WorldWideScience

Sample records for brownouts

  1. Photogrammetric Measurements of an EH-60L Brownout Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    There is a critical lack of quantitative data regarding the mechanism of brownout cloud formation. Recognizing this, tests were conducted during the Air Force Research Lab 3D-LZ Brownout Test at the US Army Yuma Proving Ground. Photogrammetry was utilized during two rounds of flight tests with an instrumented EH-60L Black Hawk to determine if this technique could quantitatively measure the formation and evolution of a brownout cloud. Specific areas of interest include the location, size, and average convective velocity of the cloud, along with the characteristics of any defined structures within it. Following the first flight test, photogrammetric data were validated through comparison with onboard vehicle data. Lessons learned from this test were applied to the development of an improved photogrammetry system. A second flight test, utilizing the improved system, demonstrated that obtaining quantitative measurements of the brownout cloud are possible. Results from these measurements are presented in the paper. Flow visualization with chalk dust seeding was also tested. It was observed that pickup forces of the brownout cloud appear to be very low. Overall, these tests demonstrate the viability of photogrammetry as a means for quantifying brownout cloud formation and evolution.

  2. SMOOTHING THE PEAKS: GRIDSHARE SMART GRID TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE BROWNOUTS ON MICRO-HYDROELECTRIC MINI-GRIDS IN BHUTAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Village scale micro-hydroelectric systems in countries like Bhutan, Thailand, Peru, Laos and China provide renewable electricity to thousands of self-reliant communities in remote locations. While promising, many of these systems are plagued by a common problem: brownouts occu...

  3. A technique to measure optical properties of brownout clouds for modeling terahertz propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Steven T; Deibel, Jason A; Grice, Phillip M; Novak, Markus H; Spinoza, Julian; Owens, Lindsay; Ganti, Satya

    2012-06-01

    Brownout, the loss of visibility caused by dust resultant of helicopter downwash, is a factor in the large majority of military helicopter accidents. As terahertz radiation readily propagates through the associated dust aerosols and is attenuated by atmospheric water vapor within short distances, it can provide low-profile imaging that improves effective pilot visibility. In order to model this application of terahertz imaging, it is necessary to determine the optical properties of obscurants at these frequencies. We present here a method of empirical calculation and experimental measurement of the complex refractive index of the obscuring aerosols. Results derived from terahertz time-domain spectral measurements are incorporated into the AFIT CDE Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) software.

  4. Brownout for 20%Down? Settle Year-End Accounts Now

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Five years ago,Chinese government vowed to bring its energy consumption down by 20%against unit gross domestic product(GDP) during 2006 - 2010,an ambitious but realistic target laid down in a clear-cut term in its 11th Five-Year Plan for Economic and Social Development.It’s time to finish the goal, but how?

  5. FlyTact : A tactile display improves a helicopter pilot's landing performance in degraded visual environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, C.; Wennemers, A.S.; Vos, W.K.; Groen, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    Helicopter landings are more challenging in 'brownout' conditions, in which sand and dust is stirred up by the rotary wing aircraft, obscuring visibility. Safe brownout landings require new sensor and display technologies to provide the pilot with information on helicopter motion. In this respect ta

  6. 7 CFR 760.810 - Qualifying 2005, 2006, or 2007 quantity crop losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., 2007; (2) Caused by a failure of power supply or brownouts; (3) Caused by the inability to market..., quarantine, boycott, or refusal of a buyer to accept production; (4) Caused by fire unless directly...

  7. 7 CFR 760.611 - Qualifying losses, eligible causes and types of loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Losses caused by a failure of power supply or brownout as defined in § 760.602; (2) Losses caused by the inability to market nursery stock as a result of quarantine, boycott, or refusal of a buyer to...

  8. Optimal Dispatch of an Industrial Microgrid with a Mixed Portfolio of Distributed Energy Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Shi; Zong, Yi; Bindner, Henrik W.;

    2014-01-01

    Local brownouts are a nuisance and have driven consumers to take greater responsibility for their electricity supply – particularly industries and communities with a critical need for reliable and safe power. By deploying a Microgrid on their own site, the consumers could benefit from having...

  9. 7 CFR 760.602 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., hail, freeze, tornado, hurricane, typhoon, excessive wind, excessive heat, weather-related saltwater..., such as disease and insect infestation. It does not include brownouts or power failures. Disaster... condition that causes deterioration of a crop such as insect infestation, plant disease, or aflatoxin...

  10. The GridShare solution: a smart grid approach to improve service provision on a renewable energy mini-grid in Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quetchenbach, T. G.; Harper, M. J.; Robinson, J., IV; Hervin, K. K.; Chase, N. A.; Dorji, C.; Jacobson, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    This letter reports on the design and pilot installation of GridShares, devices intended to alleviate brownouts caused by peak power use on isolated, village-scale mini-grids. A team consisting of the authors and partner organizations designed, built and field-tested GridShares in the village of Rukubji, Bhutan. The GridShare takes an innovative approach to reducing brownouts by using a low cost device that communicates the state of the grid to its users and regulates usage before severe brownouts occur. This demand-side solution encourages users to distribute the use of large appliances more evenly throughout the day, allowing power-limited systems to provide reliable, long-term renewable electricity to these communities. In the summer of 2011, GridShares were installed in every household and business connected to the Rukubji micro-hydro mini-grid, which serves approximately 90 households with a 40 kW nominal capacity micro-hydro system. The installation was accompanied by an extensive education program. Following the installation of the GridShares, the occurrence and average length of severe brownouts, which had been caused primarily by the use of electric cooking appliances during meal preparation, decreased by over 92%. Additionally, the majority of residents surveyed stated that now they are more certain that their rice will cook well and that they would recommend installing GridShares in other villages facing similar problems.

  11. Imaging through obscurants with a heterodyne detection-based ladar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, Randy R.; Roos, Peter A.; Kaylor, Brant M.; Berg, Trenton J.; Curry, James R.

    2014-06-01

    Bridger Photonics has been researching and developing a ladar system based on heterodyne detection for imaging through brownout and other DVEs. There are several advantages that an FMCW ladar system provides compared to direct detect pulsed time-of-flight systems including: 1) Higher average powers, 2) Single photon sensitive while remaining tolerant to strong return signals, 3) Doppler sensitivity for clutter removal, and 4) More flexible system for sensing during various stages of flight. In this paper, we provide a review of our sensor, discuss lessons learned during various DVE tests, and show our latest 3D imagery.

  12. Solar Powered Full Bridge FET SMPS based Pulse Battery Charger with Power Management Using Atmega328

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Batra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to build a microcontroller based SMPS full wave bridge power transfer system that will also incorporate some domestic alerting mechanisms, such as security-alert, mail notification, flooding, smoke detection etc. The solar energy is utilized to charge a battery, which in turn will power up the system to drive various modules. This helps the system to be a completely stand-alone device. Along with usage of renewable energy, the paper also aims at protecting the electrical devices in a domestic setting from power-fluctuations or a brown-out.

  13. Target identification and navigation performance modeling of a passive millimeter wave imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Eddie L; Furxhi, Orges

    2010-07-01

    Human task performance using a passive interferometric millimeter wave imaging sensor is modeled using a task performance modeling approach developed by the U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate. The techniques used are illustrated for an imaging system composed of an interferometric antenna array, optical upconversion, and image formation using a shortwave infrared focal plane array. Two tasks, target identification and pilotage, are modeled. The effects of sparse antenna arrays on task performance are considered. Applications of this model include system trade studies for concealed weapon identification, navigation in fog, and brownout conditions. PMID:20648126

  14. China Cools with Tighter RAC Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiang; Rosenquist, Gregory

    2006-06-01

    After boiling summer brought brown-out to most part of the country in 2004, China announced a new set of minimum energy efficiency standards for room air conditioners in September 2004, with the first tier going into effect on March 1, 2005 and the reach standard taking effect on January 1, 2009. This represents a milestone in China's standard setting process since the reach standard levels are significantly more stringent than previous standards for other appliances. This paper first analyzes cost-effectiveness of China's new standards for room air conditioners, and then attempts to evaluate the impact of the new standards on energy savings, electric generation capacity, and CO2 emissions reductions.

  15. Ramos` private-power policies pay off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This article reports that political stability, government incentives attract foreign capital for new generating plants and T and D facilities. Teams of multinational lenders, developers, equipment vendors, engineering contractors erect critical plants in record time. As recently as the summer of 1993, the Republic of the Philippines was teetering on the brink of bankruptcy--mainly because of electricity shortages. Brownouts averaging seven hours a day were common nationwide, and Manila`s business districts were frequently blacked out for most of the day. With the nation of 67-million facing economic losses estimated at several billion dollars a year, President Fidel V. Ramos took swift, decisive action. Ramos, elected the previous year, accelerated power-sector reforms initiated by his predecessor, Corazon C. Aquino, that sought to augment the aging, unreliable generating capacity of the state-owned electric utility with private power development.

  16. Amplifier based broadband pixel for sub-millimeter wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozy, Stephen; Drewes, Jonathan; Leong, Kevin M. K. H.; Lai, Richard; Mei, X. B. (Gerry); Yoshida, Wayne; Lange, Michael D.; Lee, Jane; Deal, William R.

    2012-09-01

    Broadband sub-millimeter wave technology has received significant attention for potential applications in security, medical, and military imaging. Despite theoretical advantages of reduced size, weight, and power compared to current millimeter wave systems, sub-millimeter wave systems have been hampered by a fundamental lack of amplification with sufficient gain and noise figure properties. We report a broadband pixel operating from 300 to 340 GHz, biased off a single 2 V power supply. Over this frequency range, the amplifiers provide > 40 dB gain and 1.0 THz. The first sub-millimeter wave-based images using active amplification are demonstrated as part of the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization Longe Range Personnel Imager Program. This development and demonstration may bring to life future sub-millimeter-wave and THz applications such as solutions to brownout problems, ultra-high bandwidth satellite communication cross-links, and future planetary exploration missions.

  17. Multisensory cueing for enhancing orientation information during flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albery, William B

    2007-05-01

    The U.S. Air Force still regards spatial disorientation (SD) and loss of situational awareness (SA) as major contributing factors in operational Class A aircraft mishaps ($1M in aircraft loss and/or pilot fatality). Air Force Safety Agency data show 71 Class A SD mishaps from 1991-2004 in both fixed and rotary-wing aircraft. These mishaps resulted in 62 fatalities and an aircraft cost of over $2.OB. These losses account for 21 % of the USAF's Class A mishaps during that 14-yr period. Even non-mishap SD events negatively impact aircrew performance and reduce mission effectiveness. A multisensory system has been developed called the Spatial Orientation Retention Device (SORD) to enhance the aircraft attitude information to the pilot. SORD incorporates multisensory aids including helmet mounted symbology and tactile and audio cues. SORD has been prototyped and demonstrated in the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB, OH. The technology has now been transitioned to a Rotary Wing Brownout program. This paper discusses the development of SORD and a potential application, including an augmented cognition application. Unlike automatic ground collision avoidance systems, SORD does not take over the aircraft if a pre-set altitude is broached by the pilot; rather, SORD provides complementary attitude cues to the pilot via the tactile, audio, and visual systems that allow the pilot to continue flying through disorienting conditions.

  18. Passive, real-time millimeter wave imaging for degraded visual environment mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Thomas E.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Mackrides, Daniel G.; Shi, Shouyuan; Yao, Peng; Shreve, Kevin; Harrity, Charles; Prather, Dennis W.

    2015-05-01

    Degraded visual environments create dangerous conditions for aircraft pilots due to loss of situational awareness and/or ground reference, which can result in accidents during navigation or landing. Imaging in millimeter wave spectral bands offers the ability to maintain pilot's situational awareness despite DVE with a "see-through" imaging modality. Millimeter waves exhibit low atmospheric attenuation as well as low scattering loss from airborne particulates, e.g. blowing sand, dust, fog, and other visual obscurants. As such, Phase Sensitive Innovations (PSI) has developed a passive, real-time mmW imager to mitigate brownout dangers for rotorcraft. The imager consists of a distributed aperture array with conversion of detected mmW signals to optical frequencies for processing and image formation. Recently we performed operationally representative flight testing of our sensor while imaging various natural and manmade objects. Here we present imagery collected during these tests as it confirms the performance of the sensor technology and illustrates phenomenology encountered in the mmW spectrum.

  19. Performance evaluation of active sub-Terahertz systems in Degraded Visual Environments (DVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceolato, Romain; Tanguy, Bernard; Martin, Christian; Huet, Thierry; Chervet, Patrick; Durand, Gerard; Riviere, Nicolas; Hespel, Laurent; Diakonova, Nina; But, Dmitry; Knap, Wojciech; Meilhan, Jerome; Delplanque, Baptiste; Oden, Jonathan; Simoens, François

    2016-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of critical operations in Degraded Visual Environment (DVE). DVE usually refer when the perception of a pilot is degraded by environmental factors, including the presence of obscurants from bad weather (e.g. fog, rain, snow) or accidental events (e.g. brownout, whiteout, smoke). Critical operations in DVE are a growing field of research as it is a cause of numerous fatal accidents for operational forces. Due to the lack of efficient sources and sensors in the Terahertz (THz) region, this domain has remained an unexplored part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Recently, the potential use of sub-Terahertz waves has been proposed to see through dense clouds of obscurants (e.g. sand, smoke) in DVE conditions. In order to conduct a performance evaluation of sub-Terahertz systems, several sub-terahertz systems (e.g. bolometer-array cameras, liquid helium cooled bolometers) were operated in artificial controlled DVE conditions at ONERA facilities. The purpose of this paper is to report field experiments results in controlled DVE conditions: attenuation measurements from 400 GHz to 700 GHz with a performance evaluation of different sub-Terahertz systems are presented.

  20. Climate Change Predictions and Adaption Strategies for Coastal NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, R.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change could significantly impact the personal and operations of federal coastal laboratories. The Goddard Institute for Space Studies has made downscaled climate projections for Hampton Roads, Virginia a coastal region which includes NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). These projections are being used to formulate adaptation and mitigation strategies to reduce climate change impacts at the center. Sea level rise and hurricanes will have significant impacts on LaRC and strategies such as surge modeling and tide gauge measurements and now underway. A proposed windbreak will reduce the impact of hurricane winds on center infrastructure. Disease vectors such as mosquitoes and ticks are being monitored and studied for their response to climate change. LaRC has significant forest and ecosystems which will be impacted by climate change and these impacts are being quantified. Mitigation strategies are being proposed such as the design of a 3 MW solar photovoltaic array to protect the center from brownouts and loss of power to critical missions. These and other programs will be discussed to reduce climate change impacts and allow LaRC to accomplish its mission into the next century.

  1. Operations managers conference: summary of proceedings. [Carmel, California, Feb. 13-15, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-02-01

    The fifth AESOP Operations Managers Conference was held in Carmel, California on February 13-15, 1979. The keynote address dealt with the changing role of the computer operations manager. Representatives presented contrasting approaches to managing the procurement and installation of new computer systems. The advantages and disadvantages of maintaining strong internal management support and good communication with the vendor and of increasing the involvement of broad-based planning committees and operations personnel in the computer procurement process were discussed. Two promising management programs, the PEER and 10/40 systems proved effective in improving employee morale by reducing job fragmentation, increasing internal mobility and modifying the work week. The topic of unionization of operations personnel was also discussed. The uneasy relationship between computers and the energy shortage was also considered. Techniques for avoiding computer problems caused by blackouts and brownouts were presented. The difficulty of conserving power at a computer facility was also discussed. Presentations concerning the President's committee on ADP reorganizaion and methods for predicting trends in computer innovation were made. Abstracts and two-page summaries of the papers given are included in this report.

  2. Pulling the plug : how the Liberals' plan to dismantle BC Hydro threatens taxpayers, businesses, communities and jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The British Columbia government is planning to sell-off and deregulate the province's integrated, publicly-owned electric utilities despite election promises not to do so. The author argues that the consequences will be catastrophic with massive price increasing, rolling brownouts and service cuts. A recent poll indicates that 76 per cent of British Columbians oppose the decision to sell, 68 per cent do not support deregulation, and 83 per cent support a full public consultation before any changes are made. In response, the BC Citizens for Public Power Society was formed to give voice to British Columbians demand that their power system remain in public hands. This report presents a chronology of events for BC Hydro, and describes the experience of other jurisdictions with electricity deregulation. The BC Task Force on Energy Policy has released a report which claims that a fully competitive energy market will attract private capital and bring more energy supply, thereby lowering energy costs and increasing energy security. British Columbians condemn that report, arguing that it is too ideological and poorly substantiated. This paper discusses the impact that deregulation would have on the transmission system, the environment, and on local governments and small communities. It was noted that if the public electricity resources are removed from public ownership and control, the province's future options will be restricted under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). The BC Citizens for Public Power Society argues that the future power needs of the province are best met by public investment and energy conservation using BC Hydro. 65 refs

  3. When does unreliable grid supply become unacceptable policy? Costs of power supply and outages in rural India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite frequent blackouts and brownouts, extension of the central grid remains the Indian government's preferred strategy for the country's rural electrification policy. This study reports an assessment that compares grid extension with distributed generation (DG) alternatives, based on the subsidies they will necessitate, and costs of service interruptions that are appropriate in the rural Indian context. Using cross-sectional household expenditure data and region fixed-effects models, average household demand is estimated. The price elasticity of demand is found to be in the range of −0.3 to −0.4. Interruption costs are estimated based on the loss of consumer surplus due to reduced consumption of electric lighting energy that results from intermittent power supply. Different grid reliability scenarios are simulated. Despite the inclusion of interruption costs, standalone DG does not appear to be competitive with grid extension at distances of less than 17 km. However, backing up unreliable grid service with local DG plants is attractive when reliability is very poor, even in previously electrified villages. Introduction of energy efficient lighting changes these economics, and the threshold for acceptable grid unreliability significantly reduces. A variety of polices to promote accelerated deployment and the wider adoption of improved end-use efficiency, warrant serious consideration. - Highlights: • We question the reliance on conventional grid in rural electricity supply in India. • Alternatives compared through government subsidies and consumer interruption costs. • Interruption costs are estimated based on loss of consumer surplus due to outages. • Augmenting unreliable grid with local biomass or diesel based backups preferable. • With efficient lighting, standalone biomass plants are optimal at very low distances

  4. Automated Demand Response Approaches to Household Energy Management in a Smart Grid Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adika, Christopher Otieno

    The advancement of renewable energy technologies and the deregulation of the electricity market have seen the emergence of Demand response (DR) programs. Demand response is a cost-effective load management strategy which enables the electricity suppliers to maintain the integrity of the power grid during high peak periods, when the customers' electrical load is high. DR programs are designed to influence electricity users to alter their normal consumption patterns by offering them financial incentives. A well designed incentive-based DR scheme that offer competitive electricity pricing structure can result in numerous benefits to all the players in the electricity market. Lower power consumption during peak periods will significantly enhance the robustness of constrained networks by reducing the level of power of generation and transmission infrastructure needed to provide electric service. Therefore, this will ease the pressure of building new power networks as we avoiding costly energy procurements thereby translating into huge financial savings for the power suppliers. Peak load reduction will also reduce the inconveniences suffered by end users as a result of brownouts or blackouts. Demand response will also drastically lower the price peaks associated with wholesale markets. This will in turn reduce the electricity costs and risks for all the players in the energy market. Additionally, DR is environmentally friendly since it enhances the flexibility of the power grid through accommodation of renewable energy resources. Despite its many benefits, DR has not been embraced by most electricity networks. This can be attributed to the fact that the existing programs do not provide enough incentives to the end users and, therefore, most electricity users are not willing to participate in them. To overcome these challenges, most utilities are coming up with innovative strategies that will be more attractive to their customers. Thus, this dissertation presents various

  5. Small pixel pitch MCT IR-modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Fries, P.; Rutzinger, S.; Wendler, J.

    2016-05-01

    It is only some years ago, since VGA format detectors in 15μm pitch, manufactured with AIM's MCT n-on-p LPE standard technology, have been introduced to replace TV/4 format detector arrays as a system upgrade. In recent years a rapid increase in the demand for higher resolution, while preserving high thermal resolution, compactness and low power budget is observed. To satisfy these needs AIM has realized first prototypes of MWIR XGA format (1024x768) detector arrays in 10μm pitch. They fit in the same compact dewar as 640x512, 15μm pitch detector arrays. Therefore, they are best suited for system upgrade purposes to benefit from higher spatial resolution and keep cost on system level low. By combining pitch size reduction with recent development progress in the fields of miniature cryocoolers, short dewars and high operating temperatures the way ahead to ultra-compact high performance MWIR-modules is prepared. For cost reduction MBE grown MCT on commercially available GaAs substrates is introduced at AIM. Recently, 640x512, 15μm pitch FPAs, grown with MBE have successfully passed long-term high temperature storage tests as a crucial step towards serial production readiness level for use in future products. Pitch size reduction is not limited to arrays sensitive in the MWIR, but is of great interest for high performance LWIR or 3rd Gen solutions. Some applications such as rotorcraft pilotage require superior spatial resolution in a compact design to master severe weather conditions or degraded visual environment such as brown-out. For these applications AIM is developing both LWIR as well as dual band detector arrays in HD-format (1280x720) with 12μm pitch. This paper will present latest results in the development of detector arrays with small pitch sizes of 10μm and 12μm at AIM, together with their usage to realize compact cooled IR-modules.

  6. NREL's Energy-Saving Technology for Air Conditioning Cuts Peak Power Loads Without Using Harmful Refrigerants (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    This fact sheet describes how the DEVAP air conditioner was invented, explains how the technology works, and why it won an R&D 100 Award. Desiccant-enhanced evaporative (DEVAP) air-conditioning will provide superior comfort for commercial buildings in any climate at a small fraction of the electricity costs of conventional air-conditioning equipment, releasing far less carbon dioxide and cutting costly peak electrical demand by an estimated 80%. Air conditioning currently consumes about 15% of the electricity generated in the United States and is a major contributor to peak electrical demand on hot summer days, which can lead to escalating power costs, brownouts, and rolling blackouts. DEVAP employs an innovative combination of air-cooling technologies to reduce energy use by up to 81%. DEVAP also shifts most of the energy needs to thermal energy sources, reducing annual electricity use by up to 90%. In doing so, DEVAP is estimated to cut peak electrical demand by nearly 80% in all climates. Widespread use of this cooling cycle would dramatically cut peak electrical loads throughout the country, saving billions of dollars in investments and operating costs for our nation's electrical utilities. Water is already used as a refrigerant in evaporative coolers, a common and widely used energy-saving technology for arid regions. The technology cools incoming hot, dry air by evaporating water into it. The energy absorbed by the water as it evaporates, known as the latent heat of vaporization, cools the air while humidifying it. However, evaporative coolers only function when the air is dry, and they deliver humid air that can lower the comfort level for building occupants. And even many dry climates like Phoenix, Arizona, have a humid season when evaporative cooling won't work well. DEVAP extends the applicability of evaporative cooling by first using a liquid desiccant-a water-absorbing material-to dry the air. The dry air is then passed to an indirect

  7. Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

    2008-02-29

    frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

  8. Basic Research Needs for Superconductivity. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Superconductivity, May 8-11, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrao, J.; Kwok, W-K; Bozovic, I.; Mazin, I.; Seamus, J. C.; Civale, L.; Christen, D.; Horwitz, J.; Kellogg, G.; Finnemore, D.; Crabtree, G.; Welp, U.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Shapard, L.; Nault, R. M.

    2006-05-11

    As an energy carrier, electricity has no rival with regard to its environmental cleanliness, flexibility in interfacing with multiple production sources and end uses, and efficiency of delivery. In fact, the electric power grid was named ?the greatest engineering achievement of the 20th century? by the National Academy of Engineering. This grid, a technological marvel ingeniously knitted together from local networks growing out from cities and rural centers, may be the biggest and most complex artificial system ever built. However, the growing demand for electricity will soon challenge the grid beyond its capability, compromising its reliability through voltage fluctuations that crash digital electronics, brownouts that disable industrial processes and harm electrical equipment, and power failures like the North American blackout in 2003 and subsequent blackouts in London, Scandinavia, and Italy in the same year. The North American blackout affected 50 million people and caused approximately $6 billion in economic damage over the four days of its duration. Superconductivity offers powerful new opportunities for restoring the reliability of the power grid and increasing its capacity and efficiency. Superconductors are capable of carrying current without loss, making the parts of the grid they replace dramatically more efficient. Superconducting wires carry up to five times the current carried by copper wires that have the same cross section, thereby providing ample capacity for future expansion while requiring no increase in the number of overhead access lines or underground conduits. Their use is especially attractive in urban areas, where replacing copper with superconductors in power-saturated underground conduits avoids expensive new underground construction. Superconducting transformers cut the volume, weight, and losses of conventional transformers by a factor of two and do not require the contaminating and flammable transformer oils that violate urban safety

  9. The Hydrogen Economy Making the Transition to the Third Industrial Revolution and a New Energy Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremy Rifkin

    2006-07-01

    ;forever fuel'. It never runs out and produces no harmful CO{sub 2} emissions. Commercial fuel-cells powered by hydrogen are just now being introduced into the market for home, office and industrial use. Hitachi, Toshiba, and other companies will be introducing the first hydrogen fuel cell cartridges into retail stores around the world in 2007. The small hydrogen powered micro fuel cells will replace traditional batteries and provide mobile power for lap-top computers, cell phones, PDA's, Mp3 players, camcorders, portable DVD players, hand- held computers, video games, and digital cameras. With this new energy source, computers can be powered for days at a time, where existing battery technology lasts only a few hours before needing to be plugged back into the wall socket to be recharged. Similarly, manufacturing and service-related companies are just beginning to introduce stationary fuel cell power plants to provide back-up generation during periods of peak load or when the price of electricity on the grid becomes too expensive, or when the grid cannot keep up with demand surges, resulting in rolling brownout and blackouts. Indeed, when the massive 2002 power blackout shut down large parts of the Northeast and Midwestern part of the US and the New York City skyline went black, a newly erected skyscraper in Times Square remained fully lit and powered up because a stationary fuel cell power plant had been built into its infrastructure. The German company, Linde AG, recently introduced a hydrogen fuel cell power plant at the Munich airport. The hydrogen economy makes possible a broad redistribution of power, with far-reaching beneficial consequences for society. In the new era, businesses, municipalities and homeowners could become the producers as well as the consumers of their own energy so-called 'distributed generation'. Even the automobile itself is a 'power station on wheels' with a generating capacity of twenty kilowatts. Since the average

  10. The Hydrogen Economy Making the Transition to the Third Industrial Revolution and a New Energy Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    out and produces no harmful CO2 emissions. Commercial fuel-cells powered by hydrogen are just now being introduced into the market for home, office and industrial use. Hitachi, Toshiba, and other companies will be introducing the first hydrogen fuel cell cartridges into retail stores around the world in 2007. The small hydrogen powered micro fuel cells will replace traditional batteries and provide mobile power for lap-top computers, cell phones, PDA's, Mp3 players, camcorders, portable DVD players, hand- held computers, video games, and digital cameras. With this new energy source, computers can be powered for days at a time, where existing battery technology lasts only a few hours before needing to be plugged back into the wall socket to be recharged. Similarly, manufacturing and service-related companies are just beginning to introduce stationary fuel cell power plants to provide back-up generation during periods of peak load or when the price of electricity on the grid becomes too expensive, or when the grid cannot keep up with demand surges, resulting in rolling brownout and blackouts. Indeed, when the massive 2002 power blackout shut down large parts of the Northeast and Midwestern part of the US and the New York City skyline went black, a newly erected skyscraper in Times Square remained fully lit and powered up because a stationary fuel cell power plant had been built into its infrastructure. The German company, Linde AG, recently introduced a hydrogen fuel cell power plant at the Munich airport. The hydrogen economy makes possible a broad redistribution of power, with far-reaching beneficial consequences for society. In the new era, businesses, municipalities and homeowners could become the producers as well as the consumers of their own energy so-called 'distributed generation'. Even the automobile itself is a 'power station on wheels' with a generating capacity of twenty kilowatts. Since the average car is parked most of the time, it can be plugged in