on the overall bubble volume. However, the size distribution of the bubbles varies with the melting temperature. When the melt is slowly cooled, the bubble volume increases, implying decreased solubility of the gaseous species. Mass...

  19. Simulations of bubble-wall collision and bouncing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Sohrab; Mehrabian, Hadi; Zenit, Roberto; Feng, James J.

    2012-11-01

    The collision of a rising bubble with a hydrophilic upper wall is studied numerically using an axisymmetric phase-field model. Prior experiments show bubble bouncing or adhesion depending on its incoming velocity. Using experimental parameters, our computation reproduces these different behaviors, including bubble breakup, arrest, and rebound. In particular, dimples are observed on both the fore and aft sides. We further investigate the scaling of the coefficient of restitution and the critical condition delineating arrest from rebound. The latter is plotted as a phase diagram in terms of the Ohnesorge and Weber numbers. We acknowledge financial support from NSERC.

  20. Stability of solids-coated liquid layers between bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rossen, W R.

    1999-01-01

    In principle, liquid layers between bubbles can be stabilized by a coating of fine solid particles even in the absence of surface-active agents in the liquid. Theoretical modeling of a two-dimensional liquid layer between bubbles containing one row of solid particles suggests that in three dimensions such a layer would unstable unless the solids all touch. This hints at a possible mechanism for bubble stabilization and subsequent rupture in the waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford nuclear reservation

  1. Growing bubbles rising in line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Harper

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Over many years the author and others have given theories for bubbles rising in line in a liquid. Theory has usually suggested that the bubbles will tend towards a stable distance apart, but experiments have often showed them pairing off and sometimes coalescing. However, existing theory seems not to deal adequately with the case of bubbles growing as they rise, which they do if the liquid is boiling, or is a supersaturated solution of a gas, or simply because the pressure decreases with height. That omission is now addressed, for spherical bubbles rising at high Reynolds numbers. As the flow is then nearly irrotational, Lagrange's equations can be used with Rayleigh's dissipation function. The theory also works for bubbles shrinking as they rise because they dissolve.

  2. Improvement of ore recovery efficiency in a flotation column cell using ultra-sonic enhanced bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, L. O.; Royer, J. J.; Filippova, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    The ore process flotation technique is enhanced by using external ultra-sonic waves. Compared to the classical flotation method, the application of ultrasounds to flotation fluids generates micro-bubbles by hydrodynamic cavitation. Flotation performances increase was modelled as a result of increased probabilities of the particle-bubble attachment and reduced detachment probability under sonication. A simplified analytical Navier-Stokes model is used to predict the effect of ultrasonic waves on bubble behavior. If the theory is verified by experimentation, it predicts that the ultrasonic waves would create cavitation micro-bubbles, smaller than the flotation bubble added by the gas sparger. This effect leads to increasing the number of small bubbles in the liquid which promote particle-bubble attachment through coalescence between bubbles and micro-bubbles. The decrease in the radius of the flotation bubbles under external vibration forces has an additional effect by enhancing the bubble-particle collision. Preliminary results performed on a potash ore seem to confirm the theory.

  3. Analysis of bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Sohn, Dong Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel has been modeled based on measured rim width, porosity and bubble density. Using the assumption that excessive bubble pressure in the rim is inversely proportional to its radius, proportionality constant is derived as a function of average pellet burnup and bubble radius. This approach is possible because the integration of the number of Xe atoms retained in the rim bubbles, which can be calculated as a function of bubble radius, over the bubble radius gives the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles. Here the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles can be derived from the measured Xe depletion fraction in the matrix and the calculated rim thickness. Then the rim bubble pressure is obtained as a function of fuel burnup and bubble size from the proportionality constant. Therefore, the present model can provide some useful information that would be required to analyze the behavior of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel under both normal and transient operating conditions. 28 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  4. Bubble removal and sand dissolution in an electrically heated glass melting channel with defined melt flow examined by mathematical modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrbek, L.; Kocourková, P.; Jebavá, Marcela; Cincibusová, P.; Němec, Lubomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 456, JAN 15 (2017), s. 101-113 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt flow * mathematical modelling * energy distribution * space utilization * melting performance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.124, year: 2016

  5. Study of bubble behavior in weightlessness (effects of thermal gradient and acoustic stationary wave) (M-16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to understand how bubbles behave in a thermal gradient and acoustic stationary wave under microgravity. In microgravity, bubble or bubbles in a liquid will not rise upward as they do on Earth but will rest where they are formed because there exists no gravity-induced buoyancy. We are interested in how bubbles move and in the mechanisms which support the movement. We will try two ways to make bubbles migrate. The first experiment concerns behavior of bubbles in a thermal gradient. It is well known than an effect of surface tension which is masked by gravity on the ground becomes dominant in microgravity. The surface tension on the side of the bubble at a lower temperature is stronger than at a higher temperature. The bubble migrates toward the higher temperature side due to the surface tension difference. The migration speed depends on the so-called Marangoni number, which is a function of the temperature difference, the bubble diameter, liquid viscosity, and thermal diffusivity. At present, some experimental data about migration speeds in liquids with very small Marangoni numbers were obtained in space experiments, but cases of large Marangoni number are rarely obtained. In our experiment a couple of bubbles are to be injected into a cell filled with silicon oil, and the temperature gradient is to be made gradually in the cell by a heater and a cooler. We will be able to determine migration speeds in a very wide range of Marangoni numbers, as well as study interactions between the bubbles. We will observe bubble movements affected by hydrodynamical and thermal interactions, the two kinds of interactions which occur simultaneously. These observation data will be useful for analyzing the interactions as well as understanding the behavior of particles or drops in materials processing. The second experiment concerns bubble movement in an acoustic stationary wave. It is known that a bubble in a stationary wave moves toward the node or the

  6. A Coupled Economic and Physical Model of Coastal Adaptation and Abandonment: Are human occupied coastlines a bubble waiting to burst?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D.; Keeler, A.

    2011-12-01

    Policy discussions of adaptation by coastal residents to increasing rates of sea level rise and changing frequency of damaging storms have focused on community land use planning processes. This view neglects the role that market dynamics and climate change expectations play in the way coastal communities choose among risk mitigation options and manage land use decisions in an environment of escalating risks. We use a model coupling physical coastal processes with an agent-based model of behavior in real estate and mitigation markets to examine the interplay of climate-driven coastal hazards, collective mitigation decisions, and individual beliefs. The physical component model simulates barrier island processes that respond to both storms and slow scale dynamics associated with sea level rise. The economic component model is an agent-based model of economic behavior where agents are rational economic actors working off different assessments of future climate-driven events. Agents differentially update their beliefs based on a) how much emphasis they give to observed coastal changes and b) how much weight they give to scientific predictions. In essence, agents differ along a spectrum of how much they believe that the past is the best guide to the future and how quickly they react to new information. We use the coupled model to explore three questions of interest to coastal policy. First, how do the interplay of costal processes, beliefs, and mitigation choices affect the level and stability of real estate prices? Second, how does this interplay affect the incentives for community investments in shoreline protection? Third, how do expectations and reactions to observed events, as well as mitigation investments, affect the built environment in circumstances when climate risks reach very high levels? This last question relates to a key aspect of climate change adaptation on the coast - when does mitigation give way to abandonment as an optimal adaptation strategy

  7. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  8. Modelling uncertainty due to imperfect forward model and aerosol microphysical model selection in the satellite aerosol retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Anu; Laine, Marko; Tamminen, Johanna

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to characterize the uncertainty related to the aerosol microphysical model selection and the modelling error due to approximations in the forward modelling. Many satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms rely on pre-calculated look-up tables of model parameters representing various atmospheric conditions. In the retrieval we need to choose the most appropriate aerosol microphysical models from the pre-defined set of models by fitting them to the observations. The aerosol properties, e.g. AOD, are then determined from the best models. This choice of an appropriate aerosol model composes a notable part in the AOD retrieval uncertainty. The motivation in our study was to account these two sources in the total uncertainty budget: uncertainty in selecting the most appropriate model, and uncertainty resulting from the approximations in the pre-calculated aerosol microphysical model. The systematic model error was analysed by studying the behaviour of the model residuals, i.e. the differences between modelled and observed reflectances, by statistical methods. We utilised Gaussian processes to characterize the uncertainty related to approximations in aerosol microphysics modelling due to use of look-up tables and other non-modelled systematic features in the Level 1 data. The modelling error is described by a non-diagonal covariance matrix parameterised by correlation length, which is estimated from the residuals using computational tools from spatial statistics. In addition, we utilised Bayesian model selection and model averaging methods to account the uncertainty due to aerosol model selection. By acknowledging the modelling error as a source of uncertainty in the retrieval of AOD from observed spectral reflectance, we allow the observed values to deviate from the modelled values within limits determined by both the measurement and modelling errors. This results in a more realistic uncertainty level of the retrieved AOD. The method is illustrated by both

  9. Review of bubble detector response characteristics and results from space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B J; Smith, M B; Ing, H; Andrews, H R; Machrafi, R; Tomi, L; Matthews, T J; Veloce, L; Shurshakov, V; Tchernykh, I; Khoshooniy, N

    2012-06-01

    A passive neutron-bubble dosemeter (BD), developed by Bubble Technology Industries, has been used for space applications. Both the bubble detector-personal neutron dosemeter and bubble detector spectrometer have been studied at ground-based facilities in order to characterise their response due to neutrons, heavy ion particles and protons. This technology was first used during the Canadian-Russian collaboration aboard the Russian satellite BION-9, and subsequently on other space missions, including later BION satellites, the space transportation system, Russian MIR space station and International Space Station. This paper provides an overview of the experiments that have been performed for both ground-based and space studies in an effort to characterise the response of these detectors to various particle types in low earth orbit and presents results from the various space investigations.

  10. Dynamics of a bubble rising in gravitational field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Bernardis Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The rising motion in free space of a pulsating spherical bubble of gas and vapour driven by the gravitational force, in an isochoric, inviscid liquid is investigated. The liquid is at rest at the initial time, so that the subsequent flow is irrotational. For this reason, the velocity field due to the bubble motion is described by means of a potential, which is represented through an expansion based on Legendre polynomials. A system of two coupled, ordinary and nonlinear differential equations is derived for the vertical position of the bubble center of mass and for its radius. This latter equation is a modified form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, including a term proportional to the kinetic energy associated to the translational motion of the bubble.

  11. Approximate model for calculating overall heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquid layers with bubble-induced liquid entrainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Schwarz, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    In the event a commercial power reactor is subjected to a Class 9 accident resulting in gross core melting and reactor pressure vessel penetration, it has been shown that the containment integrity may subsequently be threatened by steam overpressurization, combustible gas reactions, and basemat penetration. A major contributor to these events would be the interaction of molten core debris with the structural concrete. Modeling of core-concrete interactions involves many poorly understood and complicated heat transfer phenomena for which there exists a sparse data base. One of these phenomena, which has been shown to have significant impact upon code calculations of core-concrete interactions, is the rate of heat transfer between overlying immiscible layers of core oxides and molten metals whose interface is agitated by transverse gas flow. A mathematical model is developed to analyze this heat transfer

  12. Visualization of bubble behaviors in forced convective subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Noriaki; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo; Kikura, Hiroshige; Aritomi, Masanori; Komeno, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    Condensation characteristics of vapor bubble after the departure from a heated section in forced convective subcooled flow boiling were studied visually by using a high speed camera. The purpose of the present study was to measure two-phase flow parameters in subcooled flow boiling. These two-phase flow parameters are void fraction, interfacial area concentration and Sauter mean diameter, which express bubble interface behaviors. The experimental set-up was designed to measure the two-phase flow parameters necessary for developing composite equations for the two fluid models in subcooled flow boiling. In the present experiments, the mass flux, liquid subcooling and the heater were varied within 100-1000kg/m 2 s, 2-10K and 100-300kW/m 2 respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the bubble images were obtained by a high-speed camera, and analyzed paying attention to the condensation of vapor bubbles. These two-phase parameters were obtained by the experimental data, such as the bubble parameter, the bubble volume and the bubble surface. In the calculation process of the two phase flow parameters, it was confirmed that these parameters are related to the void fraction. (author)

  13. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-06

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet.

  14. Bubble length affects bubble speed in a rough microfluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Witten, Tom

    2010-03-01

    We discuss the creeping motion of bubbles of different length in rough capillary tubes filled with carrier fluids. This extends the results of BrethertonfootnotetextF.P.Bretherton, 1961, J. Fluid Mech., 10, 166. for an infinite-length bubble at small capillary number Ca in a circular tube. We first derive the asymptotic corrections to the speed owing to finite length. This dependence on length is exponentially small, with a decay length much shorter than the tube radius R. Then we discuss the effect of azimuthal roughness of the tube on the bubble speed. Tube roughness leads to a carrier fluid flow in the azimuthal plane; this flow controls the relaxation of the bubble shape to its infinite length limit. For long-wavelength roughness, we find that the above decay length becomes much longer and even comparable to R. This implies a much-enhanced dependence of the bubble velocity on length. A shorter bubble should then catch up with a longer bubble ahead of it in the same channel. This mechanism may explain catch-up effects seen experimentally.footnotetextR.Ismagilov, private communication.

  15. Size distribution of air bubbles entering the brain during cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M L Chung

    Full Text Available Thousands of air bubbles enter the cerebral circulation during cardiac surgery, but whether high numbers of bubbles explain post-operative cognitive decline is currently controversial. This study estimates the size distribution of air bubbles and volume of air entering the cerebral arteries intra-operatively based on analysis of transcranial Doppler ultrasound data.Transcranial Doppler ultrasound recordings from ten patients undergoing heart surgery were analysed for the presence of embolic signals. The backscattered intensity of each embolic signal was modelled based on ultrasound scattering theory to provide an estimate of bubble diameter. The impact of showers of bubbles on cerebral blood-flow was then investigated using patient-specific Monte-Carlo simulations to model the accumulation and clearance of bubbles within a model vasculature.Analysis of Doppler ultrasound recordings revealed a minimum of 371 and maximum of 6476 bubbles entering the middle cerebral artery territories during surgery. This was estimated to correspond to a total volume of air ranging between 0.003 and 0.12 mL. Based on analysis of a total of 18667 embolic signals, the median diameter of bubbles entering the cerebral arteries was 33 μm (IQR: 18 to 69 μm. Although bubble diameters ranged from ~5 μm to 3.5 mm, the majority (85% were less than 100 μm. Numerous small bubbles detected during cardiopulmonary bypass were estimated by Monte-Carlo simulation to be benign. However, during weaning from bypass, showers containing large macro-bubbles were observed, which were estimated to transiently affect up to 2.2% of arterioles.Detailed analysis of Doppler ultrasound data can be used to provide an estimate of bubble diameter, total volume of air, and the likely impact of embolic showers on cerebral blood flow. Although bubbles are alarmingly numerous during surgery, our simulations suggest that the majority of bubbles are too small to be harmful.

  16. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10{sup 13} emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  17. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-03-01

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 1013 emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  18. Two-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Ultrasound in Liquids with Gas Bubble Agglomerates: Examples of Bubbly-Liquid-Type Acoustic Metamaterials (BLAMMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Vanhille

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a theoretical analysis about the possibility of using linear and nonlinear acoustic properties to modify ultrasound by adding gas bubbles of determined sizes in a liquid. We use a two-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the effect that one and several monodisperse bubble populations confined in restricted areas of a liquid have on ultrasound by calculating their nonlinear interaction. The filtering of an input ultrasonic pulse performed by a net of bubbly-liquid cells is analyzed. The generation of a low-frequency component from a single cell impinged by a two-frequency harmonic wave is also studied. These effects rely on the particular dispersive character of attenuation and nonlinearity of such bubbly fluids, which can be extremely high near bubble resonance. They allow us to observe how gas bubbles can change acoustic signals. Variations of the bubbly medium parameters induce alterations of the effects undergone by ultrasound. Results suggest that acoustic signals can be manipulated by bubbles. This capacity to achieve the modification and control of sound with oscillating gas bubbles introduces the concept of bubbly-liquid-based acoustic metamaterials (BLAMMs.

  19. Gas–Liquid Mass Transfer Coefficient in Stirred Tanks Interpreted through Models of Idealized Eddy Structure of Turbulence in the Bubble Vicinity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Linek, V.; Kordač, M.; Zedníková, Mária; Moucha, T.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 12 (2004), s. 1511-1517 ISSN 0255-2701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : mass transfer coefficient * bubble * dynamic pressure method Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.033, year: 2004

  20. The bubble legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jeff

    2010-05-01

    Imagine an optics company - let's call it JDS Uniphase - with a market capitalization approaching the gross domestic product (GDP) of Ireland. Now imagine it merging with a laser company - say, SDL - that has a stock valuation of 41bn, higher than the GDP of Costa Rica. Finally, imagine a start-up with 109m in venture capital in its pocket but no product to its name (Novalux) turning down an offer of 500m as insufficient. It may be hard to believe, but these tales are true: they occurred in the year 2000 - an era when the laser, fibre-optics and photonics industries were the darlings of the financial world. Such was the madcap nature of that brief period that survivors call it simply "the bubble".

  1. Study of Bubble Size, Void Fraction, and Mass Transport in a Bubble Column under High Amplitude Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrouz Mohagheghian

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertical vibration is known to cause bubble breakup, clustering and retardation in gas-liquid systems. In a bubble column, vibration increases the mass transfer ratio by increasing the residence time and phase interfacial area through introducing kinetic buoyancy force (Bjerknes effect and bubble breakup. Previous studies have explored the effect of vibration frequency (f, but minimal effort has focused on the effect of amplitude (A on mass transfer intensification. Thus, the current work experimentally examines bubble size, void fraction, and mass transfer in a bubble column under relatively high amplitude vibration (1.5 mm < A <9.5 mm over a frequency range of 7.5–22.5 Hz. Results of the present work were compared with past studies. The maximum stable bubble size under vibration was scaled using Hinze theory for breakage. Results of this work indicate that vibration frequency exhibits local maxima in both mass transfer and void fraction. Moreover, an optimum amplitude that is independent of vibration frequency was found for mass transfer enhancements. Finally, this work suggests physics-based models to predict void fraction and mass transfer in a vibrating bubble column.

  2. BURST OF STAR FORMATION DRIVES BUBBLE IN GALAXY'S CORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    These NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshots reveal dramatic activities within the core of the galaxy NGC 3079, where a lumpy bubble of hot gas is rising from a cauldron of glowing matter. The picture at left shows the bubble in the center of the galaxy's disk. The structure is more than 3,000 light-years wide and rises 3,500 light-years above the galaxy's disk. The smaller photo at right is a close-up view of the bubble. Astronomers suspect that the bubble is being blown by 'winds' (high-speed streams of particles) released during a burst of star formation. Gaseous filaments at the top of the bubble are whirling around in a vortex and are being expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down upon the galaxy's disk where it may collide with gas clouds, compress them, and form a new generation of stars. The two white dots just above the bubble are probably stars in the galaxy. The close-up reveals that the bubble's surface is lumpy, consisting of four columns of gaseous filaments that tower above the galaxy's disk. The filaments disperse at a height of 2,000 light-years. Each filament is about 75 light-years wide. Velocity measurements taken by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in Hawaii show that the gaseous filaments are ascending at more than 4 million miles an hour (6 million kilometers an hour). According to theoretical models, the bubble formed when ongoing winds from hot stars mixed with small bubbles of very hot gas from supernova explosions. Observations of the core's structure by radio telescopes indicate that those processes are still active. The models suggest that this outflow began about a million years ago. They occur about every 10 million years. Eventually, the hot stars will die, and the bubble's energy source will fade away. Astronomers have seen evidence of previous outbursts from radio and X-ray observations. Those studies show rings of dust and gas and long plumes of material, all of which are larger than the bubble. NGC 3079 is 50

  3. Force acting on a spherical bubble rising through a quiescent liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    1996-01-01

    The direct numerical simulation is performed on the spherical bubble unsteadily rising through a quiescent liquid. The method is based on a finite-volume solution of the equations on an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. The calculations are performed for a bubble rising through a clean liquid and contaminated one. Following the former experimental results, the tangential stress free condition is given for a clean bubble, and no-slip condition for contaminated one. The numerical results are compared with those of the model equation of the translational motion of the bubble, which is often used in numerical models of a bubbly flow. The steady drag, added mass and history terms are checked up by the comparison. It is revealed that the history force effect is negligible for a bubble rising through the clean liquid beyond Re=O(50). From the numerical point of view, the fact that the history force is negligible is quite important, because it reduces the calculation time and memory for a bubbly flow model. For a contaminated bubble, history force effect is not negligible even though the Reynolds number is high enough. It is found that the expression of the history force by Basset kernel gives an over-estimation of the history force for the bubble rising at moderate Reynolds number. This error becomes larger with increasing Reynolds number and it reduces the accuracy to calculate the bubble motion by the model equation. (author)

  4. The Macroeconomic Consequences of Asset Bubbles and Crashes

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Lisi; Suen, Richard M. H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the macroeconomic effects of asset price bubbles and crashes in an overlapping generations economy. The model highlights the effects of asset price fluctuations on labor supply decisions, and demonstrates how labor market adjustment can help propagate the effects of these fluctuations to the aggregate economy. It is shown that, under certain conditions, asset bubbles can crowd in productive investment and lead to an expansion in total employment, and the bursting of these ...

  5. Empirical fractal geometry analysis of some speculative financial bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelico, Francisco O.; Proto, Araceli N.

    2012-11-01

    Empirical evidence of a multifractal signature during increasing of a financial bubble leading to a crash is presented. The April 2000 crash in the NASDAQ composite index and a time series from the discrete Chakrabarti-Stinchcombe model for earthquakes are analyzed using a geometric approach and some common patterns are identified. These patterns can be related the geometry of the rising period of a financial bubbles with the non-concave entropy problem.

  6. Logarithmically Slow Expansion of Hot Bubbles in Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V.; Sekimoto, Ken

    1999-01-01

    We report logarithmically slow expansion of hot bubbles in gases in the process of cooling. A model problem first solved, when the temperature has compact support. Then temperature profile decaying exponentially at large distances is considered. The periphery of the bubble is shown to remain essentially static ("glassy") in the process of cooling until it is taken over by a logarithmically slowly expanding "core". An analytical solution to the problem is obtained by matched asymptotic expansi...

  7. Combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability bubble growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Rahul; Mandal, Labakanta; Roy, S.; Khan, M.; Gupta, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on the growth rate of the bubble associated with single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is shown that the effect of viscosity on the motion of the lighter fluid associated with vorticity accumulated inside the bubble due to mass ablation may be such as to reduce the net viscous drag on the bubble exerted by the upper heavier fluid as the former rises through it.

  8. BUBBLE - an urban boundary layer meteorology project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotach, M.W.; Vogt, R.; Bernhofer, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Basel urban Boundary Layer Experiment (BUBBLE) was a year-long experimental effort to investigate in detail the boundary layer structure in the City of Basel, Switzerland. At several sites over different surface types (urban, sub-urban and rural reference) towers up to at least twice the main...... a very detailed physical scale-model in a wind tunnel. In the present paper details of all these activities are presented together with first results....

  9. Sonochemistry and the acoustic bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Grieser, Franz; Enomoto, Naoya; Harada, Hisashi; Okitsu, Kenji; Yasui, Kyuichi

    2015-01-01

    Sonochemistry and the Acoustic Bubble provides an introduction to the way ultrasound acts on bubbles in a liquid to cause bubbles to collapse violently, leading to localized 'hot spots' in the liquid with temperatures of 5000° celcius and under pressures of several hundred atmospheres. These extreme conditions produce events such as the emission of light, sonoluminescence, with a lifetime of less than a nanosecond, and free radicals that can initiate a host of varied chemical reactions (sonochemistry) in the liquid, all at room temperature. The physics and chemistry behind the p

  10. Bayesian Analysis of Bubbles in Asset Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Fulop

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new model where the dynamic structure of the asset price, after the fundamental value is removed, is subject to two different regimes. One regime reflects the normal period where the asset price divided by the dividend is assumed to follow a mean-reverting process around a stochastic long run mean. The second regime reflects the bubble period with explosive behavior. Stochastic switches between two regimes and non-constant probabilities of exit from the bubble regime are both allowed. A Bayesian learning approach is employed to jointly estimate the latent states and the model parameters in real time. An important feature of our Bayesian method is that we are able to deal with parameter uncertainty and at the same time, to learn about the states and the parameters sequentially, allowing for real time model analysis. This feature is particularly useful for market surveillance. Analysis using simulated data reveals that our method has good power properties for detecting bubbles. Empirical analysis using price-dividend ratios of S&P500 highlights the advantages of our method.

  11. New evidence on the first financial bubble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frehen, R.G.P.; Goetzmann, W.; Rouwenhorst, K.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Mississippi Bubble, South Sea Bubble and the Dutch Windhandel of 1720 together represent the world's first global financial bubble. We hand-collect cross-sectional price data and investor account data from 1720 to test theories about market bubbles. Our tests suggest that innovation was a key

  12. Dynamics of diffusive bubble growth and pressure recovery in a bubbly rhyolitic melt embedded in an elastic solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Nakano, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    We present a model of gas exsolution and bubble expansion in a melt supersaturated in response to a sudden pressure drop. In our model, the melt contains a suspension of gas bubbles of identical sizes and is encased in a penny-shaped crack embedded in an elastic solid. The suspension is modeled as a three-dimensional lattice of spherical cells with slight overlap, where each elementary cell consists of a gas bubble surrounded by a shell of volatile-rich melt. The melt is then subjected to a step drop in pressure, which induces gas exsolution and bubble expansion, resulting in the compression of the melt and volumetric expansion of the crack. The dynamics of diffusion-driven bubble growth and volumetric crack expansion span 9 decades in time. The model demonstrates that the speed of the crack response depends strongly on volatile diffusivity in the melt and bubble number density and is markedly sensitive to the ratio of crack thickness to crack radius and initial bubble radius but is relatively insensitive to melt viscosity. The net drop in gas concentration in the melt after pressure recovery represents only a small fraction of the initial concentration prior to the drop, suggesting the melt may undergo numerous pressure transients before becoming significantly depleted of gases. The magnitude of pressure and volume recovery in the crack depends sensitively on the size of the input-pressure transient, becoming relatively larger for smaller-size transients in a melt containing bubbles with initial radii less than 10-5 m. Amplification of the input transient may be large enough to disrupt the crack wall and induce brittle failure in the rock matrix surrounding the crack. Our results provide additional basis for the interpretation of volume changes in the magma conduit under Popocatépetl Volcano during Vulcanian degassing bursts in its eruptive activity in April–May 2000.

  13. Use of an ultrasonic reflectance technique to examine bubble size changes in dough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strybulevych, A; Leroy, V; Page, J H; Shum, A L; Koksel, H F; Scanlon, M G

    2012-01-01

    Bread quality largely depends on the manner in which bubbles are created and manipulated in the dough during processing. We have developed an ultrasonic reflectance technique to monitor bubbles in dough, even at high volume fractions, where near the bubble resonances it is difficult to make measurements using transmission techniques. A broadband transducer centred at 3.5 MHz in a normal incidence wave reflection set-up is used to measure longitudinal velocity and attenuation from acoustic impedance measurements. The technique is illustrated by examining changes in bubbles in dough due to two very different physical effects. In dough made without yeast, a peak in attenuation due to bubble resonance is observed at approximately 2 MHz. This peak diminishes rapidly and shifts to lower frequencies, indicative of Ostwald ripening of bubbles within the dough. The second effect involves the growth of bubble sizes due to gas generated by yeast during fermentation. This process is experimentally challenging to investigate with ultrasound because of very high attenuation. The reflectance technique allows the changes of the velocity and attenuation during fermentation to be measured as a function of frequency and time, indicating bubble growth effects that can be monitored even at high volume fractions of bubbles.

  14. Use of an ultrasonic reflectance technique to examine bubble size changes in dough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strybulevych, A.; Leroy, V.; Shum, A. L.; Koksel, H. F.; Scanlon, M. G.; Page, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Bread quality largely depends on the manner in which bubbles are created and manipulated in the dough during processing. We have developed an ultrasonic reflectance technique to monitor bubbles in dough, even at high volume fractions, where near the bubble resonances it is difficult to make measurements using transmission techniques. A broadband transducer centred at 3.5 MHz in a normal incidence wave reflection set-up is used to measure longitudinal velocity and attenuation from acoustic impedance measurements. The technique is illustrated by examining changes in bubbles in dough due to two very different physical effects. In dough made without yeast, a peak in attenuation due to bubble resonance is observed at approximately 2 MHz. This peak diminishes rapidly and shifts to lower frequencies, indicative of Ostwald ripening of bubbles within the dough. The second effect involves the growth of bubble sizes due to gas generated by yeast during fermentation. This process is experimentally challenging to investigate with ultrasound because of very high attenuation. The reflectance technique allows the changes of the velocity and attenuation during fermentation to be measured as a function of frequency and time, indicating bubble growth effects that can be monitored even at high volume fractions of bubbles.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Large-Scale Bubbly Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zboray, R.; Simiano, M.; De Cachard, F

    2004-03-01

    Carefully planned and instrumented experiments under well-defined boundary conditions have been carried out on large-scale, isothermal, bubbly plumes. The data obtained is meant to validate newly developed, high-resolution numerical tools for 3D transient, two-phase flow modelling. Several measurement techniques have been utilised to collect data from the experiments: particle image velocimetry, optical probes, electromagnetic probes, and visualisation. Bubble and liquid velocity fields, void-fraction distributions, bubble size and interfacial-area-concentration distributions have all been measured in the plume region, as well as recirculation velocities in the surrounding pool. The results obtained from the different measurement techniques have been compared. In general, the two-phase flow data obtained from the different techniques are found to be consistent, and of high enough quality for validating numerical simulation tools for 3D bubbly flows. (author)

  16. Experimental Investigation of Large-Scale Bubbly Plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zboray, R.; Simiano, M.; De Cachard, F.

    2004-01-01

    Carefully planned and instrumented experiments under well-defined boundary conditions have been carried out on large-scale, isothermal, bubbly plumes. The data obtained is meant to validate newly developed, high-resolution numerical tools for 3D transient, two-phase flow modelling. Several measurement techniques have been utilised to collect data from the experiments: particle image velocimetry, optical probes, electromagnetic probes, and visualisation. Bubble and liquid velocity fields, void-fraction distributions, bubble size and interfacial-area-concentration distributions have all been measured in the plume region, as well as recirculation velocities in the surrounding pool. The results obtained from the different measurement techniques have been compared. In general, the two-phase flow data obtained from the different techniques are found to be consistent, and of high enough quality for validating numerical simulation tools for 3D bubbly flows. (author)

  17. Hydrogen Bubbles as a Visualization Tool for Cylinder Shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdson, Lorenz; Gilbert, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    We examine the behavior of hydrogen bubbles formed by electrolysis of water on a 2.54 mm cylindrical electrode in a water tunnel. The Reynolds Number based on cylinder diameter varies from 400 to 1100, and tunnel velocities range from 17 to 50 cm/s. At the lowest velocity buoyancy is a strong effect which inhibits accurate flow tracking by the bubbles. This effect largely disappears by 25 cm/s. As the tunnel velocity increases, bubble size decreases, reflected light for photography is reduced, and bubbles begin to track the von Karman vortex street vortex cores near the cylinder. The vortex cores have a sufficiently low pressure to capture the bubbles. Vortex street wavelength is seen to discretely increase as vortices proceed downstream. The location of this scale-change becomes nearer the cylinder as Re increases. Voids of bubbles occur in continuous linear downstream segments originating near the cylinder. They seem to be due to vortex modification in the wake similar to what other cylinder shedding researchers have found.

  18. Distinguishing between microscale gaseous bubbles and liquid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Beng Hau; An, Hongjie; Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, there has been strong research interest in decorating surfaces with tiny bubbles and drops due to their potential applications in reducing slippage in micro and nanofluidic devices. Both nanobubbles and nanodrops are typically nucleated by exchanging fluids over a suitable substrate. However, the nucleation experiments present many challenges, such as reproducibility and the possibility of contamination. The use of one-use plastic syringes and needle cannulas in nucleation experiments can introduce polymeric contamination. A contaminated experiment may nucleate bubbles, drops or both. Moreover, it is surprisingly difficult to distinguish between bubbles and drops under the usual atomic force microscopy or optical techniques. Here we present an experimental study comparing bubbles and oil (PDMS) drops on an atomically smooth surface (HOPG). Instead of nucleating the objects via solvent exchange, we directly introduced bubbles via electrolysis, and oil drops by injecting a dilute solution. Contrary to previous reports, we find that under careful AFM characterisation, liquid drops and gaseous bubbles respond differently to a change in imaging force, and moreover present different characteristic force curves.

  19. Water-molecular emission from cavitation bubbles affected by electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyang-Bok; Choi, Pak-Kon

    2018-04-01

    Orange emission was observed during multibubble sonoluminescence at 1 MHz in water saturated with noble gas. The emission arose in the vicinity of the peeled ground electrode of a piezoceramic transducer exposed to water, suggesting that cavitation bubbles were affected by the electric fields that leaked from the transducer. The spectrum of the emission exhibited a broad component whose intensity increased towards the near-infrared region with peaks at 713 and 813 nm. The spectral shape was independent of the saturation gas of He, Ne, or Kr. The broad component was attributed to the superposition of lines due to vibration-rotation transitions of water molecules, each of which was broadened by the high pressure and electric fields at bubble collapse. An emission mechanism based on charge induction by electric fields and the charged droplet model is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Bubble dynamics in microchannels: inertial and capillary migration forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Rodriguez, Javier; Scheid, Benoit

    2018-05-01

    This work focuses on the dynamics of a train of unconfined bubbles flowing in microchan- nels. We investigate the transverse position of a train of bubbles, its velocity and the associated pressure drop when flowing in a microchannel depending on the internal forces due to viscosity, inertia and capillarity. Despite the small scales of the system, inertia, referred to as inertial migration force, play a crucial role in determining the transverse equilibrium position of the bubbles. Beside inertia and viscosity, other effects may also affect the transverse migration of bubbles such as the Marangoni surface stresses and the surface deformability. We look at the influence of surfactants in the limit of infinite Marangoni effect which yields rigid bubble interface. The resulting migration force may balance external body forces if present such as buoyancy, Dean or magnetic ones. This balance not only determines the transverse position of the bubbles but, consequently, the surrounding flow structure, which can be determinant for any mass/heat transfer process involved. Finally, we look at the influence of the bubble deformation on the equilibrium position and compare it to the inertial migration force at the centred position, explaining the stable or unstable character of this position accordingly. A systematic study of the influence of the parameters - such as the bubble size, uniform body force, Reynolds and capillary numbers - has been carried out using numerical simulations based on the Finite Element Method, solving the full steady Navier-Stokes equations and its asymptotic counterpart for the limits of small Reynolds and/or capillary numbers.

  1. Holography in small bubble chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecoq, P.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on an experiment to determine the total charm cross section at different incident momenta using the small, heavy liquid bubble chamber HOBC. Holography in liquid hydrogen is also tested using the holographic lexan bubble chamber HOLEBC with the aim of preparing a future holographic experiment in hydrogen. The high intensity tests show that more than 100 incident tracks per hologram do not cause a dramatic effect on the picture quality. Hydrogen is more favorable than freon as the bubble growth is much slower in hydrogen. An advantage of holography is to have the maximum resolution in the full volume of the bubble chamber, which allows a gain in sensitivity by a factor of 10 compared to classical optics as 100 tracks per hologram look reasonable. Holograms are not more difficult to analyze than classical optics high-resolution pictures. The results show that holography is a very powerful technique which can be used in very high resolution particle physics experiments

  2. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  3. Wrinkling in the deflation of elastic bubbles

    KAUST Repository

    Aumaitre, Elodie

    2013-03-01

    The protein hydrophobin HFBII self-assembles into very elastic films at the surface of water; these films wrinkle readily upon compression. We demonstrate and study this wrinkling instability in the context of non-planar interfaces by forming HFBII layers at the surface of bubbles whose interfaces are then compressed by deflation of the bubble. By varying the initial concentration of the hydrophobin solutions, we are able to show that buckling occurs at a critical packing fraction of protein molecules on the surface. Independent experiments show that at this packing fraction the interface has a finite positive surface tension, and not zero surface tension as is usually assumed at buckling. We attribute this non-zero wrinkling tension to the finite elasticity of these interfaces. We develop a simple geometrical model for the evolution of the wrinkle length with further deflation and show that wrinkles grow rapidly near the needle (used for deflation) towards the mid-plane of the bubble. This geometrical model yields predictions for the length of wrinkles in good agreement with experiments independently of the rheological properties of the adsorbed layer. © 2013 EDP Sciences, SIF, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  4. Wrinkling in the deflation of elastic bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumaitre, Elodie; Knoche, Sebastian; Cicuta, Pietro; Vella, Dominic

    2013-03-01

    The protein hydrophobin HFBII self-assembles into very elastic films at the surface of water; these films wrinkle readily upon compression. We demonstrate and study this wrinkling instability in the context of non-planar interfaces by forming HFBII layers at the surface of bubbles whose interfaces are then compressed by deflation of the bubble. By varying the initial concentration of the hydrophobin solutions, we are able to show that buckling occurs at a critical packing fraction of protein molecules on the surface. Independent experiments show that at this packing fraction the interface has a finite positive surface tension, and not zero surface tension as is usually assumed at buckling. We attribute this non-zero wrinkling tension to the finite elasticity of these interfaces. We develop a simple geometrical model for the evolution of the wrinkle length with further deflation and show that wrinkles grow rapidly near the needle (used for deflation) towards the mid-plane of the bubble. This geometrical model yields predictions for the length of wrinkles in good agreement with experiments independently of the rheological properties of the adsorbed layer.

  5. Bubbles of nothing and supersymmetric compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J. [IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011, Bilbao (Spain); Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU,48080 Bilbao (Spain); Shlaer, Benjamin [Department of Physics, University of Auckland,Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy,Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Sousa, Kepa [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU,48080 Bilbao (Spain); Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM-CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid,Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Urrestilla, Jon [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU,48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-10-03

    We investigate the non-perturbative stability of supersymmetric compactifications with respect to decay via a bubble of nothing. We show examples where this kind of instability is not prohibited by the spin structure, i.e., periodicity of fermions about the extra dimension. However, such “topologically unobstructed” cases do exhibit an extra-dimensional analog of the well-known Coleman-De Luccia suppression mechanism, which prohibits the decay of supersymmetric vacua. We demonstrate this explicitly in a four dimensional Abelian-Higgs toy model coupled to supergravity. The compactification of this model to M{sub 3}×S{sub 1} presents the possibility of vacua with different windings for the scalar field. Away from the supersymmetric limit, these states decay by the formation of a bubble of nothing, dressed with an Abelian-Higgs vortex. We show how, as one approaches the supersymmetric limit, the circumference of the topologically unobstructed bubble becomes infinite, thereby preventing the realization of this decay. This demonstrates the dynamical origin of the decay suppression, as opposed to the more familiar argument based on the spin structure. We conjecture that this is a generic mechanism that enforces stability of any topologically unobstructed supersymmetric compactification.

  6. Flow visualization and characteristics of vertical gas-liquid bubbly flow around a rectangular cylinder (bubble size effect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voutsinas, A; Shakouchi, T; Tsujimoto, K; Ando, T

    2009-01-01

    The present study deals with the effect of the bubble size, from small bubble scale to normal scale (d b =0.25∼2.6 mm), on the flow passing through a rectangular cylinder in an upward gas-liquid bubbly flow. Extensive visualization experiments are conducted and a digital camera and a high-speed camera analyzed the flow, while PIV analysis by the volume cross-correlation method is conducted to observe the differences in the flow pattern. In order to further understand the effect of bubble size, the pressure distribution along the pipe and the cylinder surface are measured. From the results taken, the drag force is calculated and compared to the case of single phase-flow. Furthermore, the fluctuation phenomena generating from the Karman vortex street downstream the cylinder are investigated, and how the intensity and frequency are affected by the bubble size and gas fraction is presented. The experiments are conducted under two different Reynolds number Re, and volumetric gas fraction ranging from α v =0∼5%, giving valuable information regarding the changes that occur due to bubble size differences and the relation it has with volumetric gas fraction.

  7. Bubble bursting at an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varun; Sajjad, Kumayl; Anand, Sushant; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2017-11-01

    Bubble bursting is crucial to understanding the life span of bubbles at an interface and more importantly the nature of interaction between the bulk liquid and the outside environment from the point of view of chemical and biological material transport. The dynamics of the bubble as it rises from inside the liquid bulk to its disappearance on the interface after bursting is an intriguing process, many aspects of which are still being explored. In our study, we make detailed high speed imaging measurements to examine carefully the hole initiation and growth in bursting bubbles that unearth some interesting features of the process. Previous analyses available in literature are revisited based on our novel experimental visualizations. Using a combination of experiments and theory we investigate the role of various forces during the rupturing process. This work aims to further our current knowledge of bubble dynamics at an interface with an aim of predicting better the bubble evolution from its growth to its eventual integration with the liquid bulk.

  8. Electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ding; Xie, Bai-Song; Ali Bake, Muhammad; Sang, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Xue-Yan; Wu, Hai-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Some typical electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction are investigated theoretically. By considering a modification of the fields and ellipsoid bubble shape due to the presence of residual electrons in the bubble regime, we study in detail the electrons nonlinear dynamics with or without laser pulse. To examine the electron dynamical behaviors, a set of typical electrons, which locate initially at the front of the bubble, on the transverse edge and at the bottom of the bubble respectively, are chosen for study. It is found that the range of trapped electrons in the case with laser pulse is a little narrower than that without laser pulse. The partial phase portraits for electrons around the bubble are presented numerically and their characteristic behaviors are discussed theoretically. Implication of our results on the high quality electron beam generation is also discussed briefly

  9. Measuring online social bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Nikolov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Social media have become a prevalent channel to access information, spread ideas, and influence opinions. However, it has been suggested that social and algorithmic filtering may cause exposure to less diverse points of view. Here we quantitatively measure this kind of social bias at the collective level by mining a massive datasets of web clicks. Our analysis shows that collectively, people access information from a significantly narrower spectrum of sources through social media and email, compared to a search baseline. The significance of this finding for individual exposure is revealed by investigating the relationship between the diversity of information sources experienced by users at both the collective and individual levels in two datasets where individual users can be analyzed—Twitter posts and search logs. There is a strong correlation between collective and individual diversity, supporting the notion that when we use social media we find ourselves inside “social bubbles.” Our results could lead to a deeper understanding of how technology biases our exposure to new information.

  10. Beyond the gas bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilt, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The deliverability issue currently being discussed within the natural gas industry involves both near-term and long-term questions. In the near-term, over the next two or three years, it is probable that the natural gas industry will need to mobilize for much greater levels of investment than have been the experience over the past few years. In the longer-term, it is expected that new opportunities for gas will arise as the nation seeks to meet increasing energy requirements within new environmental constraints. Methane for emissions control, CNG vehicles, expanded gas-fired electricity generation, and increased efficiency of traditional energy services are just a few examples. The issues in the longer-term center on the ability of the gas industry to meet increasing supply requirements reliably and at cost-competitive prices for these markets. This paper begins by reviewing the historical situation of gas deliverability that is the capability of the gas producing and transportation portions of the industry. The delivery system's ability to handle shifts in the centers of consumption and production is discussed, with an emphasis on regional problems of gas deliverability and potential bottlenecks. On the production side, the paper reviews the capability and the required investment necessary to handle an orderly transition to a stable supply and demand balance once the elusive bubble had finally disappeared

  11. Linear oscillation of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material under ultrasound irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Fumiya; Ando, Keita

    2015-01-01

    Acoustically forced oscillation of spherical gas bubbles in a viscoelastic material is studied through comparisons between experiments and linear theory. An experimental setup has been designed to visualize bubble dynamics in gelatin gels using a high-speed camera. A spherical gas bubble is created by focusing an infrared laser pulse into (gas-supersaturated) gelatin gels. The bubble radius (up to 150 μm) under mechanical equilibrium is controlled by gradual mass transfer of gases across the bubble interface. The linearized bubble dynamics are studied from the observation of spherical bubble oscillation driven by low-intensity, planar ultrasound driven at 28 kHz. It follows from the experiment for an isolated bubble that the frequency response in its volumetric oscillation was shifted to the high frequency side and its peak was suppressed as the gelatin concentration increases. The measurement is fitted to the linearized Rayleigh–Plesset equation coupled with the Voigt constitutive equation that models the behavior of linear viscoelastic solids; the fitting yields good agreement by tuning unknown values of the viscosity and rigidity, indicating that more complex phenomena including shear thinning, stress relaxation, and retardation do not play an important role for the small-amplitude oscillations. Moreover, the cases for bubble-bubble and bubble-wall systems are studied. The observed interaction effect on the linearized dynamics can be explained as well by a set of the Rayleigh–Plesset equations coupled through acoustic radiation among these systems. This suggests that this experimental setup can be applied to validate the model of bubble dynamics with more complex configuration such as a cloud of bubbles in viscoelastic materials

  12. Small-bubble transport and splitting dynamics in a symmetric bifurcation

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2017-06-28

    Simulations of small bubbles traveling through symmetric bifurcations are conducted to garner information pertinent to gas embolotherapy, a potential cancer treatment. Gas embolotherapy procedures use intra-arterial bubbles to occlude tumor blood supply. As bubbles pass through bifurcations in the blood stream nonhomogeneous splitting and undesirable bioeffects may occur. To aid development of gas embolotherapy techniques, a volume of fluid method is used to model the splitting process of gas bubbles passing through artery and arteriole bifurcations. The model reproduces the variety of splitting behaviors observed experimentally, including the bubble reversal phenomenon. Splitting homogeneity and maximum shear stress along the vessel walls is predicted over a variety of physical parameters. Small bubbles, having initial length less than twice the vessel diameter, were found unlikely to split in the presence of gravitational asymmetry. Maximum shear stresses were found to decrease exponentially with increasing Reynolds number. Vortex-induced shearing near the bifurcation is identified as a possible mechanism for endothelial cell damage.

  13. Study on characteristics of single cavitation bubble considering condensation and evaporation of kerosene steam under ultrasonic vibration honing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linzheng; Zhu, Xijing; Wang, Lujie; Guo, Ce

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration honing technology is an effective means for materials difficult to machine, where cavitation occurs in grinding fluid under the action of ultrasound. To investigate the changes of single cavitation bubble characteristics in the grinding area and how honing parameters influence bubble characteristics, a dynamic model of single cavitation bubble in the ultrasonic vibration honing grinding area was established. The model was based on the bubble dynamics and considered the condensation and evaporation of kerosene steam and honing processing environment. The change rules of bubble radius, temperature, pressure and number of kerosene steam molecules inside the bubble were numerically simulated in the process of bubble moving. The results show that the condensation and evaporation of kerosene steam can help to explain the changes of temperature and pressure inside the bubble. Compared with ultrasonic vibration, the amplitude of bubble radius is greatly suppressed in the ultrasonic honing environment. However, the rate of movement of the bubble is faster. Meanwhile, the minimum values of pressure and temperature are larger, and the number of kerosene steam molecules is less. By studying the effect of honing factors on the movement of the cavitation bubble, it is found that honing pressure has a greater influence on bubble evolution characteristics, while rotation speed of honing head has a minor effect and the reciprocating speed of honing head has little impacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Mathematical Model Of Ageing In Man Due To Gene Loss | Mbah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aging is as a result of dysfunction of the body mechanisms due to failure of one organelle, tissue, component or the other. In man there is a pointer towards gene loss as a primary cause of ageing. In this paper we develop a mathematical model describing changes in gene efficiency or gene failure. This model is used to ...

  15. Taylor bubbles at high viscosity ratios: experiments and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube, often occurring in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, particularly oil and gas production. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of three-dimensional Taylor bubble rising in highly viscous silicone oil in a vertical pipe. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is adopted here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rising and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control volume and finite element formulation, a `volume of fluid'-type method for the interface-capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Experimental results for the Taylor bubble shape and rise velocity are presented, together with numerical results for the dynamics of the bubbles. A comparison of the simulation predictions with experimental data available in the literature is also presented to demonstrate the capabilities of our numerical method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  16. Numerical study of Taylor bubbles with adaptive unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Percival, James; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry

    2014-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube. This type of bubble flow regime often occurs in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, including oil-and-gas production, chemical and nuclear reactors, and heat exchangers. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of Taylor bubbles rising in a vertical pipe filled with oils of extremely high viscosity (mimicking the ``heavy oils'' found in the oil-and-gas industry). A modelling and simulation framework is presented here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rise and reduce the computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control-volume and finite-element formulation, a ``volume of fluid''-type method for the interface capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Numerical examples of some benchmark tests and the dynamics of Taylor bubbles are presented to show the capability of this method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  17. Single-bubble dynamics in pool boiling of one-component fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2014-06-04

    We numerically investigate the pool boiling of one-component fluids with a focus on the effects of surface wettability on the single-bubble dynamics. We employed the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], a diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor flows involving liquid-vapor transition in nonuniform temperature fields. We first perform simulations for bubbles on homogeneous surfaces. We find that an increase in either the contact angle or the surface superheating can enhance the bubble spreading over the heating surface and increase the bubble departure diameter as well and therefore facilitate the transition into film boiling. We then examine the dynamics of bubbles on patterned surfaces, which incorporate the advantages of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The central hydrophobic region increases the thermodynamic probability of bubble nucleation while the surrounding hydrophilic region hinders the continuous bubble spreading by pinning the contact line at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic intersection. This leads to a small bubble departure diameter and therefore prevents the transition from nucleate boiling into film boiling. With the bubble nucleation probability increased and the bubble departure facilitated, the efficiency of heat transfer on such patterned surfaces is highly enhanced, as observed experimentally [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 57, 733 (2013)]. In addition, the stick-slip motion of contact line on patterned surfaces is demonstrated in one-component fluids, with the effect weakened by surface superheating.

  18. Single-bubble dynamics in pool boiling of one-component fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2014-06-01

    We numerically investigate the pool boiling of one-component fluids with a focus on the effects of surface wettability on the single-bubble dynamics. We employed the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], a diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor flows involving liquid-vapor transition in nonuniform temperature fields. We first perform simulations for bubbles on homogeneous surfaces. We find that an increase in either the contact angle or the surface superheating can enhance the bubble spreading over the heating surface and increase the bubble departure diameter as well and therefore facilitate the transition into film boiling. We then examine the dynamics of bubbles on patterned surfaces, which incorporate the advantages of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The central hydrophobic region increases the thermodynamic probability of bubble nucleation while the surrounding hydrophilic region hinders the continuous bubble spreading by pinning the contact line at the hydrophobic-hydrophilic intersection. This leads to a small bubble departure diameter and therefore prevents the transition from nucleate boiling into film boiling. With the bubble nucleation probability increased and the bubble departure facilitated, the efficiency of heat transfer on such patterned surfaces is highly enhanced, as observed experimentally [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 57, 733 (2013)]. In addition, the stick-slip motion of contact line on patterned surfaces is demonstrated in one-component fluids, with the effect weakened by surface superheating.

  19. THE MILKY WAY PROJECT: LEVERAGING CITIZEN SCIENCE AND MACHINE LEARNING TO DETECT INTERSTELLAR BUBBLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumont, Christopher N.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Kendrew, Sarah; Simpson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We present Brut, an algorithm to identify bubbles in infrared images of the Galactic midplane. Brut is based on the Random Forest algorithm, and uses bubbles identified by >35,000 citizen scientists from the Milky Way Project to discover the identifying characteristics of bubbles in images from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We demonstrate that Brut's ability to identify bubbles is comparable to expert astronomers. We use Brut to re-assess the bubbles in the Milky Way Project catalog, and find that 10%-30% of the objects in this catalog are non-bubble interlopers. Relative to these interlopers, high-reliability bubbles are more confined to the mid-plane, and display a stronger excess of young stellar objects along and within bubble rims. Furthermore, Brut is able to discover bubbles missed by previous searches—particularly bubbles near bright sources which have low contrast relative to their surroundings. Brut demonstrates the synergies that exist between citizen scientists, professional scientists, and machine learning techniques. In cases where ''untrained' citizens can identify patterns that machines cannot detect without training, machine learning algorithms like Brut can use the output of citizen science projects as input training sets, offering tremendous opportunities to speed the pace of scientific discovery. A hybrid model of machine learning combined with crowdsourced training data from citizen scientists can not only classify large quantities of data, but also address the weakness of each approach if deployed alone

  20. Heat-flux enhancement by vapour-bubble nucleation in Rayleigh-Bénard turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narezo Guzman, Daniela; Xie, Yanbo; Chen, S.; Fernandez Rivas, David; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Ahlers, Günter

    2016-01-01

    We report on the enhancement of turbulent convective heat transport due to vapour-bubble nucleation at the bottom plate of a cylindrical Rayleigh–Bénard sample (aspect ratio 1.00, diameter 8.8 cm) filled with liquid. Microcavities acted as nucleation sites, allowing for well-controlled bubble

  1. Kinetic energy and added mass of hydrodynamically interacting gas bubbles in liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    1988-01-01

    By averaging the basic equations on microscale, expressions are derived for the effective added mass density and the kinetic energy density of a mixture of liquid and gas bubbles. Due to hydrodynamic interaction between the bubbles there appears to be a difference between the effective added mass

  2. Influence of Changing the Diameter of the Bubble Generator Bottle and Expiratory Limb on Bubble CPAP: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Shan Wu

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: The size and submergence depth of an expiratory limb of a CPAP circuit, the diameter of the bubble generator bottle, and the compliance of the model lung all influence the magnitude and frequency of the transmitted pressure waveform. Therefore, these factors may affect lung volume recruitment and breathing efficiency in bubble CPAP.

  3. Testing for Multiple Bubbles 2: Limit Theory of Real Time Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Peter C. B. Phillips; Shu-Ping Shi; Jun Yu

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides the limit theory of real time dating algorithms for bubble detection that were suggested in Phillips, Wu and Yu (2011, PWY) and Phillips, Shi and Yu (2013b, PSY). Bubbles are modeled using mildly explosive bubble episodes that are embedded within longer periods where the data evolves as a stochastic trend, thereby capturing normal market behavior as well as exuberance and collapse. Both the PWY and PSY estimates rely on recursive right tailed unit root tests (each with a d...

  4. Taxing the rich: recombinations and bubble growth during reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanetto, Steven R.; Oh, S. Peng

    2005-11-01

    Reionization is inhomogeneous for two reasons: the clumpiness of the intergalactic medium (IGM), and clustering of the discrete ionizing sources. While numerical simulations can in principle take both into account, they are at present limited by small box sizes. On the other hand, analytic models have only examined the limiting cases of a clumpy IGM (with uniform ionizing emissivity) and clustered sources (embedded in a uniform IGM). Here, we present the first analytic model that includes both factors. At first, recombinations can be ignored and ionized bubbles grow primarily through major mergers, because at any given moment the bubbles have a well-defined characteristic size. As a result, reionization resembles `punctuated equilibrium,' with a series of well-separated sharp jumps in the ionizing background. These features are local effects and do not reflect similar jumps in the global ionized fraction. We then combine our bubble model with a simple description of recombinations in the IGM. We show that the bubbles grow until recombinations balance ionizations, when their expansion abruptly halts. If the IGM density structure is similar to that at moderate redshifts, this limits the bubble radii to ~20 comoving Mpc; however, if the IGM is significantly clumpier at higher redshifts (because of minihalo formation, for example), the limit could be much smaller. Once a bubble reaches saturation, that region of the Universe has for all intents and purposes entered the `post-overlap' stage. Because different HII regions saturate over a finite time interval, the overlap epoch actually has a finite width. Our model also predicts a mean recombination rate several times larger than expected for a uniformly illuminated IGM. This picture naturally explains the substantial large-scale variation in Lyman-series opacity along the lines of sight to the known z > 6 quasars. More quasar spectra will shed light on the transition between the `bubble-dominated' topology

  5. Magnetic Shaping of Supernova Remnant Bubbles: Effects on Estimates of Interstellar Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M. L.

    1996-05-01

    The relative amounts of cold, warm and hot phases in the Galactic ISM continues to be the focus of intense observational and theoretical studies. The production and fate of hot gas primarily from supernova explosions requires numerical simulations of increasing sophistication. We have embarked on a systematic program to incorporate magnetic fields, heat conduction, radiative cooling, cosmic rays, and turbulent motions into multidimensional models of supernova remnant and superbubble evolution. Here we present results of 2D numerical MHD simulations of the late (> 5 Myr) evolution of an isolated supernova remnant in a warm diffuse medium threaded by a uniform magnetic field. We follow the complete evolution of the remnant through collapse of the hot bubble as it radiates away its thermal energy. The effects of heat conduction are included through the incorporation of a new implicit algorithm in the ZEUS-2D code which we describe. The parameters adopted are identical to those used by Slavin and Cox (ApJ, 392, 131, 1992): Eo=5 x 10(50) erg, no=0.2 cm(-3) , To=10(4) K, Bo=5 mu G. Our results generalize the spherically symmetric models of Slavin and Cox (1992) to 2D axisymmetry. Magnetic stresses collimate the hot bubble into a prolate ``hot sausage" aligned with the magnetic field by 1 Myr. Thereafter the axis ratio of the sausage increases superlinearly with time as the bubble collapses radially but continues to expand axially with approximately the ambient magnetosonic speed. Magnetic pressure prevents the shell from collapsing due to radiative losses everywhere except at the polar caps. We compute the four-volume of the hot bubble for various choices of heat conduction and compare these results with the spherically symmetric models.

  6. Dynamic of vapor bubble growth in fields of variable pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, H.K.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical model for the description of the growth from an initial nucleus of a vapor bubble imersed in liquid, subjected to a loss of pressure is presented. The model is important for analysing LOCA (Loss of Coolant Acident) in P.W.R. type reactors. Several simplifications were made in the phenomenum governing equations. With such simplifications the heat diffusion equation became the determining factor for the bubble growth, and the problem was reduced to solve the heat diffusion equation for semi infinite solid whose surface temperature is a well known function of time (it is supposed that the surface temperature is equal to the saturation temperature of the liquid at the system pressure at a given moment). The model results in an analytical expression for the bubble radius as a function of time. Comparisons with experimental data and previous models were made, with reasonable agreement. (author) [pt

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958)PFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α-particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes.

  8. Modeling of expansion and cracking due to ASR with a 3D lattice model

    OpenAIRE

    Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Copuroglu, O.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally possible to consider modeling of ASR damage in concrete in two main groups: modeling of gel formation and its expansion; modeling of ASR related damage. In this paper, authors take an attempt to combine both: simulating the correct crack formation and the connected concrete expansion. It is aimed to simulate ASR damage in a cementitious material bearing reactive aggregates. The model that is used is a 3D lattice type model. It models concrete on a meso-scale in which particles...

  9. Ethnic diversity deflates price bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Sheen S; Apfelbaum, Evan P; Bernard, Mark; Bartelt, Valerie L; Zajac, Edward J; Stark, David

    2014-12-30

    Markets are central to modern society, so their failures can be devastating. Here, we examine a prominent failure: price bubbles. Bubbles emerge when traders err collectively in pricing, causing misfit between market prices and the true values of assets. The causes of such collective errors remain elusive. We propose that bubbles are affected by ethnic homogeneity in the market and can be thwarted by diversity. In homogenous markets, traders place undue confidence in the decisions of others. Less likely to scrutinize others' decisions, traders are more likely to accept prices that deviate from true values. To test this, we constructed experimental markets in Southeast Asia and North America, where participants traded stocks to earn money. We randomly assigned participants to ethnically homogeneous or diverse markets. We find a marked difference: Across markets and locations, market prices fit true values 58% better in diverse markets. The effect is similar across sites, despite sizeable differences in culture and ethnic composition. Specifically, in homogenous markets, overpricing is higher as traders are more likely to accept speculative prices. Their pricing errors are more correlated than in diverse markets. In addition, when bubbles burst, homogenous markets crash more severely. The findings suggest that price bubbles arise not only from individual errors or financial conditions, but also from the social context of decision making. The evidence may inform public discussion on ethnic diversity: it may be beneficial not only for providing variety in perspectives and skills, but also because diversity facilitates friction that enhances deliberation and upends conformity.

  10. A unique circular path of moving single bubble sonoluminescence in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadighi-Bonabi, Rasoul; Mirheydari, Mona; Ebrahimi, Homa; Rezaee, Nastaran; Nikzad, Lida

    2011-01-01

    Based on a quasi-adiabatic model, the parameters of the bubble interior for a moving single bubble sonoluminescence (m-SBSL) in water are calculated. By using a complete form of the hydrodynamic force, a unique circular path for the m-SBSL in water is obtained. The effect of the ambient pressure variation on the bubble trajectory is also investigated. It is concluded that as the ambient pressure increases, the bubble moves along a circular path with a larger radius and all bubble parameters, such as gas pressure, interior temperature and light intensity, increase. A comparison is made between the parameters of the moving bubble in water and those in N-methylformamide. With fluid viscosity increasing, the circular path changes into an elliptic form and the light intensity increases. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  11. Bubble Formation at a Submerged Orifice for Aluminum Foams Produced by Gas Injection Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xueliu; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Xingnan; Zhang, Huiming; Li, Yanxiang

    2013-02-01

    The bubble formation at a submerged orifice in the process of aluminum foams produced by gas injection method is investigated. The experimental results show that the increase of the gas flow rate and the orifice diameter can lead to increasing of the bubble size. The large orifice can make the frequency of bubble formation decrease by slowing down the increase of the gas chamber pressure when the gas flow rate increases. The effect of the gas chamber volume on the bubble size can be ignored in the experiment when it expands from 1 to 125 cm3. A theoretical model of bubble formation, expansion, and detachment under constant flow conditions is established to predict the bubble size. The theoretical predictions for air-aluminum melt systems are consistent with the experimental results.

  12. Mechanistic modeling of the loss of protein sieving due to internal and external fouling of microfilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Glen R; Apostolidis, Alex J

    2017-09-01

    Fed-batch and perfusion cell culture processes used to produce therapeutic proteins can use microfilters for product harvest. In this study, new explicit mathematical models of sieving loss due to internal membrane fouling, external membrane fouling, or a combination of the two were generated. The models accounted for membrane and cake structures and hindered solute transport. Internal membrane fouling was assumed to occur due to the accumulation of foulant on either membrane pore walls (pore-retention model) or membrane fibers (fiber-retention model). External cake fouling was assumed to occur either by the growth of a single incompressible cake layer (cake-growth) or by the accumulation of a number of independent cake layers (cake-series). The pore-retention model was combined with either the cake-series or cake-growth models to obtain models that describe internal and external fouling occurring either simultaneously or sequentially. The models were tested using well-documented sieving decline data available in the literature. The sequential pore-retention followed by cake-growth model provided a good fit of sieving decline data during beer microfiltration. The cake-series and cake-growth models provided good fits of sieving decline data during the microfiltration of a perfusion cell culture. The new models provide insights into the mechanisms of fouling that result in the loss of product sieving. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:1323-1333, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  13. Bubble Rise and Break-Up in Volcanic Conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, A.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Rosi, M.

    2013-12-01

    The continual passive degassing occurring at open-vent mafic volcanoes is often punctuated by bursts of active degassing. The latter are generally thought to be the result of slug flow: large, conduit-filling bubbles periodically rising up the feeder conduit and bursting at the magma-air interface. Existing models of volcanic degassing systems make the simplifying assumption that the conduit is cylindrical; however, while this may be true at shallow levels, a flaring probably connects it to a dyke-like geometry at depth. The overall goal of this research is to assess the influence of conduit geometry on the speed and stability of bubbles rising in open-vent systems, and ultimately to devise a model to infer conduit shape from emerging bubbles size. In order to do that an analogue experimental approach was used. All of the experiments were two-phase (melt+volatiles); the analogue materials of choice were golden syrup-water mixtures ranging in viscosity from 10-1 to 104 Pa*s and air. Two experimental apparatuses were used: a bi-dimensional and a tri-dimensional one. The bi-dimensional set-up is a cell made of two flat transparent PVC plates (44x23cm) 10mm or 5mm apart (the front one having a hole at the bottom permitting bubble injection) containing a variety of parallelepipeds apt to outline different plumbing system geometries. The tri-dimensional one consists of a cylindrical tube (r=1,5cm; l=7cm) allowing bubble injection through the bottom rubber tap and terminating into a square tank (l=22cm). Results indicate that conduit geometry directly controls the slug rise velocity and the surrounding liquid descending speed, which in turn control the slug stability. Small enough bubbles simply deform as they go through the flaring, while bigger ones split into two daughter bubbles. A regime diagram has been constructed, illustrating the bubble break-up threshold dependence on the flare geometry and initial slug size, the two main controlling factors. The phenomenon of

  14. Modeling of expansion and cracking due to ASR with a 3D lattice model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Copuroglu, O.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally possible to consider modeling of ASR damage in concrete in two main groups: modeling of gel formation and its expansion; modeling of ASR related damage. In this paper, authors take an attempt to combine both: simulating the correct crack formation and the connected concrete

  15. Numerical simulations of bubble-induced star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies with a novel stellar feedback scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Daisuke; Gibson, Brad K.; Barnes, David J.; Grand, Robert J. J.; Rahimi, Awat

    2014-02-01

    To study the star formation and feedback mechanism, we simulate the evolution of an isolated dwarf irregular galaxy (dIrr) in a fixed dark matter halo, similar in size to Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte, using a new stellar feedback scheme. We use the new version of our original N-body/smoothed particle chemodynamics code, GCD+, which adopts improved hydrodynamics, metal diffusion between the gas particles and new modelling of star formation and stellar wind and supernovae feedback. Comparing the simulations with and without stellar feedback effects, we demonstrate that the collisions of bubbles produced by strong feedback can induce star formation in a more widely spread area. We also demonstrate that the metallicity in star-forming regions is kept low due to the mixing of the metal-rich bubbles and the metal-poor interstellar medium. Our simulations also suggest that the bubble-induced star formation leads to many counter-rotating stars. The bubble-induced star formation could be a dominant mechanism to maintain star formation in dIrrs, which is different from larger spiral galaxies where the non-axisymmetric structures, such as spiral arms, are a main driver of star formation.

  16. A numerical study of three-dimensional bubble merger in the Rayleigh endash Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Rayleigh endash Taylor instability arises when a heavy fluid adjacent to a light fluid is accelerated in a direction against the density gradient. Under this unstable configuration, a perturbation mode of small amplitude grows into bubbles of the light fluid and spikes of the heavy fluid. Taylor discovered the steady state motion with constant velocity for a single bubble or periodic bubbles in the Rayleigh endash Taylor instability. Read and Youngs studied the motion of a randomly perturbed fluid interface in the Rayleigh endash Taylor instability. They reported constant acceleration for the overall bubble envelope. Bubble merger is believed to cause the transition from constant velocity to constant acceleration. In this paper, we present a numerical study of this important physical phenomenon. It analyzes the physical process of bubble merger and the relationship between the horizontal bubble expansion and the vertical interface acceleration. A dynamic bubble velocity, beyond Taylor close-quote s steady state value, is observed during the merger process. It is believed that this velocity is due to the superposition of the bubble velocity with a secondary subharmonic unstable mode. The numerical results are compared with experiments. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Effects of Entrapped Bubble Formation on Flow Through Porous Media During Electrical Resistance Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, R. B.; Johnson, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    In-situ thermal remediation technologies such as electrical resistance heating (ERH) have been used effectively to treat volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a variety of subsurface conditions. Field applications have shown significant reductions in total contaminant mass over relatively short time periods. The mechanism of these technologies is well understood; the subsurface temperature is increased to boil the groundwater and the target contaminant is evaporated and rises to the surface where it is collected by vapor recovery wells. Recently there is increased interest in combining ERH with other approaches (e.g., addition of chemical oxidants or reductants). These coupled applications can be effective at temperatures well below boiling; however sustained groundwater flow is especially important for delivering remediation chemicals to the treatment zone. Since heating decreases the solubility of many gases, production of entrapped bubbles due to heating could have a significant impact on groundwater flow, although this has not been thoroughly studied. We are currently characterizing this process using a combination of physical and numerical models. Experimental results from a two-dimensional (2-D) bench-scale study using water saturated with carbon dioxide indicate substantial reduction in relative permeability when gas bubbles are created by heating. The volume of gas created can be described using simple functional relationships relating the volume of bubbles created to the increase in temperature. In turn, a capillary-saturation relationship can be used to relate the relative permeability of the soil to the volume of gas within the soil matrix. Several one-dimensional (1-D) column studies are conducted to measure the volume of gas created under a range of temperatures and dissolved gas concentrations. The resultant data are being used to calibrate a coupled fluid flow and energy transport model to predict the impact of bubble formation on flow during thermal

  18. Rational Speculative Bubble Size in Gold, Hang Seng, S&P 500 and Nikkei 225 Index During Year 2008 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhan, Nurharyanti; Halim, Nurfadhlina Abdul; Amir, W. Ahmad Wan Muhammad

    2017-09-01

    A rational speculative bubble is a surge in asset prices that exceed its intrinsic value. Rational speculative bubbles are among the ascription which may lead to the collapse of an economic system. Rational speculative bubble cannot be created but it comes into existence when assets started to be traded. Financial rational speculative bubble and burst have negative effect on the economy and markets. Financial rational speculative bubbles are difficult to detect. This study aims to shows the size of rational speculative bubble in four markets, which are gold, Hang Seng, S&P500 and Nikkei 225 during year 2008 to 2016. In this study, generalized Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette model are used to find the size of the rational speculative bubble. Bubble detection is important for both sides of macro-economic decision makers and to the trader. Especially for a trading system that requires detailed knowledge about the time and the stage of the bubble burst.

  19. Hamiltonian description of bubble dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimov, A. O.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of a nonspherical bubble in a liquid is described within the Hamiltonian formalism. Primary attention is focused on the introduction of the canonical variables into the computational algorithm. The expansion of the Dirichlet-Neumann operator in powers of the displacement of a bubble wall from an equilibrium position is obtained in the explicit form. The first three terms (more specifically, the second-, third-, and fourth-order terms) in the expansion of the Hamiltonian in powers of the canonical variables are determined. These terms describe the spectrum and interaction of three essentially different modes, i.e., monopole oscillations (pulsations), dipole oscillations (translational motions), and surface oscillations. The cubic nonlinearity is analyzed for the problem associated with the generation of Faraday ripples on the wall of a bubble in an acoustic field. The possibility of decay processes occurring in the course of interaction of surface oscillations for the first fifteen (experimentally observed) modes is investigated.

  20. Neutron imaging with bubble chambers for inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilea, Marian C.

    One of the main methods to obtain energy from controlled thermonuclear fusion is inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a process where nuclear fusion reactions are initiated by heating and compressing a fuel target, typically in the form of a pellet that contains deuterium and tritium, relying on the inertia of the fuel mass to provide confinement. In inertial confinement fusion experiments, it is important to distinguish failure mechanisms of the imploding capsule and unambiguously diagnose compression and hot spot formation in the fuel. Neutron imaging provides such a technique and bubble chambers are capable of generating higher resolution images than other types of neutron detectors. This thesis explores the use of a liquid bubble chamber to record high yield 14.1 MeV neutrons resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions on ICF experiments. A design tool to deconvolve and reconstruct penumbral and pinhole neutron images was created, using an original ray tracing concept to simulate the neutron images. The design tool proved that misalignment and aperture fabrication errors can significantly decrease the resolution of the reconstructed neutron image. A theoretical model to describe the mechanism of bubble formation was developed. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as active medium was designed and implemented for the OMEGA laser system. High neutron yields resulting from deuterium-tritium capsule implosions were recorded. The bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The research done in here shows that bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  1. Bubbly flow pressure drop in a T junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, Fabien

    1991-01-01

    This research thesis reports a theoretical and experimental study of pressure evolution in the singularity of a T junction carrying a bubbly flow. The various involved phenomena are studied in the case of a single-phase flow. Thus, within the heart of the junction, the detailed study of the energy assessment leads to a kinetic modelling of pressure variations. In downstream branches, an integral model allows the prediction of flow restoration. A systematic experimental validation has been performed by using a two-component laser anemometry system, and through the determination of pressure lines. Then, the study has been extended to the case of bubbly flows. Obtained results are compared with experimental values of pressure evolution. By associating a phase segregation existing model, the problem of a bubbly flow in a T junction is then fully addressed [fr

  2. Computational Studies of Positive and Negative Streamers in Bubbles Suspended in Distilled Water

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Ashish

    2017-01-05

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamers generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under high pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description of the chemical kinetics of the discharge. We apply positive and negative trigger voltages much higher than the breakdown voltage and study the dynamic characteristics of the resulting discharge. We observe that, for high positive trigger voltages, the streamer moves along the surface of the gas bubble during the initial stages of the discharge. We also find a considerable difference in the evolution of the streamer discharge for positive and negative trigger voltages with more uniform volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel for negative trigger voltages due to formation of multiple streamers. We also observe that the presence of water vapor does not influence the breakdown voltage of the discharge but greatly affects the composition of dominant species in the trail of the streamer channel.

  3. The invisible hand and the rational agent are behind bubbles and crashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galam, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The 2000 dot-com crash and the 2008 subprime crisis have fueled the belief that the two classical paradigms of economics, the invisible hand and the rational agent, are not well appropriate to describe market dynamics and should be abandoned at the benefit of alternative new theoretical concepts. At odd with such a view, using a simple model of choice dynamics from sociophysics, the invisible hand and the rational agent paradigms are given a new legitimacy. Indeed, it is sufficient to introduce the holding of a few intermediate mini market aggregations by agents sharing their own private information, to recenter the invisible hand and the rational agent at the heart of market self regulation. An elasticity is discovered in the market efficiency mechanism due to the existence of an agent collective anticipation. This elasticity is shown to create spontaneous bubbles, which are rationally founded. At the same time, crashes occur at once when the limit of elasticity is reached. Plasticity can also be achieved through a combination of a crash with a sudden shift of the collective anticipation. Although the findings disclose a path to put an end to the bubble-crash phenomena, it is argued to be rationally not feasible. Bubbles and crashes are thus an intrinsic internal part of classical economics.

  4. Bubble dynamics equations in Newton fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, J

    2008-01-01

    For the high-speed flow of Newton fluid, bubble is produced and expanded when it moves toward the surface of fluid. Bubble dynamics is a very important research field to understand the intrinsic feature of bubble production and motion. This research formulates the bubble expansion by expansion-local rotation transformation, which can be calculated by the measured velocity field. Then, the related dynamic equations are established to describe the interaction between the fluid and the bubble. The research shows that the bubble production condition can be expressed by critical vortex value and fluid pressure; and the bubble expansion rate can be obtained by solving the non-linear dynamic equation of bubble motion. The results may help the related research as it shows a special kind of fluid motion in theoretic sense. As an application example, the nanofiber radium-voltage relation and threshold voltage-surface tension relation in electrospinning process are discussed

  5. Dynamics of the central entrapped bubble during drop impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Zhen; Channa, Murad Ali; Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2017-11-01

    When a drop impacts onto a liquid surface, it entraps a thin central air disk. The air is then brought towards the axis of symmetry by surface tension. This contraction dynamics is very challenging to capture, due to the small length scales (a few micrometers thin air disk) and time scales (contracting in a few hundred microseconds). We use the open source two-phase flow codes Gerris and Basilisk to study this air entrapment phenomenon. The effects of liquid properties such as viscosity and surface tension, and of the impact velocity were investigated. We focus on the morphology of the contracting air disk. The bubble is expected to contract into a single spherical bubble. However, in some cases, the air can be stretched vertically by the liquid inertia and split into two smaller bubbles. The convergence of capillary waves on the air disk towards the axis of symmetry can also make it rupture at the center, thus forming a toroidal bubble. In other cases, vorticity shedding can deform the contracting bubble, leading to more complex structures. A parameter space analysis based on the Reynolds and Weber numbers was then done to classify the different regimes and explain the transitions. Full affiliation:State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures,Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Environment and Control for Flight Vehicle,International Center for Applied Mechanics,School of Aerospace,Xi'an Jiaotong University.

  6. Molecular modeling of the conductivity changes of the emeraldine base polyaniline due to protonic acid doping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.A.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Zhang, G.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a molecular modeling strategy, which is capable of predicting the conductivity change of emeraldine base polyaniline polymer due to different degree of protonic acid doping. The method is comprised of two key steps: (1) generating the amorphous unit cells with given number of polymer

  7. Influence of bubble size distribution on the echogenicity of ultrasound contrast agents: a study of SonoVue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorce, J M; Arditi, M; Schneider, M

    2000-11-01

    To study the relative contributions of different bubble size classes to SonoVue's echogenicity in fundamental acoustic imaging modes. SonoVue is a contrast agent, previously known as BR1, with a bubble size distribution extending from approximately 0.7 to 10 microm. A model for the acoustic response of SonoVue was determined and validated for a set of experimental data. This model was used to simulate the acoustic response of a standard batch of SonoVue as the sum of responses of non-overlapping bubble size classes. The simulation was first validated for a standard SonoVue bubble size distribution. When this distribution was considered as five size classes with equal numbers of bubbles, it was found that bubbles smaller than 2 microm accounted for 60% of the total number but contained only 5% of the total gas volume. The simulation results indicated marked differences in the acoustic contributions from these classes, with 80% of the acoustic efficacy provided by bubbles 3 to 9 microm in diameter. The study also compared bubble distributions in number, surface, and volume, with the distribution computed in terms of acoustic efficacy. This study shows why bubble volume is a much better indicator of SonoVue's efficacy than is bubble count. A low threshold in diameter was found for SonoVue microbubbles at approximately 2 microm, under which size bubbles do not contribute appreciably to the echogenicity at medical ultrasound frequencies.

  8. An Eulerian-Eulerian Approach to CFD Simulation of Two-Phase Bubble Column using ANSYS CFX Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Amirul Syafiq Mohd Yunos; Nur Khairunnisa Abd Halim; Siti Aslina Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Bubble columns are widely used as gas-liquid contactors and reactors in chemical, biochemical and petrochemical industries. Effective mixing, high interfacial area between phases, cheap to install and lack of moving parts are the main factors bubble column is chosen for the described processes. Understanding the complexity of the fluid dynamics of gas-liquid flow in bubble column is important due to its unsteady complex processes as well as application in the chemical and bioprocess industries. The gas-liquid of two-phase fluid flow system has been carried out to investigate the hydrodynamics parameters. An Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model air as the dispersed phase within a continuous phase of water using the commercial software ANSYSTM CFD software (CFX 14.0). The turbulence in the gas-liquid simulation is described by using the k-e model. This process occurs under the atmospheric pressure. The configuration of model consists of 0.2 m width, 0.2 m depth and 0.5 m height of rectangular bubble column equipped with a sparger at the bottom. Two different sparger designs, Sparger A with 4 holes and 2.6 mm diameter each and Sparger B with 81 holes and 0.5 mm diameter each are tested for three different value of superficial gas velocity of 0.0125 m/s, 0.0501 m/s and 0.0627 m/s. The volume fraction of model is described the behavior of bubble which is represented by the parameters of gas holdup, contact surface area and gas superficial velocity. The simulation was verified by comparing the two different model results. Comparison of simulation results with the experimental work data has provided a successful validation of the model. Results shows the contact surface area increasing with behavior of bubble and gas holdup increases with increasing superficial gas velocity but independent of the sparger design at high superficial velocity (>0.05 m/s). The highest value obtained which is represented of water superficial velocity, gas holdup and superficial gas

  9. Influence of cavitation bubble growth by rectified diffusion on cavitation-enhanced HIFU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2017-11-01

    Cavitation is becoming increasingly important in therapeutic ultrasound applications such as diagnostic, tumor ablation and lithotripsy. Mass transfer through gas-liquid interface due to rectified diffusion is important role in an initial stage of cavitation bubble growth. In the present study, influences of the rectified diffusion on cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was investigated numerically. Firstly, the mass transfer rate of gas from the surrounding medium to the bubble was examined as function of the initial bubble radius and the driving pressure amplitude. As the result, the pressure required to bubble growth was decreases with increasing the initial bubble radius. Next, the cavitation-enhanced HIFU, which generates cavitation bubbles by high-intensity burst and induces the localized heating owing to cavitation bubble oscillation by low-intensity continuous waves, was reproduced by the present simulation. The heating region obtained by the simulation is agree to the treatment region of an in vitro experiment. Additionally, the simulation result shows that the localized heating is enhanced by the increase of the equilibrium bubble size due to the rectified diffusion. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP26420125,JP17K06170.

  10. Field-driven chiral bubble dynamics analysed by a semi-analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermeulen, J.; Leliaert, J.; Dupré, L.; Van Waeyenberge, B.

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, field-driven chiral bubble dynamics in the presence of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction are a topic of thorough investigation. In this paper, a semi-analytical approach is used to derive equations of motion that express the bubble wall (BW) velocity and the change in in-plane magnetization angle as function of the micromagnetic parameters of the involved interactions, thereby taking into account the two-dimensional nature of the bubble wall. It is demonstrated that the equations of motion enable an accurate description of the expanding and shrinking convex bubble dynamics and an expression for the transition field between shrinkage and expansion is derived. In addition, these equations of motion show that the BW velocity is not only dependent on the driving force, but also on the BW curvature. The absolute BW velocity increases for both a shrinking and an expanding bubble, but for different reasons: for expanding bubbles, it is due to the increasing importance of the driving force, while for shrinking bubbles, it is due to the increasing importance of contributions related to the BW curvature. Finally, using this approach we show how the recently proposed magnetic bubblecade memory can operate in the flow regime in the presence of a tilted sinusoidal magnetic field and at greatly reduced bubble sizes compared to the original device prototype.

  11. Impact of the cavitation bubble on a plasma emission following laser ablation in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilović, Marijana R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the impact of the cavitation bubble on a plasma emission produced after the interaction of the strong focused laser radiation with the target in the liquid was studied. Several experimental techniques were applied to assess different aspects of the complex phenomena of the laser induced breakdown in the liquid media. The results of the fast photography, Schlieren and shadowgraphy techniques were compared with the results of simpler probe beam techniques, transmission and scattering. In addition, emission from the plasma was analysed using optical emission spectroscopy, with aim to relate the quality of the recorded spectral lines to the bubble properties. Bubble had proved to be more convenient surrounding than the liquid for the long lasting plasma emission, due to the high temperature and pressure state inside of it and significantly lower density, which causes less confined plasma. Changes in refractive index of the bubble were also monitored, although in the limited time interval, when the bubble was sufficiently expanded and the refractive index difference between the bubble and the water was large enough to produce glory rings and the bright spot in the bubble's centre. Reshaping of the plasma emission due to the optical properties of the bubble was detected and the need for careful optimization of the optical system was stressed. Contribution to the "Topical Issue: Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  12. Rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Haddad, F.; Jouault, B.

    1995-01-01

    The energy of rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei predicted to be formed in central heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies is calculated within the generalized rotating liquid drop model. The potential barriers standing in these exotic deformation paths are compared with the three dimensional and plane fragmentation barriers. In the toroidal deformation path of the heaviest systems exists a large potential pocket localised below the plane fragmentation barriers. This might allow the temporary survival of heavy nuclear toroids before the final clusterization induced by the surface and proximity tension. (author)

  13. Computing bubble-points of CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramdin, M.; Balaji, S.P.; Vicent Luna, J.M.; Torres-Knoop, A; Chen, Q.; Dubbeldam, D.; Calero, S; de Loos, T.W.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Computing bubble-points of multicomponent mixtures using Monte Carlo simulations is a non-trivial task. A new method is used to compute gas compositions from a known temperature, bubble-point pressure, and liquid composition. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the bubble-points of

  14. Numerical analysis for simulation of condensing vapor bubble using CFD-ACE+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, P.; Dutta, Anu; Singh, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    The motion of bubbles is very complex. They may be subject to break-up or coalescence and may appear to move with a spiraling, zigzagging or rocking behavior. Recently, many studies have been carried out to numerically simulate the rising bubble in various conditions by using VOF approach. However, all the above studies were limited to adiabatic bubble where heat and mass transfer between the phases were not considered. In the present work, an attempt was made to capture the behaviour of condensing bubble flowing in a channel, by using commercial CFD code CFD-ACE+ through VOF model. A User-Defined Function was developed to simulate interfacial heat and mass transfer during condensation. The effect of condensation on bubble behavior was analyzed by comparing the behavior of condensing bubble with that of adiabatic bubble. For validation of CFD-ACE UDF of bubble condensation, a comparison was made with the literature quoted experimental data and it agreed well. Through this work an emphasis was put on VOF module along with the development of an UDF for bubble condensation in CFD-ACE+ code. This theoretical study is motivated by the future CFD application and the intent to investigate the capabilities of the CFD-ACE+ package. (author)

  15. Numerical study of the dielectric liquid around an electrical discharge generated vapor bubble in ultrasonic assisted EDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervani-Tabar, Mohammad T; Mobadersany, Nima

    2013-07-01

    In electrical discharge machining due to the electrical current, very small bubbles are created in the dielectric fluid between the tool and the workpiece. Increase of the number of bubbles and their growth in size generate a single bubble. The bubble has an important role in electrical discharge machining. In this paper the effect of ultrasonic vibration of the tool and the velocity fields and pressure distribution in the dielectric fluid around the bubble in the process of electrical discharge machining are studied numerically. The boundary integral equation method is applied for the numerical solution of the problem. It is shown that ultrasonic vibration of the tool has great influence on the evolution of the bubble, fluid behavior and the efficiency of the machining in EDM. At the last stages of the collapse phase of the bubble, a liquid jet develops on the bubble which has different shapes. Due to the different cases, and a high pressure region appears just near the jet of the bubble. Also the fluid particles have the highest relative velocity just near the liquid jet of the bubble. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Escoffre, J.M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to

  17. Electrolysis Bubbles Make Waterflow Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    Technique for visualization of three-dimensional flow uses tiny tracer bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen made by electrolysis of water. Strobe-light photography used to capture flow patterns, yielding permanent record that is measured to obtain velocities of particles. Used to measure simulated mixing turbulence in proposed gas-turbine combustor and also used in other water-table flow tests.

  18. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  19. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  20. Soliton bubbles and phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masperi, L.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that no topological classical solutions in form of bubbles of a real scalar field theory with Lagrangian of quartet and sextet self interactions in 1+1 dimensions are responsible to discontinue transitions in the quantum problem between phases with degenerated and disordered excited level. (M.C.K.)

  1. "Financial Bubbles" and Monetary Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Yuriy A.; Pudovkina, Olga E.; Permjakova, Juliana V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of this research is caused by the need of strengthening a role of monetary regulators to prevent financial bubbles in the financial markets. The aim of the article is the analysis of a problem of crisis phenomena in the markets of financial assets owing to an inadequate growth of their cost, owing to subjective reasons. The leading…

  2. Axial stability of Taylor bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, X.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Long gas bubbles rising in a vertical tube are observed to lose axial symmetry and become unstable in a downward liquid flow. In this paper an approximate linear stability analysis of this phenomenon is presented. It is found that, under the combined effect of gravity and the pressure gradient which

  3. A search for neutrino emission from the Fermi bubbles with the ANTARES telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Albert, A.; Al Samarai, I.; Andre, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Classen, F.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhofer, A.; Ernenwein, J.P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fusco, L.; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Geisselsoder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J.P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J.; Herold, B.; Hossl, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, E.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefevre, D.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J.; Martini, S.; Michael, T.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Muller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G.E.; Perrina, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Riviere, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Samtleben, D.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schussler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Sieger, C.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J.; Stolarczyk, T.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallee, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yatkin, K.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J.; Zuniga, J.; the ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the Fermi-LAT data has revealed two extended structures above and below the Galactic Centre emitting gamma rays with a hard spectrum, the so-called Fermi bubbles. Hadronic models attempting to explain the origin of the Fermi bubbles predict the emission of high-energy neutrinos and gamma

  4. Application of engineering models to predict wake deflection due to a tilted wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guntur, Srinivas; Troldborg, Niels; Gaunaa, Mac

    2012-01-01

    such a mechanism introduces control complications due to changing wind directions. Deflecting the wake in the vertical direction using tilt, on the other hand, overcomes this challenge. In this paper, the feasibility of steering wake is explored in a simple uniform inflow case. This is done by trying to model......It is a known fact that the power produced by wind turbines operating inside an array decreases due to the wake effects of the upstream turbines. It has been proposed previously to use the yaw mechanism as a potential means to steer the upstream wake away from downstream turbines, however...

  5. Effect of oxygen breathing and perfluorocarbon emulsion treatment on air bubbles in adipose tissue during decompression sickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randsoe, T; Hyldegaard, O

    2009-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) after air diving has been treated with success by means of combined normobaric oxygen breathing and intravascular perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions causing increased survival rate and faster bubble clearance from the intravascular compartment. The beneficial PFC effect...... effect of normobaric oxygen breathing and intravascular PFC infusion could lead to either enhanced extravascular bubble growth on decompression due to the increased oxygen supply, or that PFC infusion could lead to faster bubble elimination due to the increased solubility and transport capacity in blood...... combined with PFC infusion. All bubble observations were done at 101.3 kPa pressure. During oxygen breathing with or without combined PFC infusion, bubbles disappeared faster compared with air breathing. Combined oxygen breathing and PFC infusion caused faster bubble disappearance compared with oxygen...

  6. Numerical studies on the dynamics of bubble, turbulent, free shear flows: Effect of the inter-phase coupling on the global flow evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiburg, Eckart

    1993-12-01

    We use direct numerical simulations to analyze the evolution of a temporally growing two-dimensional free shear layer seeded with a dilute suspension of bubbles under gravity. The bubble concentrations are dilute enough so that bubble bubble interactions are negligible, but cumulative effects of bubbles alter the flow field. The evolution of the bubbles can then be determined by tracking many individual bubbles, and the flow field is advanced using the Navier-Stokes equations with a coupling term in the momentum equation representing the effect of the bubbles on the flow. We interpret the results in terms of the difference in the vorticity, bubble concentration, and pressure fields relative to the passive or one way coupled case. Due to the nature of the vorticity production mechanism, the net circulation is not affected by the bubbles, but local variations do occur, especially near the vortex center. In addition to the effect of the bubbles on the flow, the bubble field is also altered as a result of the two-way coupling. The location of bubble accumulation is shifted away from the vortex center and the magnitude of this accumulation is reduced relative to the passive case.

  7. Enhanced regime predictability in atmospheric low-order models due to stochastic forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniok, Frank

    2014-06-28

    Regime predictability in atmospheric low-order models augmented with stochastic forcing is studied. Atmospheric regimes are identified as persistent or metastable states using a hidden Markov model analysis. A somewhat counterintuitive, coherence resonance-like effect is observed: regime predictability increases with increasing noise level up to an intermediate optimal value, before decreasing when further increasing the noise level. The enhanced regime predictability is due to increased persistence of the regimes. The effect is found in the Lorenz '63 model and a low-order model of barotropic flow over topography. The increased predictability is only present in the regime dynamics, that is, in a coarse-grained view of the system; predictability of individual trajectories decreases monotonically with increasing noise level. A possible explanation for the phenomenon is given and implications of the finding for weather and climate modelling and prediction are discussed. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling Local Item Dependence Due to Common Test Format with a Multidimensional Rasch Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Purya; Aryadoust, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Research shows that test method can exert a significant impact on test takers' performance and thereby contaminate test scores. We argue that common test method can exert the same effect as common stimuli and violate the conditional independence assumption of item response theory models because, in general, subsets of items which have a shared…

  9. Bubble fusion: fact or fiction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennicott, Katie

    2002-04-01

    Physicists in the US claim to have seen nuclear fusion in a table-top experiment but their work has met with a hostile reaction from other researchers. In sonoluminescence, flashes of light are emitted by bubbles that are forced to expand and then collapse by sound waves, although this process is still not fully understood (see Physics World May 1998 pp38-42, print version). Physicists have long speculated that the considerable compression forces inside the collapsing bubbles could be large enough to spark nuclear reactions. If this was the case, it could lead to a new source of clean energy. In their experiment, Taleyarkhan and co-workers at Oak Ridge, the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the US, and the Russian Academy of Sciences used 14 MeV neutrons to create bubbles about 10 nano metres across in acetone in which the ordinary hydrogen atoms had been replaced by deuterium atoms (C{sub 3}D{sub 6O}). An acoustic signal then forced these bubbles - and the acetone vapour inside them - to first expand to about a millimetre in size, and then collapse. Two deuterium nuclei can fuse to produce either a tritium nucleus and a proton, or a helium-3 nucleus and a neutron with an energy of 2.45 MeV. Taleyarkhan and co-workers claim to have seen evidence for both tritium and 2.45 MeV neutrons in their experiments. They have also calculated that temperatures of a million or even 10 million degrees - the temperature at the Sun's core - must have existed inside the bubbles for these reactions to proceed. Some other experiments and the controversy discussions of the researchers are summarized. (U.K.)

  10. Bubble Universe Dynamics After Free Passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlqvist, Pontus [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Eckerle, Kate [Department of Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Greene, Brian [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-03-06

    We consider bubble collisions in single scalar field theories with multiple vacua. Recent work has argued that at sufficiently high impact velocities, collisions between such bubble vacua are governed by ‘free passage’ dynamics in which field interactions can be ignored during the collision, providing a systematic process for populating local minima without quantum nucleation. We focus on the time period that follows the bubble collision and provide evidence that, for certain potentials, interactions can drive significant deviations from the free-passage bubble profile, thwarting the production of bubbles with different field values.

  11. Lidar signature from bubbles in the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churnside, James H

    2010-04-12

    The lidar signature from a collection of bubbles is proportional to the volume backscatter coefficient at a scattering angle of 180 degrees . This quantity, calculated using a combination of geometric optics and diffraction, is proportional to the void fraction of the bubbles in the water for any bubble size distribution. The constant of proportionality is 233 m(-1) sr(-1)for clean bubbles, slightly less for bubbles coated with a thin layer of organic material, and as large as 1445 m(-1) sr(-1) for a thick coating of protein.

  12. Modeling and Mitigation for High Frequency Switching Transients Due to Energization in Offshore Wind Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Xin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive investigation on high frequency (HF switching transients due to energization of vacuum circuit breakers (VCBs in offshore wind farms (OWFs. This research not only concerns the modeling of main components in collector grids of an OWF for transient analysis (including VCBs, wind turbine transformers (WTTs, submarine cables, but also compares the effectiveness between several mainstream switching overvoltage (SOV protection methods and a new mitigation method called smart choke. In order to accurately reproduce such HF switching transients considering the current chopping, dielectric strength (DS recovery capability and HF quenching capability of VCBs, three models are developed, i.e., a user–defined VCB model, a HF transformer terminal model and a three-core (TC frequency dependent model of submarine cables, which are validated through simulations and compared with measurements. Based on the above models and a real OWF configuration, a simulation model is built and several typical switching transient cases are investigated to analyze the switching transient process and phenomena. Subsequently, according to the characteristics of overvoltages, appropriate parameters of SOV mitigation methods are determined to improve their effectiveness. Simulation results indicate that the user–defined VCB model can satisfactorily simulate prestrikes and the proposed component models display HF characteristics, which are consistent with onsite measurement behaviors. Moreover, the employed protection methods can suppress induced SOVs, which have a steep front, a high oscillation frequency and a high amplitude, among which the smart choke presents a preferable HF damping effect.

  13. Perbandingan Bubble Sort dengan Insertion Sort pada Bahasa Pemrograman C dan Fortran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Reina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sorting is a basic algorithm studied by students of computer science major. Sorting algorithm is the basis of other algorithms such as searching algorithm, pattern matching algorithm. Bubble sort is a popular basic sorting algorithm due to its easiness to be implemented. Besides bubble sort, there is insertion sort. It is lesspopular than bubble sort because it has more difficult algorithm. This paper discusses about process time between insertion sort and bubble sort with two kinds of data. First is randomized data, and the second is data of descending list. Comparison of process time has been done in two kinds of programming language that is C programming language and FORTRAN programming language. The result shows that bubble sort needs more time than insertion sort does.

  14. Post-midnight occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajith, K. K.; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Tulasiram, S.

    2016-07-01

    The equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs)/equatorial spread F (ESF) irregularities are an important topic of space weather interest because of their impact on transionospheric radio communications, satellite-based navigation and augmentation systems. This local plasma depleted structures develop at the bottom side F layer through Rayleigh-Taylor instability and rapidly grow to topside ionosphere via polarization electric fields within them. The steep vertical gradients due to quick loss of bottom side ionization and rapid uplift of equatorial F layer via prereversal enhancement (PRE) of zonal electric field makes the post-sunset hours as the most preferred local time for the formation of EPBs. However, there is a different class of irregularities that occurs during the post-midnight hours of June solstice reported by the previous studies. The occurrence of these post-midnight EPBs maximize during the low solar activity periods. The growth characteristics and the responsible mechanism for the formation of these post-midnight EPBs are not yet understood. Using the rapid beam steering ability of 47 MHz Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) at Kototabang (0.2°S geographic latitude, 100.3°E geographic longitude, and 10.4°S geomagnetic latitude), Indonesia, the spatial and temporal evolution of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were examined to classify the evolutionary-type EPBs from those which formed elsewhere and drifted into the field of view of radar. The responsible mechanism for the genesis of summer time post-midnight EPBs were discussed in light of growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor instability using SAMI2 model.

  15. Helium-filled soap bubbles for vortex core velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, Giuseppe Carlo Alp; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2017-09-01

    Velocity measurements within the core of high-swirl vortices are often hampered by heavier-than-air particle tracers being centrifuged outside the vortex core region. The use of neutrally buoyant and lighter-than-air tracers is investigated to aim at homogeneous tracers concentration in air flow experiments dealing with high-swirl vortices using particle image velocimetry. Helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) of sub-millimeter diameter are employed as flow tracers. Their density is controlled varying the relative amount of helium and soap solution composing the bubbles. The dynamics of HFSB and micro-size droplets is modeled within a Lamb-Oseen vortex to retrieve the order of magnitude of the tracers slip velocity. A positive radial drift for heavier-than-air tracers leads to an empty vortex core. In contrast, the concentration at the vortex axis is expected to increase for lighter than air tracers. Experiments are conducted on a sharp-edged slender delta wing at 20° incidence. At chosen chord-based Reynolds numbers of 2 × 105 and 6 × 105, a stable laminar vortex is formed above the delta wing. Laser sheet visualization is used to inspect the spatial concentration of tracers. A comparison is made between micron-sized fog droplets and HFSB tracers in the nearly neutrally buoyant condition. Stereo-PIV measurements with fog droplets return a systematically underestimated axial velocity distribution within the vortex core due to drop-out of image cross-correlation signal. The nearly neutrally buoyant HFSB tracers appear to maintain a homogeneous spatial concentration and yield cross-correlation signal up to the vortex axis. The resulting velocity measurements are in good agreement with literature data.

  16. The Spectrum and Morphology of the Fermi Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Brandt, T. J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi bubbles are two large structures in the gamma-ray sky extending to 55 deg above and below the Galactic center. We analyze 50 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope data between 100 MeV and 500 GeV above 10 deg in Galactic latitude to derive the spectrum and morphology of the Fermi bubbles. We thoroughly explore the systematic uncertainties that arise when modeling the Galactic diffuse emission through two separate approaches. The gamma-ray spectrum is well described by either a log parabola or a power law with an exponential cutoff. We exclude a simple power law with more than 7 sigma significance. The power law with an exponential cutoff has an index of 1.90+/-0.2 and a cutoff energy of 110+/- 50 GeV. We find that the gamma-ray luminosity of the bubbles is 4.4(+)2.4(-0.9 ) 10(exp 37) erg s-1. We confirm a significant enhancement of gamma-ray emission in the south-eastern part of the bubbles, but we do not find significant evidence for a jet. No significant variation of the spectrum across the bubbles is detected. The width of the boundary of the bubbles is estimated to be 3.4(+)3.7(-)2.6 deg. Both inverse Compton (IC) models and hadronic models including IC emission from secondary leptons t the gamma-ray data well. In the IC scenario, the synchrotron emission from the same population of electrons can also explain the WMAP and Planck microwave haze with a magnetic field between 5 and 20 micro-G.

  17. The spectrum and morphology of the Fermi bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Albert, A.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, and Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bregeon, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, Montpellier (France); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Caragiulo, M., E-mail: afrancko@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: malyshev@stanford.edu, E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); and others

    2014-09-20

    The Fermi bubbles are two large structures in the gamma-ray sky extending to 55° above and below the Galactic center. We analyze 50 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope data between 100 MeV and 500 GeV above 10° in Galactic latitude to derive the spectrum and morphology of the Fermi bubbles. We thoroughly explore the systematic uncertainties that arise when modeling the Galactic diffuse emission through two separate approaches. The gamma-ray spectrum is well described by either a log parabola or a power law with an exponential cutoff. We exclude a simple power law with more than 7σ significance. The power law with an exponential cutoff has an index of 1.9 ± 0.2 and a cutoff energy of 110 ± 50 GeV. We find that the gamma-ray luminosity of the bubbles is 4.4{sub −0.9}{sup +2.4}×10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}. We confirm a significant enhancement of gamma-ray emission in the southeastern part of the bubbles, but we do not find significant evidence for a jet. No significant variation of the spectrum across the bubbles is detected. The width of the boundary of the bubbles is estimated to be 3.4{sub −2.6}{sup +3.7} deg. Both inverse Compton (IC) models and hadronic models including IC emission from secondary leptons fit the gamma-ray data well. In the IC scenario, synchrotron emission from the same population of electrons can also explain the WMAP and Planck microwave haze with a magnetic field between 5 and 20 μG.

  18. Qualitative models of magnetic field accelerated propagation in a plasma due to the Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, A.B.; Cherepanov, K.V.

    2000-01-01

    Two qualitatively new models of accelerated magnetic field propagation (relative to normal diffusion) in a plasma due to the Hall effect are developed within the frames of the electron magnetic hydrodynamics. The first model is based on a simple hydrodynamic approach, which, in particular, reproduces the number of known theoretical results. The second one makes it possible to obtain exact analytical description of the basic characteristics of the magnetic field accelerated propagation in a inhomogeneous iso-thermic plasma, namely, the magnetic field front and its effective width [ru

  19. Probabilistic modeling of nodal electric vehicle load due to fast charging stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Difei; Wang, Peng; Wu, Qiuwei

    2016-01-01

    operation of both traffic and power systems. This paper proposes a probabilistic approach to model the nodal EV load at fast charging stations in integrated power and transport systems. Following the introduction of the spatial-temporal model of moving EV loads, we extended the model by taking fast charging...... station into consideration. Fuzzy logic inference system is applied to simulate the charging decision of EV drivers at fast charging station. Due to increasing EV loads in power system, the potential traffic congestion in fast charging stations is modeled and evaluated by queuing theory with spatial......-temporal varying arrival and service rates. The time-varying nodal EV loads are obtained by the number of operating fast chargers at each node of the power system. System studies demonstrate that the combination of AC normal and DC charging may share the EV charging demand and alleviate the impact to power system...

  20. Analytical model of cracking due to rebar corrosion expansion in concrete considering the structure internal force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyue Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the assumptions of uniform corrosion and linear elastic expansion, an analytical model of cracking due to rebar corrosion expansion in concrete was established, which is able to consider the structure internal force. And then, by means of the complex variable function theory and series expansion technology established by Muskhelishvili, the corresponding stress component functions of concrete around the reinforcement were obtained. Also, a comparative analysis was conducted between the numerical simulation model and present model in this paper. The results show that the calculation results of both methods were consistent with each other, and the numerical deviation was less than 10%, proving that the analytical model established in this paper is reliable.