WorldWideScience

Sample records for brucei trypanothione reductase

  1. Trypanothione Reductase: A Viable Chemotherapeutic Target for Antitrypanosomal and Antileishmanial Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Omar F. Khan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis are two debilitating disease groups caused by parasites of Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. and affecting millions of people worldwide. A brief outline of the potential targets for rational drug design against these diseases are presented, with an emphasis placed on the enzyme trypanothione reductase. Trypanothione reductase was identified as unique to parasites and proposed to be an effective target against trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The biochemical basis of selecting this enzyme as a target, with reference to the simile and contrast to human analogous enzyme glutathione reductase, and the structural aspects of its active site are presented. The process of designing selective inhibitors for the enzyme trypanothione reductase has been discussed. An overview of the different chemical classes of inhibitors of trypanothione reductase with their inhibitory activities against the parasites and their prospects as future chemotherapeutic agents are briefl y revealed.

  2. Nitrofuran drugs as common subversive substrates of Trypanosoma cruzi lipoamide dehydrogenase and trypanothione reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstiel, K; Schöneck, R; Yardley, V; Croft, S L; Krauth-Siegel, R L

    1999-12-01

    Lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH), trypanothione reductase (TR), and glutathione reductase (GR) catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of disulfide substrates. TR occurs exclusively in trypanosomatids which lack a GR. Besides their physiological reactions, the flavoenzymes catalyze the single-electron reduction of nitrofurans with the concomitant generation of superoxide anions. Here, we report on the interaction of clinically used antimicrobial nitrofurans with LipDH and TR from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease (South American trypanosomiasis), in comparison to mammalian LipDH and GR. The compounds were studied as inhibitors and as subversive substrates of the enzymes. None of the nitrofurans inhibited LipDH, although they did interfere with the disulfide reduction of TR and GR. When the compounds were studied as substrates, T. cruzi LipDH showed a high rate of nitrofuran reduction and was even more efficient than its mammalian counterpart. Several derivatives were also effective subversive substrates of TR, but the respective reaction with human GR was negligible. Nifuroxazide, nifuroxime, and nifurprazine proved to be the most promising derivatives since they were redox-cycled by both T. cruzi LipDH and TR and had pronounced antiparasitic effects in cultures of T. cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. The results suggest that those nitrofuran derivatives which interact with both parasite flavoenzymes should be revisited as trypanocidal drugs. PMID:10571254

  3. Molecular modeling, structural analysis and identification of ligand binding sites of trypanothione reductase from Leishmania mexicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozal Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Trypanothione reductase (TR is a member of FAD-dependent NADPH oxidoreductase protein family and it is a key enzyme which connects the NADPH and the thiol-based redox system. Inhibition studies indicate that TR is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. Therefore, it is an attractive target enzyme for novel drug candidates. There is no structural model for TR of Leishmania mexicana (LmTR in the protein databases. In this work, 3D structure of TR from L. mexicana was identified by template-based in silico homology modeling method, resultant model was validated, structurally analyzed and possible ligand binding pockets were identified. Methods: For computational molecular modeling study, firstly, template was identified by BLAST search against PDB database. Multiple alignments were achieved by ClustalW2. Molecular modeling of LmTR was done and possible drug targeting sites were identified. Refinement of the model was done by performing local energy minimization for backbone, hydrogen and side chains. Model was validated by web-based servers. Results: A reliable 3D model for TR from L. mexicana was modeled by using L. infantum trypanothione reductase (LiTR as a template. RMSD results according to C-alpha, visible atoms and backbone were 0.809 Å, 0.732 Å and 0.728 Å respectively. Ramachandran plot indicates that model shows an acceptable stereochemistry. Conclusion: Modeled structure of LmTR shows high similarity with LiTR based on overall structural features like domains and folding patterns. Predicted structure will provide a source for the further docking studies of various peptide-based inhibitors.

  4. Molecular modeling, structural analysis and identification of ligand binding sites of trypanothione reductase from Leishmania mexicana

    OpenAIRE

    Ozal Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Trypanothione reductase (TR) is a member of FAD-dependent NADPH oxidoreductase protein family and it is a key enzyme which connects the NADPH and the thiol-based redox system. Inhibition studies indicate that TR is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. Therefore, it is an attractive target enzyme for novel drug candidates. There is no structural model for TR of Leishmania mexicana (LmTR) in the protein databases. In this work, 3D structure of TR from L. mexicana ...

  5. 8-Methoxy-naphtho[2,3-b]thiophen-4,9-quinone, a non-competitive inhibitor of trypanothione reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zani Carlos L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme trypanothione reductase is a recognised drug target in trypanosomatids and has been used in the search of new compounds with potential activity against diseases such as leishmaniasis, Chagas disease and African trypanosomiasis. 8-Methoxy-naphtho [2,3-b] thiophen-4,9-quinone was selected in a screening of natural and synthetic compounds using an in vitro assay with the recombinant enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi. Its mode of inhibition fits a non-competitive model with respect to the substrate (trypanothione and to the co-factor (NADPH, with Ki-values of 5 and 3.6 µM, respectively. When tested against human glutathione reductase, this compound did not display any significant inhibition at 100 µM, indicating a good selectivity against the parasite enzyme.

  6. Identification of Novel Chemical Scaffolds Inhibiting Trypanothione Synthetase from Pathogenic Trypanosomatids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Diego; Medeiros, Andrea; Fiestas, Lucía; Panozzo-Zenere, Esteban A.; Maiwald, Franziska; Prousis, Kyriakos C.; Roussaki, Marina; Calogeropoulou, Theodora; Detsi, Anastasia; Jaeger, Timo; Šarlauskas, Jonas; Peterlin Mašič, Lucíja; Kunick, Conrad; Labadie, Guillermo R.; Flohé, Leopold; Comini, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The search for novel chemical entities targeting essential and parasite-specific pathways is considered a priority for neglected diseases such as trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism of trypanosomatids relies on bis-glutathionylspermidine [trypanothione, T(SH)2], a low molecular mass cosubstrate absent in the host. In pathogenic trypanosomatids, a single enzyme, trypanothione synthetase (TryS), catalyzes trypanothione biosynthesis, which is indispensable for parasite survival. Thus, TryS qualifies as an attractive drug target candidate. Methodology/Principal Finding A library composed of 144 compounds from 7 different families and several singletons was screened against TryS from three major pathogen species (Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania infantum). The screening conditions were adjusted to the TryS´ kinetic parameters and intracellular concentration of substrates corresponding to each trypanosomatid species, and/or to avoid assay interference. The screening assay yielded suitable Z’ and signal to noise values (≥0.85 and ~3.5, respectively), and high intra-assay reproducibility. Several novel chemical scaffolds were identified as low μM and selective tri-tryp TryS inhibitors. Compounds displaying multi-TryS inhibition (N,N'-bis(3,4-substituted-benzyl) diamine derivatives) and an N5-substituted paullone (MOL2008) halted the proliferation of infective Trypanosoma brucei (EC50 in the nM range) and Leishmania infantum promastigotes (EC50 = 12 μM), respectively. A bis-benzyl diamine derivative and MOL2008 depleted intracellular trypanothione in treated parasites, which confirmed the on-target activity of these compounds. Conclusions/Significance Novel molecular scaffolds with on-target mode of action were identified as hit candidates for TryS inhibition. Due to the remarkable species-specificity exhibited by tri-tryp TryS towards the compounds, future optimization and screening campaigns should

  7. Trypanosoma brucei DHFR-TS Revisited: Characterisation of a Bifunctional and Highly Unstable Recombinant Dihydrofolate Reductase-Thymidylate Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marc W; Dewar, Simon; Ong, Han B; Sienkiewicz, Natasha; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) is a chemically and genetically validated target in African trypanosomes, causative agents of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in cattle. Here we report the kinetic properties and sensitivity of recombinant enzyme to a range of lipophilic and classical antifolate drugs. The purified recombinant enzyme, expressed as a fusion protein with elongation factor Ts (Tsf) in ThyA- Escherichia coli, retains DHFR activity, but lacks any TS activity. TS activity was found to be extremely unstable (half-life of 28 s) following desalting of clarified bacterial lysates to remove small molecules. Stability could be improved 700-fold by inclusion of dUMP, but not by other pyrimidine or purine (deoxy)-nucleosides or nucleotides. Inclusion of dUMP during purification proved insufficient to prevent inactivation during the purification procedure. Methotrexate and trimetrexate were the most potent inhibitors of DHFR (Ki 0.1 and 0.6 nM, respectively) and FdUMP and nolatrexed of TS (Ki 14 and 39 nM, respectively). All inhibitors showed a marked drop-off in potency of 100- to 1,000-fold against trypanosomes grown in low folate medium lacking thymidine. The most potent inhibitors possessed a terminal glutamate moiety suggesting that transport or subsequent retention by polyglutamylation was important for biological activity. Supplementation of culture medium with folate markedly antagonised the potency of these folate-like inhibitors, as did thymidine in the case of the TS inhibitors raltitrexed and pemetrexed. PMID:27175479

  8. Multiple Triclosan Targets in Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Kimberly S.; Bacchi, Cyrus J.; Englund, Paul T.

    2004-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei genes encoding putative fatty acid synthesis enzymes are homologous to those encoding type II enzymes found in bacteria and organelles such as chloroplasts and mitochondria. It was therefore not surprising that triclosan, an inhibitor of type II enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase, killed both procyclic forms and bloodstream forms of T. brucei in culture with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 10 and 13 μM, respectively. Triclosan also inhibited cell-free ...

  9. Catalytic properties, localization, and in vivo role of Px IV, a novel tryparedoxin peroxidase of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ilon; Bogacz, Marta; Schaffroth, Corinna; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2016-06-01

    Px IV is a distant relative of the known glutathione peroxidase-type enzymes of African trypanosomes. Immunofluorescence microscopy of bloodstream cells expressing C-terminally Myc6-tagged Px IV revealed a mitochondrial localization. Recombinant Px IV possesses very low activity as glutathione peroxidase but catalyzes the trypanothione/tryparedoxin-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide and, even more efficiently, of arachidonic acid hydroperoxide. Neither overexpression in bloodstream cells nor the deletion of both alleles in bloodstream or procyclic parasites affected the in vitro proliferation. Trypanosoma brucei Px IV shares 58% of all residues with TcGPXII. The orthologous enzymes have in common their substrate preference for fatty acid hydroperoxides. However, the T. cruzi protein has been reported to be localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and to be specific for glutathione as reducing agent. Taken together, our data show that Px IV is a low abundant tryparedoxin peroxidase of T. brucei that is not essential, at least under culture conditions. PMID:27262262

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Trypanosoma brucei [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma_brucei_L.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NL.png Trypan...osoma_brucei_S.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypan...osoma+brucei&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp.../taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=121 ...

  11. Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 Initiates Oxidation-stimulated Osmotic Lysis of Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Amy Styer; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2016-02-01

    Human innate immunity against the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei is conferred by trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs), against which human-infective T. brucei gambiense and T. brucei rhodesiense have evolved resistance. TLF-1 is a subclass of high density lipoprotein particles defined by two primate-specific apolipoproteins: the ion channel-forming toxin ApoL1 (apolipoprotein L1) and the hemoglobin (Hb) scavenger Hpr (haptoglobin-related protein). The role of oxidative stress in the TLF-1 lytic mechanism has been controversial. Here we show that oxidative processes are involved in TLF-1 killing of T. brucei brucei. The lipophilic antioxidant N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine protected TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei from lysis. Conversely, lysis of TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei was increased by the addition of peroxides or thiol-conjugating agents. Previously, the Hpr-Hb complex was postulated to be a source of free radicals during TLF-1 lysis. However, we found that the iron-containing heme of the Hpr-Hb complex was not involved in TLF-1 lysis. Furthermore, neither high concentrations of transferrin nor knock-out of cytosolic lipid peroxidases prevented TLF-1 lysis. Instead, purified ApoL1 was sufficient to induce lysis, and ApoL1 lysis was inhibited by the antioxidant DPPD. Swelling of TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei was reminiscent of swelling under hypotonic stress. Moreover, TLF-1-treated T. brucei brucei became rapidly susceptible to hypotonic lysis. T. brucei brucei cells exposed to peroxides or thiol-binding agents were also sensitized to hypotonic lysis in the absence of TLF-1. We postulate that ApoL1 initiates osmotic stress at the plasma membrane, which sensitizes T. brucei brucei to oxidation-stimulated osmotic lysis. PMID:26645690

  12. Stage-dependent expression and up-regulation of trypanothione synthetase in amphotericin B resistant Leishmania donovani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Equbal

    Full Text Available Kinetoplastids differ from other organisms in their ability to conjugate glutathione and spermidine to form trypanothione which is involved in maintaining redox homeostasis and removal of toxic metabolites. It is also involved in drug resistance, antioxidant mechanism, and defense against cellular oxidants. Trypanothione synthetase (TryS of thiol metabolic pathway is the sole enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of trypanothione in Leishmania donovani. In this study, TryS gene of L. donovani (LdTryS was cloned, expressed, and fusion protein purified with affinity column chromatography. The purified protein showed optimum enzymatic activity at pH 8.0-8.5. The TryS amino acids sequences alignment showed that all amino acids involved in catalytic and ligands binding of L. major are conserved in L. donovani. Subcellular localization using digitonin fractionation and immunoblot analysis showed that LdTryS is localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, RT-PCR coupled with immunoblot analysis showed that LdTryS is overexpressed in Amp B resistant and stationary phase promastigotes (∼ 2.0-folds than in sensitive strain and logarithmic phase, respectively, which suggests its involvement in Amp B resistance. Also, H2O2 treatment upto 150 µM for 8 hrs leads to 2-fold increased expression of LdTryS probably to cope up with oxidative stress generated by H2O2. Therefore, this study demonstrates stage- and Amp B sensitivity-dependent expression of LdTryS in L. donovani and involvement of TryS during oxidative stress to help the parasites survival.

  13. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirků, Milan; Votýpka, Jan; Petrželková, Klára J; Jirků-Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Kriegová, Eva; Vodička, Roman; Lankester, Felix; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Wittig, Roman M; Boesch, Christophe; Modrý, David; Ayala, Francisco J; Leendertz, Fabian H; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-12-01

    Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples. In present work, we established a diagnostic ITS1-based PCR assay that allows detection of the DNA of all four Trypanosoma brucei subspecies (Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and Trypanosoma brucei evansi) in feces of experimentally infected mice. Next, using this assay we revealed the presence of trypanosomes in the fecal samples of wild chimpanzees and this finding was further supported by results obtained using a set of primate tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS1 region showed that the majority of obtained sequences fell into the robust T. brucei group, providing strong evidence that these infections were caused by T. b. rhodesiense and/or T. b. gambiense. The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained. Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies. PMID:26110113

  14. Malleable Mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verner, Zdeněk; Basu, Somuvro; Benz, C.; Dixit, S.; Dobáková, Eva; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Hashimi, Hassan; Horáková, Eva; Huang, Zhenqiu; Paris, Zdeněk; Peña-Diaz, Priscila; Ridlon, L.; Týč, Jiří; Wildridge, David; Zíková, Alena; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 315, 2015 Feb 07 (2015), s. 73-151. ISSN 1937-6448 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/2513; GA MŠk LL1205; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA MŠk LH12104; GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Kinetoplast * Metabolism * Mitochondrial transport * Mitochondrion * RNA import * T. brucei * Trypanosome * kDNA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.419, year: 2014

  15. Mapping of VSG similarities in Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Weirather, Jason L.; Wilson, Mary E; Donelson, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei switches its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) to subvert its mammalian hosts’ immune responses. The T. brucei genome contains as many as 1600 VSG genes (VSGs), but most are silent noncoding pseudogenes. Only one functional VSG, located in a telomere-linked expression site, is transcribed at a time. Silent VSGs are copied into a VSG expression site through gene conversion. Truncated gene conversion events can generate new mosaic VSGs with segments of...

  16. What happens when Trypanosoma brucei leaves Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Robert E.; Simpson, Larry; Englund, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Julius Lukeš and co-workers evaluated the evolutionary origin of Trypanosoma equiperdum and Trypanosoma evansi, parasites that cause horse and camel diseases. Although similar to T. brucei, the sleeping-sickness parasite, these trypanosomes do not cycle through the tsetse fly and have been able to spread beyond Africa. Transmission occurs sexually, or via blood-sucking flies or vampire bats. They concluded that these parasites, which resemble yeast petite mutants, are T. brucei sub-species, w...

  17. Effects of tea on survival rates and liver pathology of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mbuthia, S.K; Wachira, N.W; Ngure, R.M; Ouma, J; Kagira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of different types of Kenyan tea extracts on the pathogenesis ofTrypanosoma brucei brucei in a Swiss White mice model. Following infection with trypanosomes, the micewere monitored for survival and liver pathology. Tea significantly (P

  18. The role of glutathione reductase and related enzymes on cellular redox homoeostasis network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Narciso; Wood, Jennifer; Barber, Jill

    2016-06-01

    In this review article we examine the role of glutathione reductase in the regulation, modulation and maintenance of cellular redox homoeostasis. Glutathione reductase is responsible for maintaining the supply of reduced glutathione; one of the most abundant reducing thiols in the majority of cells. In its reduced form, glutathione plays key roles in the cellular control of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species act as intracellular and extracellular signalling molecules and complex cross talk between levels of reactive oxygen species, levels of oxidised and reduced glutathione and other thiols, and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase determine the most suitable conditions for redox control within a cell or for activation of programmed cell death. Additionally, we discuss the translation and expression of glutathione reductase in a number of organisms including yeast and humans. In yeast and human cells, a single gene expresses more than one form of glutathione reductase, destined for residence in the cytoplasm or for translocation to different organelles; in plants, however, two genes encoding this protein have been described. In general, insects and kinetoplastids (a group of protozoa, including Plasmodia and Trypanosoma) do not express glutathione reductase or glutathione biosynthetic enzymes. Instead, they express either the thioredoxin system or the trypanothione system. The thioredoxin system is also present in organisms that have the glutathione system and there may be overlapping functions with cross-talk between the two systems. Finally we evaluate therapeutic targets to overcome oxidative stress associated cellular disorders. PMID:26923386

  19. Genetic control of resistance to Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Matyáš; Havelková, Helena; Quan, L.; Svobodová, M.; Jarošíková, T.; Vojtíšková, Jarmila; Stassen, A. P. M.; Demant, P.; Lipoldová, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2011), e1173. ISSN 1935-2735 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520606; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Grant ostatní: NIH-NCI(US) 1R01CA127162-01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei brucei * mouse recombinant congenic strains * Tbbr Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  20. CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF BENZOPHENONE THIOSEMICARBAZONES ON Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Georges C. Accrombessi; Jacques Poupaert; Raymond H. Fatondji; Salomé D. S. Kpoviessi; Gbaguidi, Fernand A.; Bienvenu Glinma

    2011-01-01

    The structure of four synthesized thiosemicarbazones, substituted or not, of benzophenone has been confirmed by spectrometrical analysis IR, NMR 1H and 13C. Their anti-trypanosomal activities were evaluated on Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among these compounds, benzophenone 4 phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 4 has the highest activity with the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 8.48 micromolar (µM). Benzophenone 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 3 and benzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1 showed moderate a...

  1. An evaluation of Minor Groove Binders as anti-Trypanosoma brucei brucei therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Fraser J; Khalaf, Abedawn I; Giordani, Federica; Wong, Pui Ee; Duffy, Sandra; Barrett, Michael; Avery, Vicky M; Suckling, Colin J

    2016-06-30

    A series of 32 structurally diverse MGBs, derived from the natural product distamycin, was evaluated for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Four compounds have been found to possess significant activity, in the nanomolar range, and represent hits for further optimisation towards novel treatments for Human and Animal African Trypanosomiases. Moreover, SAR indicates that the head group linking moiety is a significant modulator of biological activity. PMID:27060763

  2. Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štáfková, Jitka; Mach, Jan; Biran, Marc; Verner, Zdeněk; Bringaud, Frédéric; Tachezy, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key product of glycolysis that regulates the energy metabolism of cells. In Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of sleeping sickness, the fate of pyruvate varies dramatically during the parasite life cycle. In bloodstream forms, pyruvate is mainly excreted, whereas in tsetse fly forms, pyruvate is metabolized in mitochondria yielding additional ATP molecules. The character of the molecular machinery that mediates pyruvate transport across mitochondrial membrane was elusive until the recent discovery of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) in yeast and mammals. Here, we characterized pyruvate import into mitochondrion of T. brucei. We identified mpc1 and mpc2 homologs in the T. brucei genome with attributes of MPC protein family and we demonstrated that both proteins are present in the mitochondrial membrane of the parasite. Investigations of mpc1 or mpc2 gene knock-out cells proved that T. brucei MPC1/2 proteins facilitate mitochondrial pyruvate transport. Interestingly, MPC is expressed not only in procyclic trypanosomes with fully activated mitochondria but also in bloodstream trypanosomes in which most of pyruvate is excreted. Moreover, MPC appears to be essential for bloodstream forms, supporting the recently emerging picture that the functions of mitochondria in bloodstream forms are more diverse than it was originally thought. PMID:26748989

  3. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Jirků

    2015-12-01

    Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies.

  4. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  5. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense resistance to human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uzureau, Pierrick; Uzureau, Sophie; Lecordier, Laurence;

    2013-01-01

    The African parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense accounts for 97% of human sleeping sickness cases. T. b. gambiense resists the specific human innate immunity acting against several other tsetse-fly-transmitted trypanosome species such as T. b. brucei, the causative agent of nagana disease in...

  6. Trypanosoma evansi is alike to Trypanosoma brucei brucei in the subcellular localisation of glycolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Andrea Moreno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi, which causes surra, is descended from Trypanosoma brucei brucei, which causes nagana. Although both parasites are presumed to be metabolically similar, insufficient knowledge of T. evansi precludes a full comparison. Herein, we provide the first report on the subcellular localisation of the glycolytic enzymes in T. evansi, which is a alike to that of the bloodstream form (BSF of T. b. brucei: (i fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate kinase, triosephosphate isomerase (glycolytic enzymes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (a glycolysis-auxiliary enzyme in glycosomes, (ii enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase, pyruvate kinase (glycolytic enzymes and a GAPDH isoenzyme in the cytosol, (iii malate dehydrogenase in cytosol and (iv glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both glycosomes and the cytosol. Specific enzymatic activities also suggest that T. evansi is alike to the BSF of T. b. brucei in glycolytic flux, which is much faster than the pentose phosphate pathway flux, and in the involvement of cytosolic GAPDH in the NAD+/NADH balance. These similarities were expected based on the close phylogenetic relationship of both parasites.

  7. Mapping of VSG similarities in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirather, Jason L; Wilson, Mary E; Donelson, John E

    2012-02-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei switches its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) to subvert its mammalian hosts' immune responses. The T. brucei genome contains as many as 1600 VSG genes (VSGs), but most are silent noncoding pseudogenes. Only one functional VSG, located in a telomere-linked expression site, is transcribed at a time. Silent VSGs are copied into a VSG expression site through gene conversion. Truncated gene conversion events can generate new mosaic VSGs with segments of sequence identity to other VSGs. To examine the VSG family sub-structure within which these events occur, we combined the available VSG sequences and annotations with scripted BLAST searches to map the relationships among VSGs in the T. brucei genome. Clusters of related VSGs were visualized in 2- and 3-dimensions for different N- and C-terminal regions. Five types of N-termini (N1-N5) were observed, within which gene recombinational events are likely to occur, often with fully-coding 'functional' or 'atypical'VSGs centrally located between more dissimilar VSGs. Members of types N1, N3 and N4 are most closely related in the middle of the N-terminal region, whereas type N2 members are more similar near the N-terminus. Some preference occurs in pairing between specific N- and C-terminal types. Statistical analyses indicated no overall tendency for more related VSGs to be located closer in the genome than less related VSGs, although exceptions were noted. Many potential mosaic gene formation events within each N-terminal type were identified, contrasted by only one possible mosaic gene formation between N-terminal types (N1 and N2). These data suggest that mosaic gene formation is a major contributor to the overall VSG diversity, even though gene recombinational events between members of different N-terminal types occur only rarely. PMID:22079099

  8. CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF BENZOPHENONE THIOSEMICARBAZONES ON Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges C. Accrombessi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The structure of four synthesized thiosemicarbazones, substituted or not, of benzophenone has been confirmed by spectrometrical analysis IR, NMR 1H and 13C. Their anti-trypanosomal activities were evaluated on Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among these compounds, benzophenone 4 phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 4 has the highest activity with the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50 = 8.48 micromolar (µM. Benzophenone 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 3 and benzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1 showed moderate anti-trypanosomal activity with IC50 values equal to 23.27 µM and 67.17 µM respectively. Benzophenone 2 methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone 2 showed no activity up to IC50 = 371.74 µM.

  9. Classical clinical signs in rats experimemtally infected with Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate clinical signs in Trypanosoma brucei infection in albino rats. Methods: Fourteen rats grouped into 2 with 7 rats in each group were used to determine classical clinical manifestation of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats. Group A rats were uninfected control and Group B rats were infected with Trypanosoma brucei. Results: Parasitaemia was recorded in Group B by (3.86±0.34 d and the peak of parasitaemia was observed at Day 5 post infection. Classical signs observed included squint eyes, raised whiskers, lethargy, no weight loss, pyrexia, isolation from the other rats, and starry hair coat. Conclusions: These signs could be diagnostic or aid in diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats.

  10. Classical clinical signs in rats experimemtally infected with Trypanosoma brucei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Omamegbe Joseph Omolathebu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate clinical signs in Trypanosoma brucei infection in albino rats. Methods:Fourteen rats grouped into 2 with 7 rats in each group were used to determine classical clinical manifestation of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats. Group A rats were uninfected control and Group B rats were infected with Trypanosoma brucei. Results:Parasitaemia was recorded in Group B by (3.86±0.34) d and the peak of parasitaemia was observed at Day 5 post infection. Classical signs observed included squint eyes, raised whiskers, lethargy, no weight loss, pyrexia, isolation from the other rats, and starry hair coat. Conclusions:These signs could be diagnostic or aid in diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats.

  11. Role of expression site switching in the development of resistance to human Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 in Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Rudo; Stephens, Natalie A; Capewell, Paul; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2012-05-01

    Human high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) play an important role in human innate immunity to infection by African trypanosomes with a minor subclass, Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1), displaying highly selective cytotoxicity to the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei but not against the human sleeping sickness pathogens Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. T. b. rhodesiense has evolved the serum resistance associated protein (SRA) that binds and confers resistance to TLF-1 while T. b. gambiense lacks the gene for SRA indicating that these parasites have diverse mechanisms of resistance to TLF-1. Recently, we have shown that T. b. gambiense (group 1) resistance to TLF-1 correlated with the loss of the haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) expression, the protein responsible for high affinity binding and uptake of TLF-1. In the course of these studies we also examined TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei cell lines, generated by long-term in vitro selection. We found that changes in TLF-1 susceptibility in T. b. brucei correlated with changes in variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression in addition to reduced TLF-1 binding and uptake. To determine whether the expressed VSG or expression site associated genes (ESAGs) contribute to TLF-1 resistance we prepared a TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei with a selectable marker in a silent bloodstream expression site (BES). Drug treatment allowed rapid selection of trypanosomes that activated the tagged BES. These studies show that TLF-1 resistance in T. b. brucei is largely independent of the expressed VSG or ESAGs further supporting the central role of HpHbR expression in TLF-1 susceptibility in these cells. PMID:22226682

  12. Phenolic Constituents of Medicinal Plants with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya Nan; No, Joo Hwan; Lee, Ga Young; Li, Wei; Yang, Seo Young; Yang, Gyongseon; Schmidt, Thomas J; Kang, Jong Seong; Kim, Young Ho

    2016-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) affect over one billion people all over the world. These diseases are classified as neglected because they impact populations in areas with poor financial conditions and hence do not attract sufficient research investment. Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness), caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is one of the NTDs. The current therapeutic interventions for T. brucei infections often have toxic side effects or require hospitalization so that they are not available in the rural environments where HAT occurs. Furthermore, parasite resistance is increasing, so that there is an urgent need to identify novel lead compounds against this infection. Recognizing the wide structural diversity of natural products, we desired to explore and identify novel antitrypanosomal chemotypes from a collection of natural products obtained from plants. In this study, 440 pure compounds from various medicinal plants were tested against T. brucei by in a screening using whole cell in vitro assays. As the result, twenty-two phenolic compounds exhibited potent activity against cultures of T. brucei. Among them, eight compounds-4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 18, 20, and 21-showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei, with IC50 values below 5 µM, ranging from 0.52 to 4.70 μM. Based on these results, we attempt to establish some general trends with respect to structure-activity relationships, which indicate that further investigation and optimization of these derivatives might enable the preparation of potentially useful compounds for treating HAT. PMID:27077842

  13. Regulation and spatial organization of PCNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Characterization of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei (TbPCNA). ► TbPCNA is a suitable marker to detect replication in T. brucei. ► TbPCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to closely related parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani. -- Abstract: As in most eukaryotic cells, replication is regulated by a conserved group of proteins in the early-diverged parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Only a few components of the replication machinery have been described in this parasite and regulation, sub-nuclear localization and timing of replication are not well understood. We characterized the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T. brucei (TbPCNA) to establish a spatial and temporal marker for replication. Interestingly, PCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to the closely related parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. TbPCNA foci are clearly detectable during S phase of the cell cycle but in contrast to T. cruzi they are not preferentially located at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, PCNA seems to be degraded when cells enter G2 phase in T. brucei suggesting different modes of replication regulation or functions of PCNA in these closely related eukaryotes.

  14. Phenolic Constituents of Medicinal Plants with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Nan Sun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs affect over one billion people all over the world. These diseases are classified as neglected because they impact populations in areas with poor financial conditions and hence do not attract sufficient research investment. Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, is one of the NTDs. The current therapeutic interventions for T. brucei infections often have toxic side effects or require hospitalization so that they are not available in the rural environments where HAT occurs. Furthermore, parasite resistance is increasing, so that there is an urgent need to identify novel lead compounds against this infection. Recognizing the wide structural diversity of natural products, we desired to explore and identify novel antitrypanosomal chemotypes from a collection of natural products obtained from plants. In this study, 440 pure compounds from various medicinal plants were tested against T. brucei by in a screening using whole cell in vitro assays. As the result, twenty-two phenolic compounds exhibited potent activity against cultures of T. brucei. Among them, eight compounds—4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 18, 20, and 21—showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei, with IC50 values below 5 µM, ranging from 0.52 to 4.70 μM. Based on these results, we attempt to establish some general trends with respect to structure-activity relationships, which indicate that further investigation and optimization of these derivatives might enable the preparation of potentially useful compounds for treating HAT.

  15. Regulation and spatial organization of PCNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Doris; Gassen, Alwine [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology II, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany); Janzen, Christian J., E-mail: christian.janzen@uni-wuerzburg.de [University of Munich (LMU), Department Biology I, Genetics, Grosshaderner Str. 2-4, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei (TbPCNA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA is a suitable marker to detect replication in T. brucei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TbPCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to closely related parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani. -- Abstract: As in most eukaryotic cells, replication is regulated by a conserved group of proteins in the early-diverged parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Only a few components of the replication machinery have been described in this parasite and regulation, sub-nuclear localization and timing of replication are not well understood. We characterized the proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T. brucei (TbPCNA) to establish a spatial and temporal marker for replication. Interestingly, PCNA distribution and regulation is different compared to the closely related parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani. TbPCNA foci are clearly detectable during S phase of the cell cycle but in contrast to T. cruzi they are not preferentially located at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, PCNA seems to be degraded when cells enter G2 phase in T. brucei suggesting different modes of replication regulation or functions of PCNA in these closely related eukaryotes.

  16. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habila, Nathan; Agbaji, Abel S; Ladan, Zakari; Bello, Isaac A; Haruna, Emmanuel; Dakare, Monday A; Atolagbe, Taofiq O

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) from Cymbopogon citratus (CC), Eucalyptus citriodora (EC), Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED), and Citrus sinensis (CS) were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb) and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi). The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09%) in CS, 6-octenal (77.11%) in EC, Eucalyptol (75%) in ED, and Citral (38.32%) in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy. PMID:20700425

  17. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habila, Nathan; Agbaji, Abel S.; Ladan, Zakari; Bello, Isaac A.; Haruna, Emmanuel; Dakare, Monday A.; Atolagbe, Taofiq O.

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) from Cymbopogon citratus (CC), Eucalyptus citriodora (EC), Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED), and Citrus sinensis (CS) were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb) and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi). The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09%) in CS, 6-octenal (77.11%) in EC, Eucalyptol (75%) in ED, and Citral (38.32%) in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy. PMID:20700425

  18. A comparative study on the susceptibility of male and female albino mice to Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Turay, G.O. Nwobu, G.R.A. Okogun, C.U. Igwe, K. Adeyeye, K.E. Aghatise, H.O. Okpal & Y.M. Tatfeng

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Trypanosomiasis has remained a major set-back in the development oflivestock farming in tropical Africa. Thus the need for ascertaining the trypanotolerant levels ofdomestic animal breeds and possible improvement on them cannot be over-emphasised.Methods: Level of trypanotolerance in animals was compared between sexes using albino mice infectedwith a Nigerian strain of Trypanosoma brucei brucei at a 50% mouse lethal dose (MLD50.Results: The male mice showed unrestrained parasite growth with a prepatent period (PP of two daysand a mean survival period (MSP of six days corresponding to a gradual decrease in packed cellvolume (PCV, body weight, diet response and white blood cells (WBC count to the time of death.Their female counterparts showed a PP of three days and MSP of ten days with a similar PCV gradientbut a refractory WBC count. There was no significant difference in the differential leucocytes countin both sexes. However, the eosinophils count was significantly higher in the infected animals. It wasfound that female albino mice exercised more parasite restraint than their male counterparts.Interpretation & conclusion: The result suggests that the female animals may be more trypanotoleranthence may be more useful in protein production in trypanosomiasis endemic areas. However, furtherresearch using large domestic breeds like goats and sheep may be required to confirm the hypothesis.

  19. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Habila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs from Cymbopogon citratus (CC, Eucalyptus citriodora (EC, Eucalyptus camaldulensis (ED, and Citrus sinensis (CS were obtained by hydrodistillation process. The EOs were evaluated in vitro for activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Tbb and Trypanosoma evansi (T. evansi. The EOs were found to possess antitrypanosomal activity in vitro in a dose-dependent pattern in a short period of time. The drop in number of parasite over time was achieved doses of 0.4 g/ml, 0.2 g/mL, and 0.1 g/mL for all the EOs. The concentration of 0.4 g/mL CC was more potent at 3 minutes and 2 minutes for Tbb and T. evansi, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of the EOs revealed presence of Cyclobutane (96.09% in CS, 6-octenal (77.11% in EC, Eucalyptol (75% in ED, and Citral (38.32% in CC among several other organic compounds. The results are discussed in relation to trypanosome chemotherapy.

  20. Triacylglycerol Storage in Lipid Droplets in Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmann, Stefan; Mazet, Muriel; Ziebart, Nicole; Bouyssou, Guillaume; Fouillen, Laetitia; Dupuy, Jean-William; Bonneu, Marc; Moreau, Patrick; Bringaud, Frédéric; Boshart, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Carbon storage is likely to enable adaptation of trypanosomes to nutritional challenges or bottlenecks during their stage development and migration in the tsetse. Lipid droplets are candidates for this function. This report shows that feeding of T. brucei with oleate results in a 4-5 fold increase in the number of lipid droplets, as quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry of BODIPY 493/503-stained cells. The triacylglycerol (TAG) content also increased 4-5 fold, and labeled oleate is incorporated into TAG. Fatty acid carbon can thus be stored as TAG in lipid droplets under physiological growth conditions in procyclic T. brucei. β-oxidation has been suggested as a possible catabolic pathway for lipids in T. brucei. A single candidate gene, TFEα1 with coding capacity for a subunit of the trifunctional enzyme complex was identified. TFEα1 is expressed in procyclic T. brucei and present in glycosomal proteomes, Unexpectedly, a TFEα1 gene knock-out mutant still expressed wild-type levels of previously reported NADP-dependent 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity, and therefore, another gene encodes this enzymatic activity. Homozygous Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 null mutant cells show a normal growth rate and an unchanged glycosomal proteome in procyclic T. brucei. The decay kinetics of accumulated lipid droplets upon oleate withdrawal can be fully accounted for by the dilution effect of cell division in wild-type and Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 cells. The absence of net catabolism of stored TAG in procyclic T. brucei, even under strictly glucose-free conditions, does not formally exclude a flux through TAG, in which biosynthesis equals catabolism. Also, the possibility remains that TAG catabolism is completely repressed by other carbon sources in culture media or developmentally activated in post-procyclic stages in the tsetse. PMID:25493940

  1. Triacylglycerol Storage in Lipid Droplets in Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Allmann

    Full Text Available Carbon storage is likely to enable adaptation of trypanosomes to nutritional challenges or bottlenecks during their stage development and migration in the tsetse. Lipid droplets are candidates for this function. This report shows that feeding of T. brucei with oleate results in a 4-5 fold increase in the number of lipid droplets, as quantified by confocal fluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry of BODIPY 493/503-stained cells. The triacylglycerol (TAG content also increased 4-5 fold, and labeled oleate is incorporated into TAG. Fatty acid carbon can thus be stored as TAG in lipid droplets under physiological growth conditions in procyclic T. brucei. β-oxidation has been suggested as a possible catabolic pathway for lipids in T. brucei. A single candidate gene, TFEα1 with coding capacity for a subunit of the trifunctional enzyme complex was identified. TFEα1 is expressed in procyclic T. brucei and present in glycosomal proteomes, Unexpectedly, a TFEα1 gene knock-out mutant still expressed wild-type levels of previously reported NADP-dependent 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity, and therefore, another gene encodes this enzymatic activity. Homozygous Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 null mutant cells show a normal growth rate and an unchanged glycosomal proteome in procyclic T. brucei. The decay kinetics of accumulated lipid droplets upon oleate withdrawal can be fully accounted for by the dilution effect of cell division in wild-type and Δtfeα1/Δtfeα1 cells. The absence of net catabolism of stored TAG in procyclic T. brucei, even under strictly glucose-free conditions, does not formally exclude a flux through TAG, in which biosynthesis equals catabolism. Also, the possibility remains that TAG catabolism is completely repressed by other carbon sources in culture media or developmentally activated in post-procyclic stages in the tsetse.

  2. Testicular pathology, gonadal and epididymal sperm reserves of Yankasa rams infected with experimental Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunusa A. Wada

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to evaluate the pathological effects of trypanosomosis on the testes, gonadal, and epididymal sperm reserves of Yankasa rams for 98 days. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 Yankasa rams, aged between 24 and 30 months and weighed between 22 and 25 kg, were acclimatized for a period of 2-months in a clean fly proof house and were adequately fed and given water ad-libitum. Of the 16 rams, 12 that were clinically fit for the experiment at the end of the acclimatization period were randomly divided into four groups: Groups I, II, III, and IV, each having 3 rams. Groups I and II were each challenged singly with experimental Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Federer strain and Trypanosoma evansi (Sokoto strain, respectively, while Group III was challenged with mixed T. brucei brucei and T. evansi parasites (50% of each species in the infective inoculum and Group IV was left as an uninfected control. Each infected ram received 2 mL of the infected blood containing 2×106 trypomastigotes via the jugular vein, while the control group received 2 mL each, normal saline. Results: All the infected rams developed clinical signs typical of trypanosomosis at varying pre-patent periods. The gross lesions observed in the infected rams in Group II were moderate and more severe in those of Groups I and III. Histological sections of the testes of infected rams (Groups I, II, and III showed moderate (T. evansi-infected group to severe (mixed and T. brucei brucei-infected groups testicular degenerations with reduction in number of spermatogenic cell layers, degenerated seminiferous tubules, congested interlobular spaces, loss of tissue architecture with significant (p<0.01 depletion, and loss of gonadal and epididymal sperm reserves in Groups I and III in comparison to Group II and the control Group IV. No observable clinical signs and histopathological lesions were found in those rams of the control Group IV. Conclusion: The study concluded

  3. Testicular pathology, gonadal and epididymal sperm reserves of Yankasa rams infected with experimental Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Trypanosoma evansi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yunusa A.; Oniye, Sonnie J.; Rekwot, Peter I.; Okubanjo, Oluyinka O.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was conducted to evaluate the pathological effects of trypanosomosis on the testes, gonadal, and epididymal sperm reserves of Yankasa rams for 98 days. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 Yankasa rams, aged between 24 and 30 months and weighed between 22 and 25 kg, were acclimatized for a period of 2-months in a clean fly proof house and were adequately fed and given water ad-libitum. Of the 16 rams, 12 that were clinically fit for the experiment at the end of the acclimatization period were randomly divided into four groups: Groups I, II, III, and IV, each having 3 rams. Groups I and II were each challenged singly with experimental Trypanosoma brucei brucei (Federer strain) and Trypanosoma evansi (Sokoto strain), respectively, while Group III was challenged with mixed T. brucei brucei and T. evansi parasites (50% of each species in the infective inoculum) and Group IV was left as an uninfected control. Each infected ram received 2 mL of the infected blood containing 2×106 trypomastigotes via the jugular vein, while the control group received 2 mL each, normal saline. Results: All the infected rams developed clinical signs typical of trypanosomosis at varying pre-patent periods. The gross lesions observed in the infected rams in Group II were moderate and more severe in those of Groups I and III. Histological sections of the testes of infected rams (Groups I, II, and III) showed moderate (T. evansi-infected group) to severe (mixed and T. brucei brucei-infected groups) testicular degenerations with reduction in number of spermatogenic cell layers, degenerated seminiferous tubules, congested interlobular spaces, loss of tissue architecture with significant (p<0.01) depletion, and loss of gonadal and epididymal sperm reserves in Groups I and III in comparison to Group II and the control Group IV. No observable clinical signs and histopathological lesions were found in those rams of the control Group IV. Conclusion: The study concluded that

  4. Identification of the mitochondrially encoded subunit 6 of F1FO ATPase in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škodová-Sveráková, Ingrid; Horváth, Anton; Maslov, Dmitri A

    2015-06-01

    Kinetoplast maxicircle DNA of trypanosomatids encodes eighteen proteins. RNA editing is required to confer translatability to mRNA for twelve of these. Sequence conservation of the predicted hydrophobic polypeptides indicates that they represent functional components of the respiratory chain. Yet, so far only two of those, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and apocytochrome b of cytochrome c reductase, have been identified with biochemical methods. Here we report on identification of A6 subunit of F1FO ATPase encoded by a pan-edited mRNA in Trypanosoma brucei. The polypeptide was present among the (35)S-labeled mitochondrial translation products characterized by anomalous migration in denaturing 2D gels. It was identified as an ATPase subunit by co-migration with this complex in Blue Native 2D gels. A partial N-terminal sequence of the corresponding polypeptide present in the gel-purified ATPase complex from Leishmania tarentolae was consistent with the predicted A6 sequence. PMID:26276057

  5. Characterization of the mitochondrial inner membrane protein translocator Tim17 from Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Singha, Ujjal K; PEPRAH, EMMANUEL; Williams, Shuntae; Walker, Robert; Saha, Lipi; Chaudhuri, Minu

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translocation machinery in the kinetoplastid parasites, like Trypanosoma brucei, has been characterized poorly. In T. brucei genome data base, one homolog for a protein translocator of mitochondrial inner membrane (Tim) has been found, which is closely related to Tim17 from other species. The T. brucei Tim17 (TbTim17) has a molecular mass 16.2 kDa and it possesses four characteristic transmembrane domains. The protein is localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane. The...

  6. Trypanosoma brucei solanesyl-diphosphate synthase localizes to the mitochondrion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lai, D.-H.; Bontempi, E. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 183, č. 2 (2012), s. 189-192. ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * Sleeping sickness * Ubiquinone * Solanesyl-diphosphate synthase * Digitonin permeabilization * In situ tagging Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.734, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166685112000539

  7. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in Trypanosoma brucei function in mitochondrial ribosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pusnik, Mascha; Small, Ian; Read, Laurie K.; Fabbro, Thomas; Schneider, André

    2008-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR), a degenerate 35-amino-acid motif, defines a novel eukaryotic protein family. Plants have 400 to 500 distinct PPR proteins, whereas other eukaryotes generally have fewer than 5. The few PPR proteins that have been studied have roles in organellar gene expression, probably via direct interaction with RNA. Here we show that the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei encodes 28 distinct PPR proteins, an extraordinarily high number for a nonplant organism. A com...

  8. Changes in blood sugar levels of rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate and diminazene aceturate

    OpenAIRE

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Omamegbe Joseph Omalathebu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) on blood sugar level of infected rats. Methods: The experiment was done with 42 albino rats grouped into 3 groups of 14 members each. Group A was uninfected (control group), Group B was infected with T. brucei and treated with diminazene aceturate, and Group C was infected with T. brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate. Blood samples were collected from the media canthus of the experimental rats on ...

  9. Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial respiratome: Composition and organization in procyclic form

    KAUST Repository

    Acestor, Nathalie

    2011-05-24

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is comprised of four different protein complexes (I-IV), which are responsible for electron transport and generation of proton gradient in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. This proton gradient is then used by F oF 1-ATP synthase (complex V) to produce ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, the respiratory complexes I, II, and III were affinity purified from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic form cells and their composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The results along with those that we previously reported for complexes IV and V showed that the respiratome of Trypanosoma is divergent because many of its proteins are unique to this group of organisms. The studies also identified two mitochondrial subunit proteins of respiratory complex IV that are encoded by edited RNAs. Proteomics data from analyses of complexes purified using numerous tagged component proteins in each of the five complexes were used to generate the first predicted protein-protein interaction network of the Trypanosoma brucei respiratory chain. These results provide the first comprehensive insight into the unique composition of the respiratory complexes in Trypanosoma brucei, an early diverged eukaryotic pathogen. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Single molecule analysis of Trypanosoma brucei DNA replication dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderano, Simone Guedes; Drosopoulos, William C; Quaresma, Marina Mônaco; Marques, Catarina A; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong; McCulloch, Richard; Schildkraut, Carl L; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-03-11

    Eukaryotic genome duplication relies on origins of replication, distributed over multiple chromosomes, to initiate DNA replication. A recent genome-wide analysis of Trypanosoma brucei, the etiological agent of sleeping sickness, localized its replication origins to the boundaries of multigenic transcription units. To better understand genomic replication in this organism, we examined replication by single molecule analysis of replicated DNA. We determined the average speed of replication forks of procyclic and bloodstream form cells and we found that T. brucei DNA replication rate is similar to rates seen in other eukaryotes. We also analyzed the replication dynamics of a central region of chromosome 1 in procyclic forms. We present evidence for replication terminating within the central part of the chromosome and thus emanating from both sides, suggesting a previously unmapped origin toward the 5' extremity of chromosome 1. Also, termination is not at a fixed location in chromosome 1, but is rather variable. Importantly, we found a replication origin located near an ORC1/CDC6 binding site that is detected after replicative stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment, suggesting it may be a dormant origin activated in response to replicative stress. Collectively, our findings support the existence of more replication origins in T. brucei than previously appreciated. PMID:25690894

  11. Tracking autophagy during proliferation and differentiation of Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Proto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent degradation mechanism that sequesters target cargo into autophagosomal vesicles. The Trypanosoma brucei genome contains apparent orthologues of several autophagy-related proteins including an ATG8 family. These ubiquitin-like proteins are required for autophagosome membrane formation, but our studies show that ATG8.3 is atypical. To investigate the function of other ATG proteins, RNAi compatible T. brucei were modified to function as autophagy reporter lines by expressing only either YFP-ATG8.1 or YFP-ATG8.2. In the insect procyclic lifecycle stage, independent RNAi down-regulation of ATG3 or ATG7 generated autophagy-defective mutants and confirmed a pro-survival role for autophagy in the procyclic form nutrient starvation response. Similarly, RNAi depletion of ATG5 or ATG7 in the bloodstream form disrupted autophagy, but did not impede proliferation. Further characterisation showed bloodstream form autophagy mutants retain the capacity to undergo the complex cellular remodelling that occurs during differentiation to the procyclic form and are equally susceptible to dihydroxyacetone-induced cell death as wild type parasites, not supporting a role for autophagy in this cell death mechanism. The RNAi reporter system developed, which also identified TOR1 as a negative regulator controlling YFP-ATG8.2 but not YFP-ATG8.1 autophagosome formation, will enable further targeted analysis of the mechanisms and function of autophagy in the medically relevant bloodstream form of T. brucei.

  12. Comparative genomics of drug resistance in Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Fabrice E; Ludin, Philipp; Arquint, Christian; Schmidt, Remo S; Schaub, Nadia; Kunz Renggli, Christina; Munday, Jane C; Krezdorn, Jessica; Baker, Nicola; Horn, David; Balmer, Oliver; Caccone, Adalgisa; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense is one of the causative agents of human sleeping sickness, a fatal disease that is transmitted by tsetse flies and restricted to Sub-Saharan Africa. Here we investigate two independent lines of T. b. rhodesiense that have been selected with the drugs melarsoprol and pentamidine over the course of 2 years, until they exhibited stable cross-resistance to an unprecedented degree. We apply comparative genomics and transcriptomics to identify the underlying mutations. Only few mutations have become fixed during selection. Three genes were affected by mutations in both lines: the aminopurine transporter AT1, the aquaporin AQP2, and the RNA-binding protein UBP1. The melarsoprol-selected line carried a large deletion including the adenosine transporter gene AT1, whereas the pentamidine-selected line carried a heterozygous point mutation in AT1, G430R, which rendered the transporter non-functional. Both resistant lines had lost AQP2, and both lines carried the same point mutation, R131L, in the RNA-binding motif of UBP1. The finding that concomitant deletion of the known resistance genes AT1 and AQP2 in T. b. brucei failed to phenocopy the high levels of resistance of the T. b. rhodesiense mutants indicated a possible role of UBP1 in melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance. However, homozygous in situ expression of UBP1-Leu(131) in T. b. brucei did not affect the sensitivity to melarsoprol or pentamidine. PMID:26973180

  13. Infeção experimental por Trypanosoma brucei brucei em modelo murino e estudo da eficácia farmacológica do benznidazol

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, João Luís Gomes

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT - TRYPANOSOMA BRUCEI BRUCEI MURINE EXPERIMENTAL MURINE INFECTION AND STUDIES ON PHARMACOLOCICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF BENZNIDAZOLE - African Trypanosomiasis (AT) is a parasitic disease caused by several species of Trypanosoma, transmitted by diptera of the Glossina genus, also known as the tsetse flies. This disease affects humans and animals, in humans takes the name of Sleeping Sickness, and in animals takes the name of Nagana. Diagnosis can be performed by parasite visualization...

  14. Rab23 is a flagellar protein in Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Field Mark C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab small GTPases are important mediators of membrane transport, and orthologues frequently retain similar locations and functions, even between highly divergent taxa. In metazoan organisms Rab23 is an important negative regulator of Sonic hedgehog signaling and is crucial for correct development and differentiation of cellular lineages by virtue of an involvement in ciliary recycling. Previously, we reported that Trypanosoma brucei Rab23 localized to the nuclear envelope 1, which is clearly inconsistent with the mammalian location and function. As T. brucei is unicellular the potential that Rab23 has no role in cell signaling was possible. Here we sought to further investigate the role(s of Rab23 in T. brucei to determine if Rab23 was an example of a Rab protein with divergent function in distinct taxa. Methods/major findings The taxonomic distribution of Rab23 was examined and compared with the presence of flagella/cilia in representative taxa. Despite evidence for considerable secondary loss, we found a clear correlation between a conventional flagellar structure and the presence of a Rab23 orthologue in the genome. By epitope-tagging, Rab23 was localized and found to be present at the flagellum throughout the cell cycle. However, RNAi knockdown did not result in a flagellar defect, suggesting that Rab23 is not required for construction or maintenance of the flagellum. Conclusions The location of Rab23 at the flagellum is conserved between mammals and trypanosomes and the Rab23 gene is restricted to flagellated organisms. These data may suggest the presence of a Rab23-mediated signaling mechanism in trypanosomes.

  15. VSG gene expression site control in insect form Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudenko, G; Blundell, P A; Taylor, M. C.; Kieft, R.; Borst, P

    1994-01-01

    When the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is taken up from mammals by a tse-tse fly, it replaces its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat by a procyclin coat. Transcription of VSG genes stops in the fly, but transcription of sequences derived from the promoter area of the VSG expression site(s) remains high. Whether this is due to continuing high activity of one promoter or to low activity of many promoters was unclear. We have used the small differences between the sequences of diff...

  16. Minimum Information Loss Based Multi-kernel Learning for Flagellar Protein Recognition in Trypanosoma Brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jingyan

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosma brucei (T. Brucei) is an important pathogen agent of African trypanosomiasis. The flagellum is an essential and multifunctional organelle of T. Brucei, thus it is very important to recognize the flagellar proteins from T. Brucei proteins for the purposes of both biological research and drug design. In this paper, we investigate computationally recognizing flagellar proteins in T. Brucei by pattern recognition methods. It is argued that an optimal decision function can be obtained as the difference of probability functions of flagella protein and the non-flagellar protein for the purpose of flagella protein recognition. We propose to learn a multi-kernel classification function to approximate this optimal decision function, by minimizing the information loss of such approximation which is measured by the Kull back-Leibler (KL) divergence. An iterative multi-kernel classifier learning algorithm is developed to minimize the KL divergence for the problem of T. Brucei flagella protein recognition, experiments show its advantage over other T. Brucei flagellar protein recognition and multi-kernel learning methods. © 2014 IEEE.

  17. Effects of DMSO on Diminazene Efficacy in Experimental Murine T. brucei Infection

    OpenAIRE

    K.I. Eghianruwa; Anika, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) daily supplementation on diminazene treatment of trypanosomosis. Four groups of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rats received 7.0 mg/kg diminazene aceturate on day 7 post infection. Three of the four groups received different doses of DMSO (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg, respectively) in addition to diminazene treatment. The changes in hematological parameters and the weights of liver, spleen and heart caused by T. brucei infection we...

  18. Antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger on Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected Wistar mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Kobo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was carried out to determine the in vivo antitrypanosomal effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ginger in Trypanosoma brucei brucei-infected mice. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five mice were randomly allocated into five groups of five animals each. Group I and II were given Tween 80 (1 ml/kg and diminazene aceturate (3.5 mg/kg to serve as untreated and treated controls, respectively. Groups III-V received the extract at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight, respectively. All treatments were given for 6 consecutive days and through the oral route. The mean body weight, mean survival period and daily level of parasitaemia were evaluated. Results: Acute toxicity showed the extract to be relatively safe. There was an insignificant increase in body weight and survival rate of mice treated with the extract. The level of parasitaemia in the extract treated groups was decreased. Conclusion: This study shows the in vivo potential of methanolic extract of Z. officinale in the treatment of trypanosomiasis.

  19. Human brain aldehyde reductases: relationship to succinic semialdehyde reductase and aldose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-08-01

    Human brain contains multiple forms of aldehyde-reducing enzymes. One major form (AR3), as previously shown, has properties that indicate its identity with NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase isolated from brain and other organs of various species; i.e., low molecular weight, use of NADPH as the preferred cofactor, and sensitivity to inhibition by barbiturates. A second form of aldehyde reductase ("SSA reductase") specifically reduces succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to produce gamma-hydroxybutyrate. This enzyme form has a higher molecular weight than AR3, and uses NADH as well as NADPH as cofactor. SSA reductase was not inhibited by pyrazole, oxalate, or barbiturates, and the only effective inhibitor found was the flavonoid quercetine. Although AR3 can also reduce SSA, the relative specificity of SSA reductase may enhance its in vivo role. A third form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, appears to be comparable to aldose reductases characterized in several species, on the basis of its activity pattern with various sugar aldehydes and its response to characteristic inhibitors and activators, as well as kinetic parameters. This enzyme is also the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of biogenic amines. These studies suggest that the various forms of human brain aldehyde reductases may have specific physiological functions. PMID:6778961

  20. Hidden Markov Models for Gene Sequence Classification: Classifying the VSG genes in the Trypanosoma brucei Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Mesa, Andrea; Basterrech, Sebastián; Guerberoff, Gustavo; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an application of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) for pattern recognition on genome sequences. We apply HMM for identifying genes encoding the Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) in the genomes of Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) and other African trypanosomes. These are parasitic protozoa causative agents of sleeping sickness and several diseases in domestic and wild animals. These parasites have a peculiar strategy to evade the host's immune system that consists in periodicall...

  1. The Phosphoproteome of Bloodstream Form Trypanosoma brucei, Causative Agent of African Sleeping Sickness

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Isabelle R. E.; Martin, David M. A.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Lamont, Douglas; Barber, Jonathan D.; Mehlert, Angela; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African sleeping sickness and related animal diseases, and it has over 170 predicted protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory mechanism for cellular function that, thus far, has been studied in T.brucei principally through putative kinase mRNA knockdown and observation of the resulting phenotype. However, despite the relatively large kinome of this organism and the demonstrated essentiality of severa...

  2. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (group 1) resistance to human trypanosome lytic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Rudo; Capewell, Paul; Turner, C Michael R; Veitch, Nicola J; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen

    2010-09-14

    Human innate immunity against most African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma brucei brucei, is mediated by a minor subclass of toxic serum HDL, called trypanosome lytic factor-1 (TLF-1). This HDL contains two primate specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-1 and haptoglobin (Hp)-related protein, as well as apolipoprotein A-1. These assembled proteins provide a powerful defense against trypanosome infection. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense causes human African sleeping sickness because it has evolved an inhibitor of TLF-1, serum resistance-associated (SRA) protein. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense lacks the SRA gene, yet it infects humans. As transfection of T. b. gambiense (group 1) is not possible, we initially used in vitro-selected TLF-1-resistant T. b. brucei to examine SRA-independent mechanisms of TLF-1 resistance. Here we show that TLF-1 resistance in T. b. brucei is caused by reduced expression of the Hp/Hb receptor gene (TbbHpHbR). Importantly, T. b. gambiense (group 1) also showed a marked reduction in uptake of TLF-1 and a corresponding decrease in expression of T. b. gambiense Hp/Hb receptor (TbgHpHbR). Ectopic expression of TbbHpHbR in TLF-1-resistant T. b. brucei rescued TLF-1 uptake, demonstrating that decreased TbbHpHbR expression conferred TLF-1 resistance. Ectopic expression of TbgHpHbR in TLF-1-resistant T. b. brucei failed to rescue TLF-1 killing, suggesting that coding sequence changes altered Hp/Hb receptor binding affinity for TLF-1. We propose that the combination of coding sequence mutations and decreased expression of TbgHpHbR directly contribute to parasite evasion of human innate immunity and infectivity of group 1 T. b. gambiense. PMID:20805508

  3. Natively Inhibited Trypanosoma brucei Cathepsin B Structure Determined by Using an X-ray Laser

    OpenAIRE

    L. Redecke; Nass, K.; DePonte, D. P.; White, T A; Rehders, D.; Barty, A.; F. Stellato; Liang, M; Barends, T. R. M.; Boutet, S.; Williams, G J; Messerschmidt, M.; Seibert, M. M.; Aquila, A.; Arnlund, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Trypanosoma brucei cysteine protease cathepsin B (TbCatB), which is involved in host protein degradation, is a promising target to develop new treatments against sleeping sickness, a fatal disease caused by this protozoan parasite. The structure of the mature, active form of TbCatB has so far not provided sufficient information for the design of a safe and specific drug against T. brucei. By combining two recent innovations, in vivo crystallization and serial femtosecond crystallography, ...

  4. The Molecular Dynamics of Trypanosoma brucei UDP-Galactose 4′-Epimerase: A Drug Target for African Sleeping Sickness

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Aaron J; Durrant, Jacob D.; Pierce, Levi C. T.; McCorvie, Thomas J; Timson, David J; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    During the past century, several epidemics of human African trypanosomiasis, a deadly disease caused by the protist Trypanosoma brucei, have afflicted sub-Saharan Africa. Over 10 000 new victims are reported each year, with hundreds of thousands more at risk. As current drug treatments are either highly toxic or ineffective, novel trypanocides are urgently needed. The T. brucei galactose synthesis pathway is one potential therapeutic target. Although galactose is essential for T. brucei survi...

  5. Trypanosoma brucei has a canonical mitochondrial processing peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desy, Silvia; Schneider, André; Mani, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Most mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane proteins have N-terminal presequences which serve as import signals. After import these presequences are cleaved by the heterodimeric mitochondrial processing peptidase. In the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial protein import relies on presequences that are much shorter than in other eukaryotes. How they are processed is unknown. The trypansomal genome encodes four open reading frames that are annotated as mitochondrial processing peptidase. Here we show that RNAi-mediated ablation of two of these proteins leads to a growth arrest and a concomitant accumulation of mitochondrial precursor proteins inside mitochondria. Import experiments using isolated mitochondria from RNAi cell lines reveals that both proteins are required for efficient import and processing of the tested precursor protein. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation demonstrates that the proteins interact with each other. In summary these results show that we have identified the two subunits of the trypanosomal mitochondrial processing peptidase. PMID:22841752

  6. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions sepiapterin reductase deficiency sepiapterin reductase ...

  7. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase is an essential enzyme for the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloatti, Andres [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Gupta, Shreedhara; Gualdron-Lopez, Melisa; Nguewa, Paul A. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Altabe, Silvia G. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Deumer, Gladys; Wallemacq, Pierre [Department of Clinical Chemistry, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, LTAP, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M. [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute and Laboratory of Biochemistry, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Uttaro, Antonio D., E-mail: toniuttaro@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Biologia Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Inhibiting {Delta}9 desaturase drastically changes T. brucei's fatty-acid composition. {yields} Isoxyl specifically inhibits the {Delta}9 desaturase causing a growth arrest. {yields} RNA interference of desaturase expression causes a similar effect. {yields} Feeding T. brucei-infected mice with Isoxyl decreases the parasitemia. {yields} 70% of Isoxyl-treated mice survived the trypanosome infection. -- Abstract: Trypanosoma brucei, the etiologic agent of sleeping sickness, is exposed to important changes in nutrients and temperature during its life cycle. To adapt to these changes, the fluidity of its membranes plays a crucial role. This fluidity, mediated by the fatty-acid composition, is regulated by enzymes named desaturases. We have previously shown that the oleoyl desaturase is essential for Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei. In this work, we present experimental support for the relevance of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) for T. brucei's survival, in both its insect or procyclic-form (PCF) and bloodstream-form (BSF) stages. We evaluated this essentiality in two different ways: by generating a SCD knocked-down parasite line using RNA interference, and by chemical inhibition of the enzyme with two compounds, Isoxyl and a thiastearate with the sulfur atom at position 10 (10-TS). The effective concentration for 50% growth inhibition (EC{sub 50}) of PCF was 1.0 {+-} 0.2 {mu}M for Isoxyl and 5 {+-} 2 {mu}M for 10-TS, whereas BSF appeared more susceptible with EC{sub 50} values 0.10 {+-} 0.03 {mu}M (Isoxyl) and 1.0 {+-} 0.6 {mu}M (10-TS). RNA interference showed to be deleterious for both stages of the parasite. In addition, T. brucei-infected mice were fed with Isoxyl, causing a reduction of the parasitemia and an increase of the rodents' survival.

  8. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase is an essential enzyme for the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Inhibiting Δ9 desaturase drastically changes T. brucei's fatty-acid composition. → Isoxyl specifically inhibits the Δ9 desaturase causing a growth arrest. → RNA interference of desaturase expression causes a similar effect. → Feeding T. brucei-infected mice with Isoxyl decreases the parasitemia. → 70% of Isoxyl-treated mice survived the trypanosome infection. -- Abstract: Trypanosoma brucei, the etiologic agent of sleeping sickness, is exposed to important changes in nutrients and temperature during its life cycle. To adapt to these changes, the fluidity of its membranes plays a crucial role. This fluidity, mediated by the fatty-acid composition, is regulated by enzymes named desaturases. We have previously shown that the oleoyl desaturase is essential for Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei. In this work, we present experimental support for the relevance of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) for T. brucei's survival, in both its insect or procyclic-form (PCF) and bloodstream-form (BSF) stages. We evaluated this essentiality in two different ways: by generating a SCD knocked-down parasite line using RNA interference, and by chemical inhibition of the enzyme with two compounds, Isoxyl and a thiastearate with the sulfur atom at position 10 (10-TS). The effective concentration for 50% growth inhibition (EC50) of PCF was 1.0 ± 0.2 μM for Isoxyl and 5 ± 2 μM for 10-TS, whereas BSF appeared more susceptible with EC50 values 0.10 0.03 μM (Isoxyl) and 1.0 ± 0.6 μM (10-TS). RNA interference showed to be deleterious for both stages of the parasite. In addition, T. brucei-infected mice were fed with Isoxyl, causing a reduction of the parasitemia and an increase of the rodents' survival.

  9. Co-infection with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei increases severity of malaria and trypanosomiasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademola, Isaiah Oluwafemi; Odeniran, Paul Olalekan

    2016-07-01

    Individuals in natural populations may be infected with multiple different parasites at a time. These parasites may interact with each other or act independently in the host, and this may result to varying outcomes on host health and survival. This study therefore aimed at investigating the health impact of co-infection of mice with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei. Forty Swiss albino mice (14-17g) were divided into four groups of ten. Mice in groups A and B received 10(6)P. berghei and groups B and C 10(5)T. brucei, while group D were uninfected. The co-infected mice had higher P. berghei and T. brucei parasitaemia, compared with the mono-infected mice. The co-infected mice had significantly (p<0.05) lower survival rate compared with the mono-infected mice. Co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei resulted in rapid P. berghei and T. brucei development and increased parasitaemia. The leukocyte numbers significantly (p<0.05) reduced on days 12 and 15 post infection among P. berghei infected mice, in the presence or absence of T. brucei. Anaemia and hypoglycaemia was more severe in the co-infected mice. Therefore, co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei may increase pathologic impact to the host by increasing parasitaemia. PMID:27021269

  10. Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Brown, Abigail E N A; Bangs, James D

    2015-11-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress mechanism to cope with misfolded proteins in the early secretory pathway, the hallmark being transcriptional upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones such as BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Despite the lack of transcriptional regulation and the absence of the classical UPR machinery, African trypanosomes apparently respond to persistent ER stress by a UPR-like response, including upregulation of BiP, and a related spliced leader silencing (SLS) response whereby SL RNA transcription is shut down. Initially observed by knockdown of the secretory protein translocation machinery, both responses are also induced by chemical agents known to elicit UPR in mammalian cells (H. Goldshmidt, D. Matas, A. Kabi, A. Carmi, R. Hope, S. Michaeli, PLoS Pathog 6:e1000731, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000731). As these findings were generated primarily in procyclic-stage trypanosomes, we have investigated both responses in pathogenic bloodstream-stage parasites. RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of the core translocon subunit Trypanosoma brucei Sec61α (TbSec61α) failed to induce either response. Interestingly, cell growth halted within 16 h of silencing, but sufficient TbSec61α remained to allow full competence for translocation of nascent secretory proteins for up to 24 h, indicating that replication is finely coupled with the capacity to synthesize and transport secretory cargo. Tunicamycin and thapsigargin at concentrations compatible with short-term (4 h) and long-term (24 h) viability also failed to induce any of the indicators of UPR-like or SLS responses. Dithiothreitol (DTT) was lethal at all concentrations tested. These results indicate that UPR-like and SLS responses to persistent ER stress do not occur in bloodstream-stage trypanosomes. PMID:26318397

  11. Telomere length affects the frequency and mechanism of antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galadriel A Hovel-Miner

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a master of antigenic variation and immune response evasion. Utilizing a genomic repertoire of more than 1000 Variant Surface Glycoprotein-encoding genes (VSGs, T. brucei can change its protein coat by "switching" from the expression of one VSG to another. Each active VSG is monoallelically expressed from only one of approximately 15 subtelomeric sites. Switching VSG expression occurs by three predominant mechanisms, arguably the most significant of which is the non-reciprocal exchange of VSG containing DNA by duplicative gene conversion (GC. How T. brucei orchestrates its complex switching mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Recent work has demonstrated that an exogenous DNA break in the active site could initiate a GC based switch, yet the source of the switch-initiating DNA lesion under natural conditions is still unknown. Here we investigated the hypothesis that telomere length directly affects VSG switching. We demonstrate that telomerase deficient strains with short telomeres switch more frequently than genetically identical strains with long telomeres and that, when the telomere is short, switching preferentially occurs by GC. Our data supports the hypothesis that a short telomere at the active VSG expression site results in an increase in subtelomeric DNA breaks, which can initiate GC based switching. In addition to their significance for T. brucei and telomere biology, the findings presented here have implications for the many diverse pathogens that organize their antigenic genes in subtelomeric regions.

  12. Biosynthesis of SUMOylated Proteins in Bacteria Using the Trypanosoma brucei Enzymatic System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ana Iribarren

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification with the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO is conserved in eukaryotic organisms and plays important regulatory roles in proteins affecting diverse cellular processes. In Trypanosoma brucei, member of one of the earliest branches in eukaryotic evolution, SUMO is essential for normal cell cycle progression and is likely to be involved in the epigenetic control of genes crucial for parasite survival, such as those encoding the variant surface glycoproteins. Molecular pathways modulated by SUMO have started to be discovered by proteomic studies; however, characterization of functional consequences is limited to a reduced number of targets. Here we present a bacterial strain engineered to produce SUMOylated proteins, by transferring SUMO from T. brucei together with the enzymes essential for its activation and conjugation. Due to the lack of background in E. coli, this system is useful to express and identify SUMOylated proteins directly in cell lysates by immunoblotting, and SUMOylated targets can be eventually purified for biochemical or structural studies. We applied this strategy to describe the ability of TbSUMO to form chains in vitro and to detect SUMOylation of a model substrate, PCNA both from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and from T. brucei. To further validate targets, we applied an in vitro deconjugation assay using the T. brucei SUMO-specific protease capable to revert the pattern of modification. This system represents a valuable tool for target validation, mutant generation and functional studies of SUMOylated proteins in trypanosomatids.

  13. A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor conveys innate immunity to Trypanosoma brucei in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; De Muylder, Géraldine; Nielsen, Marianne J; Pays, Annette; Tebabi, Patricia; Dieu, Marc; Raes, Martine; Moestrup, Soren K; Pays, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is lysed by apolipoprotein L-I, a component of human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles that are also characterized by the presence of haptoglobin-related protein. We report that this process is mediated by a parasite glycoprotein receptor, which bi...

  14. The phosphoproteome of bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei, causative agent of African sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Isabelle R E; Martin, David M A; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Lamont, Douglas; Barber, Jonathan D; Mehlert, Angela; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2009-07-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African sleeping sickness and related animal diseases, and it has over 170 predicted protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory mechanism for cellular function that, thus far, has been studied in T.brucei principally through putative kinase mRNA knockdown and observation of the resulting phenotype. However, despite the relatively large kinome of this organism and the demonstrated essentiality of several T. brucei kinases, very few specific phosphorylation sites have been determined in this organism. Using a gel-free, phosphopeptide enrichment-based proteomics approach we performed the first large scale phosphorylation site analyses for T.brucei. Serine, threonine, and tyrosine phosphorylation sites were determined for a cytosolic protein fraction of the bloodstream form of the parasite, resulting in the identification of 491 phosphoproteins based on the identification of 852 unique phosphopeptides and 1204 phosphorylation sites. The phosphoproteins detected in this study are predicted from their genome annotations to participate in a wide variety of biological processes, including signal transduction, processing of DNA and RNA, protein synthesis, and degradation and to a minor extent in metabolic pathways. The analysis of phosphopeptides and phosphorylation sites was facilitated by in-house developed software, and this automated approach was validated by manual annotation of spectra of the kinase subset of proteins. Analysis of the cytosolic bloodstream form T. brucei kinome revealed the presence of 44 phosphorylated protein kinases in our data set that could be classified into the major eukaryotic protein kinase groups by applying a multilevel hidden Markov model library of the kinase catalytic domain. Identification of the kinase phosphorylation sites showed conserved phosphorylation sequence motifs in several kinase activation segments, supporting the view that

  15. Trypanosoma brucei: Differential requirement of membrane potential for import of proteins into mitochondria in two developmental stages

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Shuntae; Saha, Lipi; Singha, Ujjal K; Chaudhuri, Minu

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosome alternative oxidase (TAO) and the cytochrome oxidase (COX) are two developmentally regulated terminal oxidases of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we have compared the import of TAO and cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (COIV), two stage specific nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins, into the bloodstream and procyclic form mitochondria of T. brucei to understand the import processes in two different developmental stages. Under in vitro conditio...

  16. The lysosomotropic drug LeuLeu-OMe induces lysosome disruption and autophagy-independent cell death in Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Hazel Xinyu Koh; Htay Mon Aye; Tan, Kevin S W; He, Cynthia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trypanosoma brucei is a blood-borne, protozoan parasite that causes African sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals. The current chemotherapy relies on only a handful of drugs that display undesirable toxicity, poor efficacy and drug-resistance. In this study, we explored the use of lysosomotropic drugs to induce bloodstream form T. brucei cell death via lysosome destabilization. Methods: We measured drug concentrations that inhibit cell proliferation by 50% (...

  17. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  18. The molecular dynamics of Trypanosoma brucei UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase:a drug target for African sleeping sickness

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Aaron J; Durrant, Jacob D.; Pierce, Levi C. T.; McCorvie, Thomas J; Timson, David J; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    During the past century, several epidemics of human African trypanosomiasis, a deadly disease caused by the protist Trypanosoma brucei, have afflicted sub-Saharan Africa. Over 10 000 new victims are reported each year, with hundreds of thousands more at risk. As current drug treatments are either highly toxic or ineffective, novel trypanocides are urgently needed. The T. brucei galactose synthesis pathway is one potential therapeutic target. Although galactose is essential for T. brucei survi...

  19. Trypanosoma brucei Infection in asymptomatic greater Kudus (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) on a game ranch in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Siamudaala, Victor; Munyeme, Musso; Nambota, Andrew; Mutoloki, Stephen; Matandiko, Wigganson

    2010-03-01

    Trypomastogotes of Trypanosoma brucei were detected from 4 asymptomatic kudus (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) on a game ranch located approximately 45 km north east of Lusaka, Zambia. Blood smears examined from 14 wildlife species comprising of the impala (Aepyceros melampus), Kafue lechwe (kobus leche kafuensis), sable antelope (Hippotragus niger), tsessebe (Damaliscus lunatus), warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), puku (Kobus vardoni), zebra (Equus burchelli), waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus), bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus), reedbuck (Redunca arundinum), wilderbeest (Connochaetes taurinus), hartebeest (Alcephelus lichtensteini), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), and kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) showed that only the kudu had T. brucei. Although game ranching has emerged to be a successful ex-situ conservation strategy aimed at saving the declining wildlife population in the National Parks, our findings suggest that it has the potential of aiding the re-distribution of animal diseases. Hence, there is a need for augmenting wildlife conservation with disease control strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease transmission between wildlife and domestic animals. PMID:20333288

  20. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wink

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, quinine, ajmalicine, ergotamine, harmine, vinblastine, vincristine, colchicine, chaconine, demissidine and veratridine induced programmed cell death, whereas quinolizidine, tropane, terpene and piperidine alkaloids were mostly inactive. Effective PCD induction (EC50 below 10 µM was caused in T. brucei by chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, and chaconine. The active alkaloids can be characterized by their general property to inhibit protein biosynthesis, to intercalate DNA, to disturb membrane fluidity or to inhibit microtubule formation.

  1. Identification of Paralogous Life-Cycle Stage Specific Cytoskeletal Proteins in the Parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Neil Portman; Keith Gull

    2014-01-01

    The life cycle of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, is characterised by a transition between insect and mammalian hosts representing very different environments that present the parasite with very different challenges. These challenges are met by the expression of life-cycle stage-specific cohorts of proteins, which function in systems such as metabolism and immune evasion. These life-cycle transitions are also accompanied by morphological rearrangements orchestrated by microtubule ...

  2. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase B Knockdown Compromises Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Form Infectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Inês Loureiro; Joana Faria; Christine Clayton; Sandra Macedo-Ribeiro; Nuno Santarém; Nilanjan Roy; Anabela Cordeiro-da-Siva; Joana Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive dru...

  3. An Atypical Mitochondrial Carrier That Mediates Drug Action in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macêdo, Juan P; Schumann Burkard, Gabriela; Niemann, Moritz; Barrett, Michael P; Vial, Henri; Mäser, Pascal; Roditi, Isabel; Schneider, André; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Elucidating the mechanism of action of trypanocidal compounds is an important step in the development of more efficient drugs against Trypanosoma brucei. In a screening approach using an RNAi library in T. brucei bloodstream forms, we identified a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, TbMCP14, as a prime candidate mediating the action of a group of anti-parasitic choline analogs. Depletion of TbMCP14 by inducible RNAi in both bloodstream and procyclic forms increased resistance of parasites towards the compounds by 7-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to uninduced cells. In addition, down-regulation of TbMCP14 protected bloodstream form mitochondria from a drug-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, over-expression of the carrier in procyclic forms increased parasite susceptibility more than 13-fold. Metabolomic analyses of parasites over-expressing TbMCP14 showed increased levels of the proline metabolite, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, suggesting a possible involvement of TbMCP14 in energy production. The generation of TbMCP14 knock-out parasites showed that the carrier is not essential for survival of T. brucei bloodstream forms, but reduced parasite proliferation under standard culture conditions. In contrast, depletion of TbMCP14 in procyclic forms resulted in growth arrest, followed by parasite death. The time point at which parasite proliferation stopped was dependent on the major energy source, i.e. glucose versus proline, in the culture medium. Together with our findings that proline-dependent ATP production in crude mitochondria from TbMCP14-depleted trypanosomes was reduced compared to control mitochondria, the study demonstrates that TbMCP14 is involved in energy production in T. brucei. Since TbMCP14 belongs to a trypanosomatid-specific clade of mitochondrial carrier family proteins showing very poor similarity to mitochondrial carriers of mammals, it may represent an interesting target for drug action or targeting. PMID

  4. Genetic validation of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases as drug targets in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalidas, Savitha; Cestari, Igor; Monnerat, Severine; Li, Qiong; Regmi, Sandesh; Hasle, Nicholas; Labaied, Mehdi; Parsons, Marilyn; Stuart, Kenneth; Phillips, Margaret A

    2014-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is an important public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Current drugs are unsatisfactory, and new drugs are being sought. Few validated enzyme targets are available to support drug discovery efforts, so our goal was to obtain essentiality data on genes with proven utility as drug targets. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known drug targets for bacterial and fungal pathogens and are required for protein synthesis. Here we survey the essentiality of eight Trypanosoma brucei aaRSs by RNA interference (RNAi) gene expression knockdown, covering an enzyme from each major aaRS class: valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) (class Ia), tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS-1) (class Ib), arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS) (class Ic), glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) (class 1c), threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) (class IIa), asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) (class IIb), and phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (α and β) (PheRS) (class IIc). Knockdown of mRNA encoding these enzymes in T. brucei mammalian stage parasites showed that all were essential for parasite growth and survival in vitro. The reduced expression resulted in growth, morphological, cell cycle, and DNA content abnormalities. ThrRS was characterized in greater detail, showing that the purified recombinant enzyme displayed ThrRS activity and that the protein localized to both the cytosol and mitochondrion. Borrelidin, a known inhibitor of ThrRS, was an inhibitor of T. brucei ThrRS and showed antitrypanosomal activity. The data show that aaRSs are essential for T. brucei survival and are likely to be excellent targets for drug discovery efforts. PMID:24562907

  5. The promoter for a variant surface glycoprotein gene expression site in Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Zomerdijk, J C; Ouellette, M; ten Asbroek, A L; Kieft, R.; Bommer, A M; Clayton, C E; Borst, P

    1990-01-01

    The variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene 221 of Trypanosoma brucei is transcribed as part of a 60 kb expression site (ES). We have identified the promoter controlling this multigene transcription unit by the use of 221 chromosome-enriched DNA libraries and VSG gene 221 expression site specific transcripts. The start of transcription was determined by hybridization and RNase protection analysis of nascent RNA. The 5' ends of the major transcripts coming from the initiation region m...

  6. Reconstitution of a surface transferrin binding complex in insect form Trypanosoma brucei.

    OpenAIRE

    Ligtenberg, M.J.; Bitter, W.; Kieft, R.; Steverding, D; Janssen, H.; Calafat, J.; Borst, P

    1994-01-01

    In the bloodstream of the mammalian host, Trypanosoma brucei takes up host transferrin by means of a high-affinity uptake system, presumably a transferrin receptor. Transferrin-binding activity is seen in the flagellar pocket and is absent in insect form trypanosomes. By transfection we have reconstituted a transferrin-binding complex in insect form trypanosomes. Formation of this complex requires the products of two genes that are part of a variant surface glycoprotein expression site, expre...

  7. An Atypical Mitochondrial Carrier That Mediates Drug Action in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P de Macêdo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the mechanism of action of trypanocidal compounds is an important step in the development of more efficient drugs against Trypanosoma brucei. In a screening approach using an RNAi library in T. brucei bloodstream forms, we identified a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, TbMCP14, as a prime candidate mediating the action of a group of anti-parasitic choline analogs. Depletion of TbMCP14 by inducible RNAi in both bloodstream and procyclic forms increased resistance of parasites towards the compounds by 7-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to uninduced cells. In addition, down-regulation of TbMCP14 protected bloodstream form mitochondria from a drug-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, over-expression of the carrier in procyclic forms increased parasite susceptibility more than 13-fold. Metabolomic analyses of parasites over-expressing TbMCP14 showed increased levels of the proline metabolite, pyrroline-5-carboxylate, suggesting a possible involvement of TbMCP14 in energy production. The generation of TbMCP14 knock-out parasites showed that the carrier is not essential for survival of T. brucei bloodstream forms, but reduced parasite proliferation under standard culture conditions. In contrast, depletion of TbMCP14 in procyclic forms resulted in growth arrest, followed by parasite death. The time point at which parasite proliferation stopped was dependent on the major energy source, i.e. glucose versus proline, in the culture medium. Together with our findings that proline-dependent ATP production in crude mitochondria from TbMCP14-depleted trypanosomes was reduced compared to control mitochondria, the study demonstrates that TbMCP14 is involved in energy production in T. brucei. Since TbMCP14 belongs to a trypanosomatid-specific clade of mitochondrial carrier family proteins showing very poor similarity to mitochondrial carriers of mammals, it may represent an interesting target for drug

  8. A Pre-clinical Animal Model of Trypanosoma brucei Infection Demonstrating Cardiac Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    McCarroll, Charlotte S; Rossor, Charlotte L.; Linda R Morrison; Morrison, Liam J.; Loughrey, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary African trypanosomiasis (AT) is a disease caused by the single-celled protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. In humans, AT causes neurological problems including sleep disturbances, which give the disease its colloquial name of “sleeping sickness”. Much of the focus of AT research has been on the neurological deficits, but other major organs are also affected, including the heart. Previous studies in humans and animals with AT have identified heart abnormalities such as contrac...

  9. Mitochondrial tRNA import in Trypanosoma brucei is independent of thiolation and the Rieske protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paris, Zdeněk; RUBIO, M. A. T.; Lukeš, Julius; Alfonzo, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 7 (2009), s. 1398-1406. ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/06/1558; GA MŠk LC07032; GA MŠk 2B06129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : T. brucei * tRNA import * 2-thiolation * RIC * Rieske * Fe-S cluster Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.198, year: 2009

  10. Proteins and lipids of glycosomal membranes from Leishmania tarentolae and Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Colasante; Frank Voncken; Theresa Manful; Thomas Ruppert; Tielens, Aloysius G. M.; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Christine Clayton

    2013-01-01

    In kinetoplastid protists, several metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and purine salvage, are located in glycosomes, which are microbodies that are evolutionarily related to peroxisomes. With the exception of some potential transporters for fatty acids, and one member of the mitochondrial carrier protein family, proteins that transport metabolites across the glycosomal membrane have yet to be identified. We show here that the phosphatidylcholine species composition of Trypanosoma brucei...

  11. Molecular variation of Trypanosoma brucei subspecies as revealed by AFLP fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Agbo, E.E.C.; Majiwa, P.A.O.; Claassen, H.J.H.M.; Pas, te, M.F.W.

    2002-01-01

    Genetic analysis of Trypanosoma spp. depends on the detection of variation between strains. We have used the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique to develop a convenient and reliable method for genetic characterization of Trypanosome (sub)species. AFLP accesses multiple independent sites within the genome and would allow a better definition of the relatedness of different Trypanosome (sub)species. Nine isolates (3 from each T. brucei subspecies) were tested with 40 AFLP pri...

  12. Wild fauna as a probable animal reservoir for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Njiokou, F.; Laveissière, Claude; Simo, G.; Nkinin, S.; Grébaut, Pascal; Cuny, Gérard; Herder, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    In order to Study the existence of a wild animal reservoir for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in South Cameroon, blood was collected from wild animals in three human African trypanosomiasis foci and from a nonendemic control area. The 1142 wild animals sampled belonged to 36 different species pertaining to eight orders (407 primates, 347 artiodactyls, 265 rodents, 54 pangolins, 53 carnivores, 11 Saurians and crocodilians, and five hyraxes). QBC (R) and KIVI tests detected trypanosomes on 1.7% (...

  13. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei)

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Wink; Vera Rosenkranz

    2008-01-01

    The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD) in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S) was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, c...

  14. Structure of a Trypanosoma brucei α/β-hydrolase fold protein with unknown function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. brucei gene Tb10.6k15.0140 codes for an α/β-hydrolase fold protein of unknown function. The 2.2 Å crystal structure shows that members of this sequence family retain a conserved Ser residue at the expected site of a catalytic nucleophile, but that trypanosomatid sequences lack structural homologs for the other expected residues of the catalytic triad. The structure of a structural genomics target protein, Tbru020260AAA from Trypanosoma brucei, has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å using multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction at the Se K edge. This protein belongs to Pfam sequence family PF08538 and is only distantly related to previously studied members of the α/β-hydrolase fold family. Structural superposition onto representative α/β-hydrolase fold proteins of known function indicates that a possible catalytic nucleophile, Ser116 in the T. brucei protein, lies at the expected location. However, the present structure and by extension the other trypanosomatid members of this sequence family have neither sequence nor structural similarity at the location of other active-site residues typical for proteins with this fold. Together with the presence of an additional domain between strands β6 and β7 that is conserved in trypanosomatid genomes, this suggests that the function of these homologs has diverged from other members of the fold family

  15. Identification, Characterization, and Classification of Genes Encoding Perchlorate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Kelly S.; Shang, Ching; Chakraborty, Romy; Belchik, Sara M.; Coates, John D.; Achenbach, Laurie A.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of perchlorate to chlorite, the first enzymatic step in the bacterial reduction of perchlorate, is catalyzed by perchlorate reductase. The genes encoding perchlorate reductase (pcrABCD) in two Dechloromonas species were characterized. Sequence analysis of the pcrAB gene products revealed similarity to α- and β-subunits of microbial nitrate reductase, selenate reductase, dimethyl sulfide dehydrogenase, ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, and chlorate reductase, all of which are type II m...

  16. Sepiapterin Reductase Deficiency: Mimic of Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at University of California at San Diego, and 22 other US national and international centers studied the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a cohort of 38 patients with sepiapterin reductase deficiency (SRD).

  17. Multiple aldehyde reductases of human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-01-01

    Human brain contains four forms of aldehyde reducing enzymes. One major activity, designated AR3, has properties indicating its identity with the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase, EC 1.1.1.2. The other major form of human brain enzyme, AR1, which is also NADPH-dependent, reduces both aldehyde and ketone-containing substrates, including vitamin K3 (menadione) and daunorubicin, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. This enzyme is very sensitive to inhibition by the flavonoids quercitrin and quercetine, and may be analogous to a daunorubicin reductase previously described in liver of other species. One minor form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, demonstrates substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity which suggest its similarity to aldose reductases found in lens and other tissues of many species. This enzyme, which can also use NADH as cofactor to some extent, is the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of the biogenic amines. The fourth human brain enzyme ("SSA reductase") differs from the other forms in its ability to use NADH as well as or better than NADPH as cofactor, and in its molecular weight, which is nearly twice that of the other forms. It is quite specific for succinic semialdehyde (SSA) as substrate, and was found to be significantly inhibited only by quercetine and quercitrin. AR3 can also reduce SSA, and both enzymes may contribute to the production of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in vivo. These results indicate that the human brain aldehyde reductases can play relatively specific physiologic roles. PMID:7424738

  18. Anti-trypanosomal Activity of Potential Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glycolytic Pathway Enzymes Selected by Docking Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarisse Musanabaganwa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, a potentially fatal protozoan infection caused by tsetse-fl mediated transmission of Trypanosoma brucei (T. Brucei, is largely recognized as a neglected disease. The repertoire of drugs that is effective against the infection is limited and all drugs have several drawbacks including high level of toxicity, diffiult administration regimens, and the resurgence of resistance. At present the biology of the parasite is well studied and a number of technologies are now available which can aid in the identifiation of potential drug targets. This review identifies putative inhibitors of trypanosomal glycolytic enzymes.

  19. Ethanolamine phosphoglycerol attachment to eEF1A is not essential for normal growth of Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Greganova; Peter Bütikofer

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) is the only protein modified by ethanolamine phosphoglycerol (EPG). In mammals and plants, EPG is attached to conserved glutamate residues located in eEF1A domains II and III, whereas in the unicellular eukaryote, Trypanosoma brucei, a single EPG moiety is attached to domain III. A biosynthetic precursor of EPG and structural requirements for EPG attachment to T. brucei eEF1A have been reported, but the role of this unique protein modification in cellul...

  20. Mitochondrial tRNA import in the parasitic protozoon "Trypanosoma brucei" and its consequences on mitochondrial translation

    OpenAIRE

    Charrière, Fabien; Schneider, André; Linder, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Le parasite protozoaire Trypanosoma brucei est l’agent pathogène responsable de la maladie du sommeil chez l’homme. En plus de son importance dans le domaine de la lutte contre les maladies tropicales, T. brucei est également un excellent modèle pour la recherche fondamentale car il présente beaucoup de caractéristiques qui lui sont propres. Par exemple, aucun ARN de transfert (ARNt) n’est codé dans le génome mitochondrial. Pour cette raison, les ARNts nécessaires au processus de traduction m...

  1. Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein Interaction with Trypanosoma brucei 14-3-3 Proteins that Display Atypical Target Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Masahiro; Yasuda, Kouichi; Uemura, Haruki; Yasaka, Natsumi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Sei, Yoshitatsu; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Fukuma, Toshihide

    2010-01-01

    Background The 14-3-3 proteins are structurally conserved throughout eukaryotes and participate in protein kinase signaling. All 14-3-3 proteins are known to bind to evolutionally conserved phosphoserine-containing motifs (modes 1 and/or 2) with high affinity. In Trypanosoma brucei, 14-3-3I and II play pivotal roles in motility, cytokinesis and the cell cycle. However, none of the T. brucei 14-3-3 binding proteins have previously been documented. Methodology/Principal Findings Initially we sh...

  2. Identification of the ISWI Chromatin Remodeling Complex of the Early Branching Eukaryote Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanne, Tara M; Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Ridewood, Sophie; Ling, Alexandra; Witmer, Kathrin; Kushwaha, Manish; Wiesler, Simone; Wickstead, Bill; Wood, Jennifer; Rudenko, Gloria

    2015-11-01

    ISWI chromatin remodelers are highly conserved in eukaryotes and are important for the assembly and spacing of nucleosomes, thereby controlling transcription initiation and elongation. ISWI is typically associated with different subunits, forming specialized complexes with discrete functions. In the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes African sleeping sickness, TbISWI down-regulates RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression sites (ESs), which are monoallelically expressed. Here, we use tandem affinity purification to determine the interacting partners of TbISWI. We identify three proteins that do not show significant homology with known ISWI-associated partners. Surprisingly, one of these is nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP), which we had previously shown to play a role in ES control. In addition, we identify two novel ISWI partners, regulator of chromosome condensation 1-like protein (RCCP) and phenylalanine/tyrosine-rich protein (FYRP), both containing protein motifs typically found on chromatin proteins. Knockdown of RCCP or FYRP in bloodstream form T. brucei results in derepression of silent variant surface glycoprotein ESs, as had previously been shown for TbISWI and NLP. All four proteins are expressed and interact with each other in both major life cycle stages and show similar distributions at Pol I-transcribed loci. They are also found at Pol II strand switch regions as determined with ChIP. ISWI, NLP, RCCP, and FYRP therefore appear to form a single major ISWI complex in T. brucei (TbIC). This reduced complexity of ISWI regulation and the presence of novel ISWI partners highlights the early divergence of trypanosomes in evolution. PMID:26378228

  3. Trypanosoma brucei modifies the tsetse salivary composition, altering the fly feeding behavior that favors parasite transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Van Den Abbeele

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies are the notorious transmitters of African trypanosomiasis, a disease caused by the Trypanosoma parasite that affects humans and livestock on the African continent. Metacyclic infection rates in natural tsetse populations with Trypanosoma brucei, including the two human-pathogenic subspecies, are very low, even in epidemic situations. Therefore, the infected fly/host contact frequency is a key determinant of the transmission dynamics. As an obligate blood feeder, tsetse flies rely on their complex salivary potion to inhibit host haemostatic reactions ensuring an efficient feeding. The results of this experimental study suggest that the parasite might promote its transmission through manipulation of the tsetse feeding behavior by modifying the saliva composition. Indeed, salivary gland Trypanosoma brucei-infected flies display a significantly prolonged feeding time, thereby enhancing the likelihood of infecting multiple hosts during the process of a single blood meal cycle. Comparison of the two major anti-haemostatic activities i.e. anti-platelet aggregation and anti-coagulation activity in these flies versus non-infected tsetse flies demonstrates a significant suppression of these activities as a result of the trypanosome-infection status. This effect was mainly related to the parasite-induced reduction in salivary gland gene transcription, resulting in a strong decrease in protein content and related biological activities. Additionally, the anti-thrombin activity and inhibition of thrombin-induced coagulation was even more severely hampered as a result of the trypanosome infection. Indeed, while naive tsetse saliva strongly inhibited human thrombin activity and thrombin-induced blood coagulation, saliva from T. brucei-infected flies showed a significantly enhanced thrombinase activity resulting in a far less potent anti-coagulation activity. These data clearly provide evidence for a trypanosome-mediated modification of the tsetse

  4. Evidence for a degradosome-like complex in the mitochondria of Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Mattiacio, Jonelle L.; Read, Laurie K.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA turnover in yeast involves the degradosome, composed of DSS-1 exoribonuclease and SUV3 RNA helicase. Here, we describe a degradosome-like complex, containing SUV3 and DSS-1 homologues, in the early branching protozoan, Trypanosoma brucei. TbSUV3 is mitochondrially localized and co-sediments with TbDSS-1 on glycerol gradients. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrates that TbSUV3 and TbDSS-1 associate in a stable complex, which differs from the yeast degradosome in that it is not s...

  5. Antitrypanosomal alkaloids from Polyalthia suaveolens (Annonaceae): their effects on three selected glycolytic enzymes of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngantchou, Igor; Nyasse, Barthélemy; Denier, Colette; Blonski, Casimir; Hannaert, Véronique; Schneider, Bernd

    2010-06-15

    In continuation of our study on medicinal plants of Cameroon, stem barks of Polyalthia suaveolens were phytochemically studied. This investigation yielded a new indolosesquiterpene alkaloid, named polysin (1) and four hitherto known alkaloids (2-5). Polysin (1) appeared as a competitive reversible inhibitor (K(i)=10 microM) of phosphofructo kinase (PFK) of Trypanosoma brucei with respect to fructose-6-phosphate (K(i)/K(M)=0.05) and could be used in the design of new trypanocidal drugs. The other isolated compounds (2-5) also exhibited interesting inhibitory effects on selected glycolytic enzymes (PFK, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and aldolase). PMID:20529682

  6. A Gateway® compatible vector for gene silencing in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Kalidas, Savitha; Li, Qiong; Margaret A Phillips

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference is the most rapid method for generation of conditional knockdown mutants in Trypanosoma brucei. The dual T7 promoter (pZJM) and the stem-loop vectors have been widely used to generate stable inducible RNAi cell lines with the latter providing tighter regulatory control. However, the steps for cloning stem-loop constructs are cumbersome requiring either multiple cloning steps or multi-fragment ligation reactions. We report the development of a vector (pTrypRNAiGate) derived fr...

  7. Development of Simplified Heterocyclic Acetogenin Analogues as Potent and Selective Trypanosoma brucei Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, Gordon J; Fraser, Andrew L; Gould, Eoin R; King, Elizabeth F; Menzies, Stefanie K; Morris, Joanne C; Thomson, Marie I; Tulloch, Lindsay B; Zacharova, Marija K; Smith, Terry K

    2016-07-19

    Neglected tropical diseases caused by parasitic infections are an ongoing and increasing concern. They are a burden to human and animal health, having the most devastating effect on the world's poorest countries. Building upon our previously reported triazole analogues, in this study we describe the synthesis and biological testing of other novel heterocyclic acetogenin-inspired derivatives, namely 3,5-isoxazoles, furoxans, and furazans. Several of these compounds maintain low-micromolar levels of inhibition against Trypanosoma brucei, whilst having no observable inhibitory effect on mammalian cells, leading to the possibility of novel lead compounds for selective treatment. PMID:27283448

  8. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  9. Mitochondrial translation factors of Trypanosoma brucei: elongation factor-Tu has a unique subdomain that is essential for its function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cristodero, M.; Mani, J.; Oeljeklaus, S.; Aeberhard, L.; Hashimi, Hassan; Ramrath, D.J.F.; Lukeš, Julius; Warscheid, B.; Schneider, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2013), s. 744-755. ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mitochondrial translation * Trypanosoma brucei * EF-Tu Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.026, year: 2013

  10. KREX2 is not essential for either procyclic or bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Carnes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei require RNA editing for maturation and translation. The edited RNAs primarily encode proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These parasites undergo extensive changes in energy metabolism between the insect and bloodstream stages which are mirrored by alterations in RNA editing. Two U-specific exonucleases, KREX1 and KREX2, are both present in protein complexes (editosomes that catalyze RNA editing but the relative roles of each protein are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The requirement for KREX2 for RNA editing in vivo was assessed in both procyclic (insect and bloodstream form parasites by methods that use homologous recombination for gene elimination. These studies resulted in null mutant cells in which both alleles were eliminated. The viability of these cells demonstrates that KREX2 is not essential in either life cycle stage, despite certain defects in RNA editing in vivo. Furthermore, editosomes isolated from KREX2 null cells require KREX1 for in vitro U-specific exonuclease activity. CONCLUSIONS: KREX2 is a U-specific exonuclease that is dispensable for RNA editing in vivo in T. brucei BFs and PFs. This result suggests that the U deletion activity, which is required for RNA editing, is primarily mediated in vivo by KREX1 which is normally found associated with only one type of editosome. The retention of the KREX2 gene implies a non-essential role or a role that is essential in other life cycle stages or conditions.

  11. The TgsGP gene is essential for resistance to human serum in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capewell, Paul; Clucas, Caroline; DeJesus, Eric; Kieft, Rudo; Hajduk, Stephen; Veitch, Nicola; Steketee, Pieter C; Cooper, Anneli; Weir, William; MacLeod, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes 97% of all cases of African sleeping sickness, a fatal disease of sub-Saharan Africa. Most species of trypanosome, such as T. b. brucei, are unable to infect humans due to the trypanolytic serum protein apolipoprotein-L1 (APOL1) delivered via two trypanosome lytic factors (TLF-1 and TLF-2). Understanding how T. b. gambiense overcomes these factors and infects humans is of major importance in the fight against this disease. Previous work indicated that a failure to take up TLF-1 in T. b. gambiense contributes to resistance to TLF-1, although another mechanism is required to overcome TLF-2. Here, we have examined a T. b. gambiense specific gene, TgsGP, which had previously been suggested, but not shown, to be involved in serum resistance. We show that TgsGP is essential for resistance to lysis as deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense renders the parasites sensitive to human serum and recombinant APOL1. Deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense modified to uptake TLF-1 showed sensitivity to TLF-1, APOL1 and human serum. Reintroducing TgsGP into knockout parasite lines restored resistance. We conclude that TgsGP is essential for human serum resistance in T. b. gambiense. PMID:24098129

  12. The TgsGP gene is essential for resistance to human serum in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Capewell

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes 97% of all cases of African sleeping sickness, a fatal disease of sub-Saharan Africa. Most species of trypanosome, such as T. b. brucei, are unable to infect humans due to the trypanolytic serum protein apolipoprotein-L1 (APOL1 delivered via two trypanosome lytic factors (TLF-1 and TLF-2. Understanding how T. b. gambiense overcomes these factors and infects humans is of major importance in the fight against this disease. Previous work indicated that a failure to take up TLF-1 in T. b. gambiense contributes to resistance to TLF-1, although another mechanism is required to overcome TLF-2. Here, we have examined a T. b. gambiense specific gene, TgsGP, which had previously been suggested, but not shown, to be involved in serum resistance. We show that TgsGP is essential for resistance to lysis as deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense renders the parasites sensitive to human serum and recombinant APOL1. Deletion of TgsGP in T. b. gambiense modified to uptake TLF-1 showed sensitivity to TLF-1, APOL1 and human serum. Reintroducing TgsGP into knockout parasite lines restored resistance. We conclude that TgsGP is essential for human serum resistance in T. b. gambiense.

  13. Transcription of the procyclic acidic repetitive protein genes of Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procyclic acidic repetitive protein (parp) genes of Trypanosoma brucei encode a small family of abundant surface proteins whose expression is restricted to the procyclic form of the parasite. They are found at two unlinked loci, parpA and parpB; transcription of both loci is developmentally regulated. The region of homology upstream of the A and B parp genes is only 640 base pairs long and may contain sequences responsible for transcriptional initiation and regulation. Transcription upstream of this putative promoter region is not developmentally regulated and is much less active than that of the parp genes; the polymerase responsible is inhibited by alpha-amanitin, whereas that transcribing the parp genes is not. Transcription of the parp genes is strongly stimulated by low levels of UV irradiation. The putative parp promoter, when placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, is sufficient to cause production of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in a T. brucei DNA transformation assay. Taken together, these results suggest that a promoter for an alpha-amanitin-resistant RNA polymerase lies less than 600 nucleotides upstream of the parp genes

  14. Action of trypanosomal lipolytic enzymes on the membrane-form variant surface glycoprotein of trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The membrane-form variant surface glycoprotein (mfVSG) of Trypanosoma brucei is anchored in the plasma membrane by myristoyl residues ester-linked to glycerophosphoethanolamine. The authors have extracted [myristoyl-3H]-mfVSG from trypanosomes incubated with [3H]-myristate and have isolated the protein by reverse phase HPLC. The extraction solvent, 20% acetonitrile in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid, prevents lipolysis of the mfVSG during isolation. The mfVSG was shown to be homogeneous by SDS-PAGE, with an apparent molecular mass ratio of 66,000. No other proteins were labelled with [3H]-myristate. The major lipolytic enzyme of T. brucei, phospholipase A1, did not release myristate from mfVSG to any significant extent, though the enzyme readily hydrolyzes ester linkages of myristoyl phospholipids and p-nitrophenylmyristate. Trypanosomal membranes contain a phosphodiesterase which releases [3H]-1,2-diglyceride from [3H]-myristoyl-mfVSG. The phospholipase A1 can be separated from the myristoyl-releasing activity (phosphodiesterase) by centrifugation, affinity chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography

  15. Action of trypanosomal lipolytic enzymes on the membrane-form variant surface glycoprotein of trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellors, A.; Forsberg, C.M.; Hambrey, P.N.

    1986-05-01

    The membrane-form variant surface glycoprotein (mfVSG) of Trypanosoma brucei is anchored in the plasma membrane by myristoyl residues ester-linked to glycerophosphoethanolamine. The authors have extracted (myristoyl-/sup 3/H)-mfVSG from trypanosomes incubated with (/sup 3/H)-myristate and have isolated the protein by reverse phase HPLC. The extraction solvent, 20% acetonitrile in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid, prevents lipolysis of the mfVSG during isolation. The mfVSG was shown to be homogeneous by SDS-PAGE, with an apparent molecular mass ratio of 66,000. No other proteins were labelled with (/sup 3/H)-myristate. The major lipolytic enzyme of T. brucei, phospholipase A/sub 1/, did not release myristate from mfVSG to any significant extent, though the enzyme readily hydrolyzes ester linkages of myristoyl phospholipids and p-nitrophenylmyristate. Trypanosomal membranes contain a phosphodiesterase which releases (/sup 3/H)-1,2-diglyceride from (/sup 3/H)-myristoyl-mfVSG. The phospholipase A/sub 1/ can be separated from the myristoyl-releasing activity (phosphodiesterase) by centrifugation, affinity chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography.

  16. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  17. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  18. A Gene of the β3-Glycosyltransferase Family Encodes N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase II Function in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damerow, Manuela; Graalfs, Frauke; Güther, M Lucia S; Mehlert, Angela; Izquierdo, Luis; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2016-06-24

    The bloodstream form of the human pathogen Trypanosoma brucei expresses oligomannose, paucimannose, and complex N-linked glycans, including some exceptionally large poly-N-acetyllactosamine-containing structures. Despite the presence of complex N-glycans in this organism, no homologues of the canonical N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I or II genes can be found in the T. brucei genome. These genes encode the activities that initiate the elaboration of the Manα1-3 and Manα1-6 arms, respectively, of the conserved trimannosyl-N-acetylchitobiosyl core of N-linked glycans. Previously, we identified a highly divergent T. brucei N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (TbGnTI) among a set of putative T. brucei glycosyltransferase genes belonging to the β3-glycosyltransferase superfamily (Damerow, M., Rodrigues, J. A., Wu, D., Güther, M. L., Mehlert, A., and Ferguson, M. A. (2014) J. Biol. Chem. 289, 9328-9339). Here, we demonstrate that TbGT15, another member of the same β3-glycosyltransferase family, encodes an equally divergent N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II (TbGnTII) activity. In contrast to multicellular organisms, where GnTII activity is essential, TbGnTII null mutants of T. brucei grow in culture and are still infectious to animals. Characterization of the large poly-N-acetyllactosamine containing N-glycans of the TbGnTII null mutants by methylation linkage analysis suggests that, in wild-type parasites, the Manα1-6 arm of the conserved trimannosyl core may carry predominantly linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains, whereas the Manα1-3 arm may carry predominantly branched poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains. These results provide further detail on the structure and biosynthesis of complex N-glycans in an important human pathogen and provide a second example of the adaptation by trypanosomes of β3-glycosyltransferase family members to catalyze β1-2 glycosidic linkages. PMID:27189951

  19. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864... reductase assay. (a) Identification. A glutathione reductase assay is a device used to determine the... fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease,...

  20. Characterization of the chlorate reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Schiltz, E.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were al

  1. Design, Mathematical Modelling, Construction and Testing of Synthetic Gene Network Oscillators to Establish Roseobacter Clade Bacteria and the Protozoan Trypanosoma brucei as Synthetic Biology Chassis.

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this project is to establish Roseobacter marine bacteria and Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) protozoa as synthetic biology chassis. This work addresses the gap within synthetic biology resulting from the limited choice of host cells available for use in practice. This was done by developing synthetic bacterial and trypanosomal genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) which function as an oscillator as well as by developing the necessary protocols and set-ups to allow for the analysis of G...

  2. Effect of experimental single Ancylostoma caninum and mixed infections of Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma congolense on the humoural immune response to anti-rabies vaccination in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Anene Boniface Maduka

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of Ancylostoma caninum (A. caninum) and trypanosome parasites on the immune response to vaccination in dogs in endemic environments. Methods: Sixteen dogs for the experiment were grouped into 4 of 4 members each. Group I was the uninfected control one, and GPII was infected with A. caninum; GPIII was infected with A. caninum/Trypanosoma congolense (T. congolense), and GPIV was infected with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei)/A. caninum. The dogs w...

  3. Evaluation of the In Vitro Efficacy of Artemisia annua, Rumex abyssinicus, and Catha edulis Forsk Extracts in Cancer and Trypanosoma brucei Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worku, Netsanet; Mossie, Andualem; Stich, August; Daugschies, Arwid; Trettner, Susanne; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    The current drugs against sleeping sickness are derived from cancer chemotherapeutic approaches. Herein, we aimed at evaluating the in vitro effect of alcoholic extracts of Artemisia annua (AMR), Rumex abyssinicus (RMA), and Catha edulis Forsk (CEF) on proliferation/viability of 1321N1 astrocytoma, MCF-7 breast cancer, THP-1 leukemia, and LNCaP, Du-145, and PC-3 prostate cancer cells and on Trypanosoma brucei cells. Proliferation of tumor cells was evaluated by WST-1 assay and viability/behaviour of T. brucei by cell counting and light microscopy. CEF was the most efficient growth inhibitor in comparison to AMR and RMA. Nevertheless, in LNCaP and THP-1 cells, all extracts significantly inhibited tumor growth at 3 μg/mL. All extracts inhibited proliferation of T. brucei cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Microscopic analysis revealed that 95% of the T. brucei cells died when exposed to 33 μg/mL CEF for 3 hrs. Similar results were obtained using 33 μg/mL AMR for 6 hrs. In case of RMA, however, higher concentrations were necessary to obtain similar effects on T. brucei. This demonstrates the antitumor efficacy of these extracts as well as their ability to dampen viability and proliferation of T. brucei, suggesting a common mechanism of action on highly proliferative cells, most probably by targeting cell metabolism. PMID:25937964

  4. Biological activities of xanthatin from Xanthium strumarium leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibret, Endalkachew; Youns, Mahamoud; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Wink, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the biological activities of the major bioactive compound, xanthatin, and other compounds from Xanthium strumarium (Asteraceae) leaves. Inhibition of bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei brucei and leukaemia HL-60 cell proliferation was assessed using resazurin as a vital stain. Xanthatin was found to be the major and most active compound against T. b. brucei with an IC(50) value of 2.63 µg/mL and a selectivity index of 20. The possible mode of action of xanthatin was further evaluated. Xanthatin showed antiinflammatory activity by inhibiting both PGE(2) synthesis (24% inhibition) and 5-lipoxygenase activity (92% inhibition) at concentrations of 100 µg/mL and 97 µg/mL, respectively. Xanthatin exhibited weak irreversible inhibition of parasite specific trypanothione reductase. Unlike xanthatin, diminazene aceturate and ethidium bromide showed strong DNA intercalation with IC(50) values of 26.04 µg/mL and 44.70 µg/mL, respectively. Substantial induction of caspase 3/7 activity in MIA PaCa-2 cells was observed after 6 h of treatment with 100 µg/mL of xanthatin. All these data taken together suggest that xanthatin exerts its biological activity by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting both PGE(2) synthesis and 5-lipoxygenase activity thereby avoiding unwanted inflammation commonly observed in diseases such as trypanosomiasis. PMID:21953905

  5. Effects of Trypanosoma brucei tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetases silencing by RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Torcoroma García

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinetoplast genetic code deviates from the universal code in that 90% of mitochondrial tryptophans are specified by UGA instead of UGG codons. A single nucleus-encoded tRNA Trp(CCA is used by both nuclear and mitochondria genes, since all kinetoplast tRNAs are imported into the mitochondria from the cytoplasm. To allow decoding of the mitochondrial UGA codons as tryptophan, the tRNA Trp(CCA anticodon is changed to UCA by an editing event. Two tryptophanyl tRNA synthetases (TrpRSs have been identified in Trypanosoma brucei: TbTrpRS1 and TbTrpRS2 which localize to the cytoplasm and mitochondria respectively. We used inducible RNA interference (RNAi to assess the role of TbTrpRSs. Our data validates previous observations of TrpRS as potential drug design targets and investigates the RNAi effect on the mitochondria of the parasite.

  6. Extracellular Vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei Mediate Virulence Factor Transfer and Cause Host Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szempruch, Anthony J; Sykes, Steven E; Kieft, Rudo; Dennison, Lauren; Becker, Allison C; Gartrell, Anzio; Martin, William J; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Almeida, Igor C; Hajduk, Stephen L; Harrington, John M

    2016-01-14

    Intercellular communication between parasites and with host cells provides mechanisms for parasite development, immune evasion, and disease pathology. Bloodstream African trypanosomes produce membranous nanotubes that originate from the flagellar membrane and disassociate into free extracellular vesicles (EVs). Trypanosome EVs contain several flagellar proteins that contribute to virulence, and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense EVs contain the serum resistance-associated protein (SRA) necessary for human infectivity. T. b. rhodesiense EVs transfer SRA to non-human infectious trypanosomes, allowing evasion of human innate immunity. Trypanosome EVs can also fuse with mammalian erythrocytes, resulting in rapid erythrocyte clearance and anemia. These data indicate that trypanosome EVs are organelles mediating non-hereditary virulence factor transfer and causing host erythrocyte remodeling, inducing anemia. PMID:26771494

  7. Trypanosoma brucei: Enrichment by UV of intergenic transcripts from the variable surface glycoprotein gene expression site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression site for the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene AnTat 1.3A of Trypanosoma brucei is 45 kilobases long and encompasses seven expression site-associated genes (ESAGs). After UV irradiation, several large transcripts from the putative promoter region were strongly enriched. We report that one such major transcript starts near the poly(A) addition site of the first gene (ESAG 7), spans the intergenic region, and extends to the poly(A) addition site of the second gene (ESAG 6), thus bypassing the normal 3' splice site of the ESAG 6 mRNA. Since this transcript is spliced, we conclude that UV irradiation does not inhibit splicing but stabilizes unstable processing products. This demonstrates that at least some intergenic regions of the VSG gene expression site are continuously transcribed in accordance with a polycistronic transcription model

  8. Protein functional links in Trypanosoma brucei, identified by gene fusion analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trimpalis Philip

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domain or gene fusion analysis is a bioinformatics method for detecting gene fusions in one organism by comparing its genome to that of other organisms. The occurrence of gene fusions suggests that the two original genes that participated in the fusion are functionally linked, i.e. their gene products interact either as part of a multi-subunit protein complex, or in a metabolic pathway. Gene fusion analysis has been used to identify protein functional links in prokaryotes as well as in eukaryotic model organisms, such as yeast and Drosophila. Results In this study we have extended this approach to include a number of recently sequenced protists, four of which are pathogenic, to identify fusion linked proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. We have also examined the evolution of the gene fusion events identified, to determine whether they can be attributed to fusion or fission, by looking at the conservation of the fused genes and of the individual component genes across the major eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages. We find relatively limited occurrence of gene fusions/fissions within the protist lineages examined. Our results point to two trypanosome-specific gene fissions, which have recently been experimentally confirmed, one fusion involving proteins involved in the same metabolic pathway, as well as two novel putative functional links between fusion-linked protein pairs. Conclusions This is the first study of protein functional links in T. brucei identified by gene fusion analysis. We have used strict thresholds and only discuss results which are highly likely to be genuine and which either have already been or can be experimentally verified. We discuss the possible impact of the identification of these novel putative protein-protein interactions, to the development of new trypanosome therapeutic drugs.

  9. Processing of the glycosomal matrix-protein import receptor PEX5 of Trypanosoma brucei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Michels, Paul A.M., E-mail: paul.michels@uclouvain.be [Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Most eukaryotic cells have a single gene for the peroxin PEX5. ► PEX5 is sensitive to in vitro proteolysis in distantly related organisms. ► TbPEX5 undergoes N-terminal truncation in vitro and possibly in vivo. ► Truncated TbPEX5 is still capable of binding PTS1-containing proteins. ► PEX5 truncation is physiologically relevant or an evolutionary conserved artifact. -- Abstract: Glycolysis in kinetoplastid protists such as Trypanosoma brucei is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Glycosomal matrix-protein import involves a cytosolic receptor, PEX5, which recognizes the peroxisomal-targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) present at the C-terminus of the majority of matrix proteins. PEX5 appears generally susceptible to in vitro proteolytic processing. On western blots of T. brucei, two PEX5 forms are detected with apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa and 72 kDa. 5′-RACE-PCR showed that TbPEX5 is encoded by a unique transcript that can be translated into a protein of maximally 72 kDa. However, recombinant PEX5 migrates aberrantly in SDS–PAGE with an apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa, similarly as observed for the native peroxin. In vitro protease susceptibility analysis of native and {sup 35}S-labelled PEX5 showed truncation of the 100 kDa form at the N-terminal side by unknown parasite proteases, giving rise to the 72 kDa form which remains functional for PTS1 binding. The relevance of these observations is discussed.

  10. Secondary Metabolites from Vietnamese Marine Invertebrates with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Phuong Thao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 < 5.0 μg/mL. Among the compounds isolated from these extracts, laevigatol B (1 from Lobophytum crassum and L. laevigatum, (24S-ergost-4-ene-3-one (2 from Sinularia dissecta, astropectenol A (3 from Astropecten polyacanthus, and cholest-8-ene-3β,5α,6β,7α-tetraol (4 from Diadema savignyi showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM. Laevigatol B (1 and 5α-cholest-8(14-ene-3β,7α-diol (5 exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  11. Population genetics of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense: clonality and diversity within and between foci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig W Duffy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are unusual among pathogenic protozoa in that they can undergo their complete morphological life cycle in the tsetse fly vector with mating as a non-obligatory part of this development. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which infects humans and livestock in East and Southern Africa, has classically been described as a host-range variant of the non-human infective Trypanosoma brucei that occurs as stable clonal lineages. We have examined T. b. rhodesiense populations from East (Uganda and Southern (Malawi Africa using a panel of microsatellite markers, incorporating both spatial and temporal analyses. Our data demonstrate that Ugandan T. b. rhodesiense existed as clonal populations, with a small number of highly related genotypes and substantial linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci. However, these populations were not stable as the dominant genotypes changed and the genetic diversity also reduced over time. Thus these populations do not conform to one of the criteria for strict clonality, namely stability of predominant genotypes over time, and our results show that, in a period in the mid 1990s, the previously predominant genotypes were not detected but were replaced by a novel clonal population with limited genetic relationship to the original population present between 1970 and 1990. In contrast, the Malawi T. b. rhodesiense population demonstrated significantly greater diversity and evidence for frequent genetic exchange. Therefore, the population genetics of T. b. rhodesiense is more complex than previously described. This has important implications for the spread of the single copy T. b. rhodesiense gene that allows human infectivity, and therefore the epidemiology of the human disease, as well as suggesting that these parasites represent an important organism to study the influence of optional recombination upon population genetic dynamics.

  12. Trypanocidal action of bisphosphonium salts through a mitochondrial target in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam A.M. Alkhaldi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipophilic bisphosphonium salts are among the most promising antiprotozoal leads currently under investigation. As part of their preclinical evaluation we here report on their mode of action against African trypanosomes, the etiological agents of sleeping sickness. The bisphosphonium compounds CD38 and AHI-9 exhibited rapid inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei growth, apparently the result of cell cycle arrest that blocked the replication of mitochondrial DNA, contained in the kinetoplast, thereby preventing the initiation of S-phase. Incubation with either compound led to a rapid reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP levels decreased by approximately 50% within 1 h. Between 4 and 8 h, cellular calcium levels increased, consistent with release from the depolarized mitochondria. Within the mitochondria, the Succinate Dehydrogenase complex (SDH was investigated as a target for bisphosphonium salts, but while its subunit 1 (SDH1 was present at low levels in the bloodstream form trypanosomes, the assembled complex was hardly detectable. RNAi knockdown of the SDH1 subunit produced no growth phenotype, either in bloodstream or in the procyclic (insect forms and we conclude that in trypanosomes SDH is not the target for bisphosphonium salts. Instead, the compounds inhibited ATP production in intact mitochondria, as well as the purified F1 ATPase, to a level that was similar to 1 mM azide. Co-incubation with azide and bisphosphonium compounds did not inhibit ATPase activity more than either product alone. The results show that, in T. brucei, bisphosphonium compounds do not principally act on succinate dehydrogenase but on the mitochondrial FoF1 ATPase.

  13. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial cytochrome b-c1 complex inhibit the cyanide-insensitive respiration of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrens, J F; Bickar, D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-01

    The cyanide-insensitive respiration of bloodstream trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei (75 +/- 8 nmol O2 min-1(mg protein)-1) is completely inhibited by the mitochondrial ubiquinone-like inhibitors 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (UHNQ) and 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole (UHDBT). The Ki values for UHDBT (30 nM) and UHNQ (2 microM) are much lower than the reported Ki for salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) (5 microM), a widely used inhibitor of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase. UHNQ also stimulated the glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent reduction of phenazine methosulfate, demonstrating that the site of UHNQ inhibition is on the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-insensitive respiration of T. brucei. These results suggest that a ubiquinone-like compound may act as an electron carrier between the two enzymatic components of the cyanide-insensitive glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase. PMID:3016533

  14. In vitro investigation of Brazilian Cerrado plant extract activity against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charneau, Sébastien; de Mesquita, Mariana Laundry; Bastos, Izabela Marques Dourado; Santana, Jaime Martins; de Paula, José Elias; Grellier, Philippe; Espindola, Laila Salmen

    2016-06-01

    The threatened Brazilian Cerrado biome is an important biodiversity hotspot but still few explored that constitutes a potential reservoir of molecules to treat infectious diseases. We selected eight Cerrado plant species for screening against the erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum, human intracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi and bloodstream forms of T. brucei gambiense, and for their cytotoxicity upon the rat L6-myoblast cell line. Bioassays were performed with 37 hexane, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts prepared from different plant organs. Activities against parasites were observed for 24 extracts: 9 with anti-P. falciparum, 4 with anti-T. cruzi and 11 with anti-T. brucei gambiense activities. High anti-protozoal activity (IC50 values knowledge essential for Cerrado conservation and sustainable development. PMID:26222897

  15. High-resolution complex of papain with remnants of a cysteine protease inhibitor derived from Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Alphey, Magnus S.; Hunter, William N.

    2006-01-01

    Attempts to cocrystallize the cysteine protease papain derived from the latex of Carica papaya with an inhibitor of cysteine proteases (ICP) from Trypanosoma brucei were unsuccessful. However, crystals of papain that diffracted to higher resolution, 1.5 Å, than other crystals of this archetypal cysteine protease were obtained, so the analysis was continued. Surprisingly, the substrate-binding cleft was occupied by two short peptide fragments which have been assigned as remnants of ICP. Compar...

  16. A target-based high throughput screen yields Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase small molecule inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK, an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the gamma-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were approximately 20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03brucei parasites, Leishmania promastigotes, and mammalian cell lines. Analysis of two structurally related compounds, ebselen and SID 17387000, revealed that both were mixed inhibitors of TbHK1 with respect to ATP. Additionally, both compounds inhibited parasite lysate-derived HK activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome.

  17. Dynamics of Mitochondrial RNA-Binding Protein Complex in Trypanosoma brucei and Its Petite Mutant under Optimized Immobilization Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huang, Zhenqiu; Kaltenbrunner, S.; Šimková, Eva; Staněk, David; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2014), s. 1232-1240. ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : mitochondrion * Trypanosoma brucei * YFP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 2.820, year: 2014

  18. A structural domain mediates attachment of ethanolamine phosphoglycerol to eukaryotic elongation factor 1A in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Greganova

    Full Text Available Ethanolamine phosphoglycerol (EPG represents a protein modification that so far has only been found in eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A. In mammals and plants, EPG is covalently attached to two conserved glutamate residues located in domains II and III of eEF1A. In contrast, Trypanosoma brucei eEF1A contains a single EPG attached to Glu362 in domain III. The sequence and/or structural requirements for covalent linkage of EPG to eEF1A have not been determined for any organism. Using a combination of biosynthetic labelling of parasites with tritiated ethanolamine and mass spectrometry analyses, we demonstrate that replacement of Glu362 in T. brucei eEF1A by site-directed mutagenesis prevents EPG attachment, whereas single or multiple amino acid substitutions around the attachment site are not critical. In addition, by expressing a series of eEF1A deletion mutants in T. brucei procyclic forms, we demonstrate that a peptide consisting of 80 amino acids of domain III of eEF1A is sufficient for EPG attachment to occur. Furthermore, EPG addition also occurs if domain III of eEF1A is fused to a soluble reporter protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report addressing amino acid sequence, or structure, requirements for EPG modification of eEF1A in any organism. Using T. brucei as a model organism, we show that amino acid substitutions around the modification site are not critical for EPG attachment and that a truncated version of domain III of eEF1A is sufficient to mediate EPG addition.

  19. Diagnosis of human trypanosomiasis, due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in central Africa, by the polymerase chain reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Penchenier, Laurent; Simo, G.; Grébaut, Pascal; Nkinin, S.; Laveissière, Claude; Herder, Stéphane

    2000-01-01

    During a mass screening of sleeping sickness conducted in 1998 and 1999, and involving 27,932 persons in Cameroon and the Central African Republic, we tested the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on whole blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis due to #Trypanosoma brucei gambiense$. The 1858 samples obtained were from 4 groups : 155 infected patients, 1432 serological suspects detected by the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT), 222 negative controls living in th...

  20. Trypanosoma brucei 29-13 strain is inducible in but not permissive for the tsetse fly vector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herder, S.; Votýpka, Jan; Jirků, Milan; Rádrová, J.; Janzen, C. J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 1 (2007), s. 111-114. ISSN 0014-4894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009; GA MŠk 2B06129 Grant ostatní: MŠk(CZ) Barrande 2-06-28 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * tsetse * Glossina * GFP * Transmission * midgut infection * tetracycline Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2007

  1. Functional dissection of T. brucei Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1 and investigation of its development as a therapeutic target

    OpenAIRE

    Ruberto, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei undergoes developmentally regulated morphological and biochemical changes during its life cycle, being transmitted between the mammalian host and the tsetse fly. It is generally recognized that cellular responses to environmental changes are mediated through signalling pathways, but our understanding of trypanosome signal transduction during differentiation is limited. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1 (TbPTP1) is the one of the few factors identified to b...

  2. Ab initio identification of novel regulatory elements in the genome of Trypanosoma brucei by Bayesian inference on sequence segmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rapid increase in the availability of genome information has created considerable demand for both comparative and ab initio predictive bioinformatic analyses. The biology laid bare in the genomes of many organisms is often novel, presenting new challenges for bioinformatic interrogation. A paradigm for this is the collected genomes of the kinetoplastid parasites, a group which includes Trypanosoma brucei the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. These genomes, though outwardly simple in organisation and gene content, have historically challenged many theories for gene expression regulation in eukaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Here we utilise a Bayesian approach to identify local changes in nucleotide composition in the genome of T. brucei. We show that there are several elements which are found at the starts and ends of multicopy gene arrays and that there are compositional elements that are common to all intergenic regions. We also show that there is a composition-inversion element that occurs at the position of the trans-splice site. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The nature of the elements discovered reinforces the hypothesis that context dependant RNA secondary structure has an important influence on gene expression regulation in Trypanosoma brucei.

  3. SCREENING OF HMG CO A REDUCTASE INHIBITOR PRODUCING MARINE ACTINOMYCETES

    OpenAIRE

    SRINU, PHANI BHUSHAN,MOGES, SRILAKSHMI, SANKAR, PRABHAKAR,LAKSHMINARAYANA

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was screening of 3-hydroxy-3- methyl glutaryl Co A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitor producing marine actinomycetes. A total of 65 morphologically different actinomycetes were screened for HMG CoA reductase inhibitor production in a two stage submerged fermentation and evaluated for HMG CoA reductase inhibitor activity by agar diffusion and thin layer chromatography technique using lovostatin as a control. Among 65 marine Actinomycete strains, only one strain pr...

  4. Characterization of the chlorate reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    OpenAIRE

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Schiltz, E; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were also found in N-terminal sequences, molecular weight, and subunit composition. Metal analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements showed the presence of iron and molybdenum, which are al...

  5. Characterization of the Chlorate Reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were also found in N-terminal sequences, molecular weight, and subunit composition. Metal analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements showed the presence of iron and molybdenum, which are al...

  6. Changes in blood sugar levels of rats experimentally infected withTrypanosoma brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate and diminazene aceturate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Omamegbe Joseph Omalathebu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To determine the effect ofTrypanosoma brucei (T. brucei) on blood sugar level of infected rats. Methods: The experiment was done with 42 albino rats grouped into 3 groups of 14 members each. Group A was uninfected (control group), Group B was infected withT. brucei and treated with diminazene aceturate, and Group C was infected withT. brucei and treated with imidocarb dipropionate. Blood samples were collected from the media canthus of the experimental rats on Days 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 for the assessment of change in blood sugar levels. The blood sugar levels were determined with a glucometer (Accu-chek active serialNo.GN:10023338). Results: By 4 to 5 days post infection, there was a significant increase (P 0.05) was observed in the groups when compared with the control group till Day 12 of the experiment. Conclusions:T. brucei caused a significant increase in blood sugar of infected rats.

  7. A Host-Pathogen Interaction Reduced to First Principles: Antigenic Variation in T. brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovel-Miner, Galadriel; Mugnier, Monica; Papavasiliou, F Nina; Pinger, Jason; Schulz, Danae

    2015-01-01

    Antigenic variation is a common microbial survival strategy, powered by diversity in expressed surface antigens across the pathogen population over the course of infection. Even so, among pathogens, African trypanosomes have the most comprehensive system of antigenic variation described. African trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei spp.) are unicellular parasites native to sub-Saharan Africa, and the causative agents of sleeping sickness in humans and of n'agana in livestock. They cycle between two habitats: a specific species of fly (Glossina spp. or, colloquially, the tsetse) and the bloodstream of their mammalian hosts, by assuming a succession of proliferative and quiescent developmental forms, which vary widely in cell architecture and function. Key to each of the developmental forms that arise during these transitions is the composition of the surface coat that covers the plasma membrane. The trypanosome surface coat is extremely dense, covered by millions of repeats of developmentally specified proteins: procyclin gene products cover the organism while it resides in the tsetse and metacyclic gene products cover it while in the fly salivary glands, ready to make the transition to the mammalian bloodstream. But by far the most interesting coat is the Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat that covers the organism in its infectious form (during which it must survive free living in the mammalian bloodstream). This coat is highly antigenic and elicits robust VSG-specific antibodies that mediate efficient opsonization and complement mediated lysis of the parasites carrying the coat against which the response was made. Meanwhile, a small proportion of the parasite population switches coats, which stimulates a new antibody response to the prevalent (new) VSG species and this process repeats until immune system failure. The disease is fatal unless treated, and treatment at the later stages is extremely toxic. Because the organism is free living in the blood, the VSG

  8. Reduced Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Is a Late Adaptation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to Isometamidium Preceded by Mutations in the γ Subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Jane C.; Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Stelmanis, Valters; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background Isometamidium is the main prophylactic drug used to prevent the infection of livestock with trypanosomes that cause Animal African Trypanosomiasis. As well as the animal infective trypanosome species, livestock can also harbor the closely related human infective subspecies T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Resistance to isometamidium is a growing concern, as is cross-resistance to the diamidine drugs diminazene and pentamidine. Methodology/Principal Findings Two isometamidium resistant Trypanosoma brucei clones were generated (ISMR1 and ISMR15), being 7270- and 16,000-fold resistant to isometamidium, respectively, which retained their ability to grow in vitro and establish an infection in mice. Considerable cross-resistance was shown to ethidium bromide and diminazene, with minor cross-resistance to pentamidine. The mitochondrial membrane potentials of both resistant cell lines were significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The net uptake rate of isometamidium was reduced 2-3-fold but isometamidium efflux was similar in wild-type and resistant lines. Fluorescence microscopy and PCR analysis revealed that ISMR1 and ISMR15 had completely lost their kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and both lines carried a mutation in the nuclearly encoded γ subunit gene of F1 ATPase, truncating the protein by 22 amino acids. The mutation compensated for the loss of the kinetoplast in bloodstream forms, allowing near-normal growth, and conferred considerable resistance to isometamidium and ethidium as well as significant resistance to diminazene and pentamidine, when expressed in wild type trypanosomes. Subsequent exposure to either isometamidium or ethidium led to rapid loss of kDNA and a further increase in isometamidium resistance. Conclusions/Significance Sub-lethal exposure to isometamidium gives rise to viable but highly resistant trypanosomes that, depending on sub-species, are infective to humans and cross-resistant to at least some diamidine drugs. The crucial

  9. Structure and mechanism of dimethylsulfoxide reductase, a molybdopterin-containing enzyme of DMSO reductase family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Apart from nitrogenase, enzymes containing molybdenum are members of a superfamily, the molybdopterin-containing enzymes. Most of these enzymes catalyse an oxygen atom transfer and two electron transfer reaction. During catalysis the Mo at the active site cycles between the Mo(VI) and Mo(IV) states. The DMSO reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes all contain a bis(molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide)Mo cofactor and over thirty examples have now been described. Over the last five years crystal structures of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase and four other enzymes of the DMSO reductase family have revealed that enzymes of this family have a similar tertiary structure. The Mo atom at the active site is coordinated by four thiolate ligands provided by the dithiolene side chains of the two MGD molecules of the bis(MGD)Mo cofactor as well as a ligand provided by an amino acid side chain. In addition, an oxygen atom in the form of an oxo, hydroxo or aqua group is also coordinated to the Mo atom. In the case of dimethylsulfoxide reductase X-ray crystallography of the product-reduced species and Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated that the enzyme contains a single exchangeable oxo group that is H-bonded to W116

  10. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH ·/FMNH2 couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed

  11. Flux Analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei Glycolysis Based on a Multiobjective-Criteria Bioinformatic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Ghozlane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite of major of interest in discovering new genes for drug targets. This parasite alternates its life cycle between the mammal host(s (bloodstream form and the insect vector (procyclic form, with two divergent glucose metabolism amenable to in vitro culture. While the metabolic network of the bloodstream forms has been well characterized, the flux distribution between the different branches of the glucose metabolic network in the procyclic form has not been addressed so far. We present a computational analysis (called Metaboflux that exploits the metabolic topology of the procyclic form, and allows the incorporation of multipurpose experimental data to increase the biological relevance of the model. The alternatives resulting from the structural complexity of networks are formulated as an optimization problem solved by a metaheuristic where experimental data are modeled in a multiobjective function. Our results show that the current metabolic model is in agreement with experimental data and confirms the observed high metabolic flexibility of glucose metabolism. In addition, Metaboflux offers a rational explanation for the high flexibility in the ratio between final products from glucose metabolism, thsat is, flux redistribution through the malic enzyme steps.

  12. Synchronous expression of individual metacyclic variant surface glycoprotein genes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey-Butler, Kiantra; Ullu, Elisabetta; Kolev, Nikolay G; Tschudi, Christian

    2015-01-01

    One distinctive feature of the Trypanosoma brucei life cycle is the presence of two discrete populations that are based on differential expression of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). Both are adapted to the environmental pressures they face and more importantly, both contribute directly to transmission. Metacyclics in the tsetse fly enable transmission to a new mammalian host, whereas bloodstream trypanosomes must avoid immune destruction to the extent that sufficient numbers are available for transmission, when the insect vector takes a blood meal. At present, there are few investigations on the molecular aspects of parasite biology in the tsetse vector and specifically about the activation of metacyclic VSG gene expression. Here we used an established in vitro differentiation system based on the overexpression of the RNA-binding protein 6 (RBP6), to monitor two metacyclic VSGs (VSG 397 and VSG 653) during development from procyclics to infectious metacyclic forms. We observed that activation of these two mVSGs was simultaneous both at the transcript and protein level, and manifested by the appearance of only one of the mVSGs in individual cells. PMID:25896436

  13. Familial aggregation of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense trypanosomiasis in a very high incidence community in Zaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khonde, N; Pépin, J; Niyonsenga, T; De Wals, P

    1997-01-01

    Familial aggregation of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) was investigated in 3 adjacent villages of central Zaire where 318/1431 inhabitants had previously suffered from HAT. Neither spatial nor familial aggregation was detected when analysing the distribution of cases in the whole community using Poisson, negative binomial and pairwise odds ratio models. However, clustering of cases was observed when specific familial relationships were examined. The risk of HAT for a child was significantly increased if the mother had also had HAT, but it was not influenced by a past history of HAT in the father. Sisters and brothers of cases of HAT had a higher risk of HAT than siblings of individuals who had never had HAT, but no such association was documented for half-sisters and half-brothers. Among married couples, a past history of HAT in one spouse had no impact on the other spouse's risk of HAT. Indirect arguments suggested that familial clustering was a consequence of shared exposure, either sequential or simultaneous, rather than of genetic susceptibility. The existence of familial clustering should be kept in mind when implementing passive or active case-finding activities. PMID:9463655

  14. Immune Evasion Strategies of Trypanosoma brucei within the Mammalian Host: Progression to Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijlemans, Benoît; Caljon, Guy; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Magez, Stefan; De Trez, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The diseases caused by African trypanosomes (AT) are of both medical and veterinary importance and have adversely influenced the economic development of sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, so far not a single field applicable vaccine exists, and chemotherapy is the only strategy available to treat the disease. These strictly extracellular protozoan parasites are confronted with different arms of the host’s immune response (cellular as well as humoral) and via an elaborate and efficient (vector)–parasite–host interplay they have evolved efficient immune escape mechanisms to evade/manipulate the entire host immune response. This is of importance, since these parasites need to survive sufficiently long in their mammalian/vector host in order to complete their life cycle/transmission. Here, we will give an overview of the different mechanisms AT (i.e. T. brucei as a model organism) employ, comprising both tsetse fly saliva and parasite-derived components to modulate host innate immune responses thereby sculpturing an environment that allows survival and development within the mammalian host.

  15. Latent Trypanosoma brucei gambiense foci in Uganda: a silent epidemic in children and adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastling, S L; Picozzi, K; Wamboga, C; VON Wissmann, B; Amongi-Accup, C; Wardrop, N A; Stothard, J R; Kakembo, A; Welburn, S C

    2011-10-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness follows a long asymptomatic phase and persists in ancient foci from which epidemic clinical disease arises. A putative focus of T. b. gambiense infections has been identified, initially in mothers and young children, on the Lake Albert shoreline of Western Uganda leading to mass screening of 6207 individuals in September 2008. T. b. gambiense infections were identified by Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT) and sub-species-specific PCR although parasitological methods failed to confirm any patent trypanosome infections. In April 2009, CATT positives were re-visited; diagnosis of individuals by CATT and PCR was unstable over the two time points and parasites remained undetected, even using mini Anion Exchange Centrifugation Technique (mAECT). These observations suggest the possibility of a silent focus of disease, where all infected individuals are in a latent stage, and highlight our limited understanding of the local natural history and disease progression of T. b. gambiense in children and adults. PMID:21554841

  16. Dynamic modelling under uncertainty: the case of Trypanosoma brucei energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Achcar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic models of metabolism require detailed knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, due to measurement errors or lack of data this knowledge is often uncertain. The model of glycolysis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei is a particularly well analysed example of a quantitative metabolic model, but so far it has been studied with a fixed set of parameters only. Here we evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainty. In order to define probability distributions for each parameter, information about the experimental sources and confidence intervals for all parameters were collected. We created a wiki-based website dedicated to the detailed documentation of this information: the SilicoTryp wiki (http://silicotryp.ibls.gla.ac.uk/wiki/Glycolysis. Using information collected in the wiki, we then assigned probability distributions to all parameters of the model. This allowed us to sample sets of alternative models, accurately representing our degree of uncertainty. Some properties of the model, such as the repartition of the glycolytic flux between the glycerol and pyruvate producing branches, are robust to these uncertainties. However, our analysis also allowed us to identify fragilities of the model leading to the accumulation of 3-phosphoglycerate and/or pyruvate. The analysis of the control coefficients revealed the importance of taking into account the uncertainties about the parameters, as the ranking of the reactions can be greatly affected. This work will now form the basis for a comprehensive Bayesian analysis and extension of the model considering alternative topologies.

  17. Spliced leader trapping reveals widespread alternative splicing patterns in the highly dynamic transcriptome of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nilsson

    Full Text Available Trans-splicing of leader sequences onto the 5'ends of mRNAs is a widespread phenomenon in protozoa, nematodes and some chordates. Using parallel sequencing we have developed a method to simultaneously map 5'splice sites and analyze the corresponding gene expression profile, that we term spliced leader trapping (SLT. The method can be applied to any organism with a sequenced genome and trans-splicing of a conserved leader sequence. We analyzed the expression profiles and splicing patterns of bloodstream and insect forms of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. We detected the 5' splice sites of 85% of the annotated protein-coding genes and, contrary to previous reports, found up to 40% of transcripts to be differentially expressed. Furthermore, we discovered more than 2500 alternative splicing events, many of which appear to be stage-regulated. Based on our findings we hypothesize that alternatively spliced transcripts present a new means of regulating gene expression and could potentially contribute to protein diversity in the parasite. The entire dataset can be accessed online at TriTrypDB or through: http://splicer.unibe.ch/.

  18. Isothermal microcalorimetry, a new tool to monitor drug action against Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Wenzler

    Full Text Available Isothermal microcalorimetry is an established tool to measure heat flow of physical, chemical or biological processes. The metabolism of viable cells produces heat, and if sufficient cells are present, their heat production can be assessed by this method. In this study, we investigated the heat flow of two medically important protozoans, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Plasmodium falciparum. Heat flow signals obtained for these pathogens allowed us to monitor parasite growth on a real-time basis as the signals correlated with the number of viable cells. To showcase the potential of microcalorimetry for measuring drug action on pathogenic organisms, we tested the method with three antitrypanosomal drugs, melarsoprol, suramin and pentamidine and three antiplasmodial drugs, chloroquine, artemether and dihydroartemisinin, each at two concentrations on the respective parasite. With the real time measurement, inhibition was observed immediately by a reduced heat flow compared to that in untreated control samples. The onset of drug action, the degree of inhibition and the time to death of the parasite culture could conveniently be monitored over several days. Microcalorimetry is a valuable element to be added to the toolbox for drug discovery for protozoal diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis and malaria. The method could probably be adapted to other protozoan parasites, especially those growing extracellularly.

  19. Immune mechanisms in trypanosomiasis: Studies in mice using 75Se-labelled Trypanosoma brucei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using trypanosomes labelled in vivo with 75Se-methionine, the ability of normal and immunized mice to remove radiolabelled parasites from their circulation was investigated. It was found that immune animals had the capacity to clear parasites rapidly from their blood essentially as a result of hepatic uptake, whereas normal mice did not have this ability and the parasites remained in the circulation. A series of experiments in actively and passively immunized mice showed that hepatic uptake was closely related to antibody levels and was not markedly influenced by macrophage activation or blockade. In subsequent studies in infected animals it was found that, in contrast to mice with chronic infections, those with acute fulminating parasitaemias were unable to remove radiolabelled trypanosomes from their circulation. It was found that this was not due to impaired macrophage function, but was apparently caused by rapid parasite replication outpacing antibody production so that effective opsonization of the trypanosomes did not occur. A comparison of replication rates of the acute strain of T. brucei with that of a strain which causes a more chronic infection showed that, while their initial rates were similar after day 5 the 'chronic' strain changed to a much slower replication rate and this allowed antibody to rise to effective levels. In contrast to the findings of other workers, there was no evidence that the parasite caused any significant suppression of antibody responses in these acute infections. (author)

  20. A new generation of T7 RNA polymerase-independent inducible expression plasmids for Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Sunter

    Full Text Available Expression of transgenes is central to forward and reverse genetic analysis in Trypanosoma brucei. The inducible expression of transgenes in trypanosomes is based on the tetracycline repressor binding to a tetracycline operator to prevent transcription in the absence of tetracycline. The same inducible system is used to produce double-stranded RNA for RNAi knockdown of target genes. This study describes a new plasmid pSPR2.1 that drives consistent high-level expression of tetracycline repressor in procyclic form trypanosomes. A complementary expression plasmid, p3227, was constructed. The major difference between this and current plasmids is the separation of the inducible transgene and selectable marker promoters by the plasmid backbone. The plasmid p3227 was able to support inducible expression in cell lines containing pSPR2.1 as well as the established Lister 427 29-13 cell line. p3666, a derivative of p3227, was made for inducible expression of stem loop RNAi constructs and was effective for knockdown of DRBD3, which had proved problematic using existing RNAi plasmids with head-to-head promoters. The plasmid system was also able to support inducible transgene expression and DRBD3 RNAi knockdown in bloodstream form cells expressing tetracycline repressor from an integrated copy of the plasmid pHD1313.

  1. Identification of paralogous life-cycle stage specific cytoskeletal proteins in the parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Portman

    Full Text Available The life cycle of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei, is characterised by a transition between insect and mammalian hosts representing very different environments that present the parasite with very different challenges. These challenges are met by the expression of life-cycle stage-specific cohorts of proteins, which function in systems such as metabolism and immune evasion. These life-cycle transitions are also accompanied by morphological rearrangements orchestrated by microtubule dynamics and associated proteins of the subpellicular microtubule array. Here we employed a gel-based comparative proteomic technique, Difference Gel Electrophoresis, to identify cytoskeletal proteins that are expressed differentially in mammalian infective and insect form trypanosomes. From this analysis we identified a pair of novel, paralogous proteins, one of which is expressed in the procyclic form and the other in the bloodstream form. We show that these proteins, CAP51 and CAP51V, localise to the subpellicular corset of microtubules and are essential for correct organisation of the cytoskeleton and successful cytokinesis in their respective life cycle stages. We demonstrate for the first time redundancy of function between life-cycle stage specific paralogous sets in the cytoskeleton and reveal modification of cytoskeletal components in situ prior to their removal during differentiation from the bloodstream form to the insect form. These specific results emphasise a more generic concept that the trypanosome genome encodes a cohort of cytoskeletal components that are present in at least two forms with life-cycle stage-specific expression.

  2. The isolation and partial characterization of the plasma membrane from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorheis, H P; Gale, J S; Owen, M J; Edwards, W

    1979-04-15

    Whole sheets of plasma membrane, each with their attached flagellum, were purified from Trypanosoma brucei. The method devised for their isolation included a new technique of cell breakage that used a combination of osmotic stress followed by mechanical sheer and avoided the problem of extreme vesiculation as well as the trapping of organelles in cell 'ghosts'. The purified membranes all contained the pellicular microtubular array. The antigenic surface coat was completely released from the plasma membrane during the isolation procedure. The membranes had a very high cholesterol/phospholipid ratio (1.54). A large proportion (42%) of the cellular DNA was recovered in the plasma-membrane fraction unless a step involving deoxyribonuclease treatment, which decreased the DNA content to less than 13%, was included before secrose-density gradient centrifugation. This step also aided the separation of plasma membranes from other cellular components. The ouabain-sensitive Na+ + K+-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase and adenylate cyclase co-purified with the plasma membranes. Although 5'-nucleotidase was thought to be a plasma-membrane component, it was easily detached from the membrane. The purified membranes were essentially free of L-alanine-alpha-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, L-asparte-alpha-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, malate dehydrogenase, oligomycin-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase, glucose 6-phosphatase, Mg2+-stimulated p-nitrophenyl phosphatase and catalase. PMID:486094

  3. Genetic identification of a respiratory arsenate reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Saltikov, Chad W.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2003-01-01

    For more than a decade, it has been recognized that arsenate [H2AsO41-; As(V)] can be used by microorganisms as a terminal electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration. Given the toxicity of arsenic, the mechanistic basis of this process is intriguing, as is its evolutionary origin. Here we show that a two-gene cluster (arrAB; arsenate respiratory reduction) in the bacterium Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3 specifically confers respiratory As(V) reductase activity. Mutants with in-frame deletions of...

  4. Membrane-associated chromate reductase activity from Enterobacter cloacae.

    OpenAIRE

    P. C. Wang; Mori, T.; Toda, K.; Ohtake, H

    1990-01-01

    Washed cells of Enterobacter cloacae HO1 reduced hexavalent chromium (chromate: CrO4(2-) anaerobically. Chromate reductase activity was preferentially associated with the membrane fraction of the cells. Right-side-out membrane vesicles prepared from E. cloacae cells showed high chromate reductase activities when ascorbate-reduced phenazine methosulfate was added as an electron donor.

  5. Canopy and seasonal profiles of nitrate reductase in soybeans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, J.E.; Hageman, R.H.

    1972-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity of soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.) was evaluated in soil plots and outdoor hydroponic gravel culture systems throughout the growing season. Nitrate reductase profiles within the plant canopy were also established. Mean activity per gram fresh weight per hour of the entire plant canopy was highest in the seedling stage while total activity (activity per gram fresh weight per hour times the total leaf weight) reached a maximum when plants were in the full bloom to midpod fill stage. Nitrate reductase activity per gram fresh weight per hour was highest in the uppermost leaf just prior to full expansion and declined with leaf positions lower in the canopy. Total nitrate reductase activity per leaf was also highest in the uppermost fully expanded leaf during early growth stages. Maximum total activity shifted to leaf positions lower in the plant canopy with later growth stages. Nitrate reductase activity of soybeans grown in hydroponic systems was significantly higher than activity of adjacent soil grown plants at later growth stages, which suggested that under normal field conditions the potential for nitrate utilization may not be realized. Nitrate reductase activity per gram fresh weight per hour and nitrate content were positively correlated over the growing season with plants grown in either soil or solution culture. Computations based upon the nitrate reductase assay of plants grown in hydroponics indicated that from 1.7 to 1.8 grams N could have been supplied to the plant via the nitrate reductase process. 11 references, 9 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tRNAs of Trypanosoma brucei have a modified cytidine in the anticodon loop.

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, A.; McNally, K P; Agabian, N

    1994-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of Trypanosoma brucei does not appear to encode any tRNA genes. Isolated organellar tRNAs hybridize to nuclear DNA, suggesting that they are synthesized in the nucleus and subsequently imported into the mitochondrion. Most imported tRNAs have cytosolic counterparts, showing identical mobility on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. We have compared three nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tRNAs (tRNA(Lys), tRNA(Leu), tRNA(Tyr)) with their cytosolic isoforms by direct enzym...

  7. THE MULTIPLE ROLES OF CYCLIN E1 IN CONTROLLING CELL CYCLE PROGRESSION AND CELLULAR MORPHOLOGY OF TRYPANOSOMA BRUCEI

    OpenAIRE

    Gourguechon, Stéphane; Savich, Jason M.; Ching C Wang

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of eukaryotic cell cycle progression requires sequential activation and inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinases. Previous RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in Trypanosoma brucei indicated that cyclin E1, cdc2-related kinase (CRK)1 and CRK2 are involved in regulating G1/S transition, whereas cyclin B2 and CRK3 play a pivotal role in controlling the G2/M checkpoint. To search for potential interactions between the other cyclins and CRKs that may not have been revealed by the RNAi ...

  8. A monoclonal antibody marker for the exclusion-zone filaments of Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decossas Marion

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei is a haemoflagellate pathogen of man, wild animals and domesticated livestock in central and southern Africa. In all life cycle stages this parasite has a single mitochondrion that contains a uniquely organised genome that is condensed into a flat disk-like structure called the kinetoplast. The kinetoplast is essential for insect form procyclic cells and therefore is a potential drug target. The kinetoplast is unique in nature because it consists of novel structural proteins and thousands of circular, interlocking, DNA molecules (kDNA. Secondly, kDNA replication is critically timed to coincide with nuclear S phase and new flagellum biogenesis. Thirdly, the kinetoplast is physically attached to the flagellum basal bodies via a structure called the tripartite attachment complex (TAC. The TAC consists of unilateral filaments (within the mitochondrion matrix, differentiated mitochondrial membranes and exclusion-zone filaments that extend from the distal end of the basal bodies. To date only one protein, p166, has been identified to be a component of the TAC. Results In the work presented here we provide data based on a novel EM technique developed to label and characterise cytoskeleton structures in permeabilised cells without extraction of mitochondrion membranes. We use this protocol to provide data on a new monoclonal antibody reagent (Mab 22 and illustrate the precise localisation of basal body-mitochondrial linker proteins. Mab 22 binds to these linker proteins (exclusion-zone filaments and provides a new tool for the characterisation of cytoskeleton mediated kinetoplast segregation. Conclusion The antigen(s recognised by Mab 22 are cytoskeletal, insensitive to extraction by high concentrations of non-ionic detergent, extend from the proximal region of basal bodies and bind to the outer mitochondrial membrane. This protein(s is the first component of the TAC exclusion-zone fibres to be identified. Mab 22

  9. Trypanosoma brucei TIF2 and TRF Suppress VSG Switching Using Overlapping and Independent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehi, Sanaa E.; Nanavaty, Vishal; Li, Bibo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei causes debilitating human African trypanosomiasis and evades the host’s immune response by regularly switching its major surface antigen, VSG, which is expressed exclusively from subtelomeric loci. We previously showed that two interacting telomere proteins, TbTRF and TbTIF2, are essential for cell proliferation and suppress VSG switching by inhibiting DNA recombination events involving the whole active VSG expression site. We now find that TbTIF2 stabilizes TbTRF protein levels by inhibiting their degradation by the 26S proteasome, indicating that decreased TbTRF protein levels in TbTIF2-depleted cells contribute to more frequent VSG switching and eventual cell growth arrest. Surprisingly, although TbTIF2 depletion leads to more subtelomeric DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that are both potent VSG switching inducers and detrimental to cell viability, TbTRF depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs inside subtelomeric VSG expression sites. Furthermore, expressing an ectopic allele of F2H-TbTRF in TbTIF2 RNAi cells allowed cells to maintain normal TbTRF protein levels for a longer frame of time. This resulted in a mildly better cell growth and partially suppressed the phenotype of increased VSG switching frequency but did not suppress the phenotype of more subtelomeric DSBs in TbTIF2-depleted cells. Therefore, TbTIF2 depletion has two parallel effects: decreased TbTRF protein levels and increased subtelomeric DSBs, both resulting in an acute increased VSG switching frequency and eventual cell growth arrest. PMID:27258069

  10. Widespread variation in transcript abundance within and across developmental stages of Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kifer Charles T

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, undergoes a complex developmental cycle that takes place in mammalian and insect hosts and is accompanied by changes in metabolism and cellular morphology. While differences in mRNA expression have been described for many genes, genome-wide expression analyses have been largely lacking. Trypanosomatids represent a unique case in eukaryotes in that they transcribe protein-coding genes as large polycistronic units, and rarely regulate gene expression at the level of transcription initiation. Results Here we present a comprehensive analysis of mRNA expression in several stages of parasite development. Utilizing microarrays that have multiple copies of multiple probes for each gene, we were able to demonstrate with a high degree of statistical confidence that approximately one-fourth of genes show differences in mRNA expression levels in the stages examined. These include complex patterns of gene expression within gene families, including the large family of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs and their relatives, where we have identified a number of constitutively expressed family members. Furthermore, we were able to assess the relative abundance of all transcripts in each stage, identifying the genes that are either weakly or highly expressed. Very few genes show no evidence of expression. Conclusion Despite the lack of gene regulation at the level of transcription initiation, our results reveal extensive regulation of mRNA abundance associated with different life cycle and growth stages. In addition, analysis of variant surface glycoprotein gene expression reveals a more complex picture than previously thought. These data provide a valuable resource to the community of researchers studying this lethal agent.

  11. 3D Architecture of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagella Connector, a Mobile Transmembrane Junction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna L Höög

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular junctions are crucial for the formation of multicellular organisms, where they anchor cells to each other and/or supportive tissue and enable cell-to-cell communication. Some unicellular organisms, such as the parasitic protist Trypanosoma brucei, also have complex cellular junctions. The flagella connector (FC is a three-layered transmembrane junction that moves with the growing tip of a new flagellum and attaches it to the side of the old flagellum. The FC moves via an unknown molecular mechanism, independent of new flagellum growth. Here we describe the detailed 3D architecture of the FC suggesting explanations for how it functions and its mechanism of motility.We have used a combination of electron tomography and cryo-electron tomography to reveal the 3D architecture of the FC. Cryo-electron tomography revealed layers of repetitive filamentous electron densities between the two flagella in the interstitial zone. Though the FC does not change in length and width during the growth of the new flagellum, the interstitial zone thickness decreases as the FC matures. This investigation also shows interactions between the FC layers and the axonemes of the new and old flagellum, sufficiently strong to displace the axoneme in the old flagellum. We describe a novel filament, the flagella connector fibre, found between the FC and the axoneme in the old flagellum.The FC is similar to other cellular junctions in that filamentous proteins bridge the extracellular space and are anchored to underlying cytoskeletal structures; however, it is built between different portions of the same cell and is unique because of its intrinsic motility. The detailed description of its structure will be an important tool to use in attributing structure / function relationships as its molecular components are discovered in the future. The FC is involved in the inheritance of cell shape, which is important for the life cycle of this human parasite.

  12. Simulating the complex cell design of Trypanosoma brucei and its motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davod Alizadehrad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei, which causes the sleeping sickness when infecting a mammalian host, goes through an intricate life cycle. It has a rather complex propulsion mechanism and swims in diverse microenvironments. These continuously exert selective pressure, to which the trypanosome adjusts with its architecture and behavior. As a result, the trypanosome assumes a diversity of complex morphotypes during its life cycle. However, although cell biology has detailed form and function of most of them, experimental data on the dynamic behavior and development of most morphotypes is lacking. Here we show that simulation science can predict intermediate cell designs by conducting specific and controlled modifications of an accurate, nature-inspired cell model, which we developed using information from live cell analyses. The cell models account for several important characteristics of the real trypanosomal morphotypes, such as the geometry and elastic properties of the cell body, and their swimming mechanism using an eukaryotic flagellum. We introduce an elastic network model for the cell body, including bending rigidity and simulate swimming in a fluid environment, using the mesoscale simulation technique called multi-particle collision dynamics. The in silico trypanosome of the bloodstream form displays the characteristic in vivo rotational and translational motility pattern that is crucial for survival and virulence in the vertebrate host. Moreover, our model accurately simulates the trypanosome's tumbling and backward motion. We show that the distinctive course of the attached flagellum around the cell body is one important aspect to produce the observed swimming behavior in a viscous fluid, and also required to reach the maximal swimming velocity. Changing details of the flagellar attachment generates less efficient swimmers. We also simulate different morphotypes that occur during the parasite's development in the tsetse fly, and

  13. Structure and expression of human dihydropteridine reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihydropteridine reductase catalyzes the NADH-mediated reduction of quinonoid dihydrobiopterin and is an essential component of the pterindependent aromatic amino acid hydroxylating systems. A cDNA for human DHPR was isolated from a human liver cDNA library in the vector λgt11 using a monospecific antibody against sheep DHPR. The nucleic acid sequence and amino acid sequence of human DHPR were determined from a full-length clone. A 112 amino acid sequence of sheep DHPR was obtained by sequencing purified sheep DHPR. This sequence is highly homologous to the predicted amino acid sequence of the human protein. Gene transfer of the recombinant human DHPR into COS cells leads to expression of DHPR enzymatic activity. These results indicate that the cDNA clone identified by antibody screening is an authentic and full-length cDNA for human DHPR

  14. Nitrite Reductase Activity in Engineered Azurin Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Steven M; Strange, Jacob N; Bladholm, Erika L; Khatiwada, Balabhadra; Hedstrom, Christine G; Sauer, Alexandra M

    2016-05-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) activity was examined in a series of dicopper P.a. azurin variants in which a surface binding copper site was added through site-directed mutagenesis. Four variants were synthesized with copper binding motifs inspired by the catalytic type 2 copper binding sites found in the native noncoupled dinuclear copper enzymes nitrite reductase and peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase. The four azurin variants, denoted Az-NiR, Az-NiR3His, Az-PHM, and Az-PHM3His, maintained the azurin electron transfer copper center, with the second designed copper site located over 13 Å away and consisting of mutations Asn10His,Gln14Asp,Asn16His-azurin, Asn10His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, Gln8Met,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, and Gln8His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, respectively. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy, and electrochemistry of the sites demonstrate copper binding as well as interaction with small exogenous ligands. The nitrite reduction activity of the variants was determined, including the catalytic Michaelis-Menten parameters. The variants showed activity (0.34-0.59 min(-1)) that was slower than that of native NiRs but comparable to that of other model systems. There were small variations in activity of the four variants that correlated with the number of histidines in the added copper site. Catalysis was found to be reversible, with nitrite produced from NO. Reactions starting with reduced azurin variants demonstrated that electrons from both copper centers were used to reduce nitrite, although steady-state catalysis required the T2 copper center and did not require the T1 center. Finally, experiments separating rates of enzyme reduction from rates of reoxidation by nitrite demonstrated that the reaction with nitrite was rate limiting during catalysis. PMID:27055058

  15. The 2’-O-ribose methyltransferase for cap 1 of spliced leader RNA and U1 small nuclear RNA in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zamudio, J. R.; Mittra, B.; Foldynová-Trantírková, Silvie; Zeiner, G. M.; Lukeš, Julius; Bujnicki, J. M.; Sturm, N. R.; Campbell, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 17 (2007), s. 6084-6092. ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06129; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : methylation * Trypanosoma brucei * methyltransferase * RNA interference Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.420, year: 2007

  16. In Silico Identification and in Vitro Activity of Novel Natural Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian C. Herrmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As part of our ongoing efforts to identify natural products with activity against pathogens causing neglected tropical diseases, we are currently performing an extensive screening of natural product (NP databases against a multitude of protozoan parasite proteins. Within this project, we screened a database of NPs from a commercial supplier, AnalytiCon Discovery (Potsdam, Germany, against Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH, a glycolytic enzyme whose inhibition deprives the parasite of energy supply. NPs acting as potential inhibitors of the mentioned enzyme were identified using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening and subsequent docking of the identified hits into the active site of interest. In a set of 700 structures chosen for the screening, 13 (1.9% were predicted to possess significant affinity towards the enzyme and were therefore tested in an in vitro enzyme assay using recombinant TbGAPDH. Nine of these in silico hits (69% showed significant inhibitory activity at 50 µM, of which two geranylated benzophenone derivatives proved to be particularly active with IC50 values below 10 µM. These compounds also showed moderate in vitro activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and may thus represent interesting starting points for further optimization.

  17. A novel high-throughput activity assay for the Trypanosoma brucei editosome enzyme REL1 and other RNA ligases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Stephan; Hall, Laurence; Riley, Sean; Sørensen, Jesper; Amaro, Rommie E.; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The protist parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), which threatens millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa. Without treatment the infection is almost always lethal. Current drugs for HAT are difficult to administer and have severe side effects. Together with increasing drug resistance this results in urgent need for new treatments. T. brucei and other trypanosomatid pathogens require a distinct form of post-transcriptional mRNA modification for mitochondrial gene expression. A multi-protein complex called the editosome cleaves mitochondrial mRNA, inserts or deletes uridine nucleotides at specific positions and re-ligates the mRNA. RNA editing ligase 1 (REL1) is essential for the re-ligation step and has no close homolog in the mammalian host, making it a promising target for drug discovery. However, traditional assays for RELs use radioactive substrates coupled with gel analysis and are not suitable for high-throughput screening of compound libraries. Here we describe a fluorescence-based REL activity assay. This assay is compatible with a 384-well microplate format and sensitive, satisfies statistical criteria for high-throughput methods and is readily adaptable for other polynucleotide ligases. We validated the assay by determining kinetic properties of REL1 and by identifying REL1 inhibitors in a library of small, pharmacologically active compounds. PMID:26400159

  18. Tracking the Biogenesis and Inheritance of Subpellicular Microtubule in Trypanosoma brucei with Inducible YFP-α-Tubulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Sheriff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule cytoskeleton forms the most prominent structural system in Trypanosoma brucei, undergoing extensive modifications during the cell cycle. Visualization of tyrosinated microtubules leads to a semiconservative mode of inheritance, whereas recent studies employing microtubule plus end tracking proteins have hinted at an asymmetric pattern of cytoskeletal inheritance. To further the knowledge of microtubule synthesis and inheritance during T. brucei cell cycle, the dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton was visualized by inducible YFP-α-tubulin expression. During new flagellum/flagellum attachment zone (FAZ biogenesis and cell growth, YFP-α-tubulin was incorporated mainly between the old and new flagellum/FAZ complexes. Cytoskeletal modifications at the posterior end of the cells were observed with EB1, a microtubule plus end binding protein, particularly during mitosis. Additionally, the newly formed microtubules segregated asymmetrically, with the daughter cell inheriting the new flagellum/FAZ complex retaining most of the new microtubules. Together, our results suggest an intimate connection between new microtubule formation and new FAZ assembly, consequently leading to asymmetric microtubule inheritance and cell division.

  19. Genome-wide Analysis Reveals Extensive Functional Interaction between DNA Replication Initiation and Transcription in the Genome of Trypanosoma brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin Tiengwe

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of replication initiation sites, termed origins, is a crucial step in understanding genome transmission in any organism. Transcription of the Trypanosoma brucei genome is highly unusual, with each chromosome comprising a few discrete transcription units. To understand how DNA replication occurs in the context of such organization, we have performed genome-wide mapping of the binding sites of the replication initiator ORC1/CDC6 and have identified replication origins, revealing that both localize to the boundaries of the transcription units. A remarkably small number of active origins is seen, whose spacing is greater than in any other eukaryote. We show that replication and transcription in T. brucei have a profound functional overlap, as reducing ORC1/CDC6 levels leads to genome-wide increases in mRNA levels arising from the boundaries of the transcription units. In addition, ORC1/CDC6 loss causes derepression of silent Variant Surface Glycoprotein genes, which are critical for host immune evasion.

  20. Synthesis of novel amide and urea derivatives of thiazol-2-ethylamines and their activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Donald A; Wenzler, Tanja; Yang, Sihyung; Weiser, Patrick T; Wang, Michael Zhuo; Brun, Reto; Tidwell, Richard R

    2016-06-01

    2-(2-Benzamido)ethyl-4-phenylthiazole (1) was one of 1035 molecules (grouped into 115 distinct scaffolds) found to be inhibitory to Trypanosoma brucei, the pathogen causing human African trypanosomiasis, at concentrations below 3.6μM and non-toxic to mammalian (Huh7) cells in a phenotypic high-throughput screen of a 700,000 compound library performed by the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (GNF). Compound 1 and 72 analogues were synthesized in this lab by one of two general pathways. These plus 10 commercially available analogues were tested against T. brucei rhodesiense STIB900 and L6 rat myoblast cells (for cytotoxicity) in vitro. Forty-four derivatives were more potent than 1, including eight with IC50 values below 100nM. The most potent and most selective for the parasite was the urea analogue 2-(2-piperidin-1-ylamido)ethyl-4-(3-fluorophenyl)thiazole (70, IC50=9nM, SI>18,000). None of 33 compounds tested were able to cure mice infected with the parasite; however, seven compounds caused temporary reductions of parasitemia (⩾97%) but with subsequent relapses. The lack of in vivo efficacy was at least partially due to their poor metabolic stability, as demonstrated by the short half-lives of 15 analogues against mouse and human liver microsomes. PMID:27102161

  1. TbPIF5 is a Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial DNA helicase involved in processing of minicircle Okazaki fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiyu Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei's mitochondrial genome, kinetoplast DNA (kDNA, is a giant network of catenated DNA rings. The network consists of a few thousand 1 kb minicircles and several dozen 23 kb maxicircles. Here we report that TbPIF5, one of T. brucei's six mitochondrial proteins related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA helicase ScPIF1, is involved in minicircle lagging strand synthesis. Like its yeast homolog, TbPIF5 is a 5' to 3' DNA helicase. Together with other enzymes thought to be involved in Okazaki fragment processing, TbPIF5 localizes in vivo to the antipodal sites flanking the kDNA. Minicircles in wild type cells replicate unidirectionally as theta-structures and are unusual in that Okazaki fragments are not joined until after the progeny minicircles have segregated. We now report that overexpression of TbPIF5 causes premature removal of RNA primers and joining of Okazaki fragments on theta structures. Further elongation of the lagging strand is blocked, but the leading strand is completed and the minicircle progeny, one with a truncated H strand (ranging from 0.1 to 1 kb, are segregated. The minicircles with a truncated H strand electrophorese on an agarose gel as a smear. This replication defect is associated with kinetoplast shrinkage and eventual slowing of cell growth. We propose that TbPIF5 unwinds RNA primers after lagging strand synthesis, thus facilitating processing of Okazaki fragments.

  2. Independent analysis of the flagellum surface and matrix proteomes provides insight into flagellum signaling in mammalian-infectious Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Michael; Langousis, Gerasimos; Nguyen, HoangKim T; Saada, Edwin A; Shimogawa, Michelle M; Jonsson, Zophonias O; Nguyen, Steven M; Wohlschlegel, James A; Hill, Kent L

    2011-10-01

    The flagellum of African trypanosomes is an essential and multifunctional organelle that functions in motility, cell morphogenesis, and host-parasite interaction. Previous studies of the trypanosome flagellum have been limited by the inability to purify flagella without first removing the flagellar membrane. This limitation is particularly relevant in the context of studying flagellum signaling, as signaling requires surface-exposed proteins in the flagellar membrane and soluble signaling proteins in the flagellar matrix. Here we employ a combination of genetic and mechanical approaches to purify intact flagella from the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, in its mammalian-infectious stage. We combined flagellum purification with affinity-purification of surface-exposed proteins to conduct independent proteomic analyses of the flagellum surface and matrix fractions. The proteins identified encompass a broad range of molecular functionalities, including many predicted to function in signaling. Immunofluorescence and RNA interference studies demonstrate flagellum localization and function for proteins identified and provide insight into mechanisms of flagellum attachment and motility. The flagellum surface proteome includes many T. brucei-specific proteins and is enriched for proteins up-regulated in the mammalian-infectious stage of the parasite life-cycle. The combined results indicate that the flagellum surface presents a diverse and dynamic host-parasite interface that is well-suited for host-parasite signaling. PMID:21685506

  3. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    OpenAIRE

    Patrizia Cesaro; Chiara Cattaneo; Elisa Bona; Graziella Berta; Maria Cavaletto

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli...

  4. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Fleck, Oliver; Watson, Adam T; Poitelea, Marius; O'Shea, Charlotte; Chahwan, Charly; Holmberg, Christian; Kragelund, Birthe B; Nielsen, Olaf; Osborne, Mark; Carr, Antony M; Liu, Cong

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  5. Structural features of the ribonucleotide reductase of Aujeszky's disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, A V; Boldogköi, Z; Fodor, I

    1994-01-01

    A gene construct of the Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) genome was prepared and the DNA fragment encoding the ribonucleotide reductase was structurally characterized. We determined the entire DNA sequence of two adjacent open reading frames of the ribonucleotide reductase genes with the intergenic sequence of nine base pairs. From the sequence analysis we predict that Aujeszky's disease virus encodes a ribonucleotide reductase which comprises two polypeptides--large and small subunits, with sizes of 835 and 303 amino acids, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the large and small subunits of the Aujeszky's disease virus ribonucleotide reductase have been compared with that of other herpesviruses, and structural features of both proteins have been characterized. PMID:7810419

  6. Aldose reductase inhibitory activity and antioxidant capacity of pomegranate extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Karasu, Çimen; CUMAOĞLU, Ahmet; Gürpinar, Ali Rifat; Kartal, Murat; Kovacikova, Lucia; Milackova, Ivana; Stefek, Milan

    2012-01-01

    The pomegranate, Punica granatum L., has been the subject of current interest as a medicinal agent with wide-ranging therapeutic indications. In the present study, pomegranate ethanolic seed and hull extracts were tested, in comparison with a commercial sample, for the inhibition of aldose reductase, an enzyme involved in the etiology of diabetic complications. In vitro inhibition of rat lens aldose reductase was determined by a conventional method. Pomegranate ethanolic hull extract and comm...

  7. Influence of trypanocidal therapy on the haematology of vervet monkeys experimentally infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngotho, Maina; Kagira, John M; Kariuki, Christopher; Maina, Naomi; Thuita, John K; Mwangangi, David M; Farah, Idle O; Hau, Jann

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the sequential haematological changes in vervet monkeys infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and subsequently treated with sub-curative diminazene aceturate (DA) and curative melarsoprol (MelB) trypanocidal drugs. Fourteen vervet monkeys, on a serial timed-kill pathogenesis study, were infected intravenously with 10(4) trypanosomes of a stabilate T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537. They were treated with DA at 28 days post infection (dpi) and with MelB following relapse of infection at 140 dpi. Blood samples were obtained from the monkeys weekly, and haematology conducted using a haematological analyser. All the monkeys developed a disease associated with macrocytic hypochromic anaemia characterised by a reduction in erythrocytes (RBC), haemoglobin (HB), haematocrit (HCT), mean cell volume (MCV), platelet count (PLT), and an increase in the red cell distribution width (RDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV). The clinical disease was characteristic of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) with a pre-patent period of 3 days. Treatment with DA cleared trypanosomes from both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The parasites relapsed first in the CSF and later in the blood. This treatment normalised the RBC, HCT, HB, PLT, MCV, and MPV achieving the pre-infection values within two weeks while RDW took up to 6 weeks to attain pre-infection levels after treatment. Most of the parameters were later characterised by fluctuations, and declined at one to two weeks before relapse of trypanosomes in the haemolymphatic circulation. Following MelB treatment at 140 dpi, most values recovered within two weeks and stabilised at pre-infection levels, during the 223 days post treatment monitoring period. It is concluded that DA and MelB treatments cause similar normalising changes in the haematological profiles of monkeys infected with T. b. rhodesiense, indicating the efficacy of the drugs. The infection related changes in haematology

  8. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  9. Binding of Fidarestat Stereoisomers with Aldose Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Sil Lee

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The stereospecificity in binding to aldose reductase (ALR2 of two fidarestat {6-fluoro-2',5'-dioxospiro[chroman-4,4'-imidazolidine]-2-carboxamide} stereoisomers [(2S,4Sand (2R,4S] has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations using freeenergy integration techniques. The difference in the free energy of binding was found to be2.0 ± 1.7 kJ/mol in favour of the (2S,4S-form, in agreement with the experimentalinhibition data. The relative mobilities of the fidarestats complexed with ALR2 indicate alarger entropic penalty for hydrophobic binding of (2R,4S-fidarestat compared to (2S,4S-fidarestat, partially explaining its lower binding affinity. The two stereoisomers differmainly in the orientation of the carbamoyl moiety with respect to the active site and rotationof the bond joining the carbamoyl substituent to the ring. The detailed structural andenergetic insights obtained from out simulations allow for a better understanding of thefactors determining stereospecific inhibitor-ALR2 binding in the EPF charges model.

  10. Aldose reductase inhibitory compounds from Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ha Na; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-09-01

    As part of our ongoing search for natural sources of therapeutic and preventive agents for diabetic complications, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of components of the fruit of Xanthium strumarium (X. strumarium) on aldose reductase (AR) and galactitol formation in rat lenses with high levels of glucose. To identify the bioactive components of X. strumarium, 7 caffeoylquinic acids and 3 phenolic compounds were isolated and their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and comparison with published data. The abilities of 10 X. strumarium-derived components to counteract diabetic complications were investigated by means of inhibitory assays with rat lens AR (rAR) and recombinant human AR (rhAR). From the 10 isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed the most potent inhibition, with IC₅₀ values of 0.30 and 0.67 μM for rAR and rhAR, respectively. In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed competitive inhibition of rhAR. Furthermore, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate inhibited galactitol formation in the rat lens and in erythrocytes incubated with a high concentration of glucose, indicating that this compound may be effective in preventing diabetic complications. PMID:23604720

  11. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27033597

  12. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Bok Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  13. JBP2, a SWI2/SNF2-like protein, regulates de novo telomeric DNA glycosylation in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Rudo; Brand, Verena; Ekanayake, Dilrukshi K; Sweeney, Kate; DiPaolo, Courtney; Reznikoff, William S; Sabatini, Robert

    2007-11-01

    Synthesis of the modified thymine base, beta-d-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil or J, within telomeric DNA of Trypanosoma brucei correlates with the bloodstream form specific epigenetic silencing of telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes involved in antigenic variation. In order to analyze the function of base J in the regulation of antigenic variation, we are characterizing the regulatory mechanism of J biosynthesis. We have recently proposed a model in which chromatin remodeling by a SWI2/SNF2-like protein (JBP2) regulates the developmental and de novo site-specific localization of J synthesis within bloodstream form trypanosome DNA. Consistent with this model, we now show that JBP2 (-/-) bloodstream form trypanosomes contain five-fold less base J and are unable to stimulate de novo J synthesis in newly generated telomeric arrays. PMID:17706299

  14. Differential expression of glycosomal and mitochondrial proteins in the two major life-cycle stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertommen, Didier; Van Roy, Joris; Szikora, Jean-Pierre; Rider, Mark H; Michels, Paul A M; Opperdoes, Fred R

    2008-04-01

    Label-free semi-quantitative differential three-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (3D-LC-MS/MS) was used to compare the glycosomal and mitochondrial proteomes of the bloodstream- and insect-form of Trypanosoma brucei. The abundance of glycosomal marker proteins identified in the two life-cycle stages corresponded well with the relative importance of biochemical pathways present in the glycosomes of the two stages and the peptide spectral count ratios of selected enzymes were in good agreement with published data about their enzymatic specific activities. This approach proved extremely useful for the generation of large scale proteomics data for the comparison of different life-cycle stages. Several proteins involved in oxidative stress protection, sugar-nucleotide synthesis, purine salvage, nucleotide-monophosphate formation and purine-nucleotide cycle were identified as glycosomal proteins. PMID:18242729

  15. Synthesis of novel guttiferone A derivatives: in-vitro evaluation toward Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromentin, Yann; Gaboriaud-Kolar, Nicolas; Lenta, Bruno Ndjakou; Wansi, Jean Duplex; Buisson, Didier; Mouray, Elisabeth; Grellier, Philippe; Loiseau, Philippe M; Lallemand, Marie-Christine; Michel, Sylvie

    2013-07-01

    The catechol pharmacomodulation of the natural product guttiferone A, isolated from the Symphonia globulifera tree, led to the semisynthesis of a collection of twenty derivatives. The ester and ether derivatives of guttiferone A were evaluated for their anti-plasmodial, trypanocidal and anti-leishmanial activities. Some compounds described below have shown potent antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani in a range from 1 to 5 μM. The evaluation of guttiferone A derivatives against VERO cells highlighted catechol modulations as an interesting tool to decrease the toxicity and keep the activity of this natural compound. The current study revealed new molecules as promising new antiparasitic drug candidates. PMID:23727538

  16. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies. PMID:27466384

  17. Crystal Structures of TbCatB and rhodesain, potential chemotherapeutic targets and major cysteine proteases of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain D Kerr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma brucei is the etiological agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis, an endemic parasitic disease of sub-Saharan Africa. TbCatB and rhodesain are the sole Clan CA papain-like cysteine proteases produced by the parasite during infection of the mammalian host and are implicated in the progression of disease. Of considerable interest is the exploration of these two enzymes as targets for cysteine protease inhibitors that are effective against T. brucei. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have determined, by X-ray crystallography, the first reported structure of TbCatB in complex with the cathepsin B selective inhibitor CA074. In addition we report the structure of rhodesain in complex with the vinyl-sulfone K11002. CONCLUSIONS: The mature domain of our TbCat*CA074 structure contains unique features for a cathepsin B-like enzyme including an elongated N-terminus extending 16 residues past the predicted maturation cleavage site. N-terminal Edman sequencing reveals an even longer extension than is observed amongst the ordered portions of the crystal structure. The TbCat*CA074 structure confirms that the occluding loop, which is an essential part of the substrate-binding site, creates a larger prime side pocket in the active site cleft than is found in mammalian cathepsin B-small molecule structures. Our data further highlight enhanced flexibility in the occluding loop main chain and structural deviations from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes that may affect activity and inhibitor design. Comparisons with the rhodesain*K11002 structure highlight key differences that may impact the design of cysteine protease inhibitors as anti-trypanosomal drugs.

  18. The orthologue of Sjogren's syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 in Trypanosoma brucei is an immunogenic self-assembling molecule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P Price

    Full Text Available Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (PSS is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease, typically manifesting as lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands leading to chronically impaired lacrimal and salivary secretion. Sjögren's Syndrome nuclear autoantigen 1 (SSNA1 or NA14 is a major specific target for autoantibodies in PSS but the precise function and clinical relevance of this protein are largely unknown. Orthologues of the gene are absent from many of the commonly used model organisms but are present in Chlamyodomonas reinhardtii (in which it has been termed DIP13 and most protozoa. We report the functional characterisation of the orthologue of SSNA1 in the kinetoplastid parasite, Trypanosoma brucei. Both TbDIP13 and human SSNA1 are small coiled-coil proteins which are predicted to be remote homologues of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin. We use comparative proteomic methods to identify potential interacting partners of TbDIP13. We also show evidence that TbDIP13 is able to self-assemble into fibril-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, a property which may contribute to its immunogenicity. Endogenous TbDIP13 partially co-localises with acetylated α-tubulin in the insect procyclic stage of the parasite. However, deletion of the DIP13 gene in cultured bloodstream and procyclic stages of T. brucei has little effect on parasite growth or morphology, indicating either a degree of functional redundancy or a function in an alternative stage of the parasite life cycle.

  19. Structural characterization of CYP51 from Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei bound to the antifungal drugs posaconazole and fluconazole.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Kuang Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas Disease is the leading cause of heart failure in Latin America. Current drug therapy is limited by issues of both efficacy and severe side effects. Trypansoma cruzi, the protozoan agent of Chagas Disease, is closely related to two other major global pathogens, Leishmania spp., responsible for leishmaniasis, and Trypansoma brucei, the causative agent of African Sleeping Sickness. Both T. cruzi and Leishmania parasites have an essential requirement for ergosterol, and are thus vulnerable to inhibitors of sterol 14alpha-demethylase (CYP51, which catalyzes the conversion of lanosterol to ergosterol. Clinically employed anti-fungal azoles inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis in fungi, and specific azoles are also effective against both Trypanosoma and Leishmania parasites. However, modification of azoles to enhance efficacy and circumvent potential drug resistance has been problematic for both parasitic and fungal infections due to the lack of structural insights into drug binding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have determined the crystal structures for CYP51 from T. cruzi (resolutions of 2.35 A and 2.27 A, and from the related pathogen T. brucei (resolutions of 2.7 A and 2.6 A, co-crystallized with the antifungal drugs fluconazole and posaconazole. Remarkably, both drugs adopt multiple conformations when binding the target. The fluconazole 2,4-difluorophenyl ring flips 180 degrees depending on the H-bonding interactions with the BC-loop. The terminus of the long functional tail group of posaconazole is bound loosely in the mouth of the hydrophobic substrate binding tunnel, suggesting that the major contribution of the tail to drug efficacy is for pharmacokinetics rather than in interactions with the target. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The structures provide new insights into binding of azoles to CYP51 and mechanisms of potential drug resistance. Our studies define in structural detail the CYP51 therapeutic target in T. cruzi, and

  20. The spliceosomal snRNP core complex of Trypanosoma brucei: Cloning and functional analysis reveals seven Sm protein constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfi, Zsofia; Lücke, Stephan; Lahm, Hans-Werner; Lane, William S.; Kruft, Volker; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Séraphin, Bertrand; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2000-01-01

    Each of the trypanosome small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) U2, U4/U6, and U5, as well as the spliced leader (SL) RNP, contains a core of common proteins, which we have previously identified. This core is unusual because it is not recognized by anti-Sm Abs and it associates with an Sm-related sequence in the trypanosome small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Using peptide sequences derived from affinity-purified U2 snRNP proteins, we have cloned cDNAs for five common proteins of 8.5, 10, 12.5, 14, and 15 kDa of Trypanosoma brucei and identified them as Sm proteins SmF (8.5 kDa), -E (10 kDa), -D1 (12.5 kDa), -G (14 kDa), and -D2 (15 kDa), respectively. Furthermore, we found the trypanosome SmB (T. brucei) and SmD3 (Trypanosoma cruzi) homologues through database searches, thus completing a set of seven canonical Sm proteins. Sequence comparisons of the trypanosome proteins revealed several deviations in highly conserved positions from the Sm consensus motif. We have identified a network of specific heterodimeric and -trimeric Sm protein interactions in vitro. These results are summarized in a model of the trypanosome Sm core, which argues for a strong conservation of the Sm particle structure. The conservation extends also to the functional level, because at least one trypanosome Sm protein, SmG, was able to specifically complement a corresponding mutation in yeast. PMID:10900267

  1. The multiple roles of cyclin E1 in controlling cell cycle progression and cellular morphology of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourguechon, Stéphane; Savich, Jason M; Wang, Ching C

    2007-05-11

    Regulation of eukaryotic cell cycle progression requires sequential activation and inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinases. Previous RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in Trypanosoma brucei indicated that cyclin E1, cdc2-related kinase (CRK)1 and CRK2 are involved in regulating G1/S transition, whereas cyclin B2 and CRK3 play a pivotal role in controlling the G2/M checkpoint. To search for potential interactions between the other cyclins and CRKs that may not have been revealed by the RNAi assays, we used the yeast two-hybrid system and an in vitro glutathione-S-transferase pulldown assay and observed interactions between cyclin E1 and CRK1, CRK2 and CRK3. Cyclins E1-E4 are homologues of yeast Pho80 cyclin. But yeast complementation assays indicated that none of them possesses a Pho80-like function. Analysis of cyclin E1+CRK1 and cyclin E1+CRK2 double knockdowns in the procyclic form of T. brucei indicated that the cells were arrested more extensively in the G1 phase beyond the cumulative effect of individual knockdowns. But BrdU incorporation was impaired significantly only in cyclin E1+CRK1-depleted cells, whereas a higher percentage of cyclin E1+CRK2 knockdown cells assumed a grossly elongated posterior end morphology. A double knockdown of cyclin E1 and CRK3 arrested cells in G2/M much more efficiently than if only CRK3 was depleted. Taken together, these data suggest multiple functions of cyclin E1: it forms a complex with CRK1 in promoting G1/S phase transition; it forms a complex with CRK2 in controlling the posterior morphogenesis during G1/S transition; and it forms a complex with CRK3 in promoting passage across the G2/M checkpoint in the trypanosome. PMID:17376478

  2. The role of biliverdin reductase in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the effects of biliverdin and bilirubin have been studied extensively, and an inhibitory effect of bile pigments in cancer progression has been proposed. In this study we focused on the effects of biliverdin reductase, the enzyme that converts biliverdin to bilirubin, in colorectal cancer. For in vitro experiments we used a human colorectal carcinoma cell line and transfected it with an expression construct of shRNA specific for biliverdin reductase, to create cells with stable knock-down of enzyme expression. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the CASY model TT cell counting device. Western blot protein analysis was performed to study intracellular signaling cascades. Samples of human colorectal cancer were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. We were able to confirm the antiproliferative effects of bile pigments on cancer cells in vitro. However, this effect was attenuated in biliverdin reductase knock down cells. ERK and Akt activation seen under biliverdin and bilirubin treatment was also reduced in biliverdin reductase deficient cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer showed elevated biliverdin reductase levels. High enzyme expression was associated with lower overall and disease free patient survival. We conclude that BVR is required for bile pigment mediated effects regarding cancer cell proliferation and modulation of intracellular signaling cascades. The role of BVR overexpression in vivo and its exact influence on cancer progression and patient survival need to be further investigated. (author)

  3. Population genetics of Trypanosoma brucei circulating in Glossina palpalis palpalis and domestic animals of the Fontem sleeping sickness focus of Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Simo, Gustave; Njitchouang, Guy Roger; Melachio, Tresor Tito Tanekou; Njiokou, Flobert; Cuny, Gerard; Tazoacha, Asonganyi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human African Trypanosomiasis is still a public health threat in Cameroon. To assess Trypanosoma brucei strains circulating in the Fontem sleeping sickness focus, we conducted a genetic structure study using microsatellites to assess genotypes circulating in both tsetse flies and domestic animals. Method: For this study, pyramidal traps were set up and 2695 tsetse flies were collected and 1535 (57%) living flies were dissected and their mid- guts collected. Furthermore, blood samp...

  4. Characterization of a novel trans-sialidase of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic trypomastigotes and identification of procyclin as the main sialic acid acceptor

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Here we report the presence of a trans-sialidase on the surface of Trypanosoma brucei culture-derived procyclic trypomastigotes. The enzyme is not detected in lysates of bloodstream trypomastigotes enriched for either stumpy or slender forms. The trans-sialidase catalyzes the transfer of alpha(2-3)-linked sialic acid residues to lactose. beta-galactopyranosyl residues are at least 100 times better acceptors for sialic acid than alpha-galactopyranosyl residues. In the absence of efficient acce...

  5. A Four-Point Screening Method for Assessing Molecular Mechanism of Action (MMOA) Identifies Tideglusib as a Time-Dependent Inhibitor of Trypanosoma brucei GSK3β

    OpenAIRE

    Swinney, Zachary T.; Haubrich, Brad A.; Xia, Shuangluo; Ramesha, Chakk; Gomez, Stephen R.; Guyett, Paul; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo; Swinney, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background New therapeutics are needed for neglected tropical diseases including Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), a progressive and fatal disease caused by the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. There is a need for simple, efficient, cost effective methods to identify new molecules with unique molecular mechanisms of action (MMOAs). The mechanistic features of a binding mode, such as competition with endogenous substrates and time-dependence can affect...

  6. Effect of experimental single Ancylostoma caninum and mixed infections of Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma congolense on the humoural immune response to anti-rabies vaccination in dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi; Anene Boniface Maduka

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To determine the effect of Ancylostoma caninum (A. caninum) and trypanosome parasites on the immune response to vaccination in dogs in endemic environments. Methods:Sixteen dogs for the experiment were grouped into 4 of 4 members each. Group I was the uninfected control one, and GPII was infected with A. caninum; GPIII was infected with A. caninum/Trypanosoma congolense (T. congolense), and GPIV was infected with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei)/A. caninum. The dogs were first vaccinated with antirabies vaccine before infecting GPII, GPIII and GPIV with A. caninum which were done 4 weeks after vaccination. By 2-week post-vaccination, trypanosome parasites were superimposed on both GPIII and GPIV. A secondary vaccination was given to GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV by Week 12 of the experiment (4 weeks post treatment). Results:The prepatent period was (3.00 ± 1.40) days, in the conjunct infection of T. brucei/A. caninum. It was (9.00 ± 1.10) days, in conjunct T. congolense/A. caninum. The prepatent period of A. caninum was (14.0 ± 2.0) days in the single A. caninum group and (13.0 ± 1.0) days in the conjunct trypanosome/A. caninum. At the 1st week after vaccination, the antibody titer in all the vaccinated groups (GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV) significantly increased (P Conclusions:It was therefore concluded that A. caninum, T. brucei and T. congolense induced immunosuppression in antirabies vaccination in dogs.

  7. Evaluation of the In Vitro Efficacy of Artemisia annua, Rumex abyssinicus, and Catha edulis Forsk Extracts in Cancer and Trypanosoma brucei Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Netsanet Worku; Andualem Mossie; August Stich; Arwid Daugschies; Susanne Trettner; Hemdan, Nasr Y. A.; Gerd Birkenmeier

    2013-01-01

    The current drugs against sleeping sickness are derived from cancer chemotherapeutic approaches. Herein, we aimed at evaluating the in vitro effect of alcoholic extracts of Artemisia annua (AMR), Rumex abyssinicus (RMA), and Catha edulis Forsk (CEF) on proliferation/viability of 1321N1 astrocytoma, MCF-7 breast cancer, THP-1 leukemia, and LNCaP, Du-145, and PC-3 prostate cancer cells and on Trypanosoma brucei cells. Proliferation of tumor cells was evaluated by WST-1 assay and viability/behav...

  8. The de novo and salvage pathways of GDP-mannose biosynthesis are both sufficient for the growth of bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Kuettel, Sabine; Wadum, Majken C T; Güther, Maria Lucia S; Mariño, Karina; Riemer, Carolin; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The sugar nucleotide GDP-mannose is essential for Trypanosoma brucei. Phosphomannose isomerase occupies a key position on the de novo pathway to GDP-mannose from glucose, just before intersection with the salvage pathway from free mannose. We identified the parasite phosphomannose isomerase gene, confirmed that it encodes phosphomannose isomerase activity and localized the endogenous enzyme to the glycosome. We also created a bloodstream-form conditional null mutant of phosphomannose ...

  9. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity is...... controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  10. [Serological evidence of the existence of a wild reservoir of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in the Pendjari biosphere reservation in the Republic of Benin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedegbe, B; Verhulst, A; Van Meirvenne, N; Pandey, V S; Doko, A

    1992-06-01

    In the national park of Pendjari, situated in the North-West of Benin, 91 wild animals, belonging to seven species, were darted. Thick and thin blood smears were examined for trypanosomes and plasma for trypanolytic antibodies against 6 antigenic variants of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Parasites were found in 13.92% and trypanolytic antibodies in 20.88% of the samples. A total of 28.57% of animals were positive by at least one of the two test systems used. Morphologically Trypanosoma congolense, T. vivax and T. brucei were identified. Overall prevalence was 40% in Adenota kob (n: 50), 13.63% in Alcelaphus buselaphus (n: 22), 10% in Hippotragus equinus (n: 10), 33% in Kobus defassa (n: 3), 0% in Phacochoerus aethiopicus (n: 3) and in Syncerus caffer (n: 2). The only lion (Panthera leo) examined was serologically positive. The results indicate that the wild animals are reservoirs of animal trypanosomes and suggest that among them Adenota kob and Panthera leo are carriers of T. brucei gambiense, one of the etiological aspects of human trypanosomiasis. PMID:1417158

  11. Aldo keto reductases 1B in endocrinology and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AntoineMartinez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aldose reductase (human AKR1B1/mouse Akr1b3 has been the focus of many research because of its role in diabetic complications. The starting point of these alterations is the massive entry of glucose in polyol pathway where it is converted into sorbitol by this enzyme. However, the issue of aldose reductase function in non-diabetic condition remains unresolved. Aldose reductase-like enzymes (AKR1B10, Akr1b7 and Akr1b8 are highly related isoforms often co-expressed with bona fide aldose reductase, making functional analysis of one or the other isoform a challenging task. AKR1B/Akr1b members share at least 65% protein identity and the general ability to reduce many redundant substrates such as aldehydes provided from lipid peroxidation, steroids and their by-products and xenobiotics in vitro. Based on these properties, AKR1B/Akr1b are generally considered as detoxifying enzymes. Considering that divergences should be more informative than similarities to help understanding their physiological functions, we chose to review specific hallmarks of each human/mouse isoforms by focusing on tissue distribution and specific mechanisms of gene regulation. Indeed, although the aldose reductase shows ubiquitous expression, aldose reductase-like proteins exhibit tissue-specific patterns of expression. We focused on 3 organs where certain isoforms are enriched, the adrenal gland, enterohepatic and adipose tissues and tried to connect recent enzymatic and regulation data with endocrine and metabolic functions of these organs. We presented recent mouse models showing unsuspected physiological functions in the regulation of glucido-lipidic metabolism and adipose tissue homeostasis. Beyond the widely accepted idea that AKR1B/Akr1b are detoxification enzymes, these recent reports provide growing evidences that they are able to modify or generate signal molecules. This conceptually shifts this class of enzymes from unenviable status of scavenger to upper class of

  12. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 → Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by α-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme

  13. Effect of vanadium on nitrate reductase activity in tomato leaves

    OpenAIRE

    J. Buczek

    2015-01-01

    The activity of nitrate reductase in cell-free extracts from tomato leaves is completely inhibited by 100 μM NaVO3 or VOCl2. In experiments in vivo vanadium ions inhibit the activity of the enzyme in 50 to 60 per cent. Addition of l mM vanadium to the medium on which tomato seedlings are grown causes after 24 h almost complete inhibition of nitrate reductase activity in cell-free extracts of the enzyme. Inhibition with vanadium may be abolished in experiments in vitro if the extract is treate...

  14. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H;

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is......(I) and the trinuclear copper centre in ascorbate oxidase, and the characteristics of the internal ET processes of these enzymes are compared. The data are consistent with the faster ET observed in nitrite reductase arising from a more advantageous entropy of activation when compared with ascorbate...

  15. Artificial electron donors for nitrate and nitrite reductases usable as mediators in amperometric biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strehlitz, B. (Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)); Gruendig, B. (Institut fuer Chemo- und Biosensorik, Muenster-Roxel (Germany)); Vorlop, K.D. (Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Technologie); Bartholmes, P. (Witten-Herdecke Univ., Witten (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemie); Kotte, H. (Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)); Stottmeister, U. (Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    Various nitrate and nitrite reductases are capable of accepting electrons from artificial donors. Combining these redox active donors with an amperometric redox electrode which is covered with an immobilized layer of such a nitrate or nitrite reductase, new enzyme sensors can be created for the detection of nitrate or nitrite, respectively. A range of suitable electron donors for nitrate reductases and nitrite reductase from different sources have been selected and characterized by electrochemical methods. (orig.)

  16. Inhibition of Albendazole and Oxfendazole on the Activity of Fumaric Reductase in Cysticercus cellulosae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xue-jun; LI Qing-zhang; LI Xia

    2004-01-01

    The activity of fumaric reductase in Cysticercus cellulosae tissue homogenate with albendazole and oxfendazole individually was detected. Results showed that the two kinds of drugs both could inhabite the activity of fumaric reductase. The results indicate that the mechanism of action of benzimidazole carbamate drugs is probably inhabiting the complex of fumaric reductase noncompetently, thus lead to the exhaostion of energy and death.

  17. Sepiapterin reductase deficiency an autosomal recessive DOPA-responsive dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.G. Abeling; M. Duran; H.D. Bakker; L. Stroomer; B. Thony; N. Blau; J. Booij; B.T. Poll-The

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of a 14-year-old girl with a new homoallelic mutation in the sepiapterin reductase (SR) gene is reported. Initially she presented at the age of 2 with hypotonia and mild cognitive developmental delay, and was diagnosed as having mild methylmalonic aciduria, which was recently identifie

  18. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  19. Bidirectional catalysis by copper-containing nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijma, HJ; Canters, GW; de Vries, S; Verbeet, MP

    2004-01-01

    The copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 was found to catalyze the oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrite, the reverse of its physiological reaction. Thermodynamic and kinetic constants with the physiological electron donor pseudoazurin were determined for both directions

  20. Thioredoxin reductase from s. Coelicolor as a drug target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koháryová, M.; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kollárová, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 282, Suppl 1 (2015), s. 396. ISSN 1742-464X. [Congress of the Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) - The Biochemical Basis of Life /40./. 04.07.2015-09.07.2015, Berlin] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : thioredoxin reductase * protein structure * drugs Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  1. Isolation and expression of the Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edman, J C; Edman, U; Cao, Mi-Mi;

    1989-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) cDNA sequences have been isolated by their ability to confer trimethoprim resistance to Escherichia coli. Consistent with the recent conclusion that P. carinii is a member of the Fungi...

  2. Fatty Acyl-CoA Reductase 1 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Swisher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Erlangen, Germany; Calgary, CA; and Kafranbel, Syria, identified mutations in the gene, fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 (FAR1 deficiency, adding to three other genes involved in plasmalogen biosynthesis, in two families affected by severe intellectual disability, early-onset epilepsy, microcephaly, congenital cataracts, growth retardation, and spasticity.

  3. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  4. Probing the metabolic network in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei using untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope labelled glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Creek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate.

  5. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P; Phillips, Margaret A

    2015-09-01

    The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5'-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  6. A single amino acid substitution in the group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor abolishes TLF-1 binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E DeJesus

    Full Text Available Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1. This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT, escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens.

  7. A single amino acid substitution in the group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor abolishes TLF-1 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, E; Kieft, R; Albright, B; Stephens, N A; Hajduk, S L

    2013-01-01

    Critical to human innate immunity against African trypanosomes is a minor subclass of human high-density lipoproteins, termed Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1). This primate-specific molecule binds to a haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) on the surface of susceptible trypanosomes, initiating a lytic pathway. Group 1 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), escaping TLF-1 killing due to reduced uptake. Previously, we found that group 1 T. b. gambiense HpHbR (TbgHpHbR) mRNA levels were greatly reduced and the gene contained substitutions within the open reading frame. Here we show that a single, highly conserved amino acid in the TbgHpHbR ablates high affinity TLF-1 binding and subsequent endocytosis, thus evading TLF-1 killing. In addition, we show that over-expression of TbgHpHbR failed to rescue TLF-1 susceptibility. These findings suggest that the single substitution present in the TbgHpHbR directly contributes to the reduced uptake and resistance to TLF-1 seen in these important human pathogens. PMID:23637606

  8. Molecular Evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Sylvatic Cycle in the Human African Trypanosomiasis Foci of Equatorial Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eCordon-Obras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of Gambiense trypanosomiasis.

  9. A pseudouridylation switch in rRNA is implicated in ribosome function during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikne, Vaibhav; Doniger, Tirza; Rajan, K Shanmugha; Bartok, Osnat; Eliaz, Dror; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Tschudi, Christian; Unger, Ron; Hashem, Yaser; Kadener, Sebastian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes devastating diseases in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa, undergoes a complex life cycle between the mammalian host and the blood-feeding tsetse fly vector. However, little is known about how the parasite performs most molecular functions in such different environments. Here, we provide evidence for the intriguing possibility that pseudouridylation of rRNA plays an important role in the capacity of the parasite to transit between the insect midgut and the mammalian bloodstream. Briefly, we mapped pseudouridines (Ψ) on rRNA by Ψ-seq in procyclic form (PCF) and bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes. We detected 68 Ψs on rRNA, which are guided by H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA). The small RNome of both life cycle stages was determined by HiSeq and 83 H/ACAs were identified. We observed an elevation of 21 Ψs modifications in BSF as a result of increased levels of the guiding snoRNAs. Overexpression of snoRNAs guiding modification on H69 provided a slight growth advantage to PCF parasites at 30 °C. Interestingly, these modifications are predicted to significantly alter the secondary structure of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA suggesting that hypermodified positions may contribute to the adaption of ribosome function during cycling between the two hosts. PMID:27142987

  10. A global comparison of the human and T. brucei degradomes gives insights about possible parasite drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan T Mashiyama

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-level computational study of sequence and structure similarity, the latter using crystal structures and models, of the proteases of Homo sapiens and the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Using sequence and structure similarity networks to summarize the results, we constructed global views that show visually the relative abundance and variety of proteases in the degradome landscapes of these two species, and provide insights into evolutionary relationships between proteases. The results also indicate how broadly these sequence sets are covered by three-dimensional structures. These views facilitate cross-species comparisons and offer clues for drug design from knowledge about the sequences and structures of potential drug targets and their homologs. Two protease groups ("M32" and "C51" that are very different in sequence from human proteases are examined in structural detail, illustrating the application of this global approach in mining new pathogen genomes for potential drug targets. Based on our analyses, a human ACE2 inhibitor was selected for experimental testing on one of these parasite proteases, TbM32, and was shown to inhibit it. These sequence and structure data, along with interactive versions of the protein similarity networks generated in this study, are available at http://babbittlab.ucsf.edu/resources.html.

  11. Rapid Identification of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Compounds from Perilla frutescens

    OpenAIRE

    Soon Sung Lim; Ji Hun Paek; Kuk Hyun Shin; Young-Hee Kang; Jae-Yong Lee

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens) inhibits aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural a...

  12. Determination of plasma gluthatione reductase enzyme activity in osteoporotic women

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi N; Oveisi M.R.; Jannat B.; Hajimahmoodi M; Jamshidi A.R; Sajadian Z.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a disease of high prevalence with increased bone loss. Free radicals have been proved to be involved in bone resorption. Glutathione reductase (GR) plays an essential role in cell defense against reactive oxygen metabolites by sustaining the reduced status of an important antioxidant, glutathione. In the present study GR activity of plasma as an antioxidant enzyme in relation to Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was investigated.Material and Method: GR activity was measur...

  13. Glutathione reductase: solvent equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glutathione reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). The kinetic mechanism is ping-pong, and we have investigated the rate-limiting nature of proton-transfer steps in the reactions catalyzed by the spinach, yeast, and human erythrocyte glutathione reductases using a combination of alternate substrate and solvent kinetic isotope effects. With NADPH or GSSG as the variable substrate, at a fixed, saturating concentration of the other substrate, solvent kinetic isotope effects were observed on V but not V/K. Plots of Vm vs mole fraction of D2O (proton inventories) were linear in both cases for the yeast, spinach, and human erythrocyte enzymes. When solvent kinetic isotope effect studies were performed with DTNB instead of GSSG as an alternate substrate, a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 1.0 was observed. Solvent kinetic isotope effect measurements were also performed on the asymmetric disulfides GSSNB and GSSNP by using human erythrocyte glutathione reductase. The Km values for GSSNB and GSSNP were 70 microM and 13 microM, respectively, and V values were 62 and 57% of the one calculated for GSSG, respectively. Both of these substrates yield solvent kinetic isotope effects greater than 1.0 on both V and V/K and linear proton inventories, indicating that a single proton-transfer step is still rate limiting. These data are discussed in relationship to the chemical mechanism of GSSG reduction and the identity of the proton-transfer step whose rate is sensitive to solvent isotopic composition. Finally, the solvent equilibrium isotope effect measured with yeast glutathione reductase is 4.98, which allows us to calculate a fractionation factor for the thiol moiety of GSH of 0.456

  14. Internal electron transfer within mitochondrial succinate-cytochrome C reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal electron transfer within succinate-cytochrome C reductase from pigeon breast muscle mitochondria was followed by the pulse radiolytic technique. The electron equivalent is transferred from an unknown donor to b type cytochrome(s), in a first order process with a rate constant of: 660 +- 150s-1. This process might be the rate determining step of electron transfer in mitochondria, since it is similar in rate to the turnover number of the mitochondrial respiratory chain

  15. Aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily: Genomics and annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Mindnich Rebekka D; Penning Trevor M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are phase I metabolising enzymes that catalyse the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H)-dependent reduction of carbonyl groups to yield primary and secondary alcohols on a wide range of substrates, including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones, ketoprostaglan-dins, ketosteroids and xenobiotics. In so doing they functionalise the carbonyl group for conjugation (phase II enzyme reactions). Although functionally diverse, AK...

  16. Effect of experimental single Ancylostoma caninum and mixed infections of Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma congolense on the humoural immune response to anti-rabies vaccination in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effect of Ancylostoma caninum (A. caninum and trypanosome parasites on the immune response to vaccination in dogs in endemic environments. Methods: Sixteen dogs for the experiment were grouped into 4 of 4 members each. Group I was the uninfected control one, and GPII was infected with A. caninum; GPIII was infected with A. caninum/Trypanosoma congolense (T. congolense, and GPIV was infected with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei/A. caninum. The dogs were first vaccinated with antirabies vaccine before infecting GPII, GPIII and GPIV with A. caninum which were done 4 weeks after vaccination. By 2-week post-vaccination, trypanosome parasites were superimposed on both GPIII and GPIV. A secondary vaccination was given to GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV by Week 12 of the experiment (4 weeks post treatment. Results: The prepatent period was (3.00 ± 1.40 days, in the conjunct infection of T. brucei/ A. caninum. It was (9.00 ± 1.10 days, in conjunct T. congolense/A. caninum. The prepatent period of A. caninum was (14.0 ± 2.0 days in the single A. caninum group and (13.0 ± 1.0 days in the conjunct trypanosome/A. caninum. At the 1st week after vaccination, the antibody titer in all the vaccinated groups (GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV significantly increased (P < 0.05 and peaked at the 3rd week after vaccination. Following infections, there were marked significant decreases (P < 0.05 in the antibody production against rabies in GPII, GPIII and GPIV. The significant decrease (P < 0.05 in antibody titer was highest in the conjunct groups (GPIII and GPIV compared to the single infection (GPII. Treatment with diminazene aceturate and mebendazole did not significantly improve antibody response in the dogs. A secondary vaccination administered at the 12th week after the primary vaccination significantly increased (P < 0.05 the antibody titer with a peak at the 3rd week after the secondary vaccination. Conclusions: It was therefore concluded

  17. Phosphoglycerate kinase acts in tumour angiogenesis as a disulphide reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Angelina J.; Jiang, Xing-Mai; Kisker, Oliver; Flynn, Evelyn; Underwood, Anne; Condron, Rosemary; Hogg, Philip J.

    2000-12-01

    Disulphide bonds in secreted proteins are considered to be inert because of the oxidizing nature of the extracellular milieu. An exception to this rule is a reductase secreted by tumour cells that reduces disulphide bonds in the serine proteinase plasmin. Reduction of plasmin initiates proteolytic cleavage in the kringle 5 domain and release of the tumour blood vessel inhibitor angiostatin. New blood vessel formation or angiogenesis is critical for tumour expansion and metastasis. Here we show that the plasmin reductase isolated from conditioned medium of fibrosarcoma cells is the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase. Recombinant phosphoglycerate kinase had the same specific activity as the fibrosarcoma-derived protein. Plasma of mice bearing fibrosarcoma tumours contained several-fold more phosphoglycerate kinase, as compared with mice without tumours. Administration of phosphoglycerate kinase to tumour-bearing mice caused an increase in plasma levels of angiostatin, and a decrease in tumour vascularity and rate of tumour growth. Our findings indicate that phosphoglycerate kinase not only functions in glycolysis but is secreted by tumour cells and participates in the angiogenic process as a disulphide reductase.

  18. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  19. Cloning and sequence of the human adrenodoxin reductase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrenodoxin reductase is a flavoprotein mediating electron transport to all mitochondrial forms of cytochrome P450. The authors cloned the human adrenodoxin reductase gene and characterized it by restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA sequencing. The entire gene is approximately 12 kilobases long and consists of 12 exons. The first exon encodes the first 26 of the 32 amino acids of the signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the remainder of signal peptide and the apparent FAD binding site. The remaining 10 exons are clustered in a region of only 4.3 kilobases, separated from the first two exons by a large intron of about 5.6 kilobases. Two forms of human adrenodoxin reductase mRNA, differing by the presence or absence of 18 bases in the middle of the sequence, arise from alternate splicing at the 5' end of exon 7. This alternately spliced region is directly adjacent to the NADPH binding site, which is entirely contained in exon 6. The immediate 5' flanking region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes; however, this region is rich in G+C and contains six copies of the sequence GGGCGGG, resembling promoter sequences of housekeeping genes. RNase protection experiments show that transcription is initiated from multiple sites in the 5' flanking region, located about 21-91 base pairs upstream from the AUG translational initiation codon

  20. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Infections in Mice Lead to Tropism to the Reproductive Organs, and Horizontal and Vertical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteau, Nicolas; Asencio, Corinne; Izotte, Julien; Rousseau, Benoit; Fèvre, Muriel; Pillay, Davita; Baltz, Théo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, transmitted by the tsetse fly, is the main causative agent of Human African trypanosomosis in West Africa and poses a significant health risk to 70 million people. Disease progression varies depending on host immunity, but usually begins with a haemo-lymphatic phase, followed by parasite invasion of the central nervous system. In the current study, the tropism of T. b. gambiense 1135, causing a low level chronic 'silent' infection, was monitored in a murine model using bioluminescence imaging and PCR. A tropism to the reproductive organs, in addition to the central nervous system, after 12-18 months of infection was observed. Bioluminescent analysis of healthy females crossed with infected males showed that 50%, 62.5% and 37.5% of the female mice were subsequently positive for parasites in their ovaries, uteri and brain respectively. Although PCR confirmed the presence of parasites in the uterus of one of these mice, the blood of all mice was negative by PCR and LAMP. Subsequently, bioluminescent imaging of the offspring of infected female mice crossed with healthy males indicated parasites were present in the reproductive organs of both male (80%) and female (60%) offspring. These findings imply that transmission of T. b. gambiense 1135 occurs horizontally, most probably via sexual contact, and vertically in a murine model, which raises the possibility of a similar transmission in humans. This has wide reaching implications. Firstly, the observations made in this study are likely to be valid for wild animals acting as a reservoir for T. b. gambiense. Also, the reproductive organs may act as a refuge for parasites during drug treatment in a similar manner to the central nervous system. This could leave patients at risk of a relapse, ultimately allowing them to act as a reservoir for subsequent transmission by tsetse and possibly, horizontally and vertically. PMID:26735855

  1. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma brucei Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase and Implications for Selective Treatment of Human Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Park, Hee-Won; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Harp, Joel M.; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Nes, W. David; Pays, Etienne; Chaudhuri, Minu; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R. (ULdB); (Vanderbilt); (TTU); (Toronto); (NWU); (Meharry)

    2010-01-25

    Sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (14DM, the CYP51 family of cytochrome P450) is an essential enzyme in sterol biosynthesis in eukaryotes. It serves as a major drug target for fungal diseases and can potentially become a target for treatment of human infections with protozoa. Here we present 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of 14DM from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma brucei, ligand-free and complexed with a strong chemically selected inhibitor N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl-4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadi-azol-2-yl)benzamide that we previously found to produce potent antiparasitic effects in Trypanosomatidae. This is the first structure of a eukaryotic microsomal 14DM that acts on sterol biosynthesis, and it differs profoundly from that of the water-soluble CYP51 family member from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, both in organization of the active site cavity and in the substrate access channel location. Inhibitor binding does not cause large scale conformational rearrangements, yet induces unanticipated local alterations in the active site, including formation of a hydrogen bond network that connects, via the inhibitor amide group fragment, two remote functionally essential protein segments and alters the heme environment. The inhibitor binding mode provides a possible explanation for both its functionally irreversible effect on the enzyme activity and its selectivity toward the 14DM from human pathogens versus the human 14DM ortholog. The structures shed new light on 14DM functional conservation and open an excellent opportunity for directed design of novel antiparasitic drugs.

  2. Functional and structural insights revealed by molecular dynamics simulations of an essential RNA editing ligase in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommie E Amaro

    Full Text Available RNA editing ligase 1 (TbREL1 is required for the survival of both the insect and bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for the devastating tropical disease African sleeping sickness. The type of RNA editing that TbREL1 is involved in is unique to the trypanosomes, and no close human homolog is known to exist. In addition, the high-resolution crystal structure revealed several unique features of the active site, making this enzyme a promising target for structure-based drug design. In this work, two 20 ns atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations are employed to investigate the dynamics of TbREL1, both with and without the ATP substrate present. The flexibility of the active site, dynamics of conserved residues and crystallized water molecules, and the interactions between TbREL1 and the ATP substrate are investigated and discussed in the context of TbREL1's function. Differences in local and global motion upon ATP binding suggest that two peripheral loops, unique to the trypanosomes, may be involved in interdomain signaling events. Notably, a significant structural rearrangement of the enzyme's active site occurs during the apo simulations, opening an additional cavity adjacent to the ATP binding site that could be exploited in the development of effective inhibitors directed against this protozoan parasite. Finally, ensemble averaged electrostatics calculations over the MD simulations reveal a novel putative RNA binding site, a discovery that has previously eluded scientists. Ultimately, we use the insights gained through the MD simulations to make several predictions and recommendations, which we anticipate will help direct future experimental studies and structure-based drug discovery efforts against this vital enzyme.

  3. Immunological comparison of the NADH:nitrate reductase from different cucumber tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanta Marciniak; Grażyna Kłobus; Józef Buczek; Tadeusz Stefaniak; Jarosław Mazur

    2014-01-01

    Soluble nitrate reductase from cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L.) was isolated and purified with blue-Sepharose 4B. Specific antibodies against the NR protein were raised by immunization of a goat. Using polyclonal antibodies anti-NR properties of the nitrate reductase from various cucumber tissues were examined. Experiments showed difference in immuno-logical properties of nitrate reductase (NR) from cotyledon roots and leaves.

  4. Immunological comparison of the NADH:nitrate reductase from different cucumber tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Marciniak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Soluble nitrate reductase from cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L. was isolated and purified with blue-Sepharose 4B. Specific antibodies against the NR protein were raised by immunization of a goat. Using polyclonal antibodies anti-NR properties of the nitrate reductase from various cucumber tissues were examined. Experiments showed difference in immuno-logical properties of nitrate reductase (NR from cotyledon roots and leaves.

  5. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT-Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. Methods The fresh frozen tissue sections (8m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. Results  The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. Conclusion The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  6. RNA interference analyses suggest a transcript-specific regulatory role for mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 in RNA editing and other RNA processing in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková, Eva; Van Den Burg, J.; Zíková, Alena; Ernst, N. L.; Stuart, K.; Benne, R.; Lukeš, Julius

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 280, č. 4 (2005), s. 2429-2438. ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma brucei * RNA editing * interference RNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2005

  7. The effect of copper and gallium compounds on ribonucleotide reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, J.

    1992-01-01

    The mode of action of copper complexes (CuL and CuKTS) and gallium compounds (gallium nitrate and citrate) in cytotoxicity was studied. The effects of these agents on the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase was investigated by monitoring the tyrosyl free radical present in the active site of the enzyme through electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Ribonucleotide reductase, a key enzyme in cellular proliferation, consists of two subunits. M1, a dimer of molecular weight 170,000 contains the substrate and effector binding sites. M2, a dimer of molecular weight 88,000, contains non-heme iron and tyrosyl free radical essential for the activity of the enzyme. In studies using copper complexes, the cellular oxidative chemistry was examined by ESR studies on adduct formation with membranes, and oxidation of thiols. Membrane thiols were oxidized through the reduction of the ESR signal of the thiol adduct and the analysis of sulfhydryl content. Using the radiolabel [sup 59]Fe, the inhibitory action of copper thiosemicarbazones on cellular iron uptake was shown. The inhibitory action of CuL on ribonucleotide reductase was shown by the quenching of the tyrosyl free radical on the M2 subunit. The hypothesis that gallium directly interacts with the M2 subunit of the enzyme and displaces the iron from it was proven. The tyrosyl free radical signal from cell lysates was inhibited by the direct addition of gallium compounds. Gallium content in the cells was measured by a fluorimetric method, to ensure the presence of sufficient amounts of gallium to compete with the iron in the M2 subunit. The enzyme activity, measured by the conversion of [sup 14]C-CDP to the labeled deoxy CDP, was inhibited by the addition of gallium nitrate in a cell free assay system. The immunoprecipitation studies of the [sup 59]Fe labeled M2 protein using the monoclonal antibody directed against this subunit suggested that gallium releases iron from the M2 subunit.

  8. biliverdin. Is there a role for biliverdin reductase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndreasDaiber

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and signaling events are involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and represent a major contribution to vascular regulation. Molecular signaling is highly dependent on reactive oxygen species. But depending on the amount of ROS production it might have toxic or protective effects. Despite a large number of negative outcomes in large clinical trials (e.g. HOPE, HOPE-TOO, antioxidant molecules and agents are important players to influence the critical balance between production and elimination of RONS. However, chronic systemic antioxidant therapy lacks clinical efficacy, probably by interfering with important physiological redox signaling pathways. Therefore, it may be a much more promising attempt to induce intrinsic antioxidant pathways in order to increase the antioxidants not systemically but at the place of oxidative stress and complications. Among others, heme oxygenase (HO has been shown to be important for attenuating the overall production of ROS in a broad range of disease states through its ability to degrade heme and to produce carbon monoxide (CO, biliverdin/bilirubin, and the release of free iron with subsequent ferritin induction. With the present review we would like to highlight the important antioxidant role of the heme oxygenase system and especially discuss the contribution of the biliverdin, bilirubin and biliverdin reductase to these beneficial effects. The bilierdin reductase was reported to confer an antioxidant redox amplification cycle by which low, physiological bilirubin concentrations confer potent antioxidant protection via recycling of biliverdin from oxidized bilirubin by the biliverdin reductase, linking this sink for oxidants to the NADPH pool. To date the existence and role of this antioxidant redox cycle is still under debate and we present and discuss the pros and cons as well as our own findings on this topic.

  9. Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy Targets Aldose Reductase and SOD2

    OpenAIRE

    Prunotto, Marco; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Candiano, Giovanni; Murtas, Corrado; Bruschi, Maurizio; Corradini, Emilia; Trivelli, Antonella; Magnasco, Alberto; Petretto, Andrea; Santucci, Laura; Mattei, Silvia; Gatti, Rita; Scolari, Francesco; Kador, Peter; Allegri, Landino

    2010-01-01

    Glomerular targets of autoimmunity in human membranous nephropathy are poorly understood. Here, we used a combined proteomic approach to identify specific antibodies against podocyte proteins in both serum and glomeruli of patients with membranous nephropathy (MN). We detected specific anti–aldose reductase (AR) and anti–manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) IgG4 in sera of patients with MN. We also eluted high titers of anti-AR and anti-SOD2 IgG4 from microdissected glomeruli of three biopsi...

  10. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-04-24

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  11. Mediated electrochemistry of dimethyl sulfoxide reductase promoted by carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BERNHARDT; Paul; V

    2010-01-01

    Mediated electrochemistry of dimethyl sulfoxide reductase from Rhodobacter capsulatus (DMSOR) which is immobilized on a bare glassy carbon (GC) electrode and a carbon nanotube (CNT)-modified GC electrode was studied using the Co complex (trans-6,13-dimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-6,13-diamine)cobalt(III) ([Co(trans-diammac)] +) as a mediator.The cyclic voltammograms of different electrodes were carried out at different substrate (DMSO) concentrations.The results demonstrated that the catalytic current was increased by employing CNT as a promoter.

  12. Vibrio harveyi Nitroreductase Is Also a Chromate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Young Hak; Lee, Dong Seok; Kim, Han Bok

    2003-01-01

    The chromate reductase purified from Pseudomonas ambigua was found to be homologous with several nitroreductases. Escherichia coli DH5α and Vibrio harveyi KCTC 2720 nitroreductases were chosen for the present study, and their chromate-reducing activities were determined. A fusion between glutathione S-transferase (GST) and E. coli DH5α NfsA (GST-EcNfsA), a fusion between GST and E. coli DH5α NfsB (GST-EcNfsB), and a fusion between GST and V. harveyi KCTC 2720 NfsA (GST-VhNfsA) were prepared f...

  13. Pulse radiolysis studies on superoxide reductase from Treponema pallidum.

    OpenAIRE

    Nivière, V; Lombard, M.; Fontecave, M.; Houée-Levin, C

    2001-01-01

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are small metalloenzymes, which catalyze reduction of O2*- to H2O2. The reaction of the enzyme from Treponema pallidum with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bi-molecular reaction of the ferrous center with O2, with a rate constant of 6 x 10 (8) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one with a slower rate constant of 4800 s(-1). This latter value is 10 times higher than the ...

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency presenting as a rash.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crushell, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    We report on the case of a 2-year-old girl recently diagnosed with Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency who originally presented in the neonatal period with a distinctive rash. At 11 weeks of age she developed seizures, she had acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The rash deteriorated dramatically following commencement of phenobarbitone; both rash and seizures abated following empiric introduction of pyridoxine and folinic acid as treatment of possible vitamin responsive seizures. We postulate that phenobarbitone in combination with MTHFR deficiency may have caused her rash to deteriorate and subsequent folinic acid was helpful in treating the rash and preventing further acute neurological decline as commonly associated with this condition.

  15. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-Based Analysis of β-D-Glucosyl-5-Hydroxymethyluracil in Genomic DNA of Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuo; Ji, Debin; Cliffe, Laura; Sabatini, Robert; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-10-01

    β-D-glucosyl-5-hydroxymethyluracil (base J) is a hyper-modified nucleobase found in the nuclear DNA of kinetoplastid parasites. With replacement of a fraction of thymine in DNA, J is localized primarily in telomeric regions of all organisms carrying this modified base. The biosynthesis of J occurs in two putative steps: first, a specific thymine in DNA is recognized and converted into 5-hydroxymethyluracil (5-HmU) by J-binding proteins (JBP1 and JBP2); a glucosyl transferase (GT) subsequently glucosylates the 5-HmU to yield J. Although several recent studies revealed the roles of internal J in regulating transcription in kinetoplastids, functions of telomeric J and proteins involved in J synthesis remain elusive. Assessing the functions of base J and understanding fully its biosynthesis necessitate the measurement of its level in cells and organisms. In this study, we reported a reversed-phase HPLC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method, together with the use of a surrogate internal standard (β-D-glucosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-gHmdC), for the accurate detection of β-D-glucosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (dJ) in Trypanosoma brucei DNA. For comparison, we also measured the level of the precursor for dJ synthesis [i.e. 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-HmdU)]. We found that base J was not detectable in the JBP-null cells whereas it replaced approximately 0.5% thymine in wild-type cells, which was accompanied with a markedly decreased level of 5-HmdU in JBP1/JBP2-null strain relative to the wild-type strain. These results provided direct evidence supporting that JBP proteins play an important role in oxidizing thymidine to form 5-HmdU, which facilitated the generation of dJ. This is the first report about the application of LC-MS/MS for the quantification of base J. The analytical method built a solid foundation for dissecting the molecular mechanisms of J biosynthesis and assessing the biological functions of base J in the

  16. Evaluation of 5α-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful as antiandrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahata, A; Dixit, V K

    2014-08-01

    This study demonstrates 5α-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful in the management of androgenic disorders. Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst (GL), Urtica dioica Linn. (UD), Caesalpinia bonducella Fleming. (CB), Tribulus terrestris Linn. (TT), Pedalium murex Linn. (PM), Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. (SI), Cuscuta reflexa Roxb. (CR), Citrullus colocynthis Schrad. (CC), Benincasa hispida Cogn. (BH), Phyllanthus niruri Linn. (PN) and Echinops echinatus Linn. (EE) were included in the study. Petroleum ether, ethanol and aqueous extracts of these herbs were tested for their 5α-reductase inhibitory activity against the standard 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. A biochemical method to determine the activity of 5α-reductase was used to evaluate the inhibition of different extracts to the enzyme. The optical density (OD) value of each sample was measured continuously with ultraviolet spectrophotometer for the reason that the substrate NADPH has a specific absorbance at 340 nm. As the enzyme 5α-reductase uses NADPH as a substrate, so in the presence of 5α-reductase inhibitor, the NADPH concentration will increase with the function of time. This method thus implicates the activity of 5α-reductase. The method proved to be extremely useful to screen the herbs for their 5α-reductase inhibitory potential. GL, UD, BH, SI and CR came out to be promising candidates for further exploring their antiandrogenic properties. PMID:23710567

  17. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  18. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael;

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression. ...

  19. Functions of Flavin Reductase and Quinone Reductase in 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Degradation by Cupriavidus necator JMP134▿

    OpenAIRE

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Xun, Luying

    2007-01-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a toxic pollutant. TcpA is a reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-dependent monooxygenase that converts 2,4,6-TCP to 6-chlorohydroxyquinone. It has been implied via genetic analysis that TcpX acts as an FAD reductase to supply TcpA with FADH2, whereas the function of TcpB in 2,4,6-TCP degradation is still unclear. In order to provide direct biochemical evidence for t...

  20. MEK2 regulates ribonucleotide reductase activity through functional interaction with ribonucleotide reductase small subunit p53R2

    OpenAIRE

    Piao, Chunmei; Youn, Cha-Kyung; Jin, Min; Yoon, Sang Pil; Chang, In-Youb; Lee, Jung Hee; You, Ho Jin

    2012-01-01

    The p53R2 protein, a newly identified member of the ribonucleotide reductase family that provides nucleotides for DNA damage repair, is directly regulated by p53. We show that p53R2 is also regulated by a MEK2 (ERK kinase 2/MAP kinase kinase 2)-dependent pathway. Increased MEK1/2 phosphorylation by serum stimulation coincided with an increase in the RNR activity in U2OS and H1299 cells. The inhibition of MEK2 activity, either by treatment with a MEK inhibitor or by transfection with MEK2 siRN...

  1. The effect of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the growth, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleiden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Buczek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion into the medium of 5 mg•dm-3 of non-ionic (ENF or ionic (DBST surfactant caused 50-60% inhibition of nitrite reductase MR activity in S. polyrrhiza. At the same time, increased accumulation of NO2- in the plant tissues and lowering of the total and soluble protein contents were found. DBST also lowered the nitrate reductase (NR activity and the dry mass of the plants.

  2. Co-Expression of Monodehydroascorbate Reductase and Dehydroascorbate Reductase from Brassica rapa Effectively Confers Tolerance to Freezing-Induced Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Sun-Young; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yul-Ho; Park, Hyang-Mi; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to various environmental stresses and have therefore developed antioxidant enzymes and molecules to protect their cellular components against toxicity derived from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ascorbate is a very important antioxidant molecule in plants, and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR; EC 1.6.5.4) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR; EC 1.8.5.1) are essential to regeneration of ascorbate for maintenance of ROS scavenging ability. The MDHAR and DHAR genes from ...

  3. Optimisation of nitrate reductase enzyme activity to synthesise silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodashenas, Bahareh; Ghorbani, Hamid Reza

    2016-06-01

    Today, the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) is very common since it has many applications in different areas. The synthesis of these nanoparticles is done by means of physical, chemical, or biological methods. However, due to its inexpensive and environmentally friendly features, the biological method is more preferable. In the present study, using nitrate reductase enzyme available in the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium, the biosynthesis of Ag NPs was investigated. In addition, the activity of the nitrate reductase enzyme was optimised by changing its cultural conditions, and the effects of silver nitrate (AgNO3) concentration and enzyme amount on nanoparticles synthesis were studied. Finally, the produced nanoparticles were studied using ultraviolet -visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering technique, and transmission electron microscopy. UV-Visible spectrophotometric study showed the characteristic peak for Ag NPs at wavelength 405-420 nm for 1 mM metal precursor solution (AgNO3) with 1, 5, 10, and 20 cc supernatant and 435 nm for 0.01M AgNO3 with 20 cc supernatant. In this study, it was found that there is a direct relationship between the AgNO3 concentration and the size of produced Ag NPs. PMID:27256897

  4. Azotobacter vinelandii NADPH:ferredoxin reductase cloning, sequencing, and overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isas, J M; Yannone, S M; Burgess, B K

    1995-09-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I (AvFdI) controls the expression of another protein that was originally designated Protein X. Recently we reported that Protein X is a NADPH-specific flavoprotein that binds specifically to FdI (Isas, J.M., and Burgess, B.K. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 19404-19409). The gene encoding this protein has now been cloned and sequenced. Protein X is 33% identical and has an overall 53% similarity with the fpr gene product from Escherichia coli that encodes NADPH:ferredoxin reductase. On the basis of this similarity and the similarity of the physical properties of the two proteins, we now designate Protein X as A. vinelandii NADPH:ferredoxin reductase and its gene as the fpr gene. The protein has been overexpressed in its native background in A. vinelandii by using the broad host range multicopy plasmid, pKT230. In addition to being regulated by FdI, the fpr gene product is overexpressed when A. vinelandii is grown under N2-fixing conditions even though the fpr gene is not preceded by a nif specific promoter. By analogy to what is known about fpr expression in E. coli, we propose that FdI may exert its regulatory effect on fpr by interacting with the SoxRS regulon. PMID:7673160

  5. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  6. Pinpointing a Mechanistic Switch Between Ketoreduction and "Ene" Reduction in Short-Chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygidakis, Antonios; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Hoeven, Robin; Ní Cheallaigh, Aisling; Leys, David; Gardiner, John M; Toogood, Helen S; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-08-01

    Three enzymes of the Mentha essential oil biosynthetic pathway are highly homologous, namely the ketoreductases (-)-menthone:(-)-menthol reductase and (-)-menthone:(+)-neomenthol reductase, and the "ene" reductase isopiperitenone reductase. We identified a rare catalytic residue substitution in the last two, and performed comparative crystal structure analyses and residue-swapping mutagenesis to investigate whether this determines the reaction outcome. The result was a complete loss of native activity and a switch between ene reduction and ketoreduction. This suggests the importance of a catalytic glutamate vs. tyrosine residue in determining the outcome of the reduction of α,β-unsaturated alkenes, due to the substrate occupying different binding conformations, and possibly also to the relative acidities of the two residues. This simple switch in mechanism by a single amino acid substitution could potentially generate a large number of de novo ene reductases. PMID:27411040

  7. Functional complementation of a nitrate reductase defective mutant of a green alga Dunaliella viridis by introducing the nitrate reductase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Gao, Xiaoshu; Li, Qiyun; Zhang, Qingqi; Xu, Zhengkai

    2006-08-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes NAD (P) H dependent reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Transformation systems have been established in several species of green algae by nitrate reductase gene functional complementation. In this report, an endogenous NR cDNA (3.4 kb) and a genomic fragment (14.6 kb) containing the NR gene (DvNIA1) were isolated from the D. viridis cDNA and genomic libraries respectively. Southern blot and Northern blot analyses showed that this gene exists as a single copy in D. viridis and is induced by nitrate. To obtain a NR defective mutant as a recipient strain, D. viridis cells were treated with a chemical mutagen and then cultured on a chlorate-containing plate to enrich chlorate tolerant mutants. Southern analysis showed that one isolate, B14, had a deletion in the DvNIA1 gene region. Using electroporation conditions determined in this laboratory, plasmid pDVNR containing the intact DvNIA1 gene has been electroporated into the defective mutant B14. Strains retaining a nitrate assimilation phenotype were obtained from nitrate plates after spreading the electroporated cells. In some individual strains, transcription of the introduced gene was detected. NR activity in these strains was slightly higher than that in the defective B14 cell, but excretion of nitrite into culture media was almost as high as that of the wild-type cell. Possible episomal presence of the introduced DNA in D. viridis is discussed. PMID:16797881

  8. Comparative analysis of respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation in Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, Zdeněk; Cermáková, Petra; Skodová, Ingrid; Kováčová, Bianka; Lukeš, Julius; Horváth, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular parasites living in a wide range of host environments, which to large extent shaped their mitochondrial energy metabolism, resulting in quite large differences even among closely related flagellates. In a comparative manner, we analyzed the activities and composition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in four species (Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and Trypanosoma brucei), which represent the main model trypanosomatids. Moreover, we measured the activity of mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the overall oxygen consumption and the mitochondrial membrane potential in each species. The comparative analysis suggests an inverse relationship between the activities of respiratory complexes I and II, as well as the overall activity of the canonical complexes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our comparative analysis shows that mitochondrial functions are highly variable in these versatile parasites. PMID:24556248

  9. Vibrio harveyi Nitroreductase Is Also a Chromate Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Young Hak; Lee, Dong Seok; Kim, Han Bok

    2003-01-01

    The chromate reductase purified from Pseudomonas ambigua was found to be homologous with several nitroreductases. Escherichia coli DH5α and Vibrio harveyi KCTC 2720 nitroreductases were chosen for the present study, and their chromate-reducing activities were determined. A fusion between glutathione S-transferase (GST) and E. coli DH5α NfsA (GST-EcNfsA), a fusion between GST and E. coli DH5α NfsB (GST-EcNfsB), and a fusion between GST and V. harveyi KCTC 2720 NfsA (GST-VhNfsA) were prepared for their overproduction and easy purification. GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNFsB, and GST-VhNFsA efficiently reduced nitrofurazone and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as their nitro substrates. The Km values for GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA for chromate reduction were 11.8, 23.5, and 5.4 μM, respectively. The Vmax values for GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA were 3.8, 3.9, and 10.7 nmol/min/mg of protein, respectively. GST-VhNfsA was the most effective of the three chromate reductases, as determined by each Vmax/Km value. The optimal temperatures of GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA for chromate reduction were 55, 30, and 30°C, respectively. Thus, it is confirmed that nitroreductase can also act as a chromate reductase. Nitroreductases may be used in chromate remediation. GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA have a molecular mass of 50 kDa and exist as a monomer in solution. Thin-layer chromatography showed that GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA contain FMN as a cofactor. GST-VhNfsA reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Cr(III) was much less toxic to E. coli than Cr(VI). PMID:12902220

  10. Structures of Trypanosoma brucei methionyl-tRNA synthetase with urea-based inhibitors provide guidance for drug design against sleeping sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Yeow Koh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Methionyl-tRNA synthetase of Trypanosoma brucei (TbMetRS is an important target in the development of new antitrypanosomal drugs. The enzyme is essential, highly flexible and displaying a large degree of changes in protein domains and binding pockets in the presence of substrate, product and inhibitors. Targeting this protein will benefit from a profound understanding of how its structure adapts to ligand binding. A series of urea-based inhibitors (UBIs has been developed with IC50 values as low as 19 nM against the enzyme. The UBIs were shown to be orally available and permeable through the blood-brain barrier, and are therefore candidates for development of drugs for the treatment of late stage human African trypanosomiasis. Here, we expand the structural diversity of inhibitors from the previously reported collection and tested for their inhibitory effect on TbMetRS and on the growth of T. brucei cells. The binding modes and binding pockets of 14 UBIs are revealed by determination of their crystal structures in complex with TbMetRS at resolutions between 2.2 Å to 2.9 Å. The structures show binding of the UBIs through conformational selection, including occupancy of the enlarged methionine pocket and the auxiliary pocket. General principles underlying the affinity of UBIs for TbMetRS are derived from these structures, in particular the optimum way to fill the two binding pockets. The conserved auxiliary pocket might play a role in binding tRNA. In addition, a crystal structure of a ternary TbMetRS•inhibitor•AMPPCP complex indicates that the UBIs are not competing with ATP for binding, instead are interacting with ATP through hydrogen bond. This suggests a possibility that a general 'ATP-engaging' binding mode can be utilized for the design and development of inhibitors targeting tRNA synthetases of other disease-causing pathogen.

  11. Characterization of a Novel Class I Transcription Factor A (CITFA) Subunit That Is Indispensable for Transcription by the Multifunctional RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, T. N.

    2012-10-26

    Trypanosoma brucei is the only organism known to have evolved a multifunctional RNA polymerase I (pol I) system that is used to express the parasite\\'s ribosomal RNAs, as well as its major cell surface antigens, namely, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) and procyclin, which are vital for establishing successful infections in the mammalian host and the tsetse vector, respectively. Thus far, biochemical analyses of the T. brucei RNA pol I transcription machinery have elucidated the subunit structure of the enzyme and identified the class I transcription factor A (CITFA). CITFA binds to RNA pol I promoters, and its CITFA-2 subunit was shown to be absolutely essential for RNA pol I transcription in the parasite. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) of CITFA revealed the subunits CITFA-1 to -6, which are conserved only among kinetoplastid organisms, plus the dynein light chain DYNLL1. Here, by tagging CITFA-6 instead of CITFA-2, a complex was purified that contained all known CITFA subunits, as well as a novel proline-rich protein. Functional studies carried out in vivo and in vitro, as well as a colocalization study, unequivocally demonstrated that this protein is a bona fide CITFA subunit, essential for parasite viability and indispensable for RNA pol I transcription of ribosomal gene units and the active VSG expression site in the mammalian-infective life cycle stage of the parasite. Interestingly, CITFA-7 function appears to be species specific, because expression of an RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant CITFA-7 transgene from Trypanosoma cruzi could not rescue the lethal phenotype of silencing endogenous CITFA-7.

  12. Structure of a bacterial homologue of vitamin K epoxide reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weikai; Schulman, Sol; Dutton, Rachel J.; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon; Rapoport, Tom A. (Harvard-Med); (HHMI)

    2010-03-19

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) generates vitamin K hydroquinone to sustain {gamma}-carboxylation of many blood coagulation factors. Here, we report the 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of VKOR from Synechococcus sp. The structure shows VKOR in complex with its naturally fused redox partner, a thioredoxin-like domain, and corresponds to an arrested state of electron transfer. The catalytic core of VKOR is a four transmembrane helix bundle that surrounds a quinone, connected through an additional transmembrane segment with the periplasmic thioredoxin-like domain. We propose a pathway for how VKOR uses electrons from cysteines of newly synthesized proteins to reduce a quinone, a mechanism confirmed by in vitro reconstitution of vitamin K-dependent disulphide bridge formation. Our results have implications for the mechanism of the mammalian VKOR and explain how mutations can cause resistance to the VKOR inhibitor warfarin, the most commonly used oral anticoagulant.

  13. Aspects of Ribonucleotide Reductase Regulation and Genome Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Berner Nedergaard

    In all living cells, synthesis of the DNA building blocks, deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), is tightly regulated to ensure a precise DNA replication to maintain genomic stability. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is the enzyme responsible for reducing ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms....... RNR consists of two subunits: R1 and R2, both of which are essential. The activity of RNR is strictly regulated to control the dNTP pool, both by allosteric feedback control and transcriptional and translational controls. Four inhibitory proteins of RNR have been identified in yeast: Spd1 in fission...... yeast, and Sml1, Hug1, and Dif1 in budding yeast. An elevated, as well as a reduced dNTP pool is shown to lead to an increase in spontaneous mutation rates, hence regulation of RNR is very important in order to maintain genomic stability. No human inhibitory proteins have yet been identified to regulate...

  14. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria;

    2008-01-01

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences. The...... present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  15. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins. PMID:16600295

  16. Pulse radiolysis studies on superoxide reductase from Treponema pallidum

    CERN Document Server

    Nivière, V; Fontecave, M; Houée-Levin, C

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are small metalloenzymes, which catalyze reduction of O2*- to H2O2. The reaction of the enzyme from Treponema pallidum with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bi-molecular reaction of the ferrous center with O2, with a rate constant of 6 x 10 (8) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one with a slower rate constant of 4800 s(-1). This latter value is 10 times higher than the corresponding one previously reported in the case of SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii. The reconstituted spectra for the two intermediates are consistent with formation of transient iron-peroxide species.

  17. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria; Hansen, Thomas; Wang, August G; Djurovic, Srdjan; Rønningen, Kjersti S; Andreassen, Ole A; Agartz, Ingrid; Werge, Thomas; Terenius, Lars; Hall, Håkan

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences. The...... present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  18. Isolation and characterization of nitric oxide reductase from Paracoccus halodenitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, N; Sakurai, T

    1997-11-11

    Nitric oxide reductase was isolated from the membrane fraction of a denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus halodenitrificans, in the presence of n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside. A relatively simple and effective procedure to purify NO reductase using DEAE-Toyopearl and hydroxyapatite (ceramic) chromatographies has been developed. The enzyme consisted of two subunits with molecular masses of 20 and 42 kDa associated with the c-type heme and two b-type hemes, respectively. The optical and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of the oxidized (as isolated) and reduced enzymes indicated that the heme c is in the low-spin state and the hemes b are in the high- and low-spin states. The EPR spectrum also showed the presence of the split high-spin component (g perpendicular = 6.6, 6.0) and two low spin components (gz,y,x = 2.96, 2.26, 1.46, gz = 3.59). Although the presence of an extra iron was suggested from atomic absorption spectroscopy, a non-heme iron could not be detected by colorimetric titrations using ferene and 2-(5-nitro-2-pyridylazo)- 5-(N-propyl-N-sulfopropylamino)phenolate (PAPS). One of the extra signals at g = 4.3 and 2.00 might come from a non-heme iron, while they may originate from an adventitious iron and a certain nonmetallic radical, respectively. When CO acted on the reduced enzyme, both of the low-spin hemes were not affected, and when NO acted on the reduced enzyme, the optical and MCD spectra were of a mixture of the oxidized and reduced enzymes. Consequently, the reduction of NO was supposed to take place at the high-spin heme b. The heme c and the low-spin heme b centers were considered to function as electron mediators during the intermolecular and intramolecular processes. PMID:9374857

  19. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx5 [ATS]x4 Gx4 [VIL]WNR[TS]x2 [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x3 {K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes. Proteins 2016; 84:600-610. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26857686

  20. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellenbrand Janine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba, domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis.

  1. Evidence for a hexaheteromeric methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in Moorella thermoacetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Johanna; Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2014-09-01

    Moorella thermoacetica can grow with H₂ and CO₂, forming acetic acid from 2 CO₂ via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. All enzymes involved in this pathway have been characterized to date, except for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF). We report here that the M. thermoacetica gene that putatively encodes this enzyme, metF, is part of a transcription unit also containing the genes hdrCBA, mvhD, and metV. MetF copurified with the other five proteins encoded in the unit in a hexaheteromeric complex with an apparent molecular mass in the 320-kDa range. The 40-fold-enriched preparation contained per mg protein 3.1 nmol flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), 3.4 nmol flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and 110 nmol iron, almost as predicted from the primary structure of the six subunits. It catalyzed the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with reduced benzyl viologen but not with NAD(P)H in either the absence or presence of oxidized ferredoxin. It also catalyzed the reversible reduction of benzyl viologen with NADH (diaphorase activity). Heterologous expression of the metF gene in Escherichia coli revealed that the subunit MetF contains one FMN rather than FAD. MetF exhibited 70-fold-higher methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activity with benzyl viologen when produced together with MetV, which in part shows sequence similarity to MetF. Heterologously produced HdrA contained 2 FADs and had NAD-specific diaphorase activity. Our results suggested that the physiological electron donor for methylenetetrahydrofolate reduction in M. thermoacetica is NADH and that the exergonic reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with NADH is coupled via flavin-based electron bifurcation with the endergonic reduction of an electron acceptor, whose identity remains unknown. PMID:25002540

  2. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase regulation by nitrogen oxides in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaty, M; Schwintner, C; Cahors, S; Richaud, P; Verméglio, A

    1999-10-01

    We have cloned the nap locus encoding the periplasmic nitrate reductase in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106. A mutant with this enzyme deleted is unable to grow under denitrifying conditions. Biochemical analysis of this mutant shows that in contrast to the wild-type strain, the level of synthesis of the nitrite and N(2)O reductases is not increased by the addition of nitrate. Growth under denitrifying conditions and induction of N oxide reductase synthesis are both restored by the presence of a plasmid containing the genes encoding the nitrate reductase. This demonstrates that R. sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106 does not possess an efficient membrane-bound nitrate reductase and that nitrate is not the direct inducer for the nitrite and N(2)O reductases in this species. In contrast, we show that nitrite induces the synthesis of the nitrate reductase. PMID:10498715

  3. The use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for the prevention of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Eun-mi; El-Ayass, Walid; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2010-07-01

    The use of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors has been studied not only in benign prostatic hyperplasia, but as a chemopreventive strategy in prostate cancer. Both finasteride and dutasteride, 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARI), have been shown to decrease the risk of prostate cancer. The results of the REDUCE trial using the dual alpha-reductase isoenzyme inhibitor dutasteride, has recently been published by Andriole et al. in the New England Journal of Medicine. Certain considerations regarding its use and applicability to men with high risk of developing prostate cancer are herein discussed. PMID:20574153

  4. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalvetti, A; Pena Diaz, Javier; Hurtado, R;

    2000-01-01

    In eukaryotes the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyses the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a common precursor to all isoprenoid compounds. Here we report the isolation and overexpression of the gene coding for HMG-CoA reductase from Leishmania major. The protein from...... Leishmania lacks the membrane domain characteristic of eukaryotic cells but exhibits sequence similarity with eukaryotic reductases. Highly purified protein was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on hydroxyapatite. Kinetic parameters were determined for the protozoan...

  5. Virtual screening of plant derived compounds for aldose reductase inhibition using molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muppalaneni, Naresh Babu; Rao, Allam Appa

    2012-01-01

    The role of the aldose reductase in type 2 diabetes is widely described. Therefore, it is of interest to identify plant derived compounds to inhibit its activity. We studied the protein-ligand interaction of 267 compounds from different parts of seven plants (Allium sativum, Coriandrum sativum, Dacus carota, Murrayyakoneigii, Eucalyptus, Calendula officinalis and Lycopersicon esculentum) with aldose reductase as the target protein. Molecular docking and re-scoring of top ten compounds (using GOLD, AutoDock Vina, eHiTS, PatchDock and MEDock) followed by rank-sum technique identified compound allium38 with high binding affinity for aldose reductase. PMID:23275691

  6. Steroidal pyrazolines evaluated as aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors for chemoprevention of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Mohamed M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Bhat, Mashooq A; Amr, Abdel-Galil E; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M

    2012-05-01

    The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibition of synthesized heterocyclic pyrazole derivatives fused with steroidal structure for chemoprevention of cancer is reported herein. All compounds were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Cyproterone(®)). The aromatase inhibitory activities of these compounds were much more potent than the lead compound resveratrol, which has an IC(50) of 80 μM. In addition, all the compounds displayed potent quinone reductase-2 inhibition. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors resulting from this study have potential value in the treatment and prevention of cancer. PMID:22361454

  7. Megazol and its bioisostere 4H-1,2,4-triazole: comparing the trypanocidal, cytotoxic and genotoxic activities and their in vitro and in silico interactions with the Trypanosoma brucei nitroreductase enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcione Silva de Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Megazol (7 is a 5-nitroimidazole that is highly active against Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei, as well as drug-resistant forms of trypanosomiasis. Compound 7 is not used clinically due to its mutagenic and genotoxic properties, but has been largely used as a lead compound. Here, we compared the activity of 7 with its 4H-1,2,4-triazole bioisostere (8 in bloodstream forms of T. brucei and T. cruzi and evaluated their activation by T. brucei type I nitroreductase (TbNTR enzyme. We also analysed the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of these compounds in whole human blood using Comet and fluorescein diacetate/ethidium bromide assays. Although the only difference between 7 and 8 is the substitution of sulphur (in the thiadiazole in 7 for nitrogen (in the triazole in 8, the results indicated that 8 had poorer antiparasitic activity than 7 and was not genotoxic, whereas 7 presented this effect. The determination of Vmax indicated that although 8 was metabolised more rapidly than 7, it bounds to the TbNTR with better affinity, resulting in equivalent kcat/KM values. Docking assays of 7 and 8 performed within the active site of a homology model of the TbNTR indicating that 8 had greater affinity than 7.

  8. Association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism and age of onset in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vares, Maria; Saetre, Peter; Deng, Hong;

    2010-01-01

    Different lines of evidence indicate that methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) functional gene polymorphisms, causative in aberrant folate-homocysteine metabolism, are associated with increased vulnerability to several heritable developmental disorders. Opposing views are expressed...

  9. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT—Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOESHWERSHUKLA

    2001-01-01

    Objective:Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium(NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated.Methods:The fresh frozen tissue sections(8m thickness)were prepared and incuated in medium containing NBT,reduced glutathione(GSH) and Phosphate uffer,The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange.Results:The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has een found to be localized in the areas rich in glutatione and actively proliferating area of the skin.Conclusion:The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutatione contents.

  10. Redesigning alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases for more efficient biosynthesis of enantiopure isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases predominantly catalyze the asymmetric biosynthesis of optically pure stereoisomers because of their unique chiral constitutions. The enantioselectivities of alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases are substrate- and cofactor-dependent, and therefore they usually catalyze specific reactions with high enantioselectivity under physiological conditions; this may not be suitable for asymmetric biosynthesis with non-natural substrates or non-natural cofactors, and under nonphysiological conditions. It is therefore necessary to modify alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases using various redesigning tools such as directed evolution and rational design, and their combinations, as well as engineering enzyme modules for more efficient production of "non-natural" products. In this article, progress in these aspects of alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase design is reviewed, and future challenges are discussed. PMID:26320091

  11. 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some steroidal cyanopyridinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Abdalla, Mohamed M; Amr, Abdel-Galil E

    2012-01-01

    We herein report the 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some synthesized heterocyclic cyanopyridone and cyanothiopyridone derivatives fused with steroidal structure. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). All the compounds, except 3b, were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Prednisolone(®)). Seventeen heterocyclic derivatives containing a cyanopyridone or cyanothiopyridone rings fused to a steroidal moiety were synthesized and screened for their 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities comparable to that of Anastrozole, Bicalutamide, Efavirenz, Capravirine, Ribavirin, Oseltamivir and Amantadine as the reference drugs. Some of the compounds exhibited better 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities than the reference drugs. The detailed 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of the synthesized compounds were reported. PMID:22057085

  12. Comparison of the Stereospecificity and Immunoreactivity of NADH-Ferricyanide Reductases in Plant Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Fredlund, Kenneth M.; Struglics, André; Widell, Susanne; ASKERLUND, Per; Kader, Jean-Claude; Møller, Ian M.

    1994-01-01

    The substrate stereospecificity of NADH-ferricyanide reductase activities in the inner mitochondrial membrane and peroxisomal membrane of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf plasma membrane, and red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) tonoplast were all specific for the [beta]-hydrogen of NADH, whereas the reductases in wheat root (Triticum aestivum L.) endoplasmic reticulum and potato tuber outer mitochondrial membrane were both [alpha]-hydrogen specific. In all...

  13. Nucleotide sequence of a cyanobacterial nifH gene coding for nitrogenase reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Mevarech, Moshe; Rice, Douglas; Haselkorn, Robert

    1980-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of nifH, the structural gene for nitrogenase reductase (component II or Fe protein of nitrogenase) from the cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 has been determined. Also reported are 194 bases of the 5′-flanking sequence and 170 bases of the 3′-flanking sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence was compared with that determined for the complete nitrogenase reductase of Clostridium pasteurianum and the cysteine-containing peptides of the protein from Azotobacter vinelandii. ...

  14. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatmen...

  15. Design and synthesis of hepatoselective, pyrrole-based HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Song, Yuntao; Sun, Kuai-Lin; Miller, Steven R; Trivedi, Bharat K; Choi, Chulho; Sorenson, Roderick J; Bratton, Larry D; Unangst, Paul C; Larsen, Scott D; Poel, Toni-Jo; Cheng, Xue-Min; Lee, Chitase; Erasga, Noe; Auerbach, Bruce; Askew, Valerie; Dillon, Lisa; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Lin, Zhiwu; Lu, Gina; Robertson, Andrew; Olsen, Karl; Mertz, Thomas; Sekerke, Catherine; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Harris, Melissa S; Bainbridge, Graeme; Caspers, Nicole; Chen, Huifen; Eberstadt, Matthias

    2007-08-15

    This manuscript describes the design and synthesis of a series of pyrrole-based inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Analogs were optimized using structure-based design and physical property considerations resulting in the identification of 44, a hepatoselective HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor with excellent acute and chronic efficacy in a pre-clinical animal models. PMID:17574412

  16. Protein Method for Investigating Mercuric Reductase Gene Expression in Aquatic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ogunseitan, O A

    1998-01-01

    A colorimetric assay for NADPH-dependent, mercuric ion-specific oxidoreductase activity was developed to facilitate the investigation of mercuric reductase gene expression in polluted aquatic ecosystems. Protein molecules extracted directly from unseeded freshwater and samples seeded with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PU21(Rip64) were quantitatively assayed for mercuric reductase activity in microtiter plates by stoichiometric coupling of mercuric ion reduction to a colorimetric redox chain through ...

  17. Molecular pharmacology and antitumor activity of palmarumycin based inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase.

    OpenAIRE

    Powis, Garth; Wipf, Peter; Lynch, Stephen M.; Birmingham, Anne; Kirkpatrick, D. Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The cytosolic thioredoxin (Trx) redox system comprising Trx-1 and the NADPH dependent thioredoxin reductase -1 reductase (TrxR-1) is an important regulator of cell growth and survival. Trx-1 is overexpressed in many human tumors where it is associated with increased cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis and decreased patient survival. We hypothesized that TrxR-1 provides a target to inhibit the activity of overexpressed Trx-1 for the development of novel anticancer agents. We found that the...

  18. Soil acidity as affecting micronutrients concentration, nitrato reductase enzyme activity and yield in upland rice plants

    OpenAIRE

    Edemar Moro; Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol; Heitor Cantarella; Adriano Stephan Nascente; Adriana Lima Moro; Fernando Broetto

    2013-01-01

    The lowest grain yield of rice under no-tillage system (NTS) in relation to the conventional system may be due to the predominance nitrate in the soil and the low nitrate reductase activity. Another reason may be caused by micronutrient deficiency because of superficially soil acidity corrections. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the changes caused by soil pH in the N forms in the soil, micronutrients concentration in rice plants, nitrate reductase activity, yield of ric...

  19. INHIBITORY ACTIVITY OF FLAVONOIDS ON THE LENS ALDOSE REDUCTASE OF HEALTHY AND DIABETIC RATS

    OpenAIRE

    M.T. Goodarzi; Zal, F; M. Malakooti; M. R. Safari S. Sadeghian

    2006-01-01

    Aldose reductase is a critical enzyme in the polyol pathway that plays an important role in diabetes mellitus. Inhibition of the activity of this enzyme can prevent cataract in diabetic patients’lenses. In this study the inhibitory effect of two flavonoids, quercetin and naringin, in the activity of aldose reductase in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and healthy rats were investigated. Thirty male rats were divided in six groups. The first, second and third group were healthy rats that receiv...

  20. Glutathione Reductase/Glutathione Is Responsible for Cytotoxic Elemental Sulfur Tolerance via Polysulfide Shuttle in Fungi*

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Ikuo; Shimatani, Kanami; Fujita, Kensaku; Abe, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Fungi that can reduce elemental sulfur to sulfide are widely distributed, but the mechanism and physiological significance of the reaction have been poorly characterized. Here, we purified elemental sulfur-reductase (SR) and cloned its gene from the elemental sulfur-reducing fungus Fusarium oxysporum. We found that NADPH-glutathione reductase (GR) reduces elemental sulfur via glutathione as an intermediate. A loss-of-function mutant of the SR/GR gene generated less sulfide from elemental sulf...

  1. Expression of the mouse dihydrofolate reductase complementary deoxyribonucleic acid in simian virus 40 vectors.

    OpenAIRE

    Subramani, S.; Mulligan, R.; Berg, P

    1981-01-01

    A mouse complementary deoxyribonucleic acid segment coding for the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase has been cloned in two general classes of vectors containing simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid: (i) those that can be propagated as virions in permissive cells and (ii) those that can be introduced into and maintained stably in various mammalian cells. Both types of vectors express the mouse dihydrofolate reductase by using signals supplied by simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid sequences. ...

  2. Interaction of Product Analogs with the Active Site of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Dimethylsulfoxide Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    George, Graham N.; Nelson, Kimberly Johnson; Harris, Hugh H.; Doonan, Christian J.; Rajagopalan, K V

    2007-01-01

    We report a structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase reduced with trimethylarsine, and show that this is structurally analogous to the physiologically relevant dimethylsulfide-reduced DMSO reductase. Our data unambiguously indicate that these species should be regarded as formal MoIV species, and indicate a classical coordination complex of trimethylarsine oxide, with no special structural distortions. The si...

  3. In Silico Docking studies of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory activity of selected Flavonoids

    OpenAIRE

    Muthuswamy Umamaheswari; C. S. Aji; Kuppusamy Asokkumar; Thirumalaisamy Sivashanmugam; Varadharajan Subhadradevi; Puliyath Jagannath; Arumugam Madeswaran

    2012-01-01

    New drugs for the inhibition of the enzyme aldose reductase are in development and they have to be screened before being considered for preclinical and clinical evaluation. The current study deals with the evaluation of the cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of flavonoids using in silico docking studies. In this perspective, flavonoids like Farobin-A, Gericudranin- B, Glaziovianin-A, Rutin, and Xanthotoxin were selected. Epalrestat, a known aldose reductase inhibitor was used as the standard....

  4. Virtual screening of plant derived compounds for aldose reductase inhibition using molecular docking

    OpenAIRE

    Muppalaneni, Naresh Babu; Rao, Allam Appa

    2012-01-01

    The role of the aldose reductase in type 2 diabetes is widely described. Therefore, it is of interest to identify plant derived compounds to inhibit its activity. We studied the protein-ligand interaction of 267 compounds from different parts of seven plants (Allium sativum, Coriandrum sativum, Dacus carota, Murrayyakoneigii, Eucalyptus, Calendula officinalis and Lycopersicon esculentum) with aldose reductase as the target protein. Molecular docking and re-scoring of top ten compounds (using ...

  5. INHIBITION OF TYPE I 5α-REDUCTASE BY MEDICINAL PLANT EXTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Vijaya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Type I 5α-reductase has been implicated in skin disorders such as acne, hirsutism and male pattern baldness and its inhibition offers a potential treatment for these disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibition of type I 5α-reductase activity by extracts from Indian medicinal plants. Plant extracts were screened and selected based on their ability to inhibit Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Since type I 5α-reductase metabolises testosterone to Δ4-androstene-3, 17-dione, the activity of enzyme was determined using RIA for testosterone and Δ4-androstene-3, 17-dione. It was found that methanolic extract of Embelia ribes was a potent inhibitor of type I 5α-reductase (IC50:100μg/mL. Extracts of Vitex negundo, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia bellerica which also inhibited type I 5α-reductase (IC50: 200-390 μg /mL. Therefore herbal formulation of these plant extracts may be used in the treatment of skin disorders involving type I 5α-reductase.

  6. Nitrate reductase activity and its relationship with applied nitrogen in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field experiments were conducted to study the nitrate reductase activity and its relationship to nitrogen by using frame tests (pot without bottom), sand culture and 15N-urea at transplanting in soybean variety Suinong 14. Results showed that the activity of nitrate reductase in leaf changed as a signal peak curve with the soybean growth, lower in vegetative growth phase, higher in reproductive growth period and reached the peak in blooming period, then decreased gradually. Nitrogen application showed obvious effect on the nitrate reductase activity. The activities of nitrate reductase in leaves followed the order of N135 > N90 > N45 > N0 in vegetative growth stage, no clear regularity was found during the whole reproductive growth period. The activities of nitrate reductase in leaves were accorded with the order of upper leaves > mid leaves > lower leaves, and it was very significant differences (P15N labeling method during beginning seed stage and full seed stage shown that 15N abundance in various organs at different node position also followed the same order, suggesting that high level of nitrate reductase activity at upper leaves of soybean promoted the assimilation of NO3-. (authors)

  7. Isobutyraldehyde production from Escherichia coli by removing aldehyde reductase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Gabriel M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing global demand and reliance on petroleum-derived chemicals will necessitate alternative sources for chemical feedstocks. Currently, 99% of chemical feedstocks are derived from petroleum and natural gas. Renewable methods for producing important chemical feedstocks largely remain unaddressed. Synthetic biology enables the renewable production of various chemicals from microorganisms by constructing unique metabolic pathways. Here, we engineer Escherichia coli for the production of isobutyraldehyde, which can be readily converted to various hydrocarbons currently derived from petroleum such as isobutyric acid, acetal, oxime and imine using existing chemical catalysis. Isobutyraldehyde can be readily stripped from cultures during production, which reduces toxic effects of isobutyraldehyde. Results We adopted the isobutanol pathway previously constructed in E. coli, neglecting the last step in the pathway where isobutyraldehyde is converted to isobutanol. However, this strain still overwhelmingly produced isobutanol (1.5 g/L/OD600 (isobutanol vs 0.14 g/L/OD600 (isobutyraldehyde. Next, we deleted yqhD which encodes a broad-substrate range aldehyde reductase known to be active toward isobutyraldehyde. This strain produced isobutanol and isobutyraldehyde at a near 1:1 ratio, indicating further native isobutyraldehyde reductase (IBR activity in E. coli. To further eliminate isobutanol formation, we set out to identify and remove the remaining IBRs from the E. coli genome. We identified 7 annotated genes coding for IBRs that could be active toward isobutyraldehyde: adhP, eutG, yiaY, yjgB, betA, fucO, eutE. Individual deletions of the genes yielded only marginal improvements. Therefore, we sequentially deleted all seven of the genes and assessed production. The combined deletions greatly increased isobutyraldehyde production (1.5 g/L/OD600 and decreased isobutanol production (0.4 g/L/OD600. By assessing production by

  8. Characterization of two alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C homologs alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C_H1 and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C_H2 in Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mee-Kyung; Cha; Yoo-Jeen; Bae; Kyu-Jeong; Kim; Byung-Joon; Park; Il-Han; Kim

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C(AhpC) homologs in Bacillus subtilis(B. subtilis) and to characterize their structural and biochemical properties. AhpC is responsible for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species in bacteria.METHODS: Two AhpC homologs(AhpC_H1 and AhpC_H2) were identified by searching the B. subtilis database; these were then cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. AhpC mutants carrying substitutions of catalytically important Cys residues(C37S, C47 S, C166 S, C37/47 S, C37/166 S, C47/166 S, and C37/47/166 S for AhpC_H1; C52 S, C169 S, and C52/169 S for AhpC_H2) were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis and purified, and their structure-function relationship was analyzed. The B. subtilis ahp C genes were disrupted by the short flanking homology method, and the phenotypes of the resulting AhpC-deficient bacteria were examined.RESULTS: Comparative characterization of AhpC homologs indicates that AhpC_H1 contains an extra C37, which forms a disulfide bond with the peroxidatic C47, and behaves like an atypical 2-Cys AhpC, while AhpC_H2 functions like a typical 2-Cys AhpC. Tryptic digestion analysis demonstrated the presence of intramolecular Cys37-Cys47 linkage, which could be reduced by thioredoxin, resulting in the association of the dimer into higher-molecular-mass complexes. Peroxidase activity analysis of Cys→Ser mutants indicated that three Cys residues were involved in the catalysis. AhpC_H1 was resistant to inactivation by peroxide substrates, but had lower activity at physiological H2O2 concentrations compared to AhpC_H2, suggesting that in B. subtilis, the enzymes may be physiologically functional at different substrate concentrations. The exposure to organic peroxides induced AhpC_H1 expression, while AhpC_H1-deficient mutants exhibited growth retardation in the stationary phase, suggesting the role of AhpC_H1 as an antioxidant scavenger of lipid hydroperoxides and a stress-response factor in B. subtilis

  9. Binding of Natural and Synthetic Polyphenols to Human Dihydrofolate Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Neptuno Rodríguez-López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR is the subject of intensive investigation since it appears to be the primary target enzyme for antifolate drugs. Fluorescence quenching experiments show that the ester bond-containing tea polyphenols (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and (--epicatechin gallate (ECG are potent inhibitors of DHFR with dissociation constants (KD of 0.9 and 1.8 μM, respectively, while polyphenols lacking the ester bound gallate moiety [e.g., (--epigallocatechin (EGC and (--epicatechin (EC] did not bind to this enzyme. To avoid stability and bioavailability problems associated with tea catechins we synthesized a methylated derivative of ECG (3-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl-(--epicatechin; TMECG, which effectively binds to DHFR (KD = 2.1 μM. In alkaline solution, TMECG generates a stable quinone methide product that strongly binds to the enzyme with a KD of 8.2 nM. Quercetin glucuronides also bind to DHFR but its effective binding was highly dependent of the sugar residue, with quercetin-3-xyloside being the stronger inhibitor of the enzyme with a KD of 0.6 μM. The finding that natural polyphenols are good inhibitors of human DHFR could explain the epidemiological data on their prophylactic effects for certain forms of cancer and open a possibility for the use of natural and synthetic polyphenols in cancer chemotherapy.

  10. Rapid identification of aldose reductase inhibitory compounds from Perilla frutescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Ji Hun; Shin, Kuk Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens) inhibits aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural analyses of the active compounds were performed by LC-MS(n). The main AR inhibiting compounds were tentatively identified as chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid by LC-MS(n). A two-step high speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC) isolation method was developed with a solvent system of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at 1.5:5:1:5, v/v and 3:7:5:5, v/v. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were determined by (1)H- and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). The main compounds inhibiting AR in the EtOAc fraction of methanol extracts of P. frutescens were identified as chlorogenic acid (2) (IC50 = 3.16 μ M), rosmarinic acid (4) (IC50 = 2.77 μ M), luteolin (5) (IC50 = 6.34 μ M), and methyl rosmarinic acid (6) (IC50 = 4.03 μ M). PMID:24308003

  11. Expression analysis of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes in Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y X; Chen, H R; Wu, A Z; Cai, R; Pan, J S

    2015-01-01

    Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) genes from Rosa chinensis (Asn type) and Calibrachoa hybrida (Asp type), driven by a CaMV 35S promoter, were integrated into the petunia (Petunia hybrida) cultivar 9702. Exogenous DFR gene expression characteristics were similar to flower-color changes, and effects on anthocyanin concentration were observed in both types of DFR gene transformants. Expression analysis showed that exogenous DFR genes were expressed in all of the tissues, but the expression levels were significantly different. However, both of them exhibited a high expression level in petals that were starting to open. The introgression of DFR genes may significantly change DFR enzyme activity. Anthocyanin ultra-performance liquid chromatography results showed that anthocyanin concentrations changed according to DFR enzyme activity. Therefore, the change in flower color was probably the result of a DFR enzyme change. Pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside was found in two different transgenic petunias, indicating that both CaDFR and RoDFR could catalyze dihydrokaempferol. Our results also suggest that transgenic petunias with DFR gene of Asp type could biosynthesize pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside. PMID:25966276

  12. 5alpha-reductase: history and clinical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Leonard S

    2004-01-01

    The treatment of men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has shifted dramatically from surgery to drug therapy over the past decade. The revolution in BPH treatment began with the discovery of congenital 5alpha-reductase (5AR) deficiency, leading to the appreciation of 2 different androgenic hormones: testosterone, which mediates overt masculinization in the adult male, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which mediates prostatic growth, acne, facial beard, and male pattern baldness. Inhibition of DHT in adults results in prostatic shrinkage and symptomatic relief in many men, without the side effects seen with conventional androgen-deprivation therapy. The 5AR inhibitor drugs (finasteride and the dual inhibitor, dutasteride) are able to ablate the accumulation of intraprostatic DHT, the mechanism most responsible for prostate growth and maintenance. Not only may these drugs relieve symptoms, but they may also alter the natural history of the BPH process. Future indications for the 5ARI drugs could include chemoprevention of prostate cancer, prophylaxis of BPH-related complications, and treatment of BPH-associated hematuria. PMID:16985920

  13. Regulation and degradation of HMGCo-A reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, T; Devi, V Amutha

    2004-12-01

    The enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) controls the biosynthesis of cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis are critical health risk factors. One way of controlling these risk factors is to manipulate regulation as well as degradation of HMGR. At present, a class of compounds called statins, which are HMGR inhibitors, are used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. However, statins suffer major setbacks as their use produces more adverse reactions than the desirable one of inhibiting the enzyme. Genetically engineered forms of HMGR are also studied in primitive life forms like bacteria, but detailed investigation of this enzyme in human systems is certainly required. Extensive studies have been made on the regulatory aspects of this enzyme, but no breakthrough is conspicuous in the clinical background to find an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia. The immediate need is to find an alternate way of regulating degradation of the enzyme. This review presents the importance of regulation and degradation of the HMGR enzyme in different systems to gain possible insight into alternative schemes for regulating this enzyme and, if these exist, the feasibility of extending them same to studies in mammalian systems. A high degree of similarity exists between mammalian and yeast HMGR. Detailed studies reported on the regulation and degradation of the yeast enzyme also throw more light on the mammalian system, leading to a better understanding of ways of controlling hypercholesterolemia. PMID:15558272

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes, Dietary Habits and Susceptibility to Stomach Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChangmingGao; TakezakiToshiro; JianzhongWu; JianhuoDing; YantingLiu; SupingLi; PingSu; XuHu; TianliongXu; HamajimaNobuyuki; TajimaKazuo

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the relation among methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T genotypes, dietary habits and the risk of stomach cancer (SC).METHODS A case-control study was conducted with 107 cases of SC and 200 population-based controls in Chuzhou district, Huaian, Jiangsu province, China. The epidemiological data were collected, and DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was obtained from all of the subjects..MTHFR genotypes were detected by PCR-RFLP. RESULTS (1) The prevalence of the MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes was found to be significantly different between controls (68.5%) and SC cases (79.4%,P=0.0416), the increased risk had an adjusted OR of 1.79 (95%C1:1.01-3.19). (2) Among subjects who had a low intake of garlic or Chinese onion, MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes significantly increased the risk of developing SC. Among non-tea drinkers or among subjects who had a frequent intakeof meat, the carriers of the MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes had a higher risk of SC than individuals with the C/C type MTHFR. CONCLUSION The polymorphism of MTHFR C677T was associated with increased risk of developing SC, and that individuals with differing genotypes may have different susceptibilities to SC, based on their exposure level to environmental factors.

  15. Ribonucleotide reductase and cancer: biological mechanisms and targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Y; Li, M; Long, M J C; Weiss, R S

    2015-04-16

    Accurate DNA replication and repair is essential for proper development, growth and tumor-free survival in all multicellular organisms. A key requirement for the maintenance of genomic integrity is the availability of adequate and balanced pools of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), the building blocks of DNA. Notably, dNTP pool alterations lead to genomic instability and have been linked to multiple human diseases, including mitochondrial disorders, susceptibility to viral infection and cancer. In this review, we discuss how a key regulator of dNTP biosynthesis in mammals, the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), impacts cancer susceptibility and serves as a target for anti-cancer therapies. Because RNR-regulated dNTP production can influence DNA replication fidelity while also supporting genome-protecting DNA repair, RNR has complex and stage-specific roles in carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, cancer cells are dependent on RNR for de novo dNTP biosynthesis. Therefore, elevated RNR expression is a characteristic of many cancers, and an array of mechanistically distinct RNR inhibitors serve as effective agents for cancer treatment. The dNTP metabolism machinery, including RNR, has been exploited for therapeutic benefit for decades and remains an important target for cancer drug development. PMID:24909171

  16. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase: a candidate Helicobacter pylori vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, Avril A; Morales, Veronica Athie; Mulligan, Linda; Faheem, Nazia; Windle, Henry J; Kelleher, Dermot P

    2012-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important etiological agent of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) and mannosylated AhpC (mAhpC) as candidate vaccines in the C57BL/6J mouse model of H. pylori infection. Recombinant AhpC was cloned, over-expressed and purified in an unmodified form and was also engineered to incorporate N and C-terminal mannose residues when expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mice were immunized systemically and mucosally with AhpC and systemically with mAhpC prior to challenge with H. pylori. Serum IgG responses to AhpC were determined and quantitative culture was used to determine the efficacy of vaccination strategies. Systemic prophylactic immunization with AhpC/alum and mAhpC/alum conferred protection against infection in 55% and 77.3% of mice, respectively. Mucosal immunization with AhpC/cholera toxin did not protect against infection and elicited low levels of serum IgG in comparison with systemic immunization. These data support the use of AhpC as a potential vaccine candidate against H. pylori infection. PMID:22512976

  17. Loss of quinone reductase 2 function selectively facilitates learning behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Charles-Etienne; Bastianetto, Stephane; Brouillette, Jonathan; Tse, YiuChung; Boutin, Jean A; Delagrange, Philippe; Wong, TakPan; Sarret, Philippe; Quirion, Rémi

    2010-09-22

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with deficits in learning and memory with age as well as in Alzheimer's disease. Using DNA microarray, we demonstrated the overexpression of quinone reductase 2 (QR2) in the hippocampus in two models of learning deficits, namely the aged memory impaired rats and the scopolamine-induced amnesia model. QR2 is a cytosolic flavoprotein that catalyzes the reduction of its substrate and enhances the production of damaging activated quinone and ROS. QR2-like immunostaining is enriched in cerebral structures associated with learning behaviors, such as the hippocampal formation and the temporofrontal cortex of rat, mouse, and human brains. In cultured rat embryonic hippocampal neurons, selective inhibitors of QR2, namely S26695 and S29434, protected against menadione-induced cell death by reversing its proapoptotic action. S26695 (8 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited scopolamine-induced amnesia. Interestingly, adult QR2 knock-out mice demonstrated enhanced learning abilities in various tasks, including Morris water maze, object recognition, and rotarod performance test. Other behaviors related to anxiety (elevated plus maze), depression (forced swim), and schizophrenia (prepulse inhibition) were not affected in QR2-deficient mice. Together, these data suggest a role for QR2 in cognitive behaviors with QR2 inhibitors possibly representing a novel therapeutic strategy toward the treatment of learning deficits especially observed in the aged brain. PMID:20861374

  18. Determination of Nitrate Reductase Assay Depending on the Microbial Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid micro-dilution assay for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibility of different bacterial isolates was developed. This assay is based on the ability of the most of viable organisms to reduce nitrates. The MIC or MBC could be determined by nitrate reductase (NR) only after 30 to 90 min of incubation depending on the behaviour of microbial growth. Bacterial viability is detected by a positive nitrite reduction rather than visible turbidity. The nitrate reduction assay was compared with standard micro-assay using 250 isolates of different taxa against 10 antibiotics belonging to different classes. An excellent agreement of 82.5 % was found between the two methods and only 17.5 % of 1794 trials showed difference in the determined MIC by tow-dilution interval above or below the MIC determined by the turbidimetric method under the same test conditions. However, the nitrate reduction assay was more rapid and sensitive in detecting viable bacteria and so, established an accurate estimate of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) or the minimal bacterial concentration (MBC). The nitrate reduction assay offers the additional advantage that it could be used to determine the MBC without having to subculture the broth. 232 cases of resistance were detected by NR and 4 different media were tested for susceptibility test. The bacterial isolates were exposed to ultra violet (UV) light for different period

  19. Aldose reductase inhibition improves nerve conduction velocity in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judzewitsch, R G; Jaspan, J B; Polonsky, K S; Weinberg, C R; Halter, J B; Halar, E; Pfeifer, M A; Vukadinovic, C; Bernstein, L; Schneider, M; Liang, K Y; Gabbay, K H; Rubenstein, A H; Porte, D

    1983-01-20

    To assess the potential role of polyol-pathway activity in diabetic neuropathy, we measured the effects of sorbinil--a potent inhibitor of the key polyol-pathway enzyme aldose reductase--on nerve conduction velocity in 39 stable diabetics in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. During nine weeks of treatment with sorbinil (250 mg per day), nerve conduction velocity was greater than during a nine-week placebo period for all three nerves tested: the peroneal motor nerve (mean increase [+/- S.E.M.], 0.70 +/- 0.24 m per second, P less than 0.008), the median motor nerve (mean increase, 0.66 +/- 0.27, P less than 0.005), and the median sensory nerve (mean increase, 1.16 +/- 0.50, P less than 0.035). Conduction velocity for all three nerves declined significantly within three weeks after cessation of the drug. These effects of sorbinil were not related to glycemic control, which was constant during the study. Although the effect of sorbinil in improving nerve conduction velocity in diabetics was small, the findings suggest that polyol-pathway activity contributes to slowed nerve conduction in diabetics. The clinical applicability of these observations remains to be determined, but they encourage further exploration of this approach to the treatment or prevention of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:6401351

  20. Glyoxalase 1 and glutathione reductase 1 regulate anxiety in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovatta, Iiris; Tennant, Richard S; Helton, Robert; Marr, Robert A; Singer, Oded; Redwine, Jeffrey M; Ellison, Julie A; Schadt, Eric E; Verma, Inder M; Lockhart, David J; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-12-01

    Anxiety and fear are normal emotional responses to threatening situations. In human anxiety disorders--such as panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, social phobia, specific phobias and generalized anxiety disorder--these responses are exaggerated. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of normal and pathological anxiety are mostly unknown. However, the availability of different inbred strains of mice offers an excellent model system in which to study the genetics of certain behavioural phenotypes. Here we report, using a combination of behavioural analysis of six inbred mouse strains with quantitative gene expression profiling of several brain regions, the identification of 17 genes with expression patterns that correlate with anxiety-like behavioural phenotypes. To determine if two of the genes, glyoxalase 1 and glutathione reductase 1, have a causal role in the genesis of anxiety, we performed genetic manipulation using lentivirus-mediated gene transfer. Local overexpression of these genes in the mouse brain resulted in increased anxiety-like behaviour, while local inhibition of glyoxalase 1 expression by RNA interference decreased the anxiety-like behaviour. Both of these genes are involved in oxidative stress metabolism, linking this pathway with anxiety-related behaviour. PMID:16244648

  1. Genotypic status of the TbAT1/P2 adenosine transporter of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense isolates from Northwestern Uganda following melarsoprol withdrawal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne J N Kazibwe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of arsenical and diamidine resistance in Trypanosoma brucei is associated with loss of drug uptake by the P2 purine transporter as a result of alterations in the corresponding T. brucei adenosine transporter 1 gene (TbAT1. Previously, specific TbAT1 mutant type alleles linked to melarsoprol treatment failure were significantly more prevalent in T. b. gambiense from relapse patients at Omugo health centre in Arua district. Relapse rates of up to 30% prompted a shift from melarsoprol to eflornithine (alpha-difluoromethylornithine, DFMO as first-line treatment at this centre. The aim of this study was to determine the status of TbAT1 in recent isolates collected from T. b. gambiense sleeping sickness patients from Arua and Moyo districts in Northwestern Uganda after this shift in first-line drug choice. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: Blood and cerebrospinal fluids of consenting patients were collected for DNA preparation and subsequent amplification. All of the 105 isolates from Omugo that we successfully analysed by PCR-RFLP possessed the TbAT1 wild type allele. In addition, PCR/RFLP analysis was performed for 74 samples from Moyo, where melarsoprol is still the first line drug; 61 samples displayed the wild genotype while six were mutant and seven had a mixed pattern of both mutant and wild-type TbAT1. The melarsoprol treatment failure rate at Moyo over the same period was nine out of 101 stage II cases that were followed up at least once. Five of the relapse cases harboured mutant TbAT1, one had the wild type, while no amplification was achieved from the remaining three samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The apparent disappearance of mutant alleles at Omugo may correlate with melarsoprol withdrawal as first-line treatment. Our results suggest that melarsoprol could successfully be reintroduced following a time lag subsequent to its replacement. A field-applicable test to predict melarsoprol treatment outcome and identify

  2. Feed-forward control of prostate growth: dihydrotestosterone induces expression of its own biosynthetic enzyme, steroid 5 alpha-reductase.

    OpenAIRE

    George, F W; Russell, D.W.; Wilson, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Dihydrotestosterone, the primary mediator of prostate growth, is synthesized in target tissues from the circulating androgen testosterone through the action of steroid 5 alpha-reductase (EC 1.3.99.5). The expression of 5 alpha-reductase and the level of 5 alpha-reductase messenger RNA in rat ventral prostate are regulated by androgens. To determine whether this control is mediated by dihydrotestosterone or testosterone, we investigated the effect of finasteride, a potent inhibitor of steroid ...

  3. Nitrite and Nitrous Oxide Reductase Regulation by Nitrogen Oxides in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106

    OpenAIRE

    Sabaty, Monique; Schwintner, Carole; Cahors, Sandrine; Richaud, Pierre; Verméglio, Andre

    1999-01-01

    We have cloned the nap locus encoding the periplasmic nitrate reductase in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106. A mutant with this enzyme deleted is unable to grow under denitrifying conditions. Biochemical analysis of this mutant shows that in contrast to the wild-type strain, the level of synthesis of the nitrite and N2O reductases is not increased by the addition of nitrate. Growth under denitrifying conditions and induction of N oxide reductase synthesis are both restored b...

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of perakine reductase, a new member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perakine reductase, a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily of higher plants, is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids in the Indian medicinal plant Rauvolfia serpentina. The enzyme has been crystallized in C-centered orthorhombic space group and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution. Perakine reductase (PR) is a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants. PR from the plant Rauvolfia serpentina is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids by performing NADPH-dependent reduction of perakine, yielding raucaffrinoline. However, PR can also reduce cinnamic aldehyde and some of its derivatives. After heterologous expression of a triple mutant of PR in Escherichia coli, crystals of the purified and methylated enzyme were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 293 K with 100 mM sodium citrate pH 5.6 and 27% PEG 4000 as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group C2221 and diffract to 2.0 Å, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.9, b = 93.0, c = 143.4 Å

  5. Thiol redox biology of trypanosomatids and potential targets for chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Alejandro E; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are the causative agents of African sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease, and the different forms of leishmaniasis. This family of protozoan parasite possesses a trypanothione-based redox metabolism that provides the reducing equivalents for various vital processes such as the biosynthesis of DNA precursors and the detoxification of hydroperoxides. Almost all enzymes of the redox pathway proved to be essential and therefore fulfil one crucial prerequisite for a putative drug target. Trypanothione synthetase and trypanothione reductase are present in all trypanosomatids but absent from the mammalian host which, in addition to the essentiality, renders them highly specific. The chemotherapy research on both enzymes is further supported by the availability of high-throughput screening techniques and crystal structures. In this review we focus on the recent advances and limitations in the development of lead compounds targeting trypanothione synthetase and trypanothione reductase. We present an overview of the available inhibitors and discuss future perspectives including other components of the parasite-specific redox pathway. PMID:26592324

  6. Proteins and lipids of glycosomal membranes from Leishmania tarentolae and Trypanosoma brucei [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/x1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Colasante

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In kinetoplastid protists, several metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and purine salvage, are located in glycosomes, which are microbodies that are evolutionarily related to peroxisomes. With the exception of some potential transporters for fatty acids, and one member of the mitochondrial carrier protein family, proteins that transport metabolites across the glycosomal membrane have yet to be identified. We show here that the phosphatidylcholine species composition of Trypanosoma brucei glycosomal membranes resembles that of other cellular membranes, which means that glycosomal membranes are expected to be impermeable to small hydrophilic molecules unless transport is facilitated by specialized membrane proteins. Further, we identified 464 proteins in a glycosomal membrane preparation from Leishmania tarentolae. The proteins included approximately 40 glycosomal matrix proteins, and homologues of peroxisomal membrane proteins - PEX11, GIM5A and GIM5B; PXMP4, PEX2 and PEX16 - as well as the transporters GAT1 and GAT3. There were 27 other proteins that could not be unambiguously assigned to other compartments, and that had predicted trans-membrane domains. However, no clear candidates for transport of the major substrates and intermediates of energy metabolism were found. We suggest that, instead, these metabolites are transported via pores formed by the known glycosomal membrane proteins.

  7. Biochemical analysis of PIFTC3, the Trypanosoma brucei orthologue of nematode DYF-13, reveals interactions with established and putative intraflagellar transport components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Joseph B; Ullu, Elisabetta

    2010-10-01

    DYF-13, originally identified in Caenorhabditis elegans within a collection of dye-filling chemosensory mutants, is one of several proteins that have been classified as putatively involved in intraflagellar transport (IFT), the bidirectional movement of protein complexes along cilia and flagella and specifically in anterograde IFT. Although genetic studies have highlighted a fundamental role of DYF-13 in nematode sensory cilium and trypanosome flagellum biogenesis, biochemical studies on DYF-13 have lagged behind. Here, we show that in Trypanosoma brucei the orthologue to DYF-13, PIFTC3, participates in a macromolecular complex of approximately 660 kDa. Mass spectroscopy of affinity-purified PIFTC3 revealed several components of IFT complex B as well as orthologues of putative IFT factors DYF-1, DYF-3, DYF-11/Elipsa and IFTA-2. DYF-11 was further analysed and shown to be concentrated near the basal bodies and in the flagellum, and to be required for flagellum elongation. In addition, by coimmunoprecipitation we detected an interaction between DYF-13 and IFT122, a component of IFT complex A, which is required for retrograde transport. Thus, our biochemical analysis supports the model, proposed by genetic analysis in C. elegans, that the trypanosome orthologue of DYF-13 plays a central role in the IFT mechanism. PMID:20923419

  8. Coenzyme Q10 prevented full blown splenomegaly and decreased melarsoprol-induced reactive encephalopathy in mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James Nyabuga Nyariki; John Kibuthu Thuita; Grace Kemunto Nyambati; Alfred Orina Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish the modulatory effects of coenzyme Q10 on experimental trypanosome infections in mice and evaluate the risk of occurrence and severity of melarsoprol-induced post treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE). Methods: Female Swiss white mice were orally administered with 200 mg/kg of coenzyme Q10 after which they were intraperitoneally inoculated with Trypanasoma brucei rhodesiense (T. b. rhodesiense). The resultant infection was allowed to develop and simulate all phases of human African trypanosomiasis and PTRE. Parasitaemia development, packed cell volume, haematological and pathological changes were determined. Results:A histological study in the brain tissue of T. b. rhodesiense infected mice demonstrated neuroinflammatory pathology which was highly amplified in the PTRE-induced groups. A prominent reduction in the severity of the neuroinflammatory response was detected when coenzyme-Q10 was administered. Furthermore, the mean tissue weight of spleen to body ratio in coenzyme Q10 supplemented group was significantly (P Conclusions: The capacity of coenzyme Q10 to alter the pathogenesis of T. b. rhodesiense infection in mice and following treatment with melarsoprol, may find application by rendering humans and animals less susceptible to deleterious effects of trypanosome infection such as splenomegaly and melarsoprol-induced PTRE and neurotoxicity.

  9. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in Indian stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalita J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: In view of the prevailing controversy about the role of Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutation in stroke and paucity of studies from India, this study has been undertaken to evaluate MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism in consecutive ischemic stroke patients and correlate these with folic acid, homocysteine (Hcy and conventional risk factors. Settings and Design: Ischemic stroke patients prospectively evaluated in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Computerized tomography proven ischemic stroke patients were prospectively evaluated including clinical, family history of stroke, dietary habits and addictions. Their fasting and postprandial blood sugar, lipid profile, vitamin B12, folic acid and MTHFR gene analysis were done. Statistical Analysis: MTHFR gene polymorphism was correlated with serum folic acid, Vitamin B12 and Hcy levels; family history of stroke in first-degree relatives; and dietary habits; employing Chi-square test. Results: There were 58 patients with ischemic stroke, whose mean age was 50 (4-79 years; among them, 10 were females. MTHFR gene polymorphism was present in 19 (32.8% patients, 3 were homozygous and 16 were heterozygous. Both serum folate and B12 levels were low in 29 (50% patients and Hcy in 48 (83%. Hypertension was present in 28 (48% patients, diabetes in 12 (21%, hyperlipidemia in 52 (90%, smoking in 17 (29%, obesity in 1 (1.7% and family history of stroke in first-degree relatives in 13 (22.4%. There was no significant relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphism with folic acid, B12, Hcy levels, dietary habits and number of risk factors. Vitamin B12 level was low in vegetarians ( P Conclusion: MTHFR gene polymorphism was found in one-third of patients with ischemic stroke and was insignificantly associated with higher frequency of elevated Hcy.

  10. Metabolism of bupropion by carbonyl reductases in liver and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connarn, Jamie N; Zhang, Xinyuan; Babiskin, Andrew; Sun, Duxin

    2015-07-01

    Bupropion's metabolism and the formation of hydroxybupropion in the liver by cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) has been extensively studied; however, the metabolism and formation of erythro/threohydrobupropion in the liver and intestine by carbonyl reductases (CR) has not been well characterized. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the relative contribution of the two metabolism pathways of bupropion (by CYP2B6 and CR) in the subcellular fractions of liver and intestine and to identify the CRs responsible for erythro/threohydrobupropion formation in the liver and the intestine. The results showed that the liver microsome generated the highest amount of hydroxybupropion (Vmax = 131 pmol/min per milligram, Km = 87 μM). In addition, liver microsome and S9 fractions formed similar levels of threohydrobupropion by CR (Vmax = 98-99 pmol/min per milligram and Km = 186-265 μM). Interestingly, the liver has similar capability to form hydroxybupropion (by CYP2B6) and threohydrobupropion (by CR). In contrast, none of the intestinal fractions generate hydroxybupropion, suggesting that the intestine does not have CYP2B6 available for metabolism of bupropion. However, intestinal S9 fraction formed threohydrobupropion to the extent of 25% of the amount of threohydrobupropion formed by liver S9 fraction. Enzyme inhibition and Western blots identified that 11β-dehydrogenase isozyme 1 in the liver microsome fraction is mainly responsible for the formation of threohydrobupropion, and in the intestine AKR7 may be responsible for the same metabolite formation. These quantitative comparisons of bupropion metabolism by CR in the liver and intestine may provide new insight into its efficacy and side effects with respect to these metabolites. PMID:25904761

  11. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramm, Anneke; Kisiela, Michael; Schulz, Rüdiger; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) represent a large superfamily of enzymes, most of which are NAD(H)-dependent or NADP(H)-dependent oxidoreductases. They display a wide substrate spectrum, including steroids, alcohols, sugars, aromatic compounds, and xenobiotics. On the basis of characteristic sequence motifs, the SDRs are subdivided into two main (classical and extended) and three smaller (divergent, intermediate, and complex) families. Despite low residue identities in pairwise comparisons, the three-dimensional structure among the SDRs is conserved and shows a typical Rossmann fold. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach to determine whether and which SDRs are present in cyanobacteria, microorganisms that played an important role in our ecosystem as the first oxygen producers. Cyanobacterial SDRs could indeed be identified, and were clustered according to the SDR classification system. Furthermore, because of the early availability of its genome sequence and the easy application of transformation methods, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, one of the most important cyanobacterial strains, was chosen as the model organism for this phylum. Synechocystis sp. SDRs were further analysed with bioinformatics tools, such as hidden Markov models (HMMs). It became evident that several cyanobacterial SDRs show remarkable sequence identities with SDRs in other organisms. These so-called 'homologous' proteins exist in plants, model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis  elegans, and even in humans. As sequence identities of up to 60% were found between Synechocystis and humans, it was concluded that SDRs seemed to have been well conserved during evolution, even after dramatic terrestrial changes such as the conversion of the early reducing atmosphere to an oxidizing one by cyanobacteria. PMID:22251568

  12. Aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily: genomics and annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindnich, Rebekka D; Penning, Trevor M

    2009-07-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are phase I metabolising enzymes that catalyse the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H)-dependent reduction of carbonyl groups to yield primary and secondary alcohols on a wide range of substrates, including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones, ketoprostaglandins, ketosteroids and xenobiotics. In so doing they functionalise the carbonyl group for conjugation (phase II enzyme reactions). Although functionally diverse, AKRs form a protein superfamily based on their high sequence identity and common protein fold, the (alpha/beta) 8 -barrel structure. Well over 150 AKR enzymes, from diverse organisms, have been annotated so far and given systematic names according to a nomenclature that is based on multiple protein sequence alignment and degree of identity. Annotation of non-vertebrate AKRs at the National Center for Biotechnology Information or Vertebrate Genome Annotation (vega) database does not often include the systematic nomenclature name, so the most comprehensive overview of all annotated AKRs is found on the AKR website (http://www.med.upenn.edu/akr/). This site also hosts links to more detailed and specialised information (eg on crystal structures, gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). The protein-based AKR nomenclature allows unambiguous identification of a given enzyme but does not reflect the wealth of genomic and transcriptomic variation that exists in the various databases. In this context, identification of putative new AKRs and their distinction from pseudogenes are challenging. This review provides a short summary of the characteristic features of AKR biochemistry and structure that have been reviewed in great detail elsewhere, and focuses mainly on nomenclature and database entries of human AKRs that so far have not been subject to systematic annotation. Recent developments in the annotation of SNP and transcript variance in AKRs are also summarised. PMID:19706366

  13. Aldo-keto reductase (AKR superfamily: Genomics and annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindnich Rebekka D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs are phase I metabolising enzymes that catalyse the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate (NAD(PH-dependent reduction of carbonyl groups to yield primary and secondary alcohols on a wide range of substrates, including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones, ketoprostaglan-dins, ketosteroids and xenobiotics. In so doing they functionalise the carbonyl group for conjugation (phase II enzyme reactions. Although functionally diverse, AKRs form a protein superfamily based on their high sequence identity and common protein fold, the (α/(β8-barrel structure. Well over 150 AKR enzymes, from diverse organisms, have been annotated so far and given systematic names according to a nomenclature that is based on multiple protein sequence alignment and degree of identity. Annotation of non-vertebrate AKRs at the National Center for Biotechnology Information or Vertebrate Genome Annotation (vega database does not often include the systematic nomenclature name, so the most comprehensive overview of all annotated AKRs is found on the AKR website (http://www.med.upenn.edu/akr/. This site also hosts links to more detailed and specialised information (eg on crystal structures, gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]. The protein-based AKR nomenclature allows unambiguous identification of a given enzyme but does not reflect the wealth of genomic and transcriptomic variation that exists in the various databases. In this context, identification of putative new AKRs and their distinction from pseudogenes are challenging. This review provides a short summary of the characteristic features of AKR biochemistry and structure that have been reviewed in great detail elsewhere, and focuses mainly on nomenclature and database entries of human AKRs that so far have not been subject to systematic annotation. Recent developments in the annotation of SNP and transcript variance in AKRs are also summarised.

  14. Expression of 5α-Reductase Type 2 Gene in Human Testis, Epididymis and Vas Deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德瑜; 吴燕婉; 罗宏志; 张桂元

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To study the expression pattern of 5α-reductase type 2 gene in human malereproductive organsMethods The expression level of 5α-reductase type 2 gene inhuman testis, epididymisand vas deferens tissues was determined by in situ hybridization using Digoxin labeled5α-reductase type 2 cRNA probe.Results The brown granules of hybridizing signals distributed in the cytoplasm ofSertoli and Leydig cells of the testis, the principle cells of epididymis and the epithe-lial cells of vas deferens, but there was no positive signal in the nuclei of above-men-tioned cells. No positive signal was observed in germ cells, basement of the testis,interstium of epididymis and basement, as well as smooth muscle of vas deferens.Conclusion This study confirmed that the 5α-reductase type 2 gene expressed in Ser-toli, Leydig cells of the testis, and the principle cells of epididymis. The expressionpattern of the gene in these cells in human was similar to that of rat and monkey. Thepresence of 5a-reductase type 2 gene in epithelial cells of the vas deferens suggested itmight possess an important physiological role in human reproduction.

  15. Pseudomonas stutzeri N2O reductase contains CuA-type sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N2O reductase (N2O → N2) is the terminal enzyme in the energy-conserving denitrification pathway of soil and marine denitrifying bacteria. The protein is composed of two identical subunits and contains eight copper ions per enzyme molecule. The magnetic circular dichroism spectrum of resting (oxidized) N2O reductase is strikingly similar to the magnetic circular dichroism spectrum of the CuA site in mammalian cytochrome c oxidase and is unlike the magnetic circular dichroism spectra of all other biological copper chromophores obtained to data. Sulfur (or chlorine) scatterers are required to fit the copper extended x-ray absorption fine structure data of both the oxidized and reduced forms of N2O reductase. Satisfactory fits require a Cu-N or Cu-O interaction at 2.0 angstrom, a Cu-(S, Cl) interaction at 2.3 angstrom and an additional Cu-(S, Cl) interaction at ∼ 2.6 angstrom (oxidized) or ∼ 2.7 angstrom (reduced). Comparison of the N2O reductase sequence, determined by translating the structural NosZ gene, with cytochrome c oxidase subunit II sequences from several sources indicates that a Gly-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Cys-Ser-Xaa-Xaa-Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-His stretch if high conserved. This sequence contains three of the probable ligands in a CuA-type site Collectively these data establish that Pseudomonas stutzeri N2O reductase contains CuA-type sites

  16. INHIBITORY ACTIVITY OF FLAVONOIDS ON THE LENS ALDOSE REDUCTASE OF HEALTHY AND DIABETIC RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Goodarzi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase is a critical enzyme in the polyol pathway that plays an important role in diabetes mellitus. Inhibition of the activity of this enzyme can prevent cataract in diabetic patients’lenses. In this study the inhibitory effect of two flavonoids, quercetin and naringin, in the activity of aldose reductase in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and healthy rats were investigated. Thirty male rats were divided in six groups. The first, second and third group were healthy rats that received water,quercetin and naringin, respectively. The fourth, fifth and sixth groups were streptozocin-induced diabetic rats that received water, quercetin and naringin, respectively. These rats were fed orally in a definite dose from each substance for 12 days. After this period rats were scarified and their lenses were separated and homogenized. The activity of aldose reductase was measured in each homogenized sample separately. The effect of feeding of these substances in blood sugar was also determined. Aldose reductase activity was reduced 73 and 69 percent in diabetic rats fed by quercetin and naringin, respectively, and the difference compared to control group was significant. In healthy rats this reduction was 63 and 59 percent, respectively, and the difference was significant compared to those who did not receive flavonoids. It was concluded that these substances were effective in reduction of aldose reductase activity in vivo and consequently could delay the progress of cataract.

  17. Current status of 5α-reductase inhibitors in the treatment of benign hyperplasia of prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vijay

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is a common problem in aging men, which is associated with lower urinary tract symptoms. This condition is dependent on the presence of androgens for its progression, and medical therapy is the first-line treatment for BPH patients with moderate-to-severe symptoms and includes the use of either alpha 1-adrenergic blockers or 5α-reductase inhibitors. Adrenergic blocking drugs reduce the dynamic component while the 5α-reductase inhibitors reduce the static component of bladder outlet obstruction in BPH. By inhibiting the generation of active form of testosterone, viz., dihydrotestosterone, the 5α-reductase inhibitors not only reduce the symptoms of BPH but also decrease the need for surgery and further progression of BPH. Besides, prolonged use of combination of 5α-reductase inhibitors and alpha 1-adrenergic blockers has been found to be more beneficial than either of the two drugs given alone. This review gives a brief account of rationale and efficacy of treatment by 5α-reductase inhibitors in the management of BPH.

  18. Structural and biochemical properties of cloned and expressed human and rat steroid 5α-reductases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microsomal enzyme steroid 5α-reductase is responsible for the conversion of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone. In man, this steroid acts on a variety of androgen-responsive target tissues to mediate such diverse endocrine processes as male sexual differentiation in the fetus and prostatic growth in men. Here we describe the isolation, structure, and expression of a cDNA encoding the human steroid 5α-reductase. A rat cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human prostate cDNA library. A 2.1-kilobase cDNA was identified and DNA sequence analysis indicated that the human steroid 5α-reductase was a hydrophobic protein of 259 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 29,462. A comparison of the human and rat protein sequences revealed a 60% identity. Transfection of expression vectors containing the human and rat cDNAs into simian COS cells resulted in the synthesis of high levels of steroid 5α-reductase enzyme activity. Both enzymes expressed in COS cells showed similar substrate specificities for naturally occurring steroid hormones. However, synthetic 4-azasteroids demonstrated marked differences in their abilities to inhibit the human and rat steroid 5α-reductases

  19. MEK2 regulates ribonucleotide reductase activity through functional interaction with ribonucleotide reductase small subunit p53R2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Chunmei; Youn, Cha-Kyung; Jin, Min; Yoon, Sang Pil; Chang, In-Youb; Lee, Jung Hee; You, Ho Jin

    2012-09-01

    The p53R2 protein, a newly identified member of the ribonucleotide reductase family that provides nucleotides for DNA damage repair, is directly regulated by p53. We show that p53R2 is also regulated by a MEK2 (ERK kinase 2/MAP kinase kinase 2)-dependent pathway. Increased MEK1/2 phosphorylation by serum stimulation coincided with an increase in the RNR activity in U2OS and H1299 cells. The inhibition of MEK2 activity, either by treatment with a MEK inhibitor or by transfection with MEK2 siRNA, dramatically decreased the serum-stimulated RNR activity. Moreover, p53R2 siRNA, but not R2 siRNA, significantly inhibits serum-stimulated RNR activity, indicating that p53R2 is specifically regulated by a MEK2-dependent pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that the MEK2 segment comprising amino acids 65-171 is critical for p53R2-MEK2 interaction, and the binding domain of MEK2 is required for MEK2-mediated increased RNR activity. Phosphorylation of MEK1/2 was greatly augmented by ionizing radiation, and RNR activity was concurrently increased. Ionizing radiation-induced RNR activity was markedly attenuated by transfection of MEK2 or p53R2 siRNA, but not R2 siRNA. These data show that MEK2 is an endogenous regulator of p53R2 and suggest that MEK2 may associate with p53R2 and upregulate its activity. PMID:22895183

  20. Discovery and characterization of a xylose reductase from Zymomonas mobilis ZM4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Manoj; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2011-11-01

    Formation of xylitol, a byproduct from xylose fermentation, is a major limiting factor in ethanol production from xylose in engineered Zymomonas strains, yet the postulated xylose reductase remains elusive. We report here the discovery of xylose reductase in Zymomonas mobilis and, for the first time, to associate the enzyme function with its gene. Besides xylose and xylulose, the enzyme was active towards benzaldehyde, furfural, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, and acetaldehyde, exhibiting nearly 150-times higher affinity with benzaldehyde than xylose. The discovery of xylose reductase paves the way for further improvement of xylose fermentation in Z. mobilis. The enzyme may also be used to mitigate toxicity of furfural and other inhibitors from plant biomass. PMID:21720846

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyota, Eduardo [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Sousa, Sylvia Morais de [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Menossi, Marcelo [Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Yunes, José Andrés [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Centro Infantil Boldrini, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aparicio, Ricardo, E-mail: aparicio@iqm.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR.

  2. Biochemical predetermination of the NO synthase and nitrite reductase components of the nitric oxide cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutov, V P

    1999-05-01

    This review presents some aspects of a concept of cellular evolution bearing a relationship to nitrate--nitrite respiration, the endosymbiosis theory, and the origin of NO synthase and nitrite reductase activity in heme-containing proteins. Analysis of structural and functional unity of the NO synthase and nitrite reductase systems suggests that these systems did not arise without any relation to evolutionarily ancient energetic systems of cells. The use of symmetry principles reveals commonalities among many electron transport chains which in the language of physics is called "invariance". This work also comparatively analyzes the nitric oxide cycle and the known nitrogen cycle. The ideas about evolution of the NO synthase and nitrite reductase systems developed here are clearly compatible with the endosymbiotic theory and the hypothesis that nitrate--nitrite respiration was a precursor of oxygen-dependent respiration. PMID:10381613

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of pig heart carbonyl reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pig heart carbonyl reductase has been crystallized in the presence of NADPH. Diffraction data have been collected using synchrotron radiation. Pig heart carbonyl reductase (PHCR), which belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Two crystal forms (I and II) have been obtained in the presence of NADPH. Form I crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P42, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 109.61, c = 94.31 Å, and diffract to 1.5 Å resolution. Form II crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 120.10, c = 147.00 Å, and diffract to 2.2 Å resolution. Both crystal forms are suitable for X-ray structure analysis at high resolution

  4. Synthetic and Crystallographic Studies of a New Inhibitor Series Targeting Bacillus anthracis Dihydrofolate Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beierlein, J.; Frey, K; Bolstad, D; Pelphrey, P; Joska, T; Smith, A; Priestley, N; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2008-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, poses a significant biodefense danger. Serious limitations in approved therapeutics and the generation of resistance have produced a compelling need for new therapeutic agents against this organism. Bacillus anthracis is known to be insensitive to the clinically used antifolate, trimethoprim, because of a lack of potency against the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme. Herein, we describe a novel lead series of B. anthracis dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors characterized by an extended trimethoprim-like scaffold. The best lead compound adds only 22 Da to the molecular weight and is 82-fold more potent than trimethoprim. An X-ray crystal structure of this lead compound bound to B. anthracis dihydrofolate reductase in the presence of NADPH was determined to 2.25 A resolution. The structure reveals several features that can be exploited for further development of this lead series.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR

  6. Alpha 1-blockers vs 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia. A comparative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T

    1995-01-01

    During recent years, pharmacological treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become the primary treatment choice for an increasing number of patients. The 2 principal drug classes employed are alpha 1-blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Current information from...... patients who will respond well to alpha 1-blockers have yet to be identified, and data concerning the long term effects of these drugs are not yet available. 5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors have a slow onset of effect, but treatment leads to improvement in symptoms, reduction of the size of the prostate gland...... and improvement in objective parameters for bladder outflow obstruction. Approximately 30 to 50% of patients will respond to treatment with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. The definitive role of pharmacological treatment in symptomatic BPH remains to be established, although it seems that patients unfit...

  7. BIOLOGICAL ROLE OF ALDO-KETO REDUCTASES IN RETINOIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS AND SIGNALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier eRuiz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Several aldo-keto reductase (AKR enzymes from subfamilies 1B and 1C show retinaldehyde reductase activity, having low Km and kcat values. Only AKR1B10 and 1B12, with all-trans-retinaldehyde, and AKR1C3, with 9-cis-retinaldehyde, display high catalytic efficiency. Major structural determinants for retinaldehyde isomer specificity are located in the external loops (A and C for AKR1B10, and B for AKR1C3, as assessed by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics. Cellular models have shown that AKR1B and 1C enzymes are well suited to work in vivo as retinaldehyde reductases and to regulate retinoic acid (RA biosynthesis at hormone pre-receptor level. An additional physiological role for the retinaldehyde reductase activity of these enzymes, consistent with their tissue localization, is their participation in β-carotene absorption. Retinaldehyde metabolism may be subjected to subcellular compartmentalization, based on enzyme localization. While retinaldehyde oxidation to RA takes place in the cytosol, reduction to retinol could take place in the cytosol by AKRs or in the membranes of endoplasmic reticulum by microsomal retinaldehyde reductases. Upregulation of some AKR1 enzymes in different cancer types may be linked to their induction by oxidative stress and to their participation in different signaling pathways related to cell proliferation. AKR1B10 and AKR1C3, through their retinaldehyde reductase activity, trigger a decrease in the RA biosynthesis flow, resulting in RA deprivation and consequently lower differentiation, with an increased cancer risk in target tissues. Rational design of selective AKR inhibitors could lead to development of novel drugs for cancer treatment as well as reduction of chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

  8. Putative Role of the Aldo-Keto Reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Benznidazole Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Patricia Andrea; Laverrière, Marc; Cannata, Joaquín J B; García, Gabriela Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Benznidazole (Bz), the drug used for treatment of Chagas' disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi), is activated by a parasitic NADH-dependent type I nitroreductase (NTR I). However, several studies have shown that other enzymes are involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the aldo-keto reductase from T. cruzi (TcAKR), a NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase previously described by our group, uses Bz as the substrate. We demonstrated that both recombinant and native TcAKR enzymes reduce Bz by using NADPH, but not NADH, as a cofactor. TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes showed higher NADPH-dependent Bz reductase activity and a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for Bz 1.8-fold higher than that of the controls, suggesting that TcAKR is involved in Bz detoxification instead of activation. To understand the role of TcAKR in Bz metabolism, we studied TcAKR expression and NADPH/NADH-dependent Bz reductase activities in two T. cruzi strains with differential susceptibility to Bz: CL Brener and Nicaragua. Taking into account the results obtained with TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes, we expected the more resistant strain, Nicaragua, to have higher TcAKR levels than CL Brener. However, the results were the opposite. CL Brener showed 2-fold higher TcAKR expression and 5.7-fold higher NADPH-Bz reduction than the Nicaragua strain. In addition, NADH-dependent Bz reductase activity, characteristic of NTR I, was also higher in CL Brener than in Nicaragua. We conclude that although TcAKR uses Bz as the substrate, TcAKR activity is not a determinant of Bz resistance in wild-type strains and may be overcome by other enzymes involved in Bz activation, such as NADPH- and NADH-dependent reductases. PMID:26856844

  9. Characterisation of a desmosterol reductase involved in phytosterol dealkylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora F Ciufo

    Full Text Available Most species of invertebrate animals cannot synthesise sterols de novo and many that feed on plants dealkylate phytosterols (mostly C(29 and C(28 yielding cholesterol (C(27. The final step of this dealkylation pathway involves desmosterol reductase (DHCR24-catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol. We now report the molecular characterisation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, of such a desmosterol reductase involved in production of cholesterol from phytosterol, rather than in de novo synthesis of cholesterol. Phylogenomic analysis of putative desmosterol reductases revealed the occurrence of various clades that allowed for the identification of a strong reductase candidate gene in Bombyx mori (BGIBMGA 005735. Following PCR-based cloning of the cDNA (1.6 kb and its heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisae, the recombinant protein catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol in an NADH- and FAD-dependent reaction.Conceptual translation of the cDNA, that encodes a 58.9 kDa protein, and database searching, revealed that the enzyme belongs to an FAD-dependent oxidoreductase family. Western blotting revealed reductase protein expression exclusively in the microsomal subcellular fraction and primarily in the gut. The protein is peripherally associated with microsomal membranes. 2D-native gel and PAGE analysis revealed that the reductase is part of a large complex with molecular weight approximately 250 kDa. The protein occurs in midgut microsomes at a fairly constant level throughout development in the last two instars, but is drastically reduced during the wandering stage in preparation for metamorphosis. Putative Broad Complex transcription factor-binding sites detectable upstream of the DHCR24 gene may play a role in this down-regulation.

  10. Aldose reductase inhibition prevents metaplasia of airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh C S Yadav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Goblet cell metaplasia that causes mucus hypersecretion and obstruction in the airway lumen could be life threatening in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-13 mediate the transformation of airway ciliary epithelial cells to mucin-secreting goblet cells in acute as well as chronic airway inflammatory diseases. However, no effective and specific pharmacologic treatment is currently available. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which aldose reductase (AR regulates the mucus cell metaplasia in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Metaplasia in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC was induced by a Th2 cytokine, IL-13, without or with AR inhibitor, fidarestat. After 48 h of incubation with IL-13 a large number of SAEC were transformed into goblet cells as determined by periodic acid-schiff (PAS-staining and immunohistochemistry using antibodies against Mucin5AC. Further, IL-13 significantly increased the expression of Mucin5AC at mRNA and protein levels. These changes were significantly prevented by treatment of the SAEC with AR inhibitor. AR inhibition also decreased IL-13-induced expression of Muc5AC, Muc5B, and SPDEF, and phosphorylation of JAK-1, ERK1/2 and STAT-6. In a mouse model of ragweed pollen extract (RWE-induced allergic asthma treatment with fidarestat prevented the expression of IL-13, phosphorylation of STAT-6 and transformation of epithelial cells to goblet cells in the lung. Additionally, while the AR-null mice were resistant, wild-type mice showed goblet cell metaplasia after challenge with RWE. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that exposure of SAEC to IL-13 caused goblet cell metaplasia, which was significantly prevented by AR inhibition. Administration of fidarestat to mice prevented RWE-induced goblet cell metaplasia and AR null mice were largely resistant to allergen induced changes in the lung. Thus our results indicate that AR inhibitors

  11. GENERATION OF THE GLYCYL RADICAL OF THE ANAEROBIC ESCHERICHIA-COLI RIBONUCLEOTIDE REDUCTASE REQUIRES A SPECIFIC ACTIVATING ENZYME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SUN, XY; ELIASSON, R; PONTIS, E; ANDERSSON, J; BUIST, G; SJOBERG, BM; REICHARD, P

    1995-01-01

    The anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase from Escherichia coli contains a glycyl radical as part of its polypeptide structure. The radical is generated by an enzyme system present in E. coli. The reductase is coded for by the nrdD gene located at 96 min. Immediately downstream, we now find an open rea

  12. Direct enzyme assay evidence confirms aldehyde reductase function of Ydr541cp and Ygl039wp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldehyde reductase gene ARI1 is a recently characterized member of intermediate subfamily under SDR (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase) superfamily that revealed mechanisms of in situ detoxification of furfural and HMF for tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Uncharacterized open reading frames ...

  13. Feedback regulation of cholesterol synthesis:sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMG CoA reductase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Russell A DeBose-Boyd

    2008-01-01

    3Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase produces mevalonate,an important intermediate in the synthesis of cholesterol and essential nonsterol isoprenoids.The reductase is subject to an exorbitant amount of feedback control through multiple mechanisms that are mediated by sterol and nonsterol end-products of mevalonate metabolism.Here,Ⅰwill discuss recent advances that shed light on one mechanism for control of reductase,which involves rapid degradation of the enzyme.Accumulation of certain sterols triggers binding of reductase to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins called Insig-1 and Insig-2.Reductase-Insig binding results in recruitment of a membrane-associated ubiquitin ligase called gp78,which initiates ubiquitination of reductase.This ubiquitination is an obligatory reaction for recognition and degradation of reductase from ER membranes by cytosolic 26S proteasomes.Thus,sterol-accelerated degradation of reductase represents an example of how a general cellular process (ER-associated degradation) is used to control an important metabolic pathway (cholesterol synthesis).

  14. Multiple Types of 8-Vinyl Reductases for (Bacterio)Chlorophyll Biosynthesis Occur in Many Green Sulfur Bacteria ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    Two 8-vinyl reductases, BciA and BciB, have been identified in chlorophototrophs. The bciA gene of Chlorobaculum tepidum was replaced with genes similar to bciB from other green sulfur bacteria. Pigment analyses of the complemented strains showed that the bciB homologs encode 8-vinyl reductases similar to those of cyanobacteria.

  15. Studies on some characteristics of nitrate reductase from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWenhua; YanGuiping; 等

    1994-01-01

    Some characteristics of nitrate reductase from sugar beet leaves shown in this paper were as follows:The nitrate reductase from sugar beet leaves required NADH as an electron donor.Accordingly,the nitrate reductase was classified as NADH-dependent(E.C.1.6.61).The Km value of the nitrate reductase for NADH and NO3- were 0.86m mol and 0.18μ mol respectively.The optimum pH in reaction mixture solution for nitrate reduction activity was 7.5.The effect of variable concentrations of inorganic phosphorus in the reaction buffer on nitrate reductase activity was investigated.When the inorganic phosphorus concentration was below 35m mol,the nitrate reductase activity was increased with increase of inorganic phosphorus concentration.Conversely,when the inorganic phosphorus concentration was over 35m mol,the nitrate reductase activity was inhibited.The nitrate reductase activity assayed in vitro was 3.2 and 5.6times of that assayed in vivo under the condition of exogenous and endogenous ground substance respectively.

  16. The role of 5'-adenylylsulfate reductase in the sulfur assimilation pathway of soybean: molecular cloning, kinetic characterization, and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean seeds are a major source of protein, but contain low levels of sulfur-containing amino acids. With the objective of studying the sulfur assimilation pathway of soybean, a full-length cDNA clone for 5’-adenylylsulfate reductase (APS reductase) was isolated and characterized. The cDNA clone ...

  17. Inverse relationship between age-dependent erythrocyte activity of methaemoglobin reductase and prilocaine-induced methaemoglobinaemia during infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A; Engberg, G; Henneberg, S; Danielson, K; De Verdier, C H

    1990-01-01

    concentrations of local anaesthetics were low (maximum values: prilocaine 78 ng ml-1, lignocaine 412 ng ml-1). The activity of erythrocyte MetHb reductase (cytochrome b5 reductase) was analysed. Data from a previously studied group of infants aged 3-12 months were included also. Enzyme activity did not reach...

  18. Identification of the bchP gene, encoding geranylgeranyl reductase in Chlorobaculum tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Aline; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A

    2008-01-01

    The Chlorobaculum tepidum genome contains two paralogous genes, CT2256 and CT1232, whose products are members of the FixC dehydrogenase superfamily and have sequence similarity to geranylgeranyl reductases. Each gene was insertionally inactivated, and the resulting mutants were characterized. CT2......2256 encodes geranylgeranyl reductase (BchP); CT1232 is not involved in bacteriochlorophyll or chlorophyll biosynthesis....

  19. Synthesis and degradation of nitrate reductase during the cell cycle of Chlorella sorokiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, P. J.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.; Whitaker, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Studies on the diurnal variations of nitrate reductase (NR) activity during the life cycle of synchronized Chlorella sorokiniana cells grown with a 7:5 light-dark cycle showed that the NADH:NR activity, as well as the NR partial activities NADH:cytochrome c reductase and reduced methyl viologen:NR, closely paralleled the appearance and disappearance of NR protein as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and immunoblots. Results of pulse-labeling experiments with [35S]methionine further confirmed that diurnal variations of the enzyme activities can be entirely accounted for by the concomitant synthesis and degradation of the NR protein.

  20. Affinity purifications of aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from the xylose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolen, P.L.; Roth, K.A.; Freer, S.N.

    1986-10-01

    Although xylose is a major product of hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, few yeasts are able to convert it to ethanol. In Pachysolen tannophilus, one of the few xylose-fermenting yeasts found, aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase were found to be key enzymes in the metabolic pathway for xylose fermentation. This paper presents a method for the rapid and simultaneous purification of both aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from P. tannophilus. Preliminary studies indicate that this method may be easily adapted to purify similar enzymes from other xylose-fermenting yeasts.

  1. Glyphosate inhibition of ferric reductase activity in iron deficient sunflower roots

    OpenAIRE

    Öztürk, Levent; Ozturk, Levent; Yazıcı, Mustafa Atilla; Yazici, Mustafa Atilla; Eker, Selim; Gökmen, Özay Özgür; Gokmen, Ozay Ozgur; Römheld, Volker; Romheld, Volker; ÇAKMAK, İsmail; Cakmak, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is increasingly being observed in cropping systems with frequent glyphosate applications. A likely reason for this is that glyphosate interferes with root uptake of Fe by inhibiting ferric reductase in roots required for Fe acquisition by dicot and nongrass species. This study investigated the role of drift rates of glyphosate (0.32, 0.95 or 1.89 mM glyphosate corresponding to 1, 3 and 6% of the recommended herbicidal dose, respectively) on ferric reductase activity of...

  2. Mutational analysis of the nor gene cluster which encodes nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A P; van der Oost, J; Reijnders, W N; Westerhoff, H V; Stouthamer, A H; van Spanning, R J

    1996-12-15

    The genes that encode the hc-type nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans have been identified. They are part of a cluster of six genes (norCBQDEF) and are found near the gene cluster that encodes the cd1-type nitrite reductase, which was identified earlier [de Boer, A. P. N., Reijnders, W. N. M., Kuenen, J. G., Stouthamer, A. H. & van Spanning, R. J. M. (1994) Isolation, sequencing and mutational analysis of a gene cluster involved in nitrite reduction in Paracoccus denitrificans, Antonie Leeu wenhoek 66, 111-127]. norC and norB encode the cytochrome-c-containing subunit II and cytochrome b-containing subunit I of nitric-oxide reductase (NO reductase), respectively. norQ encodes a protein with an ATP-binding motif and has high similarity to NirQ from Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and CbbQ from Pseudomonas hydrogenothermophila. norE encodes a protein with five putative transmembrane alpha-helices and has similarity to CoxIII, the third subunit of the aa3-type cytochrome-c oxidases. norF encodes a small protein with two putative transmembrane alpha-helices. Mutagenesis of norC, norB, norQ and norD resulted in cells unable to grow anaerobically. Nitrite reductase and NO reductase (with succinate or ascorbate as substrates) and nitrous oxide reductase (with succinate as substrate) activities were not detected in these mutant strains. Nitrite extrusion was detected in the medium, indicating that nitrate reductase was active. The norQ and norD mutant strains retained about 16% and 23% of the wild-type level of NorC, respectively. The norE and norF mutant strains had specific growth rates and NorC contents similar to those of the wild-type strain, but had reduced NOR and NIR activities, indicating that their gene products are involved in regulation of enzyme activity. Mutant strains containing the norCBQDEF region on the broad-host-range vector pEG400 were able to grow anaerobically, although at a lower specific growth rate and with lower

  3. Properties of a Thermostable Nitrate Reductase from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    OpenAIRE

    Afshar, Sepideh; Johnson, Eric; de Vries, Simon; Schröder, Imke

    2001-01-01

    The nitrate reductase of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum was purified 137-fold from the cytoplasmic membrane. Based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, the enzyme complex consists of three subunits with apparent molecular weights of 130,000, 52,000, and 32,000. The enzyme contained molybdenum (0.8-mol/mol complex), iron (15.4-mol/mol complex) and cytochrome b (0.49-mol/mol complex) as cofactors. The P. aerophilum nitrate reductase disti...

  4. Imaging the activity of nitrate reductase by means of a scanning electrochemical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaumseil, J; Wittstock, G; Bahrs, S; Steinrücke, P

    2000-06-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used to characterize immobilized nitrate reductase (NaR) from Pseudonomonas stutzeri (E.C. 1.7.99.4). Nitrate reductase with membrane fragment was embedded in a polyurethane hydrogel in a capillary and solubilized NaR without membrane fragment was covalently coupled to a diaminoethyl-cellulose-carbamitate film on glass. After systematic studies of possible mediators, SECM feedback imaging of both forms of immobilized NaR was accomplished with methylviologen as redox mediator. PMID:11225859

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil); Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A. [Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Molecular Biology Division, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531, S2002LRK Rosario (Argentina); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source

  7. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Trigoso, Yvonne D.; Russell C Evans; Karsten, William E.; Lilian Chooback

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR) is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(P)H dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to i...

  8. Pinpointing a Mechanistic Switch Between Ketoreduction and “Ene” Reduction in Short‐Chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygidakis, Antonios; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Hoeven, Robin; Ní Cheallaigh, Aisling; Leys, David; Gardiner, John M.; Toogood, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three enzymes of the Mentha essential oil biosynthetic pathway are highly homologous, namely the ketoreductases (−)‐menthone:(−)‐menthol reductase and (−)‐menthone:(+)‐neomenthol reductase, and the “ene” reductase isopiperitenone reductase. We identified a rare catalytic residue substitution in the last two, and performed comparative crystal structure analyses and residue‐swapping mutagenesis to investigate whether this determines the reaction outcome. The result was a complete loss of native activity and a switch between ene reduction and ketoreduction. This suggests the importance of a catalytic glutamate vs. tyrosine residue in determining the outcome of the reduction of α,β‐unsaturated alkenes, due to the substrate occupying different binding conformations, and possibly also to the relative acidities of the two residues. This simple switch in mechanism by a single amino acid substitution could potentially generate a large number of de novo ene reductases. PMID:27411040

  9. Isolation, modification, and aldose reductase inhibitory activity of rosmarinic acid derivatives from the roots of Salvia grandifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jie; Tang, Yanbo; Liu, Quan; Guo, Nan; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Zhiyan; Chen, Ruoyun; Shen, Zhufang

    2016-07-01

    To find aldose reductase inhibitors, two previously unreported compounds, grandifolias H and I, and five known compounds, including rosmarinic acid and rosmarinic acid derivatives, were isolated from the roots of Salvia grandifolia. A series of rosmarinic acid derivatives was obtained from rosmarinic acid using simple synthetic methods. The aldose reductase inhibitory activity of the isolated and synthesized compounds was assessed. Seven of the tested compounds showed moderate aldose reductase inhibition (IC50=0.06-0.30μM). The structure-activity relationship of aldose reductase inhibitory activity of rosmarinic acid derivatives was discussed for the first time. This study provided useful information that will facilitate the development of aldose reductase inhibitors. PMID:27233987

  10. Coenzyme Q10 prevented full blown splenomegaly and decreased melarsoprol-induced reactive encephalopathy in mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nyabuga Nyariki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the modulatory effects of coenzyme Q10 on experimental trypanosome infections in mice and evaluate the risk of occurrence and severity of melarsoprol-induced post treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE. Methods: Female Swiss white mice were orally administered with 200 mg/kg of coenzyme Q10 after which they were intraperitoneally inoculated with Trypanasoma brucei rhodesiense (T. b. rhodesiense. The resultant infection was allowed to develop and simulate all phases of human African trypanosomiasis and PTRE. Parasitaemia development, packed cell volume, haematological and pathological changes were determined. Results: A histological study in the brain tissue of T. b. rhodesiense infected mice demonstrated neuroinflammatory pathology which was highly amplified in the PTRE-induced groups. A prominent reduction in the severity of the neuroinflammatory response was detected when coenzyme-Q10 was administered. Furthermore, the mean tissue weight of spleen to body ratio in coenzyme Q10 supplemented group was significantly (P<0.05 different compared to un-supplemented groups, and clearly indicated that coenzyme Q10 prevented full blown splenomegaly pathogenesis by T. b. rhodesiense. A significant (P<0.05 increase in hemoglobin levels and red blood cells was observed in coenzyme Q10 mice compared to those infected and un-supplemented with coenzyme Q10. Conclusions: The capacity of coenzyme Q10 to alter the pathogenesis of T. b. rhodesiense infection in mice and following treatment with melarsoprol, may find application by rendering humans and animals less susceptible to deleterious effects of trypanosome infection such as splenomegaly and melarsoprol-induced PTRE and neurotoxicity.

  11. Glycolipid precursors for the membrane anchor of Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoproteins. II. Lipid structures of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C sensitive and resistant glycolipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common diagnostic feature of glycosylinositol phospholipid (GPI)-anchored proteins is their release from the membrane by a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). However, some GPI-anchored proteins are resistant to this enzyme. The best characterized example of this subclass is the human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase, where the structural basis of PI-PLC resistance has been shown to be the acylation of an inositol hydroxyl group(s). Both PI-PLC-sensitive and resistant GPI-anchor precursors (P2 and P3, respectively) have been found in Trypanosoma brucei, where the major surface glycoprotein is anchored by a PI-PLC-sensitive glycolipid anchor. The accompanying paper shows that P2 and P3 have identical glycans, indistinguishable from the common core glycan found on all the characterized GPI protein anchors. This paper shows that the single difference between P2 and P3, and the basis for the PI-PLC insusceptibility of P3, is a fatty acid, ester-linked to the inositol residue in P3. The inositol-linked fatty acid can be removed by treatment with mild base to restore PI-PLC sensitivity. Biosynthetic labeling experiments with [3H]palmitic acid and [3H]myristic acid show that [3H]palmitic acid specifically labels the inositol residue in P3 while [3H]myristic acid labels the diacylglycerol portion. Possible models to account for the simultaneous presence of PI-PLC-resistant and sensitive glycolipids are discussed in the context of available information on the biosynthesis of GPI-anchors

  12. Structure determination of glycogen synthase kinase-3 from Leishmania major and comparative inhibitor structure-activity relationships with Trypanosoma brucei GSK-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Arakaki, Tracy L; Napuli, Alberto J; Inampudi, Krishna K; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Zhang, Li; Hol, Wim G.J.; Verlind, Christophe L.M.J.; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C [UWASH

    2012-04-24

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a drug target under intense investigation in pharmaceutical companies and constitutes an attractive piggyback target for eukaryotic pathogens. Two different GSKs are found in trypanosomatids, one about 150 residues shorter than the other. GSK-3 short (GeneDB: Tb927.10.13780) has previously been validated genetically as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei by RNAi induced growth retardation; and chemically by correlation between enzyme and in vitro growth inhibition. Here, we report investigation of the equivalent GSK-3 short enzymes of L. major (LmjF18.0270) and L. infantum (LinJ18_V3.0270, identical in amino acid sequences to LdonGSK-3 short) and a crystal structure of LmajGSK-3 short at 2 Å resolution. The inhibitor structure-activity relationships (SARs) of L. major and L. infantum are virtually identical, suggesting that inhibitors could be useful for both cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Leishmania spp. GSK-3 short has different inhibitor SARs than TbruGSK-3 short, which can be explained mostly by two variant residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Indeed, mutating these residues in the ATP-binding site of LmajGSK-3 short to the TbruGSK-3 short equivalents results in a mutant LmajGSK-3 short enzyme with SAR more similar to that of TbruGSK-3 short. The differences between human GSK-3β (HsGSK-3β) and LmajGSK-3 short SAR suggest that compounds which selectively inhibit LmajGSK-3 short may be found.

  13. Protective role of glutathione reductase in paraquat induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Mirjana M; Jovanovic, Marina D; Ninkovic, Milica; Stevanovic, Ivana; Ilic, Katarina; Curcic, Marijana; Vekic, Jelena

    2012-08-30

    Paraquat (PQ), a widely used herbicide is a well-known free radical producing agent. The mechanistic pathways of PQ neurotoxicity were examined by assessing oxidative/nitrosative stress markers. Focus was on the role of glutathione (GSH) cycle and to examine whether the pre-treatment with enzyme glutathione reductase (GR) could protect the vulnerable brain regions (VBRs) against harmful oxidative effect of PQ. The study was conducted on Wistar rats, randomly divided in five groups: intact-control group, (n = 8) and four experimental groups (n = 24). All tested compounds were administered intrastriatally (i.s.) in one single dose. The following parameters of oxidative status were measured in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex, at 30 min, 24 h and 7 days post treatment: superoxide anion radical (O₂·⁻), nitrate (NO₃⁻), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total GSH (tGSH) and its oxidized, disulfide form (GSSG) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Results obtained from the intact and the sham operated groups were not statistically different, confirming that invasive i.s. route of administration would not influence the reliability of results. Also, similar pattern of changes were observed between ipsi- and contra- lateral side of examined VBRs, indicating rapid spatial spreading of oxidative stress. Mortality of the animals (10%), within 24h, along with symptoms of Parkinsonism, after awakening from anesthesia for 2-3 h, were observed in the PQ group, only. Increased levels of O₂·⁻, NO₃⁻ and MDA, increased ratio of GSSG/GSH and considerably high activity of GPx were measured at 30 min after the treatment. Cytotoxic effect of PQ was documented by drastic drop of all measured parameters and extremely high peak of the ratio GSSG/GSH at 24th hrs after the PQ i.s. injection. In the GR+PQ group, markedly low activity of GPx and low content of NO₃⁻ (in striatum and cortex) were measured during whole experiment, while increase value was

  14. Identification and characterization of an inborn error of metabolism caused by dihydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banka, S.; Blom, H.J.; Walter, J.; Aziz, M.; Urquhart, J.; Clouthier, C.M.; Rice, G.I.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Hilton, E.; Vassallo, G.; Will, A.; Smith, D.E.; Smulders, Y.M.; Wevers, R.A.; Steinfeld, R.; Heales, S.; Crow, Y.J.; Pelletier, J.N.; Jones, S.; Newman, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a critical enzyme in folate metabolism and an important target of antineoplastic, antimicrobial, and antiinflammatory drugs. We describe three individuals from two families with a recessive inborn error of metabolism, characterized by megaloblastic anemia and/or pan

  15. Direct demonstration of genetic alterations at the dihydrofolate reductase locus after gamma irradiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Graf, L. H.; Chasin, L A

    1982-01-01

    Gamma ray-induced mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking dihydrofolate reductase activity were screened for DNA sequence changes at the locus specifying this activity by using a cloned cDNA probe. Two of nine mutants screened displayed an altered restriction fragment pattern suggesting the occurrence of DNA deletions or rearrangements.

  16. Low activity of superoxide dismutase and high activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes from centenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Jeune, B; Nybo, H;

    1998-01-01

    aged between 60 and 79 years. MEASUREMENTS: enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase (GR) in erythrocytes. Functional capacity among the centenarians was evaluated by Katz' index of activities of daily living, the Physical...

  17. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A;

    1997-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a genomic clone containing the open reading frame sequence for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. The protozoan gene encoded for a smaller polypeptide than the rest of the...

  18. Novel bacterial sulfur oxygenase reductases from bioreactors treating gold-bearing concentrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Z-W; Liu, Y-Y; Wu, J-F;

    2007-01-01

    The microbial community and sulfur oxygenase reductases of metagenomic DNA from bioreactors treating gold-bearing concentrates were studied by 16S rRNA library, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), conventional cultivation, and molecular cloning. Results indicated that major bacterial sp...... SOR gene in bioleaching reactors and Acidithiobacillus species....

  19. A Rational Approach to Identify Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chhabria, M. T.; Parmar, K. B.; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 21 (2013), s. 3878-3883. ISSN 1381-6128 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mycobacterium tuberculosis * enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase * pharmacophore modeling * molecular docking * binding interactions Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.288, year: 2013

  20. Relationships between nitrate uptake and nitrate reductase activity in Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kłobus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anti-NR IgG fragments obtained after papain digestion of polyclonal antibodies gave the positive immunological reaction with both, a soluble and plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase. Anti-NR antibody as well as IgG fragments almost totally inhibited the nitrate reductase activity in cytosol proving a crossreaction of antibody with the catalytic site of a soluble NR. Anti-NR IgG fragments, but not undigested polyclonal antibodies affected the activity of the nitrate reductase associated with plasma membranes. Discrepancy in the action of intact antibodies and fragments obtained after they digestion were interpreted as a consequence of same differences in the ability of those molecules to the penetration through the membrane. Undigested anti-NR antibody have no effect on the nitrate uptake by intact plants, as well as by the right-side plasma membrane vesicles. On the other hand, IgG fragments of polyclonal antibodies abolished almost totally the nitrate uptake in the case of intact seedlings, but have only slight effect on the N03 uptake in plasma membranes. On the basis of above findings, some relations between nitrate uptake and its assimilation inside the cell are suggested. Since IgG fragments only slightly changed the N03 absorption in vesicles whereas the activity of plasmalemma associated nitrate reductase was strongly repressed, we concluded that the PM-NR is not structurally involved in the nitrate transport through the membrane.

  1. Prevention of hemodynamic and vascular albumin filtration changes in diabetic rats by aldose reductase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated hemodynamic changes in diabetic rats and their relationship to changes in vascular albumin permeation and increased metabolism of glucose to sorbitol. The effects of 6 wk of streptozocin-induced diabetes and three structurally different inhibitors of aldose reductase were examined on (1) regional blood flow (assessed with 15-microns 85Sr-labeled microspheres) and vascular permeation by 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and (2) glomerular filtration rate (assessed by plasma clearance of 57Co-labeled EDTA) and urinary albumin excretion (determined by radial immunodiffusion assay). In diabetic rats, blood flow was significantly increased in ocular tissues (anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, and optic nerve), sciatic nerve, kidney, new granulation tissue, cecum, and brain. 125I-BSA permeation was increased in all of these tissues except brain. Glomerular filtration rate and 24-h urinary albumin excretion were increased 2- and 29-fold, respectively, in diabetic rats. All three aldose reductase inhibitors completely prevented or markedly reduced these hemodynamic and vascular filtration changes and increases in tissue sorbitol levels in the anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, sciatic nerve, and granulation tissue. These observations indicate that early diabetes-induced hemodynamic changes and increased vascular albumin permeation and urinary albumin excretion are aldose reductase-linked phenomena. Discordant effects of aldose reductase inhibitors on blood flow and vascular albumin permeation in some tissues suggest that increased vascular albumin permeation is not entirely attributable to hemodynamic change

  2. Purification and characterization of a novel carbonyl reductase isolated from Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinski, T; Peters, J; Kula, M R

    1994-04-15

    During growth on n-tetradecane a novel NADH-dependent carbonyl reductase is induced in the Gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis (Peters, P., Zelinski, T. and Kula, M.R. (1992) Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 38, 334-340). The enzyme has been purified to homogeneity using fractional pH precipitation, anion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. The isoelectric point of the oxidoreductase is 4.4. The apparent molecular mass of the native enzyme is 161 kDa, that of the subunits 40 kDa as determined by SDS gel electrophoresis. A tetrameric structure of the carbonyl reductase is consistent with these results. Important biochemical data concerning the application of the reductase are: a broad pH-optimum, temperature optimum at 40 degrees C and stability at room temperature for more than 5 days. The oxidoreductase accepted as substrate aliphatic and aromatic ketones, keto esters (esters of keto carboxylic acids) and halogenated carbonyl compounds and reduced them to the corresponding hydroxyl compounds with (S)-configuration with more than 98% enantiomeric excess. The NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of primary alcohols was not catalyzed by the carbonyl reductase, whereas secondary alcohols and hydroxy acid esters were oxidized to the corresponding carbonyl compounds at about 10-fold slower reaction rates compared to the reduction. PMID:7764739

  3. Design and synthesis of novel, conformationally restricted HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Choi, Chulho; Song, Yuntao; Trivedi, Bharat K; Larsen, Scott D; Askew, Valerie; Dillon, Lisa; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Lin, Zhiwu; Lu, Gina; Robertson, Andrew; Sekerke, Catherine; Auerbach, Bruce; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Harris, Melissa S; Bainbridge, Graeme; Caspers, Nicole

    2007-08-15

    Using structure-based design, a novel series of conformationally restricted, pyrrole-based inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase were discovered. Leading analogs demonstrated potent inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in both in vitro and in vivo models and may be useful for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and related lipid disorders. PMID:17574411

  4. Cloning and expression of Candida guilliermondii xylose reductase gene (xyl1) in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handumrongkul, C; Ma, D P; Silva, J L

    1998-04-01

    A xylose reductase gene (xyl1) of Candida guilliermondii ATCC 20118 was cloned and characterized. The open reading frame of xyl1 contained 954 nucleotides encoding a protein of 317 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 36 kDa. The derived amino acid sequence of C. guilliermondii xylose reductase was 70.4% homologous to that of Pichia stipitis. The gene was placed under the control of an alcohol oxidase promoter (AOX1) and integrated into the genome of a methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. Methanol induced the expression of the 36-kDa xylose reductase in both intracellular and secreted expression systems. The expressed enzyme preferentially utilized NADPH as a cofactor and was functional both in vitro and in vivo. The different cofactor specificity between P. pastoris and C. guilliermondii xylose reductases might be due to the difference in the numbers of histidine residues and their locations between the two proteins. The recombinant was able to ferment xylose, and the maximum xylitol accumulation (7.8 g/l) was observed when the organism was grown under aerobic conditions. PMID:9615481

  5. HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibition, type 2 diabetes, and bodyweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Preiss, David; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statins increase the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to assess whether this increase in risk is a consequence of inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the intended drug target. METHODS: We used single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HMGCR...

  6. Thioredoxin reductase is a key factor in the oxidative stress response of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mariela Serrano, L.; Molenaar, D.; Wels, M.; Teusink, B.; Bron, P.A.; Vos, W.M. de; Smid, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Thioredoxin (TRX) is a powerful disulfide oxido-reductase that catalyzes a wide spectrum of redox reactions in the cell. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of the TRX system in the oxidative stress response in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. RESULTS: We have identifi

  7. The 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism interacts with smoking to increase homocysteine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, K.S.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Young, I.S.; Murray, L.; McMaster, D.; Woodside, J.; Yarnell, J.W.; Boreham, C.A.; McNulty, H.; Strain, J.J.; McPartlin, J.; Scott, J.M.; Mitchell, L.E.; Whitehead, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Elevated homocysteine is a risk marker for several human pathologies. Risk factors for elevated homocysteine include low folate and homozygosity for the T allele of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism. Because nitric oxide may inhibit folate catabolism and endothe

  8. REGULATION OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L. BY GROWTH REGULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S HEMALATHA

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of three growth regulators, namely kinetin, 6 benzyl adenine, 2 chloro ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride at three concentrations (10-6 M, 5 x 10-5 M 10-4 M was studied on the catalytic activity of nitrate reductase in green and etiolated seedlings. A concentration of 5 x 10-5 M was optimal for all the growth regulators treatments. All the growth regulators stimulated nitrate reductase activity effectively at 5 x 10-5M concentration in both etiolated and green seedlings and had an additive effect when supplemented by NO-3 up to 140% to 160%. The 99.2% and 93.4% inhibition of nitrate reductase activity resulted in development of etiolated and green seedlings, respectively when treated with eukaryotic 80S ribosome protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Prokaryotic 70S inhibitor chloromphenicol did not have any effect on measured parameters. Actinomycin D, a RNA synthesis inhibitor also inhibited the enzyme activity as 80s inhibitors (Green 80%, etiolated 98%. One may suggest from this that both DNA and protein synthesis are involved in the induction of nitrate reductase activity. The differential effect of aminoacids was observed on enzyme activity in combination with growth regulators.

  9. NADPH-dependent D-aldose reductases and xylose fermentation in Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, P.

    2004-01-01

    Two aldose (xylose) reductases (ARI and ARII) from Fusarium oxysporum were purified and characterized. The native ARI was a monomer with M-r 41000, pI 5.2 and showed a 52-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, while ARII was homodimeric with a subunit of M-r 37000, pI 3.6 and a 60-fold preference...

  10. Sensing nitrite through a pseudoazurin-nitrite reductase electron transfer relay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astier, Y; Canters, GW; Davis, JJ; Hill, HAO; Verbeet, MP; Wijma, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite is converted to nitric oxide by haem or copper-containing enzymes in denitrifying bacteria during the process of denitrification. In designing an efficient biosensor, this enzymic turnover must be quantitatively assessed. The enzyme nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis contains a redo

  11. Allosteric control of internal electron transfer in cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G;

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase is a bifunctional multiheme enzyme catalyzing the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide and the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the internal electron transfer process in the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme have...

  12. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower propo...

  13. In Silico Docking studies of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory activity of selected Flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuswamy Umamaheswari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available New drugs for the inhibition of the enzyme aldose reductase are in development and they have to be screened before being considered for preclinical and clinical evaluation. The current study deals with the evaluation of the cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of flavonoids using in silico docking studies. In this perspective, flavonoids like Farobin-A, Gericudranin- B, Glaziovianin-A, Rutin, and Xanthotoxin were selected. Epalrestat, a known aldose reductase inhibitor was used as the standard. Docking results showed that all the selected flavonoids showed binding energy ranging between -7.91 kcal/mol to - 5.08 kcal/mol when compared with that of the standard (-5.59 kcal/mol. Intermolecular energy (- 9.11 kcal/mol to -8.66 kcal/mol and inhibition constant (1.58 μM to 187.37 μM of the ligands also coincide with the binding energy. Xanthotoxin contributed better aldose reductase inhibitory activity because of its structural parameters. Further studies are required to develop potent aldose reductase inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes.

  14. EFFECT OF LINDANE ON INTESTINAL NITROREDUCTASE, AZO REDUCTASE, B-GLUCURONIDASE, DECHLORINASE AND DEHYDROCHLORINASE ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of daily p.o. injections of 20 mg/kg lindane on nitroreductase, azo reductase, B-glucuronidase, dechlorinase and dehydrochlorinase enzyme activity in the rat intestinal tract vas investigated after 2 weeks and 5 weeks of treatment. Antibiotics were administered to half...

  15. Calorimetric and spectroscopic investigations of the thermal denaturation of wild type nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stirpe, A; Guzzi, R; Wijma, H; Verbeet, MP; Canters, GW; Sportelli, L

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) is a multicopper protein, with a trimeric structure containing two types of copper site: type I is present in each subunit whereas type 2 is localized at the subunits interface. The paper reports on the thermal behaviour of wild type NiR from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6. The tem

  16. Structural and transcriptional analysis of plant genes encoding the bifunctional lysine ketoglutarate reductase saccharopine dehydrogenase enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    The analysis of a wheat lysine ketoglutarate reductase – saccharopine dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH) gene and comparative structural and functional analyses among available plant genes provides new information on this important gene. Both the structure of the LKR/SDH gene and the immediately adjacent genes...

  17. Biliverdin Reductase-A correlates with inducible nitric oxide synthasein in atorvastatin treated aged canine brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Di Domenico; Marzia Perluigi; Eugenio Barone

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive impairment and neuropathology. Recent preclinical and epidemiological studies proposed statins as a possible therapeutic drug for Alzheimer’s disease, but the exact mechanisms of action are stil unknown. Biliverdin reductase-A is a pleiotropic enzyme involved in cel ular stress responses. It not only transforms biliverdin-IX alpha into the antioxidant bilirubin-IX alpha but its serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activity is able to modulate cel signaling networks. We previously reported the beneficial effects of atorvastatin treatment on biliverdin reductase-A and heme oxygenase-1 in the brains of a well characterized pre-clinical model of Alzheimer’s disease, aged beagles, together with observed improvement in cognition. Here we extend our knowledge of the effects of atorvastatin on inducible nitric oxide synthase in parietal cortex, cerebel um and liver of the same animals. We demonstrated that atorvastatin treatment (80 mg/day for 14.5 months) to aged beagles selectively increased inducible nitric oxide synthase in the parietal cortex but not in the cerebel um. In contrast, inducible nitric oxide synthase protein levels were significantly decreased in the liver. Significant positive correlations were found between biliverdin reductase-A and inducible nitric oxide synthase as wel as heme oxygenase-1 protein levels in the parietal cortex. The opposite was observed in the liver. Inducible nitric oxide synthase up-regulation in the parietal cortex was positively associated with improved biliverdin reductase-A functions, whereas the oxidative-induced impairment of biliverdin reductase-A in the liver negatively affected inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, thus suggesting a role for biliverdin reductase-A in atorvastatin-dependent inducible nitric oxide synthase changes. Interestingly, increased inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the parietal cortex were not

  18. Biochemical and antitumor activity of trimidox, a new inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekeres, T; Gharehbaghi, K; Fritzer, M; Woody, M; Srivastava, A; van't Riet, B; Jayaram, H N; Elford, H L

    1994-01-01

    Trimidox (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzamidoxime), a newly synthesized analog of didox (N,3,4-trihydroxybenzamide) reduced the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (EC 1.17.4.1) in extracts of L1210 cells by 50% (50% growth-inhibitory concentration, IC50) at 5 microM, whereas hydroxyurea, the only ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor in clinical use, exhibited an IC50 of 500 microM. Ribonucleotide reductase activity was also measured in situ by incubating L1210 cells for 24 h with trimidox at 7.5 microM, a concentration that inhibits cell proliferation by 50% (IC50) or at 100 microM for 2 h; these concentrations resulted in a decrease in enzyme activity to 22% and 50% of the control value, respectively. Trimidox and hydroxyurea were cytotoxic to L1210 cells with IC50 values of 7.5 and 50 microM, respectively. Versus ribonucleotide reductase, trimidox and hydroxyurea yielded IC50 values of 12 and 87 microM, respectively. A dose-dependent increase in life span was observed in mice bearing intraperitoneally transplanted L1210 tumors. Trimidox treatment (200 mg/kg; q1dx9) significantly increased the life span of mice bearing L1210 leukemia (by 82% in male mice and 112% in female mice). The anti-tumor activity appeared more pronounced in female mice than in male mice. Viewed in concert, these findings suggest that trimidox is a new and potent inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase and that it is a promising candidate for the chemotherapy of cancer in humans. PMID:8174204

  19. Respiratory detoxification of nitric oxide by the cytochrome c nitrite reductase of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poock, Susannah R; Leach, Emily R; Moir, James W B; Cole, Jeffrey A; Richardson, David J

    2002-06-28

    Nitric oxide is a key element in host defense against invasive pathogens. The periplasmic cytochrome c nitrite reductase (NrfA) of Escherichia coli catalyzes the respiratory reduction of nitrite, but in vitro studies have shown that it can also reduce nitric oxide. The physiological significance of the latter reaction in vivo has never been assessed. In this study the reduction of nitric oxide by Escherichia coli was measured in strains active or deficient in periplasmic nitrite reduction. Nrf(+) cells, harvested from cultures grown anaerobically, possessed a nitric-oxide reductase activity with physiological electron donation of 60 nmol min(-1) x mg dry wt(-1), and an in vivo turnover number of NrfA of 390 NO* s(-1) was calculated. Nitric-oxide reductase activity could not be detected in Nrf(-) strains. Comparison of the anaerobic growth of Nrf(+) and Nrf(-) strains revealed a higher sensitivity to nitric oxide in the NrfA(-) strains. A higher sensitivity to the nitrosating agent S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) was also observed in agar plate disk-diffusion assays. Oxygen respiration by E. coli was also more sensitive to nitric oxide in the Nrf(-) strains compared with the Nrf(+) parent strain. The results demonstrate that active periplasmic cytochrome c nitrite reductase can confer the capacity for nitric oxide reduction and detoxification on E. coli. Genomic analysis of many pathogenic enteric bacteria reveals the presence of nrf genes. The present study raises the possibility that this reflects an important role for the cytochrome c nitrite reductase in nitric oxide management in oxygen-limited environments. PMID:11960983

  20. Conversion of NfsA, the Major Escherichia coli Nitroreductase, to a Flavin Reductase with an Activity Similar to That of Frp, a Flavin Reductase in Vibrio harveyi, by a Single Amino Acid Substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenno, Shuhei; Kobori, Toshiro; Tanokura, Masaru; Saigo, Kaoru

    1998-01-01

    NfsA is the major oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase of Escherichia coli, similar in amino acid sequence to Frp, a flavin reductase of Vibrio harveyi. Here, we show that a single amino acid substitution at position 99, which may destroy three hydrogen bonds in the putative active center, transforms NfsA from a nitroreductase into a flavin reductase that is as active as the authentic Frp and a tartrazine reductase that is 30-fold more active than wild-type NfsA. PMID:9440535

  1. Involvement of nitrate reductase and pyoverdine in competitiveness of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain C7R12 in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirleau, P; Philippot, L; Corberand, T; Lemanceau, P

    2001-06-01

    Involvement of nitrate reductase and pyoverdine in the competitiveness of the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12 was determined, under gnotobiotic conditions, in two soil compartments (bulk and rhizosphere soil), with the soil being kept at two different values of matric potential (-1 and -10 kPa). Three mutants affected in the synthesis of either the nitrate reductase (Nar(-)), the pyoverdine (Pvd(-)), or both (Nar(-) Pvd(-)) were used. The Nar(-) and Nar(-) Pvd(-) mutants were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the wild-type strain and of the Pvd(-) mutant, respectively. The selective advantage given by nitrate reductase and pyoverdine to the wild-type strain was assessed by measuring the dynamic of each mutant-to-total-inoculant (wild-type strain plus mutant) ratio. All three mutants showed a lower competitiveness than the wild-type strain, indicating that both nitrate reductase and pyoverdine are involved in the fitness of P. fluorescens C7R12. The double mutant presented the lowest competitiveness. Overall, the competitive advantages given to C7R12 by nitrate reductase and pyoverdine were similar. However, the selective advantage given by nitrate reductase was more strongly expressed under conditions of lower aeration (-1 kPa). In contrast, the selective advantage given by nitrate reductase and pyoverdine did not differ in bulk and rhizosphere soil, indicating that these bacterial traits are not specifically involved in the rhizosphere competence but rather in the saprophytic ability of C7R12 in soil environments. PMID:11375173

  2. Glutathione Reductase of Vacuole. Comparison of Glutathione Reductase Activity of Vacuole and Tissue Extract of Red Beet Root (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Pradedova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.8.1.7 is the enzyme that reduces oxidized glutathione (GSSG and thus regulates the redox state of glutathione (GSH/GSSG. GR has been studied in most plants. This enzyme has been identified in chloroplasts and cytosol, so these cellular compartments are considered to be the main place of the enzyme localization. In the same time, just a little is known about GR vacuoles. There are no conclusive evidences to prove the presence or absence of this enzyme in the vacuoles. GR activity was found in the vacuoles of red beet root cells (Beta vulgaris L.. The level of activity, the optimum pH and isoenzyme composition of GR were compared in the vacuoles and tissue extract of beet root. Vacuolar GR activity was quite high, it was 1.5-2 times higher than the activity of the tissue extract. Enzyme pH optimum of all the objects were identical. pH-optimum depend on the pyridine nucleotide nature: pH 7.0-8.0 was an optimal range with NADPH; pH 5.0 – with NADH. GR activity of the vacuoles and tissue extracts decreased in the presence of a noncompetitive inhibitor 1-chloro-2.4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB, indicating the specificity of this enzymatic reaction. Two bands with glutathione reductase activity have been identified in the vacuoles and tissue extracts using zymography method to determine the enzymatic activity in PAAG after electrophoresis of proteins. Belonging to the GR isoforms of these bands was confirmed by enzyme immunoassay (Western blotting. The electric mobility of isoforms of the study objects did not differ significantly. It is concluded that the biochemical characteristics of vacuolar glutathione reductase were substantially identical to the biochemical characteristics of other localization GR.

  3. Coenzyme A disulfide reductase, the primary low molecular weight disulfide reductase from Staphylococcus aureus. Purification and characterization of the native enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    delCardayre, S B; Stock, K P; Newton, G L; Fahey, R C; Davies, J E

    1998-03-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus does not utilize the glutathione thiol/disulfide redox system employed by eukaryotes and many bacteria. Instead, this organism produces CoA as its major low molecular weight thiol. We report the identification and purification of the disulfide reductase component of this thiol/disulfide redox system. Coenzyme A disulfide reductase (CoADR) catalyzes the specific reduction of CoA disulfide by NADPH. CoADR has a pH optimum of 7.5-8.0 and is a dimer of identical subunits of Mr 49,000 each. The visible absorbance spectrum is indicative of a flavoprotein with a lambdamax = 452 nm. The liberated flavin from thermally denatured enzyme was identified as flavin adenine dinucleotide. Steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that CoADR catalyzes the reduction of CoA disulfide by NADPH at pH 7.8 with a Km for NADPH of 2 muM and for CoA disulfide of 11 muM. In addition to CoA disulfide CoADR reduces 4,4'-diphosphopantethine but has no measurable ability to reduce oxidized glutathione, cystine, pantethine, or H2O2. CoADR demonstrates a sequential kinetic mechanism and employs a single active site cysteine residue that forms a stable mixed disulfide with CoA during catalysis. These data suggest that S. aureus employs a thiol/disulfide redox system based on CoA/CoA-disulfide and CoADR, an unorthodox new member of the pyridine nucleotide-disulfide reductase superfamily. PMID:9488707

  4. Glutathione Reductase of Vacuole. Comparison of Glutathione Reductase Activity of Vacuole and Tissue Extract of Red Beet Root (Beta vulgaris L.)

    OpenAIRE

    E.V. Pradedova; O.D. Nimaeva; Salyaev, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.8.1.7) is the enzyme that reduces oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thus regulates the redox state of glutathione (GSH/GSSG). GR has been studied in most plants. This enzyme has been identified in chloroplasts and cytosol, so these cellular compartments are considered to be the main place of the enzyme localization. In the same time, just a little is known about GR vacuoles. There are no conclusive evidences to prove the presence or absence of this enzyme in the ...

  5. Regulation of Escherichia coli fumarate reductase (frdABCD) operon expression by respiratory electron acceptors and the fnr gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, H. M.; Gunsalus, R P

    1987-01-01

    The fumarate reductase enzyme complex, encoded by the frdABCD operon, allows Escherichia coli to utilize fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic oxidative phosphorylation. To analyze the expression of fumarate reductase, protein and operon fusions were constructed between the frdA and the lacZ genes and introduced onto the E. coli chromosome at the lambda attachment site. Expression of beta-galactosidase from either fusion was increased 10-fold during anaerobic versus aerobic c...

  6. Involvement of Nitrate Reductase and Pyoverdine in Competitiveness of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain C7R12 in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mirleau, Pascal; Philippot, Laurent; Corberand, Thérèse; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    Involvement of nitrate reductase and pyoverdine in the competitiveness of the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12 was determined, under gnotobiotic conditions, in two soil compartments (bulk and rhizosphere soil), with the soil being kept at two different values of matric potential (−1 and −10 kPa). Three mutants affected in the synthesis of either the nitrate reductase (Nar−), the pyoverdine (Pvd−), or both (Nar− Pvd−) were used. The Nar− and Nar− Pvd− mutants were obtained by si...

  7. Cancer metabolism and oxidative stress: Insights into carcinogenesis and chemotherapy via the non-dihydrofolate reductase effects of methotrexate

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua A. Hess; Mohamad K. Khasawneh

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate has been in use as an anti-cancer agent for over 60 years. Though inhibition of dihydrofolate reductase is its best known mechanisms of action, its non-dihydrofolate reductase dependent mechanisms disrupt metabolic pathways resulting in a depletion of NAD(P)H and increasing oxidative stress. These mechanisms highlight a novel dependence of cancer cells on their metabolic abnormalities to buffer oxidative stress and chemotherapeutic agents interfere with these cellular abilities. ...

  8. A novel twist on molecular interactions between thioredoxin and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent thioredoxin reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine Groth; Hägglund, Per; Shahpiri, Azar;

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous disulfide reductase thioredoxin (Trx) regulates several important biological processes such as seed germination in plants. Oxidized cytosolic Trx is regenerated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR) in a multistep transfer of r....... Overall, the findings suggest that NTR:Trx interactions in different biological systems are fine-tuned by multiple intermolecular contacts. Proteins 2014; 82:607-619. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  9. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Weiwei Zhang; Guoting Tian; Shanshan Feng; Jack Ho Wong; Yongchang Zhao; Xiao Chen; Hexiang Wang; Tzi Bun Ng

    2015-01-01

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum...

  10. Loss of the tyrosyl radical in mouse ribonucleotide reductase by (-)-epicatechin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flavonoid (-)-epicatechin was previously demonstrated to interfere with tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrite [Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 285 (2001) 782]. This effect was hypothesized to be based upon an interaction of epicatechin with a transiently generated tyrosyl radical. In the present study, using electron paramagnetic resonance, we demonstrate that (-)-epicatechin is capable of destabilizing the tyrosyl radical of the mouse ribonucleotide reductase R2 component. First-order rate constants for the disappearance of tyrosyl radical signals were 1 x 10-4 and 2 x 10-4 s-1for epicatechin and hydroxyurea, a well-known tyrosyl radical scavenger, respectively. In keeping with scavenging the ribonucleotide reductase tyrosyl radical, cellular production of deoxyribonucleotides and DNA synthesis were impaired by (-)-epicatechin in normal human keratinocytes and in human squamous carcinoma cells

  11. Positive pleiotropic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor on vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobin Jean

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that statins greatly reduces cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Also, the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors has been reported to have immunosuppressive effects. Case presentation We describe an unusual case of regression of vitiligo in a patient treated with high dose simvastatin. The relation between simvastatin and regression of vitiligo in this case report may be related to the autoimmune pathophysiology of the disease. Conclusion This unexpected beneficial impact provides another scientific credence to the hypothesis that immune mechanisms play a role in the development of vitiligo and that the use of statins as immuno-modulator could be of use not only for treatment relative to organ transplant but in other pathologies such as vitiligo.

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of xylose reductase from Candida tropicalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of xylose reductase from C. tropicalis is reported. Xylose reductase (XR), which requires NADPH as a co-substrate, catalyzes the reduction of d-xylose to xylitol, which is the first step in the metabolism of d-xylose. The detailed three-dimensional structure of XR will provide a better understanding of the biological significance of XR in the efficient production of xylitol from biomass. XR of molecular mass 36.6 kDa from Candida tropicalis was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. According to X-ray diffraction data from C. tropicalis XR crystals at 2.91 Å resolution, the unit cell belongs to space group P31 or P32. Preliminary analysis indicated the presence of four XR molecules in the asymmetric unit, with 68.0% solvent content

  13. Expression Analysis of Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Genes Involved in Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Purple Grains of Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-Sen LIU; Fang WANG; Yu-Xiu DONG; Xian-Sheng ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    The grain color of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important characteristic in crop production.Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes (DFR) encode the key enzyme dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, which is involved in the pigmentation of plant tissues. To investigate the molecular mechanism of anthocyanin deposition in grains of wheat, we determined the expression of the wheat DFR gene in purple grains of cultivar Heimai 76. The results showed that DFR transcripts were localized in the seed coat of purple grains rather than in the pericarp, whereas anthocyanins were accumulated in both tissues of purple grains,suggesting that anthocyanin deposition was mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Overexpression of the TaDFR-A gene in Arabidopsis showed that TaDFR-A was responsible for the pigmentation of Arabidopsis plant tissues, indicating TaDFR-A gene has the same role in Arabidopsis.

  14. Discovery of pyrrole-based hepatoselective ligands as potent inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, Larry D; Auerbach, Bruce; Choi, Chulho; Dillon, Lisa; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Larsen, Scott D; Lu, Gina; Olsen, Karl; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Robertson, Andrew; Sekerke, Catherine; Trivedi, Bharat K; Unangst, Paul C

    2007-08-15

    In an effort to identify hepatoselective inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, two series of pyrroles were synthesized and evaluated. Efforts were made to modify (3R,5R)-7-[3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-isopropyl-4-phenyl-5-phenylcarbamoyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-3,5-dihydroxy-heptanoic acid sodium salt 30 in order to reduce its lipophilicity and therefore increase hepatoselectivity. Two strategies that were explored were replacement of the lipophilic 3-phenyl substituent with either a polar function (pyridyl series) or with lower alkyl substituents (lower alkyl series) and attachment of additional polar moieties at the 2-position of the pyrrole ring. One compound was identified to be both highly hepatoselective and active in vivo. We report the discovery, synthesis, and optimization of substituted pyrrole-based hepatoselective ligands as potent inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase for reducing low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:17560788

  15. The properties of monoclonal antibody against sepiapterin reductase from fat body of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, T; Sawada, H; Gyure, W L; Tsusué, M

    1992-12-01

    A specific monoclonal antibody prepared for the 29-kDa a subunit of silkworm fat body sepiapterin reductase (SPR) was able to recognize the subunit in crude extract of fat body after SDS treatment. Although SPR from the silkworm fat body has biochemical properties similar to those reported for SPR from mammalian sources, especially rat erythrocytes, the antibody failed to recognize the 28-kDa subunit of rat erythrocyte SPR. This result indicates that SPR from silkworm fat body has a different amino-acid sequence from that of the rat erythrocyte enzyme. Sepiapterin reductase activity has not been found in crude extract of fat body from the silkworm mutant lemon. Although the antibody recognized only 29-kDa protein in the crude extract of silkworm fat body from normal strain after SDS-treatment, the antibody recognized only an approximately 80-kDa protein in the crude extract of the lemon mutant after SDS-treatment. PMID:1292509

  16. 5alpha-Reductase inhibitor treatment of prostatic diseases: background and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörsam, J; Altwein, J

    2009-01-01

    This literature review discusses the theoretical background of 5alpha-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) treatment and the resulting clinical implications. A Medline-based search for peer-reviewed articles addressing 5ARIs, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer was performed. The 5ARIs Finasteride and Dutasteride, which specifically inhibit the production of dihydrotestosterone by acting as competitive inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase, are clinically well tolerated and represent an effective treatment option for benign prostatic obstruction. Finasteride is the first compound which has a proven efficacy in chemoprevention of prostate cancer. The aim of this review was to elucidate, if there are sufficient data available to point out clinically relevant differences between the drugs. Both compounds achieve a significant reduction of prostate volume, an improvement of symptoms and a lower risk of acute urinary retention. Whether the different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of Finasteride and Dutasteride are of clinical importance cannot be judged at this time. PMID:19030020

  17. Mechanism of biological denitrification inhibition: procyanidins induce an allosteric transition of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase through membrane alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Clément; Poly, Franck; Piola, Florence; Pancton, Muriel; Comte, Gilles; Meiffren, Guillaume; Haichar, Feth El Zahar

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it has been shown that procyanidins fromFallopiaspp. inhibit bacterial denitrification, a phenomenon called biological denitrification inhibition (BDI). However, the mechanisms involved in such a process remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of BDI involving procyanidins, using the model strainPseudomonas brassicacearumNFM 421. The aerobic and anaerobic (denitrification) respiration, cell permeability and cell viability ofP. brassicacearumwere determined as a function of procyanidin concentration. The effect of procyanidins on the bacterial membrane was observed using transmission electronic microscopy. Bacterial growth, denitrification, NO3- and NO2-reductase activity, and the expression of subunits of NO3- (encoded by the genenarG) and NO2-reductase (encoded by the genenirS) under NO3or NO2were measured with and without procyanidins. Procyanidins inhibited the denitrification process without affecting aerobic respiration at low concentrations. Procyanidins also disturbed cell membranes without affecting cell viability. They specifically inhibited NO3- but not NO2-reductase.Pseudomonas brassicacearumresponded to procyanidins by over-expression of the membrane-bound NO3-reductase subunit (encoded by the genenarG). Our results suggest that procyanidins can specifically inhibit membrane-bound NO3-reductase inducing enzymatic conformational changes through membrane disturbance and thatP. brassicacearumresponds by over-expressing membrane-bound NO3-reductase. Our results lead the way to a better understanding of BDI. PMID:26906096

  18. The prenyltransferase UBIAD1 is the target of geranylgeraniol in degradation of HMG CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Marc M; Elsabrouty, Rania; Seemann, Joachim; Jo, Youngah; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2015-01-01

    Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder in humans characterized by abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in the cornea. SCD-associated mutations have been identified in the gene encoding UBIAD1, a prenyltransferase that synthesizes vitamin K2. Here, we show that sterols stimulate binding of UBIAD1 to the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMG CoA reductase, which is subject to sterol-accelerated, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation augmented by the nonsterol isoprenoid geranylgeraniol through an unknown mechanism. Geranylgeraniol inhibits binding of UBIAD1 to reductase, allowing its degradation and promoting transport of UBIAD1 from the ER to the Golgi. CRISPR-CAS9-mediated knockout of UBIAD1 relieves the geranylgeraniol requirement for reductase degradation. SCD-associated mutations in UBIAD1 block its displacement from reductase in the presence of geranylgeraniol, thereby preventing degradation of reductase. The current results identify UBIAD1 as the elusive target of geranylgeraniol in reductase degradation, the inhibition of which may contribute to accumulation of cholesterol in SCD. PMID:25742604

  19. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective. PMID:25676153

  20. Metal complexes with 2-acetylpyridine-N(4)-orthochlorophenylthiosemicarbazone: cytotoxicity and effect on the enzymatic activity of thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilha, Gabrieli L; Ferraz, Karina S O; Lessa, Josane A; de Oliveira, Kely Navakoski; Rodrigues, Bernardo L; Ramos, Jonas P; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Ott, Ingo; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2014-09-12

    Metal complexes with 2-acetylpyridine-N(4)-orthochlorophenylthiosemicarbazone (H2Ac4oClPh) were assayed for their cytotoxicity against MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma and HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. The thiosemicarbazone and most of the complexes were highly cytotoxic. H2Ac4oClPh and its gallium(III) and tin(IV) complexes did not show any inhibitory activity against thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione reductase (GR). The palladium(II), platinum(II) and bismuth(III) complexes inhibited TrxR at micromolar concentrations but not GR. The antimony(III) and gold(III) complexes strongly inhibited TrxR at submicromolar doses with GR inhibition at higher concentrations. The selectivity of these complexes for TrxR suggests metal binding to a selenol residue in the active site of the enzyme. TrxR inhibition is likely a contributing factor to the mode of action of the gold and antimony derivatives. PMID:25058344

  1. Theoretical Calculations of the Catalytic Triad in Short-Chain Alcohol Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    OpenAIRE

    Gani, Osman A B S M; Adekoya, Olayiwola A; Giurato, Laura; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Guccione, Salvatore; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2007-01-01

    Three highly conserved active site residues (Ser, Tyr, and Lys) of the family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) were demonstrated to be essential for catalytic activity and have been denoted the catalytic triad of SDRs. In this study computational methods were adopted to study the ionization properties of these amino acids in SDRs from Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila lebanonensis. Three enzyme models, with different ionization scenarios of the catalytic triad that...

  2. Sulfate reduction in higher plants: Molecular evidence for a novel 5′-adenylylsulfate reductase

    OpenAIRE

    SETYA, AMIT; Murillo, Michael; Leustek, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Sulfate-assimilating organisms reduce inorganic sulfate for Cys biosynthesis. There are two leading hypotheses for the mechanism of sulfate reduction in higher plants. In one, adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) (5′-adenylylsulfate) sulfotransferase carries out reductive transfer of sulfate from APS to reduced glutathione. Alternatively, the mechanism may be similar to that in bacteria in which the enzyme, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase, catalyzes...

  3. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygous mutation in a young boy with cerebellar infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Spalice; Francesca Del Balzo; Francesco Massimo Perla; Enrico Properzi; Carla Carducci; Italo Antonozzi; Paola Iannetti

    2009-01-01

    Posterior circulation vascular occlusive disease in children is a rare and uncommonly reported event. Among the numerous risk factors, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation is considered to be a common genetic cause of thrombosis in adults and children. Recently, a link between the MTHFR mutation and cerebrovascular disorders was reported in children. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a great improvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), making the in vivo anatomical and...

  4. Lemierre's syndrome with double heterozygote status in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa Behpour-Oskooee; Abdollah Karimi; Shirin Sayyahfar

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are some risk factors being more vulnerable to Lemierre's syndrome such as a hypercoagulable state. Methods: We report a rare case of Lemierre's syndrome with ethmoid and maxillary sinusitis, bilateral mastoiditis, and sigmoid sinus thrombosis. Results: Genetic study revealed a double heterozygote status in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene including C677T and A1298C. Conclusion: It is suggested to screen patients with Lemierre's syndrome for a hypercoagulable state to consider anticoagulant therapy.

  5. Purine salvage pathways of Bacillus subtilis and effect of guanine on growth of GMP reductase mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, T.; Uratani, B; Freese, E.

    1983-01-01

    We have isolated numerous mutants containing mutations in the salvage pathways of purine synthesis. The mutations cause deficiencies in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (adeF), in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (guaF), in adenine deaminase (adeC), in inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, (guaP), and in GMP reductase (guaC). The physiological properties of mutants containing one or more of these mutations and corresponding enzyme measurements have been used to derive a metabolic ch...

  6. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  7. Dimethyl sulfoxide reductase activity by anaerobically grown Escherichia coli HB101.

    OpenAIRE

    Bilous, P T; Weiner, J H

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli grew anaerobically on a minimal medium with glycerol as the carbon and energy source and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the terminal electron acceptor. DMSO reductase activity, measured with an artificial electron donor (reduced benzyl viologen), was preferentially associated with the membrane fraction (77 +/- 10% total cellular activity). A Km for DMSO reduction of 170 +/- 60 microM was determined for the membrane-bound activity. Methyl viologen, reduced flavin mononucleotide,...

  8. Nitrate reductase and acid phosphatase activities as affected by inorganic phosphate in corn roots

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Kummerova; Józef Buczek

    2014-01-01

    The deficieny of inorganic phosphate in nutrient solution reduces by about 50 per cent NO3- absorption in corn seedlings, it decreases both in vitro and in vivo nitrate reductase (NR) activity, as well the potential and actual NR level and has a very weak effect on NR induction. Acid phosphatases activities increase in corn roots when the plants are grown in nutrient solution without phosphorus. We suggest that inorganic phosphate is required mainly for maintenance of NR activity rather, than...

  9. Induction of Glutathione Synthesis and Glutathione Reductase Activity by Abiotic Stresses in Maize and Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Gabor Kocsy; Gabriella Szalai; Gabor Galiba

    2002-01-01

    The effect of different abiotic stresses (extreme temperatures and osmotic stress) on the synthesis of glutathione and hydroxymethylglutathione, on the ratio of the reduced to oxidised forms of these thiols (GSH/GSSG, hmGSH/hmGSSG), and on the glutathione reductase (GR) activity was studied in maize and wheat genotypes having different sensitivity to low temperature stress. Cold treatment induced a greater increase in total glutathione (TG) content and in GR activity in tolerant genotypes of ...

  10. Thioredoxin reductase-1 (TxnRd1) mediates curcumin-induced radiosensitization of squamous carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Javvadi, Prashanthi; Hertan, Lauren; Kosoff, Rachelle; Datta, Tatini; Kolev, Johann; Mick, Rosemarie; Tuttle, Stephen W; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin, a plant polyphenol, is a widely studied chemopreventive agent with demonstrated antitumor activities in preclinical studies and low toxicity profiles in multiple clinical trials against human malignancies. We previously demonstrated that curcumin radiosensitizes cervical tumor cells without increasing the cytotoxic effects of radiation on normal human fibroblasts. Here we report that an inhibitory activity of curcumin on the anti-oxidant enzyme Thioredoxin Reductase-1 (TxnRd1) is re...

  11. Tissue distribution and ontogeny of steroid 5 alpha-reductase isozyme expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Thigpen, A E; Silver, R I; Guileyardo, J M; Casey, M L; McConnell, J D; Russell, D W

    1993-01-01

    The synthesis of dihydrotestosterone is catalyzed by steroid 5 alpha-reductase isozymes, designated types 1 and 2. Mutation of type 2 results in male pseudohermaphroditism, in which the external genitalia are phenotypically female at birth. Two striking and unexplained features of this disorder are that external genitalia of affected males undergo virilization during puberty and that these individuals have less temporal hair regression. The tissue-specific and developmental expression pattern...

  12. Dicarbonyl L-Xylulose Reductase (DCXR), a “Moonlighting Protein” in the Bovine Epididymis

    OpenAIRE

    Akintayo, Ayodélé; Légaré, Christine; Sullivan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    During maturation and the acquisition of their fertilization potential, male germ cells are subjected to various sequential modifications that occur in the epididymis. Protein addition, reorganization or withdrawal, comprise some of these modifications. Dicarbonyl L-xylulose reductase (DCXR), a multifunctional protein involved in various enzymatic and protein interaction processes in different physiological systems, is one of the proteins added to spermatozoa in the epididymis. DCXR is a well...

  13. Methionine synthase reductase deficiency results in adverse reproductive outcomes and congenital heart defects in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Liyuan; Elmore, C. Lee; Lawrance, Andrea K.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Rozen, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Low dietary folate and polymorphisms in genes of folate metabolism can influence risk for pregnancy complications and birth defects. Methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) is required for activation of methionine synthase, a folate- and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme. A polymorphism in MTRR (p.I22M), present in the homozygous state in 25% of many populations, may increase risk for neural tube defects. To examine the impact of MTRR deficiency on early development and congenital heart defects, we u...

  14. Developmental expression of Xenopus short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase 3

    OpenAIRE

    Kam, Richard Kin Ting; Chen, Yonglong; Chan, Sun On; Chan, Wood Yee; Dawid, Igor B.; Hui ZHAO

    2010-01-01

    During early embryonic development, the retinoic acid signaling pathway coordinates with other signaling pathways to regulate body axis patterning and organogenesis. The production of retinoic acid requires two enzymatic reactions, the first of which is the oxidization of vitamin A (all-trans-retinol) to all-trans-retinal, mediated in part by the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Through DNA microarrays, we have identified a gene in Xenopus laevis, which shares a high sequence similarity t...

  15. Differential expression of 5-alpha reductase isozymes in the prostate and its clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Wang; Dong-Dong Fan; Song Jin; Nian-Zeng Xing; Yi-Nong Niu

    2014-01-01

    The development of human benign or malignant prostatic diseases is closely associated with androgens, primarily testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). T is converted to DHT by 5-alpha reductase (5-AR) isozymes. Differential expression of 5-AR isozymes is observed in both human benign and malignant prostatic tissues. 5-AR inhibitors (5-ARI) are commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and were once promoted as chemopreventive agents for prostate cancer (PC...

  16. Battling Prostate Cancer with 5-Alpha-Reductase Inhibitors: a Pyrrhic Victory?

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Richard M.; Richard G. Roberts; Barry, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Given the relatively small impact of prostate cancer screening on cancer mortality, experts are now suggesting that chemoprevention with 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors (5-ARI) may be a more effective strategy for cancer control. Two large placebo-controlled randomized trials found that men receiving 5-ARI were about 25% less likely than controls to be detected with cancer. However, most cancers were detected on routine biopsies required by study protocols. The benefit from receiving 5-ARI was m...

  17. Clinical Effects of Discontinuing 5-Alpha Reductase Inhibitor in Patients With Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Won; Jung, Jae Hung; Kang, Tae Wook; Song, Jae Mann; Chung, Hyun Chul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess changes in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), prostate volume, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after discontinuation of 5-alpha reductase inhibitor (5ARI) combination therapy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Materials and Methods From December 2003 to December 2012, data were collected retrospectively from 81 men more than 40 years of age with moderate to severe BPH symptoms (International Prostate Symptom Score [IPSS]≥8). The men were classif...

  18. Targeting 5α-reductase for prostate cancer prevention and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Nacusi, Lucas P.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone is the most abundant circulating androgen, and can be converted to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a more potent androgen, by the 5α-reductase enzymes in target tissues. Current treatments for prostate cancer consist of reducing androgen levels by chemical or surgical castration or pure antiandrogen therapy that directly targets the androgen receptor (AR). Although these therapies reduce tumor burden and AR activity, the cancer inevitably recurs within 18–30 months. An approach target...

  19. 5-α reductase inhibitors and prostate cancer prevention: where do we turn now?

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton Robert J; Freedland Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract With the lifetime risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer so great, an effective chemopreventive agent could have a profound impact on the lives of men. Despite decades of searching for such an agent, physicians still do not have an approved drug to offer their patients. In this article, we outline current strategies for preventing prostate cancer in general, with a focus on the 5-α-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) finasteride and dutasteride. We discuss the two landmark randomized...

  20. Purification and Characterization of (Per)Chlorate Reductase from the Chlorate-Respiring Strain GR-1

    OpenAIRE

    Kengen, Servé W. M.; Rikken, Geoffrey B.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; van Ginkel, Cees G.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Strain GR-1 is one of several recently isolated bacterial species that are able to respire by using chlorate or perchlorate as the terminal electron acceptor. The organism performs a complete reduction of chlorate or perchlorate to chloride and oxygen, with the intermediate formation of chlorite. This study describes the purification and characterization of the key enzyme of the reductive pathway, the chlorate and perchlorate reductase. A single enzyme was found to catalyze both the chlorate-...

  1. Characterization of the Arsenate Respiratory Reductase from Shewanella sp. Strain ANA-3

    OpenAIRE

    Malasarn, Davin; Keeffe, Jennifer R.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial arsenate respiration contributes to the mobilization of arsenic from the solid to the soluble phase in various locales worldwide. To begin to predict the extent to which As(V) respiration impacts arsenic geochemical cycling, we characterized the expression and activity of the Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3 arsenate respiratory reductase (ARR), the key enzyme involved in this metabolism. ARR is expressed at the beginning of the exponential phase and persists throughout the stationary ph...

  2. Induction and inhibition of NAD(P)H: quinone reductase in murine and human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, H; Jugert, F; Bonnekoh, B; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the human cutaneous NAD(P)H: quinone reductase (NQR) activity by known inhibitors of different reductases and to compare it with the murine skin and liver NQR activity. This enzyme plays a major role in the defence of cells against oxygen stress because it inhibits the 1-electron reduction of quinones to semiquinones and their subsequent oxidation to quinones termed as quinone redox cycle. It belongs to the aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive (Ah) battery. This gene battery includes Cyp1a1 (cytochrome P-450 IA1), Cyp1a2 (cytochrome P-450 IA2) and Nmo-1 [NAD(P)H: quinone reductase]. In the skin cytochrome P-450 IA1-dependent activity is about 1-5% compared to the corresponding activity in the liver, whereas NQR has the same activity in skin and liver. NQR was determined in the cytoplasm of murine skin, liver, and human keratinocytes using 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol as the substrate. The Ah-receptor binding compounds, such as coal tar constituents, or 3-methylcholanthrene induce cytochrome P-450-dependent activities such as aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase or 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-de-ethylase and NQR, whereas butyl hydroxytoluol, which does not bind to the Ah receptor, induces only NQR. For inhibition studies several known inhibitors of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, aldo-keto and carbonyl reductase activities were used. There was a similar pattern of inhibition of the basal and induced activity in all tissues investigated. Pyrazole, progesterone and phenobarbital did not inhibit, whereas dicoumarol, rutin and indomethacin inhibited NQR activity in murine skin and liver as well as in human keratinocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1768430

  3. A Fluorimetric Readout Reporting the Kinetics of Nucleotide-Induced Human Ribonucleotide Reductase Oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yuan; Lin, Hongyu; Wisitpitthaya, Somsinee; Blessing, William A.; Aye, Yimon

    2014-01-01

    Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRNR) is a target of nucleotide chemotherapeutics in clinical use. The nucleotide-induced oligomeric regulation of hRNR subunit α is increasingly being recognized as an innate and drug-relevant mechanism for enzyme activity modulation. In the presence of negative feedback inhibitor dATP and leukemia drug clofarabine nucleotides, hRNR-α assembles into catalytically inert hexameric complexes, whereas nucleotide effectors that govern substrate specificity typicall...

  4. Novel octaheme cytochrome c tetrathionate reductase (OTR) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Octa-heme cytochrome c tetrathionate reductase (OTR) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a periplasmic protein and shows several extraordinary structural features around its active-site heme. OTR has been found able to catalyse the in vitro reduction of tetrathionate, nitrite, hydroxylamine and hydrogen peroxide. However the physiological function of this novel protein remains unknown. The subject of this thesis is the in vitro catalytic mechanism and the in vivo function of OTR...

  5. The Effects of Acrolein on Peroxiredoxins, Thioredoxins, and Thioredoxin Reductase in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Charles R.; Myers, Judith M.

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation is a common form of exposure to acrolein, a toxic reactive volatile aldehyde that is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Bronchial epithelial cells would be directly exposed to inhaled acrolein. The thioredoxin (Trx) system is essential for the maintenance of cellular thiol redox balance, and is critical for cell survival. Normally, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) maintains the cytosolic (Trx1) and mitochondrial (Trx2) thioredoxins in the reduced state, and the thioredoxins keep the...

  6. Aldose reductase regulates acrolein-induced cytotoxicity in human small airway epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Umesh CS; Ramana, KV; Srivastava, SK

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR), a glucose metabolizing enzyme, reduces lipid aldehydes and their glutathione conjugates with more than 1000-fold efficiency (Km aldehydes 5-30μM) than glucose. Acrolein, a major endogenous lipid peroxidation product as well as component of environmental pollutant and cigarette smoke, is known to be involved in various pathologies including atherosclerosis, airway inflammation, COPD, and age-related disorders but the mechanism of acrolein-induced cytotoxicity is not clea...

  7. Regulation of assimilatory nitrate reductase activity in soil by microbial assimilation of ammonium.

    OpenAIRE

    McCarty, G.W.; Bremner, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that assimilatory nitrate reductase (ANR) activity in soil is inhibited by ammonium (NH4+). To elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, we studied the effect of L-methionine sulfoximine (MSX), an inhibitor of NH4+ assimilation by microorganisms, on assimilatory reduction of nitrate (NO3-) in aerated soil slurries treated with NH4+. We found that NH4+ strongly inhibited ANR activity in these slurries and that MSX eliminated this inhibition. We also found that MSX indu...

  8. Identification and Characterization of Inhibitors of Bacterial Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Losee L.; Xian, Jun; Ali, Syed; Geng, Bolin; Fan, Jun; Mills, Debra M.; Arvanites, Anthony C.; Orgueira, Hernan; Ashwell, Mark A.; Carmel, Gilles; Xiang, Yibin; Moir, Donald T.

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) catalyzes an essential step in fatty acid biosynthesis. ENR is an attractive target for narrow-spectrum antibacterial drug discovery because of its essential role in metabolism and its sequence conservation across many bacterial species. In addition, the bacterial ENR sequence and structural organization are distinctly different from those of mammalian fatty acid biosynthesis enzymes. High-throughput screening to identify inhibitors of Esch...

  9. Dihydropteroate Synthase and Novel Dihydrofolate Reductase Gene Mutations in Strains of Pneumocystis jirovecii from South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Robberts, F. J. L.; Chalkley, L J; Weyer, K.; Goussard, P.; Liebowitz, L. D.

    2005-01-01

    Dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene mutations have raised concerns about emerging sulfonamide resistance in Pneumocystis jirovecii. DHPS and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene products were amplified in clinical specimens from South African patients. One of 53 DHPS genes sequenced contained the double mutation Thr55Ala Pro57Ser. DHFR gene mutations detected were Ala67Val and the new mutations Arg59Gly and C278T.

  10. Dihydrofolate reductase amplification and sensitization to methotrexate of methotrexate-resistant colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales Torres, Christina; García, Maria J; Ribas, Maria;

    2009-01-01

    have analyzed the structure and dynamics of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene amplification in HT29 cells treated with methotrexate (MTX). Analysis of the DHFR gene amplification process shows that the amplicon exhibits a complex structure that is consistently reproduced in independent treatments...... responsive to a second round of treatment if left untreated during a sufficient period of time. [Mol Cancer Ther 2009;8(2):424-32]....

  11. Role of 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in the management of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hudak, Steven J.; Hernandez, Javier; Thompson, Ian M

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most complex and enigmatic oncologic problems in medicine. It is highly prevalent, particularly in elderly males. Unfortunately, its generally protracted and variable clinical course and high association with treatment-related morbidity raise serious questions about the ideal treatment strategy for the individual patient. 5 alpha-reductase (5AR) inhibitors have a dramatic effect on benign prostatic disease with low toxicity. Thus, there is much interest in the po...

  12. Current Status of 5α-Reductase Inhibitors in Prostate Disease Management

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Dong Il; Chung, Jae Il

    2013-01-01

    The key enzyme in the androgen synthesis and androgen receptor pathways is 5α-reductase (5-AR), which occurs as three isoenzymes. Types I and II 5-ARs the most important clinically, and two different 5-AR inhibitors (5-ARIs), finasteride and dutasteride, have been developed. Several urology associations have recommended and upgraded the use of 5-ARIs for an enlarged prostate with lower urinary tract symptoms. In the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial and the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate...

  13. Epalrestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor, in diabetic neuropathy: An Indian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma S; Sharma Nalini

    2008-01-01

    Background: A number of diabetic patients with diabetic neuropathy, in India, were treated with epalrestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor. In this study, more than 2000 patients with diabetic neuropathy, who were treated with epalrestat for 3-12 months, were analyzed to assess the efficacy and the adverse reactions of the drug. Method: We analyzed the subjective symptoms (spontaneous pain, numbness, coldness and hypoesthesia) and the nerve function tests (motor nerve conduction velocity, s...

  14. Association of Blood Lead Levels with Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Polymorphisms among Chinese Pregnant Women in Wuhan City

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Shuyun; Wu, Hongling; Gu, Xue; Qin, Lingzhi; Tian, Ping; Zeng, Yun; Ye, Linxiang; Ni, Zemin; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnancy is an important stimulus of bone lead release. Elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) may cause adverse pregnancy outcomes for mothers and harmful lead effects on fetuses. However, the reports about maternal BLL changes during pregnancy are conflicting to some extent. This article is to explore the variations in BLLs among pregnant women. The relationships of BLLs with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene C677T, A1298C, and G1793A polymorphisms, which are associate...

  15. Altered expression of thioredoxin reductase-1 in dysplastic bile ducts and cholangiocarcinoma in a hamster model

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Dae-Yong; Jang, Ja-June; Han, Jeong-Hee

    2006-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR) is a homodimeric selenoenzyme catalyzing thioredoxin (Trx) in an NADPH-dependent manner. With regard to carcinogenesis, these redox proteins have been implicated in cell proliferation, transformation and anti-apoptosis. In the present study, using a hamster cholangiocarcinoma (ChC) model, we evaluated the immunohistochemical expression pattern of TrxR in precancerous lesions and ChCs as well as in normal bile ducts. The goal of this study was to determine the po...

  16. Anxiety and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Mutation Treated With S-Adenosyl Methionine and Methylated B Vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Shanna; Panka, Jacob; Rakobitsch, Robin; Tyre, Kaitlin; Pulliam, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    This case report highlights challenges faced in the clinical management of patients with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutations and the importance of precise dosage when recommending methylated B vitamins to compensate for deficiencies caused by the polymorphism or symptoms related to the polymorphism. It also underscores the importance of obtaining ongoing objective assessments of anxiety (eg, Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, or PROMIS) to help gauge patient response. PMID:27330489

  17. Influence of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms and coadministration of antimetabolites on toxicity after high dose methotrexate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niekerk, P.B. van Kooten; Schmiegelow, K.; Schroeder, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Through interruption of maintenance treatment with 6-mercaptopurine (6MP), toxicity after high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) may compromise the efficiency of the treatment of children with acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL). We investigated the influence of polymorphisms in the...... methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and coadministration of antimetabolites on post-HDMTX toxicity. METHODS: Toxicity was retrospectively analysed after 656 HDMTX courses administered to 88 paediatric ALL patients at a single treatment centre. RESULTS: High-dose methotrexate with high...

  18. Astaxanthin prevents changes in the activities of thioredoxin reductase and paraoxonase in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Paula R. Augusti; Quatrin, Andréia; Somacal, Sabrina; Conterato, Greicy MM; Sobieski, Rocheli; Ruviaro, Amanda R; Maurer, Luana H; Duarte, Marta MF; Roehrs, Miguel; Emanuelli, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effects of the antioxidant astaxanthin on paraoxonase and thioredoxin reductase activities as well as on other oxidative stress parameters and on the lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Rabbits were fed a standard or a hypercholesterolemic diet alone or supplemented with 50, 100 and 500 mg/100 g of astaxanthin for 60 days. Antioxidant enzymes activities, lipid profile and oxidative stress markers were evaluated in the serum. The hypercholesterolemic diet inc...

  19. The Silkworm Mutant lemon (lemon lethal) Is a Potential Insect Model for Human Sepiapterin Reductase Deficiency*

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Yan; Katsuma, Susumu; Daimon, Takaaki; Banno, Yutaka; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Tamura, Toshiki; Mita, Kazuei; Shimada, Toru

    2009-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for aromatic acid hydroxylases, which control the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters. BH4 deficiency has been associated with many neuropsychological disorders. An inherited defect in BH4 biosynthesis is caused by the deficiency of sepiapterin reductase (SPR), which catalyzes the biosynthesis of BH4 from guanosine triphosphate at the terminal step. The human SPR gene has been mapped at the PARK3 locus, which is rela...

  20. Diversity, abundance and expression of nitrite reductase (nirK)-like genes in marine thaumarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Marie B; Smith, Jason M.; Francis, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are widespread and abundant in aquatic and terrestrial habitats and appear to have a significant impact on the global nitrogen cycle. Like the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, AOA encode a gene homologous to copper-containing nitrite reductases (nirK), which has been studied very little to date. In this study, the diversity, abundance and expression of thaumarchaeal nirK genes from coastal and marine environments were investigated using two mutually excluding primer...

  1. Single-Cell Analysis of Ribonucleotide Reductase Transcriptional and Translational Response to DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Mazumder, Aprotim; Tummler, Katja; Bathe, Mark; Samson, Leona D.

    2013-01-01

    The ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) enzyme catalyzes an essential step in the production of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) in cells. Bulk biochemical measurements in synchronized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells suggest that RNR mRNA production is maximal in late G1 and S phases; however, damaged DNA induces RNR transcription throughout the cell cycle. But such en masse measurements reveal neither cell-to-cell heterogeneity in responses nor direct correlations between transcript and p...

  2. Serum total sialic acid, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione reductase levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Surapaneni Krishna; PRIYAV, Vishnu

    2010-01-01

    The changes in the serum sialic acid levels, total lipid peroxidation products (MDA), and glutathione reductase activity were estimated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Serum Sialic acid is known as a parameter of inflammation. This work was undertaken to assess the potential role of sialic acid as well as oxidative stress and antioxidant status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and methods: The levels of these parameters in serum were studied in 52 subjects with rheuma...

  3. The anaerobic ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase from Escherichia coli requires S-adenosylmethionine as a cofactor.

    OpenAIRE

    Eliasson, R; Fontecave, M; Jörnvall, H; Krook, M; Pontis, E; Reichard, P

    1990-01-01

    Extracts from anaerobically grown Escherichia coli contain an oxygen-sensitive activity that reduces CTP to dCTP in the presence of NADPH, dithiothreitol, Mg2+ ions, and ATP, different from the aerobic ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase (2'-deoxyribonucleoside-diphosphate: oxidized-thioredoxin 2'-oxidoreductase, EC 1.17.4.1) present in aerobically grown E. coli. After fractionation, the activity required at least five components, two heat-labile protein fractions and several low molecular w...

  4. Menthofuran regulates essential oil biosynthesis in peppermint by controlling a downstream monoterpene reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud, Soheil S.; Croteau, Rodney B.

    2003-01-01

    (+)-Pulegone is a central intermediate in the biosynthesis of (-)-menthol, the most significant component of peppermint essential oil. Depending on environmental conditions, this branch point metabolite may be reduced to (-)-menthone en route to menthol, by pulegone reductase (PR), or oxidized to (+)-menthofuran, by menthofuran synthase (MFS). To elucidate regulation of pulegone metabolism, we modified the expression of mfs under control of the CaMV 35S promoter in transformed peppermint plan...

  5. Disruption of the plr1+ gene encoding pyridoxal reductase of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Takegawa, Kaoru; Yagi, Toshiharu

    2004-02-01

    Pyridoxal (PL) reductase encoded by the plr1(+) gene practically catalyzes the irreversible reduction of PL by NADPH to form pyridoxine (PN). The enzyme has been suggested to be involved in the salvage synthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a coenzyme form of vitamin B(6), or the excretion of PL as PN from yeast cells. In this study, a PL reductase-disrupted (plr1 Delta) strain was constructed and its phenotype was examined. The plr1 Delta cells showed almost the same growth curve as that of wild-type cells in YNB and EMM media. In EMM, the plr1 Delta strain became flocculent at the late stationary phase for an unknown reason. The plr1 Delta cells showed low but measurable PL reductase activity catalyzed by some other protein(s) than the enzyme encoded by the plr1(+) gene, which maintained the flow of "PL --> PN --> PNP --> PLP" in the salvage synthesis of PLP. The total vitamin B(6) and pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate contents in the plr1 Delta cells were significantly lower than those in the wild-type ones. The percentages of the PLP amount as to the other vitamin B(6) compounds were similar in the two cell types. The amount of PL in the culture medium of the disruptant was significantly higher than that in the wild-type. In contrast, PN was much higher in the latter than the former. The plr1 Delta cells accumulated a 6.1-fold higher amount of PL than the wild-type ones when they were incubated with PL. The results showed that PL reductase encoded by the plr1(+ )gene is involved in the excretion of PL after reducing it to PN, and may not participate in the salvage pathway for PLP synthesis. PMID:15047724

  6. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Bidart Macedo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB using sodium nitrate (NaNO3 in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3 as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB.

  7. Methyl-hydroxylamine as an efficacious antibacterial agent that targets the ribonucleotide reductase enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Julián Gómez, Esther; Baelo, Aida; Gavaldà Santapau, Juan; Torrents Serra, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has encouraged vigorous efforts to develop antimicrobial agents with new mechanisms of action. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme in DNA replication that acts by converting ribonucleotides into the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA replication and repair. RNR has been extensively studied as an ideal target for DNA inhibition, and several drugs that are already available on the market are used for ...

  8. Mutational analysis of the triclosan-binding region of enoyl-ACP reductase from Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Mili; Gopalakrishnapai, Jayashree; Surolia, Namita; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2004-01-01

    Triclosan, a known antibacterial, acts by inhibiting enoyl-ACP (acyl-carrier protein) reductase (ENR), a key enzyme of the type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS) system. Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria-causing parasite, harbours the type II FAS; in contrast. its human host utilizes type I FAS. Due to this striking difference, ENR has emerged as an important target for the development of new antimalarials. Modelling studies, and the crystal structure of P.falciparum ENR, have highlighted ...

  9. Sources of reducing equivalents for nitrite reductase in Pisum arvense roots

    OpenAIRE

    Grażyna Kłobus

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate and NADP+ as well as malic acid and NADP+ present in the incubation mixture enhanced nitrite reductase (EC 1.6.6.4) activity in Pisum arvense roots. This was manifested by a depression of the nitrite level in the tissues and an increased reduction of nitrites by plastids isolated from P. arvense roots. A marked stimulation of plastid malate dehydrogenase was also observed under the influence of nitrates present in the medium. These results suggest that pyridin nucleotides ...

  10. Major peptides from amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) protein inhibit HMG-CoA reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  11. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Aparecida Manólio Soares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC, and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect.

  12. A preliminary study on estimating extra-cellular nitrate reductase activities in estuarine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pant H. K.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes catalyzing ammonium (NH4+/nitrate (NO3– into nitrous oxide (N2O/molecular nitrogen (N2, play critical roles in water quality management. The objective of this paper was to investigate the role of extra-cellular enzymes in cycling of nitrogen (N in aquatic systems. It appears that N in estuaries, salt marshes, etc., does not stay long enough to be available for uptake, thus, creating N limited conditions. This study showed that indigenous extra-cellular nitrate reductase along with others involved in N transformations in the waters/sediments of estuarine systems can cause complete removal of NH4+ and NO3– from the waters and available NH4+ and NO3– from the sediments. These results indicate that due to high extra-cellular nitrate reductase and other enzymes associated with N transformations in sediments/waters, substantial amounts of NH4+ and NO3– can be quickly lost from the systems as N2O and/or nitric oxide (NO, in turn, creating N limited conditions in estuarine systems. Such high activities of indigenous nitrate reductase and others are useful in removing readily bioavailable N from the systems, thereby avoidance of eutrophic conditions. However, they might contribute in increasing the N2O, a potent greenhouse gas with global warming potential (GWP of 296, in the atmosphere.

  13. 5alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmaster, Roger S

    2008-04-01

    Androgens play an essential role in prostatic development and function, but are also involved in prostate disease pathogenesis. The primary prostatic androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), is synthesized from testosterone by 5alpha-reductase types 1 and 2. Inhibition of the 5alpha-reductase isoenzymes therefore has potential therapeutic benefit in prostate disease. The two currently approved 5alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs), finasteride and dutasteride, have demonstrated long-term efficacy and safety in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Finasteride, a type-2 5ARI, has also been studied for its ability to reduce the incidence of biopsy-detectable prostate cancer in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Treatment with dutasteride, a dual 5ARI, has been shown to result in a greater degree and consistency of DHT suppression compared with finasteride. Two large-scale studies of dutasteride are currently investigating the role of near-maximal DHT suppression in the settings of prostate cancer risk reduction and expectant management of localized prostate cancer. PMID:18471794

  14. Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (Ex Vivo by Morus indica (Mulberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanitha Reddy Palvai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals are the bioactive components that contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular and other degenerative diseases. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase would be an effective means of lowering plasma cholesterol in humans. The present study explores the HMG CoA reductase inhibitory effect of extracts from leaves of Morus indica varieties, M5, V1, and S36, compared with the statin, using an ex vivo method. The assay is based on the stoichiometric formation of coenzyme A during the reduction of microsomal HMG CoA to mevalonate. Dechlorophyllised extract of three varieties was studied at 300 µg. The coenzyme A released at the end of assay in control (100.31 nmoles and statins (94.46 nm was higher than the dechlorphyllised extracts of the samples. The coenzyme A released during the reduction of HMG CoA to mevalonate in dechlorophyllised extracts of the samples was as follows: S36 < M5 < V1. The results indicated that the samples were highly effective in inhibiting the enzyme compared to statins (standard drug. The results indicate the role of Morus varieties extracts in modulating the cholesterol metabolism by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase. These results provide scope for designing in vivo animal studies to confirm their effect.

  15. Glutathione reductase gsr-1 is an essential gene required for Caenorhabditis elegans early embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Lorca, José Antonio; Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Gaffney, Christopher J; Naranjo-Galindo, Francisco José; Pedrajas, José Rafael; Guerrero-Gómez, David; Dobrzynska, Agnieszka; Askjaer, Peter; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Cabello, Juan; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant thiol in the vast majority of organisms and is maintained in its reduced form by the flavoenzyme glutathione reductase. In this work, we describe the genetic and functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans gsr-1 gene that encodes the only glutathione reductase protein in this model organism. By using green fluorescent protein reporters we demonstrate that gsr-1 produces two GSR-1 isoforms, one located in the cytoplasm and one in the mitochondria. gsr-1 loss of function mutants display a fully penetrant embryonic lethal phenotype characterized by a progressive and robust cell division delay accompanied by an aberrant distribution of interphasic chromatin in the periphery of the cell nucleus. Maternally expressed GSR-1 is sufficient to support embryonic development but these animals are short-lived, sensitized to chemical stress, have increased mitochondrial fragmentation and lower mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, the embryonic lethality of gsr-1 worms is prevented by restoring GSR-1 activity in the cytoplasm but not in mitochondria. Given the fact that the thioredoxin redox systems are dispensable in C. elegans, our data support a prominent role of the glutathione reductase/glutathione pathway in maintaining redox homeostasis in the nematode. PMID:27117030

  16. Influence of nitrogen supply on spring barley productivity and nitrate reductase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Wojcieska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to obtain some informations on the productivity of four chosen barley varieties growing at low and high nitrogen level. Some parameters of the yield structure and nitrate reductase activity were taken into consideration. It was found that there exist some differences in the yield between the compared varieties and some differences in their reaction to a high N level in the soil. The grain yield increase of the plants treated with high nitrogen doses was above all the result of the increase in dry matter of the lateral shoots and in leaf area. Distinct increase in the number of grains per ear and 1000-grains weight was also observed. The amount of reduced nitrogen collected during the growth season depended, in part, on the nitrate reductase activity and in part on the amount of the enzyme present in the plant. A rise of the nitrogen level caused an increase in nitrate reductase activity, in all varieties. The different influence of nitrogen on the growth of green organs in the compared varieties caused differences in the amount of the enzyme present in the plants and in protein yields.

  17. Progesterone 5β-reductase genes of the Brassicaceae family as function-associated molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkert, J; Costa, C; Budeanu, O; Petersen, J; Bertolucci, S; Fischer, G; Müller-Uri, F; Kreis, W

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to define progesterone 5β-reductases (P5βR, EC 1.3.99.6, enone 1,4-reductases) as function-associated molecular markers at the plant family level. Therefore cDNAs were isolated from 25 Brassicaceae species, including two species, Erysimum crepidifolium and Draba aizoides, known to produce cardiac glycosides. The sequences were used in a molecular phylogeny study. The cladogram created is congruent to the existing molecular analyses. Recombinant His-tagged forms of the P5βR cDNAs from Aethionema grandiflorum, Draba aizoides, Nasturtium officinale, Raphanus sativus and Sisymbrium officinale were expressed in E. coli. Enone 1,4-reductase activity was demonstrated in vitro using progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one as substrates. Evidence is provided that functional P5βRs are ubiquitous in the Brassicaceae. The recombinant P5βR enzymes showed different substrate preferences towards progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one. Sequence comparison of the catalytic pocket of the P5βR enzymes and homology modelling using Digitalis lanata P5βR (PDB ID: 2V6G) as template highlighted the importance of the hydrophobicity of the binding pocket for substrate discrimination. It is concluded that P5βR genes or P5βR proteins can be used as valuable function-associated molecular markers to infer taxonomic relationship and evolutionary diversification from a metabolic/catalytic perspective. PMID:26108256

  18. Soil acidity as affecting micronutrients concentration, nitrato reductase enzyme activity and yield in upland rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edemar Moro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lowest grain yield of rice under no-tillage system (NTS in relation to the conventional system may be due to the predominance nitrate in the soil and the low nitrate reductase activity. Another reason may be caused by micronutrient deficiency because of superficially soil acidity corrections. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the changes caused by soil pH in the N forms in the soil, micronutrients concentration in rice plants, nitrate reductase activity, yield of rice and its components. The experiment was performed in a greenhouse conditions. The experimental design was a completely randomized in a factorial three (levels of soil acidity x five (micronutrients sources with four replications. The addition of micronutrients does not affect levels of nitrate and ammonium in the soil; soil acidity significantly affects levels of nitrate and ammonium in the soil, concentration of micronutrients in rice plants and crop yield and its components; medium soil acidity (pH 5.5 result in medium to high levels of Cu and Fe, medium level of Zn and Mn, high nitrate reductase activity, resulting in higher dry matter, tillers, panicles, spikelets, weight of 100 grains and hence grain yield.

  19. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity. PMID:26635848

  20. Targeting 5α-reductase for prostate cancer prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacusi, Lucas P; Tindall, Donald J

    2011-07-01

    Testosterone is the most abundant circulating androgen, and can be converted to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a more potent androgen, by the 5α-reductase enzymes in target tissues. Current treatments for prostate cancer consist of reducing androgen levels by chemical or surgical castration or pure antiandrogen therapy that directly targets the androgen receptor (AR). Although these therapies reduce tumor burden and AR activity, the cancer inevitably recurs within 18-30 months. An approach targeting the androgen-AR axis at different levels could, therefore, improve the efficacy of prostate cancer therapy. Inhibition of 5α-reductase is one such approach; however, the two largest trials to investigate the use of the 5α-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) finasteride and dutasteride in patients with prostate cancer have shown that, although the incidence of cancer was reduced by 5ARI treatment, those cancers that were detected were more aggressive than in patients treated with placebo. Thus, the best practice for using these drugs to prevent and treat prostate cancer remains unclear. PMID:21629218

  1. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J; Gathercole, Laura L; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux. PMID:25974403

  2. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyeon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase (AR inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L., 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7 and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12 were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM. In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications.

  3. 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)-5,6-Dihydrouridine is one of two novel post-transcriptional modifications in tRNALys(UUU) from Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Español, Yaiza; Giessing, Anders M B;

    2011-01-01

    tRNA is the most heavily modified of all RNA types, with typically 10-20% of the residues being post-transcriptionally altered. Unravelling the modification pattern of a tRNA is a challenging task; there are 92 currently known tRNA modifications [1], many of which are chemically similar....... Furthermore, the tRNA has to be investigated with single-nucleotide resolution in order to ensure complete mapping of all modifications. In the present work, we characterized tRNA(Lys) (UUU) from Trypanosoma brucei, and provide a complete overview of its post-transcriptional modifications. The first step was...... MALDI-TOF MS of two independent digests of the tRNA, with RNase A and RNase T1, respectively. This revealed digestion products harbouring mass-changing modifications. Next, the modifications were mapped at the nucleotide level in the RNase products by tandem MS. Comparison with the sequence of the...

  4. Evaluation of the Activities of Pyrimethamine Analogs against Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum Dihydrofolate Reductase-Thymidylate Synthase Using In Vitro Enzyme Inhibition and Bacterial Complementation Assays▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bunyarataphan, Sasinee ; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree; Taweechai, Supannee; Tarnchompoo, Bongkoch; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Yuthavong, Yongyuth

    2006-01-01

    Pyrimethamine analogs were examined as potential agents against vivax malaria using a bacterial surrogate system carrying Plasmodium vivax dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (PvDHFR-TS), in which the PvDHFR complemented chemically knocked out host dihydrofolate reductase. The system was initially tested with P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase and was found to have good correlation with the parasite-based system. The 50% inhibitory concentrations derived from ...

  5. Triclosan Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Is Due to FabV, a Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lei; Lin, Jinshui; Ma, Jincheng; Cronan, John E.; Wang, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    Triclosan, a very widely used biocide, specifically inhibits fatty acid synthesis by inhibition of enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase. Escherichia coli FabI is the prototypical triclosan-sensitive enoyl-ACP reductase, and E. coli is extremely sensitive to the biocide. However, other bacteria are resistant to triclosan, because they encode triclosan-resistant enoyl-ACP reductase isozymes. In contrast, the triclosan resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has been attributed to active...

  6. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettiga, Maurizio; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2008-01-01

    Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells)-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells)-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells)-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells)-1 h-1 for the xylose reductase

  7. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells-1 h-1

  8. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskaran G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gunasekaran Baskaran,1 Shamala Salvamani,1 Siti Aqlima Ahmad,1 Noor Azmi Shaharuddin,1 Parveen Devi Pattiram,2 Mohd Yunus Shukor1 1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, 2Department of Food Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl, 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and a-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase, Basella alba, phytochemical, GC-MS/MS, RP-HPLC, hypercholesterolemia

  9. 5α—reductase type 2 gene expression in human testis,epididymis and vas deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuDY; WuYW

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression patterm of 5-α-reductase type 2 gene in human male reproductive organs.Methods:The expression level of 5α-reductase type 2 gene in human testis,epididymis and vas deferens tissues was determined by in situ hybridization using a digoxin-labeled 5α-reductase type 2 cRNA probe.Results:The brown granules of hybridizing signals distributed in the cytoplasm of the Sertoli and Leydig cells of the testis,the principle cells of epididymis and the epithelial cells of vas deferens,but there was no positive signal in the nuclei of these cellsNo positive signal was observed in the germ cells,basement of the testis, interstium of the epididymis and basement and the smooth muscle cells of vas deferens.conclusion:This study confirmed that the 5α-reductase type 2 gene expressed in the Sertoli and Leydig cells of the testis and the principle cells of the epididymis.The expression pattern of the gene in these cells in the human was similar to that in the rat and monkey.The presence of 5α-reductase type 2 gene in the epithelial cells of the vas deferens suggests that it may play a physiological role in human reproduction.

  10. Downregulation of thioredoxin reductase 1 expression in the substantia nigra pars compacta of Parkinson’s disease mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zihua Liu; Yuhong Jing; Jie Yin; Jiying Mu; Tingting Yao; Liping Gao

    2013-01-01

    Because neurons are susceptible to oxidative damage and thioredoxin reductase 1 is extensively distributed in the central nervous system and has antioxidant properties, we speculated that the enzyme may be involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. A Parkinson’s disease model was produced by intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine into C57BL/6 mice. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR, western blot analysis and colorimetric assay showed that the levels of thioredoxin reductase 1 mRNA and protein were decreased, along with a significant reduction in thioredoxin reductase activity, in the midbrain of Parkinson’s disease mice compared with normal mice. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the number of thioredoxin reductase 1-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of Parkinson’s disease mice was significantly decreased compared with normal mice. These experimental findings suggest that the expression of thioredoxin reductase 1 in the substantia nigra pars compacta of Parkinson’s disease mice is significantly decreased, and that the enzyme may be associated with disease onset.

  11. Cdna cloning and expression analyses of the isoflavone reductase-like gene of dendrobium officinale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full length of the isoflavone reductase-like gene (IRL) cDNA of Dendrobium officinale was cloned by using reverse transcription (RT) PCR combined with cDNA library, the IRL function was identified by Bioinformatics and prokaryotic expression analyses, and the IRL expression levels in the organs and tissues of D. officinale plants with different ages were determined by using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The results indicated that the full length of the cDNA of D. officinale IRL, DoIRL, was 1238 bp (accession no. KJ661023). Its open reading frame (ORF) was 930 bp which encoded 309 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 34 kDa, the 5 untranslated region (UTR) was 61 bp and the 3 UTR containing a poly (A) tail was 247 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence of DoIRL, DoIRL, was forecast to contain a NAD(P)H-binding motif (GGTGYIG) in the N-terminal region, two conserved N-glycosylation sites, a conserved nitrogen metabolite repression regulator (NmrA) domain and a phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER) domain, to hold the nearest phylogenetic relationship with the PCBER of Striga asiatica, and to share both 73% identity with the isoflavone reductases-like (IRLs) of Cucumis sativus and Striga asiatica. In Escherichia coli 'BL21' cells, the DoIRL cDNA expression produced a protein band holding the predicted molecular mass of 34 kDa. DoIRL expressed in all organs and tissues of D. officinale plants with different ages at comparatively low levels, and the expression level in the leaves of the two-year-old plants was the highest. (author)

  12. Mechanistic studies with solubilized rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase: Elucidation of the kinetic mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solubilized preparation of steroid 5 alpha-reductase from rat liver has been used in studies focused toward an understanding of the kinetic mechanism associated with enzyme catalysis. From the results of analyses with product and dead-end inhibitors, a preferentially ordered binding of substrates and release of products from the surface of the enzyme is proposed. The observations from these experiments were identical with those using the steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity associated with rat liver microsomes. The primary isotope effects on steady-state kinetic parameters when [4S-2H]NADPH was used also were consistent with an ordered kinetic mechanism. Normal isotope effects were observed for all three kinetic parameters (Vm/Km for both testosterone and NADPH and Vm) at all substrate concentrations used experimentally. Upon extrapolation to infinite concentration of testosterone, the isotope effect on Vm/Km for NADPH approached unity, indicating that the nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate is the first substrate binding to and the second product released from the enzyme. The isotope effects on Vm/Km for testosterone at infinite concentration of cofactor and on Vm were 3.8 +/- 0.5 and 3.3 +/- 0.4, respectively. Data from the pH profiles of these three steady-state parameters and the inhibition constants (1/Ki) of competitive inhibitors versus both substrates indicate that the binding of nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate involves coordination of its anionic 2'-phosphate to a protonated enzyme-associated base with an apparent pK near 8.0. From these results, relative limits have been placed on several of the internal rate constants used to describe the ordered mechanism of the rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase

  13. Dicarbonyl L-xylulose reductase (DCXR), a "moonlighting protein" in the bovine epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintayo, Ayodélé; Légaré, Christine; Sullivan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    During maturation and the acquisition of their fertilization potential, male germ cells are subjected to various sequential modifications that occur in the epididymis. Protein addition, reorganization or withdrawal, comprise some of these modifications. Dicarbonyl L-xylulose reductase (DCXR), a multifunctional protein involved in various enzymatic and protein interaction processes in different physiological systems, is one of the proteins added to spermatozoa in the epididymis. DCXR is a well-conserved protein with multiple characteristics including enzymatic activities and mediation of cell-cell interaction. In this study, we characterized the DCXR gene and protein expression in the bovine epididymis. Dicarbonyl L-xylulose reductase mRNA is differentially expressed in the caput, corpus, and cauda epididymide epithelial cells with a higher level observed in the cauda region. Tissue protein expression follows the same pattern as the corresponding mRNA expression with a cytoplasmic and apical distribution in the corpus and cauda epithelial cells, respectively. The protein can also be found with a nuclear localization in cauda epididymidis epithelial cells. Dicarbonyl L-xylulose reductase is secreted in the epididymis luminal compartment in the soluble fraction and is associated with microvesicular elements named epididymosomes. In spermatozoa, the DCXR protein was found in the cytoplasmic and membranous fractions. Expression of the DCXR protein is higher on caput spermatozoa but finally shows a weak detection in semen. These data describe DCXR in the bovine epididymis and reveal that its behavior differs from that found in humans. It seems that, in this model, the DCXR protein might have a questionable involvement in the fertilization process. PMID:25815750

  14. Dicarbonyl L-xylulose reductase (DCXR, a "moonlighting protein" in the bovine epididymis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodélé Akintayo

    Full Text Available During maturation and the acquisition of their fertilization potential, male germ cells are subjected to various sequential modifications that occur in the epididymis. Protein addition, reorganization or withdrawal, comprise some of these modifications. Dicarbonyl L-xylulose reductase (DCXR, a multifunctional protein involved in various enzymatic and protein interaction processes in different physiological systems, is one of the proteins added to spermatozoa in the epididymis. DCXR is a well-conserved protein with multiple characteristics including enzymatic activities and mediation of cell-cell interaction. In this study, we characterized the DCXR gene and protein expression in the bovine epididymis. Dicarbonyl L-xylulose reductase mRNA is differentially expressed in the caput, corpus, and cauda epididymide epithelial cells with a higher level observed in the cauda region. Tissue protein expression follows the same pattern as the corresponding mRNA expression with a cytoplasmic and apical distribution in the corpus and cauda epithelial cells, respectively. The protein can also be found with a nuclear localization in cauda epididymidis epithelial cells. Dicarbonyl L-xylulose reductase is secreted in the epididymis luminal compartment in the soluble fraction and is associated with microvesicular elements named epididymosomes. In spermatozoa, the DCXR protein was found in the cytoplasmic and membranous fractions. Expression of the DCXR protein is higher on caput spermatozoa but finally shows a weak detection in semen. These data describe DCXR in the bovine epididymis and reveal that its behavior differs from that found in humans. It seems that, in this model, the DCXR protein might have a questionable involvement in the fertilization process.

  15. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to use in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. Based on the structure, it was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes. PMID:26284087

  16. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to use in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP(+) were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. Based on the structure, it was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes. PMID:26284087

  17. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegan, Scott D.; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (IdRS); (Purdue); (Colorado); (UIC)

    2011-09-06

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC{sub 50} values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands.

  18. Differential cytochrome content and reductase activity in Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Gugliuzza, T.; Switzer, Blum J.; Oremland, R.; Martinez, Murillo F.

    1997-01-01

    The protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity in the dissimilatory selenate-reducing bacterium Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3, grown with thiosulfate, nitrate, selenate, or fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor, was investigated. Comparison of seven high-molecular-mass membrane proteins (105.3, 90.3, 82.6, 70.2, 67.4, 61.1, and 57.3 kDa) by SDS-PAGE showed that their detection was dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used. Membrane fractions from cells grown on thiosulfate contained a 70.2-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorbance maxima at 552, 522, and 421 nm. A 61.1-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorption maxima at 552, 523, and 423 nm was seen in membrane fractions from cells grown on nitrate. No c-type cytochromes were detected in membrane fractions of either selenate- or fumarate-grown cells. Difference spectra, however, revealed the presence of a cytochrome b554 (absorption maxima at 554, 523, and 422 nm) in membrane fractions from selenate-grown cells and a cytochrome b556 (absorption maxima at 556, 520, and 416 nm) in membrane fractions from fumarate-grown cells. Analysis of reductase activity in the different membrane fractions showed variability in substrate specificity. However, enzyme activity was greatest for the substrate on which the cells had been grown (e.g., membranes from nitrate-grown cells exhibited the greatest activity with nitrate). These results show that protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity are dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used for growth.

  19. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigoso, Yvonne D; Evans, Russell C; Karsten, William E; Chooback, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR) is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(P)H dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5'and 3' terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3). The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40-50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification. PMID:26815040

  20. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Histidine-Tagged Escherichia coli Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne D Trigoso

    Full Text Available The enzyme dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR is a component of the lysine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria and higher plants. DHDPR catalyzes the NAD(PH dependent reduction of 2,3-dihydrodipicolinate to the cyclic imine L-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydropicolinic acid. The dapB gene that encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase has previously been cloned, but the expression of the enzyme is low and the purification is time consuming. Therefore the E. coli dapB gene was cloned into the pET16b vector to improve the protein expression and simplify the purification. The dapB gene sequence was utilized to design forward and reverse oligonucleotide primers that were used to PCR the gene from Escherichia coli genomic DNA. The primers were designed with NdeI or BamHI restriction sites on the 5'and 3' terminus respectively. The PCR product was sequenced to confirm the identity of dapB. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET16b through NdeI and BamHI restriction endonuclease sites. The resulting plasmid containing dapB was transformed into the bacterial strain BL21 (DE3. The transformed cells were utilized to grow and express the histidine-tagged reductase and the protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. SDS/PAGE gel analysis has shown that the protein was 95% pure and has approximate subunit molecular weight of 28 kDa. The protein purification is completed in one day and 3 liters of culture produced approximately 40-50 mgs of protein, an improvement on the previous protein expression and multistep purification.